WorldWideScience

Sample records for prevention group hr

  1. An Ounce of Prevention: The Benefits of an HR Audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    During her 13 years leading a school district human resources office, the author came to recognize that managing human capital is much more than recruiting, hiring, managing personnel records, and handling performance issues. In addition to implementing initiatives to increase the efficiency with which HR officers and staff perform those tasks,…

  2. Distribution of ABO and Rh-Hr blood group antigens, alleles and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABO and Rh-Hr blood group antigens represent a genetically stably determined trait with many-sided biological and clinical significance. The indigenous Ajarian population (105 subjects) was investigated for ABO Rh-Hr red cell blood group antigens. Using immunoserologic methods, seven blood group antigens (A, B, C, c, ...

  3. OPTIMIZATION OF HR TRAINING PROGRAM : Case Company: Haier Group

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    Staff training and development is quite crucial for the enterprise in contemporary society. There is no doubt that the quality and competence of the employee plays a significant role in the development of the company, and it also can be considered as the competitive advantage of the company. The case company, Haier Group, is well-known for its well developed human resource management, which different and practical training techniques will be introduced in this thesis. The aim of the study is ...

  4. The HR97 (NR1L) Group of Nuclear Receptors: A New Group up of Nuclear Receptors Discovered in Daphnia species

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yangchun; Ginjupalli, Gautam K.; Baldwin, William S.

    2014-01-01

    The recently sequenced Daphnia pulex genome revealed the NR1L nuclear receptor group consisting of three novel receptors. Phylogenetic studies show that this group is related to the NR1I group (CAR/PXR/VDR) and the NR1J group (HR96), and were subsequently named HR97a/b/g. Each of the HR97 paralogs from Daphnia magna, a commonly used crustacean in toxicity testing, was cloned, sequenced, and partially characterized. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the HR97 receptors are present in primiti...

  5. HR Connect

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — HR Connect is the USAID HR personnel system which allows HR professionals to process HR actions related to employee's personal and position information. This system...

  6. About the Use of the HdHr Algorithm Group in Integrating the Movement Equation with Nonlinear Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitor Miranda Bottura

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This work summarizes the HdHr group of Hermitian integration algorithms for dynamic structural analysis applications. It proposes a procedure for their use when nonlinear terms are present in the equilibrium equation. The simple pendulum problem is solved as a first example and the numerical results are discussed. Directions to be pursued in future research are also mentioned.

  7. Distribution of ABO and Rh-Hr blood group antigens, alleles and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-25

    Jul 25, 2011 ... Ikemoto, 1995) and criminology. As it seems, the composition of the blood group systems' antigens in human populations is a result of a balance ... From the foregoing, we have set an objective to establish the genetic geography of the erythrocytic group antigens in the highland Khulo region of Ajara. The.

  8. Validation of Postinduction Curie Scores in High-Risk Neuroblastoma: A Children's Oncology Group and SIOPEN Group Report on SIOPEN/HR-NBL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, Gregory A; Parisi, Marguerite T; Naranjo, Arlene; Nadel, Helen; Gelfand, Michael J; Park, Julie R; Ladenstein, Ruth L; Poetschger, Ulrike; Boubaker, Ariane; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Lambert, Bieke; Castellani, Maria-Rita; Bar-Sever, Zvi; Oudoux, Aurore; Kaminska, Anna; Kreissman, Susan G; Shulkin, Barry L; Matthay, Katherine K

    2018-03-01

    A semiquantitative 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-MIBG) scoring method (the Curie score, or CS) was previously examined in the Children's Oncology Group (COG) high-risk neuroblastoma trial, COG A3973, with a postinduction CS of more than 2 being associated with poor event-free survival (EFS). The validation of the CS in an independent dataset, International Society of Paediatric Oncology European Neuroblastoma/High-Risk Neuroblastoma 1 (SIOPEN/HR-NBL1), is now reported. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 123 I-MIBG scans obtained from patients who had been prospectively enrolled in SIOPEN/HR-NBL1 was performed. All patients exhibited 123 I-MIBG-avid, International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage 4 neuroblastoma. 123 I-MIBG scans were evaluated at 2 time points, diagnosis ( n = 345) and postinduction ( n = 330), before consolidation myeloablative therapy. Scans of 10 anatomic regions were evaluated, with each region being scored 0-3 on the basis of disease extent and a cumulative CS generated. Cut points for outcome analysis were identified by Youden methodology. CSs from patients enrolled in COG A3973 were used for comparison. Results: The optimal cut point for CS at diagnosis was 12 in SIOPEN/HR-NBL1, with a significant outcome difference by CS noted (5-y EFS, 43.0% ± 5.7% [CS ≤ 12] vs. 21.4% ± 3.6% [CS > 12], P 2], P < 0.0001). The postinduction CS maintained independent statistical significance in Cox models when adjusted for the covariates of age and MYCN gene copy number. Conclusion: The prognostic significance of postinduction CSs has now been validated in an independent cohort of patients (SIOPEN/HR-NBL1), with a postinduction CS of more than 2 being associated with an inferior outcome in 2 independent large, cooperative group trials. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  9. Is neonatal group B streptococcal infection preventable?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Azam, M

    2011-05-01

    Early onset group B streptococcal (EOGBS) infection causes significant neonatal morbidity and mortality. We determined the incidence of EOGBS at Galway University Hospital (GUH) and examined any "missed opportunities" for preventing neonatal infection between 2004 and 2009. Our obstetric approach is risk-based. The incidence was 0.45\\/1,000 live-births; one death and one with neurological sequelae. A single mother received IAP; however we could not determine any potential for reducing cases of EOGBS by improving current IAP usage.

  10. Data Quality Objectives Summary Report for the 100-FR-1, 100-FR-2, 100-HR-1,100-KR-1, and 100-KR-2 Group 4 Waste Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    The 100-FR-1, 100-FR-2, 100-HR-1, 100-KR-1, and 100-KR-2 Group 4 waste sites will be the fourth set of Hanford 100 Area sites to undergo remediation. Like the sites in Groups 1, 2,and 3, the majority of Group 4 sties are considered high priority because of the contaminants present and their proximity to the Columbia River. the data quality objectives process,summarized in this document, is a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approach for addressing data collecting and decision-making issues that are part of an environmental remediation project. The basic cleanup assumptions made in the Group 1, 2, and 3 designs are retained for the Group 4 design. As was the case with Group 3, the most significant difference between this DQO Summary Report and the Group 1 and 2 DQO Summary Reports is the data gaps that exist for specific Group 4 waste sites. These data gaps affect the approach to waste profiling and are the principal focus of the Group 4 DQO process

  11. Group B Strep Infection: Prevention in Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Strategies Currently, there is no vaccine to help mothers protect their newborns from group B strep bacteria and disease. Researchers are working on developing a vaccine, which may become available ...

  12. Digitalisering og HR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kühn Pedersen, Mogens

    2017-01-01

    Digitalisering står ligesom HR for et omfattende fag- og praksisfelt. Såvel praksis som teknologiudvikling styrer feltets stadige forandringer.......Digitalisering står ligesom HR for et omfattende fag- og praksisfelt. Såvel praksis som teknologiudvikling styrer feltets stadige forandringer....

  13. Caretakers or HR Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Baba Abugre

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Do human resources (HR managers in developing countries have the clout to make strategic decisions during mergers and acquisitions (M&As? This study aims at establishing the major roles played by HR managers in M&As of public sector companies in Ghana. The research examined the M&As of 10 Ghanaian companies where 10 HR managers gave detailed narratives of their roles and the part they played in the M&A processes. The qualitative method used to solicit the narratives of the HR managers resulted in the following findings: that HR managers in Ghana have a limited role in the planning process of the M&A; that indigenous HR managers perform several tasks in the course of the M&A to get employees stable before and after the M&A processes; nevertheless, they are not part of the policy formulators. The article makes a modest input of the significance of indigenous HR role in international M&As as a panacea to solving the global crises by advocating the empowerment of HR managers in developing context to be partners in the initial commencement of M&As.

  14. Power in group contexts: the influence of group status on promotion and prevention decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Daan; Ellemers, Naomi; Sassenberg, Kai

    2013-06-01

    This research examines how group status affects the impact of individual power positions on promotion versus prevention choices in group decision making. We consider that high power not only implies control, but also indicates responsibility for the achievement of group goals. We argue that the nature of these goals depends on the current status of the group. In Experiment 1, individuals who were accorded high power showed more promotion-oriented decisions in the low group status condition while decisions were more prevention oriented under high group status. Experiment 2 replicated these effects, and further demonstrated that they only emerge when those in power are explicitly made accountable for the achievement of group goals. These results are discussed in relation to regulatory focus theory, power theories, and the role of social identities and group goals in group dynamics. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Joint optimization of production scheduling and machine group preventive maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Lei; Song, Sanling; Chen, Xiaohui; Coit, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Joint optimization models were developed combining group preventive maintenance of a series system and production scheduling. In this paper, we propose a joint optimization model to minimize the total cost including production cost, preventive maintenance cost, minimal repair cost for unexpected failures and tardiness cost. The total cost depends on both the production process and the machine maintenance plan associated with reliability. For the problems addressed in this research, any machine unavailability leads to system downtime. Therefore, it is important to optimize the preventive maintenance of machines because their performance impacts the collective production processing associated with all machines. Too lengthy preventive maintenance intervals may be associated with low scheduled machine maintenance cost, but may incur expensive costs for unplanned failure due to low machine reliability. Alternatively, too frequent preventive maintenance activities may achieve the desired high reliability machines, but unacceptably high scheduled maintenance cost. Additionally, product scheduling plans affect tardiness and maintenance cost. Two results are obtained when solving the problem; the optimal group preventive maintenance interval for machines, and the assignment of each job, including the corresponding start time and completion time. To solve this non-deterministic polynomial-time problem, random keys genetic algorithms are used, and a numerical example is solved to illustrate the proposed model. - Highlights: • Group preventive maintenance (PM) planning and production scheduling are jointed. • Maintenance interval and assignment of jobs are decided by minimizing total cost. • Relationships among system age, PM, job processing time are quantified. • Random keys genetic algorithms (GA) are used to solve the NP-hard problem. • Random keys GA and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) are compared.

  16. Group decision making applied to preventive maintenance systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zanazzi, José Luis; Gomes, Luiz Flávio Autran Monteiro; Dimitroff, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an application in group decision making, aimed at developing a procedure to help define priorities in preventive maintenance activities. The method applied is called DRV Processes (Decision with Reduction of Variability) and it combines both statistical techniques and multicriteria decision aid procedures. Among its advantages, we may highlight the possibility of reducing the noise affecting information in group decision making and of reaching a consensual decision. This ...

  17. Occasioning change through HR sourcing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Balen, Mitchell; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Strohmeier, Stefan; Diederichsen, Anke

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how structuration theory can be used to analyze changes as invoked by two HR Sourcing arrangements: HR Shared Service Centers and HR Outsourcing. This approach allows us to under-stand changing responsibilities, altered HR processes, and the adaptation of web-based tools for

  18. Er HR ude i tovene?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulfelt, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    HR: Er der behov for nytænkning i HR-land? Artikler i Harvard Business Review - bakket op af en dansk undersøgelse - konkluderer, at HR stadig mangler gennemslagskraft i virksomhederne. Er HR ude i tovene? ... For i undersøgelsen "Ny Dansk Ledelse" (maj 2015), som er baseret på danske lederes...

  19. Group decision making applied to preventive maintenance systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Zanazzi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an application in group decision making, aimed at developing a procedure to help define priorities in preventive maintenance activities. The method applied is called DRV Processes (Decision with Reduction of Variability and it combines both statistical techniques and multicriteria decision aid procedures. Among its advantages, we may highlight the possibility of reducing the noise affecting information in group decision making and of reaching a consensual decision. This approach generally improves the level of shared knowledge and helps to avoid conflict within the group. The application was carried out in a major pharmaceutical production plant. The experience showed an eighty per cent reduction in the original amount of process noise. Moreover, the paper describes evidence of improvement in interpersonal relationships.

  20. [How do Prevention Projects Reach their Target Groups? Results of a Survey with Prevention Projects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, T; Böttcher, S; Jahn, I

    2015-12-01

     The aim of this study was to assess methods used to access target groups in prevention projects funded within the prevention research framework by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.  A survey with prevention projects was conducted. Access strategies, communication channels, incentives, programme reach, and successful practical recruitment strategies were explored.  38 out of 60 projects took part in the survey. Most projects accessed their target group within structured settings (e. g., child day-care centers, schools, workplaces). Multiple communication channels and incentives were used, with written information and monetary incentives being used most frequently. Only few projects were able to report their programme reach adequately; programme reach was highest for programmes accessing the target groups in structured settings. The respondents viewed active recruitment via personal communication with the target group and key persons in the settings as the most successful strategy.  The paper provides an overview on recruitment strategies used in current preven-tion projects. More systematic research on programme reach is necessary. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. From a target group towards interaction group: Alcohol prevention policy regarding young people in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Linden

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Not only the content matters to promote participation, interactive communication, but also context and style of the communication. To enhance self reflection and deeper understanding it is essential to deliver the information in an attractive context, which has been found relevant for the target group. Just providing information may be important but is not sufficient in order to change the behaviour. Information which is elaborated through discussion – even online – may transform information into deeper understanding respectively knowledge. Thus it is more likely to have an impact on future behaviour. The target group should be recognized as interaction group. This will help to improve the adaptation and intervention continuously. Nevertheless, prevention and behaviour change will take their time and will need continuous effort at high level. Future research is needed to measure the impact of vivid discussion on people who take part in these discussions in an active way, compared to those who only follow the conversation thread.

  2. [Relapse prevention group therapy for paedophiles: French adaptation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J; Petibon, C

    2005-01-01

    Psychotherapy for sex offenders has only very recently started to develop in France. The French law on compulsory treatment for sex offenders was voted in 1998, and many mental health practitioners are not trained to treat such patients yet. In our ambulatory forensic consultation, sex offenders have been treated since 1992 and group psychotherapy has been offered to them since 1994. Our first therapeutic models were the North-American behavioural-cognitive therapy and Pithers' relapse prevention model. Behavioural-cognitive theory describes paedophilia as an acquired sexual preference maintained by positive reinforcement. Pithers (1990) considered that relapse only occurs in high-risk situations, and that high-risk situations always come after offence precursors. In North America, relapse prevention consists in helping paedophiles spot their high-risk situations and offence precursors, and enhance their skills to cope with such situations or to prevent them. Therapy programs were developed according to these models, aiming to help offenders develop such skills, ie empathy, social skills, cognitive restructuring, self-esteem, etc. Trying to apply these therapy programs in France, our team quickly realised that we would have to adapt them to French culture. On the one hand, behavioural-cognitive theory did not seem satisfactory enough in explaining paedophilic behaviour and paedophilic preference. On the other hand, behavioural-cognitive therapy made patients into children too much and increased resistance. Therapy based on programs seemed too rigid for French patients and therapists, and we often felt we were working on an issue that would have been much more accurate to work on a few sessions earlier, when this issue was spontaneously brought up by a patient. We believe change occurs all the more as issues are worked on at the right moment for the patient. Moreover, on a cultural point of view, we also realised the use of programs in psychotherapy was difficult to

  3. Controlling HR Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellig, Bruce R.

    1990-01-01

    Controlling human resources costs is critical for a competitive advantage. More money will have to be invested in education and training because of an inadequate, ill-prepared group of entry-level workers. Commitment to employees will have to be considered in relation to the increased investment in them. (JOW)

  4. Learning and Development Policy available on HR web

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    The full text of CERN’s “Learning and Development Policy” is now available in English and French on the HR training website: cern.ch/hr-training/. This new policy was presented to all personnel in the HR Public meeting held on Monday 25 June, and the slides and the video recording remain available on Indico. Pascale Goy, Head of the Learning and Development Group in HR, is available for more information: pascale.goy@cern.ch , tel. 62232.

  5. Preventing invasive Group B Streptococcus (GBS) disease in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    9 No. 3 has been successfully used for the prevention of tetanus, influenza and pertussis in infants.[11] A trivalent GBS polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine (against serotypes Ia, Ib and III) has completed phase-II evaluation among pregnant women and has the potential to prevent 70 - 80% of all invasive GBS disease.

  6. Comparison of the diagnostic value of cervical cytology and HPV HR DNA testing for the diagnosis of low-grade and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions across different age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Pruski, Dominik; Iwaniec, Kinga; Kędzia, Witold

    2017-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of cervical cytology and HPV HR DNA testing for the diagnosis of low grade and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions across different age groups. The study included 1103 patients, age 25-70 years. All patients underwent in-depth diagnostic tests following either an abnormal Pap test result or a clinically suspicious cervical lesion. In all women the following examinations were performed: a molecular test detecting 14 high-risk types of HPV, a colposcopy examination, as well as directed-biopsy of the cervix. The studied population was subdivided into four age groups. It was observed that the percentage of high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and cancers increased with women's age. Sensitivity of both methods for detecting high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions was highest for women aged 40-49 years. Sensitivity values of HPV testing was higher than that of cervical cytology among women under age 50. Specificity of HPV testing increased significantly with age of women and was several fold higher across all age groups than the specificity of cervical cytology.

  7. HR Analyticscultuur, naar een volwassen HR Analytics cultuur bij Defensie

    OpenAIRE

    Heuvel, van den, Sjoerd; Timmerman, Volken

    2017-01-01

    Op basis waarvan worden in je organisatie HR-beslissingen genomen? Op basis van eigen cijfers of van best practices bij andere organisaties? Op basis van gefundeerde argumenten, of eenvoudigweg door hoger management, waarbij je je eigen organisatie- expertise aan de kant zet? Beslisculturen in organisaties kunnen heel fact free of meer evidence-based zijn. In een fact-freecultuur heeft HR Analytics als zevende zintuig geen schijn van kans. Cijfers kunnen als moeilijkdoenerij worden gezien of ...

  8. Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Programs for Special Population Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selker, Leopold; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This article addresses the concept of "special needs" as it applies to health promotion and disease prevention. The three sections of this article deal with three special subgroups of the general population: the elderly, those with disabilities, and those with cultural heritages that are not the same as the majority population's. (Author/CT)

  9. FR/HR Sewing Thread

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT AD ________________ NATICK/TR-15/029 FR/HR SEWING THREAD...SUBTITLE FR/HR SEWING THREAD 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911QY-14-P-0290 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Vasanth Narayanan...Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center ATTN: RDNS- SEW -TDT (D. Querim) 10 General Greene Avenue, Natick, MA 01760-5000 11. SPONSOR

  10. Cancer Ward Staff Group: An Intervention Designed to Prevent Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, William H.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a case study illustrating organizational and system contingencies for introducing and maintaining a support group for oncology nursing staff in a large general hospital culture. Criteria for long-run survivability of innovation in a work system are applied to a group structured like that described by Balint for training physicians in…

  11. Using a Group Approach to Preventing Heroin Overdose in North London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Peter; Glover, Chris; Allan, Teresa; Khoo, Mary Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Aims: This study used group psycho-education methods to assist injecting heroin users in preventing, and responding to overdose. Methods: An "OD Prevention" group was advertised in a London prescribing service and associated primary care unit. The intervention took place in a small group over one afternoon (3.5 hours), and trained…

  12. Mustard Group Chemical War Agents from Preventive Medicine Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem Ucar

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Although many preventive efforts and treaties, chemical warfare agents have still been a severe assault form against both military and civilian individuals. The most important chemical warfare agents sulphur mustard and others are easy to handle and cheap those the important reasons to accept sulphur mustard as a chemical warfare agent. Many individuals attacked by sulphur mustard have severe health problems such as respiratory system diseases. After ten years of sulphur mustard exposure, several health problems such as respiratory tract problems (%42.5, eye problems (%40 and other systemic diseases have been observed to insist on induviduals when examined. Exposure of even single sulphur mustard exposure has been seen to result high level of disability and early deaths. In spite of the fact that there is no available antidote and/or remedy against sulphur mustard exposure, our country has an incremental chemical assault threat for both military personels and civilians because of its jeopolitics position. Experimental studies regarding sulphur mustard toxicity will be helpful for novel preventive strategies and antidot devolepment. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 209-214

  13. [Prevention, diagnosis and treatment of blood group immunization during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aken, W G; Christiaens, G C

    1999-12-11

    In the Netherlands last year two important policy changes were introduced to prevent haemolytic disease of the newborn: antenatal administration of anti RhD immunoglobulin and screening for antibodies against irregular erythrocyte antigens in all pregnant women. As the predictive value of such antibodies for the detection of hemolytic disease of the newborn is limited, it is uncertain if this measure is really cost-effective. Because blood transfusion is the most important probable cause of the immunization, and because of the clinical severity of anti-K antibodies, it is advised to give exclusively K negative blood to girls and women under the age of 45 years. In addition there is a need for a uniform protocol to deal with women who have been exposed to immunization.

  14. About the Nutritional Science Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group (NSRG) promotes and supports studies establishing a comprehensive understanding of the precise role of diet and food components in modulating cancer risk and tumor cell behavior. This focus includes approaches to characterize molecular targets and variability in individual responses to nutrients and dietary patterns. |

  15. HR Analyticscultuur, naar een volwassen HR Analytics cultuur bij Defensie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjoerd van den Heuvel; Volken Timmerman

    2017-01-01

    Op basis waarvan worden in je organisatie HR-beslissingen genomen? Op basis van eigen cijfers of van best practices bij andere organisaties? Op basis van gefundeerde argumenten, of eenvoudigweg door hoger management, waarbij je je eigen organisatie- expertise aan de kant zet? Beslisculturen in

  16. Hr Pitt mängib hr Smithi / Timo Diener

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Diener, Timo

    2005-01-01

    Brad Pitt actionkomöödias "Hr ja pr Smith" ("Mr and Mrs Smith") : režissöör Doug Liman : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2005. Filmi ümber puhkenud skandaalist ning näitleja plaanitavatest filmirollidest aastal 2006

  17. Article I: Prevention and education regarding rabies in human beings. National Working Group on Rabies Prevention and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, C A; Olson, J G; Clark, C J

    1999-11-01

    Substantial changes in the epizootic characteristics of rabies have transpired in the United States during the past 50 years. Traditional veterinary practices and public health recommendations have effectively controlled rabies in dogs and prevented associated human fatalities; however, they have been unable to adequately address the problem of rabies in wildlife. Attributable in part to a renewed focus on emerging infectious diseases, a conference was held at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1993 to begin discussion focused on the reemergence of rabies and to formulate new suggestions for prevention and control of rabies in the United States. Three major working groups were formed from a national committee of professionals representing a broad array of biomedical disciplines. These groups concentrated on prevention of rabies in human beings, education, laboratory diagnosis of rabies, and rabies control in animals. The groups described the perceived minimum requirements to promote prevention and control of rabies in the United States into the next century. The following article describes the needs and recommendations identified by the prevention and education working group. Two other articles, scheduled for the Nov 15 and Dec 1, 1999 issues of JAVMA, will relay the needs and recommendations of the working groups on laboratory diagnosis of rabies and rabies in wildlife.

  18. GPs' perspectives on preventive care for older people: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Yvonne M; Koenen, Julia M; de Ruijter, Wouter; van Dijk-van Dijk, D J Annemarie; van der Weele, Gerda M; Middelkoop, Barend J C; Reis, Ria; Assendelft, Willem J J; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2012-11-01

    Preventive care traditionally aims to prevent diseases or injuries. For older people, different aims of prevention, such as maintenance of independence and wellbeing, are increasingly important. To explore GPs' perspectives on preventive care for older people. Qualitative study comprising six focus groups with GPs in the Netherlands. The focus-group discussions with 37 GPs were analysed using the framework analysis method. Whether or not to implement preventive care for older people depends on the patient's individual level of vitality, as perceived by the GP. For older people with a high level of vitality, GPs confine their role to standardised disease-oriented prevention on a patient's request; when the vitality levels in older people fall, the scope of preventive care shifts from prevention of disease to prevention of functional decline. For older, vulnerable people, GPs expect most benefit from a proactive, individualised approach, enabling them to live as independently as possible. Based on these perspectives, a conceptual model for preventive care was developed, which describes GPs' different perspectives toward older people who are vulnerable and those with high levels of vitality. It focuses on five main dimensions: aim of care (prevention of disease versus prevention of functional decline), concept of care (disease model versus functional model), initiator (older persons themselves versus GP), target groups (people with requests versus specified risk groups), and content of preventive care (mainly cardiovascular risk management versus functional decline). GPs' perspectives on preventive care are determined by their perception of the level of vitality of their older patients. Preventive care for older people with high levels of vitality may consist of a standardised disease-oriented approach; those who are vulnerable will need an individualised approach to prevent functional decline.

  19. Er HR ude i tovene?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulfelt, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    erfaringer, med hensyn til hvordan ledelse udøves i de virksomheder, som de repræsenterer, var en nøglekonklusion i forhold til HR følgende: "Lederne har gode menneskelige egenskaber, men det kniber med personaleledelse og talentudvikling." Med andre ord lige nøjagtig en konklusion, som flugter med HBR...

  20. Putting HR outsourcing into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Faced with the time-consuming responsibility of human resources (HR) management, a growing number of medical practices are outsourcing their HR to professional employer organizations (PEOs) so they can concentrate on their core business. A PEO functions as an HR department-minus the high overhead-managing daily administrative tasks such as payroll processing and related tax filings, employee benefits, and workers' compensation coverage and claims resolution. PEOs help physicians' offices keep up with the piles of paperwork that never seem to shrink, freeing doctors to focus on patient care and building their practice. Because of their volume buying power, PEOs are able to offer employees of small medical practices big-company benefits-everything from health, dental, and vision coverage to long-term disability insurance and tuition assistance. A fledgling industry only a decade ago, HR outsourcing has morphed into a blossoming industry. Enlisting the services of a PEO is now considered de rigueur in many small business circles.

  1. 75 FR 38099 - Establishment of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and management, integrative health care practices, and health promotion. Membership and Designation... HUMAN SERVICES Establishment of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and... March 23, 2010. The Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health...

  2. Stress Prevention and Mindfulness: A Psychoeducational and Support Group for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Jenson E.; Murphy, Susan L.; McCarthy, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    A stress prevention and mindfulness (SPAM) group is described, which is a 6-week psychoeducational and support group for teachers. The group incorporated psychoeducation about stress and utilized elements of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). The group was implemented in a public charter school in the Southwest. Preliminary evaluation…

  3. HR Controlling v organizaci

    OpenAIRE

    Kratochvílová, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The present diploma thesis deals with HR controlling, which represents an effective way for organizations to monitor and assess quantitative and qualitative indicators. HR controlling is an efficient means of demonstrating the contribution of HR managers not only to their departments but also to the overall aims of organizations. The first part of the thesis defines basic theoretical prerequisites concerning the importance of HR management in organization efficiency, the HR system and HR cont...

  4. MIGRATION OF ORACLE HR DATABASE

    CERN Multimedia

    ais.support@cern.ch

    2001-01-01

    Restricted services from 3 to 7 November 2001 Due to the migration of the Oracle HR application to the Web, some services which rely on the application's availability may be disturbed from Friday 2 November at 17:30 until Thursday 8 November at 08:30. Amongst those services: HR Division: records office, recruitment, claims and benefits. FI Division: personnel accounting, advances and claims. ST Division: registration office (access cards). SPL Division: external firm staff records. EP Division: users' office. Experiments' secretariats: PIE, Greybook. Divisional secretariats: externals, internal addresses. All information concerning this migration is available at: http://ais.cern.ch We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you in advance for your understanding.

  5. Group B streptococcus and pregnancy : towards an optimal prevention strategy for neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg-van den Berg, Arijaantje Willemijntje (Arijaan)

    2012-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS, Streptococcus agalactiae) has been recognized as an important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. The frequency of GBS colonization ranges from 10% to 35% in women of reproductive age. GBS colonization can be transient, intermittent or persistent. Vertical

  6. Preliminary Investigation of a Stress Prevention and Mindfulness Group for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Jenson E.; McCarthy, Christopher J.

    2018-01-01

    This exploratory study evaluated a short-term (6-8 weeks) psychoeducation and support group for teachers focused on stress prevention and mindfulness (labeled SPAM group). A total of 4 groups were implemented in different schools, and evaluation was conducted with quantitative (pre- and post-measures of teacher vulnerability to stress, job…

  7. Process Evaluation of HIV Prevention Peer Groups in Malawi: A Look inside the Black Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, Linda L.; Kaponda, Chrissie P. N.; Kafulafula, Ursula K.; Ngalande, Rebecca C.; Kumbani, Lily C.; Jere, Diana L. N.; Norr, James L.; Norr, Kathleen F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the process evaluation of a peer group intervention for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention which had positive outcomes for three target groups in Malawi: rural adults, adolescents and urban hospital workers. The six-session intervention was delivered to small groups of 10-12 participants by 85 trained volunteer peer…

  8. THE EFFECTIVITY OF GROUP CONSELING ON IMPROVING PATIENT BEHAVIOR FOR PREVENTION DPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Utami Ningsih

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dengue Hemorrhage Fever is a disease with prevalence that keep on higher and spread wider. Prevention and control of DHF are affected by environment and social-behavioral factors. So that, some efforts are needed to increase people awareness in prevention of DHF by giving health education. This study was aimed to fi nd out the difference effectiveness of elucidation and group counseling method to emendation of patriarch behavior in DHF prevention. Method: This study used pre-post test design. The population is patriarch in Monjok Pemamoran Village RT 01. Samples were 40 patriarchs taken by purposive sampling. Independent variables were elucidation and group counseling. Dependent variables were patriarch behavior including knowledge, attitude and practice. Data were collected using questionnaire and observation sheet then analyzed using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and Mann Whitney U-test. Result: The result revealed that there are significant effect of elucidation and group counseling to emendation of patriarch behavior in DHF prevention. Except in patriarch’s practice, there were no difference effectiveness of elucidation and group counseling to emendation of patriarch’s knowledge and attitude. There was difference effectiveness of elucidation and group counseling method to emendation of patriarch’s practice in prevention of DHF. Discussion: From this study in can be concluded that, both elucidation and group counseling can affect patriarch’s behavior in prevention of DHF but group counseling method is more effective. That’s why, it is hoped that paramedic can apply that method to society in purpose to increase prevention and control of DHF and prevents the outbreak.

  9. Clinical improvement in chronic venous insufficiency signs and symptoms with Venoruton® (HR): an 8-month, open-registry, cost-efficacy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarone, M R; Belcaro, G; Ippolito, E; Pellegrini, L; Ledda, A; Luzzi, R; Ricci, A; Dugall, M; Bavera, P; Hosoi, M; Stuard, S; Corsi, M

    2010-06-01

    This study evaluated the clinical efficacy of Venoruton (O-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-rutosides) (HR) (Novartis Consumer Healthcare) in subjects with severe chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). Patients were included in an average 8-month follow-up registry. At the end of the study 3 spontaneous groups emerged: a group treated with HR 2 g/day, a second group with HR 1 g/day and elastic stockings, and another group with stockings only. The age range was between 45 and 55. The 3 resulting groups were comparable clinically and for age/sex distribution. There were no differences in ambulatory venous pressure (AVP) at inclusion; microcirculatory and clinical evaluations were comparable. At 8 months there was a decrease in skin resting flux in all groups. Better results (PHR alone was more effective (PHR alone was more effective (PHR alone was more effective (PHR alone was more effective (PHR. Compliance of HR was also very good. A cost comparison was made considering a comparable control groups (cost of best standard management=100%). Cost in group A was 44% of standard costs; cost in group B (HR+stockings) was 48% of standard costs, and cost in group C (stockings only) was 67% (PHR in CVI patients. Controlling signs/symptoms and edema in CVI with HR also prevents the most severe complications of CVI.

  10. Developing a culturally tailored stroke prevention walking programme for Korean immigrant seniors: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sarah E; Kwon, Ivy; Chang, Emiley; Araiza, Daniel; Thorpe, Carol Lee; Sarkisian, Catherine A

    2016-12-01

    To gain better understanding of (i) beliefs and knowledge about stroke; (ii) attitudes about walking for stroke prevention; and (iii) barriers and facilitators to walking among Korean seniors for the cultural tailoring of a stroke prevention walking programme. Physical inactivity is a major risk factor for stroke. Korean immigrant seniors are one of the most sedentary ethnic groups in the United States. An explorative study using focus group data. Twenty-nine Korean immigrant seniors (64-90 years of age) who had been told by a doctor at least once that their blood pressure was elevated participated in 3 focus groups. Each focus group consisted of 8-11 participants. Focus group audiotapes were transcribed and analysed using standard content analysis methods. Participants identified physical and psychological imbalances (e.g. too much work and stress) as the primary causes of stroke. Restoring 'balance' was identified as a powerful means of stroke prevention. A subset of participants expressed that prevention may be beyond human control. Overall, participants acknowledged the importance of walking for stroke prevention, but described barriers such as lack of personal motivation and unsafe environment. Many participants believed that providing opportunities for socialisation while walking and combining walking with health information sessions would facilitate participation in and maintenance of a walking programme. Korean immigrant seniors believe strongly that imbalance is a primary cause of stroke. Restoring balance as a way to prevent stroke is culturally special among Koreans and provides a conceptual base in culturally tailoring our stroke prevention walking intervention for Korean immigrant seniors. A stroke prevention walking programme for Korean immigrant seniors may have greater impact by addressing beliefs about stroke causes and prevention such as physical and psychological imbalances and the importance of maintaining emotional well-being. © 2016 John

  11. Vaccines for prevention of group B meningococcal disease: Not your father's vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Lee H

    2015-11-27

    For decades, there was no licensed vaccine for prevention of endemic capsular group B meningococcal disease, despite the availability of vaccines for prevention of the other most common meningococcal capsular groups. Recently, however, two new vaccines have been licensed for prevention of group B disease. Although immunogenic and considered to have an acceptable safety profile, there are many scientific unknowns about these vaccines, including effectiveness against antigenically diverse endemic meningococcal strains; duration of protection; whether they provide any herd protection; and whether there will be meningococcal antigenic changes that will diminish effectiveness over time. In addition, these vaccines present societal dilemmas that could influence how they are used in the U.S., including high vaccine cost in the face of a historically low incidence of meningococcal disease. These issues are discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Next HR Department Public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

      Dear Colleagues, I am pleased to invite you to the next public meeting organized by HR Department, which will take place on Monday 25 June at 14:30, for the first time in the Globe (in front of the Reception). The agenda will comprise of: ·         the recent staff member survey results ·         the Diversity at CERN ·         the Learning and Development Policy The first topic concerns, more specifically, staff members. All presentations will be made in English, however, we are pleased to inform you that a simultaneous interpretation in French is foreseen. Should you not be able to attend the meeting, it can also be followed via Webcast and the recording will be made available on Indico. Finally, subject to a favourable weather, refreshments...

  13. Delinquency and Crime Prevention: Overview of Research Comparing Treatment Foster Care and Group Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Gershon K.; Gorey, Kevin M.; Jozefowicz, Debra M. Hernandez

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence of treatment foster care (TFC) and group care's (GC) potential to prevent delinquency and crime has been developing. Objectives: We clarified the state of comparative knowledge with a historical overview. Then we explored the hypothesis that smaller, probably better resourced group homes with smaller staff/resident ratios have…

  14. Setting up Suicide Prevention Plans at the Local Level: The Methodology of Focus Groups with Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Stefano Zanone; Grossi, Antonello; Venturini, Monica; Cristina, Contessa; Toniolo, Emanuele

    2011-01-01

    In the prevention of suicide, there is a need to transform clinical studies into health promotion by a cooperation with territorial agencies. A survey on a group of stakeholders was performed with the methodology of focus group. The evaluation criteria used by the participants were practical and not methodological and were closely linked to the…

  15. Building a Peaceful Society: Origins, Prevention, and Reconciliation after Genocide and Other Group Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, Ervin

    2013-01-01

    The 20th century was a century of genocide and other great violence between groups within societies. Already at the beginning of the 21st century, there have been mass killings, civil wars, violent conflict, and terrorism. This article summarizes influences that tend to lead to intense group violence. It then considers prevention, stressing early…

  16. Hanford Site Guide for Preparing and Maintaining Fenerator Group Pollution Prevention Program Documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PLACE, B.G.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides guidance to generator groups for preparing and maintaining documentation of Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization (P2/WMin) Program activities. The guidance is one of a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE-RL, 1998a) and Prime Contractor implementation plans describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and (300501) (RCRA and EPA, 1994). Documentation guidance for the following five P2/WMin elements are discussed: Fiscal Year (FY) Goals; Budget and Staffing; Waste Minimization (WMinn ) Assessments (WMAs); Pollution Prevention (P2) Reporting; WMin Certification

  17. Hanford Site guide for preparing and maintaining generator group pollution prevention program documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Place, B.G.

    1998-01-01

    This document provides guidance to generator groups for preparing and maintaining documentation of Pollution Prevention Waste Minimization (P2/WMin) Program activities. The guidance is one of a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE-RL, 1998a) and Prime contractor implementation plans describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and 3005(h) (RCRA and EPA, 1994). Documentation guidance for the following five P2/WMin elements are discussed: Fiscal Year (FY) Goals; Budget and Staffing; Waste Minimization (WMin) Assessments (WMAs); Quarterly Pollution Prevention (P2) Reporting WMin Certification

  18. Réunion publique HR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Chers Collègues,Je me permets de vous rappeler qu'une réunion publique organisée par le Département HR se tiendra aujourd'hui:Vendredi 30 avril 2010 à 9h30 dans l'Amphithéâtre principal (café offert dès 9h00).Durant cette réunion, des informations générales seront données sur:le CERN Admin e-guide, qui est un nouveau guide des procédures administratives du CERN ayant pour but de faciliter la recherche d'informations pratiques et d'offrir un format de lecture convivial;le régime d'Assurance Maladie de l'Organisation (présentation effectuée par Philippe Charpentier, Président du CHIS Board) et;la Caisse de Pensions (présentation effectuée par Théodore Economou, Administrateur de la Caisse de Pensions du CERN).Une transmission simultanée de cette réunion sera assur...

  19. Next HR Department public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, I am pleased to invite you to the next public meeting organized by the HR Department, which will take place on Tuesday 28 June at 3 p.m. in the Council Chamber. A drink will be served after the meeting as of 16:30 This meeting will be the opportunity to revisit the specificities of the Career Structure measures and Benchmark Jobs, what they entail and how they will be implemented, and to answer your questions. This meeting is also important for me on a personal note, as I will bid you farewell, at least for a few years, taking special leave as of 1 August 2016 to take up the position of Director-General for Human Resources at the European Central Bank in Frankfurt.  Should you not be able to attend the meeting, it can also be followed via Webcast and the recording will be made available on Indico. I look forward to meeting you. Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin Head of the Human Resources Department

  20. Building a peaceful society: origins, prevention, and reconciliation after genocide and other group violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, Ervin

    2013-10-01

    The 20th century was a century of genocide and other great violence between groups within societies. Already at the beginning of the 21st century, there have been mass killings, civil wars, violent conflict, and terrorism. This article summarizes influences that tend to lead to intense group violence. It then considers prevention, stressing early prevention--and reconciliation as an aspect of prevention--and focusing on central principles and practices. The principles include developing positive orientations to previously devalued groups; healing from past victimization and promoting altruism born of suffering; moderating respect for authority; creating constructive ideologies; promoting understanding of the origins of violence, its impact, and avenues to prevention; promoting truth, justice, and a shared history; and raising inclusively caring, morally courageous children. Practices related to all of these are also discussed. The article stresses the role of progressive change, that is, of psychological, behavioral, and social evolution, in both extreme violence and positive relations between groups; the role of passive bystanders in the unfolding of violence; and the role of active bystandership in the prevention of violence, in the promotion of reconciliation, and in the development of harmonious societies. It emphasizes psychological processes but notes the importance of creating societal institutions. The author cites findings from both laboratory research and case studies, reviews interventions and their evaluation in Rwanda, and points to the need for further research. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  1. Short-Term Impact of a Teen Pregnancy-Prevention Intervention Implemented in Group Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Roy F; Vesely, Sara K; Green, Jennifer; Fluhr, Janene; Williams, Jean

    2016-11-01

    Youth living in group home settings are at significantly greater risk for sexual risk behaviors; however, there are no sexual health programs designed specifically for these youth. The study's purpose was to assess the effectiveness of a teen pregnancy-prevention program for youth living in group home foster care settings and other out-of-home placements. The study design was a cluster randomized controlled trial involving youth (N = 1,037) recruited from 44 residential group homes located in California, Maryland, and Oklahoma. Within each state, youth (mean age = 16.2 years; 82% male; 37% Hispanic, 20% African-American, 20% white, and 17% multiracial) in half the group homes were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n = 40 clusters) and the other half were randomly assigned to a control group that offered "usual care" (n = 40 clusters). The intervention (i.e., Power Through Choices [PTC]) was a 10-session, age-appropriate, and medically accurate sexual health education program. Compared to the control group, youth in the PTC intervention showed significantly greater improvements (p teen pregnancy-prevention program designed for youth living in foster care settings and other out-of-home placements. The numerous significant improvements in short-term outcomes are encouraging and provide preliminary evidence that the PTC program is an effective pregnancy-prevention program. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hanford site guide for preparing and maintaining generator group pollution prevention program documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    This manual provides the necessary guidance to contractor generator groups for developing and maintaining documentation of their pollution prevention (P2) program activities. Preparation of program documentation will demonstrate compliance with contractor and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements, as well as state and federal regulations. Contractor waste generator groups are no longer required to prepare and update facility waste minimization plans. Developing and maintaining program documentation replace this requirement

  3. Short-term effects of a peer group intervention for HIV prevention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report describes the implementation and short-term results of a peer group intervention for HIV prevention on the HIV-related attitudes, knowledge and behaviours of primary school teachers in Malawi. The intervention, based on the social-cognitive learning model, took place in 2000 at two teacher training colleges ...

  4. Comparing a telephone- and a group-delivered diabetes prevention program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    S, Lim; Dunbar, James; Versace, Vin

    2017-01-01

    Aims To explore the acceptability of a telephone- or a group-delivered diabetes prevention program for women with previous gestational diabetes and to compare the characteristics associated with program engagement. Methods Postpartum women participated in a lifestyle modification program delivere...

  5. Identifying target groups for the prevention of depression in early adolescence: The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monshouwer, K.; Smit, H.F.E.; Ruiter, M.; Ormel, H.; Verhulst, F.; Vollebergh, w.; Oldehinkel, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Depression in adolescence is associated with long-term adverse consequences. The aim of the present study is to identify target groups at increased risk of developing depression in early adolescence, such that prevention is associated with the largest health benefit at population-level

  6. Identifying target groups for the prevention of depression in early adolescence : The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monshouwer, K.; Smit, F.; Ruiter, M.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, F.; Vollebergh, W.; Oldehinkel, T.

    Background: Depression in adolescence is associated with long-term adverse consequences. The aim of the present study is to identify target groups at increased risk of developing depression in early adolescence, such that prevention is associated with the largest health benefit at population-level

  7. Hitting Closer to Home: A Multiple Family Prevention Group for Adolescent Disordered Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemency, Colleen E.; Rayle, Andrea Dixon

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an innovative multiple family psychoeducational group for the prevention of disordered eating among adolescent females. An overview of the concerns facing adolescents today is presented, including sociocultural norms, body dissatisfaction associated with pubertal changes, teasing regarding weight and shape, and family…

  8. Outcomes of an HIV Prevention Peer Group Intervention for Rural Adults in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaponda, Chrissie P. N.; Norr, Kathleen F.; Crittenden, Kathleen S.; Norr, James L.; McCreary, Linda L.; Kachingwe, Sitingawawo I.; Mbeba, Mary M.; Jere, Diana L. N.; Dancy, Barbara L.

    2011-01-01

    This study used a quasi-experimental design to evaluate a six-session peer group intervention for HIV prevention among rural adults in Malawi. Two rural districts were randomly assigned to intervention and control conditions. Independent random samples of community adults compared the districts at baseline and at 6 and 18 months postintervention.…

  9. About the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers, endometrial cancers, ovarian cancers, and precursor conditions related to these cancers. |

  10. 78 FR 10618 - Re-Establishment of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... lifestyle-based chronic disease prevention and management, integrative health care practices, and health... HUMAN SERVICES Re-Establishment of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative... Services announces re- establishment of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative...

  11. [Geriatric health promotion and prevention for independently living senior citizens: programmes and target groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapp, U; Anders, J; Meier-Baumgartner, H P; v Renteln-Kruse, W

    2007-08-01

    Nearly all diseases in old age that are epidemiologically important can be reduced or prevented successfully through consequent changes in individual lifestyle, a systematic provision of measures in primary prevention (i.e. vaccination programmes) and the creation of health promoting settings. However, at the moment the amount of potential for preventative interventions is neither systematically nor sufficiently utilised in Germany. Two different preventative approaches: a) multidimensional advice session in small groups through an interdisciplinary team at a geriatric centre (seniors come to seek advice offered at a centre) or b) multidimensional advice at the seniors home through one member of the interdisciplinary team from the geriatric centre (expert takes advice to seniors home) were tested simultaneously with a well-described study sample of 804 independent community-dwelling senior citizens aged 60 years or over, without need of care and cognitive impairments recruited from general practices. Information about target group specific approaches in health promotion and prevention for senior citizens were retrieved from analyses of sociodemographic, medical, psychological and spacial characteristics of this study sample. The majority of the study sample (580 out of 804 or 72.1%) decided to participate: a) 86.7% (503 out of 580) attended at the geriatric centre and sought advice in group sessions and b) 13.3% (77 out of 580) decided to receive advice in a preventive home visit. A total of 224 seniors (224 out of 804 or 27.9%) refused to participate at all. These three target groups were characterised on the basis of their age, gender, education, social background, health status, health behaviour, use of preventive care, self perceived health, functional disabilities, social net and social participation and distance or accessibility of preventative approaches. The 503 senior citizens who participated in small group sessions at the geriatric centre were

  12. A 3-Component Approach Incorporating Focus Groups in Strategic Planning for Sexual Violence Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Theresa H; Hess, Julia Meredith; Woelk, Leona; Bear, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Sexual violence is of special concern in New Mexico because of the presence of large priority populations in which its prevalence is high. This article describes a 3-component approach to developing a strategic plan to prevent sexual violence in the state that consisted of an advisory group, subject matter experts, and focus groups from geographically and demographically diverse communities. Both common and community-specific themes emerged from the focus groups and were included in the strategic plan. By incorporating community needs and experiences, this approach fosters increased investment in plan implementation.

  13. Hanford Site Guide for Preparing and Maintaining Generator Group Pollution Prevention Documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PLACE, B.G.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides guidance to generator groups for preparing and maintaining documentation of Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization (P2/WMin) Program activities. The guidance is one of a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE-RL, 2000) and Prime Contractor implementation plans describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and 3005(h) (RCRA and EPA, 1994) and Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations (DEAR) (48 CFR 970.5204-2 and 48 CFR 970.5204-78). Documentation guidance for the following five P2/WMin elements is discussed: Fiscal Year (FY) Goals; Budget and Staffing; Pollution Prevention (P2) Reporting; WMin Certification; and Waste Minimization (WMin) Assessments (WMAs)

  14. Hanford Site Guide for Preparing and Maintaining Generator Group Pollution Prevention Program Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PLACE, B.G.

    2000-11-01

    This document provides guidance to generator groups for preparing and maintaining documentation of Pollution Prevention/Waste Minimization (P2/WMin) Program activities. The guidance is one of a hierarchical series that includes the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE-RL, 2000) and Prime Contractor implementation plans describing programs required by Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) 3002(b) and 3005(h) (RCRA and EPA, 1994) and Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations (DEAR) (48 CFR 970.5204-2 and 48 CFR 970.5204-78). Documentation guidance for the following five P2/WMin elements is discussed: Fiscal Year (FY) Goals; Budget and Staffing; Pollution Prevention (P2) Reporting; WMin Certification; and Waste Minimization (WMin) Assessments (WMAs).

  15. Solid samples analysis by laser ablation-HR-ICPMS technique (LA-HR-ICPMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Elisa Kayo; Sarkis, Jorge Eduardo de Souza

    1999-01-01

    The laser ablation-ICPMS is one of the most powerful direct analytical technique. The NIST glasses have been widely used in fundamental studies of LA-ICMS systems. In this work, concentration values of some certified elements in NIST612 were determined by using the other reference materials (NIST611, 614 and (616). The results obtained for platinum group elements (PGE) and gold in geological reference materials UMT-1 and WPR-1, by using LA-HR-ICPMS and Ni S fire assay technique, also will be presented. The accuracy of results for NIST glass was better than 7.0% and for PGE it was better than 16.7%. (author)

  16. Balint groups as a means to increase job satisfaction and prevent burnout among general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldmand, Dorte; Holmström, Inger

    2008-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) occupy a central position in health care and often have demanding working situations. This corps shows signs of exhaustion, and many consider quitting their job or plan to retire early. It is therefore urgent to find ways of improving GP's satisfaction with their work. One approach might be Balint group participation. The aim of this study was to explore GPs' experience of participating in Balint groups and its influence on their work life. We conducted a descriptive, qualitative study. Nine GPs who had participated in Balint groups for 3 to 15 years were interviewed. A phenomenologic analysis was carried out to describe the phenomenon of Balint group participation. The GPs perceived that their Balint group participation influenced their work life. Analyses revealed several interrelating themes: competence, professional identity, and a sense of security, which increased through parallel processes, creating a base of endurance and satisfaction, thus enabling the GPs to rediscover the joy of being a physician. The GPs in this study described their Balint group participation as beneficial and essential to their work life as physicians in several ways. It seemed to increase their competence in patient encounters and enabled them to endure in their job and find joy and challenge in their relationships with patients. Balint groups might thus help GPs handle a demanding work life and prevent burnout. These groups might not suit all GPs, however, and additional ways to reduce stress and increase job satisfaction should be offered.

  17. Strategies to optimize participation in diabetes prevention programs following gestational diabetes: a focus group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaberi Dasgupta

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We performed a qualitative study among women within 5 years of Gestational Diabetes (GDM diagnosis. Our aim was to identify the key elements that would enhance participation in a type 2 diabetes (DM2 prevention program. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Potential participants received up to three invitation letters from their GDM physician. Four focus groups were held. Discussants were invited to comment on potential facilitators/barriers to participation and were probed on attitudes towards meal replacement and Internet/social media tools. Recurring themes were identified through qualitative content analysis of discussion transcripts. RESULTS: Among the 1,201 contacted and 79 eligible/interested, 29 women attended a focus group discussion. More than half of discussants were overweight/obese, and less than half were physically active. For DM2 prevention, a strong need for social support to achieve changes in dietary and physical activity habits was expressed. In this regard, face-to-face interactions with peers and professionals were preferred, with adjunctive roles for Internet/social media. Further, direct participation of partners/spouses in a DM2 prevention program was viewed as important to enhance support for behavioural change at home. Discussants highlighted work and child-related responsibilities as potential barriers to participation, and emphasized the importance of childcare support to allow attendance. Meal replacements were viewed with little interest, with concerns that their use would provide a poor example of eating behaviour to children. CONCLUSIONS: Among women within 5 years of a GDM diagnosis who participated in a focus group discussion, participation in a DM2 prevention program would be enhanced by face-to-face interactions with professionals and peers, provision of childcare support, and inclusion of spouses/partners.

  18. Strategies to optimize participation in diabetes prevention programs following gestational diabetes: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Kaberi; Da Costa, Deborah; Pillay, Sabrina; De Civita, Mirella; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Leong, Aaron; Bacon, Simon; Stotland, Stephen; Chetty, V Tony; Garfield, Natasha; Majdan, Agnieszka; Meltzer, Sara

    2013-01-01

    We performed a qualitative study among women within 5 years of Gestational Diabetes (GDM) diagnosis. Our aim was to identify the key elements that would enhance participation in a type 2 diabetes (DM2) prevention program. Potential participants received up to three invitation letters from their GDM physician. Four focus groups were held. Discussants were invited to comment on potential facilitators/barriers to participation and were probed on attitudes towards meal replacement and Internet/social media tools. Recurring themes were identified through qualitative content analysis of discussion transcripts. Among the 1,201 contacted and 79 eligible/interested, 29 women attended a focus group discussion. More than half of discussants were overweight/obese, and less than half were physically active. For DM2 prevention, a strong need for social support to achieve changes in dietary and physical activity habits was expressed. In this regard, face-to-face interactions with peers and professionals were preferred, with adjunctive roles for Internet/social media. Further, direct participation of partners/spouses in a DM2 prevention program was viewed as important to enhance support for behavioural change at home. Discussants highlighted work and child-related responsibilities as potential barriers to participation, and emphasized the importance of childcare support to allow attendance. Meal replacements were viewed with little interest, with concerns that their use would provide a poor example of eating behaviour to children. Among women within 5 years of a GDM diagnosis who participated in a focus group discussion, participation in a DM2 prevention program would be enhanced by face-to-face interactions with professionals and peers, provision of childcare support, and inclusion of spouses/partners.

  19. Using focus group results to inform preschool childhood obesity prevention programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Elizabeth L; Collie, Kate R; Fraser, Gertrude; Shufflebarger, Cindy; Lloyd, Bronwyn; Norman Oliver, M

    2006-08-01

    This study about maternal feeding practices and beliefs was conducted as background for the development of a childhood obesity prevention program for multi-ethnic parents in the USA receiving services from a federal government supplemental nutrition program for low-income mothers. Using a grounded theory approach, focus groups were conducted with low-income African American, white non-Hispanic (i.e. the majority Caucasian American population), Hispanic and Vietnamese parents to collect cross-cultural perspectives on: (a) infant and child feeding practices, (b) childhood overweight, (c) healthy dietary intake, (d) physical activity and inactivity, and (e) infant feeding information sources. A content analysis of the data yielded three main themes common to all four groups: (a) lack of awareness of the relationship between increased physical activity and health, (b) the use of food to influence behavior, and (c) the loss of parental control over feeding when a child starts child care or school, and revealed perspectives on age-appropriate food, infant satiety, overweight and information sources that were specific to each group. Interventions that enhance parent self-efficacy that build on themes that are specific to ethnic groups toward preventing childhood obesity are needed. There is also a need for culturally appropriate information for governmental nutrition programs that is in the client's own language and takes into account ethnic differences in beliefs and traditions.

  20. Evaluation of Cueing Innovation for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Using Staff Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Tracey L; Kennerly, Susan; Corazzini, Kirsten; Porter, Kristie; Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth A

    2014-07-25

    The purpose of the manuscript is to describe long-term care (LTC) staff perceptions of a music cueing intervention designed to improve staff integration of pressure ulcer (PrU) prevention guidelines regarding consistent and regular movement of LTC residents a minimum of every two hours. The Diffusion of Innovation (DOI) model guided staff interviews about their perceptions of the intervention's characteristics, outcomes, and sustainability. This was a qualitative, observational study of staff perceptions of the PrU prevention intervention conducted in Midwestern U.S. LTC facilities (N = 45 staff members). One focus group was held in each of eight intervention facilities using a semi-structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic content analysis, and summaries for each category were compared across groups. The a priori codes (observability, trialability, compatibility, relative advantage and complexity) described the innovation characteristics, and the sixth code, sustainability, was identified in the data. Within each code, two themes emerged as a positive or negative response regarding characteristics of the innovation. Moreover, within the sustainability code, a third theme emerged that was labeled "brainstormed ideas", focusing on strategies for improving the innovation. Cueing LTC staff using music offers a sustainable potential to improve PrU prevention practices, to increase resident movement, which can subsequently lead to a reduction in PrUs.

  1. Evaluation of Cueing Innovation for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Using Staff Focus Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracey L. Yap

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the manuscript is to describe long-term care (LTC staff perceptions of a music cueing intervention designed to improve staff integration of pressure ulcer (PrU prevention guidelines regarding consistent and regular movement of LTC residents a minimum of every two hours. The Diffusion of Innovation (DOI model guided staff interviews about their perceptions of the intervention’s characteristics, outcomes, and sustainability. Methods: This was a qualitative, observational study of staff perceptions of the PrU prevention intervention conducted in Midwestern U.S. LTC facilities (N = 45 staff members. One focus group was held in each of eight intervention facilities using a semi-structured interview protocol. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic content analysis, and summaries for each category were compared across groups. Results: The a priori codes (observability, trialability, compatibility, relative advantage and complexity described the innovation characteristics, and the sixth code, sustainability, was identified in the data. Within each code, two themes emerged as a positive or negative response regarding characteristics of the innovation. Moreover, within the sustainability code, a third theme emerged that was labeled “brainstormed ideas”, focusing on strategies for improving the innovation. Implications: Cueing LTC staff using music offers a sustainable potential to improve PrU prevention practices, to increase resident movement, which can subsequently lead to a reduction in PrUs.

  2. The perspective of Malaysian Manufacturing Organizations on Strategy, HR Outsourcing and HR Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasliza Abdul HALIM

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the relationship between different types of human resource management (HRM strategy and the human resource outsourcing, and impact on the size of human resource (HR department. Three HRM strategies are considered: Facilitation, accumulation and utilization. The data for the study were obtained from survey responses from 232 organizations, of which 113 were engaged in HR outsourcing. The findings suggest that organizations tend to rely on outsourcing of HR functions when they espouse facilitation and utilization HRM strategy. Concurrently, by relying on HR outsourcing, the organizations manage to experience a reduction in the size of HR department. The results show that it is important for the organizations to better understand the implications of an increased reliance on outsourcing within HR. This allows them to focus on how HR functions are delivered within organizations with the interaction of HRM strategy and the size of HR department will tend to be smaller resulting from outsourcing activities.

  3. The impact of social media-based support groups on smoking relapse prevention in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onezi, Hamidi Al; Khalifa, Mohamed; El-Metwally, Ashraf; Househ, Mowafa

    2018-06-01

    Tobacco smoking remains a major preventable cause of mortality and morbidity across the globe. People who attempt to quit smoking often experience episodes of relapse before finally quitting. Understanding the part that social networking sites and social media can play in smoking cessation and prevention of relapse is important to aid the development of novel techniques to curb the smoking epidemic. This study investigated the use of extra-treatment provided outside of the formal healthcare setting, bolstered by online social support in order to prevent smoking relapse in Saudi Arabia. This cross-sectional study included 473 smokers taking part in smoking cessation intervention programs run by the Riyadh branch of King Abdul-Aziz Medical City and PURITY, a Saudi anti-smoking association. Only subjects who expressed an interest in quitting smoking, and those attempting to quit, were considered for inclusion. The sample was divided into three groups: subjects who subscribed to support groups on Twitter (n = 150), and WhatsApp (n = 150), and a control group of subjects who had not subscribed to any social media support groups (n = 173). A significant difference was found between the mean average numbers of people who quit smoking among the three groups, with social media support proving to be more effective than other traditional methods. Our findings imply that Twitter and WhatsApp users found it easier to quit smoking than those who did not take part in these social media groups. Social media provides a good platform to discuss smoking cessation treatment, and thus reduce smoking relapses. Our findings support the suggestion that more social media support groups should be developed to help people to effectively cease smoking after abstinence. Individuals who struggle to quit smoking should be encouraged to join support groups on their social media platform of choice to increase their likelihood of quitting. Future studies should assess the effectiveness

  4. Worksite Environmental Interventions for Obesity Prevention and Control: Evidence from Group Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Isabel Diana; Becerra, Adan; Chin, Nancy P

    2014-06-01

    Worksites provide multiple advantages to prevent and treat obesity and to test environmental interventions to tackle its multiple causal factors. We present a literature review of group-randomized and non-randomized trials that tested worksite environmental, multiple component interventions for obesity prevention and control paying particular attention to the conduct of formative research prior to intervention development. The evidence on environmental interventions on measures of obesity appears to be strong since most of the studies have a low (4/8) and unclear (2/8) risk of bias. Among the studies reviewed whose potential risk of bias was low, the magnitude of the effect was modest and sometimes in the unexpected direction. None of the four studies describing an explicit formative research stage with clear integration of findings into the intervention was able to demonstrate an effect on the main outcome of interest. We present alternative explanation for the findings and recommendations for future research.

  5. Suicide prevention program for at-risk groups: pointers from an epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniam, T; Chinna, Karuthan; Lim, C H; Kadir, A B; Nurashikin, I; Salina, A A; Mariapun, Jeevitha

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify at-risk groups for a focused suicide prevention program for Malaysia. Data from 20,552 persons aged 16 years and above (males 45.9%), was obtained using stratified, random sampling in a national survey of psychiatric morbidity using locally validated General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) which included questions on suicidal ideation. The overall prevalence of suicidal ideation (SI) was 6.3%, CI 6.1-6.8 (n=1288). Logistic regression analysis was performed with age, ethnicity, gender, urban/rural residence, age group, marital status, household income, type of household, presence of chronic pain, social dysfunction, somatic, anxiety or depressive symptoms, obesity, and chronic medical illnesses as independent variables. Only Insomnia, Religion, Marital Status, Depression, Social Dysfunction and Anxiety were seen to be significant predictors. Prevalence of SI was significantly higher among Indians (11.0%, CI 9.5-12.5), especially those of the Hindu faith (12.2%, CI 10.5-14.0), Chinese (9.7%, CI 8.8-10.7) and those having depressive symptoms. In a developing country with competing priorities, prudent allocation of resources requires focusing suicide prevention efforts on treating depression in vulnerable groups. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemoselective Methylation of Phenolic Hydroxyl Group Prevents Quinone Methide Formation and Repolymerization During Lignin Depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Ho; Dutta, Tanmoy; Walter, Eric D.; Isern, Nancy G.; Cort, John R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singh, Seema

    2017-03-30

    Chemoselective blocking of the phenolic hydroxyl (Ar-OH) group by methylation was found to suppress secondary repolymerization and charring during lignin depolymerization. Methylation of Ar-OH prevents formation of reactive quinone methide intermediates, which are partly responsible for undesirable secondary repolymerization reactions. Instead, this structurally modified lignin produces more relatively low molecular weight products from lignin depolymerization compared to unmodified lignin. This result demonstrates that structural modification of lignin is desirable for production of low molecular weight phenolic products. This approach could be directed toward alteration of natural lignification processes to produce biomass more amenable to chemical depolymerization.

  7. Prevention of HIV infection among migrant population groups in Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Regina Sansigolo Kerr-Pontes

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV infection is spreading among the poor, women, and migrant communities in the interior of Northeast Brazil. The research focused on different configurations, beliefs, representations, and forms of social organization of behavior thought to be associated with the population's capacity to efficiently follow AIDS prevention measures. Participants located in neighborhoods known for having large migrant populations were identified by Family Health Program Workers in Fortaleza and Teresina. The study adopted a qualitative methodology. Several belief-system concepts and values, as well as the social organization of sexuality revealed in the study, represent obstacles both to AIDS prevention and condom use. Hunger, lack of prospects, and fear are associated with a social situation of poverty, exclusion, prejudice, and total absence of basic human rights When examined together, these elements define different configurations in the migrants' increased vulnerability to HIV/AIDS. The groups' increased vulnerability relates to the socioeconomic complexity that must be considered in HIV/AIDS control and prevention programs.

  8. Culturally tailored diabetes prevention in the workplace: focus group interviews with Hispanic employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sharon A; García, Alexandra A; Steinhardt, Mary A; Guevara, Henry; Moore, Claire; Brown, Adama; Winter, Mary A

    2015-04-01

    The purpose was to conduct focus groups with Hispanic employees to obtain input into adaptation of previous DSME interventions for use as a workplace diabetes prevention program. From a list of interested Hispanic employees who attended a local health fair (n = 68), 36 were randomly selected to participate in focus groups held during supper mealtime breaks. An experienced bilingual moderator directed the sessions, using interview guidelines developed by the research team. Participants' ages ranged from 22 to 65 years (mean = 50.4, n = 36, SD = 10.7), 7 males and 29 females attended, and 53% had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Employees expressed a keen interest in diabetes classes and recommended a focus on preparing healthier Hispanic foods. Primary barriers to promoting healthier lifestyles were work schedules; many employees worked 2 part-time or full-time jobs. Administrators and direct supervisors of the employees were highly supportive of a workplace diabetes prevention program. The consistent message was that a workplace program would be the ideal solution for Hispanic employees to learn about diabetes and healthy behaviors, given their busy schedules, family responsibilities, and limited resources. If found to be effective, such a workplace program would be generalizable to other service employees who have disproportionate diabetes rates. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. Pilot trial of a dissonance-based cognitive-behavioral group depression prevention with college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Paul; Stice, Eric; Shaw, Heather; Gau, Jeff M

    2016-07-01

    Conduct a pilot trial testing whether a new cognitive-behavioral (CB) group prevention program that incorporated cognitive-dissonance change principles was feasible and appeared effective in reducing depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder onset relative to a brochure control condition in college students with elevated depressive symptoms. 59 college students (M age = 21.8, SD = 2.3; 68% female, 70% White) were randomized to the 6-session Change Ahead group or educational brochure control condition, completing assessments at pretest, posttest, and 3-month follow-up. Recruitment and screening methods were effective and intervention attendance was high (86% attended all 6 sessions). Change Ahead participants showed medium-large reductions in depressive symptoms at posttest (M d = 0.64), though the effect attenuated by 3-month follow-up. Incidence of major depression onset at 3-month follow-up was 4% for Change Ahead participants versus 13% (difference ns). Change Ahead appears highly feasible and showed positive indications of reduced acute phase depressive symptoms and MDD onset relative to a minimal intervention control in this initial pilot. Given the brevity of the intervention, its apparent feasibility, and the lack of evidence-based depression prevention programs for college students, continued evaluation of Change Ahead appears warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The prevention of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, Deborah; Allen, Victoria M

    2013-10-01

    To review the evidence in the literature and to provide recommendations on the management of pregnant women in labour for the prevention of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal disease. The key revisions in this updated guideline include changed recommendations for regimens for antibiotic prophylaxis, susceptibility testing, and management of women with pre-labour rupture of membranes. Maternal outcomes evaluated included exposure to antibiotics in pregnancy and labour and complications related to antibiotic use. Neonatal outcomes of rates of early-onset group B streptococcal infections are evaluated. Published literature was retrieved through searches of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library from January 1980 to July 2012 using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words (group B streptococcus, antibiotic therapy, infection, prevention). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to May 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). The recommendations in this guideline are designed to help clinicians identify and manage pregnancies at risk for neonatal group B streptococcal disease to optimize maternal and perinatal outcomes. No cost-benefit analysis is provided. There is good evidence based on randomized control trial data that in women with pre-labour rupture of membranes at term who are colonized with group B streptococcus, rates of neonatal infection are

  11. Tenth Technical Advisory Group (TAG) meeting on vaccine-preventable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    In march 1992, participants met in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil for the 10th Meeting of the PAHO Technical Advisory Group (TAG) on Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. Immunization coverage for all vaccines exceeded 75%. In 1991, only 9 confirmed cases of wild poliovirus occurred out of 4000 stool specimens examined. These cases were in Colombia and Peru. Many national immunization days and mop-up operations complement routine immunization services and have contributed greatly to interruption of the wild poliovirus in the Americas. Social mobilization efforts and mass media campaigns have increased coverage rates nationally and regionally. Surveillance efforts continue to improve. Almost 20,000 health units in Latin America report each week on the existence or nonexistence of acute flaccid paralysis cases. TAG continues to prefer the oral polio vaccine for the eradication program in the Americas. Participants discussed issues pertaining to certification of polio eradication. Measles incidence in the Americas is still falling and intervals between outbreaks are growing. Some countries in the English-speaking Caribbean using a month long, mass vaccination strategy have apparently interrupted measles transmission. Since measles causes more deaths than any other vaccine preventable disease, PAHO's TAG places it as the highest priority. The proportion of neonatal tetanus cases that are being investigated is growing (1991=8% and 1990=35%). Participants challenged Venezuela and Panama to vaccinate 100% of reproductive age women in high risk areas before the next meeting. Inadequate data on pertussis prevents PAHO from measuring any changes in pertussis epidemiology. Some countries have set up systems to monitor adverse events associated with vaccination. Participants agreed that member nations should begin hepatitis B vaccination programs for high risk groups.

  12. The Factors of Forming the National HR-Management Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P. Kostenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available There are some factors considered in this article, which influence the forming of national HR-management model. The group-forming criterion is the nature of factors, that determine the system of HR-management as a system of corporate culture values, norms and rules of organizational behavior, ways of realization some important managing functions and dominating approaches to make decisions. This article shows that the plurality of combinations in different factors leads to forming the unique HR-management model. The geoclimatic factor influences the principles of the labor organization (orientation primarily on individual or collective forms of labor, attitude to the management experience of other countries, attitude to resources, etc., the distribution of labor resources, the level of labor mobility, and the psychosocial type of employee. Models of man's labor behavior are constituted In the process of historical development. Attention is focused on the formation of a national HR-model, such as the conducted socio-economic policy, the characteristics of the institutional environment, economic goals and priorities of the country's development, the level of development and the nature of the national productive forces and economic structures. Much attention was paid to the analysis of the historically formed value system and labor traditions, which influence the approaches to HR-management. As far as religion influences the model of person’s inclusion in labor, motives of labor behavior, management culture of a certain employee, preferred payment etc., we examined how the main traditional religions (Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism influence the HR-management system in different countries.

  13. Vaccines for the prevention of meningococcal capsular group B disease: What have we recently learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlow, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal disease remains a feared and devastating cause of sepsis and meningitis. Disease incidence is highest among infants and children although a significant burden of disease is experienced by adolescents, young adults and those with specific risk-factors. Prevention of disease against capsular groups A, C, W and Y; 4 of the 5 most pathogenic groups is achievable using capsular polysaccharide vaccines. It has only recently been possible to provide protection against capsular group B (MenB) strains following the licensure of a 4 component group B vaccine (4CMenB) in Europe in 2013. Following licensure, 4CMenB has been used in specific at-risk groups and in response to outbreaks of MenB disease. The largest outbreak interventions have been in students at 2 universities in the United States and for all individuals aged 2 months to 20 years of age in Quebec, Canada. The vaccine was recommended in February 2014 for implementation into the UK infant schedule at 2, 4 and 12 months of age, although it has taken over 12 months to resolve procurement discussions to enable implementation. The UK recommendation incorporates prophylactic paracetamol with infant doses when 4CMenB is administered concomitantly with routine vaccines. This is based on recent data demonstrating the ability of paracetamol to reduce fever rates to background levels without impacting immunogenicity. Post-implementation surveillance will be important to provide vaccine efficacy data as this was not possible to determine in pre-licensure studies due to the relative infrequency of MenB cases.

  14. Most at-risk populations: contextualising HIV prevention programmes targeting marginalised groups in Zanzibar, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Naheed

    2014-09-01

    According to a 2009 UNAIDS report the HIV/AIDS prevalence rate in Zanzibar, Tanzania, is low in the general population (0.6%), but high among vulnerable groups, specifically sex workers (10.8%), injecting drug users (15.1%), and men who have sex with men (12.3%). In response to this concentrated epidemic, the Government of Zanzibar, international and local non-profit organisations have focused their prevention activities on these marginal populations. Although these efforts are beneficial in terms of disseminating information about HIV/AIDS and referring clients to health clinics, they fail to address how the socio-economic status of these groups places them at a greater risk for contracting and dying from the virus. Furthermore, there is an absence of qualitative research on these populations which is needed to understand the challenges these groups face and to improve the effectiveness of interventions. Through interviews with employees of government agencies and non-profit organisations, medical professionals, vulnerable populations and HIV/AIDS patients, this paper used a political economy of health and syndemic framework to examine how local realities inform and challenge HIV/AIDS programmes in Zanzibar.

  15. The perspective of Malaysian Manufacturing Organizations on Strategy, HR Outsourcing and HR Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Hasliza Abdul HALIM; Norbani CHE-HA

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses the relationship between different types of human resource management (HRM) strategy and the human resource outsourcing, and impact on the size of human resource (HR) department. Three HRM strategies are considered: Facilitation, accumulation and utilization. The data for the study were obtained from survey responses from 232 organizations, of which 113 were engaged in HR outsourcing. The findings suggest that organizations tend to rely on outsourcing of HR functions when ...

  16. Peer group intervention for HIV prevention among health workers in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norr, Kathleen F; Ferrer, Lilian; Cianelli, Rosina; Crittenden, Kathleen S; Irarrázabal, Lisette; Cabieses, Báltica; Araya, Alejandra; Bernales, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    We tested the impacts of a professionally assisted peer-group intervention on Chilean health workers' HIV-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors using a quasi-experimental design with a pretest and 3-month posttest. Two Santiago suburbs were randomly assigned to the intervention or delayed intervention control condition. Five community clinics per suburb participated. Interested workers at the intervention (n = 262) and control (n = 293) clinics participated and completed both evaluations. At posttest, intervention clinic workers had higher knowledge and more positive attitudes regarding HIV, condoms, stigmatization, and self-efficacy for prevention. They reported more partner discussion about safer sex, less unprotected sex, and more involvement in HIV prevention activities in the clinic and the community, but they did not report fewer sexual partners or more standard precautions behaviors. Because of these positive impacts, the program will become a regular continuing education unit that can be used to meet health-worker licensing requirements. Copyright © 2012 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Barriers and Facilitators of HIV Prevention With Heterosexual Latino Couples: Beliefs of Four Stakeholder Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Jiménez, David; Seal, David W.; Serrano-García, Irma

    2012-01-01

    Although HIV prevention interventions for women are efficacious, long-term behavior change maintenance within power-imbalanced heterosexual relationships has been difficult. To explore the feasibility, content, and format of an HIV intervention for Latino couples, the authors conducted 13 focus groups with HIV/AIDS researchers, service providers, and heterosexual men and women in Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Mexico. Reasons that participants thought that men should be involved in prevention efforts included promotion of shared responsibility, creation of a safe environment for open conversation about sex, and increased sexual negotiation skills. Perceived barriers to men’s involvement included cultural taboos, sexual conservatism associated with Catholicism and machismo, and power-imbalanced relationships. Participants stressed the need for recruitment of men within naturally occurring settings or by influential community leaders. Participants indicated that couples-level interventions would be successful if they used strong coed facilitators, included both unigender and mixed-gender discussion opportunities, and addressed personally meaningful topics. Implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:19209976

  18. Barriers and facilitators of HIV prevention with heterosexual Latino couples: beliefs of four stakeholder groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Jiménez, David; Seal, David W; Serrano-García, Irma

    2009-01-01

    Although HIV prevention interventions for women are efficacious, long-term behavior change maintenance within power-imbalanced heterosexual relationships has been difficult. To explore the feasibility, content, and format of an HIV intervention for Latino couples, the authors conducted 13 focus groups with HIV/AIDS researchers, service providers, and heterosexual men and women in Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Mexico. Reasons that participants thought that men should be involved in prevention efforts included promotion of shared responsibility, creation of a safe environment for open conversation about sex, and increased sexual negotiation skills. Perceived barriers to men's involvement included cultural taboos, sexual conservatism associated with Catholicism and machismo, and power-imbalanced relationships. Participants stressed the need for recruitment of men within naturally occurring settings or by influential community leaders. Participants indicated that couples-level interventions would be successful if they used strong coed facilitators, included both unigender and mixed-gender discussion opportunities, and addressed personally meaningful topics. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  19. Online focus groups as an HIV prevention program for gay, bisexual, and queer adolescent males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Michele L; DuBois, L Zachary; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Prescott, Tonya L; Mustanski, Brian

    2014-12-01

    Seventy-five 14-18-year-old gay, bisexual, and queer (GBQ) males provided feedback about how their participation in national, online focus groups (FG) about GBQ sexual health related topics resulted in behavioral and attitudinal changes. Most sexually experienced youth agreed that their participation positively changed their views and behavioral intentions. Some said that being in the FG made them more comfortable talking about sex, their sexuality, and making safer choices such as negotiating condoms. Others indicated intentions to become more involved in the LGBT community. Sexually inexperienced FG participants similarly said that the FG discussion positively affected them-most commonly by reducing their sense of isolation as young GBQ men who were waiting to have sex. Many also thought that they would become more vocal advocates of abstinence and/or safe sex. Online FGs and facilitated discussion boards should be further explored as a low-cost HIV prevention program for GBQ youth.

  20. Prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal disease: screening during a pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosella Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal (GBS disease is based on the screening of all pregnant women at 35-37 weeks’ gestation for vaginal and rectal GBS colonization. The colonized women receive intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis. Our study reports the different rates of maternal GBS colonization between April 2008 and March 2011. We have collected 3430 samples by swabbing both the lower vagina and rectum and we have employed two different laboratory methods: direct agar plating and selective enrichment broth. The rates of maternal GBS colonization increased from 10.5% during 2008-2009, to 12.2% during 2009-2010 and to 14.4% during 2010-2011, when we have introduced the Todd Hewitt broth. Our results show that the use of an enrichment broth improves detection of GBS carriers women.

  1. Effects of a health promotion and fall prevention program in elderly individuals participating in interaction groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lays Cavallero Pagliosa

    Full Text Available Introduction Falls in elderly people are an increasing public health problem resulting in high costs to health services. Thus, it is essential to invest in the development of actions and programs focused on decreasing such risks. Objective To verify the effects of a program of health promotion and prevention of falls in relation to balance and functional abilities in elderly people participating in interaction groups in Caxias do Sul City, RS State. Materials and methods For this purpose, 14 elderly people were selected for assessment and reassessment through the following instruments: the Barthel Index, Timed Up and Go Test (TUG, Berg Balance Scale (BBS, and a questionnaire to characterize the sample. Over the course of 2 months, group activities were conducted in a multi-sensory and proprioceptive circuit with a frequency of 2 times per week, totaling 14 meetings. Results The average age of participants was about 72 years old, mostly women (78.6%; 64.3% of them had experienced falls, and 92.9% had already practiced physical activities. After the intervention, there was an average increase of 9.14 points in the BBS (p = 0.000 and an average reduction of 4.4 seconds in gait speed on the TUG test (p = 0.000. Conclusion The application of the proposed program resulted in increasing balance and gait performance of the elderly, reducing the risk of falls.

  2. Feasibility of Group Lifestyle Intervention for Diabetes Prevention in Arab Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Linda A.; Pinelli, Nicole R.; Brown, Morton B.; Funnell, Martha M.; Anderson, Robert; Hammad, Adnan; Herman, William H.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS To assess the feasibility and acceptability of a community-based, culturally-specific, Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)-adapted, group lifestyle intervention in Arab-Americans. METHODS Overweight (BMI≥27 kg/m2) Arab-Americans aged ≥30 years and without a history of diabetes were recruited to participate in a 24-week group lifestyle intervention. The DPP core-curriculum was culturally rewritten, translated into Arabic, and delivered in weekly sessions over a 12-week period. Follow-up was performed at week-24. The primary goals were to achieve ≥7% weight loss and ≥150 minutes/week of physical activity. An intent-to-treat analysis was performed. RESULTS Of the 71 participants (mean age±SD 47±10 years, 38% males), 44% achieved ≥7% weight loss, 59% achieved ≥5% reduction in weight, and 78% reached the physical activity goal of ≥150-minutes/week. The mean±SD weight loss was 5.2±4.4 kg at week-24 (pArab-Americans. PMID:21168232

  3. HIV prevention and marriage: peer group effects on condom use acceptability in rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero Coma, Julia

    2014-09-01

    The twofold function of condom use - contraception and sexually transmitted disease protection - should be taken into account when understanding attitudes towards this practice. Emphasis on the interpretation of condom use as a protective practice conflicts with the norms of fidelity and trust, which regulate marriage. The alternative interpretation of condom use as a contraceptive method may be less problematic. This paper analyzes the extent to which the attitude of married men and women towards condom use with their spouses, and their actual use of condoms within marriage, are affected by their expectations about the dominant attitudes and behaviors in their peer group. I expect that a social consensus on understanding condom use as an HIV-preventive behavior will not make this practice more acceptable within marriage, while social acceptance of modern contraception and, more specifically, of the use of condoms for contraceptive purposes will. Two waves of a longitudinal survey from 1996 to 1999 in rural Kenya are analyzed using fixed-effects regression. Social support for each function of condom use is measured with indicators of the proportion of individuals in the peer group that use condoms for a particular purpose or have a positive attitude towards each of the uses, according to the respondent. The results support the hypothesis for men, but are inconclusive for women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The FIGO working group on the prevention of unsafe abortion: mandate and process for achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leke, Robert J I; de Gil, Marina Padilla; Távara, Luis; Faúndes, Anibal

    2010-07-01

    The Working Group of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) on the Prevention of Unsafe Abortion and its Consequences received a mandate to contribute to reduce the number of women who have to resort to induced abortion and the maternal mortality and morbidity associated with unsafe abortion by minimizing unintended pregnancies, improving access to safe abortion services, and increasing the quality of and access to post-abortion care, including post-abortion contraception. A project proposal was prepared and approved by an anonymous donor, funding a structure headed by a general coordinator, the Chair of the Working Group, together with 6 regional coordinators and 1 assistant regional coordinator, plus 43 focal points nominated by the participating societies. A situational analysis of induced/unsafe abortion for each country was prepared by the focal points with the technical support of the Guttmacher Institute, and a plan of action based on the findings of the analysis. The situational analysis and plans of action were discussed at 7 regional workshops held between June and August, 2008. Fifty-four member societies nominated a focal point, 48 attended the regional workshops, and 43 had a plan of action approved by their governments and respective societies. The plans of action are currently in the process of implementation, with the collaboration of a number of national and international agencies and organizations. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Linking HR strategy, e-HR goals, architectures, and outcomes: a model and case study evidence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reddington, Martin; Martin, Graeme; Bondarouk, T.V.; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Ruel, H.; Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria; Looise, J.C.; Looise, Jan C.

    2011-01-01

    Building on our earlier model of the links between HR strategy, e-HR goals, architectures, and outcomes, we illustrate the relationship between some of these elements with data from three global organizations. In doing so, we aim to help academics and practitioners understand this increasingly

  6. Effect of supervised brushing with fluoride gel during primary school, taking into account the group prevention schedule in kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Julia; Jablonski-Momeni, Anahita; Ladda, Annett; Pieper, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    In one region of Germany, a group of children took part in regular fluoride gel applications during primary school following intensified prevention in kindergarten. This observational study aimed to ascertain whether the dental health of primary school children can be improved by introducing a group prevention program based on applications of fluoride gel. The subjects were distributed among six groups with varying preventive measures in kindergarten and at school. The basis for determining caries experience and calculating the caries increment consisted of dental findings gathered in the second and fourth grade. While second graders without professionally supported daily toothbrushing in kindergarten exhibited an average d 3 -6 mft of 2.17, in those who had enjoyed intensive dental prevention, the corresponding value was 19% lower (d 3-6 mft = 1.74). The caries increment was significantly lower mainly among children who had received the maximum of group prevention (intensive prevention in kindergarten and gel program at school). The results show that intensified preventive programs in kindergartens and schools, based mainly on supervised toothbrushing, have a positive effect on the dental health of primary school children. Such programs are efficient in reducing caries experience especially in socially deprived areas.

  7. Alcohol prevention at sporting events: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbeej, Natalie; Elgán, Tobias H; Jalling, Camilla; Gripenberg, Johanna

    2016-06-06

    Alcohol intoxication and overserving of alcohol at sporting events are of great concern, given the relationships between alcohol consumption, public disturbances, and violence. During recent years this matter has been on the agenda for Swedish policymakers, authorities and key stakeholders, with demands that actions be taken. There is promising potential for utilizing an environmental approach to alcohol prevention as a strategy to reduce the level of alcohol intoxication among spectators at sporting events. Examples of prevention strategies may be community mobilization, Responsible Beverage Service training, policy work, and improved controls and sanctions. This paper describes the design of a quasi-experimental control group study to examine the effects of a multi-component community-based alcohol intervention at matches in the Swedish Premier Football League. A baseline assessment was conducted during 2015 and at least two follow-up assessments will be conducted in 2016 and 2017. The two largest cities in Sweden are included in the study, with Stockholm as the intervention area and Gothenburg as the control area. The setting is Licensed Premises (LP) inside and outside Swedish football arenas, in addition to arena entrances. Spectators are randomly selected and invited to participate in the study by providing a breath alcohol sample as a proxy for Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC). Actors are hired and trained by an expert panel to act out a standardized scene of severe pseudo-intoxication. Four types of cross-sectional data are generated: (i) BAC levels among ≥ 4 200 spectators, frequency of alcohol service to pseudo-intoxicated patrons attempting to purchase alcohol at LP (ii) outside the arenas (≥200 attempts) and (iii) inside the arenas (≥ 200 attempts), and (iv) frequency of security staff interventions towards pseudo-intoxicated patrons attempting to enter the arenas (≥ 200 attempts). There is an urgent need nationally and internationally to

  8. Letting go of an old habit: group leaders' experiences of a client-centred multidisciplinary falls-prevention programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Erika; Borell, Lena; Jonsson, Hans

    2014-03-01

    It has been suggested that the prevention of disability and falls should be conducted from a client-centred approach, especially when it includes how individuals learn new strategies in everyday life. In addition, programmes for the prevention of falls need to be multi-professional and multidisciplinary in order to be effective. In preventive work with clients, using the approach of client-centredness, the therapists work together with the clients to enable them to achieve occupational goals. There are few studies in fall prevention that have explored group leaders' experiences, i.e., studies that focus on the experiences of group leaders when working from a client-centred approach. This study aims to explore, by the use of focus-group interviews, the therapists' experiences of being group leaders in a fall-prevention programme that applied the ideas and approaches described above. The analysis revealed that a change in the role of being a group leader had taken place during the intervention process. Three primary categories pertaining to this process were identified: (i) the group leaders moved between the role of expert and the role of facilitator; the group climate (ii) facilitated the translation of expert knowledge to applied knowledge; and (iii) increased awareness as a prerequisite for change.

  9. Daphnia HR96 is a promiscuous xenobiotic and endobiotic nuclear receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimullina, Elina; Li Yangchun; Ginjupalli, Gautam K.; Baldwin, William S.

    2012-01-01

    Daphnia pulex is the first crustacean to have its genome sequenced. The genome project provides new insight and data into how an aquatic crustacean may respond to environmental stressors, including toxicants. We cloned Daphnia pulex HR96 (DappuHR96), a nuclear receptor orthologous to the CAR/PXR/VDR group of nuclear receptors. In Drosophila melanogaster, (hormone receptor 96) HR96 responds to phenobarbital exposure and has been hypothesized as a toxicant receptor. Therefore, we set up a transactivation assay to test whether DappuHR96 is a promiscuous receptor activated by xenobiotics and endobiotics similar to the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X-receptor (PXR). Transactivation assays performed with a GAL4-HR96 chimera demonstrate that HR96 is a promiscuous toxicant receptor activated by a diverse set of chemicals such as pesticides, hormones, and fatty acids. Several environmental toxicants activate HR96 including estradiol, pyriproxyfen, chlorpyrifos, atrazine, and methane arsonate. We also observed repression of HR96 activity by chemicals such as triclosan, androstanol, and fluoxetine. Nearly 50% of the chemicals tested activated or inhibited HR96. Interestingly, unsaturated fatty acids were common activators or inhibitors of HR96 activity, indicating a link between diet and toxicant response. The omega-6 and omega-9 unsaturated fatty acids linoleic and oleic acid activated HR96, but the omega-3 unsaturated fatty acids alpha-linolenic acid and docosahexaenoic acid inhibited HR96, suggesting that these two distinct sets of lipids perform opposing roles in Daphnia physiology. This also provides a putative mechanism by which the ratio of dietary unsaturated fats may affect the ability of an organism to respond to a toxic insult. In summary, HR96 is a promiscuous nuclear receptor activated by numerous endo- and xenobiotics.

  10. Daphnia HR96 is a Promiscuous Xenobiotic and Endobiotic Nuclear Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimullina, Elina; Li, Yangchun; Ginjupalli, Gautam; Baldwin, William S.

    2012-01-01

    Daphnia pulex is the first crustacean to have its genome sequenced. The genome project provides new insight and data into how an aquatic crustacean may respond to environmental stressors, including toxicants. We cloned Daphnia pulex HR96 (DappuHR96), a nuclear receptor orthologous to the CAR/PXR/VDR group of nuclear receptors. In Drosophila melanogaster, (hormone receptor 96) HR96 responds to phenobarbital exposure and has been hypothesized as a toxicant receptor. Therefore, we set up a transactivation assay to test whether DappuHR96 is a promiscuous receptor activated by xenobiotics and endobiotics similar to the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X-receptor (PXR). Transactivation assays performed with a GAL4-HR96 chimera demonstrate that HR96 is a promiscuous toxicant receptor activated by a diverse set of chemicals such as pesticides, hormones, and fatty acids. Several environmental toxicants activate HR96 including estradiol, pyriproxyfen, chlorpyrifos, atrazine, and methane arsonate. We also observed repression of HR96 activity by chemicals such as triclosan, androstanol, and fluoxetine. Nearly 50% of the chemicals tested activated or inhibited HR96. Interestingly, unsaturated fatty acids were common activators or inhibitors of HR96 activity, indicating a link between diet and toxicant response. The omega-6 and omega-9 unsaturated fatty acids linoleic and oleic acid activated HR96, but the omega-3 unsaturated fatty acids alpha-linolenic acid and docosahexaenoic acid inhibited HR96, suggesting that these two distinct sets of lipids perform opposing roles in Daphnia physiology. This also provides a putative mechanism by which the ratio of dietary unsaturated fats may affect the ability of an organism to respond to a toxic insult. In summary, HR96 is a promiscuous nuclear receptor activated by numerous endo- and xenobiotics. PMID:22466357

  11. Daphnia HR96 is a promiscuous xenobiotic and endobiotic nuclear receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimullina, Elina [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch, Yekaterinburg 620144 (Russian Federation); Li Yangchun; Ginjupalli, Gautam K. [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Baldwin, William S., E-mail: baldwin@clemson.edu [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Biological Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Daphnia pulex is the first crustacean to have its genome sequenced. The genome project provides new insight and data into how an aquatic crustacean may respond to environmental stressors, including toxicants. We cloned Daphnia pulex HR96 (DappuHR96), a nuclear receptor orthologous to the CAR/PXR/VDR group of nuclear receptors. In Drosophila melanogaster, (hormone receptor 96) HR96 responds to phenobarbital exposure and has been hypothesized as a toxicant receptor. Therefore, we set up a transactivation assay to test whether DappuHR96 is a promiscuous receptor activated by xenobiotics and endobiotics similar to the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X-receptor (PXR). Transactivation assays performed with a GAL4-HR96 chimera demonstrate that HR96 is a promiscuous toxicant receptor activated by a diverse set of chemicals such as pesticides, hormones, and fatty acids. Several environmental toxicants activate HR96 including estradiol, pyriproxyfen, chlorpyrifos, atrazine, and methane arsonate. We also observed repression of HR96 activity by chemicals such as triclosan, androstanol, and fluoxetine. Nearly 50% of the chemicals tested activated or inhibited HR96. Interestingly, unsaturated fatty acids were common activators or inhibitors of HR96 activity, indicating a link between diet and toxicant response. The omega-6 and omega-9 unsaturated fatty acids linoleic and oleic acid activated HR96, but the omega-3 unsaturated fatty acids alpha-linolenic acid and docosahexaenoic acid inhibited HR96, suggesting that these two distinct sets of lipids perform opposing roles in Daphnia physiology. This also provides a putative mechanism by which the ratio of dietary unsaturated fats may affect the ability of an organism to respond to a toxic insult. In summary, HR96 is a promiscuous nuclear receptor activated by numerous endo- and xenobiotics.

  12. Group Music Therapy as a Preventive Intervention for Young People at Risk: Cluster-Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Christian; Saarikallio, Suvi; Crooke, Alexander Hew Dale; McFerran, Katrina Skewes

    2017-07-01

    Music forms an important part of the lives and identities of adolescents and may have positive or negative mental health implications. Music therapy can be effective for mental disorders such as depression, but its preventive potential is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine whether group music therapy (GMT) is an effective intervention for young people who may be at risk of developing mental health problems, as indicated via unhealthy music use. The main question was whether GMT can reduce unhealthy uses of music and increase potentials for healthy uses of music, compared to self-directed music listening (SDML). We were also interested in effects of GMT on depressive symptoms, psychosocial well-being, rumination, and reflection. In an exploratory cluster-randomized trial in Australian schools, 100 students with self-reported unhealthy music use were invited to GMT (weekly sessions over 8 weeks) or SDML. Changes in the Healthy-Unhealthy Music Scale (HUMS) and mental health outcomes were measured over 3 months. Both interventions were well accepted. No effects were found between GMT and SDML (all p > 0.05); both groups tended to show small improvements over time. Younger participants benefited more from GMT, and older ones more from SDML (p = 0.018). GMT was associated with similar changes as SDML. Further research is needed to improve the processes of selecting participants for targeted interventions; to determine optimal dosage; and to provide more reliable evidence of effects of music-based interventions for adolescents. © the American Music Therapy Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. Estimates of Intraclass Correlation Coefficients from Longitudinal Group-Randomized Trials of Adolescent HIV/STI/Pregnancy Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Jill R.; Potter, Susan C.; Baumler, Elizabeth R.; Coyle, Karin K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Group-randomized trials (GRTs) are one of the most rigorous methods for evaluating the effectiveness of group-based health risk prevention programs. Efficiently designing GRTs with a sample size that is sufficient for meeting the trial's power and precision goals while not wasting resources exceeding them requires estimates of the…

  14. Dating Violence and Sexual Assault Prevention with African American Middle Schoolers: Does Group Gender Composition Impact Dating Violence Attitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Beverly M.; Weisz, Arlene N.; Jayasundara, Dheeshana S.

    2012-01-01

    A dating violence and sexual assault prevention program was presented to 396, predominately African American, middle schoolers in two inner city schools in the United States. In one school the program was offered with a same-gender group composition; in the other school, the same program was offered with mixed-gender group composition. A…

  15. The Impact of Perceived Group Support on the Effectiveness of an HIV Prevention Intervention for African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgrave, Faye Z.; Corneille, Maya; Hood, Kristina; Foster-Woodson, Julia; Fitzgerald, Angela

    2010-01-01

    The enormous HIV/AIDS disparity among African American women and women in other ethnic groups dictates the need to implement the most effective HIV prevention interventions. This study examined the impact of perceived group support on HIV protective behaviors (i.e., attitudes and behaviors related to condom use, alcohol, and drugs) of African…

  16. CHICKEN-POX PREVENTION BY THE SPECIFIC PREVENTIVE MEASURES IN BELARUS, KAZAKHSTAN, RUSSIA AND UKRAINE (STATEMENT OF EAST EUROPEAN VACCINE ADVISORY GROUP — EEVAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Baranov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this announcement, a group of the leading world experts in the sphere of the vaccination are proud to present a strategic vision of the chicken-pox immuno prevention trends in the partner countries, as well as the basic recommendations for the vaccination in the partner countries.Key words: chicken-pox, vaccination, children.

  17. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  18. Enabling quaternion derivatives: the generalized HR calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongpo; Jahanchahi, Cyrus; Took, Clive C; Mandic, Danilo P

    2015-08-01

    Quaternion derivatives exist only for a very restricted class of analytic (regular) functions; however, in many applications, functions of interest are real-valued and hence not analytic, a typical case being the standard real mean square error objective function. The recent HR calculus is a step forward and provides a way to calculate derivatives and gradients of both analytic and non-analytic functions of quaternion variables; however, the HR calculus can become cumbersome in complex optimization problems due to the lack of rigorous product and chain rules, a consequence of the non-commutativity of quaternion algebra. To address this issue, we introduce the generalized HR (GHR) derivatives which employ quaternion rotations in a general orthogonal system and provide the left- and right-hand versions of the quaternion derivative of general functions. The GHR calculus also solves the long-standing problems of product and chain rules, mean-value theorem and Taylor's theorem in the quaternion field. At the core of the proposed GHR calculus is quaternion rotation, which makes it possible to extend the principle to other functional calculi in non-commutative settings. Examples in statistical learning theory and adaptive signal processing support the analysis.

  19. Partnerships for the design, conduct, and analysis of effectiveness, and implementation research: experiences of the prevention science and methodology group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C Hendricks; Kellam, Sheppard G; Kaupert, Sheila; Muthén, Bengt O; Wang, Wei; Muthén, Linda K; Chamberlain, Patricia; PoVey, Craig L; Cady, Rick; Valente, Thomas W; Ogihara, Mitsunori; Prado, Guillermo J; Pantin, Hilda M; Gallo, Carlos G; Szapocznik, José; Czaja, Sara J; McManus, John W

    2012-07-01

    What progress prevention research has made comes through strategic partnerships with communities and institutions that host this research, as well as professional and practice networks that facilitate the diffusion of knowledge about prevention. We discuss partnership issues related to the design, analysis, and implementation of prevention research and especially how rigorous designs, including random assignment, get resolved through a partnership between community stakeholders, institutions, and researchers. These partnerships shape not only study design, but they determine the data that can be collected and how results and new methods are disseminated. We also examine a second type of partnership to improve the implementation of effective prevention programs into practice. We draw on social networks to studying partnership formation and function. The experience of the Prevention Science and Methodology Group, which itself is a networked partnership between scientists and methodologists, is highlighted.

  20. Partnerships for the Design, Conduct, and Analysis of Effectiveness, and Implementation Research: Experiences of the Prevention Science and Methodology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. Hendricks; Kellam, Sheppard G.; Kaupert, Sheila; Muthén, Bengt O.; Wang, Wei; Muthén, Linda K.; Chamberlain, Patricia; PoVey, Craig L.; Cady, Rick; Valente, Thomas W.; Ogihara, Mitsunori; Prado, Guillermo J.; Pantin, Hilda M.; Gallo, Carlos G.; Szapocznik, José; Czaja, Sara J.; McManus, John W.

    2012-01-01

    What progress prevention research has made comes through strategic partnerships with communities and institutions that host this research, as well as professional and practice networks that facilitate the diffusion of knowledge about prevention. We discuss partnership issues related to the design, analysis, and implementation of prevention research and especially how rigorous designs, including random assignment, get resolved through a partnership between community stakeholders, institutions, and researchers. These partnerships shape not only study design, but they determine the data that can be collected and how results and new methods are disseminated. We also examine a second type of partnership to improve the implementation of effective prevention programs into practice. We draw on social networks to studying partnership formation and function. The experience of the Prevention Science and Methodology Group, which itself is a networked partnership between scientists and methodologists, is highlighted. PMID:22160786

  1. Translating an Effective Group-Based HIV Prevention Program to a Program Delivered Primarily by a Computer: Methods and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Josefina J.; Kuhn, Tamara; Solomon, Julie; Benner, Tabitha A.; Wingood, Gina M.; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe development of SAHARA (SiSTAS Accessing HIV/AIDS Resources At-a-click), an innovative HIV prevention program that uses a computer to deliver an updated version of SiSTA, a widely used, effective group-level HIV prevention intervention for African American women ages 18-29. Fidelity to SiSTA's core components was achieved using: (1)…

  2. Cost effective measures to prevent obesity: epidemiological basis and appropriate target groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidell, J.C.; Nooyens, A.C.J.; Visscher, T.L.S.

    2005-01-01

    Cost-effective prevention strategies to prevent weight gain and the development of obesity should be based on appropriate knowledge of the determinants of weight gain. The body of evidence on the dietary determinants of weight gain is, however, fragmentary at best, partly because inappropriate

  3. Cost-effective measures to prevent obesity : epidemiological basis and appropriate target groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seidell, Jacob C; Nooyens, Astrid J; Visscher, Tommy L S

    Cost-effective prevention strategies to prevent weight gain and the development of obesity should be based on appropriate knowledge of the determinants of weight gain. The body of evidence on the dietary determinants of weight gain is, however, fragmentary at best, partly because inappropriate

  4. International HR Strategy of Brazilian Technology Multinationals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Morilha Muritiba

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Four cases of Brazilian Multinationals from the information technology [IT] sector were compared in their international Human Resources strategy. The analysis is focused on the development and application of two research models. One analyzes the level of subsidiary autonomy in terms of strategic HR decisions, including difficult decisions regarding coordination in multinationals, following the theoretical approach of the autonomy of subsidiaries (Kidger, 2002; Nohria & Ghoshal, 1997. The other is related to the level of internationalization of HR strategies, defined as the capacity to take advantage of globalization, providing the best resources for the company regardless of where they are located (Sparrow, 2007. Both models were applied in a multiple case study method (Eisenhardt, 1989. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and company reports, and analyzed through content analysis. The results show: (a a more centralizing characteristic of the multinational companies examined, despite the limitations of this choice as shown by the literature; and (b that Brazilian IT multinationals tend to rely more on their national competencies when managing human resources instead of going global to aggregate differentiated competencies.

  5. Comments on H.R. 2480

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezendes, V.S.

    1990-10-01

    GAO testified on H.R. 2480, the Uranium Enrichment Reorganization Act, which would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation. Specifically, this legislation would allow the corporation to set prices to maximize long-term returns; establish a fund to meet future decontamination, decommissioning, and remedial action costs associated with past uranium enrichment activities. and require the government to pay its share of the costs to clean up mining waste generated under past government contracts. GAO believes that H.R. 2480 takes needed steps toward establishing clear objectives for the enrichment program and would allow the new corporation to better operate as a business entity. The bill would also resolve several long-term issues that seriously challenge the program's future, including the need to pay billions of dollars in environmental and decommissioning costs at a time when competition is expected to increase. However, GAO believes that the bill could be strengthened by including a specific cost recovery provision. Because DOE projects that the corporation's future earnings could be substantial, GAO suggests that Congress require the repayment of $3 billion, rather than rely solely on unspecified dividends and/or uncertain future stock sales that may not materialize unless problems related to licensing uncertainties, increased competition, and billions of dollars in liabilities are adequately resolved

  6. PLEIADES-HR IMAGE QUALITY COMMISSIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lebègue

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available PLEIADES is the highest resolution civilian earth observing system ever developed in Europe. This imagery program is conducted by the French National Space Agency, CNES. It operates since 2012 a first satellite PLEIADES-HR launched on 2011 December 17th, a second one should be launched by the end of the year. Each satellite is designed to provide optical 70 cm resolution coloured images to civilian and defence users. The Image Quality requirements were defined from users studies from the different spatial imaging applications, taking into account the trade-off between on-board technological complexity and ground processing capacity. The assessment of the image quality and the calibration operation have been performed by CNES Image Quality team during the 6 month commissioning phase that followed the satellite launch. These activities cover many topics gathered in two families : radiometric and geometric image quality. The new capabilities offered by PLEIADES-HR agility allowed to imagine new methods of image calibration and performance assessment. Starting from an overview of the satellite characteristics, this paper presents all the calibration operations that were conducted during the commissioning phase and also gives the main results for every image quality performance.

  7. To share or not to share: thats the question! When does sharing of HR services maximize perceived HR service value?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, Jeroen Gerard; Hofman, Erwin; Hemels, Hinse

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, organizations can rely on a variety of delivery channels for offering HR services to employees, such as HR shared service centres, embedded HR professionals or electronic HRM. However, when should organizations opt for one of the many HR delivery channels that are at their disposal to

  8. Conducting Cancer Control and Survivorship Research via Cooperative Groups: A Report from the American Society of Preventive Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Palesh, Oxana; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Mustian, Karen; Minasian, Lori; Rowland, Julia; Sprod, Lisa; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke; Sloan, Jeff; Engquist, Karen Basen; Jones, Lee; Buist, Diana; Paskett, Electra

    2011-01-01

    As the number of cancer survivors expands, the need for cancer control and survivorship research becomes increasingly important. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cooperative Groups may offer a viable platform to perform such research. Observational, preventive, and behavioral research can often be performed within the cooperative group setting, especially if resources needed for evaluation are fairly simple, if protocols are easily implemented within the typical clinical setting, and if in...

  9. 76 FR 58007 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the... Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with Section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory... scheduled to be held for the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public...

  10. 76 FR 67731 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the... Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with Section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory... scheduled to be held for the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public...

  11. 77 FR 15372 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the... Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with Section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory... scheduled to be held for the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public...

  12. 76 FR 26300 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the... Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with Section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory... scheduled to be held for the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public...

  13. EXCEPTIONAL CLOSURE OF VARIOUS HR DEPARTEMENT SERVICES ON 20 AND 21 SEPTEMBER 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    Due to a group training event, the following services will be exceptionally closed on Thursday 20 and Friday 21 September 2007 : installation service (removals, cars, diplomatic privileges), school fees, Personnel Records Office (including attestations), French visas; duty travel, leave, reinstallation indemnity, unemployment benefit, tax information and social affairs. The French and Swiss cards service will remain open as usual, from 8:30 to 12:30. Thank you for your understanding. HR Department HR-SPS Group

  14. EXCEPTIONAL CLOSURE OF VARIOUS HR DEPARTMENT SERVICES ON 20 AND 21 SEPTEMBER 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    *Beyond was established as CIC Productions to produce the television series Beyond 2000 for the Seven Network in Australia,

    2007-01-01

    Due to a group training event, the following services will be exceptionally closed on Thursday 20 and Friday 21 September 2007: installation service (removals, cars, diplomatic privileges), school fees, Personnel Records Office (including attestations), French visas; duty travel, leave, reinstallation indemnity, unemployment benefit, tax information and social affairs. The French and Swiss cards service will remain open as usual, from 8:30 to 12:30. Thank you for your understanding. HR Department HR-SPS Group

  15. Change of offices for HR Department - disrupted service during the last week of February 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    HR Department would like to inform that, due to office renovation work, a number of HR Services currently located on the ground, first and second floors of Building 5 will move to temporary offices as from late February.   The removals will take place from Friday 22 until Tuesday 26 February 2013 inclusive and during this period, telephone and e-mail contact may be disrupted. The following services will be relocated to: Building 510  – ground floor (until mid-June) Head of Department and Deputy Office of the Head of HR Department Group Leaders and Partners Diversity Office HR Legal Section Building 652 – Prefab/Algeco (until September) Human Resources Advisors and assistants Staff Recruitment Service Fellows & Apprentices Service Students & Associates Service Temporary office numbers will be available in the CERN phonebook. Any emergencies during the removals may be addressed to Lynda.Leroux@cern.ch Thank you in advance for your understanding. HR Head O...

  16. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  17. Mindfulness Group Work: Preventing Stress and Increasing Self-Compassion among Helping Professionals in Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Sandy; Waldo, Michael; Gruszka, Clare

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects a 6-week mindfulness group had on 31 college students who were intending to enter helping professions (e.g., nursing, social work, counseling, psychology, and teaching). Group activities included meditation, yoga, a body scan exercise, and qi gong. The group members completed the Perceived Stress Scale, the…

  18. Effectiveness of peer-led dissonance-based eating disorder prevention groups: results from two randomized pilot trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Durant, Shelley; Shaw, Heather; Wade, Emily

    2013-05-01

    The present preliminary trials tested whether undergraduate peer leaders can effectively deliver a dissonance-based eating disorder prevention program, which could facilitate broad dissemination of this efficacious intervention. In Study 1, female undergraduates (N=171) were randomized to peer-led groups, clinician-led groups, or an educational brochure control condition. In Study 2, which improved a design limitation of Study 1 by using completely parallel outcome measures across conditions, female undergraduates (N=148) were randomized to either immediate peer-led groups or a waitlist control condition. In Study 1, participants in peer- and clinician-led groups showed significantly greater pre-post reductions in risk factors and eating disorder symptoms than controls (M d=.64 and .98 respectively), though clinician- versus peer-led groups had higher attendance and competence ratings, and produced stronger effects at posttest (M d=.32) and at 1-year follow-up (M d=.26). In Study 2, participants in peer-led groups showed greater pre-post reductions in all outcomes than waitlist controls (M d=.75). Results provide novel evidence that dissonance-based eating disorder prevention groups led by undergraduate peers are feasible and produce greater reductions in eating disorder risk factors and symptoms than minimal-intervention control conditions, but indicate that effects are smaller for peer- versus clinician-led groups. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Personalised normative feedback for preventing alcohol misuse in university students: Solomon three-group randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria T Moreira

    Full Text Available Young people tend to over-estimate peer group drinking levels. Personalised normative feedback (PNF aims to correct this misperception by providing information about personal drinking levels and patterns compared with norms in similar aged peer groups. PNF is intended to raise motivation for behaviour change and has been highlighted for alcohol misuse prevention by the British Government Behavioural Insight Team. The objective of the trial was to assess the effectiveness of PNF with college students for the prevention of alcohol misuse.Solomon three-group randomised controlled trial. 1751 students, from 22 British Universities, allocated to a PNF group, a normal control group, or a delayed measurement control group to allow assessment of any measurement effects. PNF was provided by email. Participants completed online questionnaires at baseline, 6- and 12-months (only 12-months for the delayed measurement controls. Drinking behaviour measures were (i alcohol disorders; (ii frequency; (iii typical quantity, (iv weekly consumption; (v alcohol-related problems; (vi perceived drinking norms; and (vii positive alcohol expectancies. Analyses focused on high-risk drinkers, as well as all students, because of research evidence for the prevention paradox in student drinkers.Follow-up rates were low, with only 50% and 40% responding at 6- and 12-months, respectively, though comparable to similar European studies. We found no evidence for any systematic attrition bias. Overall, statistical analyses with the high risk sub-sample, and for all students, showed no significant effects of the intervention, at either time-point, in a completed case analysis and a multiple imputation analysis.We found no evidence for the effectiveness of PNF for the prevention of alcohol misuse and alcohol-related problems in a UK student population.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN30784467.

  20. Assessing the intake of obesity-related foods and beverages in young children: comparison of a simple population survey with 24 hr-recall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Andrew C

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With an increasing focus on obesity prevention there is a need for simple, valid tools to assess dietary indicators that may be the targets of intervention programs. The objective of this study was to determine the relative validity of previous day dietary intake using a newly developed parent-proxy questionnaire (EPAQ for two to five year old children. Methods A convenience sample of participants (n = 90 recruited through preschools and the community in Geelong, Australia provided dietary data for their child via EPAQ and interviewer-administered 24-hour dietary recall (24 hr-recall. Comparison of mean food and beverage group servings between the EPAQ and 24 hr-recall was conducted and Spearman rank correlations were computed to examine the association between the two methods. Results Mean servings of food/beverage groups were comparable between methods for all groups except water, and significant correlations were found between the servings of food and beverages using the EPAQ and 24-hr recall methods (ranging from 0.57 to 0.88. Conclusion The EPAQ is a simple and useful population-level tool for estimating the intake of obesity-related foods and beverages in children aged two to five years. When compared with 24-hour recall data, the EPAQ produced an acceptable level of relative validity and this short survey has application for population monitoring and the evaluation of population-based obesity prevention interventions for young children.

  1. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  2. Illness and Prevention: Self-Help Groups for Families Faced with Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, Gregory A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine what kinds of people are motivated to join a medical self-help group and whether and in what areas of psychological and social functioning such self-help groups have positive benefits for adolescents and their families. Extensive survey questionnaires were sent throughout the United States to all former…

  3. Effectiveness of water fluoridation in the prevention of dental caries across adult age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Loc; Ha, Diep; Peres, Marco A; Skinner, John; Byun, Roy; Spencer, A John

    2017-06-01

    Lifetime access to fluoridated water (FW) is associated with lower caries experience. However, assessing this association in adults is likely affected by age. Cohort stratification and categorization of per cent lifetime access to fluoridated water (% LAFW) within cohorts are current approaches to this assessment. These approaches require an examination of the % LAFW and caries experience variation within and across age groups and their association to inform future analyses. This secondary analysis aimed to examine the age group variation in % LAFW and caries experience; and the association of % LAFW with caries within and across age groups of adults. A secondary analysis was undertaken using the Australian National Survey of Adult Oral Health 2004-2006 data on 4090 persons aged 15-91 years randomly sampled by a stratified, multistage probability method. Study participants underwent an interview, an oral examination by trained and standardized dentists to determine decayed, missing or filled tooth surfaces (DMFS) and a mailed self-complete questionnaire which collected residential history to calculate % LAFW. Variations in % LAFW and DMFS across age groups (15-34; 35-44; 45-54; 55+) were examined. Multivariable regression log-link models were generated for DMFS score within each age group. The age groups varied in values and distribution of % LAFW. Caries experience was strongly associated with age. % LAFW was significantly associated with DMFS score in the two younger age groups, but not in the others. Multivariable regression models showed that the highest % LAFW quartile had significantly lower DMFS count than the lowest quartile in the two younger age groups (mean ratios: 0.67 and 0.78, respectively), controlling for other covariates. Access to FW was associated with caries experience in Australian adults. The magnitude of associations varied between age groups, dependent on the natural history of caries and its measurement by DMFS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A

  4. Methods and compositions for diagnosing and preventing a group B streptococcal infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Linda Jeannine [Gainesville, FL; Seifert, Kyle N [Harrisonburg, VA; Adderson, Elisabeth E [Memphis, TN; Bohnsack, John F [Salt Lake City, UT

    2009-09-15

    The present invention provides a group B streptococcal (GBS) surface antigen, designated epsilon antigen, that is co-expressed with the delta antigen on a subset of serotype III GBS. Epsilon is expressed on more pathogenic Restriction Digest Pattern (RDP) III-3 GBS, but not on RDP types 1, 2, or 4. Accordingly, the present invention provides compositions and methods for detecting a group B streptococcus serotype III, RDP III-3 strain. Vaccines and methods of identifying agents which inhibit adhesion of a group B streptococcal cell to a host cell are also provided.

  5. Global trends and challenges to the HR profession.

    OpenAIRE

    Prouska, Rea; Cooke, Fang Lee.

    2006-01-01

    The outsourcing of HR activities is a management strategy that may be adopted in response to a number of pressures that an organization is faced with. It is one aspect of business process outsourcing that is increasingly deployed by firms in order to enhance their organizational competitiveness. HR outsourcing can be defined as ‘placing responsibility for various elements of the HR function with a third-party provider’ (Turnbull, 2002, p.11). In spite of the perceived benefits of HR outsourci...

  6. ATTITUDE ASSESSMENT USING PLEIADES-HR CAPABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Delevit

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Since SPOT1, the French national space centre (CNES has worked on improving the geometry of Earth observation spacecrafts. The accuracy of sensor calibration is one of the main key points for any Earth observation application such as orthorectification, DEM generation or surface change detection. For the last twenty years CNES has developed two families of methods: absolute methods and relative methods. These methods are used to characterize a pushbroom acquisition along the detector line and the time line. By this way, the viewing directions are measured and the residual of the spacecraft’s attitude angles (not restituted by the Attitude and Orbit Control System is estimated. This information can complete the geometric model of all the scenes acquired by the instrument and is used in all geometric applications. This paper presents new attitude assessment methods taking advantage of the capabilities of Pléiades-HR in terms of agility and focal plane arrangement – panchromatic band and multispectral (MS bands.

  7. A Policy Intervention Study to Identify High-Risk Groups to Prevent Industrial Accidents in Republic of Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan Hyung Yi

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: The manufacturing industry, age over 50 years and workplaces with more than 50 employees showed a high severity level of occupational accidents. Male workers showed a higher severity level of occupational accidents than female workers. The employment period of < 3 years and newly hired workers with a relatively shorter working period are likely to have more occupational accidents than others. Overall, an industrial accident prevention policy must be established by concentrating all available resources and capacities of these high-risk groups.

  8. Early Gut Microbiota Perturbations Following Intrapartum Antibiotic Prophylaxis to Prevent Group B Streptococcal Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Mazzola

    Full Text Available The faecal microbiota composition of infants born to mothers receiving intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis with ampicillin against group B Streptococcus was compared with that of control infants, at day 7 and 30 of life. Recruited newborns were both exclusive breastfed and mixed fed, in order to also study the effect of dietary factors on the microbiota composition. Massive parallel sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene and qPCR analysis were performed. Antibiotic prophylaxis caused the most marked changes on the microbiota in breastfed infants, mainly resulting in a higher relative abundance of Enterobacteriaceae, compared with control infants (52% vs. 14%, p = 0.044 and mixed-fed infants (52% vs. 16%, p = 0.13 NS at day 7 and in a lower bacterial diversity compared to mixed-fed infants and controls. Bifidobacteria were also particularly vulnerable and abundances were reduced in breastfed (p = 0.001 and mixed-fed antibiotic treated groups compared to non-treated groups. Reductions in bifidobacteria in antibiotic treated infants were also confirmed by qPCR. By day 30, the bifidobacterial population recovered and abundances significantly increased in both breastfed (p = 0.025 and mixed-fed (p = 0.013 antibiotic treated groups, whereas Enterobacteriaceae abundances remained highest in the breastfed antibiotic treated group (44%, compared with control infants (16% and mixed-fed antibiotic treated group (28%. This study has therefore demonstrated the short term consequences of maternal intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis on the infant faecal microbial population, particularly in that of breastfed infants.

  9. Behind the scenes of GS: preventing and curing - the GS-SE group

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN, GS-SE

    2013-01-01

    With over 3,000 CERN personnel and more than 300 visitors on the site, CERN’s infrastructure takes a real hammering every day of the year. Fortunately, the GS-SE Group is on the watch… Here, like everywhere else, nothing stays shiny and new for very long. That’s why it’s important to carry out regular, even daily, maintenance of buildings, equipment, pipes and roads which every single day see thousands of CERN personnel and visitors passing by. The team responsible for this weighty task is part of the GS-SE Group.

  10. Barriers and Recommended Interventions to Prevent Melioidosis in Northeast Thailand: A Focus Group Study Using the Behaviour Change Wheel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornpan Suntornsut

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis, an often fatal infectious disease in Northeast Thailand, is caused by skin inoculation, inhalation or ingestion of the environmental bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei. The major underlying risk factor for melioidosis is diabetes mellitus. Recommendations for melioidosis prevention include using protective gear such as rubber boots and gloves when in direct contact with soil and environmental water, and consuming bottled or boiled water. Only a small proportion of people follow such recommendations.Nine focus group discussions were conducted to evaluate barriers to adopting recommended preventive behaviours. A total of 76 diabetic patients from northeast Thailand participated in focus group sessions. Barriers to adopting the recommended preventive behaviours and future intervention strategies were identified using two frameworks: the Theoretical Domains Framework and the Behaviour Change Wheel.Barriers were identified in the following five domains: (i knowledge, (ii beliefs about consequences, (iii intention and goals, (iv environmental context and resources, and (v social influence. Of 76 participants, 72 (95% had never heard of melioidosis. Most participants saw no harm in not adopting recommended preventive behaviours, and perceived rubber boots and gloves to be hot and uncomfortable while working in muddy rice fields. Participants reported that they normally followed the behaviour of friends, family and their community, the majority of whom did not wear boots while working in rice fields and did not boil water before drinking. Eight intervention functions were identified as relevant for the intervention: (i education, (ii persuasion, (iii incentivisation, (iv coercion, (v modeling, (vi environmental restructuring, (vii training, and (viii enablement. Participants noted that input from role models in the form of physicians, diabetic clinics, friends and families, and from the government via mass media would be required for them

  11. Economic and other barriers to adopting recommendations to prevent childhood obesity: results of a focus group study with parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taveras Elsie M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parents are integral to the implementation of obesity prevention and management recommendations for children. Exploration of barriers to and facilitators of parental decisions to adopt obesity prevention recommendations will inform future efforts to reduce childhood obesity. Methods We conducted 4 focus groups (2 English, 2 Spanish among a total of 19 parents of overweight (BMI ≥ 85th percentile children aged 5-17 years. The main discussion focused on 7 common obesity prevention recommendations: reducing television (TV watching, removing TV from child's bedroom, increasing physically active games, participating in community or school-based athletics, walking to school, walking more in general, and eating less fast food. Parents were asked to discuss what factors would make each recommendation more difficult (barriers or easier (facilitators to follow. Participants were also asked about the relative importance of economic (time and dollar costs/savings barriers and facilitators if these were not brought into the discussion unprompted. Results Parents identified many barriers but few facilitators to adopting obesity prevention recommendations for their children. Members of all groups identified economic barriers (time and dollar costs among a variety of pertinent barriers, although the discussion of dollar costs often required prompting. Parents cited other barriers including child preference, difficulty with changing habits, lack of information, lack of transportation, difficulty with monitoring child behavior, need for assistance from family members, parity with other family members, and neighborhood walking safety. Facilitators identified included access to physical activity programs, availability of alternatives to fast food and TV which are acceptable to the child, enlisting outside support, dietary information, involving the child, setting limits, making behavior changes gradually, and parental change in shopping

  12. Economic and other barriers to adopting recommendations to prevent childhood obesity: results of a focus group study with parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneville, Kendrin R; La Pelle, Nancy; Taveras, Elsie M; Gillman, Matthew W; Prosser, Lisa A

    2009-12-21

    Parents are integral to the implementation of obesity prevention and management recommendations for children. Exploration of barriers to and facilitators of parental decisions to adopt obesity prevention recommendations will inform future efforts to reduce childhood obesity. We conducted 4 focus groups (2 English, 2 Spanish) among a total of 19 parents of overweight (BMI >or= 85th percentile) children aged 5-17 years. The main discussion focused on 7 common obesity prevention recommendations: reducing television (TV) watching, removing TV from child's bedroom, increasing physically active games, participating in community or school-based athletics, walking to school, walking more in general, and eating less fast food. Parents were asked to discuss what factors would make each recommendation more difficult (barriers) or easier (facilitators) to follow. Participants were also asked about the relative importance of economic (time and dollar costs/savings) barriers and facilitators if these were not brought into the discussion unprompted. Parents identified many barriers but few facilitators to adopting obesity prevention recommendations for their children. Members of all groups identified economic barriers (time and dollar costs) among a variety of pertinent barriers, although the discussion of dollar costs often required prompting. Parents cited other barriers including child preference, difficulty with changing habits, lack of information, lack of transportation, difficulty with monitoring child behavior, need for assistance from family members, parity with other family members, and neighborhood walking safety. Facilitators identified included access to physical activity programs, availability of alternatives to fast food and TV which are acceptable to the child, enlisting outside support, dietary information, involving the child, setting limits, making behavior changes gradually, and parental change in shopping behaviors and own eating behaviors. Parents identify

  13. [Women of Guatemala City: facilitating AIDS prevention in a vulnerable group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, A; Arathoon, E; Lundgren, R; Bezmalinovic, B

    1992-01-01

    Despite the mistaken belief in Central America that AIDS is primarily a disease of male homosexuals, some 21% of reported cases in Guatemala have been women 15-44 years old. Many Guatemalan women are at risk of AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) because of their lack of sexual bargaining power and negotiating skills, the widespread acceptance of male infidelity in marriage, tolerance of bisexual relations and frequenting of prostitutes, and ignorance of women about sexuality. Condom use is infrequent in Guatemala. Most men and women lack knowledge of AIDS and other STDs and have no perception of their own vulnerability. Male alcohol use and violence against women diminishes the ability of women to protect themselves. Sex education and information about STDs should be provided for both men and women to slow the spread of AIDS. AIDS educators should direct their messages to women toward promoting condom use, increasing knowledge of AIDS and STDs, providing basic sex education, questioning stereotypes of AIDS patients as persons with disordered lifestyles, encouraging realistic assessment of risks, and assisting women to increase their negotiating ability in sexual relations. Three crucial ways of helping women protect themselves are by making them aware of the influence of gender roles in their reproductive lives, teaching them communication and negotiating skills, and providing strategies for them to confront alcohol abuse and gender violence. Survey results indicate that Guatemalan women were extremely motivated to protect their children and secondarily to maintain their homes and be good wives. Motivational messages for AIDS prevention should be related to children and the family. Men were found to be concerned about their families as well and to fear the stigma of HIV infection. Educational techniques for AIDS prevention should be accessible to the illiterate and should focus on life stories or similar methods that make AIDS seem less abstract to

  14. Preventable risk factors for coronary heart disease and stroke amongst ethnic groups in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemic-Stojcevic, N; Dundas, R; Jenkins, S; Rudd, A; Wolfe, C

    2001-05-01

    People of African Caribbean descent have higher mortality rates from stroke than other ethnic groups. However, little is known about the prevalence of stroke risk factors in UK ethnic minority groups. We investigated the prevalence of these risk factors amongst African Caribbeans, black Africans and whites. A random sample of patients aged 45-74 registered with 16 general practices in south London was surveyed in 1995. Main outcome measures were: prevalence of hypertension, mean serum cholesterol, serum fibrinogen and glycosylated haemoglobin AIC. Logistic and linear regressions were used to determine ethnic differences in these measures. Hypertension was more prevalent in black Caribbeans (79.4%) and black Africans (71.6%) than in whites (54.3%) (p Africans had similar rates to black Caribbeans for these risk factors apart from lower triglvceride levels. These differences in risk factors may partially explain the high stroke mortality rates in black Caribbeans and black Africans compared to whites. There was little difference in prevalence of these risk factors between black Caribbean and black African groups. Specific strategies targeted to each ethnic group need to be developed to reduce risk factors.

  15. Mobbing in the Schools. Scandinavian Initiatives in the Prevention and Reduction of Group Violence among Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Kristen D.

    The paper defines the concept of mobbing and notes alternate terms such as bullying, scapegoating, and group violence or aggression. Scandinavian research and literature on mobbing is analyzed, especially as it relates to the incidence of mobbing and characteristics of aggressor and victim. Intervention efforts are described, such as individual…

  16. Compliance With Protocols for Prevention of Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Sepsis: Practicalities and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendolyn L. Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare two protocols for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP against neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS sepsis, with respect to staff compliance, in a prospective cohort study in the obstetric units of a community hospital (A and a university teaching hospital (B.

  17. The Perceived Importance of HR duties to Danish line managers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Julia; Madsen, Mona Toft; Madsen, Henning

    2009-01-01

    Today, HR scholars widely acknowledge that realising HRM requires the involvement of all managers and that the personal motivation of line managers plays an important role in their successful involvement. Yet, previous research has neglected to study how line managers rate the importance...... of particular HR duties and how the importance assigned to HR duties varies across managers. Based on a survey of 1,500 Danish managers, we find that 'motivating others' is considered the most important HR duty whereas 'team building', 'handling conflicts' and 'coaching' are considered the least important HR...... duties. Female top managers in the public sector exhibit the greatest interest in HR whereas men at lower managerial levels in the private sector give lowest priority to HR work. We conclude with possible explanations for the observed differences in a Danish context and beyond and provide suggestions...

  18. Behind the scenes of GS: preventing and curing - the GS-SE group (VERSION FR)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN, GS-SE

    2013-01-01

    Avec, chaque jour, plus de 3000 Cernois sur le site et plus de 300 visiteurs, le CERN et ses infrastructures en voient des vertes et des pas mûres. Heureusement, le groupe GS-SE veille au grain… Ici comme partout ailleurs, rien ne reste jamais neuf bien longtemps. D’où l’importance d’entretenir régulièrement, pour ne pas dire « quotidiennement », les bâtiments, équipements, canalisations, routes, qui voient passer, jour après jour, des milliers de Cernois et de visiteurs. Au CERN, l’équipe en charge de cette lourde tâche fait partie du groupe GS-SE.

  19. What are the key food groups to target for preventing obesity and improving nutrition in schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A C; Swinburn, B A

    2004-02-01

    To determine differences in the contribution of foods and beverages to energy consumed in and out of school, and to compare consumption patterns between school canteen users and noncanteen users. Cross-sectional National Nutrition Survey, 1995. Australia. SUBJECTS ON SCHOOL DAYS: A total of 1656 children aged 5-15 y who had weekday 24-h dietary recall data. An average of 37% of total energy intake was consumed at school. Energy-dense foods and beverages such as fat spreads, packaged snacks, biscuits and fruit/cordial drinks made a greater contribution to energy intake at school compared to out of school (Pschool. Fruit intake was low and consumption was greater in school. In all, 14% of children purchased food from the canteen and they obtained more energy from fast food, packaged snacks, desserts, milk and confectionary (Pschool environment. To help prevent obesity and improve nutrition in schools, biscuits, snack bars and fruit/cordial drinks brought from home and fast food, packaged snacks, and confectionary sold at canteens should be replaced with fruit and water.

  20. Developing an SMS Intervention for the Prevention of Underage Drinking: Results From Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospital, Michelle M; Wagner, Eric F; Morris, Staci Leon; Sawant, Meenal; Siqueira, Lorena M; Soumah, Morgan

    2016-01-28

    There is growing evidence that text messaging-"short message service" (SMS)-is useful for health promotion and behavior change. SMS has become a preferred channel of communication among adolescents. Despite burgeoning interest, there remains a critical need for formative research regarding developmentally and culturally appropriate SMS-based health promotion with teenagers. The primary objective was to develop SMS message protocols and procedures effective for reducing underage drinking among Hispanic teens. Using focus groups, we sought our target population's perspectives on SMS parameters including scheduling, frequency, content, themes, and confirmation-of-receipt. We conducted, recorded, and transcribed six mixed-gender focus groups (20 adolescents, 4-5 per group) recruited from the Division of Adolescent Medicine at Miami Children's Hospital. Alcohol-related and "attention control" text messages were assembled from two sources (http://www.mobilehealth4youth.org and the existing literature); these SMSs, along with SMS procedures, were the focus of discussion. The recordings and transcription were reviewed by two researchers who employed a qualitative iterative process analytical approach. Findings revealed distinct preferences among teenagers about the scheduling, frequency, content, themes, and confirmation-of-receipt of SMSs. Moreover, teens were most enthusiastic about SMSs that addressed alcohol-related knowledge, self-efficacy, social support, or future orientation. Conclusion/Importance: Seeking our target population's perspectives on SMS parameters was essential for developing SMS message protocols and procedures with potential effectiveness for reducing underage drinking among Hispanic teens. It is strongly recommended that researchers or clinicians considering SMS-based interventions conduct a similar formative process prior to implementation.

  1. Preventive effects of group dance movement therapy on participants of oriental dance courses

    OpenAIRE

    Jevšenak, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    The connection of mind and body as well as the impact of physical activity on mental state of the person is defined in the theoretical part of the thesis. It featured dance as an expressive means of non-verbal communication in the therapeutic process in the group and stressed the importance of creativity in dance expression. It has given a historical overview of the role of women in dance and described the therapeutic characteristics of oriental dance. In addition to presenting dance - moveme...

  2. [Preventing cardiovascular diseases through a screening modelling applicable to wide population groups: results from the first phase of the project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Antonio; Cinquetti, Sandro; Moro, Alessandro; Siddu, Andrea; Trimarchi, Antonino; Penon, Maria Gabriella; Pavan, Pierpaolo; Camillotto, Raffaella; Rossetto, Luca; Volpe, Valter; Zevrain, Simone; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    evaluate, through active call, lifestyles of an asymptomatic population in order to identify hyperglycaemic subjects and/or high-blood pressure sufferers to dispatch to their GP to perform suitable checking, and subjects to invite to a cardiovascular disease prevention programme because of their lifestyles. between January 2009 and July 2012, all healthy residents in the Local Health Authority of Este (ULSS 17 Este) aged 45-59 years were invited to join a cardiovascular disease prevention programme. all participants were evaluated through an administered lifestyle questionnaire. Parameters such as blood pressure (BP), glycaemia, waist circumference and body mass index were collected and recorded. Participants also received counseling, informational materials on lifestyle and were invited to individual or group health promotion initiatives in relation to personal risk factors. among the invited, 55.5% (3,922/7,071) adhered. Women (58.8%) responded significantly better than men (51.9%) (p diseases.

  3. Challenges and opportunities in international molecular cancer prevention research: An ASPO Molecular Epidemiology and the Environment and International Cancer Prevention Interest Groups Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epplein, Meira; Bostick, Roberd M; Mu, Lina; Ogino, Shuji; Braithwaite, Dejana; Kanetsky, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer estimates that over half of the new cancer cases and almost two-thirds of the cancer deaths in 2012 occurred in low and middle income countries. To discuss the challenges and opportunities to reducing the burden of cancer worldwide, the Molecular Epidemiology and the Environment and the International Issues in Cancer Special Interest Groups joined forces to hold a session during the 38th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Preventive Oncology (March 2014, Arlington, Virginia). The session highlighted three topics of particular interest to molecular cancer prevention researchers working internationally, specifically: 1) biomarkers in cancer research; 2) environmental exposures and cancer; and 3) molecular pathological epidemiology. A major factor for successful collaboration illuminated during the discussion was the need for strong, committed, and reliable international partners. A key element of establishing such relationships is to thoroughly involve individual international collaborators in the development of the research question; engaged international collaborators are particularly motivated to champion and shepherd the project through all necessary steps, including issues relating to institutional review boards, political sensitivity, laboratory-based assays, and tumor subtyping. Also essential is allotting time for the building, maintaining, and investing in such relationships so that successful international collaborations may take root and bloom. While there are many challenges inherent to international molecular cancer research, the opportunities for furthering the science and prevention of cancer worldwide are great, particularly at this time of increasing cancer incidence and prevalence in low and middle income countries. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. [Whooping cough in Spain. Current epidemiology, prevention and control strategies. Recommendations by the Pertussis Working Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campins, Magda; Moreno-Pérez, David; Gil-de Miguel, Angel; González-Romo, Fernando; Moraga-Llop, Fernando A; Arístegui-Fernández, Javier; Goncé-Mellgren, Anna; Bayas, José M; Salleras-Sanmartí, Lluís

    2013-04-01

    A large increase of pertussis incidence has been observed in recent years in countries with high vaccination coverage. Outbreaks of pertussis are increasingly being reported. The age presentation has a bipolar distribution: infants younger 6months that have not initiated or completed a vaccination schedule, and adolescents and adults, due to the lost of natural or vaccine immunity over time. These epidemiological changes justify the need to adopt new vaccination strategies in order to protect young infants and to reduce pertussis incidence in all age groups. Adolescents and adults immunization must be a priority. In the first group, strategy is easy to implement, and with a very low additional cost (to replace dT vaccine by dTap one). Adult vaccination may be more difficult to implement; dT vaccine decennial booster should be replaced by dTap. The immunization of household contacts of newborn infants (cocooning) is the strategy that has a most important impact on infant pertussis. Recently, pregnant women vaccination (after 20weeks of gestation) has been recommended in some countries as the most effective way to protect the newborn. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Team and teamwork in modern european HR management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usheva Mariana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the major issues occurring in every contemporary organization is the issue of the efficiency of work and obtaining maximum results from work done. Most often when the issue of increasing the efficiency of work is laid the question of teams and teamwork in various projectя of the company comes to the foreground and frequently no proper differentiation is made between a “group of people” and a “team” and this brings to a large number of misunderstandings of managers and employees with regard to the designation and benefits of team organization of work. There are clear traceable differences between the perception of the concept of “team” and the implementation of teamwork by European and Bulgarian companies and it is good to make the differentiation between them with a view to the HR management.

  6. Conducting cancer control and survivorship research via cooperative groups: a report from the American Society of Preventive Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesh, Oxana; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Mustian, Karen; Minasian, Lori; Rowland, Julia; Sprod, Lisa; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke; Sloan, Jeff; Engquist, Karen Basen; Jones, Lee; Buist, Diana; Paskett, Electra D

    2011-05-01

    As the number of cancer survivors expands, the need for cancer control and survivorship research becomes increasingly important. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cooperative Groups may offer a viable platform to perform such research. Observational, preventive, and behavioral research can often be performed within the cooperative group setting, especially if resources needed for evaluation are fairly simple, if protocols are easily implemented within the typical clinical setting, and if interventions are well standardized. Some protocols are better suited to cooperative groups than are others, and there are advantages and disadvantages to conducting survivorship research within the cooperative group setting. Behavioral researchers currently involved in cooperative groups, as well as program staff within the NCI, can serve as sources of information for those wishing to pursue symptom management and survivorship studies within the clinical trial setting. The structure of the cooperative groups is currently changing, but going forward, survivorship is bound to be a topic of interest and one that perhaps may be more easily addressed using the proposed more centralized structure. ©2011 AACR.

  7. Cockayne syndrome group B protein prevents the accumulation of damaged mitochondria by promoting mitochondrial autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Ramamoorthy, Mahesh; Sykora, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a devastating autosomal recessive disease characterized by neurodegeneration, cachexia, and accelerated aging. 80% of the cases are caused by mutations in the CS complementation group B (CSB) gene known to be involved in DNA repair and transcription. Recent evidence...... indicates that CSB is present in mitochondria, where it associates with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We report an increase in metabolism in the CSB(m/m) mouse model and CSB-deficient cells. Mitochondrial content is increased in CSB-deficient cells, whereas autophagy is down-regulated, presumably as a result...... of defects in the recruitment of P62 and mitochondrial ubiquitination. CSB-deficient cells show increased free radical production and an accumulation of damaged mitochondria. Accordingly, treatment with the autophagic stimulators lithium chloride or rapamycin reverses the bioenergetic phenotype of CSB...

  8. Preventing cervical cancer through human papillomavirus vaccination: perspective from focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Li Ping

    2009-04-01

    It has been a little more than a year ago since the prophylactic vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) was released in Malaysia. Little is known about parental knowledge and acceptability of the vaccine. The objective of this study is to assess the mother's knowledge and attitudes toward HPV vaccination. The results are aimed to provide insights into the provision of appropriate educational and promotional program for effective immunization uptake. Purposive sampling method was adopted for recruitment of participants. A total of 47 mothers participated across 8 focus group discussions carried out between October and November 2007. The transcribed group discussions were analyzed using open-, axial-, and selective-coding procedures. Respondents have low awareness about the newly released vaccine and the link between HPV and cervical cancer. When provided with information about HPV and cervical cancer, most mothers were in favor of protecting their daughters from cervical cancer using the vaccine. As with any new vaccine, efficacy and safety were the major concern, particularly when the vaccine is recommended to preadolescent. Many expressed concern about the high cost of the vaccine and hope that the inoculation could be at least partially subsidized by the government. A minority were concerned that the sexually transmitted disease-related vaccine would promote sexual activities, and some opposed making vaccination mandatory. For Muslim respondents, the kosher issue of HPV vaccine was an important factor for acceptance. Developing public health messages that focus on the susceptibility of HPV infection and its link to cervical cancer to educate parents may have the greatest impact on improving the uptake of the vaccine. Apart from the major concern about safety and efficacy, affordability, and acceptability of vaccinating young children, religious and ethnic backgrounds were important considerations when recommending the HPV vaccine. To foster broad acceptance

  9. Effectiveness of preventive support groups for children of mentally ill or addicted parents: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Santvoort, Floor; Hosman, Clemens M H; van Doesum, Karin T M; Janssens, Jan M A M

    2014-06-01

    In various countries preventive support groups are offered to children of mentally ill and/or addicted parents to reduce the risk that they will develop problems themselves. This study assessed the effectiveness of Dutch support groups for children aged 8-12 years old in terms of reducing negative cognitions; improving social support, competence, and parent-child interaction (direct intervention goals); and reducing emotional and behavioural problems (ultimate intervention aim). Children from 254 families were randomly assigned to the intervention or a control condition. Parents and children completed questionnaires at baseline and 3 and 6 months later. Emotional and behavioural problems of intervention group children were also assessed 1 year after the start. Univariate analyses of variance showed that children in the intervention group experienced a greater decrease in negative cognitions and sought more social support, immediately after participation and 3 months later, as compared to control group children. They also remained stable in their feelings of social acceptance (competence aspect) immediately after the intervention, whereas these feelings declined in control group children. The intervention and control groups both improved over time in terms of cognitions, competence, parent-child interaction and emotional and behavioural problem scores. Additional improvement in terms of problem scores was found in the intervention group 1 year after baseline. Further enhancement of effectiveness requires re-consideration of the support group goals; it should be studied whether the goals reflect the most important and influential risk and protective factors for this specific population. Besides, effects should be studied over a longer period.

  10. Efficacy of a group-based multimedia HIV prevention intervention for drug-involved women under community supervision: project WORTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bassel, Nabila; Gilbert, Louisa; Goddard-Eckrich, Dawn; Chang, Mingway; Wu, Elwin; Hunt, Tim; Epperson, Matt; Shaw, Stacey A; Rowe, Jessica; Almonte, Maria; Witte, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study is designed to address the need for evidence-based HIV/STI prevention approaches for drug-involved women under criminal justice community supervision. We tested the efficacy of a group-based traditional and multimedia HIV/STI prevention intervention (Project WORTH: Women on the Road to Health) among drug-involved women under community supervision. We randomized 306 women recruited from community supervision settings to receive either: (1) a four-session traditional group-based HIV/STI prevention intervention (traditional WORTH); (2) a four-session multimedia group-based HIV/STI prevention intervention that covered the same content as traditional WORTH but was delivered in a computerized format; or (3) a four-session group-based Wellness Promotion intervention that served as an attention control condition. The study examined whether the traditional or multimedia WORTH intervention was more efficacious in reducing risks when compared to Wellness Promotion; and whether multimedia WORTH was more efficacious in reducing risks when compared to traditional WORTH. Primary outcomes were assessed over the 12-month post-intervention period and included the number of unprotected sex acts, the proportion of protected sex acts, and consistent condom use. At baseline, 77% of participants reported unprotected vaginal or anal sex (n = 237) and 63% (n = 194) had multiple sex partners. Women assigned to traditional or multimedia WORTH were significantly more likely than women assigned to the control condition to report an increase in the proportion of protected sex acts (β = 0.10; 95% CI = 0.02-0.18) and a decrease in the number of unprotected sex acts (IRR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.57-0.90). The promising effects of traditional and multimedia WORTH on increasing condom use and high participation rates suggest that WORTH may be scaled up to redress the concentrated epidemics of HIV/STIs among drug-involved women in the criminal justice system. Clinical

  11. [Personal contextual factors of the ICF draft from the Working Group "ICF" of Specialty Group II of the Geman Society for Social Medicine and Prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotkamp, S; Cibis, W; Behrens, J; Bucher, P O; Deetjen, W; Nyffeler, I D; Gutenbrunner, C; Hagen, T; Hildebrandt, M; Keller, K; Nüchtern, E; Rentsch, H P; Schian, H; Schwarze, M; Sperling, M; Seger, W

    2010-12-01

    Personal contextual factors play an essential part in the ICF model in relation to patient-centred care. It is generally assumed that their classification must refer to the country-specific social and cultural setting and its particular linguistic terms. Therefore personal factors are not classified as yet by the WHO for general use. In Germany in 2006 a group of experts working on the medical advisory board of statutory health insurance published a proposal for a systematic classification of relevant personal factors to describe the background of an individual's life and living. This classification was now further analysed and thoroughly revised by a more comprehensive group of German specialists working in different health care insurances and institutions, authorised by the German Society for Social Medicine and Prevention (DGSMP), supported by German-speaking Swiss ICF specialists. This classification is published as work in progress intending to broaden and prepare the process of discussion for a consensus conference to be held in Germany in 2011. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. When the group encourages extramarital sex: Difficulties in HIV/AIDS prevention in rural Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Cordero Coma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Recent research on the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa has highlighted the relevance of married individuals' extramarital sexual behavior for the spread of the disease. At the same time, there is social disapproval of sexual infidelity. OBJECTIVE This article examines the extent to which Malawian married men's likelihood of having extramarital sex is influenced by their expectations about the prevalence of extramarital relationships in their social network. It also explores whether this effect depends on the network density, and whether it is also observed when the extramarital behavior of a particularly influential actor is controlled for. METHODS Data from the last two waves, 2004 and 2006, of the longitudinal survey provided by the Malawi Diffusion and Ideational Change Project are analyzed both cross-sectionally and through a panel analysis with fixed effects. The longitudinal approach enables the researcher to deal with the potential non-random distribution of social interactions among respondents, which bias the estimation in the cross-sectional analysis. RESULTS Married men's expectations about the prevalence of extramarital sexual relationships in the network were shown to have a substantial influence on their extramarital behavior, and the impact was found to be bigger in dense networks. In addition, there was some evidence that the perceived dominant behavior in the peer group is relevant, independent of the extramarital behavior of the respondents' best friends.

  13. The Role of Nuclear Suppliers Group in Preventing the Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilijas, B.; Cizmek, A.; Prah, M.; Medakovic, S.

    2008-01-01

    The non-proliferation regime today is a pretty heterogeneous system of measures and different ways of control of nuclear material production, transport and use, as well as nuclear activities and technology in general. In its basis are the Statute of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Non-proliferation Treaty. However, the development of a nuclear technology and technological progress in the world in general, poses the need for more efficient and much more concrete systems of control of nuclear material and activities. One of organizations which covers these issues is Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG), founded in 1991 with goal to assemble all states suppliers, regardless are they signatories of Non-proliferation Treaty or not. The important thing is that NSG do not rely only to the list of limitations for traffic of the equipment which is directly related to nuclear activities, but also to so call dual use equipment, i.e. equipment which could be, besides its primary purpose, converted to some nuclear activities. Concerning continuous technological development, and also the actual political situation in the world, these lists are continuously amended. In this presentation the principles and methods of work of NSG are analyzed, together with the role of the Republic of Croatia as its member as from 2005.(author)

  14. Preventive and curative role of mezo-inosite B group vitamin in radiation disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perepelkin, S.P.; Egorova, N.D.; Katsitadze, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of mezo-inosite (optically nonactive stereoisomer of inosite B group vitamine) having vitamin properties has been studied. Investigations were carried out with nonpedigree male rats. Mezo-inosite was used perorally in two variants of doses: according to the first variant - 2, 5, 10 mg per rat, according to the second variant - 1, 2, 2.5 and 5 mg per rat, which were conditionally named as doses of daily man organism demand, minimum therapeutic and therapeutic doses, respectively. Mezo-inosite was added into the rat ration for 21 days before irradiation and for 30-33 days after irradiation. The animals were exposed to 600 R total X-ray irradiation. Strong protective mezo-inosite effect (particularly at small doses, used in the second variant) in irradiation disease against a background of physiological diet application has been established. These data are confirmed by high animal survival, some increased duration of animal life,some more weight increase for the first ten-day period after irradiation and a comparatively better normalization of leucocytic composition of peripherical blood of the experimental animals, getting mezoinosite, in comparison with the controls

  15. Group A Streptococcus Prevents Mast Cell Degranulation to Promote Extracellular Trap Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Clark

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The resurgence of Group A Streptococcus (GAS infections in the past two decades has been a rising major public health concern. Due to a large number of GAS infections occurring in the skin, mast cells (MCs, innate immune cells known to localize to the dermis, could play an important role in controlling infection. MCs can exert their antimicrobial activities either early during infection, by degranulation and release of antimicrobial proteases and the cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptide LL-37, or by forming antibacterial MC extracellular traps (MCETs in later stages of infection. We demonstrate that MCs do not directly degranulate in response to GAS, reducing their ability to control bacterial growth in early stages of infection. However, MC granule components are highly cytotoxic to GAS due to the pore-forming activity of LL-37, while MC granule proteases do not significantly affect GAS viability. We therefore confirmed the importance of MCETs by demonstrating their capacity to reduce GAS survival. The data therefore suggests that LL-37 from MC granules become embedded in MCETs, and are the primary effector molecule by which MCs control GAS infection. Our work underscores the importance of a non-traditional immune effector cell, utilizing a non-conventional mechanism, in the defense against an important human pathogen.

  16. The role of nuclear suppliers group in preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medakovic, S.; Cizmek, A.; Horvatic, M.; Ilijas, B.

    2009-01-01

    The non-proliferation regime today is a pretty heterogeneous system of measures and different ways of control of nuclear material production, transport and use, as well as nuclear activities and technology in general. In its basis are the Statute of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Non-proliferation Treaty. However, the development of a nuclear technology and technological progress in the world in general, poses the need for more efficient and much more concrete systems of control of nuclear material and activities. One of organizations which cover these issues is Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG), founded in 1991 with goal to assemble all states suppliers, regardless are they signatories of Non-proliferation Treaty or not. The important thing is that NSG do not rely only to the list of limitations for traffic of the equipment which is directly related to nuclear activities, but also to so call dual use equipment, i.e. equipment which could be, besides its primary purpose, converted to some nuclear activities. Concerning continuous technological development, and also the actual political situation in the world, these lists are continuously amended. In this presentation the principles and methods of work of NSG are analyzed, together with the role of the Republic of Croatia as its member.(author)

  17. [Mindfulness-based-relapse prevention (MBRP): Evaluation of the impact of a group of Mindfulness Therapy in alcohol relapse prevention for alcohol use disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, D; Romo, L; Bouthillon-Heitzmann, P; Limosin, F

    2015-12-01

    For several years, the learning of mindfulness has developed in a psychological intervention perspective, particularly in the field of addiction. Presently, the management of addictions with substances is centered on two questions: the motivation in the change of behaviour and in a significant change in alcohol consumption. Concerning alcohol dependence, the evolution of behaviour is variable and characterized by forgiveness episodes and relapses. Over many years, a treatment for the abuse of substance associated with techniques based on full consciousness (Kabat-Zinn, 1990; Segal et al., 2002) Mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) was developed by Marlatt et al. (2011). The prevention of the relapse therapy, based on full consciousness, is a program of eight sessions integrating techniques of "mindfulness" into the techniques of prevention of the relapse. However, not much research has focused on the MBRP, the publication of the manual regarding this intervention is too recent (Bowen S et al., 2011). We are interested in the active mechanisms, which are at stake in the MBRP. Indeed, the meditation acts presents many mechanisms in the addicting disorders. Our non-controlled research was based on a protocol in order to evaluate the alcohol consummation, mindfulness, impulsiveness, automatic thoughts, anxiety and abilities to cope. The first results are interesting: reduction of alcohol consummation, increase of mindfulness, reduction of trigger relapse, increasing cognitive flexibility and high degree of satisfaction among participants. An intervention MBRP was proposed to 26 patients who were assigned to three groups. They were questioned about their alcohol consumption and assessed by a protocol of seven evaluations before and after the group MBRP: Five Facets Mindfulness (FFMQ), Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS), Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ II), State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-A, STAI-B), Questionnaire of the automatic thoughts (QPA), and

  18. Considerations for Secondary Prevention of Nutritional Deficiencies in High-Risk Groups in High-Income Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike J. Bruins

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Surveys in high-income countries show that inadequacies and deficiencies can be common for some nutrients, particularly in vulnerable subgroups of the population. Inadequate intakes, high requirements for rapid growth and development, or age- or disease-related impairments in nutrient intake, digestion, absorption, or increased nutrient losses can lead to micronutrient deficiencies. The consequent subclinical conditions are difficult to recognize if not screened for and often go unnoticed. Nutrient deficiencies can be persistent despite primary nutrition interventions that are aimed at improving dietary intakes. Secondary prevention that targets groups at high risk of inadequacy or deficiency, such as in the primary care setting, can be a useful complementary approach to address persistent nutritional gaps. However, this strategy is often underestimated and overlooked as potentially cost-effective means to prevent future health care costs and to improve the health and quality of life of individuals. In this paper, the authors discuss key appraisal criteria to consider when evaluating the benefits and disadvantages of a secondary prevention of nutrient deficiencies through screening.

  19. Suicide in Illinois, 2005-2010: A reflection of patterns and risks by age groups and opportunities for targeted prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLone, Suzanne G; Loharikar, Anagha; Sheehan, Karen; Mason, Maryann

    2016-10-01

    Suicide accounts for two thirds of all deaths from intentional or violence-related injury and is a leading cause of death in the United States. Patterns of suicide have been well described among high-risk groups, but few studies have compared the circumstances related to suicides across all age groups. We sought to understand the epidemiology of suicide cases in Illinois and to characterize the risks and patterns for suicide among different age groups. We used suicide data collected from the Illinois Violent Death Reporting System to assess demographics, method of suicide, circumstances, and mental health status among different age groups. Between 2005 and 2010, 3,016 suicides were reported; 692 (23%) were female, and the median age (n = 3,013) was 45 years (range, 10-98 years). The most common method/weapon types were hanging/strangulation (33%), firearm (32%) and poisoning (21%). Hanging was more common (74%) among young people aged 10 to 19 years, while firearm use was more common among elderly persons age 65 years and older (55%). The percentage of victims within an age group experiencing a crisis within two weeks before committing suicide was highest among 10- to 14-year-olds, while the risk factor of having a family member or friend die in the past 5 years was highest among older victims. The final analysis demonstrated age-related trends in suicide in Illinois, suggesting prevention programs should tailor services by age. Epidemiologic study, level IV.

  20. A group randomized controlled trial integrating obesity prevention and control for postpartum adolescents in a home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haire-Joshu, Debra L; Schwarz, Cynthia D; Peskoe, Sarah B; Budd, Elizabeth L; Brownson, Ross C; Joshu, Corinne E

    2015-06-26

    Adolescence represents a critical period for the development of overweight that tracks into adulthood. This risk is significantly heightened for adolescents that become pregnant, many of whom experience postpartum weight retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate Balance Adolescent Lifestyle Activities and Nutrition Choices for Energy (BALANCE), a multicomponent obesity prevention intervention targeting postpartum adolescents participating in a national home visiting child development-parent education program. A group randomized, nested cohort design was used with 1325 adolescents, 694 intervention and 490 control, (mean age = 17.8 years, 52 % underrepresented minorities) located across 30 states. Participatory methods were used to integrate lifestyle behavior change strategies within standard parent education practice. Content targeted replacement of high-risk obesogenic patterns (e.g. sweetened drink and high fat snack consumption, sedentary activity) with positive behaviors (e.g. water intake, fruit and vegetables, increased walking). Parent educators delivered BALANCE through home visits, school based classroom-group meetings, and website activities. Control adolescents received standard child development information. Phase I included baseline to posttest (12 months); Phase II included baseline to follow-up (24 months). When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents who were ≥12 weeks postpartum were 89 % more likely (p = 0.02) to maintain a normal BMI or improve an overweight/obese BMI by 12 months; this change was not sustained at 24 months. When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents significantly improved fruit and vegetable intake (p = .03). In stratified analyses, water intake improved among younger BALANCE teens (p = .001) and overweight/obese BALANCE teens (p = .05) when compared to control counterparts. There were no significant differences between groups in sweetened drink and snack consumption

  1. Cisplatin impairs rat liver mitochondrial functions by inducing changes on membrane ion permeability: Prevention by thiol group protecting agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Custodio, Jose B.A.; Cardoso, Carla M.P.; Santos, Maria S.; Almeida, Leonor M.; Vicente, Joaquim A.F.; Fernandes, Maria A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is the most important platinum anticancer drug widely used in the treatment of head, neck, ovarian and testicular cancers. However, the mechanisms by which CisPt induces cytotoxicity, namely hepatotoxicity, are not completely understood. The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of CisPt on rat liver mitochondrial functions (Ca 2+ -induced mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), mitochondrial bioenergetics, and mitochondrial oxidative stress) to better understand the mechanism underlying its hepatotoxicity. The effect of thiol group protecting agents and some antioxidants against CisPt-induced mitochondrial damage was also investigated. Treatment of rat liver mitochondria with CisPt (20 nmol/mg protein) induced Ca 2+ -dependent mitochondrial swelling, depolarization of membrane potential (ΔΨ), Ca 2+ release, and NAD(P)H fluorescence intensity decay. These effects were prevented by cyclosporine A (CyA), a potent and specific inhibitor of the MPT. In the concentration range of up to 40 nmol/mg protein, CisPt slightly inhibited state 3 and stimulated state 2 and state 4 respiration rates using succinate as respiratory substrate. The respiratory indexes, respiratory control ratio (RCR) and ADP/O ratios, the ΔΨ, and the ADP phosphorylation rate were also depressed. CisPt induced mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization to protons (proton leak) but did not induce significant changes on mitochondrial H 2 O 2 generation. All the effects induced by CisPt on rat liver mitochondria were prevented by thiol group protecting agents namely, glutathione (GSH), dithiothreitol (DTT), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and cysteine (CYS), whereas superoxide-dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate (ASC) were without effect. In conclusion, the anticancer drug CisPt: (1) increases the sensitivity of mitochondria to Ca 2+ -induced MPT; (2) interferes with mitochondrial bioenergetics by increasing mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization to

  2. Evaluation of the expect respect support group program: A violence prevention strategy for youth exposed to violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Dennis E; Holland, Kristin M; Cortina, Kai; Ball, Barbara; Rosenbluth, Barri

    2017-07-01

    In the present study, we assess the effects of the Expect Respect Support Groups (ERSG) on frequency of teen dating violence (TDV) and general youth violence. ERSG is a school-based violence prevention program for youth who have been exposed to violence in their home, school, or community. Boys and girls (N=1,678, M age =14.3, S.D.=1.7, Range=11-17) from 36 schools in Texas participated in this accelerated longitudinal (7-year trajectory) study beginning in 2011. Latent growth curve analyses were conducted using three waves of data from three cross-sectional cohorts of adolescents. Among boys, the number of ERSG sessions attended related to incremental declines in psychological TDV perpetration and victimization, physical TDV victimization, sexual TDV perpetration and victimization, reactive aggression, and proactive aggression. Girls attending ERSG demonstrated reductions in reactive and proactive aggression. The present findings suggest ERSG may be an effective cross-cutting strategy to reduce TDV and other forms of violence among high-risk boys and possibly girls. This information provides valuable understanding of TDV and youth violence in high-risk populations and may be useful in tailoring future prevention efforts to different groups of teens. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Alendronate prevents postmenopausal bone loss in women without osteoporosis. A double-blind, randomized, controlled trial. Alendronate Osteoporosis Prevention Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McClung, M; Clemmesen, B; Daifotis, A

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preventing bone loss associated with menopause and aging and maintaining the normal micro-architecture of bone provide important opportunities for the prevention of osteoporosis and fractures. OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and efficacy of alendronate, an aminobisphosphonate, for ...

  4. Designing HR Organizational Structures in terms of the HR Business Partner Model Principles from the Perspective of Czech Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Stříteský

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes new trends related to the concepts contained in HR organizational structures within Czech organizations. In addition, it describes the specifics of the roles played by HR in those organizations which have transformed their HR departments in terms of the principles of the HR Business Partner Model, both in theory based on available resources, and at the practical level based on the results of primary examination. The goal of this paper is to present the key perceptions of the changes made in the HR structure within the organizations, as well as the impact of these changes on the effectiveness of the HR departments concerned. Another goal of the paper is to summarize the responsibilities of the newly created position known as the HR Business Partner in these organizations as well as the demands placed upon the personnel employed in the HR Business Partner role. The paper offers conclusions based on the results of both quantitative and qualitative surveys. It also contains a case study of one organization which has one of the best transformed HR departments, and whose services are classified, by internal clients, as being of high quality.

  5. [A Group Cognitive-Behavioural Intervention to Prevent Depression Relapse in Individuals Having Recently Returned to Work: Protocol and Feasibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Tania; Corbière, Marc

    Workplace depression is one of the major causes for sick leave and loss of productivity at work. Many studies have investigated factors predicting return to work for people with depression, including studies evaluating return to work programs and organizational factors. Yet, a paucity of studies have targeted the prevention of depressive relapses at work, even though more than half of those having had a depression will have a depressive relapse in the near future.Objectives This article describes a research protocol involving a novel group intervention based on cognitive behavioural principles with the aim to optimize return to work and diminish risk of depressive relapses.Method This pilot study follows a randomized controlled trial design, with half the participants (N=25) receiving the group intervention and the other half (N=25) receiving usual services. The theoretical and empirical underpinnings of the intervention are described, along with a detailed presentation of the intervention and of the study's objectives. The group intervention consists of 8 sessions whereby Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) principles and techniques are applied to the following themes: (1) Coping with stress at work; (2) Recognizing and modifying my dysfunctional beliefs linked to work; (3) Overcoming obstacles linked to work functioning and maintaining work; (4) Negotiating needed work adjustments with the support of the immediate supervisor; (5) Finding my strengths and competencies related to work; (6) Accepting criticism and asserting myself appropriately at work; (7) Uncovering my best coping strategies for work.Results Qualitative information pertaining to the first two cohorts' participants' subjective appreciation of the group experience revealed that the intervention was perceived as very useful by all, with group support, namely harmony and interpersonal support, as well as CBT strategies being mentioned specifically.Conclusion Finally, the potential relevance of the

  6. Sealed Radioactive Sources. Information, Resources, and Advice for Key Groups about Preventing the Loss of Control over Sealed Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-10-01

    Among its many activities to improve the safety and security of sealed sources, the IAEA has been investigating the root causes of major accidents and incidents since the 1980's and publishes findings so that others can learn from them. There are growing concerns today about the possibility that an improperly stored source could be stolen and used for malicious purposes. To improve both safety and security, information needs to be in the hands of those whose actions and decisions can prevent a source from being lost or stolen in the first place. The IAEA developed this booklet to help improve communication with key groups about hazards that may result from the loss of control over sealed radioactive sources and measures that should be implemented to prevent such loss of control. Many people may benefit from the information contained in this booklet, particularly those working with sources and those likely to be involved if control over a source is lost; especially: officials in government agencies, first responders, medical users, industrial users and the metal recycling industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety. This booklet is comprised of several stand-alone chapters intended to communicate with these key groups. Various accidents that are described and information that is provided are relevant to more than one key group and therefore, some information is repeated throughout the booklet. This booklet seeks to raise awareness of the importance of the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. However, it is not intended to be a comprehensive 'how to' guide for implementing safety and security measures for sealed radioactive sources. For more information on these measures, readers are encouraged to consult the key IAEA safety and security-related publications identified in this booklet

  7. Value creation through HR shared services: towards a conceptual framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, Jeroen Gerard; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Looise, Jan C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to derive a measure for the performance of human resource shared service providers (HR SSPs) and then to develop a theoretical framework that conceptualises their performance. Design/methodology/approach – This conceptual paper starts from the HR shared

  8. Outsourcing HR Services: The Role of Human Resource Intermediaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Henrik; Wallo, Andreas; Nilsson, Barbro; Hoglund, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the area of interest is an emerging type of organisation called human resource intermediaries (HRIs), which focus on delivering human resource (HR) services to public sector organisations and private companies. The purpose of this article is, thus, to explore HRIs as deliverers of HR services. More specifically, the…

  9. Strategic HR Policy and Planning Officer | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The incumbent is responsible for developing new policy or revising existing policies for the full range of human resources areas in the Centre, as well as the management of related projects in line with Centre's priorities and Strategic HR Plan. The incumbent is responsible for liaising and supporting members of the HR team ...

  10. Managing (Sales)People towards Performance: HR Strategy, Leadership & Teamwork

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M.S. Dietz (Bart)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractManaging people towards performance is one of the most critical priorities for managers in practice. This dissertation focuses on this important issue and explores how HR Strategy, Leaders, and Teams, impact performance. It addresses respectively how HR as a system of coherent

  11. [Prevention of Neonatal Group B Sreptococcal Infection. Spanish Recommendations. Update 2012. SEIMC/SEGO/SEN/SEQ/SEMFYC Consensus Document].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alós Cortés, Juan Ignacio; Andreu Domingo, Antonia; Arribas Mir, Lorenzo; Cabero Roura, Luis; de Cueto López, Marina; López Sastre, José; Melchor Marcos, Juan Carlos; Puertas Prieto, Alberto; de la Rosa Fraile, Manuel; Salcedo Abizanda, Salvador; Sánchez Luna, Manuel; Sanchez Pérez, María José; Torrejon Cardoso, Rafael

    2013-03-01

    Group B streptococci (GBS) remain the most common cause of early onset neonatal sepsis. In 2003 the Spanish Societies of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Neonatology, Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Chemotherapy, and Family and Community Medicine published updated recommendations for the prevention of early onset neonatal GBS infection. It was recommended to study all pregnant women at 35-37 weeks gestation to determine whether they were colonised by GBS, and to administer intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) to all colonised women. There has been a significant reduction in neonatal GBS infection in Spain following the widespread application of IAP. Today most cases of early onset GBS neonatal infection are due to false negative results in detecting GBS, to the lack of communication between laboratories and obstetric units, and to failures in implementing the prevention protocol. In 2010, new recommendations were published by the CDC, and this fact, together with the new knowledge and experience available, has led to the publishing of these new recommendations. The main changes in these revised recommendations include: microbiological methods to identify pregnant GBS carriers and for testing GBS antibiotic sensitivity, and the antibiotics used for IAP are updated; The significance of the presence of GBS in urine, including criteria for the diagnosis of UTI and asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy are clarified; IAP in preterm labour and premature rupture of membranes, and the management of the newborn in relation to GBS carrier status of the mother are also revised. These recommendations are only addressed to the prevention of GBS early neonatal infection, are not effective against late neonatal infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Using community readiness key informant assessments in a randomized group prevention trial: impact of a participatory community-media intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Michael D; Edwards, Ruth W; Plested, Barbara A; Thurman, Pamela J; Kelly, Kathleen J; Comello, Maria Leonora G; Keefe, Thomas J

    2005-02-01

    This study examines the role of key informant community readiness assessments in a randomized group trial testing the impact of a participatory community-media intervention (which was also complemented by in-school efforts). These assessments were used to help match communities in random assignment, as a source of formative data about the community, as the basis for a coalition-building workshop, and as an evaluation tool, with a follow-up set of surveys approximately 2 years after the baseline survey. Results of the nested, random effects analysis indicated that the intervention influenced community knowledge of efforts and (at marginally significant levels) improved prevention leadership quality and community climate supportive of prevention efforts. There was evidence that the professional affiliation of informants in some cases had an effect on their assessments, which could be controlled in the analysis. The authors conclude that key informant community readiness assessments can usefully serve to supplement aggregated measures of individual attitudes and behavior (reported elsewhere for this study) in evaluating community-based interventions.

  13. HIV/STI Prevention Among Heterosexually Active Black Adolescents With Mental Illnesses: Focus Group Findings for Intervention Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawner, Bridgette M; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet; Wingood, Gina; Reason, Janaiya; Mack, Niya

    Heterosexually active Black adolescents with mental illnesses are at increased risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV. However, few HIV/STI prevention interventions exist for this demographic. We held seven focus groups (N = 33) to elucidate social, cultural, and psychological factors that influence HIV/STI risk-related sexual behaviors in this understudied population. Seven themes emerged: (a) Blackness and media portrayals, (b) Blackness as a source of cultural resilience and pride, (c) psychosocial determinants of condom use, (d) consequences of engaging in sexual activity, (e) attitudes and beliefs toward sexual behaviors, (f) benefits of sexual activity, and (g) coping mechanisms. Participants also supported the feasibility of and interest in HIV/STI prevention programs integrated with mental health treatment. Transportation, potential breaches of confidentiality, and time were noted barriers to participation. Psychoeducational, skills-based programs are needed to address the sequelae of mental illnesses as they relate to the sexual decision-making process in adolescents. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Knowledge and preventive behaviors related to cervical cancer and human papiloma virus in a group of Chilean adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, M Teresa; Concha, Ximena; Riquelme, Giselle; Padilla, Oslando

    2012-12-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) is a common sexually transmitted infection in young people and recognized as the most important risk factor for cervical cancer (CC). To describe the degree of knowledge that a group of Chilean teenagers have of HPV infection, CC, and its relationship with preventive behavior. This is an analytical study, with a random sample of 226 adolescents from three public schools of the Metropolitan Region in Santiago. A fifth of the interviewed students did not know there was a HPV vaccine. Multiple sexual partners was indicated as a risk factor of CC by 70.8% and of HPV infection by 78.3% of them; while 60.3% identified inheritance as a risk factor. HPV transmission through unprotected sexual relations was identified by 68.2% of the sample. Of sexually active adolescents, condom use during sexual relations was reported by 31.1%. The adolescents who use condoms significantly have more knowledge regarding the number of sexual partners and age of first sexual intercourse as a risk factor for CC. adolescents know about HPV transmission, however, the preventing conducts are not related to this information.

  15. Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse within the Family System: Guidelines for an Educational Social Group Work Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilo, Daniel Tuelo

    2018-02-28

    Children have the right to be brought up in safe environments. However, this right is often infringed by people who are supposed to provide love, care, and protection to children. These people can include biological fathers, step-fathers, brothers, cousins, aunts, mothers, and uncles. Violation of children takes place in a variety of ways, however, for the purpose of this paper, the focus is on child sexual abuse within the family system. A literature review is adopted as the methodology for the discussions in this paper. The purpose of this paper is firstly to demonstrate that child sexual abuse happens within the family system in South Africa, and secondly, to argue that the prevention of child sexual abuse should start within the family system and this can be achieved by conducting educational social group work sessions on child sexual abuse with the family members.

  16. The Use of Self-Directed Relapse Prevention Booklets to Assist in Maintaining Abstinence after a 6-Week Group Smoking Cessation Treatment Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldheer, Susan; Hrabovsky, Shari; Yingst, Jessica; Sciamanna, Chris; Berg, Arthur; Foulds, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Background: Identifying effective relapse prevention interventions is a vital step to help smokers maintain abstinence for the long term. Aims: The purpose of this study is to determine if providing recently quit smokers with self-directed relapse prevention booklets is effective at maintaining abstinence after intensive group smoking cessation…

  17. Opportunities to Reduce Overuse of Antibiotics for Perinatal Group B Streptococcal Disease Prevention and Management of Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Schrag

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify opportunities to reduce overuse of antibiotics for prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal (GBS disease and management of preterm premature rupture of membranes (pPROM.

  18. Identification and characterization of XPC-binding domain of hHR23B.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Masutani (Chikahide); M. Araki; K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); A. Yamada; A. Uchida; T. Maekawa; D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); F. Hanaoka (Fumio)

    1997-01-01

    textabstracthHR23B was originally isolated as a component of a protein complex that specifically complements nucleotide excision repair (NER) defects of xeroderma pigmentosum group C cell extracts in vitro and was identified as one of two human homologs of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NER gene

  19. THE ROLE OF HR ANALYTICS IN HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

    OpenAIRE

    Priyanka Singh*1, Rajesh Kumar Upadhyay2 & Dr. Monika Srivastava3

    2017-01-01

    The HR analytics has emerged as a new fad for the management leaders that captured the head line for business world news. This paper tries to figure out the theoretical and conceptual the framework of analytics in higher education intuitions. The objectives of the study are to understand the role of HR analytics for education institution in increasing the organizational effectiveness and efficiency. The research used exploratory research design. Further study came up with categorizing the dat...

  20. Stimulating teachers’ team performance through team-oriented HR practices

    OpenAIRE

    Bouwmans, Machiel; Runhaar, Piety; Wesselink, Renate; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Teams of teachers are increasingly held accountable for the quality of education and educational reforms in vocational education and training institutions. However, historically teachers have not been required to engage in deep-level collaboration, thus team-oriented HR practices are being used to promote teamworking in the sector. This paper examines the relationship between team-oriented HR practices and team performance in terms of innovation and efficiency via teachers’ affective team com...

  1. Efficacy Trial of a Selective Prevention Program Targeting Both Eating Disorder Symptoms and Unhealthy Weight Gain among Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C. Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a selective prevention program targeting both eating disorder symptoms and unhealthy weight gain in young women. Method: Female college students at high-risk for these outcomes by virtue of body image concerns (N = 398; M age = 18.4 years, SD = 0.6) were randomized to the Healthy Weight group-based 4-hr prevention program,…

  2. Wearable cardioverter defibrillators for the prevention of sudden cardiac arrest: a health technology assessment and patient focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettinger S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sabine Ettinger,1 Michal Stanak,1 Piotr Szymański,2 Claudia Wild,1 Romana Tandara Haček,3 Darija Erčević,3 Renata Grenković,3 Mirjana Huić3 1Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Health Technology Assessment, Vienna, Austria; 2Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw, Poland; 3Department for Development, Research and Health Technology Assessment, Agency for Quality and Accreditation in Health Care and Social Welfare, Zagreb, Croatia Aim: To summarize the evidence on clinical effectiveness and safety of wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD therapy for primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac arrest in patients at risk. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search in databases including MEDLINE via OVID, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and CRD (DARE, NHS-EED, HTA. The evidence obtained was summarized according to GRADE methodology. A health technology assessment (HTA was conducted using the HTA Core Model® for rapid relative effectiveness assessment. Primary outcomes for the clinical effectiveness domain were all-cause and disease-specific mortality. Outcomes for the safety domain were adverse events (AEs and serious adverse events (SAEs. A focus group with cardiac disease patients was conducted to evaluate ethical, organizational, patient, social, and legal aspects of the WCD use. Results: No randomized- or non-randomized controlled trials were identified. Non-comparative studies (n=5 reported AEs including skin rash/itching (6%, false alarms (14%, and palpitations/light-headedness/fainting (9% and discontinuation due to comfort/lifestyle issues (16–22%, and SAEs including inappropriate shocks (0–2%, unsuccessful shocks (0–0.7%, and death (0–0.3%. The focus group results reported that experiencing a sense of security is crucial to patients and that the WCD is not considered an option for weeks or even months due to expected restrictions in living a “normal” life. Conclusion: The WCD appears to be relatively safe for short

  3. [Colonization by group B hemolytic streptococcus in pregnancy. Note of prevention and therapy of the materno-neonatal infection. Casuistics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Morte, M A; Ratti, E; Sala, M R; Colombo, B

    1996-01-01

    As several international studies show, the knowledge of the wide clinical spectrum of perinatal group B streptococcal infection, particularly of the early and of the late-onset neonatal diseases in GBS carrier mothers, is basically important for medical diagnosis. Risk factors analysis further determines both the diagnosis and the maternal intrapartum chemoprophylaxis. The considerable rate of neonatal disease without risk factors and its possible serious and fatal consequences bring to tendentially non selective prevention approaches that must consider the local background. At Merate Hospital, in a 3 years time, vaginal and rectal specimens for GBS cultures were obtained from 1766 pregnant women either at the 32nd or at the 36th week of gestation and regularly at the labor. 376 women (21.29 percent) resulted GBS carriers; the maternal-fetal contamination rate was 15.42 percent (58/376) i.e. 32.6 per 1000 live births (58/1769). Intrapartum chemoprophylaxis was carried out with i.v. erytromycin, i.v. or i.m. cephalosporins, i.v. ampicillin and per os amoxicillin (which gave the most interesting results). In infants born to mothers who received an antibiotic therapy at labor as compared with those who received no treatment, GBS neonatal colonization was present in 31 of 286 (10.8 percent) versus 27 of 90 (30 percent; P infected infants (25 percent). Intrapartum therapy both in carriers and in no-screened women significantly reduced GBS neonatal colonization, particularly the heavy one and, consequently, the early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal disease.

  4. Moderators of the effects of indicated group and bibliotherapy cognitive behavioral depression prevention programs on adolescents' depressive symptoms and depressive disorder onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sina; Rohde, Paul; Gau, Jeff M; Stice, Eric

    2015-12-01

    We investigated factors hypothesized to moderate the effects of cognitive behavioral group-based (CB group) and bibliotherapy depression prevention programs. Using data from two trials (N = 631) wherein adolescents (M age = 15.5, 62% female, 61% Caucasian) with depressive symptoms were randomized into CB group, CB bibliotherapy, or an educational brochure control condition, we evaluated the moderating effects of individual, demographic, and environmental factors on depressive symptom reductions and major depressive disorder (MDD) onset over 2-year follow-up. CB group and bibliotherapy participants had lower depressive symptoms than controls at posttest but these effects did not persist. No MDD prevention effects were present in the merged data. Relative to controls, elevated depressive symptoms and motivation to reduce depression amplified posttest depressive symptom reduction for CB group, and elevated baseline symptoms amplified posttest symptom reduction effects of CB bibliotherapy. Conversely, elevated substance use mitigated the effectiveness of CB group relative to controls on MDD onset over follow-up. Findings suggest that both CB prevention programs are more beneficial for youth with at least moderate depressive symptoms, and that CB group is more effective for youth motivated to reduce their symptoms. Results also imply that substance use reduces the effectiveness of CB group-based depression prevention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Moderators of the Effects of Indicated Group and Bibliotherapy Cognitive Behavioral Depression Prevention Programs on Adolescents’ Depressive Symptoms and Depressive Disorder Onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sina; Rohde, Paul; Gau, Jeff M.; Stice, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We investigated factors hypothesized to moderate the effects of cognitive behavioral group-based (CB group) and bibliotherapy depression prevention programs. Using data from two trials (N = 631) wherein adolescents (M age = 15.5, 62% female, 61% Caucasian) with depressive symptoms were randomized into CB group, CB bibliotherapy, or an educational brochure control condition, we evaluated the moderating effects of individual, demographic, and environmental factors on depressive symptom reductions and major depressive disorder (MDD) onset over 2-year follow-up. CB group and bibliotherapy participants had lower depressive symptoms than controls at posttest but these effects did not persist. No MDD prevention effects were present in the merged data. Relative to controls, elevated depressive symptoms and motivation to reduce depression amplified posttest depressive symptom reduction for CB group, and elevated baseline symptoms amplified posttest symptom reduction effects of CB bibliotherapy. Conversely, elevated substance use mitigated the effectiveness of CB group relative to controls on MDD onset over follow-up. Findings suggest that both CB prevention programs are more beneficial for youth with at least moderate depressive symptoms, and that CB group is more effective for youth motivated to reduce their symptoms. Results also imply that substance use reduces the effectiveness of CB group-based depression prevention. PMID:26480199

  6. DNase Sda1 allows invasive M1T1 Group A Streptococcus to prevent TLR9-dependent recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Uchiyama

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS has developed a broad arsenal of virulence factors that serve to circumvent host defense mechanisms. The virulence factor DNase Sda1 of the hyperinvasive M1T1 GAS clone degrades DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps allowing GAS to escape extracellular killing. TLR9 is activated by unmethylated CpG-rich bacterial DNA and enhances innate immune resistance. We hypothesized that Sda1 degradation of bacterial DNA could alter TLR9-mediated recognition of GAS by host innate immune cells. We tested this hypothesis using a dual approach: loss and gain of function of DNase in isogenic GAS strains and presence and absence of TLR9 in the host. Either DNA degradation by Sda1 or host deficiency of TLR9 prevented GAS induced IFN-α and TNF-α secretion from murine macrophages and contributed to bacterial survival. Similarly, in a murine necrotizing fasciitis model, IFN-α and TNF-α levels were significantly decreased in wild type mice infected with GAS expressing Sda1, whereas no such Sda1-dependent effect was seen in a TLR9-deficient background. Thus GAS Sda1 suppressed both the TLR9-mediated innate immune response and macrophage bactericidal activity. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism of bacterial innate immune evasion based on autodegradation of CpG-rich DNA by a bacterial DNase.

  7. Prevention of suicide and attempted suicide in Denmark. Epidemiological studies of suicide and intervention studies in selected risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordentoft, Merete

    2007-11-01

    The suicide rates in Denmark have been declining during the last two decades. The decline was relatively larger among women than among men. All age groups experienced a decline except the very young with stable rates and the very old with increasing rates. The Universal, Selective, Indicated (USI) model recommended by Institute of Medicine was used as a framework for the thesis. Universal preventive interventions are directed toward the entire population; selective interventions are directed toward individuals who are at greater risk for suicidal behaviour; and indicated preventions are targeted at individuals who have already begun self-destructive behaviour. At the universal level, a review was carried out to highlight the association between availability of methods for suicide and suicide rate. There were mostly studies of firearms, and the conclusion of the review was that there was clear indication of restricted access to lethal means was associated with decline in suicide with that specific method, and in many cases also with overall suicide mortality. Restricting access is especially important for methods with high case fatality rate. Our own study indicated a beneficial effect on suicide rates of restrictions in access to barbiturates, dextropropoxyphen, domestic gas and car exhaust with high content of carbon monoxide. Although a range of other factors in the society might also be of importance, it was concluded that restrictions in access to dangerous means for suicide were likely to play an important role in reducing suicide rates in Denmark, especially for women. At the selective level, there are several important risk groups such as psychiatric patients, persons with alcohol and drug abuse, persons with newly diagnosed severe physical illness, all who previously attempted suicide, and groups of homeless, institutionalized, prisoners and other socially excluded persons. The thesis focused on homeless persons and psychiatric patients, especially patients

  8. Prevention and Control Program for Cardiovascular Diseases in Turkish Population: PRE-CONTROL Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozan, Ömer; Zoghi, Mehdi; Ergene, Oktay; Arıcı, Mustafa; Derici, Ülver; Bakaç, Göksel; Güllü, Sevim; Sain Güven, Gülay

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death throughout the world. Despite its high prevalence, the atherosclerotic process can be slowed and its consequences markedly reduced by preventive measures. The lack of risk factor awareness is a major barrier. We aimed to assess total CV risk, determine the knowledge and awareness regarding CVD, and evaluate the effectiveness of education program in urban population of Turkey. A 24-item questionnaire was used to detect CV risk factors and the awareness of participants about CVD. The feedback data for the education program were collected by either questionnaires or individual interviews with participants. For comparison of total CVD risk in men and women in different age groups, a sample t test was used. The level of statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. The prevalence of hyperlipidemia was established to be 41.3%. Nearly one-quarter of the women and one-third of the men were smokers (p < 0.001). One-quarter of the responders had a history of hypertension (men: 21.5%, women: 18.6%), and one-tenth were diabetic. The high CV risk rate was more pronounced among men (p < 0.01) and those with low socioeconomic level (p < 0.01). Awareness regarding CV risk factors following the educational program increased from 6.6% to 12.7% for high blood pressure, from 3.9% to 9.2% for diabetes mellitus, and from 10.2% to 15.1% for elevated cholesterol levels. All the increases were statistically significant. The educational program significantly increased the awareness of CVD and risk factors. The prevalence of CV risk factors was higher in low socioeconomic level groups. The knowledge and awareness of the risk factors for CVD before the education program was very low in our study group. The awareness of CVD and risk factors significantly increased following our education programs. Copyright © 2013 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-Term Improvements in Knowledge and Psychosocial Factors of a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Intervention Implemented in Group Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer; Oman, Roy F; Lu, Minggen; Clements-Nolle, Kristen D

    2017-06-01

    Youth in out-of-home care have higher rates of sexual risk behaviors and pregnancy than youth nationally. This study aimed to determine if Power Through Choices (PTC), a teen pregnancy prevention program developed for youth in out-of-home care, significantly improves knowledge and psychosocial outcomes regarding HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual activity and contraception methods, long term. A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted with 1,036 ethnically diverse youths (aged 13-18 years) recruited from 44 residential group homes in three states. Intervention participants received the 10-session PTC intervention; control participants received usual care. Participants were administered self-report surveys at baseline, after intervention, 6 and 12 months after the intervention. Survey items assessed knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and behavioral intentions regarding HIV and STIs, sexual activity and contraception methods. Random intercept logistic regression analyses were used to assess differences between the intervention and control groups. Compared with youth in the control group, youth in the PTC intervention demonstrated significant improvements in knowledge about anatomy and fertility (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-1.11), HIV and STIs (AOR = 1.03, 95% CI = 1.002-1.07), and methods of protection (AOR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.03-1.09), as well as self-efficacy regarding self-efficacy to communicate with a partner (AOR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.04-1.26), plan for protected sex and avoid unprotected sex (AOR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.04-1.28), and where to get methods of birth control (AOR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.01-1.26) 12 months after the intervention. Findings suggest that the PTC intervention can have positive long-term knowledge and psychosocial effects regarding contraception methods on youth in out-of-home care. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by

  10. News from HR: a word from Anne-Sylvie Catherin

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Anne-Sylvie Catherin, head of HR Department, looks back over her years at CERN before taking up her new position at the European Central Bank.   At the end of July, I will be leaving CERN on a special leave of absence to take up a new position at the European Central Bank. This is a new chapter in my career, in a new context with its own challenges, and as I prepare for it, I would like to take a little time to look back over my years at CERN and share with you the enriching journey it has been, both for myself and for HR. It has always been my strong belief that any organisation’s greatest asset is its people. When an HR professional believes that, it’s only a short step to the conclusion that the best way to nurture those people is by adopting a professional approach to HR. In this respect, I arrived at a very fortuitous time. Enrico Chiaveri was head of HR and, although his background is in physics, we shared that same conviction. Enrico was the icebreaker in driving change, a...

  11. The Link between HR Attributions and Employees’ Turnover Intentions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Caesaria Tandung

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Human Resources Management (HRM is part of the organizational functions that contribute to the effectiveness of a firm’s performance, and brings an organization a competitive advantage through the implementation of its Human Resources (HR practices. HR practices adopted by management are perceived or attributed subjectively by individual employees, and can in turn affect the employees’ attitudes and behavior (e.g. Job satisfaction and turnover intention. The purpose of this study is to contribute to the process-based approach by investigating the effect of HR attributions on turnover intentions, with job satisfaction playing a mediating role. The analysis is on the individual level, with 454 respondents from various organizations within the Netherlands. The results show that HR attributions can affect the turnover intention, through the presence of job satisfaction. Thus, it can be said that it is important to always consider the employees’ attitudes and behavior when examining their perception of HR practices, and in predicting their intention to leave.

  12. Perceptions of HIV/STI prevention among young adults in Sweden who travel abroad: a qualitative study with focus group and individual interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Qvarnström, Anna; Oscarsson, Marie G

    2014-01-01

    Background Young adults are at risk for HIV/STIs because they generally have an active sex life with multiple sexual partners; moreover, they use condoms to a lesser extent. Travelling increases sexually risky behaviour, and among both women and men, sexual contacts abroad are common. Better knowledge of how young adults experience prevention efforts prior to travelling, and what they prefer, is important when planning prevention efforts to this group. Experiences of and attitudes towards pre...

  13. Prevention of bone loss with alendronate in postmenopausal women under 60 years of age. Early Postmenopausal Intervention Cohort Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosking, D; Chilvers, C E; Christiansen, C

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Estrogen-replacement therapy prevents osteoporosis in postmenopausal women by inhibiting bone resorption, but the balance between its long-term risks and benefits remains unclear. Whether other antiresorptive therapies can prevent osteoporosis in these women is also not clear. METHODS...

  14. HealthWorks: results of a multi-component group-randomized worksite environmental intervention trial for weight gain prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linde Jennifer A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background U.S. adults are at unprecedented risk of becoming overweight or obese, and most scientists believe the primary cause is an obesogenic environment. Worksites provide an opportunity to shape the environments of adults to reduce obesity risk. The goal of this group-randomized trial was to implement a four-component environmental intervention at the worksite level to positively influence weight gain among employees over a two-year period. Environmental components focused on food availability and price, physical activity promotion, scale access, and media enhancements. Methods Six worksites in a U.S. metropolitan area were recruited and randomized in pairs at the worksite level to either a two-year intervention or a no-contact control. Evaluations at baseline and two years included: 1 measured height and weight; 2 online surveys of individual dietary intake and physical activity behaviors; and 3 detailed worksite environment assessment. Results Mean participant age was 42.9 years (range 18-75, 62.6% were women, 68.5% were married or cohabiting, 88.6% were white, 2.1% Hispanic. Mean baseline BMI was 28.5 kg/m2 (range 16.9-61.2 kg/m2. A majority of intervention components were successfully implemented. However, there were no differences between sites in the key outcome of weight change over the two-year study period (p = .36. Conclusions Body mass was not significantly affected by environmental changes implemented for the trial. Results raise questions about whether environmental change at worksites is sufficient for population weight gain prevention. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00708461

  15. THE PRESENCE OF EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES IN HR MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Farkas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring equal opportunities is a priority for CEO-s and decision makers, however, it is often not put into practice. Changes in recent years along with the priorities of the EU and the efforts made to banish discrimination becoming more prominent brought with themselves a pressure on firms to provide equal opportunities for the different under-privileged social groups. In Hungary the Act CXXV of 2003 on discrimination and equal opportunities lists the groups in need of protection. The law requires employers with more than fifty employees to have an equal opportunities program. In spite of this, these programs are often general and do not implement the changes and goals identified after the assessment. Still, strategies and plans are only worth how much of them are realized. Our article is about the conscious principles of the Hungarian business sector about equality and whether there are regional differences. We compare answers given by both employers and employees on the subject of the extent to which the above mentioned principles are realized by the management and whether the employees experience these changes. Our theory is that the prioritisation of equal opportunities in firms is more the result of access to project funds than that of inner initiative from the firm's management. We analyse our research questions using a quantitative method on a regionally representative national sample. We examined 992 firms with special attention on those and their employees who had some sort of written guidelines on equal opportunities and plans on implementing these. In our paper we give a short review on the importance of equal opportunities, it's manifestation in HR management and it's written declaration, the so called Equal Opportunities Plan (EOP. The efforts of the EU and access to financial resources for the EU projects as a condition our hypotheses are that (1 at least 30% of the firms studied have written guidelines or declaration on equal

  16. FIFA 11+: an effective programme to prevent football injuries in various player groups worldwide—a narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzini, Mario; Dvorak, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, FIFA promoted and disseminated the FIFA 11+ injury prevention programme worldwide. Developed and studied by the FIFA Medical Assessment and Research Centre (F-MARC), the programme was based on a randomised controlled study and one countrywide campaign in amateur football that significantly reduced injuries and healthcare costs. Since the FIFA 11+ launch, key publications have confirmed the preventive effects of the programme and have evaluated its performance effects in female as well as male amateur football players. Furthermore, implementation strategies of this prevention programme have also been studied. The goal of this narrative review was to summarise the available scientific evidence about the FIFA 11+ programme. While FIFA continues to disseminate and implement FIFA 11+ among its Member Associations, adaptations of the injury prevention programme for children and referees have been developed and are currently being evaluated. PMID:25878073

  17. Topical W-7 inhibits ultraviolet radiation-induced melanogenesis in Skh:HR2 pigmented hairless mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdy, J.C.; Anthony, F.A.; Costlow, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    We studied the effect of N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-napthalenesulfonamide (W-7) on ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced melanogenesis (tanning) in Skh:HR2 pigmented hairless mice. Topically pretreated mice were exposed to subminimal edematogenic as well as edematogenic UVR doses to establish whether W-7-UVR-induced edema prophylaxis allows increased melanogenesis while preventing edema. Ultraviolet light-irradiated vehicle control animals developed visible trans; however, both W-7-treated groups failed to tan. Topical W-7 before UVR exposure inhibited UVR induction of dopa oxidase activity in melanocytes by 49% (P=0.029) and inhibited UVR-induced deposition of melanin in the epidermis by 88% (P=0.006). Topical W-7 blocked 23% of the UVR but this blockage could not account for the inhibition of dopa oxidase and melanization. We conclude that, in addition to preventing edema, W-7 inhibits UVR-induced melanogenesis, possibly by affecting Ca 2+ -calmodulin and/or protein kinase C-dependent processes. (au) 30 refs

  18. Multiple wavelength microwave observations of the RS Canum Venaticorum stars UX Arietis, HR 1099, HR 5110, and II Pegasi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Robert F.; Lang, Kenneth R.

    1987-01-01

    The variabilities, core size and magnetic field of the RS CVn star UX Arietis was measured with the VLA at pairs of frequencies near 1415 MHz and 4835 MHz on June 10, 1985. Data were also gathered on HR 1099, HR 5110 and II Peg. UX Arietis exhibited variability on time scales ranging from 30 sec to 1 hr at 4835 MHz, but no detectable variations at 1415 MHz. An upper limit of 900 billion cm was placed on the size of the core emitting region, which is estimated to have a magnetic field strength of 15 G. The 30 sec variations are attributed to absorption by thermal plasma between the G5 and K1 companions of the UX Arietis system.

  19. Comparison of the lower extremities' explosive muscular strength via jumping tests in different performance level and age groups of women volleyball players [Komparace explozivní odrazové síly dolních končetin u výkonnostně a věkově rozdílných skupin hráček volejbalu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Jandačka

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sport performance in volleyball is significantly influenced by the quality of the player´s jumping abilities, above all on the height of the jump. Results in jumping tests indirectly indicate information about explosive muscle strength. Information about the quality of the results of jumping tests is the starting point for the monitoring of the athlete’s conditioning. OBJECTIVE: This work´s purpose consists in finding out whether there exist some differences between women volleyball players according to their age and their sport performance level and whether women volleyball players differ from women university students. A secondary aim of the study is to assess the suitability of using three jumping tests in volleyball. METHODS: For the set of women volleyball players (n = 273 divided into five different age and sport performance categories and for the set of university female students (n = 33, three jump tests were applied:the spike jump test SPJ, the counter movement jump test CMJ and the standing broad jump test SBJ. Statistical analysis was done using the Czech STATISTICA system, version 6 (Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Spearman coefficient correlation, paired t-test and ANOVA for independent samples. RESULTS: Relatively small and mostly statistically insignificant differences have been found between women volleyball players of various age and sport performance groups. All groups of volleyball players significantly exceeded the university students set in the level of their explosive muscle strength. Our research showed a lower level of jump performance, especially in what concerns the highest sport performance of women players. The initial hypotheses about the usefulness of applying three jumping tests in volleyball were confirmed. CONCLUSIONS: The differences in the results of jumping tests for different age and sport performance groups of women volleyball players are small. The relatively lower level of the jumping abilities of

  20. HR Manager Leadership in Quality Improvement in a College Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the influence of the human resource (HR) manager on the quality of service in an academic college, and the human resource management (HRM) outcomes of the process. Design/methodology/approach: The paper relates to a customer satisfaction survey. More than 120 questionnaires were completed by the…

  1. THE CHANGING ROLE OF HR: VALUES AND CONTRIBUTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben; Krogager, Per

    2011-01-01

    This paper illustrates, through a case-study of one of the old life sciences and diagnostics companies in Denmark, Radiometer Medical Plc. (now part of the Danaher Corporation), how the HR-department starts to work in a much more systematic way with effectiveness and efficiency, in the attempt...... with a stronger emphasis on core values and rationalizing the function itself....

  2. HR practices for enhancing sustainable employability : implementation, use, and outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ybema, Jan Fekke; van Vuuren, Tinka; van Dam, Karen

    2017-01-01

    With the aging of the workforce, organizations need to maintain or improve the sustainable employability of their workforce throughout their working life. This raises the question which HR practices increase workers’ sustainable employability at work. The aim of this study is to investigate the

  3. Stimulating teachers’ team performance through team-oriented HR practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmans, Machiel; Runhaar, Piety; Wesselink, Renate; Mulder, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Teams of teachers are increasingly held accountable for the quality of education and educational reforms in vocational education and training institutions. However, historically teachers have not been required to engage in deep-level collaboration, thus team-oriented HR practices are being used

  4. Employee Work-Life Balance as an HR Imperative | Igbinomwanhia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Employers are realising that the quality of an employee's personal and family life impacts work quality and that there are concrete business reasons to promote work and non-work integration. In this paper, we contend that assisting employees to achieve a work-life balance should become a critical part of HR policy and ...

  5. Can HR practices retain flexworkers with their agency?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, B.; Freese, C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Workers have different motives to be employed at specialist contract work agencies, such as career development aspirations, or a desire for freedom and independence. The purpose of this paper is to study how these different motives relate to the appreciation of HR practices applied by

  6. In-sourcing HR: shared service centres in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farndale, Elaine; Paauwe, Jaap; Hoeksema, Ludwig

    2009-01-01

    Due to the impact of now widely-available technologies, new logics behind the organisation of the HR function through the in- and outsourcing of HRM activities have been emerging, particularly addressing issues of integration, cost-efficiency and competitive advantage. In particular, increasing

  7. FACILITATING RADICAL FRONT-END INNOVATION THROUGH TARGETED HR PRACTICES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth

    2017-01-01

    study of the Danish pharmaceutical company, H. Lundbeck A/S, and explorative studies of seven European and American pharmaceutical and biotech companies. The study aims to show how companies can apply HR practices in ways that actively supports the development of radical front end innovation. The value...

  8. Enrico Chiaveri: The dialogue in the HR Strategy

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Enrico Chiaveri has been Head of the Human Resources Department since 2005. A core part of his department’s mission with the new Management is to develop and implement a strategic HR approach for our forward-looking Organization. He explained key aspects of the HR strategy to the Bulletin. For the first time in CERN’s history, a head of the HR Department and his deputy - Anne-Sylvie Catherin - invited the staff to a general information meeting on 23 February 2009. The scope of the meeting was to present the status of a number of current initiatives that will improve and tailor CERN’s HR strategy to the needs of the Organization and its staff, and also open up dialogue. Presented for the first time in an integrated way, the initiatives include contract policy, MARS, a staff survey, CERN’s values, a performance model, recruitment & outreach, learning & development, internal mobility and the development of a code of condu...

  9. Teaching HR Professionals: The Classroom as a Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Kate; Avramenko, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces an innovative course design incorporating both communities of practice and reflective practice as a learning strategy for part-time learners in higher education. The new design has been applied to teaching HR practitioners in a UK-based business school. Findings indicate that the suggested way of organizing teaching and…

  10. Learning Culture, Line Manager and HR Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on the role of line management and learning culture in the development of professional practice for the human resource (HR) practitioner. Design/methodology/approach: Three-year longitudinal, matched-pair study involving five participants and their line managers. Findings: Two of the five participants experienced…

  11. Two and a half-year outcome of caries-preventive programs offered to groups of children in the Solntsevsky district of Moscow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, K R; Kuzmina, I N; Kuzmina, E; Christiansen, M E

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the 2.5-year outcome of preventive programs - based on the Nexö method - offered to three groups of children from Solntsevsky, a district of Moscow. Study group A consisted of 45 3-year-olds, study group B of 50 6-year-olds, and study group C of 50 11-year-olds. A similar number of children were selected as control groups and they followed the normal dental service provided by the local Health Service System in the district. The caries-preventive programs offered to the study groups were based on: (1) education of the child, parents and teachers in the caries disease, (2) training in toothbrushing. In addition, the children in study groups B and C were offered professional plaque removal, applications of sodium fluoride (2%) and sealant applications according to individual needs. The children in groups B and C were clinically examined in March 1994 (baseline) after 1 and 2.5 years, respectively. Because of the age of the children in group A, these children were only examined once, after the study had been completed. After 2.5 years the children in all three study groups had improved their oral health status significantly compared to the children in the control group. The caries experience among the children in study group A was about half of that observed among children in the control group (4.91 def-s versus 8.60 def-s). The program was highly effective in controlling dental caries in the permanent dentition among the children in the study groups, who finished with a mean DMF-S of 0.28 (group B) and 3.12 (group C) compared to 2.24 and 6.35 among the children in the corresponding control groups. Nearly all the children used fluoridated toothpaste. The mean number of visits to the clinic decreased from year 1 to year 2 (5 versus 3.4 in study group B and 4.5 versus 3.3 in study group C). In conclusion, the preventive programs were highly effective with regard to improving the level of oral hygiene, and thereby reducing or even controlling the

  12. Online Social Support for the Prevention of Smoking Relapse: A Content Analysis of the WhatsApp and Facebook Social Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yee Tak Derek; Chan, Ching Han Helen; Wang, Man Ping; Li, Ho Cheung William; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2017-06-01

    Online social groups have been increasingly used for smoking cessation intervention. This study aimed to explore the social support components of the online discussion through WhatsApp and Facebook, how these components addressed the need of relapse prevention, and how the participants evaluated this intervention. We coded and analyzed the posts (N = 467) by the 82 recent quitters in WhatsApp and Facebook social groups, who were recruited from the eight smoking cessation clinics in Hong Kong to participate in a pragmatic randomized trial of relapse prevention. Participants' postintervention feedback was collected from the 13 qualitative interviews after the intervention. The WhatsApp social groups had more participants' posts than the Facebook counterparts. The participants' posts in the online social groups could be classified as sharing views and experiences (55.5%), encouragement (28.7%), and knowledge and information (15.8%). About half of the participants' posts (52.9%) addressed the themes listed in the U.S. Clinical Practice Guideline for preventing smoking relapse. The participants perceived the posts as useful reminders for smoking cessation, but avoidance of reporting relapse, inactive discussions, and uninteresting content were barriers to the success of the intervention. Online social groups provided a useful platform for the delivery of cessation support and encouragement of reporting abstinence, which support relapse prevention. The effectiveness of such intervention can be improved by encouraging more self-report of relapse, active discussions, sharing of interesting content, and using an appropriate discussion platform. Quitters who participate in the online social groups can benefit from peer support and information sharing, and hence prevent smoking relapse.

  13. Short preventive intervention in a group – a constructive use of cognitive dissonance in prevention for an increased risk group, using the example of the “Korekta” [Correction] program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof A. Wojcieszek

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available People socially maladjusted often drink alcohol-containing drinks in a problematic manner (risky, harmful or addictive. Thus there is continuous need for appropriate selective and dedicated prevention. One of such procedures, developed for the military, is the „Korekta” program. It is a therapeutic treatment here referred to as a „short preventive intervention within a group”, and its structure enables to circumvent the typical obstacles encountered during preventive work, such as the effects of cognitive dissonance and the resulting resistance from the ones being treated. The specific structure of the program is the reason why the participants have got a limited possibility to use unconstructive strategies aiming at releasing the tension (resulting from the cognitive dissonance caused by the confrontation between their lifestyle and their knowledge of potential losses caused by drinking alcohol. It brings them closer to changing their lifestyle (contemplation phase according to Prochaski model as a result of using constructive strategies of releasing the tension caused by the cognitive dissonance. Thanks to such solutions the program is highly accepted by the participants, what is shown in formative evaluation scores and what is a sort of a paradox of prevention. It is recommended to apply this tool systematically in the resocialization system.

  14. Efficacy Trial of a Selective Prevention Program Targeting Both Eating Disorders and Obesity among Female College Students: 1- and 2-Year Follow-Up Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C. Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the effects of a prevention program targeting both eating disorders and obesity at 1- and 2-year follow-ups. Method: Female college students at risk for these outcomes because of body image concerns (N = 398) were randomized to the "Healthy Weight 2" group-based 4-hr prevention program, which promotes lasting healthy…

  15. Prevention of bone loss with alendronate in postmenopausal women under 60 years of age. Early Postmenopausal Intervention Cohort Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosking, D; Chilvers, C E; Christiansen, C

    1998-01-01

    increases in bone mineral density. Alendronate did not increase bone mineral density of the forearm, but it slowed the loss. The responses to estrogen-progestin were 1 to 2 percentage points greater than those to the 5-mg dose of alendronate. Alendronate was well tolerated, with a safety profile similar...... to that of placebo or estrogen-progestin. CONCLUSIONS: Alendronate prevents bone loss in postmenopausal women under 60 years of age to nearly the same extent as estrogen-progestin.......BACKGROUND: Estrogen-replacement therapy prevents osteoporosis in postmenopausal women by inhibiting bone resorption, but the balance between its long-term risks and benefits remains unclear. Whether other antiresorptive therapies can prevent osteoporosis in these women is also not clear. METHODS...

  16. Group B streptococcal immunisation of pregnant women for the prevention of early and late onset Group B streptococcal infection of the neonate as well as adult disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchington, Anna L.; Lamont, Ronald F.

    2017-01-01

    screening-based or risk-based, differ according to the local burden of disease. Despite the introduction of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, there remains a significant burden of disease, which can be resolved by better adherence to guidelines, rapid identification of maternal colonization...... of specific polyvalent vaccines continues, but testing has challenges and may require surrogate markers or molecular-based techniques to manipulate antigenicity and immunogenicity. Expert commentary: Group B streptococcal vaccination using conjugated polyvalent vaccines against the major disease causing...

  17. Getting the HR message across: The linkage between line HR consensus and commitment strength among hospital employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorenbosch, Luc; Reuver, Renee; Sanders, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Related to the theoretical work of Bowen and Ostroff (2004; also Ostroff/Bowen 2000), this article focuses on the features of an HRM system that help or constrain organizations to get their HR message across. At a department-level of analysis, we focus on the consensus between line managers and

  18. A Meta-Analysis of Trials Evaluating Patient Education and Counseling for Three Groups of Preventive Health Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Simons-Morton, Denise G.; Ramirez, Gilbert; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Green, Lawrence W.; Mains, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    The overall effectiveness of patient education and counseling on preventive health behaviors was examined across published clinical trials, 1971-1994. The effectiveness of various approaches for modifying specific types of behaviors among patients without diagnosed disease was assessed. Multiple regression models indicated differences among…

  19. Sexual risk attitudes and intentions of youth aged 12-14 years: survey comparisons of parent-teen prevention and control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Regina P; Chan, Wenyaw; Roberts-Gray, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors compared differences in sexual risk attitudes and intentions for three groups of youth (experimental program, n = 90; attention control, n = 80; and nonparticipant control, n = 634) aged 12-14 years. Two student groups participated with their parents in programs focused on strengthening family interaction and prevention of sexual risks, HIV, and adolescent pregnancy. Surveys assessed students' attitudes and intentions regarding early sexual and other health-risk behaviors, family interactions, and perceived parental disapproval of risk behaviors. The authors used general linear modeling to compare results. The experimental prevention program differentiated the total scores of the 3 groups (p < .05). A similar result was obtained for student intentions to avoid sex (p < .01). Pairwise comparisons showed the experimental program group scored higher than the nonparticipant group on total scores (p < .01) and on students' intention to avoid sex (p < .01). The results suggest this novel educational program involving both parents and students offers a promising approach to HIV and teen pregnancy prevention.

  20. Canagliflozin for Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Bruce; Perkovic, Vlado; de Zeeuw, Dick; Fulcher, Greg; Erondu, Ngozi; Shaw, Wayne; Fabbrini, Elisa; Sun, Tao; Li, Qiang; Desai, Mehul; Matthews, David R.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Canagliflozin is a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor that significantly reduces the composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and elevated cardiovascular risk. The comparative effects among participants with and without a history of cardiovascular disease (secondary versus primary prevention) were prespecified for evaluation. Methods: The CANVAS Program (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study) randomly assigned 10 142 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus to canagliflozin or placebo. The primary prevention cohort comprised individuals ≥50 years of age with ≥2 risk factors for cardiovascular events but with no prior cardiovascular event, and the secondary prevention cohort comprised individuals ≥30 years of age with a prior cardiovascular event. The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Secondary outcomes included heart failure hospitalization and a renal composite (40% reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate, renal replacement therapy, or renal death). Results: Primary prevention participants (N=3486; 34%) were younger (63 versus 64 years of age), were more often female (45% versus 31%), and had a longer duration of diabetes mellitus (14 versus 13 years) compared with secondary prevention participants (N=6656; 66%). The primary end point event rate was higher in the secondary prevention group compared with the primary prevention group (36.9 versus 15.7/1000 patient-years, P<0.001). In the total cohort, the primary end point was reduced with canagliflozin compared with placebo (26.9 versus 31.5/1000 patient-years; hazard ratio [HR], 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75–0.97; P<0.001 for noninferiority, P=0.02 for superiority) with no statistical evidence of heterogeneity (interaction P value=0.18) between the primary (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.74–1.30) and

  1. Collaborative leadership and the implementation of community-based fall prevention initiatives: a multiple case study of public health practice within community groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markle-Reid, Maureen; Dykeman, Cathy; Ploeg, Jenny; Kelly Stradiotto, Caralyn; Andrews, Angela; Bonomo, Susan; Orr-Shaw, Sarah; Salker, Niyati

    2017-02-16

    Falls among community-dwelling older adults are a serious public health concern. While evidence-based fall prevention strategies are available, their effective implementation requires broad cross-sector coordination that is beyond the capacity of any single institution or organization. Community groups comprised of diverse stakeholders that include public health, care providers from the public and private sectors and citizen volunteers are working to deliver locally-based fall prevention. These groups are examples of collective impact and are important venues for public health professionals (PHPs) to deliver their mandate to work collaboratively towards achieving improved health outcomes. This study explores the process of community-based group work directed towards fall prevention, and it focuses particular attention on the collaborative leadership practices of PHPs, in order to advance understanding of the competencies required for collective impact. Four community groups, located in Ontario, Canada, were studied using an exploratory, retrospective, multiple case study design. The criteria for inclusion were presence of a PHP, a diverse membership and the completion of an initiative that fit within the scope of the World Health Organization Fall Prevention Model. Data were collected using interviews (n = 26), focus groups (n = 4), and documents. Cross-case synthesis was conducted by a collaborative team of researchers. The community groups differed by membership, the role of the PHP and the type of fall prevention initiatives. Seven practice themes emerged: (1) tailoring to address context; (2) making connections; (3) enabling communication; (4) shaping a vision; (5) skill-building to mobilize and take action; (6) orchestrating people and projects; and (7) contributing information and experience. The value of recognized leadership competencies was underscored and the vital role of institutional supports was highlighted. To align stakeholders working

  2. The latest on the recent HR staff survey

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The data collected in the framework of the staff survey sent out by the Human Resources (HR) Department in March this year are currently being analysed. The first results concern the response rate and the breakdown of participants. 1328 staff members replied to the questionnaire, representing a response rate of close to 60%. Marie-Luce Falipou, who is in charge of the project within the HR Department, is evidently satisfied with the result: "The high response rate shows that the staff appreciated HR’s efforts to sound out their opinions and felt concerned by the subjects covered in the questionnaire". All the data are now being processed by the team led by Philippe Sarnin, Director of the Social Psychology Department at the University of Lyon2. "The number of responses submitted during the 15 days the form was available on line was very satisfactory. This is a vital factor in ensuring that we are able to build up an accurate pictu...

  3. Human Resource Predictive Analytics HRPA For HR Management In Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeet N. Mishra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Human resource predictive analytics is an evolving application field of analytics for HRM purposes. The purpose of HRM is measuring employee performance and engagement studying workforce collaboration patterns analyzing employee churn and turnover and modelling employee lifetime value. The motive of applying HRPA is to optimize performances and produce better return on investment for organizations through decision making based on data collection HR metrics and predictive models. The paper is divided into three sections to understand the emergence of HR predictive analytics for HRM. Firstly the paper introduces the concept of HRPA. Secondly the paper discusses three aspects of HRPA a Need b Approach amp Application c Impact. Lastly the paper leads to the conclusion on HRPA.

  4. Development of High Reliable Safety Data Link (HR-SDL) for Safety Grade PLC(POSAFEQ) for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyung Chul; Song, Seung Whan; Yun, Dong Hwa [POSCON, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Hwoi [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    HR-SDL communication module uses deterministic, uni-direction, and broadcasting methods. The HR-SDL protocol uses Profibus FDL(Fieldbus Data Link) based on SDN (Send Data with No acknowledge) in order to prevent handshaking. The communication module uses peer-to-peer communication method that communicates through dedicated link, and fiber-optic cable is used as a physical link for physical isolation. To satisfy quality of data, CRC examination method is used. HR-SDL offers 4 independent communication ports in maximum. All hardware of the communication module satisfies IEEE safety class 1E, and seismic category I. And, the software used in the communication module is classified by safety critical software. The communication module will be used for transmitting a local trip signal from bistable processor to coincidence processor in Reactor Protection System.

  5. Performance capabilities of the Cameca 1280-HR SIMS instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Wiedenbeck; F. Couffignal; S. Glynn; A. Kidane; A. Rocholl; R. Trumbull

    2015-01-01

    Since december 2013 the Helmholtz Zentrum Potsdam has operated a 1280-HR instrument: the latest generation of Cameca large geometry ion microprobe. Here we report the observed performance of this tool, with particular emphasis on the determination of isotopic ratios on geomaterials. We have already acquired extensive experience in the determination of δ 18 o values in silicates, for which a single analysis requires circa 80 seconds of actual data acquisition. Running in full automatic m...

  6. Teaching HR Professionals: The Classroom as a Community of Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Avramenko

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an innovative course design incorporating both communities of practice and reflective practice as a learning strategy for part-time learners in higher education. The new design has been applied to teaching HR practitioners in a UK-based business school. Findings indicate that the suggested way of organizing teaching and learning for part-time professionals is very informative and facilitates a richer engagement with theory whilst addressing issues of practice.

  7. Photoelectric photometry of the Am star HR = V423 Per

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerzykiewicz, M.

    1989-01-01

    This spectroscopic binary is the largest amplitude variable among Am stars. UBV observations of the star are presented. They show that in 1964 and 1965 it was constant in B and was only marginally variable in U. The hypothesis of the ellipsoidal variability of HR 976 is then discussed and found untenable. It is pointed out that this result may reopen the issue of light variability of Am stars. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs. (author)

  8. CAMECA IMS 1300-HR3: The New Generation Ion Microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, P.; Choi, S. Y.; Renaud, L.; Saliot, P.; Larson, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The success of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in Geo- and Cosmo-chemistry relies on its performance in terms of: 1) very high sensitivity (mandatory for high precision measurements or to achieve low detection limits); 2) a broad mass range of elemental and isotopic species, from low mass (H) to high mass (U and above); 3) in-situ analysis of any solid flat polished surface; and 4) high spatial resolution from tens of microns down to sub-micron scale. The IMS 1300-HR3 (High Reproducibility, High spatial Resolution, High mass Resolution) is the latest generation of CAMECA's large geometry magnetic sector SIMS (or ion microprobe), successor to the internationally recognized IMS 1280-HR. The 1300-HR3delivers unmatched analytical performance for a wide range of applications (stable isotopes, geochronology, trace elements, nuclear safeguards and environmental studies…) due to: • High brightness RF-plasma oxygen ion source with enhanced beam density and current stability, dramatically improving spatial resolution, data reproducibility, and throughput • Automated sample loading system with motorized sample height (Z) adjustment, significantly increasing analysis precision, ease-of-use, and productivity • UV-light microscope for enhanced optical image resolution, together with dedicated software for easy sample navigation (developed by University of Wisconsin, USA) • Low noise 1012Ω resistor Faraday cup preamplifier boards for measuring low signal intensities In addition, improvements in electronics and software have been integrated into the new instrument. In order to meet a growing demand from geochronologists, CAMECA also introduces the KLEORA, which is a fully optimized ion microprobe for advanced mineral dating derived from the IMS 1300-HR3. Instrumental developments as well as data obtained for stable isotope and U-Pb dating applications will be presented in detail.

  9. Selective Isotope Determination of Uranium using HR-RIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeder, S.; Fies, S.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Tomita, H.

    2009-01-01

    The detection of lowest abundances of the ultra trace isotope 236 U in environmental samples requires an efficient detection method which allows a high elemental and isotopic selectivity to suppress neighbouring isotopes of the same element and other background. High Resolution Laser Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (HR-RIMS) uses the individual electron structure of each isotope to provide an outstanding element and isotope selective ionization.

  10. Atmospheric Eclipsing Binaries HR6902 and 22Vul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ake, Thomas B.

    We propose to perform a comparative study of the atmospheric eclipsing binaries HR 6902 and 22 Vul. Each of these is comprised of a luminous G-type primary with a late B main sequence secondary. The eclipsing nature of these systems allows a determination of the physical conditions in the outer atmospheres of the evolved primary components. The G stars are on different sides of the cool star dividing line between coronal and non-coronal stars. HR 6902 has a thin chromosphere and a hot, low mass-loss wind, seen in C IV and Si IV absorption when the B star passes behind the primary. 22 Vul, on the other hand, shows extended absorption far from the star and a cool, high velocity wind of approx. -200 km s-1. It is more like the classical zeta Aur systems, but the Fe II wind lines have peculiar profiles, likely owning to the effects of the radiation field of the hot star. Although located close to each other on the HR diagram, there are fundamental differences in the outer layers of these stars. We propose obtaining FUSE exposures during partial and total eclipse phases to study the kinematics and structure of the transition regions and winds of the primary stars and relate them to other FUSE observations of single objects. These observations will also be of use in understanding the complex spectra of other, interacting binary systems, where the stellar components are embedded in much denser material due to mass transfer effects.

  11. Barriers and Recommended Interventions to Prevent Melioidosis in Northeast Thailand: A Focus Group Study Using the Behaviour Change Wheel.

    OpenAIRE

    Suntornsut, P; Wongsuwan, N; Malasit, M; Kitphati, R; Michie, S; Peacock, SJ; Limmathurotsakul, D

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Melioidosis, an often fatal infectious disease in Northeast Thailand, is caused by skin inoculation, inhalation or ingestion of the environmental bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei. The major underlying risk factor for melioidosis is diabetes mellitus. Recommendations for melioidosis prevention include using protective gear such as rubber boots and gloves when in direct contact with soil and environmental water, and consuming bottled or boiled water. Only a small proportion ...

  12. The influence of perception and peer support on STI prevention behavior (syphilis case study) in group of MSM at veterans STI-VCT clinic in Medan year 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukatendel, K.; Napitupulu, T. E.; Rusmalawati; Andayani, L. S.; Yustina, I.

    2018-03-01

    According to Behavioral and Biological Integrated Surveillance (BBIS) in Indonesia, 2011, there was an increase in syphilis surveillance in men who like to commit sexual intercourse with other men (MSM). It was 13% of the 3% in BBIS 2007 in bad STI prevention behavior. There were 478 MSM have visited STI-VCT clinic in Medan throughout 2015, and syphilis-infected 59 men. This study aims to analyze the influence of perception and peer support on prevention of STI in MSM at Veteran STI-VCT Clinic in Medan, 2016. It was a mixed method quantitative and qualitative study with the cross-sectional approach, enrolled 50 respondents. Data were collected and analyzed with SPSS 19. There was the influence of perception and peer support on STI prevention behavior of MSM group at STI-VCT Veteran Clinic in Medan.

  13. Prevention of involuntary admission through Family Group Conferencing: a qualitative case study in community mental health nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, G.; Schout, G.; Abma, T.

    2014-01-01

    To understand whether and how Family Group Conferencing might contribute to the social embedding of clients with mental illness. Background: Ensuring the social integration of psychiatric clients is a key aspect of community mental health nursing. Family Group Conferencing has potency to create

  14. Prevention of suicide and attempted suicide in Denmark. Epidemiological studies of suicide and intervention studies in selected risk groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete

    2007-01-01

    of young persons who had severe suicidal thoughts or who had attempted suicide showed that risk of repetition was reduced in the intervention group, and that the intervention group obtained a significantly greater improvement in Beck's Depression Inventory, Hopelessness Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale...

  15. Perceptions of HIV/STI prevention among young adults in Sweden who travel abroad: a qualitative study with focus group and individual interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvarnström, Anna; Oscarsson, Marie G

    2014-09-01

    Young adults are at risk for HIV/STIs because they generally have an active sex life with multiple sexual partners; moreover, they use condoms to a lesser extent. Travelling increases sexually risky behaviour, and among both women and men, sexual contacts abroad are common. Better knowledge of how young adults experience prevention efforts prior to travelling, and what they prefer, is important when planning prevention efforts to this group. Experiences of and attitudes towards prevention efforts against HIV/STI among young adults in Sweden who have travelled abroad were investigated. We conducted 12 focus-group interviews and four individual interviews with young adults (20-29 years) who had travelled abroad within the last 12 months. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using thematic content analysis. Results were discussed from a salutogenic perspective. Only a few had any experience of prevention efforts against HIV/STIs. The majority welcomed the idea of prevention efforts prior to travelling and would have welcomed more, preferably short reminders or links to reliable websites, or someone professional to discuss the issue with. Most of the young adults would use the Internet to search for information. They proposed the possibility of reaching young adults through social media, and the importance of better basic knowledge in school. It is difficult to reach young adults before their trips abroad. Prevention efforts on HIV/STI must therefore focus on the use of established forums. Setting the foundation for a positive attitude towards condom use is needed during school years. Even social media, where there is the possibility for dialogue, should be used as an information source.

  16. The Comparison of Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy Based on Coping Skills and Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Improvement of Emotional Regulation Strategies and Relapse Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghorbany

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study compared the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy based on coping skills (CBT and methadone maintenance therapy (MMT in improvement of emotional regulation strategies and prevention of relapse. Method: The method of the present study was semi-experimental research design (pre-test-post-test with witness group. For sampling 45 substance abuse people who had referred to addiction treatment centers were selected and assigned to three groups of cognitive behavior therapy, methadone maintenance treatment and witness group randomly. The participants in all three groups completed the emotional intelligence questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed by covariance method. Results: The results showed that cognitive-behavior therapy in comparison to methadone maintenance therapy and witness group led to significant improvement of emotional regulation in substance abusers, but there was no significant difference between the methadone maintenance treatment group and control group. Also, the rate of relapse in individuals who assigned to cognitive-behavior therapy group in comparison to methadone maintenance therapy and the witness group was significantly lower, but there was no significant difference between methadone therapy and witness. Conclusion: Cognitive-behavior therapy was an effective treatment that can change the cognitive and behavioral variables related to substance abuse, such as emotional regulation strategies. Thus, results suggested that drug abuse treatment programs must target these mediator variables.

  17. Blood Group Substances as Potential Therapeutic Agents for the Prevention and Treatment of Infection with Noroviruses Proving Novel Binding Patterns in Human Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Shin; Yokobori, Takehiko; Ueta, Gen; Ide, Munenori; Altan, Bolag; Thongprachum, Aksara; Nishimura, Toyo; Nakajima, Tamiko; Kominato, Yoshihiko; Asao, Takayuki; Saniabadi, Abby R.; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Le Pendu, Jacques; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Blood group-related glycans determining ABO and Lewis blood groups are known to function as attachment factors for most of the norovirus (NoV) strains. To identify binding specificity of each NoV, recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLPs) and human saliva samples with different ABO, Lewis phenotypes and secretor status have been commonly applied. When binding specificities of VLPs prepared from 16 different genotypes of NoVs in GI and GII genogroups were characterized in samples of human gastric mucosa compared to human saliva based on blood group phenotypes, considerable differences were observed for several strains. Novel binding specificities determined by an ELISA using preparations from human gastric mucosa were also ascertained by immunohistochemical analyses using human jejunal mucosa, widely believed to be susceptible to NoV infection. Further, A, B and O(H) blood group substances prepared from porcine and squid tissues were found to be effective for preventing ABO blood group-specific binding of VLPs to both saliva and mucosa samples. Therefore, these blood group substances might have potential for the prevention and treatment of NoV infection. PMID:24558470

  18. Possible functional co-operation of palindromes hr3 and hr4 in the genome of Cydia pomonella granulovirus affects viral replication capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmenofy, Wael H; Jehle, Johannes A

    2015-09-01

    After previous studies had shown that natural transposon insertion between the two homologous regions hr3 and hr4 of the genome of the Mexican (M) strain of Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV-M) resulted in a loss of viral competitiveness, the function of these homologous regions was investigated. A CpGV-based bacmid (CpBAC) was constructed and mutants with deleted hr3 and hr4 palindromes (CpBAChr3/hr4KO) and a construct (CpBAChr3-kan-hr4) with physically separated hr3 and hr4 repeats were generated to investigate their involvement in in vivo replication. Based on median lethal concentration (LC50) and median survival time (ST50) of the mutant viruses vCpBAChr3/hr4KO and vCpBAChr3-kan-hr4 it was found that the infectivity of both mutants for codling moth Cydia pomonella L. (Lep.: Tortricidae) larvae was not influenced compared with the parental virus vCpBAC. Co-infection experiments with vCpBAChr3-kan-hr4 and vCpBAC using different virus ratios revealed that vCpBAChr3-kan-hr4 was efficiently out-competed by vCpBAC during in vivo replication. These findings suggested that the separation of hr3 and hr4 resulted in a replication disadvantage of the mutant similar to the observation made in previous co-infection experiments using the transposon-carrying mutant CpGV-MCp5 and WT CpGV-M. It was concluded that the palindromes hr3 and hr4 may play a non-essential but co-functional role in the replication of CpGV-M.

  19. Men's perspectives on fall risk and fall prevention following participation in a group-based programme conducted at Men's Sheds, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Jeannine L M; Lovarini, Meryl; Clemson, Lindy M; Jang, Haeyoung; Willis, Karen; Lord, Stephen R; Sherrington, Catherine

    2017-05-01

    Research on older men's views regarding fall prevention is limited. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences and perspectives of older men regarding fall risk and prevention so that fall prevention programmes can better engage older men. Eleven men who had taken part in a group-based fall prevention programme called Stepping On conducted at Men's Sheds in Sydney, Australia, participated in semi-structured interviews during June and July 2015 which were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data were coded and analysed using constant comparative methods. Over-arching theoretical categories were developed into a conceptual framework linking programme context and content with effects of programme participation on men. Men's Sheds facilitated participation in the programme by being inclusive, male-friendly places, where Stepping On was programmed into regular activities and was conducted in an enjoyable, supportive atmosphere. Programme content challenged participants to think differently about themselves and their personal fall risk, and provided practical options to address fall risk. Two major themes were identified: adjusting the mindset where men adopted a more cautious mindset paying greater attention to potential fall risks, being careful, concentrating and slowing down; and changing the ways where men acted purposefully on environmental hazards at home and incorporated fall prevention exercises into their routine schedules. Practitioners can engage and support older men to address falls by better understanding men's perspectives on personal fall risk and motivations for action. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Effect of Education-Based Intervention Using Small Group Discussion in Empowering Adolescent Girls to Prevent Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemehsadat Seyed Nematollah Roshan

    2014-10-01

    Results: At baseline, independent T-test showed no significant difference between the two groups in the perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, and self efficacy, all of which could be regarded as empowerment process components (P>0.05. However, significant differences were observed after intervention. Also, the paired T-test showed a significant difference before and after the intervention in the test group in means of the perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, self efficacy and, in the grand scheme, adolescent girls' empowerment (P

  1. Worksite interventions for preventing physical deterioration among employees in job-groups with high physical work demands: background, design and conceptual model of FINALE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Andreas; Jørgensen, Marie B; Gram, Bibi

    2010-01-01

    A mismatch between individual physical capacities and physical work demands enhance the risk for musculoskeletal disorders, poor work ability and sickness absence, termed physical deterioration. However, effective intervention strategies for preventing physical deterioration in job groups with high...... physical demands remains to be established. This paper describes the background, design and conceptual model of the FINALE programme, a framework for health promoting interventions at 4 Danish job groups (i.e. cleaners, health-care workers, construction workers and industrial workers) characterized by high...

  2. What determines the size of the HR function? A cross-national analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brewster, C.; Wood, G.; Brookes, M.; van Ommeren, J.N.

    2006-01-01

    What determines the resources allocated to an HR department? The antecedents of the size of HR departments within firms and the relationship between HR department size and the role that HR departments perform are issues of theoretical and practical importance. Using large-scale survey data from

  3. Development of the Croatian HR Benchmarks List and its Comparison with the World-Approved Ones

    OpenAIRE

    Pološki Vokić, Nina; Vidović, Maja

    2004-01-01

    Human resource benchmarking has become increasingly important as organizations strive for better performance. Observing, adapting and reapplying best HR practices from others became the essential management tool. The article defines HR benchmarks appropriate and significant for the Croatian business environment, which were predominantly compensation indicators. In particular, the research revealed that Croatian HR benchmarks are different from HR benchmarks used in developed countries. Namely...

  4. 10 MMBt/Hr AFBC Commercial Demonstration Cedar Lane Farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold M. Keener; Mary H. Wicks; Tom Machamer; Dave Hoecke; Don Bonk; Bob Brown

    2005-10-31

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate and promote the commercialization of coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) systems, with limestone addition for SO2 emissions control and a baghouse for particulate emissions control. This AFBC system was targeted for small scale industrial-commercial-institutional space and process heat applications in the 4-40 MMBtu/hr size range. A cost effective and environmentally acceptable AFBC technology in this size range could displace a considerable amount of heating gas and oil with coal, while resulting in significant total cost savings to the owner/operators.

  5. The joint relationship between organizational design factors and HR practice factors on direct care workers' job satisfaction and turnover intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungyoon; Wehbi, Nizar; Dellifraine, Jami L; Brannon, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Human resource (HR) practices, such as training and communication, have been linked to positive employee job commitment and lower turnover intent for direct care workers (DCWs). Not many studies have looked at the combined interaction of HR practices and organizational structure. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between organizational structure (centralization, formalization, and span of control) and HR practices (training, horizontal communication, and vertical communication) on DCW's job satisfaction and turnover intent. Data were collected from 58 long-term care facilities in five states. We used latent class analysis to group facility characteristics into three sets of combinations: "organic," "mechanistic," and "minimalist." We used multivariate regression to test the relationship of each of these groups on DCW's job satisfaction and turnover intent. After controlling for state, organizational, and individual covariates, the organic group, which represents decentralized and less formalized structures and high levels of job training and communication, was positively related to job satisfaction and negatively related to intent to leave. On the other hand, the minimalist group, which is characterized by low levels of job-related training and communication, showed no significant differences from the mechanistic group (referent) on job satisfaction and intent to leave. These findings imply that managers in long-term care facilities may want to consider adopting organic, decentralized structures and HR practices to retain DCWs.

  6. Drug Prevention by Increasing Self-Esteem: Influence of Teaching Approaches and Gender on Different Consumption Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyne, Thomas; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    Our study focused on an educational intervention designed to increase the self-esteem of low-achieving eighth graders. The intervention was a substance-specific life skills program built upon teacher-centered versus student-centered teaching methods. A cluster analysis identified four consumption groups prior to the intervention: A potentially…

  7. 77 FR 42313 - Recharter of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of... Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Corinne Graffunder... Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory Group'') within the Department of Health and Human Services. To...

  8. 78 FR 14798 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the... Public Health Service. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with Section 10(a) of the Federal Advisory... and Public Health (the ``Advisory Group''). The meeting will be open to the public. Information about...

  9. 78 FR 48877 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Office of the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of the Secretary, Department... Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory Group''). The meeting will be open to the public. Information...

  10. 78 FR 69853 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Office of the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of the Secretary, Department... Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory Group''). The meeting will be open to the public. Information...

  11. 78 FR 38345 - Meeting of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health AGENCY: Office of the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of the Secretary, Department... Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory Group''). The meeting will be open to the public. [[Page 38346...

  12. 77 FR 33220 - Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... Integrative and Public Health; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Office of the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of the Secretary, Department... Integrative and Public Health (the ``Advisory Group''). The web meeting will be open to the public. The agenda...

  13. Tonsillectomies and adenoidectomies do not prevent the onset of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with group A streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Tanya K; Lewin, Adam B; Parker-Athill, E Carla; Storch, Eric A; Mutch, P Jane

    2013-08-01

    In children presenting with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and/or tics, especially those with a temporal association with streptococcal pharyngitis (eg, Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus), there is speculation about whether tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy might improve the child's neuropsychiatric course. Our objective was to examine whether removal of the tonsils and/or adenoids impacted streptococcal antibody titers, the timing of onset of OCD and/or tics and the clinical severity of these symptoms. Study participants (N = 112; average age = 9.2 ± 2.4; 44 women) were recruited as part of a prospective investigation of neuropsychiatric phenomena with temporal association to streptococcal pharyngitis and examined by family history, diagnostic interview, physical examination, medical record review, psychological testing and streptococcal antibodies and divided into surgical or nonsurgical groups. The surgical group consisted of children having previously had a tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy (n = 32). The remaining children were categorized as nonsurgical group (n = 76). Measures of OCD and tic severity, streptococcal antibody titers and Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus classification were compared between both groups. There were no significant differences as determined by streptococcal antibody titers, Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus classification and OCD or tic severity between the surgical and nonsurgical groups. Most participants had surgery before the onset of neuropsychiatric symptoms and surgery did not affect symptomology. Streptococcal antibodies and neuropsychiatric symptom severity did not differ on the basis of surgical status. From these data, we cannot infer that tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy are likely to impact positively the course of OCD/tics or streptococcal antibody concentrations.

  14. Optimal conjugation of catechol group onto hyaluronic acid in coronary stent substrate coating for the prevention of restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lih, Eugene; Choi, Seul Gi; Ahn, Dong June; Joung, Yoon Ki; Han, Dong Keun

    2016-01-01

    Although endovascular stenting has been used as an interventional therapy to treat cardio- and cerebro-vascular diseases, it is associated with recurrent vascular diseases following stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. In this study, a metallic stent was coated with dopamine-conjugated hyaluronic acid with different ratios of catechol group to improve hemocompatibility and re-endothelialization. Especially, we were interested in how much amount of catechol group is appropriate for the above-mentioned purposes. Therefore, a series of dopamine-conjugated hyaluronic acid conjugates with different ratios of catechol group were synthesized via a carbodiimide coupling reaction. Dopamine-conjugated hyaluronic acid conjugates were characterized with 1 H-nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the amount of catechol group in dopamine-conjugated hyaluronic acid was measured by ultraviolet spectrometer. Co-Cr substrates were polished and coated with various dopamine-conjugated hyaluronic acid conjugates under pH 8.5. Dopamine-conjugated hyaluronic acid amounts on the substrate were quantified by micro-bicinchoninic acid assay. Surface characteristics of dopamine-conjugated hyaluronic-acid-coated Co-Cr were evaluated by water contact angle, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The hemocompatibility of the surface-modified substrates was assessed by protein adsorption and platelet adhesion tests. Adhesion and activation of platelets were confirmed with scanning electron microscopy and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured on the substrates, and the viability, adhesion, and proliferation were investigated through cell counting kit-8 assay and fluorescent images. Obtained results demonstrated that optimal amounts of catechol group (100 µmol) in the dopamine-conjugated hyaluronic acid existed in terms of various properties such as hemocompatibility and cellular responses.

  15. Dynamical Mass of the Exoplanet Host Star HR 8799

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Aldo; Bowler, Brendan

    2018-01-01

    HR 8799 is a young A5 star hosting four giant planets at wide separations (15-70 AU) which are undergoing orbital motion and have been continuously monitored with adaptive optics imaging since their discovery nearly a decade ago. Despite intensive searches for similar systems, this remains the only known star with multiple directly imaged exoplanets and is among the most extensively studied systems in the exoplanet community. Many mass estimates of the host star exist in the literature; however, currently no dynamical mass of HR 8799 has been measured. A dynamical mass of the host star is advantageous because it is independent of models and assumes only Kepler's laws of orbital motion. Furthermore, a dynamical mass can help to break degeneracies in the age and bulk metallicity of the host star. We fit Keplerian orbits to existing astrometry and new unpublished adaptive optics observations of this system from Keck Observatory, treating the orbiting planets as massless test particles. Each planet produces an independent mass constraint, together resulting in a cumulative dynamical mass using a Bayesian framework. This result is twice as precise as previous mass estimates based on spectroscopy and is an important step to clarify the fundamental properties of this peculiar A star.

  16. Effectiveness and implementation of a community-based prevention programme targeting anabolic androgenic steroid use in gyms: study protocol of a quasi-experimental control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molero, Yasmina; Gripenberg, Johanna; Bakshi, Ann-Sofie

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, concerns about increased anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) use among recreational sportspeople have been raised, yet there is a paucity of AAS prevention efforts targeting this group. Accordingly, doping prevention efforts aimed at gyms have been recommended. The overall objective of the present project is to examine a prevention programme named 100% Pure Hard Training (100% PHT), which targets AAS use among recreational sportspeople training in gyms. Specifically, the project aims to: 1) assess the prevalence of AAS, and its associations with alcohol, illicit drugs, and nutritional supplements use; 2) examine whether 100% PHT can decrease AAS use in gyms, and 3) provide insights into which factors facilitate and/or impede implementation of the programme. The intervention group consists of 27 gyms, and 27 gyms serve as controls. Intervention gyms take part in 100% PHT, a community-based programme involving several components: (a) training of key stakeholders (i.e., gym staff, gym owners, local police, and municipal prevention coordinators) regarding AAS use; (b) developing an action plan for AAS prevention for each gym; (c) certification of gyms that follow 100% PHT; (d) cooperative relationship between stakeholders; (e) annual follow-up of gyms. The project consists of two studies: Study A will examine the prevalence of AAS use and the effectiveness of 100% PHT (aims 1 and 2), and data for Study A will be collected using questionnaires distributed to gym attendees at two assessment points: baseline (pre-intervention) and follow-up (post-intervention). Study B will evaluate the implementation of 100% PHT (aim 3), and semi-structured interviews with participating stakeholders will be carried out post-intervention. Knowledge gained from the present project can be used to develop community-based doping prevention efforts aimed at recreational sportspeople training in gyms. Furthermore, it can provide insights into which factors are important

  17. Cost analysis for the prevention of variceal rebleeding: a comparison between transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and endoscopic sclerotherapy in a selected group of Italian cirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddi, P; Merli, M; Lionetti, R; De Santis, A; Valeriano, V; Masini, A; Rossi, P; Salvatori, F; Salerno, F; de Franchis, R; Capocaccia, L; Riggio, O

    1999-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the cumulative cost of the first 18-month period in a selected group of Italian cirrhotic patients treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) versus endoscopic sclerotherapy (ES) to prevent variceal rebleeding. Thirty-eight patients enrolled in a controlled trial were considered (18 TIPS and 20 sclerotherapy). The number of days spent in the hospital for the initial treatment and during the follow-up period were defined as the costs of hospitalization. ES sessions, TIPS procedures, angioplasty or addition of a second stent to maintain the shunt patency, were defined as the costs of therapeutic procedures. The two groups were comparable for age, sex, and Child-Pugh score. During the observation period 4 patients died in the TIPS group, and 2 died and 1 was transplanted in the sclerotherapy group. The rebleeding rate was significantly higher in the sclerotherapy group. Despite this, the number of days spent in the hospital was similar in the two groups. This was because of a higher number of hospital admissions for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy and shunt insufficiency in the TIPS group. The therapeutic procedures were more expensive for TIPS. Consequently, the cumulative cost was higher for patients treated with TIPS than for those treated with sclerotherapy. The extra cost was because of the initial higher cost of the procedure and the difference was still maintained at the end of the 18-month follow-up. When the cumulative costs were expressed per month free of rebleeding, the disadvantage of TIPS disappeared. In conclusion, a program of prevention of variceal rebleeding with TIPS, despite the longer interval free of rebleeding, is not a cost-saving strategy in comparison with sclerotherapy.

  18. CHILE: Outcomes of a group randomized controlled trial of an intervention to prevent obesity in preschool Hispanic and American Indian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sally M; Myers, Orrin B; Cruz, Theresa H; Morshed, Alexandra B; Canaca, Glenda F; Keane, Patricia C; O'Donald, Elena R

    2016-08-01

    We examined the outcomes of the Child Health Initiative for Lifelong Eating and Exercise (CHILE) study, a group randomized controlled trial to design, implement, and test the efficacy of a trans-community intervention to prevent obesity in children enrolled in Head Start centers in rural American Indian and Hispanic communities in New Mexico. CHILE was a 5-year evidence-based intervention that used a socioecological approach to improving dietary intake and increasing physical activity of 1898 children. The intervention included a classroom curriculum, teacher and food service training, family engagement, grocery store participation, and healthcare provider support. Height and weight measurements were obtained four times (fall of 2008, spring and fall of 2009, and spring of 2010), and body mass index (BMI) z-scores in the intervention and comparison groups were compared. At baseline, demographic characteristics in the comparison and intervention groups were similar, and 33% of all the children assessed were obese or overweight. At the end of the intervention, there was no significant difference between the two groups in BMI z-scores. Obesity prevention research among Hispanic and AI preschool children in rural communities is challenging and complex. Although the CHILE intervention was implemented successfully, changes in overweight and obesity may take longer than 2years to achieve. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of target risk groups for population-based Clostridium difficile infection prevention strategies using a population attributable risk approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sung-Hee; Kang, Hye-Young

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to determine risk factors associated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and assess the contributions of these factors on CDI burden. We conducted a 1:4 matched case-control study using a national claims dataset. Cases were incident CDI without a history of CDI in the previous 84 days, and were age- and sex-matched with control patients. We ascertained exposure, defined as a history of morbidities and drug use within 90 days. The population attributable risk (PAR) percent for risk factors was estimated using odds ratios (ORs) obtained from the case-control study. Overall, the strongest CDI-associated risk factors, which have significant contributions to the CDI burden as well, were the experience of gastroenteritis (OR=5.08, PAR%=17.09%) and use of antibiotics (OR=1.69, PAR%=19.00%), followed by the experiences of female pelvic infection, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, and pneumonia, and use of proton-pump inhibitors (OR=1.52-2.37, PAR%=1.95-2.90). The control of risk factors that had strong association with CDI and affected large proportions of total CDI cases would be beneficial for CDI prevention. We suggest performing CDI testing for symptomatic patients with gastroenteritis and implementing antibiotics stewardship. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. HIV Prevention Among Women Who Use Substances And Report Sex Work: Risk Groups Identified Among South African Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsberg, Wendee M; Peasant, Courtney; Kline, Tracy; Zule, William A; Ndirangu, Jacqueline; Browne, Felicia A; Gabel, Colby; van der Horst, Charles

    2017-11-01

    This cross-sectional study presents baseline data from women (n = 641) in a community-based randomized trial in Pretoria, South Africa. Women were eligible if they reported recent alcohol or other drug (AOD) use and condomless sex. Latent class analyses were conducted separately for those who reported sex work and those who did not. Among those who reported sex work, a Risky Sex class (n = 72, 28%) and Low Sexual Risk class (n = 190, 73%) emerged. Those in the Risky Sex class were more likely to report that their last episode of sexual intercourse was with their boyfriend (vs. a client/other partner) compared with the Low Sexual Risk class (p work, a Drug-Using, Violence-Exposed, and Impaired Sex class (n = 53; 14%) and Risky Sex and Moderate Drinking class (n = 326; 86%) emerged. The findings suggest that interventions for women who engage in sex work should promote safer sexual behavior and empowerment with main partners. Women who use AODs, experience physical or sexual violence, and have impaired sex may be a key population at risk for HIV and should be considered for tailored behavioral interventions in conjunction with South Africa's plan to disseminate HIV prevention methods to vulnerable women. ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT01497405.

  1. Focus Groups of Parents and Teens Help Develop Messages to Prevent Early Marijuana Use in the Context of Legal Retail Sales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Martie L; Haggerty, Kevin P; Casey-Goldstein, Mary; Thompson, Ronald W; Buddenberg, Laura; Mason, W Alex

    2017-02-23

    The changes in Washington State and Colorado marijuana laws call for the development of new brief family-focused adolescent marijuana use preventive interventions that are relevant for and tailored to the context of legalization for retail sale. To that end, focus groups with parents and teens were conducted to find out about their concerns and needs in the context of legalization. Six semi-structured focus groups (3 with parents, 3 with teens) were conducted in Washington State in 2013 related to consequences of teen marijuana use and messages that would be effective in helping to prevent teens from using marijuana in the context of legal adult use. A total of 33 teens and 35 parents participated. Three primary themes were common to these parents and teens: the negative consequences of marijuana use during adolescence on mental, physical, and social health; the need for more or better information; and the need for information/messages to come from trusted sources. The themes related to potential prevention messages include the use of fear; stories about real people; focusing on short-term consequences; and teens needing alternative activities (something better to do). The results suggest that parents and teens need information about the new retail marijuana legalization law. Teens are open to both information and guidance from parents as long as it is calm and respectful. Firsthand accounts of consequences of marijuana use from peers and adults, rather than threats from authority figures, could hold some promise for persuading teens to avoid marijuana use.

  2. Cancer chemoprevention and cancer preventive vaccines--a call to action: leaders of diverse stakeholder groups present strategies for overcoming multiple barriers to meet an urgent need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberman, Ronald B; Pearce, Homer L; Lippman, Scott M; Pyenson, Bruce S; Alberts, David S

    2006-12-15

    The emerging field of cancer prevention through chemoprevention agents and cancer vaccines offers significant promise for reducing suffering and death from cancer. However, that promise may not be kept unless major barriers to progress are lowered or eliminated. Among the most significant barriers are the relatively small investment from government and industry in research and development of cancer preventive agents; a predominant emphasis of translational cancer research on therapeutic interventions for metastatic or advanced cancer; complexities of prevention trial design; a relatively uncharted Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval process for preventive agents; insufficient public and patient understanding of the importance and potential for cancer preventive measures, with consequent unpredictable public and patient willingness to take preventive agents; an uncertain reimbursement from payors; and limitations in patent law, liability protection, and data package exclusivity that undermine the opportunity for recouping investment. Viewed individually or collectively, each of these barriers serves as a substantial deterrent to intellectual and financial investment by all sectors of the cancer community. In an effort to ultimately overcome these barriers, a Cancer Prevention Research Summit was assembled June 12-13, 2006 in Bethesda, Maryland, organized by C-Change with support from the AACR. The Summit brought together some 120 leaders from private, public, and not-for-profit entities, including cancer researchers and clinicians; federal health officials; regulatory agency representatives; pharmaceutical, biotech, and food industry leaders; patent attorneys; economists; public and private provider group executives; and advocates. Participants engaged in a detailed process to more carefully define the major barriers, identify potential solutions, and formulate initial priorities and recommendations for action. At the conclusion of this dialogue among

  3. The Effectiveness of Marlaat’s Cognitive Behavior Intervention and Group Treatment Based on Change Stages for Recovery and Relapse Prevention Rates in Male Heroin Crack Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khodadust

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was the Study of effectiveness of Marlaat’s cognitive behavior intervention and group treatment based on change stages for recovery and relapse rates in male heroin crack addictions. Method: In a experimental research design, 45 men addictions, who were diagnosed as the dependence of the heroin crack on the basis of DSM-IV-TR criteria, were chosen after successfully detoxified. They were divided two experimental groups (30 participants and a control group (15 participants that have been selected by random sampling. The first experimental group was undergone group treatment based on change stages underwent 16 sessions of 1.5 hours, totally 24 hours and the second experimental groups who were undergone Marlaat’s cognitive behavior intervention has been held 15 sessions of 2 hours, totally 24 hours. The control group were just received MMT without any psychotherapy. All participants were assessed by structured interview, urine test, before treatment, after treatment and after 3 months follow up. Results: Results showed that both psychotherapy treatments were affected on recovery and relapse rates. Conclusion: It seems that psychological problems and conflicts before addiction and after addiction could be caused for individuals’ tendency to narcotics consumption. Therefore, applying of psychotherapy could be useful in relapse prevention.

  4. Using HIV notification data to identify priority migrant groups for HIV prevention, New South Wales, 2000-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Michelle E; McMahon, Tadgh; Moreton, Renee J; Ward, Kate A

    2011-06-01

    Non-Australian-born people comprise a third of HIV notifications in Australia. With increasing numbers of immigrants in Australia, public health and health promotion programs will need to adapt to the emerging epidemic of HIV among people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. This study uses HIV notification data to compare Australian-born and non-Australian-born cases in New South Wales and aims to determine if income of source country is useful in identifying high priority CALD groups. Notified cases of newly diagnosed HIV between 2000 and 2008 in New South Wales were divided into Australian-born, persons born in high-income countries and persons born in middle and low-income countries based on World Bank classifications. These three groups were then compared to determine their risk factors for HIV infection. Of the 3,397 newly diagnosed HIV infections in New South Wales, 2,906 (86%) had a country of birth reported from 102 different countries. Cases born in high-income countries were similar to Australian-born cases; predominantly men reporting homosexual acquisition. Both these groups were different to cases born in middle and low-income countries; they were younger, more commonly female and reported heterosexual acquisition of HIV. Using income from source countries is useful as a model to better understand and target responses to HIV in non-Australian-born populations in New South Wales as it suggests that the public health and health promotion response in New South Wales and Australia should also focus on the priority communities drawn from low and middle income countries.

  5. BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL BY DRUG GROUP IN THE ANTIHYPERTENSIVE AND LIPID-LOWERING TREATMENT TO PREVENT HEART ATTACK TRIAL (ALLHAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushma, William C.; Ford, Charles E.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Wright, Jackson T.; Preston, Richard A.; Davis, Barry R.; Basile, Jan N.; Whelton, Paul K.; Weiss, Robert J.; Bastien, Arnaud; Courtney, Donald L.; Hamilton, Bruce P.; Kirchner, Kent; Louis, Gail T.; Retta, Tamrat M.; Vidt, Donald G.

    2009-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control rates and number of antihypertensive medications were compared (average follow-up 4.9 years) by randomized groups: chlorthalidone, 12.5-25 mg/d (n=15,255), amlodipine 2.5-10 mg/d (n=9,048), or lisinopril 10-40 mg/d (n=9,054) in a randomized double-blind hypertension trial. Participants were hypertensives age t55 with additional cardiovascular risk factor(s), recruited from 623 centers. Additional agents from other classes were added as needed to achieve BP control. BP was reduced from 145/83 mmHg (27% control) to 134/76 mmHg (chlorthalidone, 68% control), 135/75 mmHg (amlodipine, 66% control), and 136/76 mmHg (lisinopril, 61% control) by 5 years; the mean number of drugs prescribed was 1.9, 2.0, and 2.1, respectively. Only 28% (chlorthalidone), 24% (amlodipine), and 24% (lisinopril) were controlled on monotherapy. A majority achieved BP control in each randomized group--a greater proportion with chlorthalidone. Over time, providers and patients should expect multidrug therapy to achieve BP<140/90 mmHg in a majority of patients. PMID:19090876

  6. Evaluation of acid-labile S-protecting groups to prevent Cys racemization in Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Hajime; Miki, Yasuyoshi; Nishiuchi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Phosphonium and uronium salt-based reagents enable efficient and effective coupling reactions and are indispensable in peptide chemistry, especially in machine-assisted SPPS. However, after the activating and coupling steps with these reagents in the presence of tertiary amines, Fmoc derivatives of Cys are known to be considerably racemized during their incorporation. To avoid this side reaction, a coupling method mediated by phosphonium/uronium reagents with a weaker base, such as 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine, than the ordinarily used DIEA or that by carbodiimide has been recommended. However, these methods are appreciably inferior to the standard protocol applied for SPPS, that is, a 1 min preactivation procedure of coupling with phosphonium or uronium reagents/DIEA in DMF, in terms of coupling efficiency, and also the former method cannot reduce racemization of Cys(Trt) to an acceptable level (DIEA in DMF. Furthermore, these protecting groups significantly reduced the rate of racemization compared to the Trt group even in the case of microwave-assisted SPPS performed at a high temperature. © 2013 The Authors. European Peptide Society published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Developing a coordinated school health approach to child obesity prevention in rural Appalachia: results of focus groups with teachers, parents, and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schetzina, Karen E; Dalton, William T; Lowe, Elizabeth F; Azzazy, Nora; Vonwerssowetz, Katrina M; Givens, Connie; Stern, Harold P

    2009-01-01

    High prevalence rates of obesity, particularly among those residing in US rural areas, and associated physical and psychosocial health consequences, direct attention to the need for effective prevention programs. The current study describes an initial step in developing a school-based obesity prevention program in rural Appalachia, USA. The program, modeled on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Coordinated School Health (CSH) Program, includes a community-based participatory research approach to addressing the health needs specific to this region. Focus groups with teachers, parents, and 4th grade students were used to understand perceptions and school policy related to nutrition, physical activity, and the role of the school in obesity prevention. Results revealed that these community stakeholders were concerned about the problem of child obesity and supported the idea of their school doing more to improve the diet and physical activity of its students. Specifically, all groups thought that foods and drinks consumed by students at school should be healthier and that they should have more opportunities for physical activity. However, they cited limitations of the school environment, academic pressures, and lack of parental support as potential barriers to making such changes. Parents were most concerned that their children were not getting enough to eat and they and the teachers were not in favor of BMI screening at the school. Parents were in favor of increasing physical activity during school and thought that parent volunteers should help students select foods in the cafeteria. Students cited examples of how diet and physical activity affect their health and school performance, and thought that they should have more physical education time and recess. The data collected in the current study contributed to the limited knowledge base regarding rural populations as well as identified strengths and potential barriers to assist with the development of a

  8. Effectiveness of mobile phone messaging in prevention of type 2 diabetes by lifestyle modification in men in India: a prospective, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Ambady; Snehalatha, Chamukuttan; Ram, Jagannathan; Selvam, Sundaram; Simon, Mary; Nanditha, Arun; Shetty, Ananth Samith; Godsland, Ian F; Chaturvedi, Nish; Majeed, Azeem; Oliver, Nick; Toumazou, Christofer; Alberti, K George; Johnston, Desmond G

    2013-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes can often be prevented by lifestyle modification; however, successful lifestyle intervention programmes are labour intensive. Mobile phone messaging is an inexpensive alternative way to deliver educational and motivational advice about lifestyle modification. We aimed to assess whether mobile phone messaging that encouraged lifestyle change could reduce incident type 2 diabetes in Indian Asian men with impaired glucose tolerance. We did a prospective, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial between Aug 10, 2009, and Nov 30, 2012, at ten sites in southeast India. Working Indian men (aged 35-55 years) with impaired glucose tolerance were randomly assigned (1:1) with a computer-generated randomisation sequence to a mobile phone messaging intervention or standard care (control group). Participants in the intervention group received frequent mobile phone messages compared with controls who received standard lifestyle modification advice at baseline only. Field staff and participants were, by necessity, not masked to study group assignment, but allocation was concealed from laboratory personnel as well as principal and co-investigators. The primary outcome was incidence of type 2 diabetes, analysed by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00819455. We assessed 8741 participants for eligibility. 537 patients were randomly assigned to either the mobile phone messaging intervention (n=271) or standard care (n=266). The cumulative incidence of type 2 diabetes was lower in those who received mobile phone messages than in controls: 50 (18%) participants in the intervention group developed type 2 diabetes compared with 73 (27%) in the control group (hazard ratio 0·64, 95% CI 0·45-0·92; p=0·015). The number needed to treat to prevent one case of type 2 diabetes was 11 (95% CI 6-55). One patient in the control group died suddenly at the end of the first year. We recorded no other serious adverse events. Mobile

  9. Impact of the HIV-1 env genetic context outside HR1-HR2 on resistance to the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide and viral infectivity in clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baatz, Franky; Nijhuis, Monique; Lemaire, Morgane; Riedijk, Martiene; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Servais, Jean-Yves; van Ham, Petra M; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Koopmans, Peter P; Sprenger, Herman G; Devaux, Carole; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Perez Bercoff, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Resistance mutations to the HIV-1 fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide emerge mainly within the drug's target region, HR1, and compensatory mutations have been described within HR2. The surrounding envelope (env) genetic context might also contribute to resistance, although to what extent and through which determinants remains elusive. To quantify the direct role of the env context in resistance to enfuvirtide and in viral infectivity, we compared enfuvirtide susceptibility and infectivity of recombinant viral pairs harboring the HR1-HR2 region or the full Env ectodomain of longitudinal env clones from 5 heavily treated patients failing enfuvirtide therapy. Prior to enfuvirtide treatment onset, no env carried known resistance mutations and full Env viruses were on average less susceptible than HR1-HR2 recombinants. All escape clones carried at least one of G36D, V38A, N42D and/or N43D/S in HR1, and accordingly, resistance increased 11- to 2800-fold relative to baseline. Resistance of full Env recombinant viruses was similar to resistance of their HR1-HR2 counterpart, indicating that HR1 and HR2 are the main contributors to resistance. Strictly X4 viruses were more resistant than strictly R5 viruses, while dual-tropic Envs featured similar resistance levels irrespective of the coreceptor expressed by the cell line used. Full Env recombinants from all patients gained infectivity under prolonged drug pressure; for HR1-HR2 viruses, infectivity remained steady for 3/5 patients, while for 2/5 patients, gains in infectivity paralleled those of the corresponding full Env recombinants, indicating that the env genetic context accounts mainly for infectivity adjustments. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that quasispecies selection is a step-wise process where selection of enfuvirtide resistance is a dominant factor early during therapy, while increased infectivity is the prominent driver under prolonged therapy.

  10. Cognitive-behavioral group depression prevention compared to bibliotherapy and brochure control: nonsignificant effects in pilot effectiveness trial with college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Paul; Stice, Eric; Shaw, Heather; Gau, Jeff M

    2014-04-01

    Conduct a pilot trial testing whether a brief cognitive-behavioral (CB) group reduced depressive symptoms and secondary outcomes relative to bibliotherapy and brochure controls in college students with elevated depressive symptoms. 82 college students (M age=19.0, SD=0.9; 70% female, 80% White) with elevated self-assessed depressive symptoms were randomized to a 6-session CB group, bibliotherapy, or educational brochure control condition, completing assessments at pretest, posttest, and at 6- and 12-month follow-up. Planned contrasts found no significant effects for CB group on depressive symptoms compared to either bibliotherapy or brochure controls at posttest (d=-.08 and .06, respectively) or over follow-up (d=-.04 and -.10, respectively). There were no intervention effects for social adjustment and substance use, though CB group participants had improved knowledge of CB concepts at posttest, versus brochure controls. Condition differences in major depression onset were nonsignificant but suggested support for CB interventions (CB group=7.4%, bibliotherapy=4.5%, brochure control=15.2%). Unexpectedly modest support was found for a brief CB group depression prevention intervention, compared to bibliotherapy or brochure control, when provided to self-selected college students, suggesting that alternative screening or interventions approaches are needed for this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multiple Stars Across the H-R Diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Hubrig, Swetlana; Tokovinin, Andrei; Proceedings of the ESO Workshop held in Garching, Germany, 12-15 July 2005

    2008-01-01

    Stars show a marked tendency to be in systems of different multiplicity, ranging from simple binaries and triples to globular clusters with several 10,000's of stars. The formation and evolution of multiple systems remains a challenging part of astrophysics, and the contributions in this book report on the significant progress that had been made in this research field in the last years. The reader will find a variety of research topics addressed, such as the dynamical evolution in multiple stars, the effects of the environment on multiple system parameters, stellar evolution within multiple stars, multiplicity of massive stars, pre-main sequence and intermediate mass stars, multiplicity of low-mass stars from embedded protostars to open clusters, and brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets in multiples. This book presents the proceedings of the ESO Workshop on Multiple Stars across the H-R Diagram held in the summer of 2005.

  12. STAR-BASED METHODS FOR PLEIADES HR COMMISSIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fourest

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available PLEIADES is the highest resolution civilian earth observing system ever developed in Europe. This imagery program is conducted by the French National Space Agency, CNES. It has been operating since 2012 a first satellite PLEIADES-HR launched on 2011 December 17th, a second one should be launched by the end of the year. Each satellite is designed to provide optical 70 cm resolution colored images to civilian and defense users. Thanks to the extreme agility of the satellite, new calibration methods have been tested, based on the observation of celestial bodies, and stars in particular. It has then been made possible to perform MTF measurement, re-focusing, geometrical bias and focal plane assessment, absolute calibration, ghost images localization, micro-vibrations measurement, etc… Starting from an overview of the star acquisition process, this paper will discuss the methods and present the results obtained during the first four months of the commissioning phase.

  13. Ultraviolet and radio flares from UX Arietis and HR 1099

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.; Willson, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of the RS CVn systems UX Ari and HR 1099 with the IUE satellite and the VLA are presented. Flaring activity is observed at ultraviolet wavelengths with the IUE when none is detected at radio wavelengths with the VLA. Radio flares with no detectable ultraviolet activity have also been observed. Thus, flares in the two spectral regions are either uncorrelated or weakly correlated. The flaring emission probably originates in different regions at the two wavelengths. Radio flares from RS CVn stars may originate in sources that are larger than, or comparable to, a star in size. This is in sharp contrast to compact, coherent radio flares from dwarf M stars. The ultraviolet flares from RS CVn stars probably originate in sources that are smaller than a component star.

  14. Direct imaging of multiple planets orbiting the star HR 8799

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marois, C; Macintosh, B; Barman, T; Zuckerman, B; Song, I; Patience, J; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R

    2008-10-14

    Direct imaging of exoplanetary systems is a powerful technique that can reveal Jupiter-like planets in wide orbits, can enable detailed characterization of planetary atmospheres, and is a key step towards imaging Earth-like planets. Imaging detections are challenging due to the combined effect of small angular separation and large luminosity contrast between a planet and its host star. High-contrast observations with the Keck and Gemini telescopes have revealed three planets orbiting the star HR 8799, with projected separations of 24, 38, and 68 astronomical units. Multi-epoch data show counter-clockwise orbital motion for all three imaged planets. The low luminosity of the companions and the estimated age of the system imply planetary masses between 5 and 13 times that of Jupiter. This system resembles a scaled-up version of the outer portion of our Solar System.

  15. Understanding and Preventing Financial Fraud Against Older Citizens in Chinese Society: Results of a Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jessica C M; Yu Yolanda, Mengyan; Wong, Gabriel T W; Ngan, Raymond M H

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the public discourse on financial fraud against older citizens in Chinese society using six focus groups with 45 stakeholders comprising social workers, police officers, caregivers, nurses, community representatives, and insurance and banking personnel. This study uses qualitative data to describe the patterns and social features that facilitate this specific type of crime in Hong Kong. The narratives of the community stakeholders reveal several specific social features of Hong Kong that contribute to financial fraud against older persons, such as traditional Chinese values and ideologies, increasing cross-border activities, the Internet and technological advancements, and unfavourable economic situations. The results of this study support the assumptions of the routine activity approach and have a number of theoretical and practical implications. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Awareness of preventive medication among women at high risk for breast cancer and their willingness to consider transdermal or oral tamoxifen: a focus group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karavites, Lindsey C.; Allu, Subhashini; Khan, Seema A.; Kaiser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Despite demonstrated efficacy, acceptance of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), such as tamoxifen, for breast cancer risk reduction remains low. Delivering SERMs via local transdermal therapy (LTT) could significantly reduce systemic effects and therefore may increase acceptance. We aim to assess women’s knowledge of breast cancer prevention medications and views on LTT of SERMs. Focus groups were conducted with healthy women identified through the comprehensive breast center of a large urban cancer institution. Group discussions covered risk perceptions, knowledge of and concerns about risk reducing medications. Participants reported their perceived risk for breast cancer (average, below/above average), preference for SERMs in a pill or gel form, risk factors, and prior physician recommendations regarding risk-reducing medicines. Participants’ breast cancer risk was estimated using tools based on the Gail Model. Trained personnel examined all qualitative results systematically; risk perceptions and preferred method of medication delivery were tallied quantitatively. Four focus groups (N = 32) were conducted. Most participants had at least a college degree (78.2 %) and were of European (50 %) or African ancestry (31 %). The majority (72 %) were at elevated risk for breast cancer; approximately half of these women perceived themselves to be at elevated risk. Few participants had prior knowledge of preventive medications. The women noted a number of concerns about LTT, including dosage, impact on day-to-day life, and side effects; nonetheless, over 90 % of the women stated they would prefer LTT to a pill. Awareness of preventive medications was low even in a highly educated sample of high-risk women. If given a choice in the route of administration, most women preferred a gel to a pill, anticipating fewer side effects. Future work should focus on demonstrating equivalent efficacy and reduced toxicity of topical over oral medications and on raising

  17. Pattern of injury mortality by age-group in children aged 0–14 years in Scotland, 2002–2006, and its implications for prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone David H

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the epidemiology of injuries in children is essential for the planning, implementation and evaluation of preventive measures but recent epidemiological information on injuries in children both in general and by age-group in Scotland is scarce. This study examines the recent pattern of childhood mortality from injury by age-group in Scotland and considers its implications for prevention. Methods Routine mortality data for the period 2002–2006 were obtained from the General Register Office for Scotland and were analysed in terms of number of deaths, mean annual mortality rates per 100,000 population, leading causes of death, and causes of injury death. Mid-year population estimates were used as the denominator. Chi-square tests were used to determine statistical significance. Results 186 children aged 0–14 died from an injury in Scotland during 2002–06 (MR 4.3 per 100,000. Injuries were the leading cause of death in 1–14, 5–9 and 10–14 year-olds (causing 25%, 29% and 32% of all deaths respectively. The leading individual causes of injury death (0–14 years were pedestrian and non-pedestrian road-traffic injuries and assault/homicide but there was variation by age-group. Assault/homicide, fire and suffocation caused most injury deaths in young children; road-traffic injuries in older ones. Collectively, intentional injuries were a bigger threat to the lives of under-15s than any single cause of unintentional injury. The mortality rate from assault/homicide was highest in infants ( Conclusion Injuries continue to be a leading cause of death in childhood in Scotland. Variation in causes of injury death by age-group is important when targeting preventive efforts. In particular, the threats of assault/homicide in infants, fire in 1–4 year-olds, pedestrian injury in 5–14 year-olds, and suicide in 10–14 year-olds need urgent consideration for preventive action.

  18. Attitudes and beliefs among high- and low-risk population groups towards β-thalassemia prevention: a cross-sectional descriptive study from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Swati; Singh, Rajnish Kumar; Lakkakula, Bhaskar V K S; Vadlamudi, Raghavendra Rao

    2017-07-01

    β-thalassemia is an autosomal recessive blood disorder caused by gene mutations that affect all aspects of β-globin production. In majority of Asian countries including India, the frequency of β-thalassemia is closely intertwined with social, cultural, and religious issues of the respective country. Several national level screening programs imparted education regarding β-thalassemia, but follow-up evaluation revealed that education was not effective. It has been hypothesized that the beliefs and attitudes, carrier screening, and education among "high risk communities" will have far-reaching implications towards β-thalassemia prevention in the country. The present study is aimed to investigate attitudes, intention, and behavior of β-thalassemia high- and low-risk ethnic groups towards carrier screening and education. A structured questionnaire on knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding β-thalassemia was administered on 926 individuals belong to Arora, a high-risk ethnic group for β-thalassemia (347 rural (AR) and 202 urban (AU)) and 377 cosmopolitan commoners (CC) aged above 18 years of both sexes. To understand the relationship between various questions, Pearson's correlation test and factor analysis was performed. The responses were further categorized into the theory of planned behavior (TPB) constructs with the measures of the main constructs reported as a mean. Various dimensions of knowledge, attitude, and practice reveal that the urban groups (AU and CC) are better aware of the disease "β-thalassemia" than the rural group (AR) who witness suffering at close quarters. The AR group is more positive for preventive measures than the urban groups. Significant correlations and factor analysis show "intentions" for premarital and prenatal screening highly loaded as outcome behaviors. The Ajzen's "Theory of planned behavior" support that the "intention" and "perceived behavior control" are better predictors of "outcome behavior" compared to "attitude

  19. Bringing human resources to the table: utilization of an HR balanced scorecard at Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fottler, Myron D; Erickson, Eric; Rivers, Patrick A

    2006-01-01

    Rather than viewing HR as a critical driver of organizational strategy and outcomes, most health care organizations see HR as a drain on the organization's bottom line. Only by aligning HR with the organizational strategy will HR leaders truly get a seat at the leadership table. HR professionals can overcome impediments and gain a seat at the table by learning the language of business and the ways in which organizational leaders use data to drive their decisions. This article shows how Mayo Clinic uses the popular Balanced Scorecard approach to align its measures of HR performance to the organization's strategic plan.

  20. Using WhatsApp and Facebook Online Social Groups for Smoking Relapse Prevention for Recent Quitters: A Pilot Pragmatic Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yee Tak Derek; Chan, Ching Han Helen; Lai, Chi-Keung Jonah; Chan, Wai Fung Vivian; Wang, Man Ping; Li, Ho Cheung William; Chan, Sophia Siu Chee; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2015-10-22

    Quit attempters often have episodes of smoking relapse before they eventually quit. Interactive text messaging through mobile phones has been shown to increase abstinence. This service can be potentially applied on the platform of a social networking service to help quitters maintain abstinence. Our aim was to determine if the group discussion and reminders via the WhatsApp or Facebook social group were effective to prevent smoking relapse in quitters who had stopped smoking recently. This was a single-blinded, parallel, 3-arm pilot cluster randomized controlled trial allocating recent quitters, who had completed an 8-week treatment and reported abstinence for at least 7 days, to WhatsApp (n=42), Facebook (n=40), and a control group (n=54). The 2 intervention groups participated in a 2-month online group discussion with either WhatsApp or Facebook moderated by a trained smoking cessation counselor and received a self-help booklet on smoking cessation. The control group only received the booklet. The primary outcome was the 2- and 6-month relapse rates, defined as the proportion of participants who smoked at least 5 cigarettes in 3 consecutive days. Fewer participants in the WhatsApp group (17%, 7/42) reported relapse than the control group (42.6%, 23/54) at 2-month (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.10-0.71) and 6-month (40.5%, 17/42 vs 61.1%, 33/54; OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.19-0.99) follow-ups. The Facebook group (30.0%, 12/40) had an insignificantly lower relapse rate than the control group (42.6%, 23/54) at 2-month (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.24-1.37) and 6-month (52.5%, 13/40 vs 61.1%, 33/54; OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.31-1.61) follow-ups. The WhatsApp social groups had more moderators' posts (median 60, IQR 25 vs median 32, IQR 7; P=.05) and participants' posts (median 35, IQR 50 vs median 6, IQR 9; P=.07) than their Facebook counterparts, but the difference was insignificant. The intervention via the WhatsApp social group was effective in reducing relapse probably because of enhanced discussion and

  1. Preventing secondary cases of invasive meningococcal capsular group B (MenB) disease using a recently-licensed, multi-component, protein-based vaccine (Bexsero(®)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Cordery, Rebecca; Mandal, Sema; Christensen, Hannah; Campbell, Helen; Borrow, Ray; Ramsay, Mary E

    2014-11-01

    To assess the potential use of a protein-based meningococcal group B (MenB) vaccine (Bexsero(®)) in addition to antibiotic chemoprophylaxis for preventing secondary cases. Published studies on the risk of secondary meningococcal infections were used to estimate the numbers needed to vaccinate (NNV) with Bexsero(®) to prevent a secondary case in household and educational settings. Most secondary cases occur within a few days of diagnosis in the index case. Unlike conjugate vaccines, early protection offered after a single dose of Bexsero(®) is likely to be low, particularly in young children, who are at higher risk of secondary infection. NNV was dependent on predicted meningococcal strain coverage, estimated onset of protection after one Bexsero(®) dose and estimated vaccine efficacy. Even in the most favourable scenario where we assume the vaccine is administered within 4 days of the index case and prevents 90% of cases occurring after 14 days, the NNV for household contacts was >1000. NNV in educational settings was much higher. The estimated NNV should be taken into account when deciding policy to recommend Bexsero(®) for close contacts of single cases in household or educational settings. Bexsero(®) may have a protective role in clusters and outbreaks. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A randomized controlled trial of a senior centre group programme for increasing social support and preventing depression in elderly people living at home in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bøen Hege

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Late-life depression is a common condition and a challenging public health problem. A lack of social support is strongly associated with psychological distress. Senior centres seem to be suitable arenas for community-based health promotion interventions, although few studies have addressed this subject. The objectives were to examine the effect of a preventive senior centre group programme consisting of weekly meetings, on social support, depression and quality of life. Methods A questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 4,000 persons over 65 in Oslo, and a total of 2,387 completed questionnaires were obtained. These subjects served as a basis for recruitment of participants for a trial, with scores on HSCL-10 being used as a main inclusion criterion. A total of 138 persons were randomized into an intervention group (N = 77 and control group (N = 61. Final analyses included 92 persons. Social support (OSS-3, depression (BDI, life satisfaction and health were measured in interviews at baseline and after 12 months (at the end of the intervention programme. Perceptions of benefits from the intervention were also measured. Mean scores, SD, SE and CI were used to describe the changes in outcomes. Effect sizes were calculated based on the original scales and as Cohen’s d. Paired sample tests and ANOVA were used to test group differences. Results There was an increase in social support in both groups, but greatest in the intervention group. The level of depression increased for both groups, but more so in the control than the intervention group. There was a decrease in life satisfaction, although the decrease was largest among controls. There were almost no differences in reported health between groups. However, effect sizes were small and differences were not statistically significant. In contrast, most of the participants said the intervention meant much to them and led to increased use of the centre. Conclusions In

  3. Recommendations for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic hepatitis B and C in special population groups (migrants, intravenous drug users and prison inmates).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasio, Piero L; Babudieri, Sergio; Barbarini, Giorgio; Brunetto, Maurizia; Conte, Dario; Dentico, Pietro; Gaeta, Giovanni B; Leonardi, Claudio; Levrero, Massimo; Mazzotta, Francesco; Morrone, Aldo; Nosotti, Lorenzo; Prati, Daniele; Rapicetta, Maria; Sagnelli, Evangelista; Scotto, Gaetano; Starnini, Giulio

    2011-08-01

    The global spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), their high chronicity rates and their progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, are major public health problems. Research and intervention programmes for special population groups are needed in order to assess their infection risk and set up suitable prevention and control strategies. Aim of this paper is to give health care professionals information on HBV and HCV infections amongst migrants, drug users and prison inmates. The manuscript is an official Position Paper on behalf of the following Scientific Societies: Italian Association for the Study of the Liver (A.I.S.F.), Italian Society of Infectious and Tropical Diseases (S.I.M.I.T.), Italian Federation Department's Operators and Addiction Services (FederSerD), Italian Prison Medicine and Healthcare Society (S.I.M.S.Pe.). The considered population groups, having a high prevalence HBV and HCV infections, require specific interventions. In this context, the expression "special population" refers to specific vulnerable groups at risk of social exclusion, such as migrants, prison inmates, and intravenous drug users. When dealing with special population groups, social, environmental and clinical factors should be considered when selecting candidates for therapy as indicated by national and international guidelines. Copyright © 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A randomised, placebo-controlled trial assessing the efficacy of an oral B group vitamin in preventing the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Janet M; Colosimo, Maree; Airey, Caroline; Masci, Paul; Linnane, Anthony W; Vitetta, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a debilitating side effect resulting from neurotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of an oral B group vitamin compared to placebo, in preventing the incidence of CIPN in cancer patients undergoing neurotoxic chemotherapy. A pilot, randomised, placebo-controlled trial was conducted. Newly diagnosed cancer patients prescribed with taxanes, oxaliplatin or vincristine were invited to participate. A total of 71 participants (female 68 %, male 32 %) were enrolled into the study and randomised to the B group vitamin (n = 38) arm or placebo (n = 33). The data from 47 participants were eligible for analysis (B group vitamins n = 27, placebo n = 22). The primary outcome measure was the total neuropathy score assessed by an independent neurologist. Secondary outcome measures included serum vitamin B levels, quality of life, pain inventory and the patient neurotoxicity questionnaires. Outcome measures were conducted at baseline, 12, 24 and 36 weeks. The total neuropathy score (TNS) demonstrated that a B group vitamin did not significantly reduce the incidence of CIPN compared to placebo (p = 0.73). Statistical significance was achieved for patient perceived sensory peripheral neuropathy (12 weeks p = 0.03; 24 weeks p = 0.005; 36 weeks p = 0.021). The risk estimate for the Patient Neurotoxicity Questionnaire (PNQ) was also statistically significant (OR = 5.78, 95 % CI = 1.63-20.5). The European Organisation of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life, total pain score and pain interference showed no significance (p = 0.46, p = 0.9, p = 0.37 respectively). A trend was observed indicating that vitamin B12 may reduce the onset and severity of CIPN. An oral B group vitamin as an adjunct to neurotoxic chemotherapy regimens was not superior to placebo (p > 0.05) for the prevention of CIPN. Patients taking the B group vitamin perceived a

  5. Impact of the HIV-1 env Genetic Context outside HR1-HR2 on Resistance to the Fusion Inhibitor Enfuvirtide and Viral Infectivity in Clinical Isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baatz, Franky; Nijhuis, Monique; Lemaire, Morgane; Riedijk, Martiene; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Servais, Jean-Yves; van Ham, Petra M.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Koopmans, Peter P.; Sprenger, Herman G.; Devaux, Carole; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Bercoff, Danielle Perez

    2011-01-01

    Resistance mutations to the HIV-1 fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide emerge mainly within the drug's target region, HR1, and compensatory mutations have been described within HR2. The surrounding envelope (env) genetic context might also contribute to resistance, although to what extent and through which

  6. Coronavirus escape from heptad repeat 2 (HR2)-derived peptide entry inhibition as a result of mutations in the HR1 domain of the spike fusion protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Berend Jan; Rossen, John W. A.; Bartelink, Willem; Zuurveen, Stephanie J.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Duquerroy, Stephane; Boucher, Charles A. B.; Rottier, Peter J. M.

    Peptides based on heptad repeat (HR) domains of class I viral fusion proteins are considered promising antiviral drugs targeting virus cell entry. We have analyzed the evolution of the mouse hepatitis coronavirus during multiple passaging in the presence of an HR2-based fusion inhibitor.

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis Prevention Based on Its Predicted Incidence within the Datong Coal Mine Group in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fuhai; Liu, Hongbo; Yuan, Juxiang; Han, Bing; Cui, Kai; Ding, Yu; Fan, Xueyun; Cao, Hong; Yao, Sanqiao; Suo, Xia; Sun, Zhiqian; Yun, Xiang; Hua, Zhengbing; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the economic losses currently caused by coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) and, on the basis of these measurements, confirm the economic benefit of preventive measures. Our cohort study included 1,847 patients with CWP and 43,742 coal workers without CWP who were registered in the employment records of the Datong Coal Mine Group. We calculated the cumulative incidence rate of pneumoconiosis using the life-table method. We used the dose-response relationship between cumulative incidence density and cumulative dust exposure to predict the future trend in the incidence of CWP. We calculate the economic loss caused by CWP and economic effectiveness of CWP prevention by a step-wise model. The cumulative incidence rates of CWP in the tunneling, mining, combining, and helping cohorts were 58.7%, 28.1%, 21.7%, and 4.0%, respectively. The cumulative incidence rates increased gradually with increasing cumulative dust exposure (CDE). We predicted 4,300 new CWP cases, assuming the dust concentrations remained at the levels of 2011. If advanced dustproof equipment was adopted, 537 fewer people would be diagnosed with CWP. In all, losses of 1.207 billion Renminbi (RMB, official currency of China) would be prevented and 4,698.8 healthy life years would be gained. Investments in advanced dustproof equipment would be total 843 million RMB, according to our study; the ratio of investment to restored economic losses was 1:1.43. Controlling workplace dust concentrations is critical to reduce the onset of pneumoconiosis and to achieve economic benefits.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis Prevention Based on Its Predicted Incidence within the Datong Coal Mine Group in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Juxiang; Han, Bing; Cui, Kai; Ding, Yu; Fan, Xueyun; Cao, Hong; Yao, Sanqiao; Suo, Xia; Sun, Zhiqian; Yun, Xiang; Hua, Zhengbing; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the economic losses currently caused by coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP) and, on the basis of these measurements, confirm the economic benefit of preventive measures. Our cohort study included 1,847 patients with CWP and 43,742 coal workers without CWP who were registered in the employment records of the Datong Coal Mine Group. We calculated the cumulative incidence rate of pneumoconiosis using the life-table method. We used the dose-response relationship between cumulative incidence density and cumulative dust exposure to predict the future trend in the incidence of CWP. We calculate the economic loss caused by CWP and economic effectiveness of CWP prevention by a step-wise model. The cumulative incidence rates of CWP in the tunneling, mining, combining, and helping cohorts were 58.7%, 28.1%, 21.7%, and 4.0%, respectively. The cumulative incidence rates increased gradually with increasing cumulative dust exposure (CDE). We predicted 4,300 new CWP cases, assuming the dust concentrations remained at the levels of 2011. If advanced dustproof equipment was adopted, 537 fewer people would be diagnosed with CWP. In all, losses of 1.207 billion Renminbi (RMB, official currency of China) would be prevented and 4,698.8 healthy life years would be gained. Investments in advanced dustproof equipment would be total 843 million RMB, according to our study; the ratio of investment to restored economic losses was 1:1.43. Controlling workplace dust concentrations is critical to reduce the onset of pneumoconiosis and to achieve economic benefits. PMID:26098706

  9. Effect of professional mechanical plaque removal on secondary prevention of periodontitis and the complications of gingival and periodontal preventive measures: consensus report of group 4 of the 11th European Workshop on Periodontology on effective prevention of periodontal and peri-implant diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanz, M.; Bäumer, A.; Buduneli, N.; Dommisch, H.; Farina, R.; Kononen, E.; Linden, G.; Meyle, J.; Preshaw, P.M.; Quirynen, M.; Roldan, S.; Sanchez, N.; Sculean, A.; Slot, D.E.; Trombelli, L.; West, N.; Winkel, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The scope of this working group was to review: (1) the effect of professional mechanical plaque removal (PMPR) on secondary prevention of periodontitis; (2) the occurrence of gingival recessions and non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL) secondary to traumatic tooth brushing; (3)

  10. Resolved Millimeter Observations of the HR 8799 Debris Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilner, David J.; MacGregor, Meredith A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Matthews, Brenda; Su, Kate

    2018-03-01

    We present 1.3 mm observations of the debris disk surrounding the HR 8799 multi-planet system from the Submillimeter Array to complement archival ALMA observations that spatially filtered away the bulk of the emission. The image morphology at 3.″8 (150 au) resolution indicates an optically thin circumstellar belt, which we associate with a population of dust-producing planetesimals within the debris disk. The interferometric visibilities are fit well by an axisymmetric radial power-law model characterized by a broad width, ΔR/R ≳ 1. The belt inclination and orientation parameters are consistent with the planet orbital parameters within the mutual uncertainties. The models constrain the radial location of the inner edge of the belt to {R}in}={104}-12+8 au. In a simple scenario where the chaotic zone of the outermost planet b truncates the planetesimal distribution, this inner edge location translates into a constraint on the planet b mass of {M}pl}={5.8}-3.1+7.9 M Jup. This mass estimate is consistent with infrared observations of the planet luminosity and standard hot-start evolutionary models, with the uncertainties allowing for a range of initial conditions. We also present new 9 mm observations of the debris disk from the Very Large Array and determine a millimeter spectral index of 2.41 ± 0.17. This value is typical of debris disks and indicates a power-law index of the grain size distribution q = 3.27 ± 0.10, close to predictions for a classical collisional cascade.

  11. Do line managers’ have ‘linking pin’ in HR roles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ayyub Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present article aims to identify the possible line managers’ involvement factors in human resource (HR initiatives and its ‘linking pin’ to the HR roles. In this regard, few factors have been considered pertinent to line managers’ involvement factors in HR initiatives which are desire, self-efficacy, and HR support. Whereas, the considered dimensions of HR roles reviewed are strategic partner, change agent, employee champion, and administrative expert. Design/methodology/approach: The paper intends to provide a conceptual review of the past literature in the areas of HR roles and line managers and further justify the proposed conceptual framework that will move this work further. Findings: The review also showed that HR devolution to line managers will boost line managers’ participation and responsibility to practice HR roles at the workplace. Research limitations/implications: The main limitation of this review is no empirical evidence provided by the authors to support the literature of the article. All the provided literature is written based on the findings gained from the previous studies. Practical implications: Line managers’ involvement in HR Initiatives can increase the competency diversity among line manager. This in turn can help the organization to operate at high efficiency. Originality/value: There is a notable lack of research conducted to identify line managers’ involvement in HR. Therefore, this article contributes to the literature on the relationship between line managers and HR roles.

  12. Transgenic mice display hair loss and regrowth overexpressing mutant Hr gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kuicheng; Xu, Cunshuan; Zhang, Jintao; Chen, Yingying; Liu, Mengduan

    2017-10-30

    Mutations in the hairless (Hr) gene in both mice and humans have been implicated in the development of congenital atrichia, but the role of Hr in skin and hair follicle (HF) biology remains unknown. Here, we established transgenic mice (TG) overexpressing mutant Hr to investigate its specific role in the development of HF. Three transgenic lines were successfully constructed, and two of them (TG3 and TG8) displayed a pattern of hair loss and regrowth with alternation in the expression of HR protein. The mutant Hr gene inhibited the expression of the endogenous gene in transgenic individuals, which led to the development of alopecia. Interestingly, the hair regrew with the increase in the endogenous expression levels resulting from decreased mutant Hr expression. The findings of our study indicate that the changes in the expression of Hr result in hair loss or regrowth.

  13. Perception on prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT of HIV among women of reproductive age group in Osogbo, Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga-Bello AI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AI Olugbenga-Bello,1 WO Adebimpe,2 FF Osundina,3 ST Abdulsalam3 1Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology (LAUTECH, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria; 2Department of Community Medicine, Osun State University, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigera; 3Department of Community Medicine, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology (LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria Introduction: The fastest growing group of adults living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, is women. As more women contract the virus, the number of children infected in utero, intra-partum, and during breastfeeding has been growing. This study assessed the knowledge and attitude of women of child bearing age towards the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission (PMTCT of HIV. Materials and methods: This is a descriptive cross sectional survey of 420 women of the reproductive age group (15–49 years selected using a multistage sampling technique. Data were obtained using interviewer-administered, pretested, semistructured questionnaires. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software version 15. Results: A high level of awareness about HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS was observed among the respondents (99.8%. The knowledge about MTCT and PMTCT of HIV was high, 92.1% and 91.4%, respectively. However, a significant portion (71.27% of the study population had poor attitudes towards PMTCT of HIV. Conclusion: Despite the high level of awareness of HIV/AIDS, and good knowledge about MTCT and PMTCT of HIV/AIDS among the respondents, the attitude towards PMTCT is poor. There is need for the involvement of the stakeholders in bridging the gap between knowledge and attitude of prevention of MTCT of HIV among women. Keywords: HIV/AIDS, PMTCT, women, perception, knowledge, attitude

  14. Trends in the knowledge, attitudes and practices of travel risk groups towards prevention of malaria: results from the Dutch Schiphol Airport Survey 2002 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genderen, Perry J J; van Thiel, Pieter P A M; Mulder, Paul G H; Overbosch, David

    2012-05-29

    Previous studies investigating the travellers' knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) profile indicated an important educational need among those travelling to risk destinations. Initiatives to improve such education should target all groups of travellers, including business travellers, those visiting friends and relatives (VFRs), and elderly travellers. In the years 2002 to 2009, a questionnaire-based survey was conducted at the Dutch Schiphol Airport with the aim to study trends in KAP of travel risk groups towards prevention of malaria. The risk groups last-minute travellers, solo-travellers, business travellers, VFRs and elderly travellers were specifically studied. A total of 3,045 respondents were included in the survey. Travellers to destinations with a high risk for malaria had significantly more accurate risk perceptions (knowledge) than travellers to low-risk destinations. The relative risk for malaria in travellers to high-risk destinations was probably mitigated by higher protection rates against malaria as compared with travellers to low risk destinations. There were no significant differences in intended risk-taking behaviour. Trend analyses showed a significant change over time in attitude towards more risk-avoiding behaviour and towards higher protection rates against malaria in travellers to high-risk destinations. The KAP profile of last-minute travellers substantially increased their relative risk for malaria, which contrasts to the slight increase in relative risk of solo travellers, business travellers and VFRs for malaria. The results of this sequential cohort survey in Dutch travellers suggest an annual 1.8% increase in protection rates against malaria coinciding with an annual 2.5% decrease in intended risk-seeking behaviour. This improvement may reflect the continuous efforts of travel health advice providers to create awareness and to propagate safe and healthy travel. The KAP profile of last-minute travellers, in particular

  15. Trends in the knowledge, attitudes and practices of travel risk groups towards prevention of malaria: results from the Dutch Schiphol Airport Survey 2002 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Genderen Perry JJ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies investigating the travellers’ knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP profile indicated an important educational need among those travelling to risk destinations. Initiatives to improve such education should target all groups of travellers, including business travellers, those visiting friends and relatives (VFRs, and elderly travellers. Methods In the years 2002 to 2009, a questionnaire-based survey was conducted at the Dutch Schiphol Airport with the aim to study trends in KAP of travel risk groups towards prevention of malaria. The risk groups last-minute travellers, solo-travellers, business travellers, VFRs and elderly travellers were specifically studied. Results A total of 3,045 respondents were included in the survey. Travellers to destinations with a high risk for malaria had significantly more accurate risk perceptions (knowledge than travellers to low-risk destinations. The relative risk for malaria in travellers to high-risk destinations was probably mitigated by higher protection rates against malaria as compared with travellers to low risk destinations. There were no significant differences in intended risk-taking behaviour. Trend analyses showed a significant change over time in attitude towards more risk-avoiding behaviour and towards higher protection rates against malaria in travellers to high-risk destinations. The KAP profile of last-minute travellers substantially increased their relative risk for malaria, which contrasts to the slight increase in relative risk of solo travellers, business travellers and VFRs for malaria. Conclusions The results of this sequential cohort survey in Dutch travellers suggest an annual 1.8% increase in protection rates against malaria coinciding with an annual 2.5% decrease in intended risk-seeking behaviour. This improvement may reflect the continuous efforts of travel health advice providers to create awareness and to propagate safe and healthy travel

  16. A possible architecture of the planetary system HR 8799

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidemeister, M.; Krivov, A. V.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Fiedler, S.; Müller, S.; Löhne, T.; Neuhäuser, R.

    2009-08-01

    HR 8799 is a nearby A-type star with a debris disk and three planetary candidates, which have been imaged directly. We undertake a coherent analysis of various observational data for all known components of the system, including the central star, imaged companions, and dust. Our goal is to elucidate the architecture and evolutionary status of the system. We try to further constrain the age and orientation of the system, the orbits and masses of the companions, and the location of dust. On the basis of the high luminosity of debris dust and dynamical constraints, we argue for a rather young system's age of ⪉50 Myr. The system must be seen nearly, but not exactly, pole-on. Our analysis of the stellar rotational velocity yields an inclination of 13-30°, whereas i ⪆ 20° is needed for the system to be dynamically stable, which suggests a probable inclination range of 20-30°. The spectral energy distribution, including the Spitzer/IRS spectrum in the mid-infrared as well as IRAS, ISO, JCMT, and IRAM observations, is naturally reproduced by two dust rings associated with two planetesimal belts. The inner “asteroid belt” is located at ~10 AU inside the orbit of the innermost companion and a “Kuiper belt” at ⪆100 AU is just exterior to the orbit of the outermost companion. The dust masses in the inner and outer ring are estimated to be ≈1 × 10-5 and 4 × 10-2 Earth masses, respectively. We show that all three planetary candidates may be stable in the mass range suggested in the discovery paper by Marois et al. (2008) (between 5 and 13 Jupiter masses), but only for some of all possible orientations. For (M_b, M_c, M_d) = (5, 7, 7) Jupiter masses, an inclination i ⪆ 20° is required and the line of nodes of the system's symmetry plane on the sky must lie within between 0° an 50° from north eastward. For higher masses M_b, M_c, Md from (7, 10, 10) to (11, 13, 13), the constraints on both angles are even more stringent. Stable orbits imply a double (4

  17. HR MAS1H NMR and chemometrics as useful tool to assess the geographical origin of cocoa beans - Comparison with HR1H NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marseglia, A; Acquotti, D; Consonni, R; Cagliani, L R; Palla, G; Caligiani, A

    2016-07-01

    Chocolate and cocoa-based products are among the goods with higher added value. A current trend of the cocoa market is to offer to the consumers high quality cocoa products, namely mono-origin cocoa. However, a reliable analytical method able to trace the geographical origin of cocoa is lacking. In this work we tested the capability of HR MAS 1 H NMR combined with chemometrics to assess the geographical origins of 60 fermented and dried cocoa beans of 23 different cocoa producing countries from the three major crop-growing areas (Africa, Central/South America, Asia/Oceania). Metabolic profiling was determined by HR MAS 1 H NMR directly on cocoa powder after the method optimization. The same samples were also subjected to extraction and analysis with HR 1 H NMR. HR MAS 1 H NMR, as 1 H NMR analysis, allowed the simultaneous detection of amino acids, polyalcohols, organic acids, sugars, methylxanthines, catechins. Moreover, HR MAS allows the detection of lipids, not present in the aqueous extract utilized for 1 H NMR. The data set obtained is therefore representative of all classes of cocoa compounds. Untargeted HR MAS 1 H NMR and 1 H NMR datasets were utilized as fingerprint of the samples and elaborated with multivariate statistical methods. A targeted quantitative approach of selected metabolites was possible only with HR 1 H NMR data, because HR MAS 1 H NMR does not give reliable quantitative results. All the approaches adopted showed a discrimination of the cocoa origins. HR MAS presents the advantages to obtain a very rapid picture of the samples, comprising both lipophilic and hydrophilic components, avoiding any sample manipulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Women's responses to changes in U.S. Preventive Task Force's mammography screening guidelines: results of focus groups with ethnically diverse women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jennifer D; Bluethmann, Shirley Morrison; Sheets, Margaret; Opdyke, Kelly Morrison; Gates-Ferris, Kathryn; Hurlbert, Marc; Harden, Elizabeth

    2013-12-12

    The 2009 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) changed mammography guidelines to recommend routine biennial screening starting at age 50. This study describes women's awareness of, attitudes toward, and intention to comply with these new guidelines. Women ages 40-50 years old were recruited from the Boston area to participate in focus groups (k = 8; n = 77). Groups were segmented by race/ethnicity (Caucasian = 39%; African American = 35%; Latina = 26%), audio-taped, and transcribed. Thematic content analysis was used. Participants were largely unaware of the revised guidelines and suspicious that it was a cost-savings measure by insurers and/or providers. Most did not intend to comply with the change, viewing screening as obligatory. Few felt prepared to participate in shared decision-making or advocate for their preferences with respect to screening. Communication about the rationale for mammography guideline changes has left many women unconvinced about potential disadvantages or limitations of screening. Since further guideline changes are likely to occur with advances in technology and science, it is important to help women become informed consumers of health information and active participants in shared decision-making with providers. Additional research is needed to determine the impact of the USPSTF change on women's screening behaviors and on breast cancer outcomes.

  19. Calculation of numbers-needed-to-treat in parallel group trials assessing ordinal outcomes: case examples from acute stroke and stroke prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Philip; Hogg, Cheryl; Tracy, Michael; Pocock, Stuart

    2011-12-01

    Number-needed-to-treat describes the magnitude of the effect of an intervention, underpins health economic analyses, and is typically calculated for binary events. Ordered categorical outcomes provide more clinical information and their analysis using ordinal approaches is usually more efficient statistically. However, to date, techniques to calculate number-needed-to-treat based on ordinal outcomes for parallel group trials have had important limitations. Aims Numbers-needed-to-treat may be calculated for ordinal data from parallel group trials by using an unmatched comparison of all subjects or by generating matched pairs of patients nested within the study. The above approaches were assessed and compared with numbers-needed-to-treat calculated for binary outcomes using individual patient data from acute and prevention stroke trials testing the effect of interventions of varying utility and efficacy. Numbers-needed-to-treat were generally lower numerically for ordinal vs. binary, and matched vs. unmatched analyses, and the lowest in highly efficacious interventions: hemicraniectomy, ordinal matched 2.4 vs. ordinal unmatched 2.5 vs. binary matched 12 vs. binary unmatched 9 (one trial, 12 month outcome); alteplase, 4.5 vs. 6.6 vs. 8.4 vs. 8.4 (one trial with two parts, three-months); aspirin, 42 vs. 58 vs. 76 vs. 80 (one trial, six-months); and stroke units, 3.6-5.3 vs. 6.2 vs. 4.7-5.9 vs. 6.3-7.0 (two trials, three- to 60 months). Similar trends were seen for aspirin/dipyridamole vs. aspirin in secondary prevention, 22 vs. 20 vs. 31 vs. 31 (one trial, 24 months). Number-needed-to-treat may be calculated for ordinal outcome data derived from parallel group stroke trials; such numbers-needed-to-treat are lower than those calculated for binary outcomes. Their use complements the use of ordinal statistical approaches in the analysis of ordered categorical data. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2011 World Stroke Organization.

  20. The impact of HR-management on the company productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Аджибаева, Ажархан

    2014-01-01

    Данная статья посвящена вопросам эффективной системы управления человеческими ресурсами: Как функции HR-менеджмента влияют на продуктивность и производительность работников и компании. Человеческие ресурсы являются важнейшим фактором экономики. Человеческие ресурсы – это люди, составляющие трудоспособное население страны, обладающие определенным человеческим капиталом. Очевидно, что чем выше качество человеческих ресурсов, тем выше возможности для качественного экономического роста страны. Ус...

  1. Trends in knowledge, attitudes, and practices of travel risk groups toward prevention of hepatitis A: results from the Dutch Schiphol Airport survey 2002 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genderen, Perry J J; van Thiel, Pieter P A M; Mulder, Paul G H; Overbosch, David

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies investigating the travelers' knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) profile indicated an important educational need among those traveling to risk destinations. Initiatives to improve such education should target all groups of travelers, including business travelers, those visiting friends and relatives (VFR), and older adult travelers. In the years 2002 to 2009, a longitudinal questionnaire-based survey was conducted at the Dutch Schiphol Airport with the aim to study trends in KAP of travel risk groups toward prevention of hepatitis A. The risk groups last-minute travelers, solo travelers, business travelers, travelers VFR, and older adult travelers were specifically studied. A total of 3,045 respondents were included in the survey. Travelers to destinations with a high risk for hepatitis A had significantly less accurate risk perceptions (knowledge) than travelers to low-to-intermediate-risk destinations. The relative risk for hepatitis A in travelers to high-risk destinations was probably mitigated by less intended risk-seeking behavior and by higher protection rates against hepatitis A as compared with travelers to low-to-intermediate-risk destinations. Logistic regression analyses showed that an age >60 years was the only significant determinant for improvement of their knowledge. Trend analyses showed a significant change over time in attitude toward more risk-avoiding behavior and toward higher protection rates against hepatitis A in travelers to high-risk destinations. The KAP profile of the risk groups travelers VFR (irrespective of hepatitis A risk of their destination) and solo as well as last-minute travelers to high-risk destinations substantially increased their relative risk for hepatitis A. The results of this longitudinal survey in Dutch travelers suggest an annual 5% increase in protection rates against hepatitis A coinciding with an annual 1% decrease in intended risk-seeking behavior. This improvement may reflect the

  2. Lumbar supports for prevention and treatment of low back pain: a systematic review within the framework of the Cochrane Back Review Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, P.; van Tulder, M. W.; van Poppel, M. N.; Nachemson, A. L.; Bouter, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials. Lumbar supports are used in the treatment of low back pain, but also to prevent the onset (primary prevention) or recurrences of a low back pain episode (secondary prevention). To assess the effects of lumbar sup-ports for

  3. Clinical Application of Immunofluorescence I. Grouping β-Hemolytic Streptococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas B.

    1965-01-01

    Smith, Thomas B. (Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.). Clinical application of immunofluorescence. I. Grouping β-hemolytic streptococci. J. Bacteriol. 89:198–204. 1965.—Procedures are described for the production of antistreptococcal serum in rabbits and for the preparation of group-specific conjugates for Lancefield groups A, C, and G. A modification of the conventional technique of absorption and inhibition to prevent cross-reactions with common antigens was used with excellent results. In addition, a promising new approach to eliminating cross-reactions of group A conjugate with antigens of groups C and G by dilution with group A-variant antiserum was tested. A complete method is introduced that enables the clinical laboratory to report whether group A streptococci are present in a given throat culture well within 24 hr after the physician collects the sample. Images PMID:14255663

  4. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE. I. GROUPING BETA-HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SMITH, T B

    1965-01-01

    Smith, Thomas B. (Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.). Clinical application of immunofluorescence. I. Grouping beta-hemolytic streptococci. J. Bacteriol. 89:198-204. 1965.-Procedures are described for the production of antistreptococcal serum in rabbits and for the preparation of group-specific conjugates for Lancefield groups A, C, and G. A modification of the conventional technique of absorption and inhibition to prevent cross-reactions with common antigens was used with excellent results. In addition, a promising new approach to eliminating cross-reactions of group A conjugate with antigens of groups C and G by dilution with group A-variant antiserum was tested. A complete method is introduced that enables the clinical laboratory to report whether group A streptococci are present in a given throat culture well within 24 hr after the physician collects the sample.

  5. Studies on the intracellular localization of hHR23B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katiyar, Samiksha; Lennarz, William J.

    2005-01-01

    Yeast Rad23, originally identified as a DNA repair protein, has been proposed to participate in other cellular functions, i.e., the proteasome-degradation pathway, the process of spindle pole body duplication and as a component of the anaphase checkpoint. Two human homologs of yeast Rad23, hHR23A and hHR23B, exhibit high sequence homology with yRad23 and also have been shown to be involved in DNA repair and proteasome-dependent degradation. Previous studies on the intracellular localization of hHR23A and hHR23B revealed their predominant localization in the nucleus during interphase and in the cytoplasm during mitosis. We have analyzed the localization of hHR23B during all the phases of the cell cycle using immunofluorescence. Unlike previous studies, our results suggest localization of hHR23B in the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm during G1 phase. The nuclear levels of hHR23B decrease during S-phase of the cell cycle. When the cell enters mitosis, hHR23B relocalizes in the cytoplasm without association with chromatin. These results indicate that the intracellular distribution hHR23B is cell cycle dependent

  6. Worksite interventions for preventing physical deterioration among employees in job-groups with high physical work demands: Background, design and conceptual model of FINALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortensen Ole S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A mismatch between individual physical capacities and physical work demands enhance the risk for musculoskeletal disorders, poor work ability and sickness absence, termed physical deterioration. However, effective intervention strategies for preventing physical deterioration in job groups with high physical demands remains to be established. This paper describes the background, design and conceptual model of the FINALE programme, a framework for health promoting interventions at 4 Danish job groups (i.e. cleaners, health-care workers, construction workers and industrial workers characterized by high physical work demands, musculoskeletal disorders, poor work ability and sickness absence. Methods/Design A novel approach of the FINALE programme is that the interventions, i.e. 3 randomized controlled trials (RCT and 1 exploratory case-control study are tailored to the physical work demands, physical capacities and health profile of workers in each job-group. The RCT among cleaners, characterized by repetitive work tasks and musculoskeletal disorders, aims at making the cleaners less susceptible to musculoskeletal disorders by physical coordination training or cognitive behavioral theory based training (CBTr. Because health-care workers are reported to have high prevalence of overweight and heavy lifts, the aim of the RCT is long-term weight-loss by combined physical exercise training, CBTr and diet. Construction work, characterized by heavy lifting, pushing and pulling, the RCT aims at improving physical capacity and promoting musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health. At the industrial work-place characterized by repetitive work tasks, the intervention aims at reducing physical exertion and musculoskeletal disorders by combined physical exercise training, CBTr and participatory ergonomics. The overall aim of the FINALE programme is to improve the safety margin between individual resources (i.e. physical capacities, and

  7. Absolute risk representation in cardiovascular disease prevention: comprehension and preferences of health care consumers and general practitioners involved in a focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Rebecca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communicating risk is part of primary prevention of coronary heart disease and stroke, collectively referred to as cardiovascular disease (CVD. In Australia, health organisations have promoted an absolute risk approach, thereby raising the question of suitable standardised formats for risk communication. Methods Sixteen formats of risk representation were prepared including statements, icons, graphical formats, alone or in combination, and with variable use of colours. All presented the same risk, i.e., the absolute risk for a 55 year old woman, 16% risk of CVD in five years. Preferences for a five or ten-year timeframe were explored. Australian GPs and consumers were recruited for participation in focus groups, with the data analysed thematically and preferred formats tallied. Results Three focus groups with health consumers and three with GPs were held, involving 19 consumers and 18 GPs. Consumers and GPs had similar views on which formats were more easily comprehended and which conveyed 16% risk as a high risk. A simple summation of preferences resulted in three graphical formats (thermometers, vertical bar chart and one statement format as the top choices. The use of colour to distinguish risk (red, yellow, green and comparative information (age, sex, smoking status were important ingredients. Consumers found formats which combined information helpful, such as colour, effect of changing behaviour on risk, or comparison with a healthy older person. GPs preferred formats that helped them relate the information about risk of CVD to their patients, and could be used to motivate patients to change behaviour. Several formats were reported as confusing, such as a percentage risk with no contextual information, line graphs, and icons, particularly those with larger numbers. Whilst consumers and GPs shared preferences, the use of one format for all situations was not recommended. Overall, people across groups felt that risk

  8. Comparative study of the pharmacokinetics of carbon tetrachloride in the rat following repeated inhalation exposures of 8 and 11.5 hr/day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paustenbach, D.J.; Carlson, G.P.; Christian, J.E.; Born, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    To evaluate whether exposure to inhaled vapors for periods longer than 8 hr/day could affect the rates and routes of elimination, male Sprague-Dawley rats were repeatedly exposed to 100 ppm of radiolabeled carbon tetrachloride ( 14 CCl 4 ) in a closed-loop chamber. One group was exposed for 8 hr/day for 5 days and another group for 11.5 hr/day for 4 days. Two other groups were exposed for either 8 hr/day for 10 of 12 consecutive days or 11.5 hr/day for 7 of 10 days. The elimination of 14 C activity was measured in the expired air, urine, and feces for up to 100 hr following exposure and the pharmacokinetic parameters were determined. Following 2 weeks of exposure to the 8-hr/day schedule, 14 CCl 4 in the breath and 14 C activity in the feces comprised 45 and 48% of the total 14 C excreted, respectively. Following 2 weeks of exposure to the 11.5-hr/day schedule, the values were 32 and 62%, respectively, indicating that repeated exposure to the longer schedule altered the route of elimination of CCl 4 . Regardless of the period of exposure, less than 8% of the inhaled 14 CCl 4 was excreted in the urine and less than 2% was exhaled in the breath as the 14 CO 2 metabolite. Approximately 97-98% of the 14 C activity in the expired air was 14 CCl 4 . The quantities of 14 C noted in the feces and urine suggest that more than 60% of the inhaled CCl 4 was metabolized. Elimination of 14 CCl 4 and 14 CO 2 in the breath followed a two-compartment, first-order pharmacokinetic model (r2 = 0.98). For rats exposed 8 hr/day and 11.5 hr/day for 2 weeks, the average half-lives for elimination of 14 CCl 4 in the breath for the fast (alpha) and slow (beta) phases averaged 96 and 455 min, and 89 and 568 min, respectively. The average alpha and beta half-lives for elimination of 14 CO 2 in the breath

  9. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2 allosteric potentiators prevent sodium lactate-induced panic-like response in panic-vulnerable rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip L; Fitz, Stephanie D; Engleman, Eric A; Svensson, Kjell A; Schkeryantz, Jeffrey M; Shekhar, Anantha

    2013-02-01

    Rats with chronic inhibition of GABA synthesis by infusion of l-allyglycine, a glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibitor, into their dorsomedial/perifornical hypothalamus are anxious and exhibit panic-like cardio-respiratory responses to treatment with intravenous (i.v.) sodium lactate (NaLac) infusions, in a manner similar to what occurs in patients with panic disorder. We previously showed that either NMDA receptor antagonists or metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2/3 receptor agonists can block such a NaLac response, suggesting that a glutamate mechanism is contributing to this panic-like state. Using this animal model of panic, we tested the efficacy of CBiPES and THIIC, which are selective group II metabotropic glutamate type 2 receptor allosteric potentiators (at 10-30 mg/kg i.p.), in preventing NaLac-induced panic-like behavioral and cardiovascular responses. The positive control was alprazolam (3mg/kg i.p.), a clinically effective anti-panic benzodiazepine. As predicted, panic-prone rats given a NaLac challenge displayed NaLac-induced panic-like cardiovascular (i.e. tachycardia and hypertensive) responses and "anxiety" (i.e. decreased social interaction time) and "flight" (i.e. increased locomotion) -associated behaviors; however, systemic injection of the panic-prone rats with CBiPES, THIIC or alprazolam prior to the NaLac dose blocked all NaLac-induced panic-like behaviors and cardiovascular responses. These data suggested that in a rat animal model, selective group II metabotropic glutamate type 2 receptor allosteric potentiators show an anti-panic efficacy similar to alprazolam.

  10. Study Protocol: The Norfolk Diabetes Prevention Study [NDPS]: a 46 month multi - centre, randomised, controlled parallel group trial of a lifestyle intervention [with or without additional support from lay lifestyle mentors with Type 2 diabetes] to prevent transition to Type 2 diabetes in high risk groups with non - diabetic hyperglycaemia, or impaired fasting glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Melanie; Murray, Nikki; Bachmann, Max; Barton, Garry; Clark, Allan; Howe, Amanda; Greaves, Colin; Sampson, Mike

    2017-01-06

    This 7 year NIHR programme [2011-2018] tests the primary hypothesis that the NDPS diet and physical activity intervention will reduce the risk of transition to type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in groups at high risk of Type 2 diabetes. The NDPS programme recognizes the need to reduce intervention costs through group delivery and the use of lay mentors with T2DM, the realities of normal primary care, and the complexity of the current glycaemic categorisation of T2DM risk. NDPS identifies people at highest risk of T2DM on the databases of 135 general practices in the East of England for further screening with ab fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin [HbA1c]. Those with an elevated fasting plasma glucose [impaired fasting glucose or IFG] with or without an elevated HbA1c [non -diabetic hyperglycaemia; NDH] are randomised into three treatment arms: a control arm receiving no trial intervention, an arm receiving an intensive bespoke group-based diet and physical activity intervention, and an arm receiving the same intervention with enhanced support from people with T2DM trained as diabetes prevention mentors [DPM]. The primary end point is cumulative transition rates to T2DM between the two intervention groups, and between each intervention group and the control group at 46 months. Participants with screen detected T2DM are randomized into an equivalent prospective controlled trial with the same intervention and control arms with glycaemic control [HbA1c] at 46 months as the primary end point. Participants with NDH and a normal fasting plasma glucose are randomised into an equivalent prospective controlled intervention trial with follow up for 40 months. The intervention comprises six education sessions for the first 12 weeks and then up to 15 maintenance sessions until intervention end, all delivered in groups, with additional support from a DPM in one treatment arm. The NDPS programme reports in 2018 and will provide trial outcome data for a group delivered

  11. HR role of Front Office Manager in a hotel chain

    OpenAIRE

    Kývalová, Markéta

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to analyze the activities carried out by executive (Front Office Manager) in a specific company. The thesis first explains the concept of personal work of individual personnel actions and then analyzes the procedures used in the company Prague Spirit Group Ltd., which operates in the hotel industry. Individual personal activities, such as organizing workers, staff selection and adaptation, evaluation, remuneration and training of personnel and labor relations are comp...

  12. Comparison of illumigene Group A Streptococcus Assay with Culture of Throat Swabs from Children with Sore Throats in the New Zealand School-Based Rheumatic Fever Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Arlo; Bissessor, Liselle; Farrell, Elizabeth; Shulman, Stanford T; Zheng, Xiaotian; Lennon, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis is a particularly important condition in areas of New Zealand where the incidence of acute rheumatic fever remains unacceptably high. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of GAS pharyngitis are cornerstones of the Rheumatic Fever Prevention Programme, but these are hindered by the turnaround time of culture. Tests with excellent performance and rapid turnaround times are needed. For this study, throat swabs (Copan ESwabs) were collected from schoolchildren self-identifying with a sore throat. Samples were tested by routine culture and the illumigene GAS assay using loop-mediated isothermal amplification. Discrepant results were resolved by retesting of the same specimen by an alternative molecular assay. Seven hundred fifty-seven throat swab specimens were tested by both methods. The performance characteristics of the illumigene assay using culture on blood agar as the "gold standard" and following discrepancy analysis were as follows: sensitivity, 82% and 87%, respectively; specificity, 93% and 98%, respectively; positive predictive value, 61% and 88%, respectively; and negative predictive value, 97% and 97%, respectively. In our unique setting of a school-based throat swabbing program, the illumigene assay did not perform quite as well as described in previous reports. Despite this, its improved sensitivity and rapid turnaround time compared with those of culture are appealing. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Serum-epidemiological survey in a group of illegal immigrates for the evaluation of immunity against vaccine-preventable diseases in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bruno

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDuring the period May 2004 – December 2005 a serum epidemiological survey for preventable diseases through compulsory vaccination in Italy (diphtheria, tetanus, poliovirus, hepatitis B and rubella in women was performed in a group of adult and illegal immigrants living in Rome, to evaluate the relationship between vaccination coverage and socio-demographic characteristics.MethodsIt was carried out by Elisa test (for rubella, tetanus, diphtheria and hepatitis B and by neutralizing antibody titration (Poliovirus.Both descriptive analyses (calculation of mean, median, standard deviation, percentage and inferential statistics (hypothesis tests were used.ResultsSix hundred and sixty-seven immigrants were invited to participate and 318 of them performed the analysis (participation rate = 47.6 %.The percentages of immunized individuals were: 39.1% for diphtheria (basic immunization 59.3%, 74.8% for tetanus, 74.1% for poliomyelitis, and 94.7% for rubella. Only 2.8% was vaccinated against hepatitis B.ConclusionMost immigrants would need a booster dose for diphtheria and tetanus. Among Eastern European subjects Poliovirus vaccination coverage was lower than 70%, implying that the maintenance of high levels of it is strongly necessary. With regard to rubella, African women had the lowest coverage (87.5% and their young age exposes to congenital rubella. Over half of immigrants were healthy carriers for HBV.

  14. Physical examination instead of laboratory tests for most infants born to mothers colonized with group B Streptococcus: support for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2010 recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantoni, Luigi; Ronfani, Luca; Da Riol, Rosalia; Demarini, Sergio

    2013-08-01

    To compare 2 approaches in the management of neonates at risk for group B Streptococcus early-onset sepsis: laboratory tests plus standardized physical examination and standardized physical examination alone. Prospective, sequential study over 2 consecutive 12-month periods, carried out in the maternity hospitals of the region Friuli-Venezia Giulia (north-eastern Italy). All term infants were included (7628 in the first period, 7611 in the second). In the first period, complete blood count and blood culture were required for all infants at risk, followed by a 48-hour period of observation with a standardized physical examination. In the second period, only standardized physical examination was performed. Study outcomes were: (1) number of neonates treated with antibiotics; and (2) time between onset of signs of possible sepsis and beginning of treatment. There was no difference between the 2 periods in the rate of maternal colonization (19.7% vs 19.8%, P = .8), or in other risk factors. The interval between onset of signs of sepsis and starting of antibiotics was not different in the 2 periods. Significantly fewer infants were treated with antibiotics in the second period (0.5% vs 1.2%, P physical examination seem to offer no advantage over standardized physical examination alone; the latter was associated with fewer antibiotic treatments. Our results are in agreement with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's 2010 recommendations. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Canagliflozin for Primary and Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events: Results From the CANVAS Program (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Neal, Bruce; Perkovic, Vlado; de Zeeuw, Dick; Fulcher, Greg; Erondu, Ngozi; Shaw, Wayne; Fabbrini, Elisa; Sun, Tao; Li, Qiang; Desai, Mehul; Matthews, David R

    2018-01-23

    Canagliflozin is a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor that significantly reduces the composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and elevated cardiovascular risk. The comparative effects among participants with and without a history of cardiovascular disease (secondary versus primary prevention) were prespecified for evaluation. The CANVAS Program (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study) randomly assigned 10 142 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus to canagliflozin or placebo. The primary prevention cohort comprised individuals ≥50 years of age with ≥2 risk factors for cardiovascular events but with no prior cardiovascular event, and the secondary prevention cohort comprised individuals ≥30 years of age with a prior cardiovascular event. The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Secondary outcomes included heart failure hospitalization and a renal composite (40% reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate, renal replacement therapy, or renal death). Primary prevention participants (N=3486; 34%) were younger (63 versus 64 years of age), were more often female (45% versus 31%), and had a longer duration of diabetes mellitus (14 versus 13 years) compared with secondary prevention participants (N=6656; 66%). The primary end point event rate was higher in the secondary prevention group compared with the primary prevention group (36.9 versus 15.7/1000 patient-years, P <0.001). In the total cohort, the primary end point was reduced with canagliflozin compared with placebo (26.9 versus 31.5/1000 patient-years; hazard ratio [HR], 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-0.97; P <0.001 for noninferiority, P =0.02 for superiority) with no statistical evidence of heterogeneity (interaction P value=0.18) between the primary (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.74-1.30) and secondary prevention (HR, 0.82; 95

  16. Beyond shared savings : a multilevel analysis of the perceived value of HR shared services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, Jeroen Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Human Resource Shared Service Centers are introduced by organizations with the aim to create value for employees and managers. Although several studies uncovered the value potential of HR shared services (e.g. possibilities for reducing costs, improving HR service quality and increasing the

  17. How the impact of HR practices on employee well-being and performance changes with age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, T.A.M.; Guest, D.; Clinton, M.; Knight, T.; Jansen, P.G.W.; Dikkers, J.S.E.

    2013-01-01

    With changing retirement ages and an aging workforce, interest is growing on the potential contribution of relevant bundles of HR practices in eliciting well-being and performance among aging workers. Drawing on theories on lifespan development and self-regulation, we distinguished two bundles of HR

  18. 1+1=3 : De kansen van samenwerking tussen wetenschap en praktijk bij HR Analytics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, S.; Freese, C.

    2017-01-01

    In het artikel "1+1=3 De kansen van samenwerking tussen wetenschap en praktijk bij HR analytics" breken Sjoerd van den Heuvel en Charissa Freese een lans voor intensievere samenwerking tussen praktijk en wetenschap op het gebied van HR analytics. Immers, de één kan goed analyseren, de ander beschikt

  19. Experimental trials with V 4 HR and LaSota Newcastle disease virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experimental trials with V 4 HR and LaSota Newcastle disease virus vaccines administered to chicks via eye drop, drinking water and commercial feed Essais experimentaux avec des vaccins V 4 HR et LaSota contre le virus de la maladie de newcastle administres a l'aide des gouttes pour les yeux, de l'eau potable et des ...

  20. How can HR practices support front-end innovation and increase the innovativeness of companies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth; Andersen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    ' innovativeness. If HR is to support these activities, focus should be on broader issues such as team-based organising, founded on a questioning attitude and a management style with a high level of empowerment. In addition, traditional HR themes such as recruitment, training and development have...

  1. Data-driven HR how to use analytics and metrics to drive performance

    CERN Document Server

    Marr, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Traditionally seen as a purely people function unconcerned with numbers, HR is now uniquely placed to use company data to drive performance, both of the people in the organization and the organization as a whole. Data-driven HR is a practical guide which enables HR practitioners to leverage the value of the vast amount of data available at their fingertips. Covering how to identify the most useful sources of data, how to collect information in a transparent way that is in line with data protection requirements and how to turn this data into tangible insights, this book marks a turning point for the HR profession. Covering all the key elements of HR including recruitment, employee engagement, performance management, wellbeing and training, Data-driven HR examines the ways data can contribute to organizational success by, among other things, optimizing processes, driving performance and improving HR decision making. Packed with case studies and real-life examples, this is essential reading for all HR profession...

  2. How the impact of HR Practices on employee well-being and performance changes with age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, T.A.M.; Guest, D.; Clinton, M.; Knight, T.; Jansen, P.G.W.; Dikkers, J.S.E.

    2013-01-01

    With changing retirement ages and an aging workforce, interest is growing on the potential contribution of relevant bundles of HR practices in eliciting well-being and performance among aging workers. Drawing on theories on lifespan development and self-regulation, we distinguished two bundles of HR

  3. Diabetes Prevention and Management among Minority Ethnic Groups in Nicaragua: Findings from Phase 2 of a Community-Based Participatory Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newlin Lew, Kelley; Mitchell, Emma McKim; Mclean, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To (1) describe barriers to diabetes prevention and self-management, (2) explore how religious beliefs inform diabetes prevention and self-management and (3) describe community action strategies to address the problem of diabetes locally. Design: Qualitative, descriptive design. Setting: Three Moravian Churches located, respectively,…

  4. Effectiveness of the Surviving the Teens® Suicide Prevention and Depression Awareness Program: An Impact Evaluation Utilizing a Comparison Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Catherine M.; King, Keith A.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.; Sorter, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Youth suicide is a serious public health issue in the United States. It is currently the third leading cause of death for youth aged 10 to 19. School-based prevention programs may be an effective method of educating youth and enhancing their help-seeking. Most school-based suicide prevention programs have not been rigorously evaluated for their…

  5. Model for Using Hip-Hop Music for Small Group HIV/AIDS Prevention Counseling with African American Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Torrance; Braithwaite, Ronald L.; Taylor, Sandra E.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a HIV/AIDS preventive counseling protocol developed for use with African American young adults that makes use of hip-hop music. Contends that an increased understanding of the relationships that many African American young adults have with hip-hop music may be used by disease prevention personnel to educate these populations about…

  6. Rivaroxaban for Preventing Atherothrombotic Events in People with Acute Coronary Syndrome and Elevated Cardiac Biomarkers: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandor, Abdullah; Pollard, Daniel; Chico, Tim; Henderson, Robert; Stevenson, Matt

    2016-05-01

    As part of its Single Technology Appraisal process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the company that manufactures rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Bayer) to submit evidence of the clinical and cost effectiveness of rivaroxaban for the prevention of adverse outcomes in patients after the acute management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology, based upon the company's submission to NICE. The evidence was derived mainly from a randomised, double-blind, phase III, placebo-controlled trial of rivaroxaban (either 2.5 or 5 mg twice daily) in patients with recent ACS [unstable angina, non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)]. In addition, all patients received antiplatelet therapy [aspirin alone or aspirin and a thienopyridine either as clopidogrel (approximately 99 %) or ticlopidine (approximately 1 %) according to national or local guidelines]. The higher dose of rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily) did not form part of the marketing authorisation. A post hoc subgroup analysis of the licensed patients who had ACS with elevated cardiac biomarkers (that is, patients with STEMI and NSTEMI) without prior stroke or transient ischaemic stroke showed that compared with standard care, the addition of rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) to existing antiplatelet therapy reduced the composite endpoint of cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction or stroke, but increased the risk of major bleeding and intracranial haemorrhage. However, there were a number of limitations in the evidence base that warrant caution in its interpretation. In particular, the evidence may be confounded because of the post hoc subgroup

  7. Translational study of obesity management using the Diabetes Prevention Program "Group Lifestyle Balance" in primary care clinics and public hospitals from Mexico: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Giovanni Díaz-Zavala

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is the main modifiable risk factor for the development of chronic diseases in Mexico. Several randomized controlled trials have shown that intensive lifestyle programs are efficacious for the management of obesity. These programs include frequent sessions (14 or more contacts in the first 6 months focused on diet and physical activity and use a behavior change protocol. However, most Mexican primary care clinics and public hospitals apply traditional treatments for obesity management with limited results on weight loss. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP “Group Lifestyle Balance” for weight loss among adults with overweight and obesity from baseline to 6 months and from baseline to 12 months in primary care clinics and public hospitals from Sonora, Mexico. Material and Methods: This is a translational, multi-center, non-controlled, 6 and 12-month follow-up clinical study with a pre-test and post-test design. Healthcare providers from two primary care clinics, two hospitals and one university clinic will be trained with the DPP protocol to implement on their patients with overweight and obesity. Body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, depression, quality of life and stress scales will be measured in participants receiving the program at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Biochemical parameters will be measured at baseline and 12 months. The primary outcome is the change in body weight at 6 and 12 months. Discussion: This study will provide scientific evidence of the effectiveness of the DPP protocol as a model for obesity management in real world clinical practice among the adult Mexican population.

  8. A Pilot Study of a Group-Based HIV and STI Prevention Intervention for Lesbian, Bisexual, Queer, and Other Women Who Have Sex with Women in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; Weaver, James; Navia, Daniela; Este, David

    2015-06-01

    Limited research has evaluated interventions to reduce HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) vulnerability among lesbian, bisexual, and queer (LBQ) women, and other women who have sex with women. The Queer Women Conversations (QWC) study examined the effectiveness of a group-based psycho-educational HIV/STI intervention with LBQ women in Toronto and Calgary, Canada. We conducted a nonrandomized cohort pilot study. Participants completed a pre-test, post-test, and 6-week follow-up. The primary outcome was sexual risk practices, while secondary objectives included intrapersonal (self-esteem, STI knowledge, resilient coping, depression), interpersonal (safer sex self-efficacy), community (community connectedness, social support), and structural (sexual stigma, access to healthcare) factors. The study was registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov. Forty-four women (mean age 28.7 years) participated in a weekend retreat consisting of six consecutive sessions tailored for LBQ women. Sessions covered a range of topics addressing behavioral and social-structural determinants of HIV/STI risk, including STI information, safer sex negotiation skills, and addressing sexual stigma. Adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, sexual risk practices (β2=-2.96, 95% CI -4.43, -1.50), barrier use self-efficacy (β2=1.52, 95% CI 0.51, 2.53), STI knowledge (β2=4.41, 95% CI 3.52, 5.30), and sexual stigma (β2=-2.62, 95% CI -3.48, -1.75) scores showed statistically significant changes 6 weeks post-intervention. Initial increases in safer sex self-efficacy, social support, and community connectedness were not sustained at 6-week follow up, highlighting the need for booster sessions or alternative approaches to address social factors. Study results may inform HIV/STI prevention interventions, sexual health care provision, and support services tailored for LBQ women.

  9. Vocal problems of group fitness instructors: prevalence of self-reported sensory and auditory-perceptual voice symptoms and the need for preventative education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbach, Anna F

    2013-07-01

    To determine the prevalence and nature of both acute and chronic voice problems experienced by group fitness instructors (GFIs) and gather information about the level of education currently being received by fitness professionals, the source of their education, and their opinion on mandatory voice training to highlight potential training needs. Prospective self-completion questionnaire design. A total of 361 GFIs (81 males and 280 females), aged between 18 and 67 years currently active in the Australian fitness industry completed a self-report questionnaire distributed via SurveyMonkey. The prevalence of self-reported acute and chronic voice symptoms was high at 78.95% and 70.91%, respectively. Partial voice loss and hoarseness while instructing was experienced most often (57.62%), followed by partial voice loss and hoarseness immediately after instructing (46.81%). Aphonia after teaching was less frequently reported (9.97%). Over 25% of the total cohort reported chronic voice symptoms of increased hoarseness (39.61%), difficulty with high notes (31.58%), strained voice (32.13%), and limited singing range (27.7%). Only 30% of GFIs reported having received any voice education, with even fewer respondents (10%) receiving any practical voice training, despite 98.06% agreeing that formal voice education should be covered as a standard topic in all official GFI training. The results of this study confirm that voice problems represent a significant occupational hazard for GFIs. Speech-language pathologists and other voice professionals should consider taking a proactive stance in understanding the vocal demands of the profession and engage in training for instructors to prevent both acute and chronic voice problems. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ascertaining serum levels of trace elements in melanoma patients using PIXE and HR-ICPMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardes, S., E-mail: suene@if.usp.br [Physics Institute, University of São Paulo (Brazil); Tabacniks, M.H. [Physics Institute, University of São Paulo (Brazil); Santos, I.D.A.O.; Oliveira, A.F.; Shie, J.N. [São Paulo Federal University (UNIFESP), São Paulo (Brazil); Sarkis, J.E.S.; Oliveira, T. [Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN), Laboratory of Chemical Characterization (LCQ), Center for Chemistry and the Environment - CQMA, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is a serious and deadly form of skin cancer. However, patients’ chances of survival and recovery are considerably increased when it is diagnosed and treated in its early stages. In this study, trace element concentrations in serum samples from patients with melanoma were measured using PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission) and HR-ICPMS (High-Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry), with the purpose of correlating these concentrations with the disease. Blood samples from 30 melanoma patients and 116 healthy donors were collected at São Paulo Hospital (protocol CEP 1036/08 UNIFESP). Relevant clinical information on the patients has also been included in the statistical analysis. Analysis of the control group showed different P and Mg concentrations in individuals above and below 40 years of age. P, S, Ca, Cu and Zn concentrations in healthy individuals differed according to gender, highlighting the necessity to include age and gender variables in the case-control analysis. There were also differences in K, S, Ca and Se concentrations between the control and melanoma groups.

  11. Exploring the central characteristics of HR shared services: evidence from a critical case study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, Jeroen Gerard; Bondarouk, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    Human resource shared service centers (HR SSCs) are foreseen as improving HR service delivery for their end-users: employees, line managers and decentralized HR professionals. Although the concept expects the benefits of HR SSCs to come from centralizing knowledge and decentralizing the control

  12. RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 100-HR-3 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Four areas of the Hanford Site (the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas) have been included on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), more than 1000 inactive waste disposal and unplanned release sites on the Hanford Site have been grouped into a number of source and groundwater operable units. These operable units contain contamination in the form of hazardous waste, radioactive/hazardous mixed waste, and other CERCLA hazardous substances. Also included in the Tri-Party Agreement are 55 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities that will be closed or permitted to operate in accordance with RCRA regulations, under the authority of Chapter 173-303 Washington Administrative Code (WAC). Some of the TSD facilities are included in the operable units. This work plan and the attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study (RFI/CMS) for the 100-HR-3 operable unit. The 100-HR-3 operable unit underlies the D/DR and H Areas, the 600 Area between them, and the six source operable units these areas contain. The 100-HR-3 operable unit includes all contamination found in the aquifer soils and water within its boundary. Source operable units include facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of contamination. Separate work plans have been initiated for the 100-DR-1 (DOE-RL 1992a) and 100-HR-1 (DOE-RL 1992b) source operable units

  13. Model for using hip-hop music for small group HIV/AIDS prevention counseling with African American adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, T; Braithwaite, R L; Taylor, S E

    1998-10-01

    Currently little attention has been directed, with the exception of peer education efforts, to constructively develop new and innovative ways to promote HIV/AIDS primary prevention among African American (AA) adolescents and young adults. With this in mind, the aim of this conceptual effort is to present a HIV/AIDS preventive counseling protocol developed for use with AA young adults that makes use of hip-hop music, a form of music popularized by young AAs. The author contend that an increased understanding of the relationships that many AA young adults have with hip-hop music may be used by disease prevention personnel to educate these populations about protective factors for HIV. Making use of hip-hop music is one strategy for integrating counseling in prevention and health maintenance. The overall implications of using hip-hop music in health promotion are unlimited. First, this method makes use of cultural relevant materials to address the educational and health needs of the target community. Second, it is grounded in an approach that serves to stimulate cooperative learning based on peer developed content. Moreover, the use of this medium can be applied to other health promotion activities such as violence/harm reduction and substance abuse prevention, upon reviews of songs for appropriate content. The authors contend that such an approach holds heuristic value in dealing with HIV/AIDS prevention among AA young adults. Additional testing of the intervention is warranted in the refinement of this innovative intervention.

  14. Towards a Conceptual Model of HR Shared Services: the Employment of Intellectual Capital to Create Value for Employees, Managers and HR Professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, Jeroen Gerard; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Looise, Jan C.

    2009-01-01

    Human Resource Shared Services (HRSS) are established to reap the benefits of both centralization and decentralization through bundling intellectual capital and offering HR services that are adapted to the needs of clients and end-users. As a result, HRSS are believed to create value for end-users:

  15. The HIPAA privacy rule and HR/benefits outsourcing: does the business associate label belong on your recordkeeper?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, Denise D

    2004-01-01

    Employers that sponsor group health plans and serve as the plan administrator of those plans are required by the HIPAA Privacy Rule to execute business associate contracts with vendors that provide services on behalf of the plans. The business associate contracts must contain many specific provisions regarding the protection, use and disclosure of health information. This article looks at the implications of imposing business associate contract obligations on an integrated HR and benefits-outsourcing recordkeeper and cautions employers against an overly broad application of the requirements.

  16. Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. V. The Upper HR Diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris; Hahn, David [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, 116 Church St SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Martin, John C. [Barber Observatory, University of Illinois, Springfield, IL 62703 (United States); Weis, Kerstin, E-mail: roberta@umn.edu [Astronomical Institute, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany)

    2017-07-20

    We present HR diagrams for the massive star populations in M31 and M33, including several different types of emission-line stars: the confirmed luminous blue variables (LBVs), candidate LBVs, B[e] supergiants, and the warm hypergiants. We estimate their apparent temperatures and luminosities for comparison with their respective massive star populations and evaluate the possible relationships of these different classes of evolved, massive stars, and their evolutionary state. Several of the LBV candidates lie near the LBV/S Dor instability strip that supports their classification. Most of the B[e] supergiants, however, are less luminous than the LBVs. Many are very dusty with the infrared flux contributing one-third or more to their total flux. They are also relatively isolated from other luminous OB stars. Overall, their spatial distribution suggests a more evolved state. Some may be post-RSGs (red supergiants) like the warm hypergiants, and there may be more than one path to becoming a B[e] star. There are sufficient differences in the spectra, luminosities, spatial distribution, and the presence or lack of dust between the LBVs and B[e] supergiants to conclude that one group does not evolve into the other.

  17. Investigation of HV/HR-CMOS technology for the ATLAS Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Grabas, H.; Grillo, A. A.; Liang, Z.; Martinez-Mckinney, F.; Seiden, A.; Volk, J.; Affolder, A.; Buckland, M.; Meng, L.; Arndt, K.; Bortoletto, D.; Huffman, T.; John, J.; McMahon, S.; Nickerson, R.; Phillips, P.; Plackett, R.; Shipsey, I.; Vigani, L.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Kanisauskas, K.; Maneuski, D.; Benoit, M.; Di Bello, F.; Caragiulo, P.; Dragone, A.; Grenier, P.; Kenney, C.; Rubbo, F.; Segal, J.; Su, D.; Tamma, C.; Das, D.; Dopke, J.; Turchetta, R.; Wilson, F.; Worm, S.; Ehrler, F.; Peric, I.; Gregor, I. M.; Stanitzki, M.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Seidel, S.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Muenstermann, D.; Wang, R.; Zhang, J.; Warren, M.; Song, W.; Xiu, Q.; Zhu, H.

    2016-09-01

    ATLAS has formed strip CMOS project to study the use of CMOS MAPS devices as silicon strip sensors for the Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade. This choice of sensors promises several advantages over the conventional baseline design, such as better resolution, less material in the tracking volume, and faster construction speed. At the same time, many design features of the sensors are driven by the requirement of minimizing the impact on the rest of the detector. Hence the target devices feature long pixels which are grouped to form a virtual strip with binary-encoded z position. The key performance aspects are radiation hardness compatibility with HL-LHC environment, as well as extraction of the full hit position with full-reticle readout architecture. To date, several test chips have been submitted using two different CMOS technologies. The AMS 350 nm is a high voltage CMOS process (HV-CMOS), that features the sensor bias of up to 120 V. The TowerJazz 180 nm high resistivity CMOS process (HR-CMOS) uses a high resistivity epitaxial layer to provide the depletion region on top of the substrate. We have evaluated passive pixel performance, and charge collection projections. The results strongly support the radiation tolerance of these devices to radiation dose of the HL-LHC in the strip tracker region. We also describe design features for the next chip submission that are motivated by our technology evaluation.

  18. Luminous and Variable Stars in M31 and M33. V. The Upper HR Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris; Hahn, David; Martin, John C.; Weis, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    We present HR diagrams for the massive star populations in M31 and M33, including several different types of emission-line stars: the confirmed luminous blue variables (LBVs), candidate LBVs, B[e] supergiants, and the warm hypergiants. We estimate their apparent temperatures and luminosities for comparison with their respective massive star populations and evaluate the possible relationships of these different classes of evolved, massive stars, and their evolutionary state. Several of the LBV candidates lie near the LBV/S Dor instability strip that supports their classification. Most of the B[e] supergiants, however, are less luminous than the LBVs. Many are very dusty with the infrared flux contributing one-third or more to their total flux. They are also relatively isolated from other luminous OB stars. Overall, their spatial distribution suggests a more evolved state. Some may be post-RSGs (red supergiants) like the warm hypergiants, and there may be more than one path to becoming a B[e] star. There are sufficient differences in the spectra, luminosities, spatial distribution, and the presence or lack of dust between the LBVs and B[e] supergiants to conclude that one group does not evolve into the other.

  19. Recommendations of the Spanish Working Group on Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis (GETECCU) on the monitoring, prevention and treatment of post-operative recurrence in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domènech, Eugeni; López-Sanromán, Antonio; Nos, Pilar; Vera, Maribel; Chaparro, María; Esteve, María; Gisbert, Javier P; Mañosa, Míriam

    Despite the availability of new, powerful drugs for Crohn's disease, a significant proportion of patients will undergo an intestinal resection to control the disease as it develops. In the absence of an effective preventative treatment, the appearance of new intestinal lesions after surgery for Crohn's disease is the norm; this is known as post-operative recurrence and may appear very early on, even a few weeks after the surgical resection. Furthermore, the drugs that are currently available for the prevention of post-operative recurrence have a limited effect; up to 50% of cases present recurrent Crohn's disease activity despite the preventative treatment, which may require further surgery with the consequent loss of intestinal function, leading some patients to suffer from short bowel syndrome as an irreversible complication. The management of Crohn's disease patients who undergo an intestinal resection should thus be geared towards prevention, early detection and, in the worst case scenario, the treatment of post-operative recurrence. This article reviews the natural history, diagnostic measures, monitoring, prevention and treatment of post-operative recurrence, and proposes recommendations based on existing knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  20. Kosteneffectiviteitsanalyse van verschillende strategieën ter preventie van neonatale infectie met groep B-streptokokken [Cost-effectiveness analysis of a number of strategies in the prevention of neonatal infection with group-B streptococci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnders, M.E.B.; Akker-van Marle, M.E. van den; Dommelen, P. van; Amelink-Verburg, M.P.; Wouwe, J.P. van; Verkerk, P.H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To assess the cost effectiveness of four strategies in the prevention of neonatal infection with group-B streptococci (GBS). Design. Cost-effectiveness analysis. Method. A modelling study was carried out in which the effects and the fondercosts of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP)

  1. [Evaluation of the Relapse Prevention Guidance for drug-dependent inmates: the intervention using self-teach workbook and group therapy in a "Private Finance Initiative" prison --the second report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Ohji; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Imamura, Fumi; Wada, Kiyoshi; Ozaki, Shiro; Takeuchi, Yoshio; Hasegawa, Masahiko; Imamura, Yoko; Tania, Yuko; Adachi, Yasumori

    2011-06-01

    There has been no relapse prevention program for drug dependent inmates in Japanese prisons. Recently, "Relapse Prevention Guidance" program is provided to the adult male inmates in Harima Rehabilitation Program Center (HRPC), one of the newly founded "Private Finance Initiative" prisons. To evaluate the effectiveness of the program by comparing the outcomes between groups of inmates with different severity level of dependence. The program was provided to 89 subjects in HRPC. Inmates were classified into 4 groups according to the severity measured by the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST). After a month of waiting period, self-teaching workbook was provided to each inmate for 4 weeks. The educational program consisting of 8 weekly psychoeducational group therapies was then provided to each group of 10 inmates. The evaluation was conducted both at the beginning and at the end of the workbook and the educational program intervention by administering 2 self-reporting questionnaires; the Self-efficacy Scale for drug dependence (SES), and the 8th version of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale for drug dependence (SOCRATES-8D). Only the "mild" group showed significant increase in SES during waiting period. After the workbook intervention, "moderate" group showed significant decrease in SES, and increase in the recognition and the ambivalence subscale of the SOCRATES-8D. The same increase in the subscales of SOCRATES-8D was noted in "Severe" group. Educational program produced increase in the recognition and the taking steps subscales of SOCRATES-8D in "mild" group, increase in SES score and the taking steps subscale in "moderate", increase in SES score and total score of SOCRATES-8D in "severe" group. No significant change was noted in "very severe" group in any of the interventions. The "Relapse Prevention Guidance" is sufficiently effective, improving self-efficacy and motivation for change in drug dependent adult male inmates.

  2. Synthetic H-R diagrams as an observational test of stellar evolution theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, G.J.; Becker, S.A.; Brunish, W.M.

    1983-07-01

    Synthetic H-R diagrams are constructed from a grid of stellar models. These are compared directly with observations of young clusters in the LMC and SMC as a test of the models and as a means to determine the age, age dispersion, and composition of the clusters. Significant discrepancies between the observed and model H-R diagrams indicate the possible influences of convective overshoot, large AGB mass-loss rates, and the best value for the mixing length parameter

  3. Acute effects of Cu on oxygen consumption and 96 hr-LC 50 values ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The median lethal copper (Cu) concentration (96 hr-LC50) values for acute Cu toxicity for Tilapia sparrmanii (live mass: 30 ± 8g) in Mooi River hard water of dolomitic origin at 20° C, pH 7.9, was 68.1 µmol l–1. At this 96 hr-LC50 value the specific oxygen consumption rate (∉ O2) decreased by 44.2 (± 2.1) % from a ...

  4. Acute effects of Cu on oxygen consumption and 96 hr-LC 50 values ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute effects of Cu on oxygen consumption and 96 hr-LC 50 values in the freshwater fish Tilapia sparrmani (Teleostei: Cichlidae) in Mooi River hard water, South ... hr-LC50) values for acute Cu toxicity for Tilapia sparrmanii (live mass: 30 ± 8g) in Mooi River hard water of dolomitic origin at 20° C, pH 7.9, was 68.1 µmol l–1.

  5. The role of the corporate HR function in global talent management

    OpenAIRE

    Farndale, E; Scullion, H; Sparrow, P R

    2010-01-01

    We currently know little of the role of the corporate human resource (HR) function in multinational corporations regarding global talent management (GTM). GTM is explored here from two perspectives: increasing global competition for talent, and new forms of international mobility. The first considers the mechanisms of GTM, and the second, individual willingness to be mobile, especially in emerging markets, and the organizational capability needed to manage this talent. New corporate HR roles ...

  6. Site specific health and safety plan, 100-HR-3 pump and treat. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, B.G.

    1996-06-01

    The 100-HR-3 Operable Unit encompasses groundwater contamination underlying the 100-D and 100-H Areas. The primary contaminate is chromium VI. The sources of chromium contamination resulted from the use of sodium dichromate during past reactor operations. The purpose of the 100-HR-3 Pump-and-Treat system is to pump contaminated groundwater through aboveground ion exchange resin and then return the treated waster to the aquifer. This plan covers operation, maintenance, repairs, and pump removal/installation

  7. Measurement of 24-hr whole-body retention of Tc-99mMDP with a thyroid uptake probe: quantitative assessment of metabolic and metastatic bone diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seto, H.; Futatsuya, R.; Kamei, T.; Furumoto, N.; Ishizaki, Y.; Hada, M.; Kakishita, M.

    1983-01-01

    A new method for measurement of 24-hr whole body retention (WBR) of Tc-99mMDP, using a thyroid uptake probe was established and its clinical significance was evaluated in 102 patients with various bone disorders, including metabolic and metastatic bone diseases, aged above 20 years old. Reproducibility of 24-hr WBR in 10 patients was very good (r=0.996). The 24-hr WBR of Tc-99mMDP in the normal subjects was 30.4 +- 4.6%. The WBR values of chronic renal failure, metastatic bone disease and hyperthyroidism groups were 98.4 +- 3.0, 44.0 +- 8.0, 40,6 +- 6.3% respectively, which were significantly higher (p < 0.001). However the WBR of steroid-induced osteoporotic group was significantly lower (17.3 +- 5.4%) as compared with the normal group (p < 0.001). Based on these results the method is simple, reproducible and accurate to measure 24-hr WBR of Tc-99mMDP. Quantification of WBR is of great clinical value to diagnose metabolic bone disease and to follow-up metabolic and metastatic bone disease after treatment

  8. Principles in prevention of periodontal diseases: consensus report of group 1 of the 11th European Workshop on Periodontology on effective prevention of periodontal and peri-implant diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonetti, M.S.; Eickholz, P.; Loos, B.G.; Papapanou, P.; van der Velden, U.; Armirage, G.; Bouchard, P.; Deinzer, R.; Dietrich, T.; Hughes, F.; Kocher, T.; Lang, N.P.; Lopez, R.; Needleman, I.; Newton, T.; Nibali, L.; Pretzl, B.; Ramseier, C.; Sanz-Sanchez, I.; Schlagenhauf, U.; Suvan, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims In spite of the remarkable success of current preventive efforts, periodontitis remains one of the most prevalent diseases of mankind. The objective of this workshop was to review critical scientific evidence and develop recommendations to improve: (i) plaque control at the individual and

  9. Design of an internet-based health economic evaluation of a preventive group-intervention for children of parents with mental illness or substance use disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woolderink, M; Smit, H.F.E.; Zanden, R.; Beecham, J; Knapp, M.; Paulus, A; Evers, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Preventive interventions are developed for children of parents with mental and substance use disorders (COPMI), because these children have a higher risk of developing a psychological or behavioral disorder in the future. Mental health and substance use disorders contribute significantly

  10. Identification of infectious microbiota from oral cavity environment of various population group patients as a preventive approach to human health risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł J. Zawadzki

    2016-09-01

    Colonization of oral cavities of patients requiring surgical treatment by the potentially pathogenic bacteria constitutes the threat of their spread, and development of general infections. Assessment of oral cavity infectious microbiota should be performed as a preventive measure against peri-surgical complications.

  11. Other adaptations to training/inactivity in type 2 diabetics and other groups with insulin resistance: emphasis on prevention of CHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    Physical training is recommended for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease in the general population. In patients with type 2 diabetes this is even more important, because the risk of clinical atherosclerotic disease is 2- to 3-fold that of nondiabetics and the survival rate...

  12. Evaluation of Yoga for Preventing Adolescent Substance Use Risk Factors in a Middle School Setting: A Preliminary Group-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRusso, Amanda; Shin, Sunny H.; Khalsa, Sat Bir S.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a key developmental period for preventing substance use initiation, however prevention programs solely providing educational information about the dangers of substance use rarely change adolescent substance use behaviors. Recent research suggests that mind–body practices such as yoga may have beneficial effects on several substance use risk factors, and that these practices may serve as promising interventions for preventing adolescent substance use. The primary aim of the present study was to test the efficacy of yoga for reducing substance use risk factors during early adolescence. Seventh-grade students in a public school were randomly assigned by classroom to receive either a 32-session yoga intervention (n = 117) in place of their regular physical education classes or to continue with physical-education-as-usual (n = 94). Participants (63.2 % female; 53.6 % White) completed pre- and post-intervention questionnaires assessing emotional self-regulation, perceived stress, mood impairment, impulsivity, substance use willingness, and actual substance use. Participants also completed questionnaires at 6-months and 1-year post-intervention. Results revealed that participants in the control condition were significantly more willing to try smoking cigarettes immediately post-intervention than participants in the yoga condition. Immediate pre- to post-intervention differences did not emerge for the remaining outcomes. However, long-term follow-up analyses revealed a pattern of delayed effects in which females in the yoga condition, and males in the control condition, demonstrated improvements in emotional self-control. The findings suggest that school-based yoga may have beneficial effects with regard to preventing males' and females' willingness to smoke cigarettes, as well as improving emotional self-control in females. However additional research is required, particularly with regard to the potential long-term effects of mind–body interventions in

  13. Cost-effectiveness of HIV prevention for high-risk groups at scale: an economic evaluation of the Avahan programme in south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassall, Anna; Pickles, Michael; Chandrashekar, Sudhashree; Boily, Marie-Claude; Shetty, Govindraj; Guinness, Lorna; Lowndes, Catherine M; Bradley, Janet; Moses, Stephen; Alary, Michel; Vickerman, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Avahan is a large-scale, HIV preventive intervention, targeting high-risk populations in south India. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of Avahan to inform global and national funding institutions who are considering investing in worldwide HIV prevention in concentrated epidemics. We estimated cost effectiveness from a programme perspective in 22 districts in four high-prevalence states. We used the UNAIDS Costing Guidelines for HIV Prevention Strategies as the basis for our costing method, and calculated effect estimates using a dynamic transmission model of HIV and sexually transmitted disease transmission that was parameterised and fitted to locally observed behavioural and prevalence trends. We calculated incremental cost-effective ratios (ICERs), comparing the incremental cost of Avahan per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) averted versus a no-Avahan counterfactual scenario. We also estimated incremental cost per HIV infection averted and incremental cost per person reached. Avahan reached roughly 150 000 high-risk individuals between 2004 and 2008 in the 22 districts studied, at a mean cost per person reached of US$327 during the 4 years. This reach resulted in an estimated 61 000 HIV infections averted, with roughly 11 000 HIV infections averted in the general population, at a mean incremental cost per HIV infection averted of $785 (SD 166). We estimate that roughly 1 million DALYs were averted across the 22 districts, at a mean incremental cost per DALY averted of $46 (SD 10). Future antiretroviral treatment (ART) cost savings during the lifetime of the cohort exposed to HIV prevention were estimated to be more than $77 million (compared with the slightly more than $50 million spent on Avahan in the 22 districts during the 4 years of the study). This study provides evidence that the investment in targeted HIV prevention programmes in south India has been cost effective, and is likely to be cost saving if a commitment is made to provide ART to all

  14. The Comparison of the Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavior Therapy and Methadone Maintenance Therapy on Changing Beliefs Related to Substance and Relapse Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taherh Ghorbani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was aimed to compare of the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy and methadone maintenance therapy on changing beliefs toward substance abuse among addicted people. Method: The research method was a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest with witness group. 30 addicted people who were referred to the addiction treatment centers selected by available sampling, and they randomly assigned to three groups namely: cognitive-behavioral therapy, methadone maintenance therapy and witness groups. Substance abuse beliefs questionnaire was administered among all participants before and after intervention. Results: Results showed that in both experimental groups, beliefs toward drug was reduced significantly in comparison with witness group. Conclusion: Cognitive-behavioral therapy can be changed on cognitive mediator variables, like beliefs toward substance therefore, it can reduce the risk of relapse. However, the programs of treatment of substance abuse should be targeted this type of intermediate variables.

  15. HR 8844: A New Transition Object between the Am Stars and the HgMn Stars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, R.; Gebran, M.; Royer, F.; Kilicoglu, T.; Frémat, Y.

    2018-02-01

    While monitoring a sample of apparently slowly rotating superficially normal early-A stars, we have discovered that HR 8844 (A0 V) is actually a new chemically peculiar star. We first compared the high-resolution spectrum of HR 8844 with that of four slow rotators near A0V (ν Cap, ν Cnc, Sirius A, and HD 72660) to highlight similarities and differences. The lines of Ti II, Cr II, Sr II, and Ba II are conspicuous features in the high-resolution high signal-to-noise SOPHIE spectra of HR 8844 and much stronger than in the spectra of the normal star ν Cap. The Hg II line at 3983.93 Å is also present in a 3.5% blend. Selected unblended lines of 31 chemical elements from He up to Hg have been synthesized using model atmospheres computed with ATLAS9 and the spectrum synthesis code SYNSPEC48 including hyperfine structure of various isotopes when relevant. These synthetic spectra have been adjusted to the mean SOPHIE spectrum of HR 8844, and high-resolution spectra of the comparison stars. Chi-squares were minimized to derive abundances or upper limits to the abundances of these elements for HR 8844 and the comparison stars. HR 8844 is found to have underabundances of He, C, O, Mg, Ca, and Sc, mild enhancements of Ti, V, Cr, Mn, and distinct enhancements of the heavy elements Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Pr, Sm, Eu, and Hg, the overabundances increasing steadily with atomic number. This chemical pattern suggests that HR 8844 may actually be a new transition object between the coolest HgMn stars and the Am stars.

  16. Biochemical markers can predict the response in bone mass during alendronate treatment in early postmenopausal women. Alendronate Osteoporosis Prevention Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Clemmesen, B; Christiansen, C

    1999-01-01

    Data from the Danish cohort (n = 67) of a multicenter trial of oral alendronate in the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis were used to evaluate the capacity of the biochemical markers to predict changes in bone mineral density (BMD). A panel of markers were measured: serum N-terminal midfr......Data from the Danish cohort (n = 67) of a multicenter trial of oral alendronate in the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis were used to evaluate the capacity of the biochemical markers to predict changes in bone mineral density (BMD). A panel of markers were measured: serum N...... at month 6 in the biochemical markers for predicting prevention of bone loss in the spine over 2 years. The cutpoints used were a 30% (N-MID OC) or 50% (all other markers) decrease from baseline. Sensitivity levels were 82% (N-MID OC), 98% (total OC), 78% (sCL and NTX), and 89% (uCL). Specificities were 91...... at the spine were similar: sensitivity, 82%; specificity, 55%; and positive predictive value, 79%. In conclusion, short-term changes in biochemical markers were valid predictors of long-term changes in BMD. Short-term changes in the sensitive biochemical markers revealed a predictive capacity similar to bone...

  17. Evaluation of Yoga for Preventing Adolescent Substance Use Risk Factors in a Middle School Setting: A Preliminary Group-Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Bethany; LoRusso, Amanda; Shin, Sunny H; Khalsa, Sat Bir S

    2017-03-01

    Adolescence is a key developmental period for preventing substance use initiation, however prevention programs solely providing educational information about the dangers of substance use rarely change adolescent substance use behaviors. Recent research suggests that mind-body practices such as yoga may have beneficial effects on several substance use risk factors, and that these practices may serve as promising interventions for preventing adolescent substance use. The primary aim of the present study was to test the efficacy of yoga for reducing substance use risk factors during early adolescence. Seventh-grade students in a public school were randomly assigned by classroom to receive either a 32-session yoga intervention (n = 117) in place of their regular physical education classes or to continue with physical-education-as-usual (n = 94). Participants (63.2 % female; 53.6 % White) completed pre- and post-intervention questionnaires assessing emotional self-regulation, perceived stress, mood impairment, impulsivity, substance use willingness, and actual substance use. Participants also completed questionnaires at 6-months and 1-year post-intervention. Results revealed that participants in the control condition were significantly more willing to try smoking cigarettes immediately post-intervention than participants in the yoga condition. Immediate pre- to post-intervention differences did not emerge for the remaining outcomes. However, long-term follow-up analyses revealed a pattern of delayed effects in which females in the yoga condition, and males in the control condition, demonstrated improvements in emotional self-control. The findings suggest that school-based yoga may have beneficial effects with regard to preventing males' and females' willingness to smoke cigarettes, as well as improving emotional self-control in females. However additional research is required, particularly with regard to the potential long-term effects of mind-body interventions

  18. Preventing Undesirable Effects of Mutual Trust and the Development of Skepticism in Virtual Groups by Applying the Knowledge and Information Awareness Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Tanja; Kolodziej, Richard; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical studies have proven the effectiveness of the knowledge and information awareness approach of Engelmann and colleagues for improving collaboration and collaborative problem-solving performance of spatially distributed group members. This approach informs group members about both their collaborators' knowledge structures and their…

  19. Parental Control over Mate Choice to Prevent Marriages with Out-group Members A Study among Mestizos, Mixtecs, and Blacks in Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Abraham P.; Pollet, Thomas V.; Dubbs, Shelli

    The present research examined how a preference for influencing the mate choice of one's offspring is associated with opposition to out-group mating among parents from three ethnic groups in the Mexican state of Oaxaca: mestizos (people of mixed descent, n = 103), indigenous Mixtecs (n = 65), and

  20. Systematic review of the use of bone turnover markers for monitoring the response to osteoporosis treatment: the secondary prevention of fractures, and primary prevention of fractures in high-risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Jane; Rice, Stephen; Yang, Huiqin; Neilson, Aileen; Stirk, Lisa; Francis, Roger; Holloway, Paul; Selby, Peter; Craig, Dawn

    2014-02-01

    of a decision model was planned to determine the cost-effectiveness of bone turnover markers for informing changes in patient management if clinical effectiveness could be established. Forty-two studies (70 publications) met the inclusion criteria; none evaluated cost-effectiveness. Only five were randomised controlled trials (RCTs); these assessed only the impact of bone marker monitoring on aspects of adherence. No RCTs evaluated the effectiveness of bone turnover marker monitoring on treatment management. One trial suggested that feedback of a good response decreased non-persistence [hazard ratio (HR) 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53 to 0.95], and feedback of a poor response increased non-persistence (HR 2.22, 95% CI 1.27 to 3.89); it is not clear whether or not the trial recruited a population representative of that seen in clinical practice. Thirty-three studies reported results of some assessment of test accuracy, mostly correlations between changes in bone turnover and bone mineral density. Only four studies reported on intra- or interpatient reliability and reproducibility in treated patients. Overall, the results were inconsistent and inconclusive, owing to considerable clinical heterogeneity across the studies and the generally small sample sizes. As clinical effectiveness of bone turnover monitoring could not be established, a decision-analytic model was not developed. There was insufficient evidence to inform the choice of which bone turnover marker to use in routine clinical practice to monitor osteoporosis treatment response. The research priority is to identify the most promising treatment-test combinations for evaluation in subsequent, methodologically sound, RCTs. In order to determine whether or not bone turnover marker monitoring improves treatment management decisions, and ultimately impacts on patient outcomes in terms of reduced incidence of fracture, RCTs are required. Given the large number of potential patient population

  1. Cloning and characterization of an Echinococcus granulosus ecdysteroid hormone nuclear receptor HR3-like gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Mei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis is an important parasitic zoonosis caused by the dog tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. Little is known about adult worm development at the molecular level. Transcription analysis showed that the E. granulosus hormone receptor 3-like (EgHR3 gene was expressed in protoscoleces and adult worms, indicating its role in early adult development. In this study, we cloned and characterized EgHR3 showing that its cDNA contains an open reading frame (ORF of 1890 bp encoding a 629 amino acid protein, which has a DNA-binding domain (DBD and a ligand-binding domain (LBD. Immunolocalization revealed the protein was localized in the parenchyma of protoscoleces and adult worms. Real-time PCR analysis showed that EgHR3 was expressed significantly more in adults than in other stages of development (p<0.01 and that its expression was especially high in the early stage of adult worm development induced by bile acids. EgHR3 siRNA silenced 69–78% of the level of transcription in protoscoleces, which resulted in killing 43.6–60.9% of protoscoleces after 10 days of cultivation in vitro. EgHR3 may play an essential role in early adult worm development and in maintaining adult biological processes and may represent a novel drug or vaccine target against echinococcosis.

  2. PENGEMBANGAN PERSAMAAN VO2 MAX DAN EVALUASI HR MAX (STUDI AWAL PADA PEKERJA PRIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnawan Adi Wicaksono

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kapasitas fisik maksimum seseorang direpresentasikan dengan nilai konsumsi oksigen maksimum (VO2 Max dan denyut nadi maksimum (HR Max yang memberikan suatu informasi batasan kemampuan fisik maksimum seseorang dalam melakukan pekerjaan. Penelitian kali ini mempunyai tujuan untuk mencari nilai VO2 Max pekerja pria Indonesia untuk nantinya akan dikembangkan suatu persamaan prediksi VO2 Max yang didekati dengan hubungan linier antara denyut nadi (Heart Rate seperti yang dilakukan Astrand (2003, tinggi badan (Chatterjee et al, 2006, berat badan (Akalan et al, 2008, usia (Magrani et al, 2009 dan mengevaluasi persamaan HR Max manakah yang dapat diaplikasikan untuk mendekati nilai denyut nadi maksimum pekerja Indonesia. Responden dalam penelitian kali ini adalah 12  pekerja industri pria yang diambil dari beberapa industri di Depok dan sekitarnya. Kriteria responden yang berpartisipasi dalam penelitian kali ini adalah: berusia 20-40 tahun, bukan perokok baik aktif maupun pasif, sehat , tidak mengkonsumsi makanan, kafein, alkohol minimal 2 jam sebelum eksperimen (Balderrama et. al, 2007.Eksperimen yang dilakukan menggunakan metode maximal test dengan protokol treadmill. Adapun peralatan yang digunakan adalah seperangkat alat pengukur kondisi fisiologi Fitmate MED (COSMED srl-Italy terdiri dari Heart Rate Transmitter, Heart Rate Receiver, V mask (Hans Rudolph Inc,dan treadmill SportArt@60.  Eksperimen dilakukan menjadi dua bagian, yaitu istirahat dan tahap bekerja.Aktivitas istirahat terdiri dari tidur selama 20 menit, duduk selama 20 menit dan berdiri selama 10 menit. Eksperimen tahap kedua yaitu tahap kerja yang terdiri dari latihan selama 5 menit. Responden dipersilakan beristirahat selama 15 menit, setelah itu responden melaksanakan maximal test detik hingga responden merasa tidak sanggup lagi melanjutkan eksperimen. Hasil penelitian model prediksi VO2 max untuk pekerja industri pria mempunyai nilai 2,78 ± 0,5 liter/menit dan dengan regresi linier

  3. Comparative evaluation of heart rate-based monitors: Apple Watch vs Fitbit Charge HR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Hibbing, Paul; Mantis, Constantine; Welk, Gregory J

    2017-12-06

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the validity of energy expenditure (EE), steps, and heart rate measured with the Apple Watch 1 and Fitbit Charge HR. Thirty-nine healthy adults wore the two monitors while completing a semi-structured activity protocol consisting of 20 minutes of sedentary activity, 25 minutes of aerobic exercise, and 25 minutes of light intensity physical activity. Criterion measures were obtained from an Oxycon Mobile for EE, a pedometer for steps, and a Polar heart rate strap worn on the chest for heart rate. For estimating whole-trial EE, the mean absolute percent error (MAPE) from Fitbit Charge HR (32.9%) was more than twice that of Apple Watch 1 (15.2%). This trend was consistent for the individual conditions. Both monitors accurately assessed steps during aerobic activity (MAPE Apple : 6.2%; MAPE Fitbit : 9.4%) but overestimated steps in light physical activity. For heart rate, Fitbit Charge HR produced its smallest MAPE in sedentary behaviors (7.2%), followed by aerobic exercise (8.4%), and light activity (10.1%). The Apple Watch 1 had stronger validity than the Fitbit Charge HR for assessing overall EE and steps during aerobic exercise. The Fitbit Charge HR provided heart rate estimates that were statistically equivalent to Polar monitor.

  4. Direct detection and orbital analysis of the exoplanets HR 8799 bcd from archival 2005 Keck/NIRC2 data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Currie, T.; Fukagawa, M.; Thalmann, C.; Matsumura, S.; Plavchan, P.

    2012-01-01

    We present previously unpublished 2005 July H-band coronagraphic data of the young, planet-hosting star HR 8799 from the newly released Keck/NIRC2 archive. Despite poor observing conditions, we detect three of the planets (HR 8799 bcd), two of them (HR 8799 bc) without advanced image processing.

  5. The metabolic profile of lemon juice by proton HR-MAS NMR: the case of the PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Nicola; Corsaro, Carmelo; Salvo, Andrea; Vasi, Sebastiano; Giofré, Salvatore V; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Di Stefano, Vita; Mallamace, Domenico; Dugo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    We have studied by means of High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HR-MAS NMR) the metabolic profile of the famous Sicilian lemon known as 'Interdonato Lemon of Messina PGI'. The PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina possesses high organoleptic and healthy properties and is recognised as one of the most nutrient fruits. In particular, some of its constituents are actively studied for their chemo-preventive and therapeutic properties. In this paper, we have determined by means of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy the molar concentration of the main metabolites constituent the juice of PGI Interdonato Lemon of Messina in comparison with that of the not-PGI Interdonato Lemon of Turkey. Our aim is to develop an analytical technique, in order to determine a metabolic fingerprint able to reveal commercial frauds in national and international markets.

  6. Analysis of HR consultants and French recruiters activity on LinkedIn. In between work resource and quest of identity development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène HOBLINGRE

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates usage of LinkedIn by HR professionals. Based on twelve HR consultants and recruiters interviews, LinkedIn usage analysis highlights that this tool is used in a mix of private and professional practices. It sheds a light on the tension of using LinkedIn as a business tool versus LinkedIn as a tool to develop personal projects. Using LinkedIn in a professional context implies following norms and guidelines that impact user freedom. As a consequence, this prevents user from benefiting from all LinkedIn developmental capabilities. Eventually, our results stress the need for an individual to use LinkedIn as a reflective practitioner. This should be done in the light of building purpose to professional activities and accommodating functional usage with strategic practices.

  7. Estimation of Epidemiological Effectiveness of the Program of Pharmaceutical Prevention of Influenza and ARVI «Antigripp» in Organized Children's Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Yakovlev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors estimated epidemiological effectiveness of the program for prophylaxis of influenza and ARVI «Antigripp» for children of 7—12 years old. Children received Arbidol (capsules of 100 mg 2 times a week for 3 weeks and Complivit activ. As a result there was a decline in absolute and relative indicators of ARVI morbidity risks. Epidemiological effectiveness of the program during the application of the drugs made up 56% and index of preventive efficacy was 2,3.

  8. Qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 groundwater operable unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukelich, S.E. [Golder Associates, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-22

    This report provides the qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 operable unit on the Hanford Reservation. 100-HR-3 is a ground water unit. The purpose of the QRA at the 100-HR-3 operable unit is to focus on a predefined set of human and environmental exposure scenarios in order to provides sufficient information that will assist the Tri-Party signatories (Washington State Department of Ecology, EPA and US DOE) in making defensible decisions on the necessity of Interim Remedial Measures. Frequent- and occasional-use exposure scenarios are evaluated in the human health risk assessment to provide bounding estimates of risk. The ecological risk assessment consists of an evaluation of the risks to riparian and aquatic receptors which live in or near the Columbia River.

  9. A Role For HR In Corporate Ethics? South African Practitioners’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. van Vuuren

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Since few South African organisations have as yet appointed ethics officers, there is often a lack of clarity on who should take responsibility for coordinating organisations’ ethics management efforts. The purpose of this paper was to assess HR (the Human Resource function and its practitioners as a possible contender to assume responsibility for ethics management in SA organisations. To this end a mail survey was conducted among registered HR practitioners (N=410. Two factors related to 1 the extent of HR’s ethics management competence and 2 HR’s responsibility for ethics management, were identified. The results showed that HR practitioners on average believe that they indeed have an ethics management competence and that they should be involved in ethics management. However, practitioners with a great deal of exposure to organisations that manage ethics believe to a lesser extent that they should be involved in ethics management. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  10. Qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 groundwater operable unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukelich, S.E.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides the qualitative risk assessment for the 100-HR-3 operable unit on the Hanford Reservation. 100-HR-3 is a ground water unit. The purpose of the QRA at the 100-HR-3 operable unit is to focus on a predefined set of human and environmental exposure scenarios in order to provides sufficient information that will assist the Tri-Party signatories (Washington State Department of Ecology, EPA and US DOE) in making defensible decisions on the necessity of Interim Remedial Measures. Frequent- and occasional-use exposure scenarios are evaluated in the human health risk assessment to provide bounding estimates of risk. The ecological risk assessment consists of an evaluation of the risks to riparian and aquatic receptors which live in or near the Columbia River

  11. Site specific health and safety plan, 100-HR-3 pump and treat. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St John, C.H.

    1997-09-01

    The 100-HR-3 Pump and Treat system is a groundwater remedial action to remove Hexavalent Chromium (Cr+6) from the groundwater underlying the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. This plan covers operation, maintenance, repairs, resin exchange and equipment removal/installation. The 100-HR-3 Operable Unit addresses groundwater underlying the 100-D Area. The primary groundwater contaminant is Chromium +6. The chromium contamination resulted from the use of sodium dichromate during past reactor operations. Sodium dichromate was used to treat reactor coolant water during reactor operations. The purpose of this Pump and Treat system is to pump contaminated groundwater through above ground ion exchange resin and then return treated water to aquifer. Chromium levels extracted from the wells are anticipated to range in the low parts per billion (∼50 ppb) which is the drinking water limit for Cr+6

  12. Trends in Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Travel Risk Groups Toward Prevention of Hepatitis A: Results From the Dutch Schiphol Airport Survey 2002 to 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Genderen, Perry J. J.; van Thiel, Pieter P. A. M.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; Overbosch, David

    2012-01-01

    Background. Previous studies investigating the travelers' knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) profile indicated an important educational need among those traveling to risk destinations. Initiatives to improve such education should target all groups of travelers, including business travelers,

  13. Trends in the knowledge, attitudes and practices of travel risk groups towards prevention of malaria: Results from the Dutch Schiphol airport survey 2002 to 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.J. van Genderen (Perry); P.P.A.M. van Thiel (Pieter P. A.); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); D. Overbosch (David)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Previous studies investigating the travellers knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) profile indicated an important educational need among those travelling to risk destinations. Initiatives to improve such education should target all groups of travellers, including business

  14. Trends in the knowledge, attitudes and practices of travel risk groups towards prevention of malaria: results from the Dutch Schiphol Airport Survey 2002 to 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Genderen, Perry J. J.; van Thiel, Pieter P. A. M.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; Overbosch, David; Hoebe, Christian; Felix, Sietse

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous studies investigating the travellers' knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) profile indicated an important educational need among those travelling to risk destinations. Initiatives to improve such education should target all groups of travellers, including business

  15. Melatonin prevents experimental preterm labor and increases offspring survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Rubio, Ana P; Sordelli, Micaela S; Salazar, Ana I; Aisemberg, Julieta; Bariani, María V; Cella, Maximiliano; Rosenstein, Ruth E; Franchi, Ana M

    2014-03-01

    Preterm delivery is the leading cause of neonatal mortality and contributes to delayed physical and cognitive development in children. At present, there is no efficient therapy to prevent preterm labor. A large body of evidence suggests that intra-amniotic infections may be a significant and potentially preventable cause of preterm birth. This work assessed the effect of melatonin in a murine model of inflammation-associated preterm delivery which mimics central features of preterm infection in humans. For this purpose, preterm labor was induced in BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal injections of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at 10.00 hr (10 μg LPS) and 13.00 hr (20 μg LPS) on day 15 of pregnancy. On day 14 of pregnancy, a pellet of melatonin (25 mg) had been subcutaneously implanted into a group of animals. In the absence of melatonin, a 100% incidence of preterm birth was observed in LPS-treated animals, and the fetuses showed widespread damage. By comparison, treatment with melatonin prevented preterm birth in 50% of the cases, and all pups from melatonin-treated females were born alive and their body weight did not differ from control animals. Melatonin significantly prevented the LPS-induced rises in uterine prostaglandin (PG) E2 , PGF2α, and cyclooxygenase-2 protein levels. In addition, melatonin prevented the LPS-induced increase in uterine nitric oxide (NO) production, inducible NO synthase protein, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) levels. Collectively, our results suggest that melatonin could be a new therapeutic tool to prevent preterm labor and to increase offspring survival. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Primary Prevention Programme for Burnout-Endangered Teachers: Follow-Up Effectiveness of a Combined Group and Individual Intervention of AFA Breathing Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Goetz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Early retirement of teachers due to burnout is frequent in Germany. In this study short- and medium-term effects of AFA breathing therapy were evaluated. Methods. This study was designed as a longitudinal controlled intervention design with four points of measurements: before assessment (T1, after intervention (T2, three months (follow up 1 (T3 after intervention, and six months (follow up 2 after intervention (T4. The intervention lasted a total of 11 weeks (weekly group therapy for eight weeks and three weeks of individual breathing session. The effects of intervention were measured with the questionnaire “work-related behaviour and experience Patterns” (AVEM at four times. Results. In the intervention group 64 teachers and in the self-selected control group 27 teachers were included. The AVEM scales “subjective significance of work” and “professional ambition” changed over time and within both groups (interaction effect. Significant improvements over the four measurements were observed in the intervention group in two AVEM scales: “emotional distancing” (F=6.3; P<0.01 and “balance and mental stability” (F=4.4; P<0.02. Conclusions. AFA breathing therapy showed short- and medium-term effects in the intervention group over four points of measurements. It may be assumed that breath therapy supports teachers in resisting occupational demand.

  17. The Evolution of the Personnel Function in Capital Group (Case of Zywiec Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Borkowska

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article constitutes a detailed case study on the evolution on the personnel function in Zywiec Group that followed from the restructuring of the member breweries of the capital group. It covers the process of integration of the Group and changes to the human resources management system. It also contains theoretical reflections upon the role of HR specialists in the process of the integration of the companies. The organization of the personnel function has been presented here against a period spanning 3 years of G activity (wider range of HR responsibility, increase in the number of specialists employed in HR, lower age, higher level of education.

  18. Clinical evaluation of wide-latitude HR-C film for chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Sung; Hwang, Nam Sun; Yeo, Young Bok; Lee, In Ja; Huh, Joon

    1990-01-01

    In application of wide latitude HR-C film to chest x-ray examination, former x-ray diagnosis area is larger and diagnostic information has great deal of promotion. HR-C film is compare to former x-ray film is larger latitude and density level is small, reading is very easily. Especially, high estimate that is in characteristic curve linearity of toe part is good, contrast of low density made good shape and not good describe to overlap is diagnostic information increase mediastinum portion etc

  19. The role of vascular biomarkers for primary and secondary prevention. A position paper from the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on peripheral circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Xaplanteris, Panagiotis; Aboyans, Victor

    2015-01-01

    as a substitute for a clinical endpoint. In order to be considered as a surrogate endpoint of cardiovascular events, a biomarker should satisfy several criteria, such as proof of concept, prospective validation, incremental value, clinical utility, clinical outcomes, cost-effectiveness, ease of use......, methodological consensus, and reference values. We scrutinized the role of peripheral (i.e. not related to coronary circulation) noninvasive vascular biomarkers for primary and secondary cardiovascular disease prevention. Most of the biomarkers examined fit within the concept of early vascular aging. Biomarkers...... haemodynamics/wave reflections and C-reactive protein; biomarkers that do no not at present fulfill essential criteria are flow-mediated dilation, endothelial peripheral arterial tonometry, oxidized LDL and dysfunctional HDL. Nevertheless, it is still unclear whether a specific vascular biomarker is overly...

  20. [Recommendations of the Spanish Paediatric Endocrinology Society Working Group on Obesity on eating habits for the prevention of obesity and cardiovascular risk factors in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo Atance, E; Bahíllo Curieses, P; Bueno Lozano, G; Feliu Rovira, A; Gil-Campos, M; Lechuga-Sancho, A M; Ruiz Cano, R; Vela Desojo, A

    2016-03-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with a high risk of cardiovascular disease and early mortality. This paper summarises the currently available evidence on the implications of dietary factors on the development and prevention of obesity in paediatric patients. Evidence-based recommendations are: promote the consumption of slowly absorbed carbohydrates and reduce those with a high-glycaemic-index, avoid intake of sugar-sweetened beverages. Fat may provide up to 30-35% of the daily energy intake and saturated fat should provide no more than 10% of daily energy intake; reduce cholesterol intake, avoid formula milk with a high protein content during the first year; promote higher fibre content in the diet, reduce sodium intake, and have at least four meals a day, avoiding regular consumption of fast food and snacks. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. [Evaluation of the relapse prevention guidance for drug-dependent inmates: the intervention using self-teach workbook and group therapy in a "private finance initiative" prison--the first report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Imamura, Fumie; Kobayashi, Ohji; Wada, Kiyoshi; Ozaki, Shiro; Takeuchi, Yoshio; Hasegawa, Masahiko; Imamura, Yoko; Tania, Yuko; Adachi, Yasumori

    2011-04-01

    In Japan, methamphetamine (MAP) abuse has been a serious problem for 60 years, and many of MAP abusers have been incarcerated in prisons as a violator of the Stimulant Control Law in Japan. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate effectiveness of the relapse prevention guidance for drug-dependent inmates using a self-teaching workbook for drug-abusing adolescents and group therapy, conducted in the Harima Rehabilitation Program Center, one of the new prisons which the Ministry of Justice founded cooperating private enterprises as a "Private Finance Initiative" project. We provided for 89 male drug-dependent inmates, incarcerated in the Harima Rehabilitation Program Center, with the relapse prevention guidance consisting of a self-teaching workbook and group therapy, and implement pre-and post-evaluations by the Self-efficacy Scale for Drug Dependence (SES) and the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale, 8th version for Drug Dependence (SOCRATES-8D). After a waiting term, the participants were provided with a self-teaching program, subsequently with a group program. At the point of completing the waiting term, no significant changes were observed in the SES and SOCRATES-8D scores. However, at the point of completing the self-teaching program, the SES scores significantly fell, while the total SOCRATES-8D score and the scores of the two subscales, the "Recognition" and "Ambivalence," significantly rose. Further, at the point of completing the group program, the total scores of the SES and SOCRATES-8D, and the score of the two SOCRATES-8D subscales, the "Recognition" and "Taking Steps," significantly rose. The relapse prevention guidance consisting of a self-teaching workbook and group therapy, conducted in the Harima Rehabilitation Program Center, were supposed to bring same internal changes as the "Stage of Changes" model, proposed by Prochaska and DiClemente, to drug-dependent inmates.

  2. Women in high places : When and why promoting women into top positions can harm them individually or as a group (and how to prevent this)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellemers, Naomi; Rink, Floor; Derks, Belle; Ryan, Michelle K.

    2012-01-01

    This contribution focuses on women in leadership positions. We propose that two convictions are relevant to the effects of having women in high places. On the one hand, women as a group are expected to employ different leadership styles than men, in this way adding diversity to management teams. On

  3. Effects of Small-Group Tutoring with and without Validated Classroom Instruction on At-Risk Students' Math Problem Solving: Are Two Tiers of Prevention Better than One?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Fuchs, Douglas; Craddock, Caitlin; Hollenbeck, Kurstin N.; Hamlett, Carol L.; Schatschneider, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of small-group tutoring with and without validated classroom instruction on at-risk students' math problem solving. Stratifying within schools, 119 3rd-grade classes were randomly assigned to conventional or validated problem-solving instruction (Hot Math, schema-broadening instruction). Students identified as at…

  4. CERN HR receives award for on-line recruitment and communication

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    In a survey of 21,000 European students, CERN ranked 15th, ahead of giants like Microsoft and Nestlé, for the quality of its on-line "talent communication", that is how it uses the Internet to attract job applicants. HR now boasts a new virtual award, certifying its on-line savvy.   The "virtual" award given to HR. How did you get your job at CERN? Via the CERN HR website, or Facebook, or Twitter? Or were you headhunted on LinkedIn? Particularly if you’re from the younger generation, chances are that you used some form of on-line recruitment. In this case you will have used one of the best recruitment tools in Europe, according to the 2012 OTaC (Online Talent Communication) study, carried out by a research institute named Potentialpark. It surveyed over 21,000 students, asking them to rate employers’ use of seven different channels of communication about jobs and careers, from HR websites and on-line application systems to the...

  5. 1+1=3 De kansen van samenwerking tussen wetenschap en praktijk bij HR analytics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charissa Freese; Sjoerd van den Heuvel

    2017-01-01

    Wanneer we over HRM en technologie spreken, kunnen we niet meer heen om HR analytics. Gefaciliteerd door de alsmaar groeiende hoeveelheid beschikbare data, oftewel Big Data, proberen organisaties momenteel volop waardevolle inzichten uit de bijna oneindige hoeveelheid data te genereren. Samenwerking

  6. Getting People Involved: The Benefit of Intellectual Capital Management for Addressing HR Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pook, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the benefits of intellectual capital assessment for facing current challenges of human resources work and organizational development. Design/methodology/approach: The paper takes findings of studies on challenges in HR work and maps them with features of intellectual capital assessment methods. It is thus a…

  7. The effect of individual HR domains on financial performance : Evidence from Belgian small businesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faems, D; Sels, L; De Winne, S; Maes, J

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of this study, which assesses the influence of HRM on financial performance, is fourfold. (1) We assess the relative contribution of different HR domains to organizational performance. By controlling for the overall HRM intensity in all analyses we try to meet one of the most

  8. Epstein-Barr HR-1 Virion DNA Is Very Highly Methylated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diala, Edward S.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    The virion DNA of Epstein-Barr virus strain HR-1 was found to be methylated to a very large extent, approaching 15%. This extent of methylation is in great contrast to other classes of tumor viruses, and it is the highest that we know of in any mammalian system. PMID:6296457

  9. Ribociclib for post-menopausal women with HR+/HER2- advanced or metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangardi, Mark L; Spring, Laura M; Blouin, Gayle C; Bardia, Aditya

    2017-11-01

    The introduction of CDK4/6 inhibitors, such as ribociclib, has changed the treatment landscape for post-menopausal women with HR+/HER2- advanced or metastatic breast cancer. As first-line treatment of HR+/HER2- MBC, the addition of a CDK4/6 inhibitor to an aromatase inhibitor improves progression-free survival compared to an aromatase inhibitor alone. Areas covered: In this drug profile, we review the current market for HR+/HER2- MBC, as well as the characteristics, mechanism, pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, clinical efficacy, toxicities, monitoring, and dosing modification of the CDK4/6 inhibitor ribociclib. Expert commentary: CDK4/6 inhibitors, such as ribociclib, improve outcomes in post-menopausal women with HR+/HER2- MBC. The most common toxicity of ribociclib is neutropenia, which is generally not complicated and can be managed with dose modification and/or supportive care measures. Additional research will help better define the optimal clinical use of ribociclib.

  10. HR professionals exploring cooperative configurational human resource management using a serious game: what do they miss?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collou, Luuk Dirk; Bruinsma, Guido Wybe Jan; van Riemsdijk, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    Configurational thinking in HRM is expected to increase understanding of the HRM-firm performance link and potentially aid HR professionals in the complex task of designing effective HRM. Here, we specify configurational theory in HRM to a level of detail that has been lacking. We present two

  11. GFZ HR/LL GPS Ground station networks and their use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigber, C.; Galas, R.; Koehler, W.; Forberg, M.; Ramatschi, M.

    2003-12-01

    The contribution presents GFZ's global and local High-Rate and Low-Latency GPS networks. The global HR/LL network was established, in collaboration with JPL, to support the CHAMP and GRACE POD activities and the radio occultation experiment on both missions. The GFZ sub-network is composed of 13 continuously tracking stations, generating 15-min 1 Hz GPS data files and transmitting them to GFZ every 15 minutes. Eight stations contribute to the Galileo mission preparations. Since early 2003 eight HR sites are streaming GPS data in real time. Three of them take part in the IGS Real-Time Prototype Network. GPS HR/LL network for deformation monitoring is an example of local HR/LL GPS array. This 1 Hz network was installed on Popocapetel volcano end of 1999. For the calibration of satellite altimetry, an autonomous 10 Hz GPS-Buoy was developed by GFZ and is operating in the North Sea. The presentation describes shortly the three systems and discusses issues such as: data performance, real-time data aspects and quality monitoring. Application results from ultra-rapid CHAMP/GRACE orbit processing, radio-occultation routine processing, buoy monitoring and volcano monitoring in geodesy, geophysics and meteorology will be presented.

  12. Creep properties of simulated heat-affected zone of HR3C austenitic steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenička, Václav; Kuchařová, Květa; Kvapilová, Marie; Svoboda, Milan; Král, Petr; Dvořák, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 128, JUN (2017), s. 238-247 ISSN 1044-5803 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : HR3C steel * Welding * Heat affected zone * Creep * Microstructure * Fractography Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 2.714, year: 2016

  13. CHARACTERIZING THE ATMOSPHERES OF THE HR8799 PLANETS WITH HST/WFC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, Abhijith; Patience, Jennifer [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85282 (United States); Barman, Travis [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Soummer, Rémi; Hagan, J. Brendan; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Élodie [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Konopacky, Quinn [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Macintosh, Bruce [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Marois, Christian [National Research Council of Canada Herzberg, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2015-08-20

    We present results from a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) program characterizing the atmospheres of the outer two planets in the HR8799 system. The images were taken over 15 orbits in three near-infrared (near-IR) medium-band filters—F098M, F127M, and F139M—using the Wide Field Camera 3. One of the three filters is sensitive to a water absorption band inaccessible from ground-based observations, providing a unique probe of the thermal emission from the atmospheres of these young giant planets. The observations were taken at 30 different spacecraft rolls to enable angular differential imaging (ADI), and the full data set was analyzed with the Karhunen–Loéve Image Projection routine, an advanced image processing algorithm adapted to work with HST data. To achieve the required high contrast at subarcsecond resolution, we utilized the pointing accuracy of HST in combination with an improved pipeline designed to combine the dithered ADI data with an algorithm designed to both improve the image resolution and accurately measure the photometry. The results include F127M (J) detections of the outer planets, HR8799b and c, and the first detection of HR8799b in the water-band (F139M) filter. The F127M photometry for HR8799c agrees well with fitted atmospheric models, resolving the longstanding difficulty in consistently modeling the near-IR flux of the planet.

  14. A nonlinear filtering algorithm for denoising HR(S)TEM micrographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Hongchu

    2015-01-01

    Noise reduction of micrographs is often an essential task in high resolution (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (HR(S)TEM) either for a higher visual quality or for a more accurate quantification. Since HR(S)TEM studies are often aimed at resolving periodic atomistic columns and their non-periodic deviation at defects, it is important to develop a noise reduction algorithm that can simultaneously handle both periodic and non-periodic features properly. In this work, a nonlinear filtering algorithm is developed based on widely used techniques of low-pass filter and Wiener filter, which can efficiently reduce noise without noticeable artifacts even in HR(S)TEM micrographs with contrast of variation of background and defects. The developed nonlinear filtering algorithm is particularly suitable for quantitative electron microscopy, and is also of great interest for beam sensitive samples, in situ analyses, and atomic resolution EFTEM. - Highlights: • A nonlinear filtering algorithm for denoising HR(S)TEM images is developed. • It can simultaneously handle both periodic and non-periodic features properly. • It is particularly suitable for quantitative electron microscopy. • It is of great interest for beam sensitive samples, in situ analyses, and atomic resolution EFTEM

  15. Application of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy for studying chemotype variations of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, S K; Bhatia, Anil; Tewari, S K; Sidhu, O P; Roy, Raja

    2011-10-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal (Solanaceae), commonly known as Ashwagandha, is one of the most valued Indian medicinal plants with a number of pharmaceutical and nutraceutical applications. Metabolic profiling has been performed by HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy on fresh leaf and root tissue specimens from four chemotypes of W. somnifera. The HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy of lyophilized defatted leaf tissue specimens clearly distinguishes resonances of medicinally important secondary metabolites (withaferin A and withanone) and its distinctive quantitative variability among the chemotypes. A total of 41 metabolites were identified from both the leaf and root tissues of the chemotypes. The presence of methanol in leaf and root tissues of W. somnifera was detected by HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy. Multivariate principal component analysis (PCA) on HR-MAS (1) H NMR spectra of leaves revealed clear variations in primary metabolites among the chemotypes. The results of the present study demonstrated an efficient method, which can be utilized for metabolite profiling of primary and secondary metabolites in medicinally important plants. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Risk management is every managers’ responsibility: Are HR practitioners ready for the challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Siphelele Zulu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Risk and Enterprise Risk Management has become a strategic imperative in most organisations and government departments over the years. Most company boards and government entities in South Africa have adopted various corporate governance frameworks as a mechanism to direct and control the operations of their organisations. As a result, risk management and enterprise risk management has become every manager’s responsibility. The key question that the study investigates is whether HR managers are aware of this strategic imperative and ready to be risk champions in their environment. Data was collected from forty eight (48 HR Managers and Practitioners from private companies and sixty eight (68 HR Managers and Practitioners from government departments and government companies in Durban, Kwazulu-Natal and Cape Town, Western Cape using both personal interviews and questionnaires which were distributed to one hundred and fifty (150 employees, of which one hundred and sixteen (116 questionnaires were completed (return rate 77.3%. The results of this paper indicate that, in general and across all sectors, HR practitioners’ levels of understanding of corporate governance and risk management is limited

  17. Managing aging workers: a mixed methods study on bundles of HR practices for aging workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Dorien T. A. M.; Jansen, Paul G. W.; Dikkers, Josje S. E.; de Lange, Annet H.

    2014-01-01

    Since abilities and motives change with age and common human resource (HR) practices might be less suitable for aging employees, scholars and practitioners are currently challenged to find new ways of managing aging workers and motivating them to continue working. Therefore, this mixed methods study

  18. Practitioner talk: the changing textscape of HRM and emergence of HR business partnership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keegan, A.; Francis, H.

    2010-01-01

    It has been evident for some time in mainstream HRM writing, that HR work is largely framed as a business issue, accelerated by new developments in technology and increasing pressures being placed on the function to enhance its contribution to the organisation, and at the same time be more cost

  19. Linking educational leadership styles to the HR architecture for new teachers in primary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekeman, Eva; Devos, Geert; Valcke, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to gain insight in the relationship between principals' leadership styles and the configuration of different HR practices for new teachers in primary education. Besides the longstanding interest in educational leadership as a key element in teacher and student performance, there is a growing interest in strategic human resource management (SHRM) in the educational sector. However, few educational studies link educational leadership to SHRM. In particular, this study examines the relationship between principals' instructional and transformational leadership style and principals' strategic and HR orientation in configuring HR practices for new teachers. Data were gathered using a mixed methods approach, including interviews with 75 principals as well as an online survey of 1058 teachers in Flemish primary education. Qualitative interview data were transformed and analysed together with the quantitative survey data using logistic regression and ANOVA analyses. The results indicate that both instructional and transformational leadership is associated with the strategic orientation of principals. The HR orientation, on the other hand, is not reflected in the principals' leadership style. Recommendations for further research in this area are discussed.

  20. Cloning and shake flask expression of hrIDS-Like in Pichia pastoris

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, D.C., Colombia. 4Unidad de Biologia Celular y Microscopía, Decanato de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Centroccidental Lisandro ..... molecular weight of the peptides of hrIDS-Like expressed in yeast were slightly bigger that the ones observed in.

  1. Calcium isotope measurement by combined HR-MC-ICPMS and TIMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiller, Martin; Paton, Chad; Bizzarro, Martin

    2012-01-01

    studies demonstrate that it is possible to measure the mass-dependent Ca isotope composition of terrestrial materials using HR-MC-ICPMS with an external reproducibility comparable to that typically obtained with double spike TIMS techniques. The resolution of the mass-independent 43Ca, 46Ca and 48Ca data...

  2. Relevance of genetics and genomics for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, the Stroke Council, and the Functional Genomics and Translational Biology Interdisciplinary Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Donna K; Baird, Alison E; Barkley, Ruth A; Basson, Craig T; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ganesh, Santhi K; Herrington, David M; Hong, Yuling; Jaquish, Cashell; McDermott, Deborah A; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2007-06-05

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major health problem in the United States and around the world. Evidence accumulated over decades convincingly demonstrates that family history in a parent or a sibling is associated with atherosclerotic CVD, manifested as coronary heart disease, stroke, and/or peripheral arterial disease. Although there are several mendelian disorders that contribute to CVD, most common forms of CVD are believed to be multifactorial and to result from many genes, each with a relatively small effect working alone or in combination with modifier genes and/or environmental factors. The identification and the characterization of these genes and their modifiers would enhance prediction of CVD risk and improve prevention, treatment, and quality of care. This scientific statement describes the approaches researchers are using to advance understanding of the genetic basis of CVD and details the current state of knowledge regarding the genetics of myocardial infarction, atherosclerotic CVD, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension. Current areas of interest and investigation--including gene-environment interaction, pharmacogenetics, and genetic counseling--are also discussed. The statement concludes with a list of specific recommendations intended to help incorporate usable knowledge into current clinical and public health practice, foster and guide future research, and prepare both researchers and practitioners for the changes likely to occur as molecular genetics moves from the laboratory to clinic.

  3. Design of the high resolution optical instrument for the Pleiades HR Earth observation satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamard, Jean-Luc; Gaudin-Delrieu, Catherine; Valentini, David; Renard, Christophe; Tournier, Thierry; Laherrere, Jean-Marc

    2017-11-01

    As part of its contribution to Earth observation from space, ALCATEL SPACE designed, built and tested the High Resolution cameras for the European intelligence satellites HELIOS I and II. Through these programmes, ALCATEL SPACE enjoys an international reputation. Its capability and experience in High Resolution instrumentation is recognised by the most customers. Coming after the SPOT program, it was decided to go ahead with the PLEIADES HR program. PLEIADES HR is the optical high resolution component of a larger optical and radar multi-sensors system : ORFEO, which is developed in cooperation between France and Italy for dual Civilian and Defense use. ALCATEL SPACE has been entrusted by CNES with the development of the high resolution camera of the Earth observation satellites PLEIADES HR. The first optical satellite of the PLEIADES HR constellation will be launched in mid-2008, the second will follow in 2009. To minimize the development costs, a mini satellite approach has been selected, leading to a compact concept for the camera design. The paper describes the design and performance budgets of this novel high resolution and large field of view optical instrument with emphasis on the technological features. This new generation of camera represents a breakthrough in comparison with the previous SPOT cameras owing to a significant step in on-ground resolution, which approaches the capabilities of aerial photography. Recent advances in detector technology, optical fabrication and electronics make it possible for the PLEIADES HR camera to achieve their image quality performance goals while staying within weight and size restrictions normally considered suitable only for much lower performance systems. This camera design delivers superior performance using an innovative low power, low mass, scalable architecture, which provides a versatile approach for a variety of imaging requirements and allows for a wide number of possibilities of accommodation with a mini

  4. THE CHARA ARRAY ANGULAR DIAMETER OF HR 8799 FAVORS PLANETARY MASSES FOR ITS IMAGED COMPANIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; White, Russel J.; Jones, Jeremy; Boyajian, Tabetha; McAlister, Harold A.; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Turner, Nils H.; Sturmann, Judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Goldfinger, P. J.; Farrington, Christopher D.; Riedel, Adric R.; Huber, Daniel; Ireland, Michael; Von Braun, Kaspar; Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2012-01-01

    HR 8799 is an hF0 mA5 γ Doradus-, λ Bootis-, Vega-type star best known for hosting four directly imaged candidate planetary companions. Using the CHARA Array interferometer, we measure HR 8799's limb-darkened angular diameter to be 0.342 ± 0.008 mas (an error of only 2%). By combining our measurement with the star's parallax and photometry from the literature, we greatly improve upon previous estimates of its fundamental parameters, including stellar radius (1.44 ± 0.06 R ☉ ), effective temperature (7193 ± 87 K, consistent with F0), luminosity (5.05 ± 0.29 L ☉ ), and the extent of the habitable zone (HZ; 1.62-3.32 AU). These improved stellar properties permit much more precise comparisons with stellar evolutionary models, from which a mass and age can be determined, once the metallicity of the star is known. Considering the observational properties of other λ Bootis stars and the indirect evidence for youth of HR 8799, we argue that the internal abundance, and what we refer to as the effective abundance, is most likely near solar. Finally, using the Yonsei-Yale evolutionary models with uniformly scaled solar-like abundances, we estimate HR 8799's mass and age considering two possibilities: 1.516 +0.038 –0.024 M ☉ and 33 +7 –13.2 Myr if the star is contracting toward the zero-age main sequence or 1.513 +0.023 –0.024 M ☉ and 90 +381 –50 Myr if it is expanding from it. This improved estimate of HR 8799's age with realistic uncertainties provides the best constraints to date on the masses of its orbiting companions, and strongly suggests they are indeed planets. They nevertheless all appear to orbit well outside the HZ of this young star.

  5. [Prevention of decline in subjectively perceived physical function of the elderly by regular participation in a community-based exercise group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotou, Tomomi; Niu, Kaijun; Nagatomi, Ryoichi

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a community-based group exercise program on physical functioning among elderly people. This prospective observational study enrolled 494 persons aged 70-84 years who volunteered for the study and completed a baseline measurement in 2006 and were re-evaluated 1 year later in 2007. The exercise regimen consisted of resistance training and recreational exercise for 1.5 hours conducted twice a month. Physical functioning was evaluated by a self-administered questionnaire consisting of the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence (TMIG-IC) and Motor Fitness Scale (MFS). Decline in physical functioning was defined as a reduction in either TMIG-IC or MFS scores of more than 2 points deviation from the median change of each score. TMIG-IC and MFS results were obtained from 494 and 392 eligible subjects, respectively. After 1 year, 68 subjects (TMIG-IC) and 88 subjects (MFS) reported a decline in physical functioning. After adjustment for confounding factors, the odds ratio of reduced physical functioning, as assessed by the TMIG-IC among the subjects who did not participate in the exercise group and those who did, were 1.00 (control) and 0.15 (95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.75). Similar results were obtained when assessed on the MFS. These results suggest that participation in a community-based exercise group of elderly people was effective in maintaining self-reported physical function.

  6. Small-Magnitude Effect Sizes in Epigenetic End Points are Important in Children's Environmental Health Studies: The Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center's Epigenetics Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Carrie V; Marsit, Carmen J; Faustman, Elaine; Nadeau, Kari; Goodrich, Jaclyn M; Dolinoy, Dana C; Herbstman, Julie; Holland, Nina; LaSalle, Janine M; Schmidt, Rebecca; Yousefi, Paul; Perera, Frederica; Joubert, Bonnie R; Wiemels, Joseph; Taylor, Michele; Yang, Ivana V; Chen, Rui; Hew, Kinjal M; Freeland, Deborah M Hussey; Miller, Rachel; Murphy, Susan K

    2017-04-01

    Characterization of the epigenome is a primary interest for children's environmental health researchers studying the environmental influences on human populations, particularly those studying the role of pregnancy and early-life exposures on later-in-life health outcomes. Our objective was to consider the state of the science in environmental epigenetics research and to focus on DNA methylation and the collective observations of many studies being conducted within the Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers, as they relate to the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis. We address the current laboratory and statistical tools available for epigenetic analyses, discuss methods for validation and interpretation of findings, particularly when magnitudes of effect are small, question the functional relevance of findings, and discuss the future for environmental epigenetics research. A common finding in environmental epigenetic studies is the small-magnitude epigenetic effect sizes that result from such exposures. Although it is reasonable and necessary that we question the relevance of such small effects, we present examples in which small effects persist and have been replicated across populations and across time. We encourage a critical discourse on the interpretation of such small changes and further research on their functional relevance for children's health. The dynamic nature of the epigenome will require an emphasis on future longitudinal studies in which the epigenome is profiled over time, over changing environmental exposures, and over generations to better understand the multiple ways in which the epigenome may respond to environmental stimuli.

  7. Statistical Parametric Mapping of HR-pQCT Images: A Tool for Population-Based Local Comparisons of Micro-Scale Bone Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Bonaretti, Serena; Kazakia, Galateia J; Khosla, Sundeep; Majumdar, Sharmila; Lang, Thomas F; Burghardt, Andrew J

    2017-04-01

    HR-pQCT enables in vivo multi-parametric assessments of bone microstructure in the distal radius and distal tibia. Conventional HR-pQCT image analysis approaches summarize bone parameters into global scalars, discarding relevant spatial information. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) techniques for HR-pQCT studies, which enable population-based local comparisons of bone properties. We present voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to assess trabecular and cortical bone voxel-based features, and a surface-based framework to assess cortical bone features both in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. In addition, we present tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to assess trabecular and cortical bone structural changes. The SPM techniques were evaluated based on scan-rescan HR-pQCT acquisitions with repositioning of the distal radius and distal tibia of 30 subjects. For VBM and surface-based SPM purposes, all scans were spatially normalized to common radial and tibial templates, while for TBM purposes, rescans (follow-up) were spatially normalized to their corresponding scans (baseline). VBM was evaluated based on maps of local bone volume fraction (BV/TV), homogenized volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), and homogenized strain energy density (SED) derived from micro-finite element analysis; while the cortical bone framework was evaluated based on surface maps of cortical bone thickness, vBMD, and SED. Voxel-wise and vertex-wise comparisons of bone features were done between the groups of baseline and follow-up scans. TBM was evaluated based on mean square errors of determinants of Jacobians at baseline bone voxels. In both anatomical sites, voxel- and vertex-wise uni- and multi-parametric comparisons yielded non-significant differences, and TBM showed no artefactual bone loss or apposition. The presented SPM techniques demonstrated robust specificity thus warranting their application in future clinical HR

  8. Study protocol for a group randomized controlled trial of a classroom-based intervention aimed at preventing early risk factors for drug abuse: integrating effectiveness and implementation research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keegan Natalie

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While a number of preventive interventions delivered within schools have shown both short-term and long-term impact in epidemiologically based randomized field trials, programs are not often sustained with high-quality implementation over time. This study was designed to support two purposes. The first purpose was to test the effectiveness of a universal classroom-based intervention, the Whole Day First Grade Program (WD, aimed at two early antecedents to drug abuse and other problem behaviors, namely, aggressive, disruptive behavior and poor academic achievement. The second purpose--the focus of this paper--was to examine the utility of a multilevel structure to support high levels of implementation during the effectiveness trial, to sustain WD practices across additional years, and to train additional teachers in WD practices. Methods The WD intervention integrated three components, each previously tested separately: classroom behavior management; instruction, specifically reading; and family-classroom partnerships around behavior and learning. Teachers and students in 12 schools were randomly assigned to receive either the WD intervention or the standard first-grade program of the school system (SC. Three consecutive cohorts of first graders were randomized within schools to WD or SC classrooms and followed through the end of third grade to test the effectiveness of the WD intervention. Teacher practices were assessed over three years to examine the utility of the multilevel structure to support sustainability and scaling-up. Discussion The design employed in this trial appears to have considerable utility to provide data on WD effectiveness and to inform the field with regard to structures required to move evidence-based programs into practice. Trial Registration Clinical Trials Registration Number: NCT00257088

  9. Implementation HR information system – part of a unified information environment of MPEI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Krepkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the unified information environment of National Research University “Moscow Power Engineering Institute” (MPEI, and its most important component – the HR information system. The article describes the architecture of the unified information space of MPEI. The main objective of the development of the HR information system – to provide access to users, including other information systems, to actual information about employees of MPEI.HR information system are based on many years of operating experience of the previous system and the like, are available on the market today, taking into account the decisions of personnel. The earlier HR information system was developed in 1995–1997 and used until mid-2015. In the process of its using it has accumulated a large number of «patches» and requests for revision that was stopped by limitations in the platform and solutions architecture. Comparative analysis of 1C and SAP products showed that the cost of implementation, configuration and maintenance of these products is higher than developing new solutions. Package of Microsoft technology software was chosen as a platform. These technologies have proven themselves in the development of similar projects, and vendor solutions for a long time support all key processes of information systems. Important is the presence of the selected software Microsoft FSTEC certificates (Federal Service for Technical and Export Control, which support the use of these products for storing and processing information in accordance with the laws of the Russian Federation. The MPEI has already implemented a number of systems on the Microsoft platform – postgraduate register, an Internet portal, etc. The use of technology of one supplier facilitates the integration processes and products into a unified information environment. The article details the technical and hardware specifications of the HR information system. The result of the work on

  10. Choking Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations At Home ...

  11. Phase 1 testing of detoxified LPS/group B meningococcal outer membrane protein vaccine with and without synthetic CPG 7909 adjuvant for the prevention and treatment of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Alan S; Greenberg, Nancy; Billington, Melissa; Zhang, Lei; DeFilippi, Christopher; May, Ryan C; Bajwa, Kanwaldeep K

    2015-11-27

    Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) are a leading cause of nosocomial infection and sepsis. Increasing multi-antibiotic resistance has left clinicians with fewer therapeutic options. Antibodies to GNB lipopolysaccharide (LPS, or endotoxin) have reduced morbidity and mortality as a result of infection and are not subject to the resistance mechanisms deployed by bacteria against antibiotics. In this phase 1 study, we administered a vaccine that elicits antibodies against a highly conserved portion of LPS with and without a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) TLR9 agonist as adjuvant. A vaccine composed of the detoxified LPS (dLPS) from E. coli O111:B4 (J5 mutant) non-covalently complexed to group B meningococcal outer membrane protein (OMP). Twenty healthy adult subjects received three doses at 0, 29 and 59 days of antigen (10 μg dLPS) with or without CPG 7909 (250 or 500 μg). Subjects were evaluated for local and systemic adverse effects and laboratory findings. Anti-J5 LPS IgG and IgM antibody levels were measured by electrochemiluminesence. Due to premature study termination, not all subjects received all three doses. All vaccine formulations were well-tolerated with no local or systemic events of greater than moderate severity. The vaccine alone group achieved a ≥ 4-fold "responder" response in IgG and IgM antibody in only one of 6 subjects. In contrast, the vaccine plus CPG 7909 groups appeared to have earlier and more sustained (to 180 days) responses, greater mean-fold increases, and a higher proportion of "responders" achieving ≥ 4-fold increases over baseline. Although the study was halted before all enrolled subjects received all three doses, the J5dLPS/OMP vaccine, with or without CpG adjuvant, was safe and well-tolerated. The inclusion of CpG increased the number of subjects with a ≥ 4-fold antibody response, evident even after the second of three planned doses. A vaccine comprising J5dLPS/OMP antigen with CpG adjuvant merits further investigation. Clinical

  12. Decontamination of breast pump milk collection kits and related items at home and in hospital: guidance from a Joint Working Group of the Healthcare Infection Society and Infection Prevention Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, E; Weaver, G; Hoffman, P; Jones, M; Gilks, J; O'Brien, V; Ridgway, G

    2016-03-01

    A variety of methods are in use for decontaminating breast pump milk collection kits and related items associated with infant feeding. This paper aims to provide best practice guidance for decontamination of this equipment at home and in hospital. It has been compiled by a Joint Working Group of the Healthcare Infection Society and the Infection Prevention Society. The guidance has been informed by a search of the literature in Medline, the British Nursing Index, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Midwifery and Infant Care, and the results of two surveys of UK neonatal units in 2002/3 and 2006, and of members of the Infection Prevention Society in 2014. Since limited good quality evidence was available from these sources, much of the guidance represents good practice based on the consensus view of the Working Group. This guidance provides practical recommendations to support the safe decontamination of breast pump milk collection kits for healthcare professionals to use and communicate to other groups such as parents and carers. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. [Return to Work Strategies of Employees who Experienced Depression: Employers and HR's Perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbière, Marc; Lecomte, Tania; Lachance, Jean-Philippe; Coutu, Marie-France; Negrini, Alessia; Laberon, Sonia

    Major depression is one of the leading causes of work disability across the world. In Canada, the lifetime prevalence of depression varies from 10 to 12%. Depression impacts not only the employee who is often stigmatized and can lose his professional identity, but also has consequences on colleagues and supervisors in organizations. In the literature, four models are described from which employers and managers use in their organizations to make decisions regarding the work disability of employees on sick leave: biomedical, financial management, personnel management, and organizational development. These models can also be supported by economic, legal and ethical interests. Even though these models are essential to better understand the decision of employers and HR regarding work disability, information remains scarce regarding the concrete strategies used by these stakeholders to facilitate the return to work for employees on sick leave due to depression.Objectives the aim of this paper is to document, considering employers' and human resources' perspectives, the best strategies to put in place to facilitate the return to work of employees on sick leave due to depression.Method This study was part of a larger study carried out in Canada to assess factors influencing the return to work after a depression-related sick leave, taking into account the viewpoint of four types of stakeholders: employers/human resources, supervisors, unions and people diagnosed with depression. 219 employers (68.5%) and human resources directors (31.5%) from 82.6% organizations having more than 100 employees accepted to answer a telephone semi-structured interview. The question of interest in this study is: In your opinion, what are the best strategies to help an employee who has had a depression to return to work? Coding was influenced by empirical findings and theories related to psychosocial risk factors that the authors use in their respective disciplines as well as return to work

  14. Attending Weak Signals: The Prevention of Work-related Illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Liff

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the characteristics of communication among managers, human resource (HR experts, and occupational health care specialists, as they deal with such informal information as weak signals in the prevention of work-related illnesses, using a theoretical framework in which the prevention of work-related illness is analogous to theory on crisis management. This is a qualitative study in which individual and focus-group interviews were conducted in a Swedish context with occupational health care specialists, managers, and HR experts. The results suggest that organizational solutions have failed and continue to fail at controlling workers’ health problems, although the main difficulty is not in identifying the ‘right’ individually oriented weak signals. Rather, it is upper management’s reliance on formal information (e.g., statistics and surveys – because of the difficulty in supplementing it with informal information (e.g., rumors and gossip – that makes it difficult to improve traditional health and safety work

  15. hrHPV E5 oncoprotein: immune evasion and related immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Antonio Carlos; de Oliveira, Talita Helena Araújo; Barros, Marconi Rego; Venuti, Aldo

    2017-05-25

    The immune response is a key factor in the fight against HPV infection and related cancers, and thus, HPV is able to promote immune evasion through the expression of oncogenes. In particular, the E5 oncogene is responsible for modulation of several immune mechanisms, including antigen presentation and inflammatory pathways. Moreover, E5 was suggested as a promising therapeutic target, since there is still no effective medical therapy for the treatment of HPV-related pre-neoplasia and cancer. Indeed, several studies have shown good prospective for E5 immunotherapy, suggesting that it could be applied for the treatment of pre-cancerous lesions. Thus, insofar as the majority of cervical, oropharyngeal and anal cancers are caused by high-risk HPV (hrHPV), mainly by HPV16, the aim of this review is to discuss the immune pathways interfered by E5 oncoprotein of hrHPV highlighting the various aspects of the potential immunotherapeutic approaches.

  16. Bone structure assessed by HR-pQCT, TBS and DXL in adult patients with different types of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocijan, R; Muschitz, C; Haschka, J; Hans, D; Nia, A; Geroldinger, A; Ardelt, M; Wakolbinger, R; Resch, H

    2015-10-01

    Bone microarchitecture by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) was assessed in adult patients with mild, moderate, and severe osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The trabecular bone score (TBS), bone mineral density (BMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and dual X-ray and laser (DXL) at the calcaneus were likewise assessed in patients with OI. Trabecular microstructure and BMD in particular were severely altered in patients with OI. OI is characterized by high fracture risk but not necessarily by low BMD. The main purpose of this study was to assess bone microarchitecture and BMD at different skeletal sites in different types of OI. HR-pQCT was performed in 30 patients with OI (mild OI-I, n = 18 (41.8 [34.7, 55.7] years) and moderate to severe OI-III-IV, n = 12 (47.6 [35.3, 58.4] years)) and 30 healthy age-matched controls. TBS, BMD by DXA at the lumbar spine and hip, as well as BMD by DXL at the calcaneus were likewise assessed in patients with OI only. At the radius, significantly lower trabecular parameters including BV/TV (p = 0.01 and p < 0.0001, respectively) and trabecular number (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively) as well as an increased inhomogeneity of the trabecular network (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively) were observed in OI-I and OI-III-IV in comparison to the control group. Similar results for trabecular parameters were found at the tibia. Microstructural parameters were worse in OI-III-IV than in OI-I. No significant differences were found in cortical thickness and cortical porosity between the three subgroups at the radius. The cortical thickness of the tibia was thinner in OI-I (p < 0.001), but not OI-III-IV, when compared to controls. Trabecular BMD and trabecular bone microstructure in particular are severely altered in patients with clinical OI-I and OI-III-IV. Low TBS and DXL and their significant associations to HR-pQCT parameters of trabecular bone support this conclusion.

  17. Data validation report for the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, fifth round groundwater samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukelich, S.E. [Kearney (A.T.), Inc., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-01-20

    The data from the chemical analysis of 68 samples from the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit Third Quarter 1993 Groundwater Sampling Investigation and their related quality assurance samples were reviewed and validated to verify that reported sample results were of sufficient quality to support decisions regarding remedial actions performed at the site. Sample analysis included inorganics and general chemical parameters. Fifty three samples were validated for radiochemical parameters.

  18. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit investigative phase and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA). The 100-HR-2 Operable Unit contains solid waste burial grounds, an ash pit, bum pits, electrical facilities, septic systems, and support facilities. All known and suspected areas of contamination were classified as solid waste burial grounds or low-priority waste sites based on the collective knowledge of the operable unit managers (representatives from the US Department of Energy [DOE], the US Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], and Washington Department of Ecology [Ecology]) during the preparation of the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit work plan (DOE/RL 1993f). Solid waste burial grounds were judged to pose sufficient risk(s), through one or more pathways, to require evaluation for an interim remedial measure (IRM) as per the Hanford Past-Practice Strategy (HPPS) (DOE/RL 1991) and negotiations with DOE, EPA, and Ecology. An IRM is intended to achieve remedies that are likely to lead to a final record of decision. Low-priority sites are those judged not to pose significant risk to require the streamlined evaluation. There were six low-priority waste sites and seven solid waste burial grounds identified. The investigative phase was conducted in accordance with the RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit (DOE/RL 1993f). The QRA was performed in accordance with the Hanford Site Baseline Risk Assessment Methodology (DOE/RL 1993b) and the recommendations incorporate the strategies of the HPPS. The purpose of this report is to: (1) provide a summary of site investigative activities; (2) refine the conceptual exposure model (as needed); (3) identify chemical- and location-specific corrective action requirements; and (4) provide a human health and ecological QRA associated with solid waste burial grounds

  19. HR MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy analysis of marine microalgal whole cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chauton, Matilde S.; Optun, Odd Inge; Bathen, Tone F.; Volent, Zsolt; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.; Johnsen, Geir

    2003-01-01

    To study the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as a method of classification, we performed high-resolution magic angle spinning proton (HR MAS 1H) NMR spectroscopy analysis of whole-cell samples of Dunaliella sp. (Chlorophyceae), Amphidinium carterae (Dinophyceae), Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana (Bacillariophyceae). Emphasising the potential use of NMR spectroscopy as a routine analysis of microalgae we chose a straightforward procedure for culturing...

  20. Redesain Pasar Pagi Jalan HR. Soebrantas Pekanbaru dengan Pendekatan Arsitektur Tropis

    OpenAIRE

    ', Asmadi '; Hidayat, Wahyu '; Rijal, Muhammad '

    2014-01-01

    Pasar Pagi located in HR.Soebrantas street takes an imfortant role in fulfilling the needs of the society surroundings, completely to the economic social order. Considering the unsuppported services faced in these public facilities; frequently traffic congestion, insufficient parking space, poor drainage system, and incompletely arranged market spot, redesigning of the Pasar Pagi is a significance to overcome the cases exist. The design method undertaken prior to the project uses the principl...

  1. Shaping HR8799's outer dust belt with an unseen planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, M. J.; Wyatt, M. C.; Marino, S.; Kennedy, G. M.

    2018-04-01

    HR8799 is a benchmark system for direct imaging studies. It hosts two debris belts, which lie internally and externally to four giant planets. This paper considers how the four known planets and a possible fifth planet interact with the external population of debris through N-body simulations. We find that when only the known planets are included, the inner edge of the outer belt predicted by our simulations is much closer to the outermost planet than recent ALMA observations suggest. We subsequently include a fifth planet in our simulations with a range of masses and semimajor axes, which is external to the outermost known planet. We find that a fifth planet with a mass and semimajor axis of 0.1 MJ and 138 au predicts an outer belt that agrees well with ALMA observations, whilst remaining stable for the lifetime of HR8799 and lying below current direct imaging detection thresholds. We also consider whether inward scattering of material from the outer belt can input a significant amount of mass into the inner belt. We find that for the current age of HR8799, only ˜1 per cent of the mass-loss rate of the inner disc can be replenished by inward scattering. However, we find that the higher rate of inward scattering during the first ˜10 Myr of HR8799 would be expected to cause warm dust emission at a level similar to that currently observed, which may provide an explanation for such bright emission in other systems at ˜10 Myr ages.

  2. Monitoring training status with HR measures: do all roads lead to Rome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eBuchheit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring an athlete's physiological status in response to various types and volumes of (aerobic-oriented training can provide useful information for optimizing training programs. Measures of resting, exercise and recovery heart rate (HR are receiving increasing interest for monitoring fatigue, fitness and endurance performance responses, which has direct implications for adjusting training load 1 daily during specific training blocks and 2 throughout the competitive season. These measures are still not widely implemented to monitor athletes’ responses to training load, probably because of apparent contradictory findings in the literature. In this review I contend that most of the contradictory findings are related to methodological inconsistencies and/or misinterpretation of the data rather than to limitations of heart rate measures to accurately inform on training status. I also provide evidence that measures derived from 5-min (almost daily recordings of resting (indices capturing beat-to-beat changes in HR, reflecting parasympathetic activity and submaximal exercise (30- to 60-s average HR are likely the most useful monitoring tools. For appropriate interpretation at the individual level, changes in a given measure should be interpreted by taking into account the error of measurement and the smallest important change of the measure, as well as the training context (training phase, load and intensity distribution. The decision to use a given measure should be based upon the level of information that is required by the athlete, the marker’s sensitivity to changes in training status and the practical constrains required for the measurements. However, measures of HR cannot inform on all aspects of wellness, fatigue and performance, so their use in combination with daily training logs, psychometric questionnaires and non-invasive, cost-effective performance tests such as a countermovement jump may offer a complete solution to monitor

  3. Cool half of the H-R diagram in soft X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, T.R.; Linsky, J.L.; Vaiana, G.S.; Golub, L.; Rosner, R.

    1981-01-01

    We report results of an Einstein Guest Observing program to map the occurrence of soft x-ray emission, which is a signature of hot stellar coronae (T>10 6 K), in the cool half of the Hertzsprung Russell (H-R) diagram. We detect X-rays from F--M dwarfs and late F through early K giants, but not from the cooler giants, other than the spectroscopic binary epsilon Car (K0 II+B), or from any supergiants, other than Canopus (F0IB--II). The empirical separation of the cool half of the H-R diagram into a region where stellar soft X-ray emission is a common phenomenon, and a region where hot coronae are rare, if present at all among single stars, is similar to that found previously by Linsky and Haisch for C IV lambdalambda1548,1551 emission (Troughly-equal10 5 K) and by Stencel and Mullan for the onset of rapid mass loss in strong, cool (T 4 K) stellar winds. We discuss the energy balance in the outer atmospheres of the coronal stars, the likely absorption of X-ray emission by cool winds in the ''hybrid-spectrum'' supergiants, a rotation-activity connection among the G dwarfs, and possible evolutionary origins of the structure seen in the cool half of the X-ray H-R diagram

  4. A Qualitative Study of HR/OHS Stress Interventions in Australian Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, Silvia; Winefield, Anthony H; Boyd, Carolyn M; Provis, Chris

    2018-01-09

    To enhance the understanding of psychosocial factors and extend research on work stress interventions, we investigated the key human resource (HR)/occupational health and safety (OHS) stress interventions implemented at five Australian universities over a three-year period. Five senior HR Directors completed an online survey to identify the intervention strategies taken at their university in order to reduce stress and enhance employee well-being and morale. We also explored the types of individual-, organization-, and individual/organization-directed interventions that were implemented, and the strategies that were prioritized at each university. Across universities, the dominant interventions were strategies that aimed to balance the social exchange in the work contract between employee-organization with an emphasis on initiatives to: enhance training, career development and promotional opportunities; improve remuneration and recognition practices; and to enhance the fairness of organizational policies and procedures. Strategies to improve work-life balance were also prominent. The interventions implemented were predominantly proactive (primary) strategies focused at the organizational level and aimed at eliminating or reducing or altering work stressors. The findings contribute to the improved management of people at work by identifying university-specific HR/OHS initiatives, specifically leadership development and management skills programs which were identified as priorities at three universities.

  5. Metabolic profiles of placenta in preeclampsia using HR-MAS MRS metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austdal, Marie; Thomsen, Liv Cecilie Vestrheim; Tangerås, Line Haugstad; Skei, Bente; Mathew, Seema; Bjørge, Line; Austgulen, Rigmor; Bathen, Tone Frost; Iversen, Ann-Charlotte

    2015-12-01

    Preeclampsia is a heterogeneous gestational disease characterized by maternal hypertension and proteinuria, affecting 2-7% of pregnancies. The disorder is initiated by insufficient placental development, but studies characterizing the placental disease components are lacking. Our aim was to phenotype the preeclamptic placenta using high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS MRS). Placental samples collected after delivery from women with preeclampsia (n = 19) and normotensive pregnancies (n = 15) were analyzed for metabolic biomarkers including amino acids, osmolytes, and components of the energy and phospholipid metabolism. The metabolic biomarkers were correlated to clinical characteristics and inflammatory biomarkers in the maternal sera. Principal component analysis showed inherent differences in placental metabolic profiles between preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies. Significant differences in metabolic profiles were found between placentas from severe and non-severe preeclampsia, but not between preeclamptic pregnancies with fetal growth restricted versus normal weight neonates. The placental metabolites correlated with the placental stress marker sFlt-1 and triglycerides in maternal serum, suggesting variation in placental stress signaling between different placental phenotypes. HR-MAS MRS is a sensitive method for defining the placental disease component of preeclampsia, identifying several altered metabolic pathways. Placental HR-MAS MRS analysis may improve insight into processes affected in the preeclamptic placenta, and represents a novel long-required tool for a sensitive placental phenotyping of this heterogeneous disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Qualitative Study of HR/OHS Stress Interventions in Australian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pignata

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the understanding of psychosocial factors and extend research on work stress interventions, we investigated the key human resource (HR/occupational health and safety (OHS stress interventions implemented at five Australian universities over a three-year period. Five senior HR Directors completed an online survey to identify the intervention strategies taken at their university in order to reduce stress and enhance employee well-being and morale. We also explored the types of individual-, organization-, and individual/organization-directed interventions that were implemented, and the strategies that were prioritized at each university. Across universities, the dominant interventions were strategies that aimed to balance the social exchange in the work contract between employee-organization with an emphasis on initiatives to: enhance training, career development and promotional opportunities; improve remuneration and recognition practices; and to enhance the fairness of organizational policies and procedures. Strategies to improve work-life balance were also prominent. The interventions implemented were predominantly proactive (primary strategies focused at the organizational level and aimed at eliminating or reducing or altering work stressors. The findings contribute to the improved management of people at work by identifying university-specific HR/OHS initiatives, specifically leadership development and management skills programs which were identified as priorities at three universities.

  7. Prevention and treatment of respiratory viral infections: Presentations on antivirals, traditional therapies and host-directed interventions at the 5th ISIRV Antiviral Group conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKimm-Breschkin, Jennifer L; Jiang, Shibo; Hui, David S; Beigel, John H; Govorkova, Elena A; Lee, Nelson

    2018-01-01

    The International Society for Influenza and other Respiratory Virus Diseases held its 5th Antiviral Group (isirv-AVG) Conference in Shanghai, China, in conjunction with the Shanghai Public Health Center and Fudan University from 14-16 June 2017. The three-day programme encompassed presentations on some of the clinical features, management, immune responses and virology of respiratory infections, including influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H7N9) viruses, MERS-CoV, SARS-CoV, adenovirus Type 80, enterovirus D68, metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Updates were presented on several therapeutics currently in clinical trials, including influenza polymerase inhibitors pimodivir/JNJ6362387, S033188, favipiravir, monoclonal antibodies MHAA45449A and VIS410, and host directed strategies for influenza including nitazoxanide, and polymerase ALS-008112 and fusion inhibitors AK0529, GS-5806 for RSV. Updates were also given on the use of the currently licensed neuraminidase inhibitors. Given the location in China, there were also presentations on the use of Traditional Chinese Medicines. Following on from the previous conference, there were ongoing discussions on appropriate endpoints for severe influenza in clinical trials from regulators and clinicians, an issue which remains unresolved. The aim of this conference summary is to provide information for not only conference participants, but a detailed referenced review of the current status of clinical trials, and pre-clinical development of therapeutics and vaccines for influenza and other respiratory diseases for a broader audience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Weak G-band stars on the H-R diagram: clues to the origin of the Li anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, A.; Parthasarathy, M.; Bharat Kumar, Y.; Jasniewicz, G.

    2012-02-01

    Aims: Weak G-band (WGB) stars are a rare class of cool luminous stars that present a strong depletion in carbon, but also lithium abundance anomalies that have been little explored in the literature since the first discovery of these peculiar objects in the early 1950s. Here we focus on the Li-rich WGB stars and report on their evolutionary status. We explored different paths to propose a tentative explanation for the lithium anomaly. Methods: Using archive data, we derived the fundamental parameters of WGB (Teff, log g, log (L/L⊙)) using Hipparcos parallaxes and recent temperature scales. From the equivalent widths of Li resonance line at 6707 Å, we uniformly derived the lithium abundances and applied NLTE corrections when possible following the procedure described by Lind et al. (2009). We also computed dedicated stellar evolution models in the mass range 3.0 to 4.5 M⊙, exploring the effects of rotation-induced and thermohaline mixing. These models are used to locate the WGB stars in the H-R diagram and to explore the origin of the abundance anomalies. Results: The location of WGB stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram shows that these are intermediate mass stars of masses ranging from 3.0 to 4.5 M⊙ located at the clump, which implies a degeneracy of their evolutionary status between subgiant/red giant branch and core helium burning phases. The atmospheres of a large proportion of WGB stars (more than 50%) exhibit lithium abundances A(Li) ≥ 1.4 dex similar to Li-rich K giants. However, the position of WGB stars along with the Li-rich K giants in the H-R diagram, indicates that both are well-separated groups. The combined and tentatively consistent analysis of the abundance pattern for lithium, carbon, and nitrogen of WGB stars seems to indicate that carbon underabundance could be decorrelated from the lithium and nitrogen overabundances.

  9. Should Israel screen all mothers-to-be to prevent early-onset of neonatal group B streptococcal disease? A cost-utility analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginsberg Gary M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Israel, an average of 37 children are born each year with sepsis and another four with meningitis as a result of Group B Streptococcal (GBS disease. Israel currently only screens mothers with defined risk factors (around 15% of all pregnancies in order to identify candidates for Intrapartum Antiobiotic Prophyhlaxis (IAP of GBS. This paper presents a cost-utility analysis of implementing an alternative strategy, which would expand the current protocol to one aiming to screen all pregnant women at 35–37 weeks gestation based on taking a vaginal culture for GBS. Methods A spreadsheet model was built incorporating technical, epidemiological, health service costs, demographic and economic data based primarily on Israeli sources. Results The intervention of universal screening (compared with the current scenario would increase screening costs from 580,000 NIS to 3,278,000 million NIS. In addition, the intervention would also increase penicillin costs from 39,000 NIS to 221,000 NIS. Current culture screening of approximately 15% of mothers-to-be with high risk factors resulted in 42 GBS births in 2008-9 (0.253/1000 births. Expanding culture screening to 85% of mothers-to-be, will decrease the number of GBS births to 17.3 (0.104/1000 births. The initial 2.9 million NIS incremental intervention costs are offset by decreased treatment costs of 1.9 million NIS and work productivity gains of 811,000 NIS as a result of a decrease in neurological sequelae from GBS caused meningitis. Thus the resultant net cost of the intervention is only around 134,000 NIS. Culture based screening will reduce the burden of disease by 12.6 discounted Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYS, giving a very cost effective baseline incremental cost per QALY (cf. risk factor screening of 10,641 NIS per QALY. The data was very sensitive to rates of anaphylactic shock and changes in the percentage of meningitis cases that had associated long term

  10. Rivaroxaban versus warfarin in Japanese patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation for the secondary prevention of stroke: a subgroup analysis of J-ROCKET AF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Norio; Hori, Masatsugu; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Momomura, Shin-ichi; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Goto, Shinya; Izumi, Tohru; Koretsune, Yukihiro; Kajikawa, Mariko; Kato, Masaharu; Ueda, Hitoshi; Iwamoto, Kazuya; Tajiri, Masahiro

    2013-11-01

    The overall analysis of the rivaroxaban versus warfarin in Japanese patients with atrial fibrillation (J-ROCKET AF) trial revealed that rivaroxaban was not inferior to warfarin with respect to the primary safety outcome. In addition, there was a strong trend for a reduction in the rate of stroke/systemic embolism with rivaroxaban compared with warfarin. In this subanalysis of the J-ROCKET AF trial, we investigated the consistency of safety and efficacy profile of rivaroxaban versus warfarin among the subgroups of patients with previous stroke, transient ischemic attack, or non-central nervous system systemic embolism (secondary prevention group) and those without (primary prevention group). Patients in the secondary prevention group were 63.6% of the overall population of J-ROCKET AF. In the secondary prevention group, the rate of the principal safety outcome (% per year) was 17.02 in rivaroxaban-treated patients and 18.26 in warfarin-treated patients (hazard ratio [HR] 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-1.29), while the rate of the primary efficacy endpoint was 1.66 in rivaroxaban-treated patients and 3.25 in warfarin-treated patients (HR 0.51; 95% CI 0.23-1.14). There were no significant interactions in the principal safety and the primary efficacy endpoints of rivaroxaban compared to warfarin between the primary and secondary prevention groups (P=.090 and .776 for both interactions, respectively). The safety and efficacy profile of rivaroxaban compared with warfarin was consistent among patients in the primary prevention group and those in the secondary prevention group. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of land use classification accuracy based upon TM and CBERS-02B HR data fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guifang; Lu, Heli

    2010-11-01

    Data fusions from SAR and TM, SPOT and TM, ASTER and TM, MODIS and ETM, etc are the common methods. But that from TM and CBERS-02B is rare. With HR camera working in September 19th 2007, Chinese-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite 02B (CBERS-02B) became the first civilian high-resolution satellite in China. It could provide 2.36m panchromatic image which is better to Landsat TM. Meanwhile the spectral resolution of TM is better than CBERS-02B. So it's a good idea to take advantage of benefits from CBERS-02B HR and TM through data fusion. In this study, images of TM and CBERS-02B HR in 2007 were used as data sources. After image registration and noiseremoval process, data fusion methods of IHS and PCA were adopted. Then unsupervised classification and supervised classification were used for land use classification. Finally, classification accuracy between original image and fusion image was compared and evaluated. The result shows: (1) Compared with original TM or CBERS-02B HR image, the fusion image not only retains abundance spectrum but also enhances the object details. Residential texture, lake morphological, the relative position between roads, industrial and mining sites, etc, was identified easily. (2) Results from IHS and PCA are different. IHS image had higher spatial resolution but more spectral distortion. Spectral differences between some objects became smaller and classification accuracy was lower. Supervised classification accuracy assessment shows that overall Kappa index and overall land use classification accuracy decreased by 0.237 and 11% respectively. Meanwhile PCA image not only had high spatial resolution, but also smaller spectral distortion. Different land use / cover types can be better distinguished. (3) Disadvantages of low spatial resolution in TM and single color in CBERS-02B HR image are overcome in PCA fusion image to a certain extent. In this research under supervised classification in PCA image Kappa index of farm land, forest land and

  12. The more the better…or is it? The contradictory effects of HR practices on knowledge sharing motivation and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreeva, T.; Sergeeva, A.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how individual-level antecedents such as motivation and ability to share knowledge mediate the relationship between HR practices and knowledge-sharing behaviour. The results of a survey of 329 secondary school teachers reveal the contradictory effects of different HR practices

  13. The rise (and fall?) of HR analytics : A study into the future application, value, structure, and system support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Heuvel, Sjoerd; Bondarouk, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Driven by the rapidly accelerating pace of technology-enabled developments within human resource management (HRM), human resource (HR) analytics is infiltrating the research and business agenda. As one of the first in its field, the purpose of this paper is to explore what the future of HR

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Blood Disease Bacterium A2 HR-MARDI, a Pathogen Causing Banana Bacterial Wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrun, Rafidah; Abu Bakar, Norliza; Laboh, Rozeita; Redzuan, Rohaiza; Bala Jaganath, Indu

    2017-06-01

    Blood disease bacterium A2 HR-MARDI was isolated from banana plants infected with banana blood disease and which were planted in Kuala Kangsar, Malaysia. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of blood disease bacterium A2 HR-MARDI, which could provide important information on the virulence mechanism of this pathogen. Copyright © 2017 Badrun et al.

  15. DNA methylation analysis in self-sampled brush material as a triage test in hrHPV-positive women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, A.; Bosgraaf, R. P.; van Leeuwen, R. W.; Schuuring, E.; Heideman, D. A. M.; Massuger, L. F. A. G.; Verhoef, V. M. J.; Bulten, J.; Melchers, W. J. G.; van der Zee, A. G. J.; Bekkers, R. L. M.; Wisman, G. B. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Primary high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) testing in cervical cancer screening shows relatively low specificity, which makes triage testing necessary. In this study, DNA methylation analysis was compared with cytology for triage testing in hrHPV-positive women. Moreover, feasibility

  16. Understanding the effectiveness of precursor reductions in lowering 8-hr ozone concentrations--Part II. The eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Steven D; Blanchard, Charles L; Ziman, Stephen D

    2004-11-01

    Analyses of ozone (O3) measurements in conjunction with photochemical modeling were used to assess the feasibility of attaining the federal 8-hr O3 standard in the eastern United States. Various combinations of volatile organic compound (VOC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emission reductions were effective in lowering modeled peak 1-hr O3 concentrations. VOC emissions reductions alone had only a modest impact on modeled peak 8-hr O3 concentrations. Anthropogenic NOx emissions reductions of 46-86% of 1996 base case values were needed to reach the level of the 8-hr standard in some areas. As NOx emissions are reduced, O3 production efficiency increases, which accounts for the less than proportional response of calculated 8-hr O3 levels. Such increases in O3 production efficiency also were noted in previous modeling work for central California. O3 production in some urban core areas, such as New York City and Chicago, IL, was found to be VOC-limited. In these areas, moderate NOx emissions reductions may be accompanied by increases in peak 8-hr O3 levels. The findings help to explain differences in historical trends in 1- and 8-hr O3 levels and have serious implications for the feasibility of attaining the 8-hr O3 standard in several areas of the eastern United States.

  17. Design criteria and design basis for the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 pump-and-treat projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, W.S.; Winters, J.N.

    1996-06-01

    The 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 Operable Units are located in the 100 Area at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The document describes the project objectives and design criteria to be used for the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater pump-and-treat design activities

  18. Rationale, Design, and Baseline Characteristics of the Utopia Trial for Preventing Diabetic Atherosclerosis Using an SGLT2 Inhibitor: A Prospective, Randomized, Open-Label, Parallel-Group Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakami, Naoto; Mita, Tomoya; Yoshii, Hidenori; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Yasuda, Tetsuyuki; Okada, Yosuke; Umayahara, Yutaka; Kaneto, Hideaki; Osonoi, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Tsunehiko; Kuribayashi, Nobuichi; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Kosugi, Keisuke; Ohtoshi, Kentaro; Hayashi, Isao; Sumitani, Satoru; Tsugawa, Mamiko; Ohashi, Makoto; Taki, Hideki; Nakamura, Tadashi; Kawashima, Satoshi; Sato, Yasunori; Watada, Hirotaka; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2017-10-01

    Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are anti-diabetic agents that improve glycemic control with a low risk of hypoglycemia and ameliorate a variety of cardiovascular risk factors. The aim of the ongoing study described herein is to investigate the preventive effects of tofogliflozin, a potent and selective SGLT2 inhibitor, on the progression of atherosclerosis in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) using carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), an established marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD), as a marker. The Study of Using Tofogliflozin for Possible better Intervention against Atherosclerosis for type 2 diabetes patients (UTOPIA) trial is a prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint, multicenter, and parallel-group comparative study. The aim was to recruit a total of 340 subjects with T2DM but no history of apparent CVD at 24 clinical sites and randomly allocate these to a tofogliflozin treatment group or a conventional treatment group using drugs other than SGLT2 inhibitors. As primary outcomes, changes in mean and maximum IMT of the common carotid artery during a 104-week treatment period will be measured by carotid echography. Secondary outcomes include changes in glycemic control, parameters related to β-cell function and diabetic nephropathy, the occurrence of CVD and adverse events, and biochemical measurements reflecting vascular function. This is the first study to address the effects of SGLT2 inhibitors on the progression of carotid IMT in subjects with T2DM without a history of CVD. The results will be available in the very near future, and these findings are expected to provide clinical data that will be helpful in the prevention of diabetic atherosclerosis and subsequent CVD. Kowa Co., Ltd. UMIN000017607.

  19. Evaluation of bone mineral density and microarchitectural parameters by DXA and HR-pQCT in 37 children and adults with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colares Neto, G P; Pereira, R M R; Alvarenga, J C; Takayama, L; Funari, M F A; Martin, R M

    2017-05-01

    In X-linked hypophosphatemic (XLH) rickets, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements must be analyzed with caution. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) analysis suggested that XLH primarily affects the cancellous compartment, with the tibia more affected than the radius. Effective treatment of XLH appears to positively affect bone mineralization, mainly in the bone cortex. The purpose of this study is to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) and microarchitecture in 37 patients (13 children and 24 adults) with XLH confirmed by PHEX mutations from a tertiary center compared to healthy controls. Areal BMD (aBMD) was evaluated by DXA, whereas volumetric BMD (vBMD) and microarchitectural parameters were analyzed by HR-pQCT. Adult XLH patients had higher lumbar aBMD (p children and adult groups. Analysis based on metabolic status showed that the adult XLH patients with non-compensated disease had lower cortical vBMD at the tibia than the compensated XLH patients (p = 0.03). The microarchitectural differences at the radius and tibia included lower trabecular number (p children. In XLH patients, DXA measurements must be analyzed with caution due to the interference of anatomic and anthropometric factors. HR-pQCT analysis suggested that XLH primarily affects the cancellous compartment, with the tibia more affected than the radius. Effective treatment of XLH appears to positively affect bone mineralization, mainly in the bone cortex.

  20. LC/ESI-MS n and 1H HR-MAS NMR analytical methods as useful taxonomical tools within the genus Cystoseira C. Agardh (Fucales; Phaeophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégou, Camille; Culioli, Gérald; Kervarec, Nelly; Simon, Gaëlle; Stiger-Pouvreau, Valérie

    2010-12-15

    Species of the genus Cystoseira are particularly hard to discriminate, due to the complexity of their morphology, which can be influenced by their phenological state and ecological parameters. Our study emphasized on the relevance of two kinds of analytical tools, (1) LC/ESI-MS(n) and (2) (1)H HR-MAS NMR, also called in vivo NMR, to identify Cystoseira specimens at the specific level and discuss their taxonomy. For these analyses, samples were collected at several locations in Brittany (France), where Cystoseira baccata, C. foeniculacea, C. humilis, C. nodicaulis and C. tamariscifolia were previously reported. To validate our chemical procedure, the sequence of the ITS2 has been obtained for each species to investigate their phylogenetic relationships at a molecular level. Our study highlighted the consistency of the two physico-chemical methods, compared to "classical" molecular approach, in studying taxonomy within the genus Cystoseira. Especially, LC/ESI-MS(n) and phylogenetic analyses converged into the discrimination of two taxonomical groups among the 5 species. The occurrence of some specific signals in the (1)H HR-MAS NMR spectra and/or some characteristic chemical compounds during LC/ESI-MS(n) analysis could be regarded as discriminating factors. LC/ESI-MS(n) and (1)H HR-MAS NMR turned out to be two relevant and innovative techniques to discriminate taxonomically this complex genus. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Allergy prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muche-Borowski, Cathleen; Kopp, Matthias; Reese, Imke; Sitter, Helmut; Werfel, Thomas; Schäfer, Torsten

    2010-09-01

    The further increase of allergies in industrialized countries demands evidence-based measures of primary prevention. The recommendations as published in the guideline of 2004 were updated and consented on the basis of a systematic literature search. Evidence from the period February 2003-May 2008 was searched in the electronic databases Cochrane and MEDLINE as well as in reference lists of recent reviews and by contacting experts. The retrieved citations were screened for relevance first by title and abstract and in a second step as full paper. Levels of evidence were assigned to each included study and the methodological quality of the studies was assessed as high or low. Finally the revised recommendations were formally consented (nominal group process) by representatives of relevant societies and organizations including a self-help group. Of originally 4556 hits, 217 studies (4 Cochrane Reviews, 14 meta-analyses, 19 randomized controlled trials, 135 cohort and 45 case-control studies) were included and critically appraised. Grossly unchanged remained the recommendations on avoiding environmental tobacco smoke, breast-feeding over 4 months (alternatively hypoallergenic formulas for children at risk), avoiding a mold-promoting indoor climate, vaccination according to current recommendations, and avoidance of furry pets (especially cats) in children at risk. The recommendation on reducing the house dust mite allergen exposure as a measure of primary prevention was omitted and the impact of a delayed introduction of supplementary food was reduced. New recommendations were adopted concerning fish consumption (during pregnancy / breast-feeding and as supplementary food in the first year), avoidance of overweight, and reducing the exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollutants. The revision of this guideline on a profound evidence basis led to (1) a confirmation of existing recommendations, (2) substantial revisions, and (3) new recommendations. Thereby it is possible

  2. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit investigative phase and the associated qualitative risk assessment. The 100-HR-2 Operable Unit contains solid waste burial grounds, an ash pit, burn pits, electrical facilities, septic systems, and support facilities. All known and suspected areas of contamination were classified as solid waste burial grounds or low-priority waste sites based on the collective knowledge of the operable unit managers (representatives from the US Department of Energy, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology during the preparation of the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit Work Plan (DOE-RL 1993f). Solid waste burial grounds were judged to pose sufficient risk(s), through one or more pathways, to require evaluation for an interim remedial measure as per the Hanford Past-Practice Strategy (DOE-RL 1991) and negotiations with the Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology. An interim remedial measure is intended to achieve remedies that are likely to lead to a final record of decision. Low-priority sites are those judged not to pose significant risk to require the streamlined evaluation. There were six low-priority waste sites and seven solid waste burial grounds identified. The purpose of this report is to: (1) provide a summary of site investigative activities; (2) refine the conceptual exposure model (as needed); (3) identify chemical- and location-specific corrective action requirements; and 4) provide a human health and ecological QRA associated with solid waste burial grounds

  3. The planetary system host HR8799: on its λ Bootis nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, A.; Amado, P. J.; Barrado, D.; Hernández, A. García; Aberasturi, M.; Montesinos, B.; Aceituno, F.

    2010-07-01

    HR8799 is a λ Bootis, γ Doradus star hosting a planetary system and a debris disc with two rings. This makes this system a very interesting target for asteroseismic studies. This work is devoted to the determination of the internal metallicity of this star, linked with its λ Bootis nature (i.e. solar surface abundances of light elements and subsolar surface abundances of heavy elements), taking advantage of its γ Doradus pulsations. This is the most accurate way of obtaining this information, and this is the first time that such a study is performed for a planetary-system-host star. We have used the equilibrium code CESAM and the non-adiabatic pulsational code GRACO. We have applied the frequency ratio method (FRM) and the time-dependent convection theory to estimate the mode identification, the Brunt-Vaïsälä frequency integral and the mode instability, making the selection of the models possible. When the non-seismological constraints (i.e. HR8799's position in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram) are used, the solar abundance models are discarded. This result contradicts one of the main hypotheses for explaining the λ Bootis nature, namely the accretion/diffusion of gas by a star with solar abundance. Therefore, according to this result, a revision of this hypothesis is needed. The inclusion of accurate internal chemical mixing processes seems to be necessary to explain the peculiar abundances observed in the surface of stars with internal subsolar metallicities. The use of the asteroseismological constraints, like those provided by the FRM or the instability analysis, provides a very accurate determination of the physical characteristics of HR8799. However, the dependence of the results on the inclination angle i still remains. The determination of this angle, more accurate multicolour photometric observations and high-resolution spectroscopy can definitively fix the mass and metallicity of this star.

  4. HR007: a family of biomaterials based on glycosaminoglycans for tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Mendez, A; Palomares, T; Castro, B; Herrero, J; Granado, M H; Bejar, J M; Alonso-Varona, A

    2017-04-01

    Most new advances in tissue engineering (TE) focus on the creation of adequate microenvironments that may accelerate the repair processes of damaged tissues. Extracellular matrix (ECM) of Wharton's jelly (WJ) from umbilical cords is very rich in sulphated GAGs (sGAGs) and hyaluronic acid (HA), components which have special properties that could positively influence the regeneration of several types of tissue. Previously, we described the methodology for the extraction and purification of GAGs from WJ and, importantly, the separation of sGAGs and HA to develop various scaffolds for regenerative medicine. In this new study we hypothesized that the biomaterials obtained, called HR007s, would be excellent candidates for two different applications, chondral and dermal repair. First, we have confirmed that the GAGs obtained are biocompatible, as they do not cause cytotoxicity, haemolysis or an inflammatory response. Second, we have developed three-dimensional (3D) structures through the combination of different ratios of GAGs and their subsequent stabilization, which can be properly adapted to target tissues, cartilage or skin. Finally, we have combined these scaffolds with adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) or fibroblasts for application to chondral or dermal defects, respectively, with the goal of promoting fast reparative processes. The results show that HR007 scaffolds induce cell proliferation, enhance the expression of specific gene markers, increase the production of tissue ECM proteins and have chemotactic effects over the studied cells. In summary, the bioactive properties of HR007 scaffolds make them promising candidates for use in regenerative medicine, at least for chondral and dermal repair. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The costs of HIV prevention for different target populations in Mumbai, Thane and Bangalore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekar, Sudha; Vassall, Anna; Reddy, Bhaskar; Shetty, Govindraj; Vickerman, Peter; Alary, Michel

    2011-12-29

    Avahan, the India AIDS Initiative, delivers HIV prevention services to high-risk populations at scale. Although the broad costs of such HIV interventions are known, to-date there has been little data available on the comparative costs of reaching different target groups, including female sex workers (FSWs), replace with 'high risk men who have sex with men (HR-MSM) and trans-genders. Costs are estimated for the first three years of Avahan scale up differentiated by typology of female sex workers (brothel, street, home, lodge based, bar based), HR-MSM and transgenders in urban districts in India: Mumbai and Thane in Maharashtra and Bangalore in Karnataka. Financial and economic costs were collected prospectively from a provider perspective. Outputs were measured using data collected by the Avahan programme. Costs are presented in US$2008. Costs were found to vary substantially by target group. Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) working with transgender populations had a higher mean cost (US $116) per person reached compared to those dealing primarily with FSWs (US $75-96) and MSWs (US $90) by the end of year three of the programme in Mumbai. The mean cost of delivering the intervention to HR-MSMs (US $42) was higher than delivering it to FSWs (US $37) in Bangalore. The package of services delivered to each target group was similar, and our results suggest that cost variation is related to the target population size, the intensity of the programme (in terms of number of contacts made per year) and a number of specific issues related to each target group. Based on our data policy makers and program managers need to consider the ease of accessing high risk population when planning and budgeting for HIV prevention services for these populations and avoid funding programmes on the basis of target population size alone.

  6. Change through Group Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllan, Les; Friedman, Amy; Spears, Evans

    Perhaps the most well known treatment modalities in the field of prevention and treatment of addiction are groups. Group settings serve to bring individuals with addictions together at one time in one place to work on relevant issues together. Groups may serve as a safe environment for learning new social and relationship skills, gaining…

  7. Assay of S for Quantitation of PEG and TNF Ligated Au Nanoparticles using ID-HR-MC-ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, J. L.; Vocke, R. D.; Newman, J. D.; Kelly, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    The use of nanomaterials in medicine has recently increased with the discovery that these materials can deliver drugs to specific sites within the body. An active area of nanomedicine involves the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a delivery platform for anti-cancer agents such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). TNF-α molecules attack the blood vessels in a tumor causing them to hemorrhage profusely. TNF-α is also highly toxic to normal cells, making targeted delivery to the tumor site crucial. AuNPs ensure the ligated TNF-α is delivered to its appropriate target, mitigating systemic toxicity. Additionally, coating AuNPs with the surface modifier polyethylene glycol (PEG) promotes bioavailability and biodistribution of TNF-α by preventing protein binding and bodily uptake thereby increasing the lifetime in the bloodstream. The FDA will likely mandate all nanotechnologies of this sort undergo quality control to ensure the nanoplatforms are modified with approximately the same number of drug molecules and other surface modifiers. Quality control methods, such as visible spectroscopy, can be used to qualitatively assess the total amounts of TNF-α and PEG on AuNPs, however, these methods need to be validated via calibration by an absolute technique. The sulfur content can be used as a proxy for both PEG and TNF-α concentrations because of the presence of at least one thiol in each of the ligands. The goal of this work was to provide a benchmark for future spectroscopic results by providing an accurate assessment of the TNF-α and PEG concentrations through the accurate quantitation of S. The sulfur concentration was assayed using isotope dilution (ID) combined with high resolution multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-MC-ICPMS). The measurement of S using ICPMS instrumentation is challenging because 1) molecular interferences (e.g. oxides, nitrides, and hydrides) exist on each of the S isotopes and 2) the need to perform the

  8. Economic Burden of HR+/HER2- Metastatic Breast Cancer Among Adult Premenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Geneviève; Gagnon-Sanschagrin, Patrick; Guérin, Annie; Burne, Rebecca; Small, Tania; Niravath, Polly; Dalal, Anand A

    2018-03-20

    Premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HR+/HER2-) metastatic breast cancer (mBC) have complex treatment needs and may receive sequential combinations of endocrine therapy (ET) or chemotherapy. This study describes healthcare utilization (HRU) and costs among premenopausal women with HR+/HER2- mBC in real-world settings from a payer's perspective. In this retrospective cohort study, premenopausal women with HR+/HER2- mBC who received ET or chemotherapy were identified from the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan database (1 January 2006-31 December 2015). The main HRU outcomes per patient per 6 months (PPP6 M) were measured during each line of therapy and included number of days in inpatient (IP) and outpatient (OP) services. Healthcare costs per patient per month (PPPM) included medical and pharmacy costs. A total of 3203 patients received first-line, 2194 received second-line, and 1242 received third-line therapy for mBC. Mean number of IP days PPP6 M were 1.6, 1.3, and 1.5 days in the first, second, and third lines, respectively. Mean number of days with OP services PPP6 M was 31.4, 30.9, and 23.3 in the first, second, and third lines, respectively. Among patients receiving ET, mean total healthcare costs were $6521, $4440, and $4555 PPPM in the first, second, and third line, respectively. Among patients receiving chemotherapy, mean total healthcare costs were $16,842, $12,868, and $16,129 PPPM in the first, second, and third line, respectively. These costs were mainly driven by treatment and OP costs. Real-world HRU and costs among premenopausal women with HR+/HER2- mBC are extensive. Patients who received chemotherapy incurred approximately twice the costs of patients treated with ET. Novartis Pharmaceutical Corp.

  9. BONA FIDE, STRONG-VARIABLE GALACTIC LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE STARS ARE FAST ROTATORS: DETECTION OF A HIGH ROTATIONAL VELOCITY IN HR CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groh, J. H.; Damineli, A.; Moises, A. P.; Teodoro, M.; Hillier, D. J.; Barba, R.; Fernandez-Lajus, E.; Gamen, R. C.; Solivella, G.

    2009-01-01

    We report optical observations of the luminous blue variable (LBV) HR Carinae which show that the star has reached a visual minimum phase in 2009. More importantly, we detected absorptions due to Si IV λλ4088-4116. To match their observed line profiles from 2009 May, a high rotational velocity of v rot ≅ 150 ± 20 km s -1 is needed (assuming an inclination angle of 30 deg.), implying that HR Car rotates at ≅0.88 ± 0.2 of its critical velocity for breakup (v crit ). Our results suggest that fast rotation is typical in all strong-variable, bona fide galactic LBVs, which present S-Dor-type variability. Strong-variable LBVs are located in a well-defined region of the HR diagram during visual minimum (the 'LBV minimum instability strip'). We suggest this region corresponds to where v crit is reached. To the left of this strip, a forbidden zone with v rot /v crit >1 is present, explaining why no LBVs are detected in this zone. Since dormant/ex LBVs like P Cygni and HD 168625 have low v rot , we propose that LBVs can be separated into two groups: fast-rotating, strong-variable stars showing S-Dor cycles (such as AG Car and HR Car) and slow-rotating stars with much less variability (such as P Cygni and HD 168625). We speculate that supernova (SN) progenitors which had S-Dor cycles before exploding (such as in SN 2001ig, SN 2003bg, and SN 2005gj) could have been fast rotators. We suggest that the potential difficulty of fast-rotating Galactic LBVs to lose angular momentum is additional evidence that such stars could explode during the LBV phase.

  10. Decontamination of breast pump milk collection kits and related items at home and in hospital: guidance from a Joint Working Group of the Healthcare Infection Society & Infection Prevention Society*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, E; Weaver, G; Hoffman, P; Jones, M; Gilks, J; O’Brien, V; Ridgway, G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A variety of methods are in use for decontaminating breast pump milk collection kits and related items associated with infant feeding. This paper aims to provide best practice guidance for decontamination of this equipment at home and in hospital. It has been compiled by a joint Working Group of the Healthcare Infection Society and the Infection Prevention Society. Methods: The guidance has been informed by a search of the literature in Medline, the British Nursing Index, the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature, Midwifery & Infant Care and the results of two surveys of UK neonatal units in 2002/3 and 2006, and of members of the Infection Prevention Society in 2014. Since limited good quality evidence was available from these sources much of the guidance represents good practice based on the consensus view of the Working Group. Key recommendations: Breast pump milk collection kits should not be reused by different mothers unless they have been sterilized in a Sterile Services Department between these different users. When used by the same mother, a detergent wash followed by thorough rinsing and drying after each use gives acceptable decontamination for most circumstances, as long as it is performed correctly. Additional decontamination precautions to washing, rinsing and drying may be used if indicated by local risk assessments and on advice from the departmental clinicians and Infection Prevention and Control Teams. The microbiological quality of the rinse water is an important consideration, particularly for infants on neonatal units. If bottle brushes or breast/nipple shields are used, they should be for use by one mother only. Decontamination should be by the processes used for breast pump milk collection kits. Dummies (soothers, pacifiers or comforters) needed for non-nutritive sucking by infants on neonatal units, should be for single infant use. Manufacturers should provide these dummies ready-to-use and individually packaged

  11. High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (hrHPV) E6/E7 mRNA Testing by PreTect HPV-Proofer for Detection of Cervical High-Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Cancer among hrHPV DNA-Positive Women with Normal Cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkaart, D. C.; Heideman, D. A. M.; Coupe, V. M. H.; Brink, A. A. T. P.; Verheijen, R. H. M.; Skomedal, H.; Karlsen, F.; Morland, E.; Snijders, P. J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether high-risk HPV (hrHPV) mRNA detection by PreTect HPV-Proofer can be used to stratify hrHPV DNA-positive women of different cytology classes for risk of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or worse (cervical precancer or cancer, i.e., cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or higher [≥CIN2]). A total of 375 women participating in population-based screening, with a GP5+/6+-PCR hrHPV DNA-positive cervical scrape with normal cytology (n = 202), borderline or mild dyskaryosis (BMD) (n = 88), or moderate dyskaryosis or worse (>BMD) (n = 85), were enrolled. Cervical scrapes were additionally subjected to HPV16/18/31/33/45 E6/E7 mRNA analysis by PreTect HPV-Proofer (mRNA test). Referral and follow-up policies were based on cytology, hrHPV DNA, and mRNA testing. The primary study endpoint was the number of ≥CIN2 detected within 3 years of follow-up. The mRNA positivity increased with the severity of cytological abnormality, ranging from 32% (64/202) in hrHPV DNA-positive women with normal cytology to 47% (41/88) in BMD and 68% (58/85) in >BMD groups (P cytology, i.e., 0.55 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.34 to 0.76) in mRNA-positive versus 0.20 (95% CI, 0.07 to 0.33) in mRNA-negative women. In hrHPV DNA-positive women with BMD or >BMD, the result of the mRNA test did not influence the ≥CIN2 risk. In conclusion, mRNA testing by PreTect HPV-Proofer might be of value to select hrHPV DNA-positive women with normal cytology in need of immediate referral for colposcopy. PMID:22553244

  12. Prevention and control of dental caries and periodontal diseases at individual and population level: consensus report of group 3 of joint EFP/ORCA workshop on the boundaries between caries and periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Søren; Blanco, Juan; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Carvalho, Joana C; Dietrich, Thomas; Dörfer, Christof; Eaton, Kenneth A; Figuero, Elena; Frencken, Jo E; Graziani, Filippo; Higham, Susan M; Kocher, Thomas; Maltz, Marisa; Ortiz-Vigon, Alberto; Schmoeckel, Julian; Sculean, Anton; Tenuta, Livia M A; van der Veen, Monique H; Machiulskiene, Vita

    2017-03-01

    The non-communicable diseases dental caries and periodontal diseases pose an enormous burden on mankind. The dental biofilm is a major biological determinant common to the development of both diseases, and they share common risk factors and social determinants, important for their prevention and control. The remit of this working group was to review the current state of knowledge on epidemiology, socio-behavioural aspects as well as plaque control with regard to dental caries and periodontal diseases. Discussions were informed by three systematic reviews on (i) the global burden of dental caries and periodontitis; (ii) socio-behavioural aspects in the prevention and control of dental caries and periodontal diseases at an individual and population level; and (iii) mechanical and chemical plaque control in the simultaneous management of gingivitis and dental caries. This consensus report is based on the outcomes of these systematic reviews and on expert opinion of the participants. Key findings included the following: (i) prevalence and experience of dental caries has decreased in many regions in all age groups over the last three decades; however, not all societal groups have benefitted equally from this decline; (ii) although some studies have indicated a possible decline in periodontitis prevalence, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that prevalence has changed over recent decades; (iii) because of global population growth and increased tooth retention, the number of people affected by dental caries and periodontitis has grown substantially, increasing the total burden of these diseases globally (by 37% for untreated caries and by 67% for severe periodontitis) as estimated between 1990 and 2013, with high global economic impact; (iv) there is robust evidence for an association of low socio-economic status with a higher risk of having dental caries/caries experience and also with higher prevalence of periodontitis; (v) the most important behavioural factor

  13. Rape prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date rape - prevention; Sexual assault - prevention ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Sexual assault and abuse and STDs. In: 2015 sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines 2015. www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/sexual- ...

  14. Dengue Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This photograph ... medications to treat a dengue infection. This makes prevention the most important step, and prevention means avoiding ...

  15. Trends in the knowledge, attitudes and practices of travel risk groups toward prevention of hepatitis B: results from the repeated cross-sectional Dutch Schiphol Airport Survey 2002-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Genderen, Perry J J; van Thiel, Pieter P A M; Mulder, Paul G H; Overbosch, D

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies investigating the travellers' knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) profile indicated an important educational need among those travelling to risk destinations. In the years 2002-2009 an annually repeated cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey was conducted at the Dutch Schiphol Airport with the aim to study trends in KAP of travel risk groups toward prevention of hepatitis B. The frequently encountered risk groups last-minute travellers, solo-travellers, business travellers, travellers visiting friends and relatives (VFR) and elderly travellers were specifically studied. A total of 3045 respondents were included in the survey. Travellers to destinations with a high risk for hepatitis B had significantly less accurate risk perceptions (knowledge) than travellers to low-risk destinations but no differences were observed in past risk-taking attitude. Protection rates against hepatitis B were significantly higher in travellers to high-risk destinations. There was a positive trend over the years in the proportion of travellers to high-risk destinations seeking travel health advice. In accordance with this, trend analyses also indicated rising protection rates against hepatitis B. No significant trends in protection over time were observed for the travel risk groups. The results of this repeated cross-sectional survey suggest an annual 10% increase in protection rates against hepatitis B in Dutch travellers, both to destinations with a high risk and to destinations with a lower risk of hepatitis B, but these trends in protection rates were not observed for the travel risk groups to high-risk destinations. The KAP profile of last-minute travellers and (to a lesser extent) VFRs showed an increased relative risk in hepatitis B, irrespective of the travel destination, underlining the need for specific targeting of these travel risk groups. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An exploration of beliefs and attitudes regarding healthy lifestyle behaviour in an urban population in The Netherlands: Results from a focus group study in a community-based prevention project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloosterboer, Sanne M; van den Brekel, Karolien; Rengers, Antonia H; Peek, Niels; de Wit, Niek J

    2015-06-01

    The positive effects of lifestyle intervention programmes might be enhanced when targeted to the health-related behaviour of the users. This study explores the beliefs and attitudes regarding a healthy lifestyle, the influences on lifestyle behavioural change and the needs to support a healthy lifestyle in the local community, during an integrated community-based prevention project in newly developed urban area in the Netherlands. Three focus groups were conducted with urban residents aged 45-70 (n = 28). Thematic qualitative analysis was applied to verbatim transcripts to identify emerging themes. The following themes were identified: beliefs to healthy behaviour, responsibility for health, perceived behavioural control, external influences on behavioural change and needs in the local community. Within these themes, personal responsibility for health and the influence of the social and physical environment emerged to be important for health and lifestyle. The participants expressed the need for clearly organized health and lifestyle facilities, a personalized approach and an easily accessible health risk assessment to support lifestyle behavioural change in the community. In our study, urban residents experienced a strong influence of the social and physical environment to their lifestyle behaviour. This finding supports an integrated approach for preventive health services in this population. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  17. Pretreatment with Pancaspase Inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK Delays but Does Not Prevent Intraperitoneal Heat-Killed Group B Streptococcus-Induced Preterm Delivery in a Pregnant Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Equils

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Caspases and apoptosis are thought to play a role in infection-associated preterm-delivery. We have shown that in vitro treatment with pancaspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK protects trophoblasts from microbial antigen-induced apoptosis. Objective. To examine whether in vivo administration of Z-VAD-FMK would prevent infection-induced preterm-delivery. Methods. We injected 14.5 day-pregnant-mice with heat-killed group B streptococcus (HK-GBS. Apoptosis within placentas and membranes was assessed by TUNEL staining. Calpain expression and caspase-3 activation were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Preterm-delivery was defined as expulsion of a fetus within 48 hours after injection. Results. Intrauterine (i.u. or intraperitoneal (i.p. HK-GBS injection led to preterm-delivery and induced apoptosis in placentas and membranes at 14 hours. The expression of calpain, a caspase-independent inducer of apoptosis, was increased in placenta. Treatment with the specific caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK (i.p. prior to HK-GBS (i.p. delayed but did not prevent preterm-delivery. Conclusion. Caspase-dependent apoptosis appears to play a role in the timing but not the occurrence of GBS-induced preterm delivery in the mouse.

  18. Plague Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthcare Professionals Clinicians Public Health Officials Veterinarians Prevention History of Plague Resources FAQ Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Reduce rodent habitat around your ...

  19. Sex- and Site-Specific Normative Data Curves for HR-pQCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Lauren A; Liang, Zhiying; Sajobi, Tolulope T; Hanley, David A; Boyd, Steven K

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop age-, site-, and sex-specific centile curves for common high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) and finite-element (FE) parameters for males and females older than 16 years. Participants (n = 866) from the Calgary cohort of the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos) between the ages of 16 and 98 years were included in this study. Participants' nondominant radius and left tibia were scanned using HR-pQCT. Standard and automated segmentation methods were performed and FE analysis estimated apparent bone strength. Centile curves were generated for males and females at the tibia and radius using the generalized additive models for location, scale, and shape (GAMLSS) package in R. After GAMLSS analysis, age-, sex-, and site-specific centiles (10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th) for total bone mineral density and trabecular number as well as failure load have been calculated. Clinicians and researchers can use these reference curves as a tool to assess bone health and changes in bone quality. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  20. A count rate model for PET and its application to an LSO HR PLUS scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moisan, C.; Rogers, J.G.; Douglas, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    We present a count rate model for PET. Considering a standard 20 x 20 cm phantom in the field-of-view of a cylindrical septaless tomograph, the model computes the acceptance to prompt and random events from simple geometric considerations. Dead time factors at all stages of a typical event acquisition architecture are calculated from specified processing clock cycles. Validations of the model's predictions against the measured performances of the ECAT-953B and the EXACT HR PLUS are presented. The model is then used to investigate the benefit of using detectors made of LSO in the EXACT HR PLUS scanner geometry. The results indicate that in replacing BGO by the faster LSO, one can count on an increase of the peak noise-equivalent-count rate by a factor 2.2. This gain will be achieved by using a 5 nsec coincidence window, buckets operating on 128 nsec clock cycle, and front-end data acquisition that can sustain a total rate of 2.9 MHz. (authors)

  1. Focal plane AIT sequence: evolution from HRG-Spot 5 to Pleiades HR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, Roland; Pranyies, Pascal; Toubhans, Isabelle

    2017-11-01

    Optical and geometrical image qualities of Focal Planes, for "push-broom" high resolution remote sensing satellites, require the implementation of specific means and methods for the AIT sequence. Indeed the geometric performances of the focal plane mainly axial focusing and transverse registration, are duly obtained on the basis of adjustment, setting and measurement of optical and CCD components with an accuracy of a few microns. Since the end of the 1970s, EADS-SODERN has developed a series of detection units for earth observation instruments like SPOT and Helios. And EADS-SODERN is now responsible for the development of the Pleiades High Resolution Focal Plane assembly. This paper presents the AIT sequences. We introduce all the efforts, innovative solutions and improvements made on the assembly facilities to match the technical evolutions and breakthrough of the Pleiades HR FP concept in comparison with the previous High Resolution Geometric SPOT 5 Focal Plane. The main evolution drivers are the implementation of strip filters and the realization of 400 mm continuous retinas. For Pleiades HR AIT sequence, three specific integration and measuring benches, corresponding with the different assembly stages, are used: a 3-D non-contact measurement machine for the assembly of detection module, a 3-D measurement machine for mirror integration on the main Focal Plane SiC structure, and a 3-D geometric coordinates control bench to focus detection module lines and to ensure they are well registered together.

  2. Pengembangan Services Untuk Menghubungkan Aplikasi Human Resource Information System (HRIS Dengan Modul Hr SAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyliana Meyliana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid business changes also trigger changes in interconnected applications. Changing multiple interrelated applications, have a level of difficulty and complexity of its own, especially if the platform and framework of these applications are not the same. One of the concepts that can help bridge the time gap problem between business change with changes in applications and platforms and frameworks to bridge the gap between applications is the implementation of "services". By using "services", interconnected applications will be able to produce more realtime information. A case study for the development of "service" is performed at the Human Resource (HR department, which uses two different applications of Human Resource Information System (HRIS for the frontend and use the SAP HR module as its backend. Bottom-up strategy is chosen as a strategy in developing the "service". Application of "service" is expected to help accelerate change in the development of applications and facilitate the further application, and can result in real-time information. 

  3. Characterization of the Red Giant HR 2582 Using the CHARA Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Ellyn K.; McAlister, Harold A.; ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Turner, Nils H.; Sturmann, Judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Farrington, Christopher D.; Vargas, Norm; van Belle, Gerard T.; Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2013-07-01

    We present the fundamental parameters of HR 2582, a high-mass red giant star whose evolutionary state is a mystery. We used the CHARA Array interferometer to directly measure the star's limb-darkened angular diameter (1.006 ± 0.020 mas) and combined our measurement with parallax and photometry from the literature to calculate its physical radius (35.76 ± 5.31 R ⊙), luminosity (517.8 ± 17.5 L ⊙), bolometric flux (14.8 ± 0.5 × 10-8 erg s-1 cm-2), and effective temperature (4577 ± 60 K). We then determined the star's mass (5.6 ± 1.7 M ⊙) using our new values with stellar oscillation results from Baudin et al. Finally, using the Yonsei-Yale evolutionary models, we estimated HR 2582's age to be 165^{+20}_{-15} Myr. While our measurements do not provide the precision required to definitively state where the star is in its evolution, it remains an excellent test case for evaluating stellar interior models.

  4. IUE ultraviolet spectra and chromospheric models of HR 1099 and UX Arietis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T.; Linsky, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    IUE spectra in the region 1150-3200 A of the RS CVn-type variables HR 1099 and UX Arietis are presented and analyzed in terms of chromospheric models. Measurements of Mg h and k lines and Ca II H-K and H alpha spectra are indicated which are found not to be correlated with orbital phase or radio flares and which suggest that the strong emission arises in the K star rather than the G star in these systems. Under the assumption that the UV emission lines are associated with the K star, surface gravities of log g = 3.6 and 3.4 and effective temperatures of 4850 and 5000 K are adopted for HR 1099 and UX Ari, respectively, along with solar metal abundances for each. Model calculations of the chromospheric structure necessary to account for observed C(+), Mg(+), Si(+) and Si(+2) line fluxes are presented which indicate that the transition region pressure lies in the range 0.18-1.0 dynes/sq cm, implying transition regions that are more extended than that of the sun and are not conductively heated. It is noted that pressure scaling laws and the use of Mg II and C II lines as pressure diagnostics may be invalid, possibly due to atmospheric inhomogeneities or gas flows.

  5. DNA-repair protein hHR23a alters its protein structure upon binding proteasomal subunit S5a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Kylie J.; Lech, Patrycja J.; Goh, Amanda M.; Wang, Qinghua; Howley, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    The Rad23 family of proteins, including the human homologs hHR23a and hHR23b, stimulates nucleotide excision repair and has been shown to provide a novel link between proteasome-mediated protein degradation and DNA repair. In this work, we illustrate how the proteasomal subunit S5a regulates hHR23a protein structure. By using NMR spectroscopy, we have elucidated the structure and dynamic properties of the 40-kDa hHR23a protein and show it to contain four structured domains connected by flexible linker regions. In addition, we reveal that these domains interact in an intramolecular fashion, and by using residual dipolar coupling data in combination with chemical shift perturbation analysis, we present the hHR23a structure. By itself, hHR23a adopts a closed conformation defined by the interaction of an N-terminal ubiquitin-like domain with two ubiquitin-associated domains. Interestingly, binding of the proteasomal subunit S5a disrupts the hHR23a interdomain interactions and thereby causes it to adopt an opened conformation. PMID:14557549

  6. Direct Detection and Orbit Analysis of the Exoplanets HR 8799 bcd from Archival 2005 Keck/NIRC2 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Thayne; Fukagawa, Misato; Thalmann, Christian; Matsumura, Soko; Plavchan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present previously unpublished July 2005 H-band coronagraphic data of the young, planet-hosting star HR 8799 from the newly-released Keck/NIRC2 archive. Despite poor observing conditions, we detect three of the planets (HR 8799 bcd), two of them (HR 8799 bc) without advanced image processing. Comparing these data with previously published 1998-2011 astrometry and that from re-reduced October 2010 Keck data constrains the orbits of the planets. Analyzing the planets' astrometry separately, HR 8799 d's orbit is likely inclined at least 25 deg from face-on and the others may be on in inclined orbits. For semimajor axis ratios consistent with a 4:2:1 mean-motion resonance our analysis yields precise values for HR 8799 bcd's orbital parameters and strictly constrains the planets' eccentricities to be less than 0.18-0.3. However, we find no acceptable orbital solutions with this resonance that place the planets in face-on orbits; HR 8799 d shows the largest deviation from such orbits. Moreover, few orbits make HR 8799 d coplanar with b and c, whereas dynamical stability analyses used to constrain the planets' masses typically assume coplanar and/or fare.on orbits. This paper illustrates the significant science gain enabled with the release of the NIRC2 archive.

  7. Triage of HR-HPV positive women with minor cytological abnormalities: a comparison of mRNA testing, HPV DNA testing, and repeat cytology using a 4-year follow-up of a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Maria; Elfström, K Miriam; Brismar Wendel, Sophia; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Andersson, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the viral E6/E7 oncogenes of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) is necessary for malignant conversion and maintenance in cervical tissue. In order to determine whether HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing more effectively predicts precancerous lesions and invasive cervical cancer than HR-HPV DNA testing, we aimed to compare triage using HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing by APTIMA HPV Assay (APTIMA) to HPV16 DNA testing, HPV16/18 DNA testing, and repeat cytology. Liquid-based (PreservCyt) cell samples were obtained from HR-HPV-positive women diagnosed with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) within the framework of the population-based cervical cancer screening program in Stockholm, Sweden. Samples were tested for HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA by APTIMA (Gene-Probe Inc., San Diego, CA, USA). Women were followed up for 4 years after the index cytology via medical and laboratory records, and the Stockholm Oncology Center. Nine of 25 (36%) women in the ASCUS group, and 64 of 180 (36%) women in the LSIL group developed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or worse during 4 years of follow-up. 162 (74%) women were APTIMA-positive, and APTIMA had the highest sensitivity to predict CIN2 or worse and CIN3 or worse in the ASCUS (77.8% and 100%) and LSIL (78.1 and 75.8%) groups, although specificity was insufficient (cytology were more specific than APTIMA. The results of this population-based study with comprehensive follow-up support the use of APTIMA as a triage test for women with ASCUS. More focused investigation is required for women with LSIL.

  8. Deep thermal infrared imaging of HR 8799 bcde: new atmospheric constraints and limits on a fifth planet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currie, Thayne; Cloutier, Ryan; Jayawardhana, Ray [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Science, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Girard, Julien H. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Fukagawa, Misato [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Sorahana, Satoko [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kuchner, Marc [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kenyon, Scott J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Itoh, Yoichi [Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory, Center for Astronomy, University of Hyago, 407-2 Nishigaichi, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan); Matsumura, Soko [School of Engineering, Physics, and Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); Pyo, Tae-Soo [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 N. Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We present new L' (3.8 μm) and Brα (4.05 μm) data and reprocessed archival L' data for the young, planet-hosting star HR 8799 obtained with Keck/NIRC2, VLT/NaCo, and Subaru/IRCS. We detect all four HR 8799 planets in each data set at a moderate to high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≳ 6-15). We fail to identify a fifth planet, 'HR 8799 f', at r < 15 AU at a 5σ confidence level: one suggestive, marginally significant residual at 0.''2 is most likely a point-spread function artifact. Assuming companion ages of 30 Myr and the Baraffe planet cooling models, we rule out an HR 8799 f with a mass of 5 M{sub J} (7 M{sub J} ), 7 M{sub J} (10 M{sub J} ), or 12 M{sub J} (13 M{sub J} ) at r {sub proj} ∼ 12 AU, 9 AU, and 5 AU, respectively. All four HR 8799 planets have red early T dwarf-like L' – [4.05] colors, suggesting that their spectral energy distributions peak in between the L' and M' broadband filters. We find no statistically significant difference in HR 8799 cde's color. Atmosphere models assuming thick, patchy clouds appear to better match HR 8799 bcde's photometry than models assuming a uniform cloud layer. While non-equilibrium carbon chemistry is required to explain HR 8799 b and c's photometry/spectra, evidence for it from HR 8799 d and e's photometry is weaker. Future, deep-IR spectroscopy/spectrophotometry with the Gemini Planet Imager, SCExAO/CHARIS, and other facilities may clarify whether the planets are chemically similar or heterogeneous.

  9. Deep thermal infrared imaging of HR 8799 bcde: new atmospheric constraints and limits on a fifth planet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, Thayne; Cloutier, Ryan; Jayawardhana, Ray; Burrows, Adam; Girard, Julien H.; Fukagawa, Misato; Sorahana, Satoko; Kuchner, Marc; Kenyon, Scott J.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Itoh, Yoichi; Matsumura, Soko; Pyo, Tae-Soo

    2014-01-01

    We present new L' (3.8 μm) and Brα (4.05 μm) data and reprocessed archival L' data for the young, planet-hosting star HR 8799 obtained with Keck/NIRC2, VLT/NaCo, and Subaru/IRCS. We detect all four HR 8799 planets in each data set at a moderate to high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≳ 6-15). We fail to identify a fifth planet, 'HR 8799 f', at r < 15 AU at a 5σ confidence level: one suggestive, marginally significant residual at 0.''2 is most likely a point-spread function artifact. Assuming companion ages of 30 Myr and the Baraffe planet cooling models, we rule out an HR 8799 f with a mass of 5 M J (7 M J ), 7 M J (10 M J ), or 12 M J (13 M J ) at r proj ∼ 12 AU, 9 AU, and 5 AU, respectively. All four HR 8799 planets have red early T dwarf-like L' – [4.05] colors, suggesting that their spectral energy distributions peak in between the L' and M' broadband filters. We find no statistically significant difference in HR 8799 cde's color. Atmosphere models assuming thick, patchy clouds appear to better match HR 8799 bcde's photometry than models assuming a uniform cloud layer. While non-equilibrium carbon chemistry is required to explain HR 8799 b and c's photometry/spectra, evidence for it from HR 8799 d and e's photometry is weaker. Future, deep-IR spectroscopy/spectrophotometry with the Gemini Planet Imager, SCExAO/CHARIS, and other facilities may clarify whether the planets are chemically similar or heterogeneous.

  10. Effectiveness and micro-costing of the KiVa school-based bullying prevention programme in Wales: study protocol for a pragmatic definitive parallel group cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Suzy; Axford, Nick; Berry, Vashti; Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor; Bjornstad, Gretchen; Wrigley, Zoe; Charles, Joanna; Hoare, Zoe; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Matthews, Justin; Hutchings, Judy

    2016-02-01

    Bullying refers to verbal, physical or psychological aggression repeated over time that is intended to cause harm or distress to the victims who are unable to defend themselves. It is a key public health priority owing to its widespread prevalence in schools and harmful short- and long-term effects on victims' well-being. There is a need to strengthen the evidence base by testing innovative approaches to preventing bullying. KiVa is a school-based bullying prevention programme with universal and indicated elements and an emphasis on changing bystander behaviour. It achieved promising results in a large trial in Finland, and now requires testing in other countries. This paper describes the protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) of KiVa in Wales. The study uses a two-arm waitlist control pragmatic definitive parallel group cluster RCT design with an embedded process evaluation and calculation of unit cost. Participating schools will be randomised a using a 1:1 ratio to KiVa plus usual provision (intervention group) or usual provision only (control group). The trial has one primary outcome, child self-reported victimisation from bullying, dichotomised as 'victimised' (bullied at least twice a month in the last couple of months) versus 'not victimised'. Secondary outcomes are: bullying perpetration; aspects of child social and emotional well-being (including emotional problems, conduct, peer relations, prosocial behaviour); and school attendance. Follow-up is at 12 months post-baseline. Implementation fidelity is measured through teacher-completed lesson records and independent school-wide observation. A micro-costing analysis will determine the costs of implementing KiVa, including recurrent and non-recurrent unit costs. Factors related to the scalability of the programme will be examined in interviews with head teachers and focus groups with key stakeholders in the implementation of school-based bullying interventions. The results from this trial

  11. Efficacy of folic acid therapy in primary prevention of stroke among adults with hypertension in China: the CSPPT randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yong; Li, Jianping; Qin, Xianhui; Huang, Yining; Wang, Xiaobin; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Tang, Genfu; Wang, Binyan; Chen, Dafang; He, Mingli; Fu, Jia; Cai, Yefeng; Shi, Xiuli; Zhang, Yan; Cui, Yimin; Sun, Ningling; Li, Xiaoying; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Wang, Jian'an; Yang, Xinchun; Yang, Tianlun; Xiao, Chuanshi; Zhao, Gang; Dong, Qiang; Zhu, Dingliang; Wang, Xian; Ge, Junbo; Zhao, Lianyou; Hu, Dayi; Liu, Lisheng; Hou, Fan Fan

    2015-04-07

    Uncertainty remains about the efficacy of folic acid therapy for the primary prevention of stroke because of limited and inconsistent data. To test the primary hypothesis that therapy with enalapril and folic acid is more effective in reducing first stroke than enalapril alone among Chinese adults with hypertension. The China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial, a randomized, double-blind clinical trial conducted from May 19, 2008, to August 24, 2013, in 32 communities in Jiangsu and Anhui provinces in China. A total of 20,702 adults with hypertension without history of stroke or myocardial infarction (MI) participated in the study. Eligible participants, stratified by MTHFR C677T genotypes (CC, CT, and TT), were randomly assigned to receive double-blind daily treatment with a single-pill combination containing enalapril, 10 mg, and folic acid, 0.8 mg (n = 10,348) or a tablet containing enalapril, 10 mg, alone (n = 10,354). The primary outcome was first stroke. Secondary outcomes included first ischemic stroke; first hemorrhagic stroke; MI; a composite of cardiovascular events consisting of cardiovascular death, MI, and stroke; and all-cause death. During a median treatment duration of 4.5 years, compared with the enalapril alone group, the enalapril-folic acid group had a significant risk reduction in first stroke (2.7% of participants in the enalapril-folic acid group vs 3.4% in the enalapril alone group; hazard ratio [HR], 0.79; 95% CI, 0.68-0.93), first ischemic stroke (2.2% with enalapril-folic acid vs 2.8% with enalapril alone; HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.64-0.91), and composite cardiovascular events consisting of cardiovascular death, MI, and stroke (3.1% with enalapril-folic acid vs 3.9% with enalapril alone; HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.69-0.92). The risks of hemorrhagic stroke (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.65-1.34), MI (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.60-1.82), and all-cause deaths (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.81-1.10) did not differ significantly between the 2 treatment groups. There were no

  12. Food irradiation. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session on H.R. 956, June 19, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Government officials and representatives from health and food service groups were among those testifying on H.R. 956, the Food Irradiation Safety and Labeling Requirement Act of 1987. The area of most concern was to evaluate the actions of the Food and Drug Administration in approving the use of food irradiation technology and to discuss whether the FDA decision was the right one

  13. The selection and adaptation of staff as the basis of the successful implementation of HR strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanicheva A.G.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available the article deals with questions of effective strategies of HR policy in the field of selection and adaptation of staff in the company. The text gives an information about effective methods of selection and adaptation, also it draws our attention to development of communication between employees. This paper can help to pay managers’ attention to effective selection and adaptation taking into consideration that introduction of a new employee to a position is responsible enough. Probably, first days in a new company are crucial for the system of motivation of HR policy in the development of HR strategy. Much attention is given to stages of adaptation for employee or chief executive.

  14. Deep Thermal Infrared Imaging of HR 8799 bcde: New Atmospheric Constraints and Limits on a Fifth Planet

    OpenAIRE

    Currie, Thayne; Burrows, Adam; Girard, Julien H.; Cloutier, Ryan; Fukagawa, Misato; Sorahana, Satoko; Kuchner, Marc; Kenyon, Scott J.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Itoh, Yoichi; Jayawardhana, Ray; Matsumura, Soko; Pyo, Tae-Soo

    2014-01-01

    We present new $L^\\prime$ (3.8 $\\mu m$) and Br-$\\alpha$ (4.05 $\\mu m$) data and reprocessed archival $L^\\prime$ data for the young, planet-hosting star HR 8799 obtained with Keck/NIRC2, VLT/NaCo and Subaru/IRCS. We detect all four HR 8799 planets in each dataset at a moderate to high signal-to-noise (SNR $\\gtrsim$ 6-15). We fail to identify a fifth planet, "HR 8799 f", at $r$ $

  15. Behavioural treatment of tics: Habit reversal and exposure with response prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griendt, J.M.T.M. van de; Verdellen, C.W.J.; Dijk, M.K. van; Verbraak, M.J.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Behaviour therapy has been shown to be an effective strategy in treating tics; both habit reversal (HR) and exposure and response prevention (ER) are recommended as first-line interventions. This review provides an overview of the history, theoretical concepts and evidence at present for HR and ER.

  16. Sublethal concentrations of 17-AAG suppress homologous recombination DNA repair and enhance sensitivity to carboplatin and olaparib in HR proficient ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Eun; Battelli, Chiara; Watson, Jacqueline; Liu, Joyce; Curtis, Jennifer; Morse, Alexander N; Matulonis, Ursula A; Chowdhury, Dipanjan; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A

    2014-05-15

    The promise of PARP-inhibitors(PARPis) in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer(EOC) is tempered by the fact that approximately 50% of patients with homologous recombination (HR)-proficient tumors do not respond well to these agents. Combination of PARPis with agents that inhibit HR may represent an effective strategy to enhance their activity in HR-proficient tumors. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified that heat shock protein 90 inhibitors(HSP90i) may suppress HR and thus revert HR-proficient to HR-deficient tumors. Analysis of publicly available gene expression data showed that exposure of HR-proficient breast cancer cell lines to HSP90i 17-AAG(17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) downregulated HR, ATM and Fanconi Anemia pathways. In HR-proficient EOC cells, 17-AAG suppressed HR as assessed using the RAD51 foci formation assay and this was further confirmed using the Direct Repeat-GFP reporter assay. Furthermore, 17-AAG downregulated BRCA1 and/or RAD51 protein levels, and induced significantly more γH2AX activation in combination with olaparib compared to olaparib alone. Finally, sublethal concentrations of 17-AAG sensitized HR-proficient EOC lines to olaparib and carboplatin but did not affect sensitivity of the HR-deficient OVCAR8 line arguing that the 17-AAG mediated sensitization is dependent on suppression of HR. These results provide a preclinical rationale for using a combination of olaparib/17-AAG in HR-proficient EOC.

  17. Value-based HR practices, i-deals and clinical error control with CSR as a moderator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Tuan; Rowley, Chris; Siengthai, Sununta; Thanh Thao, Vo

    2017-05-08

    Purpose Notwithstanding the rising magnitude of system factors in patient safety improvement, "human factors" such as idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) which also contribute to the adjustment of system deficiencies should not be neglected. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of value-based HR practices in catalyzing i-deals, which then influence clinical error control. The research further examines the moderating role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on the effect of value-based HR practices on i-deals. Design/methodology/approach The data were collected from middle-level clinicians from hospitals in the Vietnam context. Findings The research results confirmed the effect chain from value-based HR practices through i-deals to clinical error control with CSR as a moderator. Originality/value The HRM literature is expanded through enlisting i-deals and clinical error control as the outcomes of HR practices.

  18. Lobbying, Ethics and Related Procedural Reforms: Comparison of Current Provisions of S.2349 and H.R. 4975

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maskell, Jack; Petersen, R. E; Streeter, Sandy

    2006-01-01

    This report provides a table to summarize and provide a side-by-side comparison of the provisions concerning lobbying, ethics, and related congressional procedural reforms that are currently being considered in S. 2349 and H.R...

  19. Detection of MAPK3/6 Phosphorylation During Hypersensitive Response (HR)-Associated Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingyu; Jackson, David

    2018-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an essential component of development, biotic and abiotic responses. Hypersensitive response (HR)-associated cell death activated under pathogen attack is one of the most dramatic manifestations of PCD in plants. Signal transduction through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, a very conserved signaling pathway across eukaryotes, is a core mediator for HR-associated PCD. Therefore, monitoring MAPK activation enables the mechanisms underlying HR-associated PCD to be elucidated. Here, we describe the use of a phosphorylation-specific MAPK3/6 antibody to monitor the activation of MAPK3/6 during HR-associated PCD. The technique may be adapted for use in other types of PCD.

  20. Geophysical investigation of the 116-H-1 liquid waste disposal trench, 100-HR-1 operable unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstrom, K.A.; Mitchell, T.H.

    1996-04-01

    A geophysical investigation and data integration were conducted for the 116-H-1 Liquid Waste Disposal Trench, which is located in the 100-HR-1 Operable Unit. The 116-H-1 Liquid Waste Disposal Trench is also known as the 107-H Liquid Waste Disposal Trench, the 107-H Rupture Effluent Trench, and the 107-H Trench (Deford and Einan 1995). The trench was primarily used to hold effluent from the 107-H Retention Basin that had become radioactive from contact with ruptured fuel elements. The effluent may include debris from the ruptured fuel elements (Koop 1964). The 116-H-1 Liquid Waste Disposal Trench was also used to hold water and sludge from the 107-H Retention Basin during the basin's deactivation in 1965