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Sample records for prevention algae production

  1. The Selective Use of Hypochlorite to Prevent Pond Crashes for Algae-Biofuel Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Although algae-biofuels have many advantages including high areal productivity, algae can be preyed upon by amoebas, protozoans, ciliates, and rotifers, particularly in open pond systems. Thus, these higher organisms need to be controlled. In this study, Chlorella kessleri was used as the algal culture and Brachionus calyciflorus as the source of predation. The effect of sodium hypochlorite (bleach) was tested with the goal of totally inhibiting the rotifer while causing minor inhibition to the alga. The 24-hr LC50 for B. calyciflorus in spring water was 0.198 mg Cl/L while the 24-hr LC50 for C. kessleri was 0.321 mg Cl/L. However, chlorine dissipates rapidly as the algae serves as reductant. Results showed a chlorine dosage between 0.45 to 0.6 mg Cl/L and a dosing interval of two hours created the necessary chlorine concentrations to inhibit predation while letting the algae grow; thus giving algae farmers a tool to prevent pond crashes. Water Environ. Res., 87 (2015).

  2. Algae biotechnology: products and processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bux, F; Chisti, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    This book examines the utilization of algae for the development of useful products and processes with the emphasis towards green technologies and processes, and the requirements to make these viable...

  3. Scenario studies for algae production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slegers, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae are a promising biomass for the biobased economy to produce food, feed, fuel, chemicals and materials. So far, large-scale production of algae is limited and as a result estimates on the performance of such large systems are scarce. There is a need to estimate large-scale biomass

  4. Bioethanol Production from Indigenous Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuka Roy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced rate of fossil fuel extraction is likely to deplete limited natural resources over short period of time. So search for alternative fuel is only the way to overcome this problem of upcoming energy crisis. In this aspect biofuel is a sustainable option. Agricultural lands cannot be compromised for biofuel production due to the requirement of food for the increasing population. Certain species of algae can produce ethanol during anaerobic fermentation and thus serve as a direct source for bioethanol production. The high content of complex carbohydrates entrapped in the cell wall of the microalgae makes it essential to incorporate a pre-treatment stage to release and convert these complex carbohydrates into simple sugars prior to the fermentation process. There have been researches on production of bioethanol from a particular species of algae, but this work was an attempt to produce bioethanol from easily available indigenous algae. Acid hydrolysis was carried out as pre-treatment. Gas Chromatographic analysis showed that 5 days’ fermentation by baker’s yeast had yielded 93% pure bioethanol. The fuel characterization of the bioethanol with respect to gasoline showed comparable and quite satisfactory results for its use as an alternative fuel.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v4i1.12182International Journal of Environment Volume-4, Issue-1, Dec-Feb 2014/15, page: 112-120  

  5. Macro algae as substrate for biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik; Sarker, Shiplu; Gautam, Dhan Prasad

    Algae as a substrate for biogas is superior to other crops since it has a much higher yield of biomass per unit area and since algae grows in the seawater there will be no competition with food production on agricultural lands. So far, the progress in treating different groups of algae as a source...... of energy is promising. In this study 5 different algae types were tested for biogas potential and two algae were subsequent used for co-digestion with manure. Green seaweed, Ulva lactuca and brown seaweed Laminaria digitata was co-digested with cattle manure at mesophilic and thermophilic condition...

  6. Biogas production experimental research using algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrėnas, Pranas; Misevičius, Antonas

    2015-01-01

    The current study is on the the use of macro-algae as feedstock for biogas production. Three types of macro-algae, Cladophora glomerata (CG), Chara fragilis (CF), and Spirogyra neglecta (SN), were chosen for this research. The experimental studies on biogas production were carried out with these algae in a batch bioreactor. In the bioreactor was maintained 35 ± 1°C temperature. The results showed that the most appropriate macro-algae for biogas production are Spirogyra neglecta (SN) and Cladophora glomerata (CG). The average amount of biogas obtained from the processing of SN - 0.23 m(3)/m(3)d, CG - 0.20 m(3)/m(3)d, and CF - 0.12 m(3)/m(3)d. Considering the concentration of methane obtained during the processing of SN and CG, which after eight days and until the end of the experiment exceeded 60%, it can be claimed that biogas produced using these algae is valuable. When processing CF, the concentration of methane reached the level of 50% only by the final day of the experiment, which indicates that this alga is less suitable for biogas production.

  7. Sustainable Algae Biodiesel Production in Cold Climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudras Baliga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This life cycle assessment aims to determine the most suitable operating conditions for algae biodiesel production in cold climates to minimize energy consumption and environmental impacts. Two hypothetical photobioreactor algae production and biodiesel plants located in Upstate New York (USA are modeled. The photobioreactor is assumed to be housed within a greenhouse that is located adjacent to a fossil fuel or biomass power plant that can supply waste heat and flue gas containing CO2 as a primary source of carbon. Model results show that the biodiesel areal productivity is high (19 to 25 L of BD/m2/yr. The total life cycle energy consumption was between 15 and 23 MJ/L of algae BD and 20 MJ/L of soy BD. Energy consumption and air emissions for algae biodiesel are substantially lower than soy biodiesel when waste heat was utilized. Algae's most substantial contribution is a significant decrease in the petroleum consumed to make the fuel.

  8. Can the primary algae production be measured precisely?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olesen, M.; Lundsgaard, C.

    1996-01-01

    Algae production in seawater is extremely important as a basic link in marine food chains. Evaluation of the algae quantity is based on 14CO 2 tracer techniques while natural circulation and light absorption in seawater is taken insufficiently into account. Algae production can vary by 500% in similar nourishment conditions, but varying water mixing conditions. (EG)

  9. Use of Brown Algae to Demonstrate Natural Products Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Lee A.

    1985-01-01

    Background information is provided on the natural products found in marine organisms in general and the brown algae in particular. Also provided are the procedures needed to isolate D-mannitol (a primary metabolite) and cholesterol from brown algae. (JN)

  10. Production and characterization of algae extract from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weston Kightlinger

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that algae extract derived from C. reinhardtii is similar, if not superior, to commercially available yeast extract in nutrient content and effects on the growth and metabolism of E. coli and S. cerevisiae. Bacto™ yeast extract is valued at USD $0.15–0.35 per gram, if algae extract was sold at similar prices, it would serve as a high-value co-product in algae-based fuel processes.

  11. Photobiological hydrogen production with switchable photosystem-II designer algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James Weifu

    2014-02-18

    A process for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production using transgenic alga. The process includes inducing exogenous genes in a transgenic alga by manipulating selected environmental factors. In one embodiment inducing production of an exogenous gene uncouples H.sub.2 production from existing mechanisms that would downregulate H.sub.2 production in the absence of the exogenous gene. In other embodiments inducing an exogenous gene triggers a cascade of metabolic changes that increase H.sub.2 production. In some embodiments the transgenic alga are rendered non-regenerative by inducing exogenous transgenes for proton channel polypeptides that are targeted to specific algal membranes.

  12. Potential of wastewater grown algae for biodiesel production and CO

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potential of wastewater grown algae for biodiesel production and CO 2 sequestration. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Mixed algae sample showed the highest CO2 fixation rate, followed by Chlorella sp., Scenedesmus incrassatulus, Scenedesmus dimorphus and Chroococcus cohaerens (2.807, 1.627, 1.501, 1.270 ...

  13. Scenario analysis of large scale algae production in tubular photobioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slegers, P.M.; Beveren, van P.J.M.; Wijffels, R.H.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Microalgae productivity in tubular photobioreactors depends on algae species, location, tube diameter, biomass concentration, distance between tubes and for vertically stacked systems, the number of horizontal tubes per stack. A simulation model for horizontal and vertically stacked horizontal

  14. Biodiesel Production From Algae to Overcome the Energy Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suliman Khan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of energy sources has reached at the level that whole world is relying on it. Being the major source of energy, fuels are considered the most important. The fear of diminishing the available sources thirst towards biofuel production has increased during last decades. Considering the food problems, algae gain the most attention to be used as biofuel producers. The use of crop and food-producing plants will never be a best fit into the priorities for biofuel production as they will disturb the food needs. Different types of algae having the different production abilities. Normally algae have 20%–80% oil contents that could be converted into different types of fuels such as kerosene oil and biodiesel. The diesel production from algae is economical and easy. Different species such as tribonema, ulothrix and euglena have good potential for biodiesel production. Gene technology can be used to enhance the production of oil and biodiesel contents and stability of algae. By increasing the genetic expressions, we can find the ways to achieve the required biofuel amounts easily and continuously to overcome the fuels deficiency. The present review article focusses on the role of algae as a possible substitute for fossil fuel as an ideal biofuel reactant.

  15. Algae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raven, John A.; Giordano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 13 (2014), s. 590-595 ISSN 0960-9822 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : algae * life cycle * evolution Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.571, year: 2014

  16. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James Weifu [Knoxville, TN

    2011-04-26

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  17. Inorganic carbon addition stimulates snow algae primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, T. L.; Havig, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Earth has experienced glacial/interglacial oscillations throughout its history. Today over 15 million square kilometers (5.8 million square miles) of Earth's land surface is covered in ice including glaciers, ice caps, and the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica, most of which are retreating as a consequence of increased atmospheric CO2. Glaciers are teeming with life and supraglacial snow and ice surfaces are often red due to blooms of photoautotrophic algae. Recent evidence suggests the red pigmentation, secondary carotenoids produced in part to thrive under high irradiation, lowers albedo and accelerates melt. However, there are relatively few studies that report the productivity of snow algae communities and the parameters that constrain their growth on snow and ice surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that snow algae primary productivity can be stimulated by the addition of inorganic carbon. We found an increase in light-dependent carbon assimilation in snow algae microcosms amended with increasing amounts of inorganic carbon. Our snow algae communities were dominated by typical cosmopolitan snow algae species recovered from Alpine and Arctic environments. The climate feedbacks necessary to enter and exit glacial/interglacial oscillations are poorly understood. Evidence and models agree that global Snowball events are accompanied by changes in atmospheric CO2 with increasing CO2 necessary for entering periods of interglacial time. Our results demonstrate a positive feedback between increased CO2 and snow algal productivity and presumably growth. With the recent call for bio-albedo effects to be considered in climate models, our results underscore the need for robust climate models to include feedbacks between supraglacial primary productivity, albedo, and atmospheric CO2.

  18. Switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James Weifu

    2010-01-05

    A switchable photosystem-II designer algae for photobiological hydrogen production. The designer transgenic algae includes at least two transgenes for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production wherein a first transgene serves as a genetic switch that can controls photosystem II (PSII) oxygen evolution and a second transgene encodes for creation of free proton channels in the algal photosynthetic membrane. In one embodiment, the algae includes a DNA construct having polymerase chain reaction forward primer (302), a inducible promoter (304), a PSII-iRNA sequence (306), a terminator (308), and a PCR reverse primer (310). In other embodiments, the PSII-iRNA sequence (306) is replaced with a CF.sub.1-iRNA sequence (312), a streptomycin-production gene (314), a targeting sequence (316) followed by a proton-channel producing gene (318), or a PSII-producing gene (320). In one embodiment, a photo-bioreactor and gas-product separation and utilization system produce photobiological H.sub.2 from the switchable PSII designer alga.

  19. Biogas Production from Food Wastes and Algae | Jeetah | University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University of Mauritius Research Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 22 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Biogas Production from Food Wastes and Algae.

  20. Inorganic carbon addition stimulates snow algae primary productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Havig, Jeff R

    2018-01-29

    Earth has experienced glacial/interglacial oscillations accompanied by changes in atmospheric CO 2 throughout much of its history. Today over 15 million square kilometers of Earth's land surface is covered in ice including glaciers, ice caps, and ice sheets. Glaciers are teeming with life and supraglacial snow and ice surfaces are often darkened by the presence of photoautotrophic snow algae, resulting in accelerated melt due to lowered albedo. Few studies report the productivity of snow algal communities and the parameters which constrain their growth on supraglacial surfaces-key factors for quantifying biologically induced albedo effects (bio-albedo). We demonstrate that snow algae primary productivity is stimulated by the addition of inorganic carbon. Our results indicate a positive feedback between increasing CO 2 and snow algal primary productivity, underscoring the need for robust climate models of past and present glacial/interglacial oscillations to include feedbacks between supraglacial primary productivity, albedo, and atmospheric CO 2 .

  1. Evaluation of filamentous green algae as feedstocks for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yonggang; Cui, Binjie; Wang, Hui; Liu, Tianzhong

    2016-11-01

    Compared with unicellular microalgae, filamentous algae have high resistance to grazer-predation and low-cost recovery in large-scale production. Green algae, as the most diverse group of algae, included numerous filamentous genera and species. In this study, records of filamentous genera and species in green algae were firstly censused and classified. Then, seven filamentous strains subordinated in different genera were cultivated in bubbled-column to investigate their growth rate and energy molecular (lipid and starch) capacity. Four strains including Stigeoclonium sp., Oedogonium nodulosum, Hormidium sp. and Zygnema extenue were screened out due to their robust growth. And they all could accumulate triacylglycerols and starch in their biomass, but with different capacity. After nitrogen starvation, Hormidium sp. and Oedogonium nodulosum respectively exhibited high capacity of lipid (45.38% in dry weight) and starch (46.19% in dry weight) accumulation, which could be of high potential as feedstocks for biodiesel and bioethanol production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Circular resource flows from algae production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seghetta, Michele; Manninen, Kaisa; Spilling, Kristian

    and biogas production. Unfortunately, so far no industrial scale plant has been set up. This is a demonstration that there are still constraints to be overcome. This study will tackle the fi rst obstacle for the development of this technology: the feedstock supply to a potential biorefi nery. This study...... evaluates diffi culties and constraints in the macroalgae and microalgae growth process though the utilization of the Life Cycle Assessment and an economic evaluation. In particular a case study of Saccharina latissima cultivation site in Limfjorden (Denmark) and a microalgae cultivation site in Finland...

  3. Metabolic engineering of higher plants and algae for isoprenoid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempinski, Chase; Jiang, Zuodong; Bell, Stephen; Chappell, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of compounds derived from the five carbon precursors, dimethylallyl diphosphate, and isopentenyl diphosphate. These molecules present incredible natural chemical diversity, which can be valuable for humans in many aspects such as cosmetics, agriculture, and medicine. However, many terpenoids are only produced in small quantities by their natural hosts and can be difficult to generate synthetically. Therefore, much interest and effort has been directed toward capturing the genetic blueprint for their biochemistry and engineering it into alternative hosts such as plants and algae. These autotrophic organisms are attractive when compared to traditional microbial platforms because of their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as a carbon substrate instead of supplied carbon sources like glucose. This chapter will summarize important techniques and strategies for engineering the accumulation of isoprenoid metabolites into higher plants and algae by choosing the correct host, avoiding endogenous regulatory mechanisms, and optimizing potential flux into the target compound. Future endeavors will build on these efforts by fine-tuning product accumulation levels via the vast amount of available "-omic" data and devising metabolic engineering schemes that integrate this into a whole-organism approach. With the development of high-throughput transformation protocols and synthetic biology molecular tools, we have only begun to harness the power and utility of plant and algae metabolic engineering.

  4. Biodiesel production from algae grown on food industry wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mureed, Khadija; Kanwal, Shamsa; Hussain, Azhar; Noureen, Shamaila; Hussain, Sabir; Ahmad, Shakeel; Ahmad, Maqshoof; Waqas, Rashid

    2018-04-10

    Algae have an ample potential to produce biodiesel from spent wash of food industry. In addition, it is cheaper and presents an environment friendly way to handle food industry wastewater. This study was conducted to optimize the growth of microalgal strains and to assess biodiesel production potential of algae using untreated food industry wastewater as a source of nutrients. The food industry wastewater was collected and analyzed for its physicochemical characteristics. Different dilutions (10, 20, 40, 80, and 100%) of this wastewater were made with distilled water, and growth of two microalgal strains (Cladophora sp. and Spyrogyra sp.) was recorded. Each type of wastewater was inoculated with microalgae, and biomass was harvested after 7 days. The growth of both strains was also evaluated at varying temperatures, pH and light periods to optimize the algal growth for enhanced biodiesel production. After optimization, biodiesel production by Spyrogyra sp. was recorded in real food industry wastewater. The algal biomass increased with increasing level of food industry wastewater and was at maximum with 100% wastewater. Moreover, statistically similar results were found with algal growth on 100% wastewater and also on Bristol's media. The Cladophora sp. produced higher biomass than Spyrogyra sp. while growing on food industry wastewater. The optimal growth of both microalgal strains was observed at temperature 30 °C, pH: 8, light 24 h. Cladophora sp. was further evaluated for biodiesel production while growing on 100% wastewater and found that this strain produced high level of oil and biodiesel. Algae have an ample potential to produce biodiesel from spent wash of food industry. In addition, it is cheaper and presents an environment friendly way to handle food industry wastewater.

  5. Solar-driven hydrogen production in green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Steven J; Tamburic, Bojan; Zemichael, Fessehaye; Hellgardt, Klaus; Nixon, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The twin problems of energy security and global warming make hydrogen an attractive alternative to traditional fossil fuels with its combustion resulting only in the release of water vapor. Biological hydrogen production represents a renewable source of the gas and can be performed by a diverse range of microorganisms from strict anaerobic bacteria to eukaryotic green algae. Compared to conventional methods for generating H(2), biological systems can operate at ambient temperatures and pressures without the need for rare metals and could potentially be coupled to a variety of biotechnological processes ranging from desalination and waste water treatment to pharmaceutical production. Photobiological hydrogen production by microalgae is particularly attractive as the main inputs for the process (water and solar energy) are plentiful. This chapter focuses on recent developments in solar-driven H(2) production in green algae with emphasis on the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We review the current methods used to achieve sustained H(2) evolution and discuss possible approaches to improve H(2) yields, including the optimization of culturing conditions, reducing light-harvesting antennae and targeting auxiliary electron transport and fermentative pathways that compete with the hydrogenase for reductant. Finally, industrial scale-up is discussed in the context of photobioreactor design and the future prospects of the field are considered within the broader context of a biorefinery concept. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An Overview of Algae Biofuel Production and Potential Environmental Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algae are among the most potentially significant sources of sustainable biofuels in the future of renewable energy. A feedstock with virtually unlimited applicability, algae can metabolize various waste streams (e.g., municipal wastewater, carbon dioxide from industrial flue gas)...

  7. Methane production from marine, green macro-algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, G.

    1983-01-01

    Fermentation studies have been carried out to produce methane from green algae native to Scandinavian water and suitable for large scale cultivation. Long term semi-continuous fermentations during mesophilic and thermophilic conditions were performed as well as batch fermentations in flasks and syringes. A mixed inoculum was prepared from sediments, rotting seaweed, sewage sludge and rumen contents. Methane production from the seaweed substrate, consisting of ground green algae without any nutrient additions, started immediately in this culture, mesophilicly as well as thermophilicly. Fermentations were carried out with retention times from 27 to 11 days and loading rates from 1.1 to 2.6 g volatile solids (VS added) per litre per day. In the mesophilic fermentation, gas yields were 250-350 ml CH/sub 4//g VS added and the VS-reduction was around 50-55% at all tested retention times and loading rates. The level of volatile fatty acids was very low in this system. In the thermophilic digestor, gas yields were somewhat lower although the VS-reduction was around 50% also in this systems. The VFA-levels were higher and the culture more sensitive to disturbances. Thus no advantages were found with the thermophilic fermentation. In mesophilic batch fermentations the gas production was rather rapid and almost completed after 12-15 days, in agreement with the continuous fermentations. The gas yields in batch experiments were high, 350-480 ml CH/sub 4//g VS added. (Refs. 20).

  8. Research and development for algae-based technologies in Korea: a review of algae biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Won; Jo, Seung-Woo; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2015-03-01

    This review covers recent research and development (R&D) activities in the field of algae-based biofuels in Korea. As South Korea's energy policy paradigm has focused on the development of green energies, the government has funded several algae biofuel R&D consortia and pilot projects. Three major programs have been launched since 2009, and significant efforts are now being made to ensure a sustainable supply of algae-based biofuels. If these R&D projects are executed as planned for the next 10 years, they will enable us to overcome many technical barriers in algae biofuel technologies and help Korea to become one of the leading countries in green energy by 2020.

  9. Enhancement of biodiesel production from different species of algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Moneim M. R. Afify, Abd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Eight algal species (4 Rhodo, 1 chloro and 1 phaeophycean macroalgae, 1 cyanobacterium and 1 green microalga were used for the production of biodiesel using two extraction solvent systems (Hexane/ether (1:1, v/v and (Chloroform/ methanol (2:1, v/v. Biochemical evaluations of algal species were carried out by estimating biomass, lipid, biodiesel and sediment (glycerin and pigments percentages. Hexane/ ether (1:1, v/v extraction solvent system resulted in low lipid recoveries (2.3-3.5% dry weight while; chloroform/methanol (2: 1, v/v extraction solvent system was proved to be more efficient for lipid and biodiesel extraction (2.5 – 12.5% dry weight depending on algal species. The green microalga Dictyochloropsis splendida extract produced the highest lipid and biodiesel yield (12.5 and 8.75% respectively followed by the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis (9.2 and 7.5 % respectively. On the other hand, the macroalgae (red, brown and green produced the lowest biodiesel yield. The fatty acids of Dictyochloropsis splendida Geitler biodiesel were determined using gas liquid chromatography. Lipids, biodiesel and glycerol production of Dictyochloropsis splendida Geitler (the promising alga were markedly enhanced by either increasing salt concentration or by nitrogen deficiency with maximum production of (26.8, 18.9 and 7.9 % respectively at nitrogen starvation condition.

    Ocho especies de algas (4 Rhodo, 1 cloro y 1 macroalgas phaeophycean, 1 cianobacteria y 1 microalga verde fueron utilizados para la producción de biodiesel utilizando dos sistemas de extracción con disolventes (hexano/éter (1:1, v/v y (Cloroformo / metanol (2:1, v/v. La evaluación bioquímica de las especies de algas se llevó a cabo mediante la estimación de los porcentajes de biomasa, de lípidos, de biodiesel y de sedimento (glicerina y pigmentos. El sistema extracción con el disolvente hexano/éter (1:1, v

  10. Uptake of caprolactam and its influence on growth and oxygen production of Desmodesmus quadricauda algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinová, Jana Pexová; Tříska, Jan; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Novák, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The consumption of polyamides produced from caprolactam is increasing continuously, and for that reason the danger of environmental contamination by this lactam is also rising. This study's aim was to evaluate the influence of caprolactam on the growth and oxygen production of the green alga Desmodesmus quadricauda and on caprolactam uptake by this alga. The presence of caprolactam in water was observed to cause the algae significantly to increase its oxygen production. Caprolactam concentration of 5,000 mg/L stopped algae growth after 6 days and influenced coenobia structure (seen as disappearance of pyrenoids, deformation of cells) but did not decrease the number of cells in the coenobia. Caprolactam uptake is probably passive but relatively rapid. Maximum concentration in the algae was reached after 18-24 h. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Health benefits of blue-green algae: prevention of cardiovascular disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Chai Siah; Yang, Yue; Park, Youngki; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-02-01

    Blue-green algae (BGA) are among the most primitive life forms on earth and have been consumed as food or medicine by humans for centuries. BGA contain various bioactive components, such as phycocyanin, carotenoids, γ-linolenic acid, fibers, and plant sterols, which can promote optimal health in humans. Studies have demonstrated that several BGA species or their active components have plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride-lowering properties due to their modulation of intestinal cholesterol absorption and hepatic lipogenic gene expression. BGA can also reduce inflammation by inhibiting the nuclear factor κ B activity, consequently reducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, BGA inhibit lipid peroxidation and have free radical scavenging activity, which can be beneficial for the protection against oxidative stress. The aforementioned effects of BGA can contribute to the prevention of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of the health-promoting functions of BGA against cardiovascular disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which are major health threats in the developed countries.

  12. Energy Productivity of the High Velocity Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID-HV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attalah, Said; Waller, Peter M.; Khawam, George; Ryan, Randy D.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2015-06-03

    The original Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID) raceway was an effective method to increase algae culture temperature in open raceways. However, the energy input was high and flow mixing was poor. Thus, the High Velocity Algae Raceway Integrated Design (ARID-HV) raceway was developed to reduce energy input requirements and improve flow mixing in a serpentine flow path. A prototype ARID-HV system was installed in Tucson, Arizona. Based on algae growth simulation and hydraulic analysis, an optimal ARID-HV raceway was designed, and the electrical energy input requirement (kWh ha-1 d-1) was calculated. An algae growth model was used to compare the productivity of ARIDHV and conventional raceways. The model uses a pond surface energy balance to calculate water temperature as a function of environmental parameters. Algae growth and biomass loss are calculated based on rate constants during day and night, respectively. A 10 year simulation of DOE strain 1412 (Chlorella sorokiniana) showed that the ARID-HV raceway had significantly higher production than a conventional raceway for all months of the year in Tucson, Arizona. It should be noted that this difference is species and climate specific and is not observed in other climates and with other algae species. The algae growth model results and electrical energy input evaluation were used to compare the energy productivity (algae production rate/energy input) of the ARID-HV and conventional raceways for Chlorella sorokiniana in Tucson, Arizona. The energy productivity of the ARID-HV raceway was significantly greater than the energy productivity of a conventional raceway for all months of the year.

  13. Can algae-based technologies be an affordable green process for biofuel production and wastewater remediation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo Hoang Nhat, P; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Chang, S W; Nguyen, D D; Nguyen, P D; Bui, X T; Zhang, X B; Guo, J B

    2018-05-01

    Algae is a well-known organism that its characteristic is prominent for biofuel production and wastewater remediation. This critical review aims to present the applicability of algae with in-depth discussion regarding three key aspects: (i) characterization of algae for its applications; (ii) the technical approaches and their strengths and drawbacks; and (iii) future perspectives of algae-based technologies. The process optimization and combinations with other chemical and biological processes have generated efficiency, in which bio-oil yield is up to 41.1%. Through life cycle assessment, algae bio-energy achieves high energy return than fossil fuel. Thus, the algae-based technologies can reasonably be considered as green approaches. Although selling price of algae bio-oil is still high (about $2 L -1 ) compared to fossil fuel's price of $1 L -1 , it is expected that the algae bio-oil's price will become acceptable in the next coming decades and potentially dominate 75% of the market. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Algae Production from Wastewater Resources: An Engineering and Cost Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenung, Susan [Longitude 122 West, Inc.; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL

    2018-03-01

    Co-locating algae cultivation ponds near municipal wastewater (MWW) facilities provides the opportunity to make use of the nitrogen and phosphorus compounds in the wastewater as nutrient sources for the algae. This use benefits MWW facilities, the algae biomass and biofuel or bioproduct industry, and the users of streams where treated or untreated waste would be discharged. Nutrient compounds can lead to eutrophication, hypoxia, and adverse effects to some organisms if released downstream. This analysis presents an estimate of the cost savings made possible to cultivation facilities by using the nutrients from wastewater for algae growth rather than purchase of the nutrients. The analysis takes into consideration the cost of pipe transport from the wastewater facility to the algae ponds, a cost factor that has not been publicly documented in the past. The results show that the savings in nutrient costs can support a wastewater transport distance up to 10 miles for a 1000-acre-pond facility, with potential adjustments for different operating assumptions.

  15. Production and release of selenocyanate by different green freshwater algae in environmental and laboratory samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Kelly L; Smith, Matthew S; Wallschläger, Dirk

    2012-06-05

    In a previous study, selenocyanate was tentatively identified as a biotransformation product when green algae were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of selenate. In this follow-up study, we confirm conclusively the presence of selenocyanate in Chlorella vulgaris culture medium by electrospray mass spectrometry, based on selenium's known isotopic pattern. We also demonstrate that the observed phenomenon extends to other green algae (Chlorella kesslerii and Scenedesmus obliquus) and at least one species of blue-green algae (Synechococcus leopoliensis). Further laboratory experiments show that selenocyanate production by algae is enhanced by addition of nitrate, which appears to serve as a source of cyanide produced in the algae. Ultimately, this biotransformation process was confirmed in field experiments where trace amounts of selenocyanate (0.215 ± 0.010 ppb) were observed in a eutrophic, selenium-impacted river with massive algal blooms, which consisted of filamentous green algae (Cladophora genus) and blue-green algae (Anabaena genus). Selenocyanate abundance was low despite elevated selenium concentrations, apparently due to suppression of selenate uptake by sulfate, and insufficient nitrogen concentrations. Finally, trace levels of several other unidentified selenium-containing compounds were observed in these river water samples; preliminary suggestions for their identities include thioselenate and small organic Se species.

  16. Combining micro-structures and micro-algae to increase lipid production for bio-fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh; Zhu, Emilly; Mestler, Troy; Estévez-Torres, André.; Austin, Robert

    2011-03-01

    3rd generation bio-fuels like lipid producing micro-algae are a promising source of energy that could replace our dependence on petroleum. However, until there are improvements in algae oil yields, and a reduction in the energy needed for processing, algae bio-fuels are not economically competitive with petroleum. Here, we describe our work combining micro-fabricated devices with micro-algae Neochloris oleoabundans, a species first isolated on the sand dunes of Saudi Arabia. Inserting micro-algae of varying fitness into a landscape of micro-habitats allows us to evolve and select them based on a variety of conditions like specific gravity, starvation response and Nile Red fluorescence (which is a marker for lipid production). Hence, we can both estimate the production of lipids and generate conditions that allow the creation and isolation of algae which produce higher amounts of lipids, while discarding the rest. Finally, we can use micro-fabricated structures and flocculation to de-water these high lipid producing algae, reducing the need for expensive centrifugation and filtration.

  17. Modelling and evaluation of productivity and economic feasibility of a combined production of tomato and algae in Dutch greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slager, B.; Sapounas, A.; Henten, van E.J.; Hemming, S.

    2014-01-01

    Combination of production of algae and tomato increases efficient use of available resources of greenhouse enterprises, such as controlled environment, water and nutrients, carbon dioxide, greenhouse space and infrastructure and knowledge. No information is available, however, about the potential

  18. Lipid metabolism and potentials of biofuel and high added-value oil production in red algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoki; Moriyama, Takashi; Mori, Natsumi; Toyoshima, Masakazu

    2017-04-01

    Biomass production is currently explored in microalgae, macroalgae and land plants. Microalgal biofuel development has been performed mostly in green algae. In the Japanese tradition, macrophytic red algae such as Pyropia yezoensis and Gelidium crinale have been utilized as food and industrial materials. Researches on the utilization of unicellular red microalgae such as Cyanidioschyzon merolae and Porphyridium purpureum started only quite recently. Red algae have relatively large plastid genomes harboring more than 200 protein-coding genes that support the biosynthetic capacity of the plastid. Engineering the plastid genome is a unique potential of red microalgae. In addition, large-scale growth facilities of P. purpureum have been developed for industrial production of biofuels. C. merolae has been studied as a model alga for cell and molecular biological analyses with its completely determined genomes and transformation techniques. Its acidic and warm habitat makes it easy to grow this alga axenically in large scales. Its potential as a biofuel producer is recently documented under nitrogen-limited conditions. Metabolic pathways of the accumulation of starch and triacylglycerol and the enzymes involved therein are being elucidated. Engineering these regulatory mechanisms will open a possibility of exploiting the full capability of production of biofuel and high added-value oil. In the present review, we will describe the characteristics and potential of these algae as biotechnological seeds.

  19. Codigestion of Taihu blue algae with swine manure for biogas production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Hengfeng; Wang, Shouquan; Zhao, Mingxing; Huang, Zhenxing; Ren, Hongyan; Yan, Qun; Ruan, Wenquan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Codigestion of blue algae with swine manure has the highest CH 4 yield at ISR 2.0. • pH, TAN, N-NH 3 and VFAs confirmed the appropriate stability of the codigestion. • 35.44% VS reduction was achieved by codigestion of blue algae with swine manure. • Three key enzyme characteristics demonstrated the higher efficiencies of codigestion. - Abstract: Anaerobic digestion (AD) of Taihu blue algae and its codigestion with swine manure was evaluated at different inoculum substrate ratios (ISRs) from 0.5 to 3.0. Results showed that codigestion of blue algae with swine manure led to the highest methane (CH 4 ) production of 212.7 mL g −1 VS at ISR 2.0, while digestion of blue algae inoculated with granular sludge brought out the optimized CH 4 production of 73.5 mL g −1 VS at ISR 3.0. The values of pH, total ammonia nitrogen (TAN), free ammonia nitrogen (N-NH 3 ) and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) showed no significant difference between the digestion and codigestion, confirming the appropriate stability of the two batch anaerobic processes. Closer examination of VS removal rates and key enzymes variation proved codigestion had higher efficiencies in biodegradation and methanation, which demonstrated that AD of blue algae with swine manure was a promising technology for both solid wastes treatment and renewable-energy production

  20. Production of Biodiesel from Marine Algae to Mitigate Environmental Pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.M.; Obaid, M.; Sultana, R.

    2015-01-01

    This research article demonstrates the conversion of oily contents of marine macroalgae, namely Cystoseira indica and Scinia hatei to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) through alkaline transesterification. The algae were dried, crushed and grinded into the powder form, which were analyzed for physical appearance, water content and particle size profile. The oily contents from these powdered algae were extracted by using different non-polar solvents like n-hexane, n-heptane, dichloromethane, diethyl ether and n-hexane: diethyl ether (1:1) mixture at small scale. The efficiency index of the solvent was developed based on the yield of the oily content and boiling point of these solvents, which showed that n-hexane: diethyl ether (1:1) mixture is the best solvent system for the extraction of oils. The yield of oily contents with respect to the dried algal weight was found to be 2.81 ± 0.43 percentage w/w and 3.10 ± 0.27 percentage w/w for C. indica and S. hatei respectively. These oily contents were subjected to physical and chemical analysis. The oily contents were converted into biodiesel by alkaline transesterification using potassium methoxide as catalyst which is prepared by dissolving KOH in methanol (0.5g/12 ml, 4.2 percentage w/v) in a separate flask. All the reactions were carried out under completely anhydrous conditions using silica as desiccant and with continuous stirring so that the reactants in two immiscible phases of oily contents and methanol were remain in contact. The yield of biodiesel was found to be 89.0 ± 0.51 percentage w/w (2.50 percentage w/w of dried alga) and 90.6 ± 0.36 percentage w/w (2.81 percentage w/w of dried alga) of biodiesel from C. indica and S. hatei respectively. Finally, biodiesel was characterized by gas chromatography and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as well as by European (EN) standards which were found to be in agreement with the standard values of biodiesel. (author)

  1. Techno-economic assessment of micro-algae as feedstock for renewable bio-energy production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, J.G.G.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper determines the energy consumption ratio and overall bio-energy production costs of microalgae cultivation, harvesting and conversion to secondary energy carriers, thus helping to clarify future perspectives of micro-algae production for energy purposes. A limitation growth model is

  2. Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 2, September 30--December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary results on the production of acetic acid from marine algae by anaerobic fermentation indicate that the rate is quite fast. First order rate constants of 0.77 day/sup -1/ were observed. This rate constant gives a half-life of less than one day. In other words, with a properly designed product removal system a five day retention time would yield 98% of theoretical conversion. Determination of the theoretical conversion of marine algae to acetic acid is the subject of much experimentation. The production of one acetic acid molecule (or equivalent in higher organic acids) for each three carbon atoms in the substrate has been achieved; but it is possible that with a mixed culture more than one acetic acid molecule may be produced for each three carbons in the substrate. Work is continuing to improve the yield of acetic acid from marine algae. Marine algae have been found to be rather low in carbon, but the carbon appears to be readily available for fermentation. It, therefore, lends itself to the production of higher value chemicals in relatively expensive equipment, where the rapid conversion rate is particularly cost effective. Fixed packed bed fermenters appear to be desirable for the production of liquid products which are inhibitory to the fermentation from coarse substrates. The inhibitory products may be removed from the fermentation by extraction during recirculation. This technique lends itself to either conventional processing or low capital processing of substrates which require long retention times.

  3. Micro algae to obtain chemical products. Las microalgas como fuente de productos quimicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.E.; Molina, E.; Garcia, F. (Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica. Facultad de Ciencias. Universidad de Granada. Granada (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show the relevance of micro algae biomass production to obtain chemicals of industrial application. The chemicals are classified in: lipids, pigments, colloids, glycerol and others, it emphasizes the culture conditions that mainly induce the synthesis of these compounds.

  4. Wastewater use in algae production for generation of renewable resources: a review and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Microalgae feedstock production can be integrated with wastewater and industrial sources of carbon dioxide. This study reviews the literature on algae grown on wastewater and includes a preliminary analysis of algal production based on anaerobic digestion sludge centrate from the Howard F. Curren Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant (HFC AWTP) in Tampa, Florida and secondary effluent from the City of Lakeland wastewater treatment facilities in Lakeland, Florida. It was demonstrated that a mixed culture of wild algae species could successfully be grown on wastewater nutrients and potentially scaled to commercial production. Algae have demonstrated the ability to naturally colonize low-nutrient effluent water in a wetland treatment system utilized by the City of Lakeland. The results from these experiments show that the algae grown in high strength wastewater from the HFC AWTP are light-limited when cultivated indoor since more than 50% of the outdoor illumination is attenuated in the greenhouse. An analysis was performed to determine the mass of algae that can be supported by the wastewater nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorous) available from the two Florida cities. The study was guided by the growth and productivity data obtained for algal growth in the photobioreactors in operation at the University of South Florida. In the analysis, nutrients and light are assumed to be limited, while CO2 is abundantly available. There is some limitation on land, especially since the HFC AWTP is located at the Port of Tampa. The temperature range in Tampa is assumed to be suitable for algal growth year round. Assuming that the numerous technical challenges to achieving commercial-scale algal production can be met, the results presented suggest that an excess of 71 metric tons per hectare per year of algal biomass can be produced. Two energy production options were considered; liquid biofuels from feedstock with high lipid content, and biogas generation from anaerobic

  5. Wastewater use in algae production for generation of renewable resources: a review and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Omatoyo K; Halfhide, Trina; Udom, Innocent; Gilles, Benjamin; Wolan, John; Zhang, Qiong; Ergas, Sarina

    2013-01-05

    Microalgae feedstock production can be integrated with wastewater and industrial sources of carbon dioxide. This study reviews the literature on algae grown on wastewater and includes a preliminary analysis of algal production based on anaerobic digestion sludge centrate from the Howard F. Curren Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant (HFC AWTP) in Tampa, Florida and secondary effluent from the City of Lakeland wastewater treatment facilities in Lakeland, Florida. It was demonstrated that a mixed culture of wild algae species could successfully be grown on wastewater nutrients and potentially scaled to commercial production. Algae have demonstrated the ability to naturally colonize low-nutrient effluent water in a wetland treatment system utilized by the City of Lakeland. The results from these experiments show that the algae grown in high strength wastewater from the HFC AWTP are light-limited when cultivated indoor since more than 50% of the outdoor illumination is attenuated in the greenhouse.An analysis was performed to determine the mass of algae that can be supported by the wastewater nutrients (mainly nitrogen and phosphorous) available from the two Florida cities. The study was guided by the growth and productivity data obtained for algal growth in the photobioreactors in operation at the University of South Florida. In the analysis, nutrients and light are assumed to be limited, while CO2 is abundantly available. There is some limitation on land, especially since the HFC AWTP is located at the Port of Tampa. The temperature range in Tampa is assumed to be suitable for algal growth year round. Assuming that the numerous technical challenges to achieving commercial-scale algal production can be met, the results presented suggest that an excess of 71 metric tons per hectare per year of algal biomass can be produced. Two energy production options were considered; liquid biofuels from feedstock with high lipid content, and biogas generation from anaerobic

  6. Natural products from marine algae of the genus Osmundaria (Rhodophyceae, Ceramiales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osako, Kelvin; Teixeira, Valéria Laneuville

    2013-04-01

    The present work is a review of the natural products isolated from red marine algae of the genus Osmundaria (including Vidalia), which intends to encompass their occurrence in the species of this genus, the possible synonymies, their geographic distribution, their structural variety and their biological potential as prototypes for the pharmaceutical industry and as active principles of cosmetics. At the end, we provide a table with these natural products and their biological activities.

  7. Marine Natural Products from Seaweeds [Produtos Naturais de Algas Marinhas Bentônicas

    OpenAIRE

    Valéria L. Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Natural products from seaweeds have been studied with the aim of finding new drugs of industrial value, understanding their ecological role, and well as establishing the limits of taxonomic species, genera and families of marine algae. The present review shows the main features of natural products from seaweeds of the Divisions Chlorophyta – Class Ulvophyceae (green seaweeds), Ochrophyta – Class Phaeophyceae (Brown seaweeds) and Rhodophyta (red seaweeds). The most important examples of natura...

  8. Microbial community structures in algae cultivation ponds for bioconversion of agricultural wastes from livestock industry for feed production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynamics of seasonal microbial community compositions in algae cultivation ponds are complex. There is very limited knowledge on community compositions that may play significant roles in the bioconversion of manure nu¬trients to animal feed. Algae production is an alternative where land area for pro...

  9. Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 2, September 30 to December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, J E; Wise, D L

    1978-03-10

    Preliminary results on the production of acetic acid from marine algae by anaerobic fermentation indicates that the rate is quite fast. First order rate constants of 0.77 day/sup -1/ have been observed. This rate constant gives a half-life of less than one day. In other words, with a properly designed product removal system a five day retention time would yield 98% of theoretical conversion. Determination of the theoretical conversion of marine algae to acetic acid is the subject of much experimentation. The production of one acetic acid molecule (or equivalent in higher organic acids) for each three carbon atoms in the substrate has been achieved; but it is possible that with a mixed culture more than one acetic acid molecule may be produced for each three carbons in the substrate.

  10. Induced production of brominated aromatic compounds in the alga Ceramium tenuicorne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Elin; Enhus, Carolina; Lindqvist, Dennis; Eklund, Britta; Asplund, Lillemor

    2015-11-01

    In the Baltic Sea, high concentrations of toxic brominated aromatic compounds have been detected in all compartments of the marine food web. A growing body of evidence points towards filamentous algae as a natural producer of these chemicals. However, little is known about the effects of environmental factors and life history on algal production of brominated compounds. In this study, several congeners of methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs), hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs) and brominated phenols (BPs) were identified in a naturally growing filamentous red algal species (Ceramium tenuicorne) in the Baltic Sea. The identified substances displayed large seasonal variations in the alga with a concentration peak in July. Production of MeO-/OH-PBDEs and BPs by C. tenuicorne was also established in isolated clonal material grown in a controlled laboratory setting. Based on three replicates, herbivory, as well as elevated levels of light and salinity in the culture medium, significantly increased the production of 2,4,6-tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP). Investigation of differences in production between the isomorphic female, male and diploid clonal life stages of the alga grown in the laboratory revealed a significantly higher production of 2,4,6-TBP in the brackish water female gametophytes, compared to the corresponding marine gametophytes. Even higher concentrations of 2,4,6-TBP were produced by marine male gametophytes and sporophytes.

  11. Genetic Engineering of Algae for Enhanced Biofuel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radakovits, Randor; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Darzins, Al; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    There are currently intensive global research efforts aimed at increasing and modifying the accumulation of lipids, alcohols, hydrocarbons, polysaccharides, and other energy storage compounds in photosynthetic organisms, yeast, and bacteria through genetic engineering. Many improvements have been realized, including increased lipid and carbohydrate production, improved H2 yields, and the diversion of central metabolic intermediates into fungible biofuels. Photosynthetic microorganisms are attracting considerable interest within these efforts due to their relatively high photosynthetic conversion efficiencies, diverse metabolic capabilities, superior growth rates, and ability to store or secrete energy-rich hydrocarbons. Relative to cyanobacteria, eukaryotic microalgae possess several unique metabolic attributes of relevance to biofuel production, including the accumulation of significant quantities of triacylglycerol; the synthesis of storage starch (amylopectin and amylose), which is similar to that found in higher plants; and the ability to efficiently couple photosynthetic electron transport to H2 production. Although the application of genetic engineering to improve energy production phenotypes in eukaryotic microalgae is in its infancy, significant advances in the development of genetic manipulation tools have recently been achieved with microalgal model systems and are being used to manipulate central carbon metabolism in these organisms. It is likely that many of these advances can be extended to industrially relevant organisms. This review is focused on potential avenues of genetic engineering that may be undertaken in order to improve microalgae as a biofuel platform for the production of biohydrogen, starch-derived alcohols, diesel fuel surrogates, and/or alkanes. PMID:20139239

  12. From Current Algae Products to Future Biorefinery Practices: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppink, Michel H M; Olivieri, Giuseppe; Reith, Hans; van den Berg, Corjan; Barbosa, Maria J; Wijffels, Rene H

    2017-03-07

    Microalgae are considered to be one of the most promising next generation bio-based/food feedstocks with a unique lipid composition, high protein content, and an almost unlimited amount of other bio-active molecules. High-value components such as the soluble proteins, (poly) unsaturated fatty acids, pigments, and carbohydrates can be used as an important ingredient for several markets, such as the food/feed/chemical/cosmetics and health industries. Although cultivation costs have decreased significantly in the last few decades, large microalgae production processes become economically viable if all complex compounds are optimally valorized in their functional state. To isolate these functional compounds from the biomass, cost-effective, mild, and energy-efficient biorefinery techniques need to be developed and applied. In this review we describe current microalgae biorefinery strategies and the derived products, followed by new technological developments and an outlook toward future products and the biorefinery philosophy.

  13. Evaluation of marine sediments as microbial sources for methane production from brown algae under high salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    Various marine sediments were evaluated as promising microbial sources for methane fermentation of Saccharina japonica, a brown alga, at seawater salinity. All marine sediments tested produced mainly acetate among volatile fatty acids. One marine sediment completely converted the produced volatile fatty acids to methane in a short period. Archaeal community analysis revealed that acetoclastic methanogens belonging to the Methanosarcina genus dominated after cultivation. Measurement of the specific conversion rate at each step of methane production under saline conditions demonstrated that the marine sediments had higher conversion rates of butyrate and acetate than mesophilic methanogenic granules. These results clearly show that marine sediments can be used as microbial sources for methane production from algae under high-salt conditions without dilution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Relation between hydrogen production and photosynthesis in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The modernized world is over-consuming low-cost energy sources that strongly contributes to pollution and environmental stress. As a consequence, the interest for environmentally friendly alternatives has increased immensely. One such alternative is the use of solar energy and water as a raw material to produce biohydrogen through the process of photosynthetic water splitting. In this work, the relation between H2-production and photosynthesis in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was ...

  15. The effect of algae species on biodiesel and biogas production observed by using a data model combines algae cultivation with an anaerobic digestion (ACAD) and a biodiesel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapci, Zehra; Morken, John

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A combined ACAD-biorefinery based model was investigated. • The model was implemented in the data analysis program MathCad. • Three different scenarios were modeled. • Chlorella vulgaris, Nannochloropsis sp. and Haematococcus pluvialis were evaluated. - Abstract: The influence of an algae species based on the biodiesel yield was investigated by using a combined plant model from the literature. The model has six different processes: algal cultivation, the flocculation and separation process, biodiesel production, anaerobic digestion, scrubbing, and combined heat and power (CHP). The data model in the literature was operated with the values for Chlorella vulgaris. To investigate the roles of the algae species on the biodiesel yield in the model, two different algae species, Nannochloropsis sp. and Haematococcus pluvialis, were selected. Depending on the data from these algae in the literature, three different scenarios were modeled in the study. The model shows that all of the scenarios for biodiesel production can be totally independent of an external energy supply. Energy estimations for all of the applications scenarios show that the system produces more energy than the amount that is required for the processing operation

  16. Preliminary assessment of Malaysian micro-algae strains for the production of bio jet fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. T.; Mustafa, E. M.; Vello, V.; Lim, P.; Nik Sulaiman, N. M.; Majid, N. Abdul; Phang, S.; Tahir, P. Md.; Liew, K.

    2016-10-01

    Malaysia is the main hub in South-East Asia and has one of the highest air traffic movements in the region. Being rich in biodiversity, Malaysia has long been touted as country rich in biodiversity and therefore, attracts great interests as a place to setup bio-refineries and produce bio-fuels such as biodiesel, bio-petrol, green diesel, and bio-jet fuel Kerosene Jet A-1. Micro-algae is poised to alleviate certain disadvantages seen in first generation and second generation feedstock. In this study, the objective is to seek out potential micro-algae species in Malaysia to determine which are suitable to be used as the feedstock to enable bio-jet fuel production in Malaysia. From 79 samples collected over 30 sites throughout Malaysia, six species were isolated and compared for their biomass productivity and lipid content. Their lipid contents were then used to derived the require amount of micro-algae biomass to yield 1 kg of certifiable jet fuel via the HEFA process, and to meet a scenario where Malaysia implements a 2% alternative (bio-) jet fuel requirement.

  17. Natural Products among Brown Algae: The Case of Cystoseira schiffneri Hamel (Sargassaceae, Phaeophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Abdelkader Ben; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Anesi, Andrea; Hammami, Saoussen; Mighri, Zine; Guella, Graziano

    2017-04-01

    A chemotaxonomic study on the marine brown alga Cystoseira schiffneri collected from the Tunisian marine coast allowed us to identify kjellmanianone (1) and a new isololiolide derivative named schiffnerilolide (2). The structure elucidation and the assignment of relative configurations of the isolated natural products were based on advanced mass spectrometric and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. This outcome suggested a close phylogenetic relationship of C. schiffneri with brown algae belonging to genus Sargassum C. Agardh. Molecular characterization using the nuclear small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) gene (18S) sequence as genetic marker was made. Pigment analysis showed a significant seasonal change of carotenoids, in particular of fucoxanthin and fucoxanthinol. Also galactolipids, the main constituents of the thylakoid membranes, showed remarkable seasonal changes. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  18. Evaluating the potential of renewable diesel production from algae cultured on wastewater: techno-economic analysis and life cycle assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Juneja

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Algae, a renewable energy source, has an added advantage of consuming nutrients from wastewater and consequently aiding in wastewater treatment. The algae thus produced can be processed using alternative paths for conversion to fuels. However, due to high moisture content of algae, wet algae processing methods are being encouraged to avoid the dewatering cost and energy. Hydrothermal liquefaction is one such technology that converts the algae into high heating value bio-oil under high temperature and pressure. This bio-oil can be further upgraded to renewable diesel (RD which can be used in diesel powered vehicles without any modifications. The objective of this study is to evaluate the economic viability and to estimate the energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions during life cycle of RD production from algae grown in wastewater using hydrothermal liquefaction. Economic analysis of RD production on commercial scale was performed using engineering process model of RD production plant with processing capacity of 60 Mgal wastewater/day, simulated in SuperPro designer. RD yields for algae were estimated as 10.18 MML/year with unit price of production as $1.75/RD. The GHG emissions during life cycle of RD production were found to be 6.2 times less than those produced for conventional diesel. Sensitivity analysis indicated a potential to reduce ethanol production cost either by using high lipid algae or increasing the plant size. The integrated economic and ecological assessment analyses are helpful in determining long-term sustainability of a product and can be used to drive energy policies in an environmentally sustainable direction.

  19. Economic, energy, and environmental impacts of alcohol dehydration technology on biofuel production from brown algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasahati, Peyman; Liu, J. Jay

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of alcohol recovery technology on the economics, energy consumption, and environment of bioethanol production from brown algae. The process under consideration is the anaerobic digestion of brown algae to produce VFAs (volatile fatty acids), which are then hydrogenated to produce mixed alcohols. Three alternative processes, i.e., hybrid pervaporation/distillation (PV), hybrid vapor-permeation/distillation (VP), and classical molecular-sieves/distillation (classical), are considered for the dehydration and recovery of ethanol. The alternatives are analyzed in terms of product value (i.e., minimum ethanol selling price – MESP), capital costs, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. For a plant scale of 400,000 ton/year of dry brown algae, the MESPs for the PV (Pervaporation), VP (vapor permeation), and classical processes were calculated to be $1.06/gal, $1.08/gal, and $1.24/gal, respectively. Results show that the PV, VP, and classical processes have $2.0, $2.6, and $4.6 million/year utility costs, respectively, for the recovery of alcohols and produce 23.1, 30.2, and 62.2 kton CO 2 -eq/year greenhouse gases. Therefore, PV is more economical and environmentally friendly process, with lower MESP, CO 2 emissions, and utility requirements. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the selling price of the heavier alcohols and biomass price have the highest impact on the economics of bioethanol production from brown algae. - Highlights: • Biofuel production through anaerobic digestion of brown algae is assessed. • Three alternative dehydration technologies were considered for ethanol recovery. • MESP for PV, VP, and classic processes are 1.06, 1.08, and 1.24$/gal, respectively. • PV and VP were superior over classic process in terms of energy and GHG emissions. • PV has an energy cost of 20.2 mm$/y and GHG emissions of 23.1 kton CO 2 -eq/year.

  20. Influence of biochemical composition during hydrothermal liquefaction of algae on product yields and fuel properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Rajdeep; Adhikari, Sushil; Mahadevan, Ravishankar; Shanmugam, Saravanan R; Nam, Hyungseok; Hassan, El Barbary; Dempster, Thomas A

    2017-11-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of nine algae species were performed at two reaction temperatures (280 and 320°C) to compare the effect of their biomass composition on product yields and properties. Results obtained after HTL indicate large variations in terms of bio-oil yields and its properties. The maximum bio-oil yield (66wt%) was obtained at 320°C with a high lipid containing algae Nannochloropsis. The higher heating value of bio-oils ranged from 31 to 36MJ/kg and around 50% of the bio-oils was in the vacuum gas oil range while high lipid containing algae Nannochloropsis contained a significant portion (33-42%) in the diesel range. A predictive relationship between bio-oil yields and biochemical compositions was developed and showed a broad agreement between predictive and experimental yields. The aqueous phases obtained had high amount of TOC (12-43g/L), COD (35-160g/L), TN (1-18g/L), ammonium (0.34-12g/L) and phosphate (0.7-12g/L). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling of biodiesel production in algae cultivation with anaerobic digestion (ACAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morken, John; Sapci, Zehra; Strømme, Jon Eivind T.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a model of an ecotechnology that combines algae cultivation with anaerobic digestion in order to recycle nutrients and to reduce the need for external energy. The concept is to convert organic waste into several products, such as electricity, biodiesel and organic fertilizer. It is labeled as the ACAD biorefinery. The simulation model of the ACAD biorefinery proved itself to be a powerful tool for understanding the symbioses and dynamics of the system, and therefore also a good tool for reaching political decisions. The model shows that the ACAD biorefinery could be totally independent of external energy supplies. Energy calculations indicate that more energy can be produced by combining the algae cultivation and anaerobic digestion processes. For every unit of energy entering the system in feedstock, 0.6 units of energy are exported as either biodiesel or electricity. The exported electricity accounts for approximately 30% of the total exported energy, while the remaining 70% is exported as biodiesel. By producing its own energy, the biorefinery improves its renewability and level of carbon neutrality. - Highlights: • The model combines algae cultivation with anaerobic digestion. • In the model nutrients and carbon dioxide are recycled. • Organic waste is converted into electrical power, biodiesel and organic fertilizer. • Results showed that more energy can be produced by combining the processes

  2. Algae-mediated removal of selected pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) from Lake Mead water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xuelian; Acharya, Kumud

    2017-03-01

    The persistence and fate of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in the Lake Mead ecosystem are particularly important considering the potential ecological risks and human health impacts. This study evaluated the removal of five common PPCPs (i.e., trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, ciprofloxacin, and triclosan) from Lake Mead water mediated by the green alga Nannochloris sp. The results from the incubation studies showed that trimethoprim and carbamazepine were highly resistant to uptake in the algal cultural medium and were measured at approximately 90%-100% of the applied dose after 14days of incubation. Sulfamethoxazole was found relatively persistent, with >60% of the applied dose remaining in the water after 14days, and its removal was mainly caused by algae-mediated photolysis. However, ciprofloxacin and triclosan dissipated significantly and nearly 100% of the compounds were removed from the water after 7days of incubation under 24h of light. Ciprofloxacin and triclosan were highly susceptible to light, and their estimated half-lives were 12.7hours for ciprofloxacin and 31.2hours for triclosan. Algae-mediated sorption contributed to 11% of the removal of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, 13% of the removal of carbamazepine, and 27% of the removal of triclosan from the lake water. This research showed that 1) trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, and carbamazepine are quite persistent in aquatic environments and may potentially affect human health via drinking water intake; 2) photolysis is the dominant pathway to remove ciprofloxacin from aquatic ecosystems, which indicates that ciprofloxacin may have lower ecological risks compared with other PPCPs; and 3) triclosan can undergo photolysis as well as algae-mediated uptake and it may potentially affect the food web because of its high toxicity to aquatic species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Marine natural products in prevention and treatment of osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ghanbari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Undoubtedly, pharmaceutical and nutritional factors play an important role in the prevention of age-related bone loss. According to the several studies so far, the effects of nutrients and bioactive components which are extracted from marine resources are very promising in osteoporosis. Most of these investigations have been done on various marine algae extracts. Since, algae are rich source of essential minerals, primary and secondary unique natural products, several amino acids and growth factors their extracts show favorable effects on bone metabolism. Moreover, it has been shown that marine nutrients such as marine fishes, shrimp and crabs increase the absorption of calcium and bone collagen synthesis or reduce the production of prostaglandins and decrease the deoxypyridinoline disposal. On the other hand, secondary products which are extracted and characterized from marine organisms such as mollusks, fungi, bacteria, sponges and coral reefs show anti-osteoporosis activities via the inhibition of osteoclast differentiation and the induction of apoptosis in osteoclasts like cells or stimulation of osteoblast differentiation. Although, several investigations have been done in this area, many of studies have been carried out on animal models, like ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice. Hence, clinical investigations are warranted to develop marine natural products against bone loss and to prevent osteoporosis.

  4. Algae Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    Algae are highly efficient at producing biomass, and they can be found all over the planet. Many use sunlight and nutrients to create biomass, which contain key components—including lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates— that can be converted and upgraded to a variety of biofuels and products. A functional algal biofuels production system requires resources such as suitable land and climate, sustainable management of water resources, a supplemental carbon dioxide (CO2) supply, and other nutrients (e.g., nitrogen and phosphorus). Algae can be an attractive feedstock for many locations in the United States because their diversity allows for highpotential biomass yields in a variety of climates and environments. Depending on the strain, algae can grow by using fresh, saline, or brackish water from surface water sources, groundwater, or seawater. Additionally, they can grow in water from second-use sources such as treated industrial wastewater; municipal, agricultural, or aquaculture wastewater; or produced water generated from oil and gas drilling operations.

  5. Re-utilization of Industrial CO2 for Algae Production Using a Phase Change Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Brian [Touchstone Research Laboratory Ltd, Triadelphia, WV (United States)

    2014-03-31

    This is the final report of a 36-month Phase II cooperative agreement. Under this project, Touchstone Research Laboratory (Touchstone) investigated the merits of incorporating a Phase Change Material (PCM) into an open-pond algae production system that can capture and re-use the CO2 from a coal-fired flue gas source located in Wooster, OH. The primary objective of the project was to design, construct, and operate a series of open algae ponds that accept a slipstream of flue gas from a coal-fired source and convert a significant portion of the CO2 to liquid biofuels, electricity, and specialty products, while demonstrating the merits of the PCM technology. Construction of the pilot facility and shakedown of the facility in Wooster, OH, was completed during the first two years, and the focus of the last year was on operations and the cultivation of algae. During this Phase II effort a large-scale algae concentration unit from OpenAlgae was installed and utilized to continuously harvest algae from indoor raceways. An Algae Lysing Unit and Oil Recovery Unit were also received and installed. Initial parameters for lysing nanochloropsis were tested. Conditions were established that showed the lysing operation was effective at killing the algae cells. Continuous harvesting activities yielded over 200 kg algae dry weight for Ponds 1, 2 and 4. Studies were conducted to determine the effect of anaerobic digestion effluent as a nutrient source and the resulting lipid productivity of the algae. Lipid content and total fatty acids were unaffected by culture system and nutrient source, indicating that open raceway ponds fed diluted anaerobic digestion effluent can obtain similar lipid productivities to open raceway ponds using commercial nutrients. Data were also collected with respect to the performance of the PCM material on the pilot-scale raceway ponds. Parameters such as evaporative water loss, temperature differences, and growth/productivity were

  6. Development Of Nutrient And Water Recycling Capabilities In Algae Biofuels Production Systems. Final Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, Tryg [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Dept.; Spierling, Ruth [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Poole, Kyle [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Blackwell, Shelley [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Crowe, Braden [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Hutton, Matt [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Lehr, Corinne [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2018-01-25

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate methods of recycling of water and nutrients for algal biofuels production. Recycling was accomplished both internal to the system and, in a broader sense, through import and reuse of municipal wastewater. Such an integrated system with wastewater input had not been demonstrated previously, and the performance was unknown, particularly in terms of influence of recycling on algal productivity and the practical extent of nutrient recovery from biomass residuals. Through long-term laboratory and pilot research, the project resulted in the following: 1. Bench-scale pretreatment of algal biomass did not sufficiently increase methane yield of nutrient solubilization during anaerobic digestion to warrant incorporation of pre-treatment into the pilot plant. The trial pretreatments were high-pressure orifice homogenization, sonication, and two types of heat treatment. 2. Solubilization of biomass particulate nutrients by lab anaerobic digesters ranged from 20% to nearly 60% for N and 40-65% for P. Subsequent aerobic degradation of the anaerobically digested biomass simulated raceways receiving whole digestate and resulted in an additional 20-55% N solubilization and additional 20% P solubilization. 3. Comparisons of laboratory and pilot digesters showed that laboratory units were reasonable proxies for pilot-scale. 4. Pilot-scale anaerobic digesters were designed, installed, and operated to digest algal biomass. Nutrient re-solubilization by the digesters was monitored and whole digestate was successfully used as a fertilizer in pilot algae raceways. 5. Unheated, unmixed digesters achieved greater methane yield and nutrient solubilization than heated, mixed digesters, presumably due to longer the solids residence times in unmixed digesters. The unmixed, unheated pilot digesters yielded 0.16 LCH4/g volatile solids (VS) introduced with 0.15 g VS/L-d organic loading and 16oC average temperature. A

  7. Effect of algae pigmentation on photobioreactor productivity and scale-up: A light transfer perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Thomas E.; Berberoğlu, Halil

    2011-12-01

    This paper reports a numerical study coupling light transfer with photosynthetic rate models to determine the size and microorganism concentration of photobioreactors based on the pigmentation of algae to achieve maximum productivity. The wild strain Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and its transformant tla1 with 63% lower pigmentation are used as exemplary algae. First, empirical models of the specific photosynthetic rates were obtained from experimental data as a function of local irradiance using inverse methods. Then, these models were coupled with the radiative transfer equation (RTE) to predict both the local and total photosynthetic rates in a planar photobioreactor (PBR). The optical thickness was identified as the proper scaling parameter. The results indicated that under full sunlight corresponding to about 400 W/m2 photosynthetically active irradiation, enhancement of PBR productivity up to 30% was possible with tla1. Moreover, under similar irradiation, optical thicknesses above 169 and 275 for the wild strain and tla1, respectively, did not further enhance PBR productivity. Based on these results guidelines are provided for maximizing PBR productivity from a light transport perspective.

  8. Semi-continuous methane production from undiluted brown algae using a halophilic marine microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Acclimated marine sediment-derived culture was used for semi-continuous methane production from materials equivalent to raw brown algae, without dilution of salinity and without nutrient supply, under 3 consecutive conditions of varying organic loading rates (OLRs) and hydraulic retention time (HRT). Methane production was stable at 2.0gVS/kg/day (39-day HRT); however, it became unstable at 2.9gVS/kg/day (28-day HRT) due to acetate and propionate accumulation. OLR subsequently decreased to 1.7gVS/kg/day (46-day HRT), stabilizing methane production beyond steady state. Methane yield was above 300mL/g VS at all OLRs. These results indicated that the acclimated marine sediment culture was able to produce methane semi-continuously from raw brown algae without dilution and nutrient supply under steady state. Microbial community analysis suggested that hydrogenotrophic methanogens predominated among archaea during unstable methane production, implying a partial shift of the methanogenic pathway from acetoclastic methanogenesis to acetate oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cultivation of a native alga for biomass and biofuel accumulation in coal bed methane production water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgskiss, Logan H.; Nagy, Justin; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) production has resulted in thousands of ponds in the Powder River Basin of low-quality water in a water-challenged region. A green alga isolate, PW95, was isolated from a CBM production pond, and analysis of a partial ribosomal gene sequence indicated the isolate belongs to the Chlorococcaceae family. Different combinations of macro- and micronutrients were evaluated for PW95 growth in CBM water compared to a defined medium. A small level of growth was observed in unamended CBM water (0.15 g/l), and biomass increased (2-fold) in amended CBM water or defined growth medium. The highest growth rate was observed in CBM water amended with both N and P, and the unamended CBM water displayed the lowest growth rate. The highest lipid content (27%) was observed in CBM water with nitrate, and a significant level of lipid accumulation was not observed in the defined growth medium. Growth analysis indicated that nitrate deprivation coincided with lipid accumulation in CBM production water, and lipid accumulation did not increase with additional phosphorus limitation. The presented results show that CBM production wastewater can be minimally amended and used for the cultivation of a native, lipid-accumulating alga.

  10. Effect of algae pigmentation on photobioreactor productivity and scale-up: A light transfer perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Thomas E.; Berberoglu, Halil

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a numerical study coupling light transfer with photosynthetic rate models to determine the size and microorganism concentration of photobioreactors based on the pigmentation of algae to achieve maximum productivity. The wild strain Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and its transformant tla1 with 63% lower pigmentation are used as exemplary algae. First, empirical models of the specific photosynthetic rates were obtained from experimental data as a function of local irradiance using inverse methods. Then, these models were coupled with the radiative transfer equation (RTE) to predict both the local and total photosynthetic rates in a planar photobioreactor (PBR). The optical thickness was identified as the proper scaling parameter. The results indicated that under full sunlight corresponding to about 400 W/m 2 photosynthetically active irradiation, enhancement of PBR productivity up to 30% was possible with tla1. Moreover, under similar irradiation, optical thicknesses above 169 and 275 for the wild strain and tla1, respectively, did not further enhance PBR productivity. Based on these results guidelines are provided for maximizing PBR productivity from a light transport perspective.

  11. Bicarbonate-based Integrated Carbon Capture and Algae Production System with alkalihalophilic cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhanyou; Xie, Yuxiao; Elloy, Farah; Zheng, Yubin; Hu, Yucai; Chen, Shulin

    2013-04-01

    An extremely alkalihalophilic cyanobacteria Euhalothece ZM001 was tested in the Bicarbonate-based Integrated Carbon Capture and Algae Production System (BICCAPS), which utilize bicarbonate as carbon source for algae culture and use the regenerated carbonate to absorb CO2. Culture conditions including temperature, inoculation rate, medium composition, pH, and light intensity were investigated. A final biomass concentration of 4.79 g/L was reached in tissue flask culture with 1.0 M NaHCO3/Na2CO3. The biomass productivity of 1.21 g/L/day was achieved under optimal conditions. When pH increased from 9.55 to 10.51, 0.256 M of inorganic carbon was consumed during the culture process. This indicated sufficient carbon can be supplied as bicarbonate to the culture. This study proved that a high biomass production rate can be achieved in a BICCAPS. This strategy can also lead to new design of photobioreactors that provides an alternative supply of CO2 to sparging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Primary production and algae diversity vs. pollution in xochimilco wet-lands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroza-Pichardo, R.; Hernandez-Delgadillo, R.; Boll-Arguello, G.

    2009-01-01

    Xochimilco is an ancient endorheic lake located in the Valley of Mexico. Due to its shallow water and the freshwater springs that lined the canals, they are surround raised agricultural fields called chinampas. Since the Valley of Mexico was originally wetlands, the chinampas were the most productive means of agricultural production. Xochimilco are considered one of the most important urban lungs in Mexico City. However, it is not clear how the huge urbanization around is to know if there is a correlation between primary production (PP), algae diversity, BOD 5 and faecal coliforms. Sample collection was done every month over a year at six different canals named: Embarcadero Celada, Embarcadero Nuevo Nativitas, Canal Las Abejas, Canal Zacapa, Canal Santo Domingo y Canal Nacional. (Author)

  13. Primary production and algae diversity vs. pollution in xochimilco wet-lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedroza-Pichardo, R.; Hernandez-Delgadillo, R.; Boll-Arguello, G.

    2009-07-01

    Xochimilco is an ancient endorheic lake located in the Valley of Mexico. Due to its shallow water and the freshwater springs that lined the canals, they are surround raised agricultural fields called chinampas. Since the Valley of Mexico was originally wetlands, the chinampas were the most productive means of agricultural production. Xochimilco are considered one of the most important urban lungs in Mexico City. However, it is not clear how the huge urbanization around is to know if there is a correlation between primary production (PP), algae diversity, BOD{sub 5} and faecal coliforms. Sample collection was done every month over a year at six different canals named: Embarcadero Celada, Embarcadero Nuevo Nativitas, Canal Las Abejas, Canal Zacapa, Canal Santo Domingo y Canal Nacional. (Author)

  14. Biochemical and genetic engineering strategies to enhance hydrogen production in photosynthetic algae and cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srirangan, Kajan; Pyne, Michael E; Perry Chou, C

    2011-09-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen gas is a promising substitute to carbonaceous fuels owing to its superb conversion efficiency, non-polluting nature, and high energy content. At present, hydrogen is predominately synthesized via chemical reformation of fossil fuels. While various biological methods have been extensively explored, none of them is justified as economically feasible. A sustainable platform for biological production of hydrogen will certainly impact the biofuel market. Among a selection of biological systems, algae and cyanobacteria have garnered major interests as potential cell factories for hydrogen production. In conjunction with photosynthesis, these organisms utilize inexpensive inorganic substrates and solar energy for simultaneous biosynthesis and hydrogen evolution. However, the hydrogen yield associated with these organisms remains far too low to compete with the existing chemical systems. This article reviews recent advances of biochemical, bioprocess, and genetic engineering strategies in circumventing technological limitations to hopefully improve the applicative potential of these photosynthetic hydrogen production systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigating the link between fermentative metabolism and hydrogen production in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, S.J.; Nixon, P.J. [Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    In the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the electrons required for hydrogen production can come from both the biophotolysis of water and from the fermentation of carbohydrate reserves. Anoxia leads to the activation of several fermentative pathways, which produce a number of end products including formic, malic and acetic acid along with ethanol, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. It has been proposed that by switching off competing fermentative pathways hydrogen production can be increased. Therefore the aim of this study was to devise an experimental strategy to down-regulate the expression of enzymes thought to control C. reinhardtii's fermentative metabolism. We demonstrate here that it is possible to use artificial microRNA (amiRNA) technology to generate knock-down mutants with reduced expression of pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1), a key fermentative enzyme in C. reinhardtii. This work opens up new possibilities to improve hydrogen yields through metabolic engineering. (orig.)

  16. Thermodynamic modelling and solar reactor design for syngas production through SCWG of algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Mahesh B.; Rahbari, Alireza; Pye, John

    2017-06-01

    Conversion of algal biomass into value added products, such as liquid fuels, using solar-assisted supercritical water gasification (SCWG) offers a promising approach for clean fuel production. SCWG has significant advantages over conventional gasification in terms of flexibility of feedstock, faster intrinsic kinetics and lower char formation. A relatively unexplored avenue in SCWG is the use of non-renewable source of energy for driving the endothermic gasification. The use of concentrated solar thermal to provide the process heat is attractive, especially in the case of expensive feedstocks such as algae. This study attempts to identify the key parameters and constraints in designing a solar cavity receiver/reactor for on-sun SCWG of algal biomass. A tubular plug-flow reactor, operating at 24 MPa and 400-600 °C with a solar input of 20MWth is modelled. Solar energy is utilized to increase the temperature of the reaction medium (10 wt.% algae solution) from 400 to 605 °C and simultaneously drive the gasification. The model additionally incorporates material constraints based on the allowable stresses for a commercially available Ni-based alloy (Inconel 625), and exergy accounting for the cavity reactor. A parametric evaluation of the steady state performance and quantification of the losses through wall conduction, external radiation and convection, internal convection, frictional pressure drop, mixing and chemical irreversibility, is presented.

  17. Microbial modulation in the biomass and toxin production of a red-tide causing alga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, T L; Su, J Q; Maskaoui, K; Yu, Z M; Hu, Z; Xu, J S; Hong, H S

    2005-01-01

    The effect of S10, a strain of marine bacteria isolated from sediment in the Western Xiamen Sea, on the growth and paralytic shellfish poison (PSP) production in the alga Alexandrium tamarense (A. tamarense) was studied under controlled experimental conditions. The results of these experiments have shown that the growth of A. tamarense is obviously inhibited by S10 at high concentrations, however no evident effect on its growth was observed at low concentrations. Its PSP production was also inhibited by S10 at different concentrations, especially at low concentrations. The toxicity of this strain of A. tamarense is about (0.95-12.14) x 10(-6) MU/cell, a peak toxicity value of 12.14 x 10(-6) MU/cell appeared on the 14th day, after which levels decreased gradually. The alga grew well in conditions of pH 6-8 and salinities of 20-34 per thousand. The toxicity of the alga varied markedly at different pH and salinity levels. Toxicity decreased as pH increased, while it increased with salinity and reached a peak value at a salinity of 30 per thousand, after which it declined gradually. S10 at a concentration of 1.02 x 10(9) cells/ml inhibited growth and the PSP production of A. tamarense at different pH and salinity levels. S10 had the strongest inhibitory function on the growth of A. tamarense under conditions of pH 7 and a salinity of 34 per thousand. The best inhibitory effect on PSP production by A. tamarense was at pH 7, this inhibitory effect on PSP production did not relate to salinity. Interactions between marine bacteria and A. tamarense were also investigated using the flow cytometer technique (FCM) as well as direct microscope counting. S10 was identified as being a member of the genus Bacillus, the difference in 16S rDNA between S10 and Bacillus halmapalus was only 2%. The mechanism involved in the inhibition of growth and PSP production of A. tamarense by this strain of marine bacteria, and the prospect of using it and other marine bacteria in the bio

  18. Phytoremediation of agriculture runoff by filamentous algae poly-culture for biomethane production, and nutrient recovery for secondary cultivation of lipid generating microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohutskyi, Pavlo; Chow, Steven; Ketter, Ben; Fung Shek, Coral; Yacar, Dean; Tang, Yuting; Zivojnovich, Mark; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Bouwer, Edward J

    2016-12-01

    An integrated system was implemented for water phytoremediation and biofuel production through sequential cultivation of filamentous algae followed by cultivation of lipid-producing microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana. Natural poly-culture of filamentous algae was grown in agricultural stormwater using the Algal Turf Scrubber®, harvested and subjected for lipid extraction and/or methane production using anaerobic digestion (AD). While filamentous algae lipid content was too low for feasible biodiesel production (filamentous algae poly-culture was exploited for waste nutrient capturing and biofuel feedstock generation. These nutrients were recovered and reused as a concentrated supplement for potentially high-value microalgae. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Antimicrobial-resistant faecal organisms in algae products marketed as health supplements

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2017-09-01

    Dietary supplements are increasingly popular in Irish society. One of these is blue-green algae which is used with a variety health benefits in mind. A batch of Chlorella powder was found to be contaminated with Salmonella species in Ireland in 2015. This prompted additional testing of a total of 8 samples of three different products (Chlorella, Spirulina and Super Greens), for other faecal flora and antimicrobial resistance in any bacteria isolated. All 8 samples cultured enteric flora such as Enterococci, Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium species. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed one isolate with extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) activity and one with carbapenemase activity. Clinicians caring for vulnerable patients should be aware of the potential risk of exposure to antimicrobial resistant bacteria associated with these products

  20. Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 3, January 1, 1978--March 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, J.E.; Wise, D.L.

    1978-06-01

    The program for acetic acid production from marine algae has made significant progress in the current quarter. Some of the significant developments during this period are: (1) conversion of the available reducing equivalents in Chondrus crispus to organic acids has been carried to better than 80% completion; (2) thermophilic fermentations produce higher ratios of acetic acid to total acid than is the case for mesophilic fermentations (80% vs. 50%); (3) a membrane extraction process for removing organic acid products has been developed which has potential for commercial use; (4) a large scale fermentation was shown to convert over 50% of the available carbon in five days; (5) a reducing equivalents balance on the large scale fermentation was closed to with 96% of theoretical.

  1. Antimicrobial-resistant Faecal Organisms in Algae Products Marketed as Health Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, L; Molloy, M; Evans, L; Quinn, A; Burke, E; McGrath, E; Cormican, M

    2017-08-12

    Dietary supplements are increasingly popular in Irish society. One of these is blue-green algae which is used with a variety health benefits in mind. A batch of Chlorella powder was found to be contaminated with Salmonella species in Ireland in 2015. This prompted additional testing of a total of 8 samples of three different products (Chlorella, Spirulina and Super Greens), for other faecal flora and antimicrobial resistance in any bacteria isolated. All 8 samples cultured enteric flora such as Enterococci, Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium species. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed one isolate with extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL) activity and one with carbapenemase activity. Clinicians caring for vulnerable patients should be aware of the potential risk of exposure to antimicrobial resistant bacteria associated with these products.

  2. Photosynthetic biomanufacturing in green algae; production of recombinant proteins for industrial, nutritional, and medical uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasala, Beth A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant proteins are widely used for industrial, nutritional, and medical applications. Green microalgae have attracted considerable attention recently as a biomanufacturing platform for the production of recombinant proteins for a number of reasons. These photosynthetic eukaryotic microorganisms are safe, scalable, easy to genetically modify through transformation, mutagenesis, or breeding, and inexpensive to grow. Many microalgae species are genetically transformable, but the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the most widely used host for recombinant protein expression. An extensive suite of molecular genetic tools has been developed for C. reinhardtii over the last 25 years, including a fully sequenced genome, well-established methods for transformation, mutagenesis and breeding, and transformation vectors for high levels of recombinant protein accumulation and secretion. Here, we review recent successes in the development of C. reinhardtii as a biomanufacturing host for recombinant proteins, including antibodies and immunotoxins, hormones, industrial enzymes, an orally-active colostral protein for gastrointestinal health, and subunit vaccines. In addition, we review the biomanufacturing potential of other green algae from the genera Dunaliella and Chlorella.

  3. Removal of Selected Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products by the Green Alga Nannochloris sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, X.; Acharya, K.

    2016-12-01

    Emerging contaminants have become an increasing concern in the environment due to their ubiquitous distribution and potential adverse effects on wildlife and humans. Municipal wastewater is a major source of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in the Las Vegas metropolitan area. The ecotoxic impacts of PPCPs on aquatic organisms include development of antimicrobial resistance, decreases in plankton diversity, and endocrine disruption. Freshwater algae can be responsible for the uptake and transfer of the contaminants because they are a major food source for most aquatic organisms. This research applied laboratory-based incubation studies to evaluate the removal efficiency and uptake mechanisms of the selected PPCPs (trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, and triclosan) by the green alga Nannochloris sp. The results showed that trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole remained in the algal culture at 100% and 68%, respectively, after 14 days of incubation, and therefore were not significantly removed from the medium. However, the antimicrobial triclosan was significantly removed from the medium. Immediately after incubation began, 74% of triclosan dissipated and 100% of triclosan was removed after 7 days of incubation. Additionally, over 42% of triclosan was found associated with the algal cells throughout the incubation. The results demonstrate that the presence of Nannochloris sp. eliminated triclosan in the aquatic system, but could not significantly remove the antibiotics trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole. This study provided crucial information that toxicity of triclosan in aquatic organisms is a critical concern because of its high uptake by phytoplankton. The resistance of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole to uptake by phytoplankton may threaten water quality.

  4. Sub-canopy light conditions only allow low annual net productivity of epiphytic algae on kelp Laminaria hyperborea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Nejrup, Lars Brammer; Pedersen, Troels Møller

    2014-01-01

    The stipes of older Laminaria hyperborea individuals are heavily covered by epiphytic assemblages that are dominated by macroalgae, and we hypothesized that the production of these algae may contribute significantly to total primary production of the kelp forest ecosystem. The epiphytic assemblages...... on the stipes of Laminaria were dominated by potentially fast-growing red algae with total biomass ranging from 25 to 120 g dry weight (DW) m-2 seafloor depending on season and site. Sub-canopy light conditions were poor and averaged only ~10% of the surface irradiance in summer. Photosynthetic profiles...

  5. Health Benefits of Blue-Green Algae: Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ku, Chai Siah; Yang, Yue; Park, Youngki; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-01-01

    Blue-green algae (BGA) are among the most primitive life forms on earth and have been consumed as food or medicine by humans for centuries. BGA contain various bioactive components, such as phycocyanin, carotenoids, γ-linolenic acid, fibers, and plant sterols, which can promote optimal health in humans. Studies have demonstrated that several BGA species or their active components have plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride-lowering properties due to their modulation of intestinal cholester...

  6. Performance assessment of biofuel production in an algae-based remediation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Shy Chyi; Luo, Yanpei Darren; Wang, Simai; Chua, Pei Qiang Danny; Tee, Pok Siang

    2016-03-10

    The production of biofuel from microalgae has been an area of great interest as microalgae have higher productivities than land plants, and certain species have high lipid constituents which are the major feedstock for biodiesel production. One way to enhance the economic feasibility of algal-based biofuel is to couple it with waste remediation. This study investigated the technical feasibility of cultivating Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp. with fish water for biofuel production. The remediation potential of Chlorella sp. was found to be higher but the lipid yield is lower, when compared to Nannochloropsis sp. Lipid productivities were found to be similar for both types of algae at 1.1-1.3mgL(-1)h(-1). The fatty acid profiles of the obtained lipids were found suitable for biofuel production, and the calorific values were high at 30-32MJ/kg. The results provide insights into lipid production in Chlorella sp. and Nannochloropsis sp., when coupled with waste remediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Feasibility Studies of Vortex Flow Impact On the Proliferation of Algae in Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskon, Azizi; A/L Thanakodi, Suresh; Shiema Moh Nazar, Nazatul; Kit Chong, Marcus Wai; Sobri Takriff, Mohd; Fakir Kamarudin, Kamrul; Aziz Norzali, Abdul; Nooraya Mohd Tawil, Siti

    2016-11-01

    The instability of crude oil price in global market as well as the sensitivity towards green energy increases, more research works being carried out to find alternative energy replacing the depleting of fossil fuels. Photobiological hydrogen production system using algae is one of the promising alternative energy source. However, the yield of hydrogen utilizing the current photobioreactor (PBR) is still low for commercial application due to restricted light penetration into the deeper regions of the reactor. Therefore, this paper studies the feasibility of vortex flow impact utilizing magnetic stirring in hydrogen production for fuel cell applications. For comparison of results, a magnetic stirrer is placed under a PBR of algae to stir the algae to obtain an even distribution of sunlight to the algae while the controlled PBR of algae kept in static. The produced hydrogen level was measured using hydrogen sensor circuit and the data collected were communicated to laptop using Arduino Uno. The results showed more cell counts and hydrogen produced in the PBR under the influence of magnetic stirring compared to static PBR by an average of 8 percent in 4 days.

  8. Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngan, Chew Yee; Wong, Chee-Hong; Choi, Cindy; Pratap, Abhishek; Han, James; Wei, Chia-Lin

    2013-02-19

    The diminishing reserve of fossil fuels calls for the development of biofuels. Biofuels are produced from renewable resources, including photosynthetic organisms, generating clean energy. Microalgae is one of the potential feedstock for biofuels production. It grows easily even in waste water, and poses no competition to agricultural crops for arable land. However, little is known about the algae lipid biosynthetic regulatory mechanisms. Most studies relied on the homology to other plant model organisms, in particular Arabidopsis or through low coverage expression analysis to identify key enzymes. This limits the discovery of new components in the biosynthetic pathways, particularly the genetic regulators and effort to maximize the production efficiency of algal biofuels. Here we report an unprecedented and de novo approach to dissect the algal lipid pathways through disclosing the temporal regulations of chromatin states during lipid biosynthesis. We have generated genome wide chromatin maps in chlamydomonas genome using ChIP-seq targeting 7 histone modifications and RNA polymerase II in a time-series manner throughout conditions activating lipid biosynthesis. To our surprise, the combinatory profiles of histone codes uncovered new regulatory mechanism in gene expression in algae. Coupled with matched RNA-seq data, chromatin changes revealed potential novel regulators and candidate genes involved in the activation of lipid accumulations. Genetic perturbation on these candidate regulators further demonstrated the potential to manipulate the regulatory cascade for lipid synthesis efficiency. Exploring epigenetic landscape in microalgae shown here provides powerful tools needed in improving biofuel production and new technology platform for renewable energy generation, global carbon management, and environmental survey.

  9. Red Algae (Rhodophyta) from the Coast of Madagascar: Preliminary Bioactivity Studies and Isolation of Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahelivao, Marie Pascaline; Gruner, Margit; Andriamanantoanina, Hanta; Andriamihaja, Bakolinirina; Bauer, Ingmar; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2015-07-07

    Several species of red algae (Rhodophyta) from the coastal regions of Madagascar have been investigated for their natural products. The most abundant compound was cholesterol (5) in combination with a series of oxidized congeners. The brominated indoles 1-3 along with the sesquiterpene debilone (4) have been isolated from Laurencia complanata. For the first time, debilone (4) has been obtained from a marine plant. From the methanol extract of Calloseris sp., we have achieved the second isolation of the unusual A-ring contracted steroids (-)-2-ethoxycarbonyl-2β-hydroxy-A-nor-cholest-5-en-4-one (9) and phorbasterone B (10). The crude extracts of Laurencia complanata exhibited antimicrobial activity against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Candida albicans.

  10. Red Algae (Rhodophyta from the Coast of Madagascar: Preliminary Bioactivity Studies and Isolation of Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Pascaline Rahelivao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Several species of red algae (Rhodophyta from the coastal regions of Madagascar have been investigated for their natural products. The most abundant compound was cholesterol (5 in combination with a series of oxidized congeners. The brominated indoles 1–3 along with the sesquiterpene debilone (4 have been isolated from Laurencia complanata. For the first time, debilone (4 has been obtained from a marine plant. From the methanol extract of Calloseris sp., we have achieved the second isolation of the unusual A-ring contracted steroids (−-2-ethoxycarbonyl-2β-hydroxy-A-nor-cholest-5-en-4-one (9 and phorbasterone B (10. The crude extracts of Laurencia complanata exhibited antimicrobial activity against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Candida albicans.

  11. THE POSSIBILITY OF USING WASTEWATER FOR THE PRODUCTION OF PLATYMONAS SUBCORDIFORMIS ALGAE BIOMASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Dudek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the possibility of treated dairy wastewater using in the process of microalgae Platymonas subcordiformis biomass production. Researches were conducted in the laboratory scale with vertical photobioreactors using. Experiment was divided on the three variants based on the amount of wastewater introduced to culture medium. The researches proved the tested wastewater can be used in the intensive culture biomass of microalgae Platymonas subcordiformis. The highest technological effects associated with the increase in algal biomass obtained in the control sample where the concentration of algae cells at the end of the expansion process was nearly 3500 mgs.m.o./dm3. In embodiments using waste water as a component of the culture medium obtained microalgae increase over 2000 mgs.m.o./dm3.

  12. Transcriptome for photobiological hydrogen production induced by sulfur deprivation in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh Vu; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Malnoë, Alizée; Timmins, Matthew; Mussgnug, Jan H; Rupprecht, Jens; Kruse, Olaf; Hankamer, Ben; Schenk, Peer M

    2008-11-01

    Photobiological hydrogen production using microalgae is being developed into a promising clean fuel stream for the future. In this study, microarray analyses were used to obtain global expression profiles of mRNA abundance in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at different time points before the onset and during the course of sulfur-depleted hydrogen production. These studies were followed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and protein analyses. The present work provides new insights into photosynthesis, sulfur acquisition strategies, and carbon metabolism-related gene expression during sulfur-induced hydrogen production. A general trend toward repression of transcripts encoding photosynthetic genes was observed. In contrast to all other LHCBM genes, the abundance of the LHCBM9 transcript (encoding a major light-harvesting polypeptide) and its protein was strongly elevated throughout the experiment. This suggests a major remodeling of the photosystem II light-harvesting complex as well as an important function of LHCBM9 under sulfur starvation and photobiological hydrogen production. This paper presents the first global transcriptional analysis of C. reinhardtii before, during, and after photobiological hydrogen production under sulfur deprivation.

  13. Review and evaluation of immobilized algae systems for the production of fuels from microalgae. Final subcontract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the use of immobilized algae systems. It was the finding that commercial immobilized algae systems are not in operation at this time but, with research, could certainly become so. The use of immobilized algae will depend on, as in all commercial systems, the economic value of the product. This paper reviews the technical feasibility of immobilization as it applies to algae. Finally, the economics of possible immobilized algal systems that would produce liquid fuels were investigated. It was calculated that an immobilized system would have 8.5 times the capital costs of a conventional microalgae culture system. Operational costs would be about equal, although there would be substantial savings of water with the immobilized system. A major problem with immobilizing algae is the fact that sunlight drives the system. At present, an immobilized algal system to mass produce lipids for use as a liquid fuel does not appear to be economically feasible. The major drawback is developing a low-cost system that obtains the same amount of solar energy as provided to a shallow 3 square mile pond while increasing the culture density by an order of magnitude. R and D to increase light availability and to develop low cost transparent tanks could increase the competitiveness of immobilized algal systems. 44 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Improved methane production from brown algae under high salinity by fed-batch acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Here, a methanogenic microbial community was developed from marine sediments to have improved methane productivity from brown algae under high salinity. Fed-batch cultivation was conducted by adding dry seaweed at 1wt% total solid (TS) based on the liquid weight of the NaCl-containing sediment per round of cultivation. The methane production rate and level of salinity increased 8-fold and 1.6-fold, respectively, at the 10th round of cultivation. Moreover, the rate of methane production remained high, even at the 10th round of cultivation, with accumulation of salts derived from 10wt% TS of seaweed. The salinity of the 10th-round culture was equivalent to 5% NaCl. The improved methane production was attributed to enhanced acetoclastic methanogenesis because acetate became rapidly converted to methane during cultivation. The family Fusobacteriaceae and the genus Methanosaeta, the acetoclastic methanogen, predominated in bacteria and archaea, respectively, after the cultivation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lipid content and fatty acid composition of Mediterranean macro-algae as dynamic factors for biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlia M. El Maghraby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the total lipid contents and fatty acid profiles, the marine macro-algae Jania rubens (Rhodophyceae, Ulva linza (Chlorophyceae and Padina pavonica (Phaeophyceae were evaluated for biodiesel production during the spring, summer and autumn. Seawater parameters such as pH, salinity and temperature were measured. The total lipid content varied from 1.56% (J. rubens to 4.14% (U. linza of dry weight, with the highest values occurring in spring. The fatty acid methyl ester profiles were analysed using gas chromatography. The highest percentage of total fatty acids was recorded in P. pavonica, with 6.2% in autumn, whereas the lowest was in J. rubens, with 68.6% in summer. The relative amount of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids was significantly higher in P. pavonica than in the other macro-algae. Seasonal variations in pH, salinity and temperature had no significant effect on the total lipid and fatty acid contents. Principal component analysis grouped brown and green algae together, whereas red alga grouped out. Furthermore, methyl ester profiles indicate that brown and green seaweeds are preferred, followed by red seaweeds, which appears to have little potential for oil-based products. Therefore, these seaweeds are not targets for biodiesel production.

  16. Bio-oil production through pyrolysis of blue-green algae blooms (BGAB): Product distribution and bio-oil characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Zhiquan; Zheng, Yang; Yan, Feng; Xiao, Bo; Liu, Shiming

    2013-01-01

    Pyrolysis experiments of blue-green algae blooms (BGAB) were carried out in a fixed-bed reactor to determine the effects of pyrolysis temperature, particle size and sweep gas flow rate on pyrolysis product yields and bio-oil properties. The pyrolysis temperature, particle size and sweep gas flow rate were varied in the ranges of 300–700 °C, below 0.25–2.5 mm and 50–400 mL min −1 , respectively. The maximum oil yield of 54.97% was obtained at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C, particle size below 0.25 mm and sweep gas flow rate of 100 mL min −1 . The elemental analysis and calorific value of the oil were determined, and the chemical composition of the oil was investigated using gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy (GC–MS) technique. The analysis of bio-oil composition showed that bio-oil from BGAB could be a potential source of renewable fuel with a heating value of 31.9 MJ kg −1 . - Highlights: ► Bio-oil production from pyrolysis of blue-green algae blooms in fixed bed reactor. ► Effects of pyrolysis conditions on product distribution were investigated. ► The maximum bio-oil yield reached 54.97 wt %. ► The bio-oil has high heating value and may be suitable as renewable fuel. ► Pyrolysis of algal biomass beneficial for energy recovery, eutrophication control

  17. Toxicity of nano-TiO{sub 2} on algae and the site of reactive oxygen species production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fengmin, E-mail: lifengmin@ouc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science and Ecology, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Technology, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Liang, Zhi [Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science and Ecology, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Technology, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Zheng, Xiang, E-mail: zhengxiang7825@sina.com [School of Environment and Natural Resources, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China); Zhao, Wei; Wu, Miao; Wang, Zhenyu [Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science and Ecology, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Technology, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The growth of two species of algae was inhibited under nano-TiO{sub 2} exposure. • Oxidative stress was one of the mechanisms of toxicity of nano-TiO{sub 2} on algae. • The site of ROS production was the electron transfer chain of chloroplast. - Abstract: Given the extensive use of nanomaterials, they may enter aquatic environments and harm the growth of algae, which are primary producers in an aquatic ecosystem. Thus, the balance of an aquatic ecosystem may be destroyed. In this study, Karenia brevis and Skeletonema costatum were exposed to nano-TiO{sub 2} (anatase, average particle size of 5–10 nm, specific surface area of 210 ± 10 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) to assess the effects of nano-TiO{sub 2} on algae. The findings of transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrate aggregation of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the algal suspension. Nano-TiO{sub 2} was also found to be inside algal cells. The growth of the two species of algae was inhibited under nano-TiO{sub 2} exposure. The 72 h EC{sub 50} values of nano-TiO{sub 2} to K. brevis and S. costatum were 10.69 and 7.37 mg L{sup −1}, respectively. TEM showed that the cell membrane of K. brevis was destroyed and its organelles were almost undistinguished under nano-TiO{sub 2} exposure. The malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of K. brevis and S. costatum significantly increased compared with those of the control (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities (CAT) of K. brevis and S. costatum changed in different ways. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in both species were significantly higher than those of the control (p < 0.05). The site of ROS production and accumulation in K. brevis and S. costatum under nano-TiO{sub 2} exposure was explored with the addition of inhibitors of different electron transfer chains. This study indicated that nano-TiO{sub 2} in algal suspensions inhibited the growth

  18. Toxicity of nano-TiO2 on algae and the site of reactive oxygen species production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Fengmin; Liang, Zhi; Zheng, Xiang; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Miao; Wang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The growth of two species of algae was inhibited under nano-TiO 2 exposure. • Oxidative stress was one of the mechanisms of toxicity of nano-TiO 2 on algae. • The site of ROS production was the electron transfer chain of chloroplast. - Abstract: Given the extensive use of nanomaterials, they may enter aquatic environments and harm the growth of algae, which are primary producers in an aquatic ecosystem. Thus, the balance of an aquatic ecosystem may be destroyed. In this study, Karenia brevis and Skeletonema costatum were exposed to nano-TiO 2 (anatase, average particle size of 5–10 nm, specific surface area of 210 ± 10 m 2 g −1 ) to assess the effects of nano-TiO 2 on algae. The findings of transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrate aggregation of nano-TiO 2 in the algal suspension. Nano-TiO 2 was also found to be inside algal cells. The growth of the two species of algae was inhibited under nano-TiO 2 exposure. The 72 h EC 50 values of nano-TiO 2 to K. brevis and S. costatum were 10.69 and 7.37 mg L −1 , respectively. TEM showed that the cell membrane of K. brevis was destroyed and its organelles were almost undistinguished under nano-TiO 2 exposure. The malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of K. brevis and S. costatum significantly increased compared with those of the control (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities (CAT) of K. brevis and S. costatum changed in different ways. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in both species were significantly higher than those of the control (p < 0.05). The site of ROS production and accumulation in K. brevis and S. costatum under nano-TiO 2 exposure was explored with the addition of inhibitors of different electron transfer chains. This study indicated that nano-TiO 2 in algal suspensions inhibited the growth of K. brevis and S. costatum. This effect was attributed to oxidative

  19. Photostimulation of H2 production in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon photoinhibition of its O2-evolving system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, J.; Markov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    A brief exposure (15-30 min) of green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells to high intensity light (100 W·m -2 ) was accompanied by rapid suppression of photosynthetic O 2 evolution. The decline in the rate of O 2 evolution was accompanied by stimulation of H 2 production. The effect was dependent on cell suspension density, culture age, and light intensity. It appears that photoinhibition of photosynthetic O 2 evolution led to anaerobiosis that is favorable for H 2 production. (author)

  20. Beyond HIV microbicides: multipurpose prevention technology products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, R K; Boyd, P; McCoy, C F; Murphy, D J

    2014-10-01

    Multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) that aim to simultaneously prevent unintended pregnancy, HIV-1 infection and other sexually transmitted infections are among the most innovative and complex products currently in development within women's sexual and reproductive health care. In this review article, MPTs are placed within the wider context of combination products, combination drug products and multi-indication products. The current MPT product landscape is mapped and assessed with reference to existing products for the corresponding single indications, before identifying the gaps in the current MPT product pipeline and highlighting priority products and challenges moving forward. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  1. Characterization of the bacterial metagenome in an industrial algae bioenergy production system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shi [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Fulbright, Scott P [Colorado State University; Zeng, Xiaowei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yates, Tracy [Solix Biofuels; Wardle, Greg [Solix Biofuels; Chisholm, Stephen T [Colorado State University; Xu, Jian [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Lammers, Peter [New Mexico State University

    2011-03-16

    Cultivation of oleaginous microalgae for fuel generally requires growth of the intended species to the maximum extent supported by available light. The presence of undesired competitors, pathogens and grazers in cultivation systems will create competition for nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, iron and other micronutrients in the growth medium and potentially decrease microalgal triglyceride production by limiting microalgal health or cell density. Pathogenic bacteria may also directly impact the metabolism or survival of individual microalgal cells. Conversely, symbiotic bacteria that enhance microalgal growth may also be present in the system. Finally, the use of agricultural and municipal wastes as nutrient inputs for microalgal production systems may lead to the introduction and proliferation of human pathogens or interfere with the growth of bacteria with beneficial effects on system performance. These considerations underscore the need to understand bacterial community dynamics in microalgal production systems in order to assess microbiome effects on microalgal productivity and pathogen risks. Here we focus on the bacterial component of microalgal production systems and describe a pipeline for metagenomic characterization of bacterial diversity in industrial cultures of an oleaginous alga, Nannochloropsis salina. Environmental DNA was isolated from 12 marine algal cultures grown at Solix Biofuels, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, and 16S amplicons were sequenced using a 454 automated pyrosequencer. The approximately 70,000 sequences that passed quality control clustered into 53,950 unique sequences. The majority of sequences belonged to thirteen phyla. At the genus level, sequences from all samples represented 169 different genera. About 52.94% of all sequences could not be identified at the genus level and were classified at the next highest possible resolution level. Of all sequences, 79.92% corresponded to 169 genera and 70 other taxa. We

  2. Freshwater algae competition and correlation between their growth and microcystin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Xana; Valero, Enrique; Cancela, Ángeles; Sánchez, Ángel

    2016-11-01

    There are some different freshwater algae in Eutrophic reservoirs which bloom with specific environmental conditions, and some of them are cyanobacteria. In this investigation, we have cultivated microalgae present in natural water samples from a eutrophic reservoir. Variations in temperature and light were evaluated, as well as the competition among different green algae and cyanobacteria. There were three different freshwater algae growing together, Scenedesmus sp., Kirchneriella sp. and Microcystis aeruginosa, this cyanobacterium was the algae that reached the highest development and growth during the culture. While the algae grew, the concentration of toxin (microcystin-LR) increased until it reached the highest levels at 570 μg g -1 . Blooms occurred at temperatures of 28 ± 1.5 °C and light cycles of longer hours of light than dark. This took place during the summer months, from June to September (in the study area). At temperatures below 18 °C, algae did not grow. Blooms were reproduced to a laboratory scale in different conditions in order to understand the development of freshwater algae, as well as to help decision-making about water supply from that reservoir.

  3. Effects of Environmental Factors and Nutrient Availability on the Biochemical Composition of Algae for Biofuels Production: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganti S. Murthy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to significant lipid and carbohydrate production as well as other useful properties such as high production of useful biomolecular substrates (e.g., lipids and the ability to grow using non-potable water sources, algae are being explored as a potential high-yield feedstock for biofuels production. In both natural and engineered systems, algae can be exposed to a variety of environmental conditions that affect growth rate and cellular composition. With respect to the latter, the amount of carbon fixed in lipids and carbohydrates (e.g., starch is highly influenced by environmental factors and nutrient availability. Understanding synergistic interactions between multiple environmental variables and nutritional factors is required to develop sustainable high productivity bioalgae systems, which are essential for commercial biofuel production. This article reviews the effects of environmental factors (i.e., temperature, light and pH and nutrient availability (e.g., carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and trace metals as well as cross-interactions on the biochemical composition of algae with a special focus on carbon fixation and partitioning of carbon from a biofuels perspective.

  4. Acetic acid production from marine algae. Progress report No. 1, July 1--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, J.E.; Augenstein, D.C.; Wise, D.L.

    1977-10-14

    Progress is reported in research designed to develop an economically competitive process for producing acetic acid from biomass for the purpose of sparing petroleum for other uses, to evaluate marine algae as a potential source of biomass, and to document the feasibility of running fermentations in fixed packed bed fermenters. It was demonstrated that marine algae can be fermented to acetic acid. Initial rates of up to 168 meq/1 day were observed. These rates are substantially in excess of the 47 meq/1 day used in the economic projections. Also, when using marine algae as a substrate, acid levels were generated equivalent to the highest reported with other substrates. It was also demonstrated that a 4-foot fixed packet bed fermenter may be operated with marine algae as a substrate at 20 percent solids or 200 meq/1.

  5. Kinetics of methane production from the codigestion of switchgrass and Spirulina platensis algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mashad, Hamed M

    2013-03-01

    Anaerobic batch digestion of four feedstocks was conducted at 35 and 50 °C: switchgrass; Spirulina platensis algae; and two mixtures of both switchgrass and S. platensis. Mixture 1 was composed of 87% switchgrass (based on volatile solids) and 13% S. platensis. Mixture 2 was composed of 67% switchgrass and 33% S. platensis. The kinetics of methane production from these feedstocks was studied using four first order models: exponential, Gompertz, Fitzhugh, and Cone. The methane yields after 40days of digestion at 35 °C were 355, 127, 143 and 198 ml/g VS, respectively for S. platensis, switchgrass, and Mixtures 1 and 2, while the yields at 50 °C were 358, 167, 198, and 236 ml/g VS, respectively. Based on Akaike's information criterion, the Cone model best described the experimental data. The Cone model was validated with experimental data collected from the digestion of a third mixture that was composed of 83% switchgrass and 17% S. platensis. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Production of the blood pressure lowing peptides from brown alga ( Undaria pinnatifida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoru, Sato; Takashi, Oba; Takao, Hosokawa; Toshiyasu, Yamaguchi; Toshiki, Nakano; Tadao, Saito; Koji, Muramoto; Takashi, Kahara; Katsura, Funayama; Akio, Kobayashi; Takahisa, Nakano

    2005-07-01

    Brown alga ( Undaria pinnatifida) was treated with alginate lyase and hydrolyzed using 17 kinds of proteases and the inhibitory activity of the hydrolysates for the angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) was measured. Four hydrolysates with potent ACE-inhibitory activity were administered singly and orally to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). The systolic blood pressure of SHRs decreases significantly after single oral administration of the brown alga hydrolysates by protease S ‘Amano’ (from Bacillus stearothermophilus) at the concentration of 10 (mg protein) (kg body weight)-1. In the 17 weeks of feeding experiment, 7-week-old SHRs were fed standard diet supplemented with the brown alga hydrolysates for 10 weeks. In SHRs fed 1.0 and 0.1% brown alga hydrolysates, elevating of systolic bloodpressure was significantly suppressed for 7 weeks. To elucidate the active components, the brown alga hydrolysates were fractionated by 1-butanol extraction and HPLC on a reverse-phase column. Seven kinds of ACE-inhibitory peptides were isolated and identified by amino acid composition analysis, sequence analysis, and LC-MS with the results Val-Tyr, Ile-Tyr, Ala-Trp, Phe-Tyr, Val-Trp, Ile-Trp, and Leu-Trp. Each peptide was determined to have an antihypertensive effect after a single oral administration in SHRs. The brown alga hydrolysates were also confirmed to decrease the blood pressure in humans.

  7. Micro -algae biomass as an alternative resource for fishmeal and fish oil in the production of fish feed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safafar, Hamed

    application for aquaculture are related to nutrition, being used as a sole fresh feed or an additive, e.g. source of pigment. Algae produce almost all nutritious compounds which are required for fish. The diverse biochemical composition of microalgae represents them as a promising candidate...... for the formulation of fish feed. The nutritional composition of microalgae depends on the species, environmental conditions and growth medium composition. Microalgae for use in aquaculture should be non-toxic and possess the essential nutritive constituents, in a reasonable price. Photosynthetic production of algae...... of microalgae biomass intended to be used as a fish feed ingredient. A pre-gasified industrial process water with high concentration of ammonia and free from toxic compounds, representing effluent from a local biogas plant was used as a low price growth medium. Therefore, the biomass production benefits from...

  8. Reuse of red algae waste for the production of cellulose nanocrystals and its application in polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Achaby, Mounir; Kassab, Zineb; Aboulkas, Adil; Gaillard, Cédric; Barakat, Abdellatif

    2018-01-01

    Red algae is widely available around the world and its exploitation for the production of agar products has become an important industry in recent years. The industrial processing of red algae generates a large quantity of solid fibrous wastes, which constitutes a source of serious environmental problems. In the present work, the utilization of red algae waste as raw material to produce high-quality cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) has been investigated, and the ability of the as-isolated CNC to reinforce polymer has been studied. Red algae waste was chemically treated via alkali, bleaching and acid hydrolysis treatments, in order to obtain pure cellulose microfibers and CNC. The raw waste and the as-extracted cellulosic materials were successively characterized at different stages of treatments using serval analysis techniques. It was found that needle-like shaped CNC were successfully isolated at nanometric scale with diameters and lengths ranged from 5.2±2.9 to 9.1±3.1nm, and from 285.4±36.5 to 315.7±30.3nm, respectively, and the crystallinity index ranged from 81 to 87%, depending on the hydrolysis time (30, 40 and 80min). The as-extracted CNC were used as nanofillers for the production of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based nanocomposite films with improved thermal and tensile properties, as well as optical transparency. It is shown that the addition of 8wt% CNC into the PVA matrix increased the Young's modulus by 215%, the tensile strength by 150%, and the toughness by 45%. Additionally, the nanocomposite films maintained the same transparency level of the neat PVA film (transmittance of ∼90% in the visible region), suggesting that the CNC were dispersed at the nanoscale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrasound assisted direct transesterification of algae for biodiesel production : Analysis of emission characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namasivayam Manickam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the algae-for-fuel concept has gained renewed interest with energy prices fluctuating widely. Due to some restrictions over the oil extraction from algae, direct transesterification may be considered as a good alternative. In this study, to improve the performance of direct transesterification, ultrasound induction was carried out. A sonicator probe was used to induce the direct transesterification of Cladophora fracta, a freshwater macro alga, which contains 14% lipid on dry biomass basis. Due to ultrasonication about 25% increased biodiesel yields were obtained and the biodiesel thus prepared was analyzed for emission characteristics. The analysis results showed that Cladophora biodiesel emits 18 mg/L of CO whereas petroleum diesel emits 50 mg/L. Similarly, the emission of NOx and particulate matter also were reduced to a considerable level. The Cladophora is a suitable source of biodiesel by ultrasound assisted direct transesterification in industrial level in the future.

  10. Brown Algae (Phaeophyceae) from the Coast of Madagascar: preliminary Bioactivity Studies and Isolation of Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahelivao, Marie Pascaline; Gruner, Margit; Andriamanantoanina, Hanta; Bauer, Ingmar; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Eight species of brown algae (Phaeophyceae) from the coast of Madagascar have been investigated for their chemical constituents. Fucosterol (3) was obtained as the most abundant compound. The brown alga Sargassum ilicifolium was the source for the first isolation of the terpenoid C27-alcohol 1,1',2-trinorsqualenol (1) from marine sources. From S. incisifolium we isolated the highly unsaturated glycolipid 1-O-palmitoyl-2-O-stearidonoyl-3-O-β-D-galactopyranosylglycerol (4) and we report the first full assignment of its (1)H and (13)C NMR data. Apo-9'-fucoxanthinone (8) along with 24-ketocholesterol (5), (22E)-3β-hydroxycholesta-5,22-dien-24-one (6), and saringosterol (7) were obtained from Turbinaria ornata. The crude extracts of all eight species of brown algae exhibited a pronounced antimicrobial activity against the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  11. Acclimation of green algae to sulfur deficiency: underlying mechanisms and application for hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Taras K; Krendeleva, Tatyana E; Rubin, Andrew B

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen is definitely one of the most acceptable fuels in the future. Some photosynthetic microorganisms, such as green algae and cyanobacteria, can produce hydrogen gas from water by using solar energy. In green algae, hydrogen evolution is coupled to the photosynthetic electron transport in thylakoid membranes via reaction catalyzed by the specific enzyme, (FeFe)-hydrogenase. However, this enzyme is highly sensitive to oxygen and can be quickly inhibited when water splitting is active. A problem of incompatibility between the water splitting and hydrogenase reaction can be overcome by depletion of algal cells of sulfur which is essential element for life. In this review the mechanisms underlying sustained hydrogen photoproduction in sulfur deprived C. reinhardtii and the recent achievements in studying of this process are discussed. The attention is focused on the biophysical and physiological aspects of photosynthetic response to sulfur deficiency in green algae.

  12. Harvesting green algae from eutrophic reservoir by electroflocculation and post-use for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Enrique; Álvarez, Xana; Cancela, Ángeles; Sánchez, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Each year there are more frequent blooms of green algae and cyanobacteria, representing a serious environmental problem of eutrophication. Electroflocculation (EF) was studied to harvest the algae which are present in reservoirs, as well as different factors which may influence on the effectiveness of the process: the voltage applied to the culture medium, run times, electrodes separation and natural sedimentation. Finally, the viability of its use to obtain biodiesel was studied by direct transesterification. The EF process carried out at 10V for 1min, with an electrode separation of 5.5cm and a height of 4cm in culture vessel, obtained a recovery efficiency greater than 95%, and octadecenoic and palmitic acids were obtained as the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). EF is an effective method to harvest green algae during the blooms, obtaining the greatest amount of biomass for subsequent use as a source of biodiesel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. soil algae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    Also, the importance of algae in soil formation and soil fertility improvement cannot be over emphasized as the world is working ... farms further establishes the role of blue green algae in soil nutrients for plant growth. Key words- Soil Fertility, Soil ... with sunlight will promote the growth of soil algae and their contribution to ...

  14. Multipurpose prevention technologies: products in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, David R; Clark, Justin T; Kiser, Patrick F; Clark, Meredith R

    2013-12-01

    Multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) are broadly defined as products capable of simultaneously addressing multiple sexual and reproductive health needs including unintended pregnancy, STIs including HIV-1, and other reproductive tract infections. MPTs have been discussed for a few decades but little product development has occurred. With the recent proof-of-concept that a topically applied antiretroviral (ARV) can effectively reduce sexual transmission of HIV-1 (tenofovir 1% gel) the impetus to develop MPTs is gaining momentum. Products currently in development are broadly categorized as either long-acting or on-demand. Long-acting MPTs include intravaginal rings (IVRs) and long-acting injectable products. Several IVR MPTs are under development including one designed to release tenofovir to prevent transmission of HIV-1 and levonorgestrel (LNG) to prevent unintended pregnancy over a 90-day period. Another MPT IVR under development is designed to release the ARV dapivirine and LNG for 2 months. Long-acting injectable pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) formulations of rilpivirine (TMC278) and GSK1265744 have entered clinical evaluation and could form the basis of long-acting injectable products for HIV-1 prevention and prevention of unintended pregnancy. On-demand products include TFV 1% gel (HIV-1/HSV-2 prevention), a zinc/carrageenan zinc gel (HIV-1/HSV-2 prevention), and the SILCS diaphragm administered with TFV 1% gel. Significant technical, funding, and regulatory hurdles must be overcome to develop most MPTs; however, the significant reproductive health benefits to many women around the world should provide motivation to overcome these hurdles. This article is based on a presentation at the "Product Development Workshop 2013: HIV and Multipurpose Prevention Technologies", held in Arlington, Virginia on February 21-22, 2013. It forms part of a special supplement to Antiviral Research. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Uptake of caprolactam and its influence on growth and oxygen production of Desmodesmus quadricauda algae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pexová Kalinová, J.; Tříska, Jan; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Novák, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 213, JUN (2016), s. 518-523 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Lactam * Algae * pollution * biosorption * pyrenoid * growth Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.099, year: 2016

  16. Physiological aspects of the production and conversion of DMSP in marine algae and higher plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefels, J

    Dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) is a compound produced in several classes of algae and higher plants that live in the marine environment. Considering its generally high intracellular concentrations, DMSP has a function in the osmotic protection of algal cells. Due to the relatively slow

  17. Product modular design incorporating preventive maintenance issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yicong; Feng, Yixiong; Tan, Jianrong

    2016-03-01

    Traditional modular design methods lead to product maintenance problems, because the module form of a system is created according to either the function requirements or the manufacturing considerations. For solving these problems, a new modular design method is proposed with the considerations of not only the traditional function related attributes, but also the maintenance related ones. First, modularity parameters and modularity scenarios for product modularity are defined. Then the reliability and economic assessment models of product modularity strategies are formulated with the introduction of the effective working age of modules. A mathematical model used to evaluate the difference among the modules of the product so that the optimal module of the product can be established. After that, a multi-objective optimization problem based on metrics for preventive maintenance interval different degrees and preventive maintenance economics is formulated for modular optimization. Multi-objective GA is utilized to rapidly approximate the Pareto set of optimal modularity strategy trade-offs between preventive maintenance cost and preventive maintenance interval difference degree. Finally, a coordinate CNC boring machine is adopted to depict the process of product modularity. In addition, two factorial design experiments based on the modularity parameters are constructed and analyzed. These experiments investigate the impacts of these parameters on the optimal modularity strategies and the structure of module. The research proposes a new modular design method, which may help to improve the maintainability of product in modular design.

  18. Analysis of Solid and Aqueous Phase Products from Hydrothermal Carbonization of Whole and Lipid-Extracted Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Broch

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae have tremendous potential as a feedstock for production of liquid biofuels, particularly biodiesel fuel via transesterification of algal lipids. However, biodiesel production results in significant amounts of algal residues, or “lipid extracted algae” (LEA. Suitable utilization of the LEA residue will improve the economics of algal biodiesel. In the present study, we evaluate the hydrothermal carbonization (HTC of whole and lipid extracted algal (Spirulina maxima feedstocks in order to produce a solid biofuel (hydrochar and value-added co-products in the aqueous phase. HTC experiments were performed using a 2-L Parr reactor (batch type at 175–215 °C with a 30-min holding time. Solid, aqueous and gaseous products were analyzed using various laboratory methods to evaluate the mass and carbon balances, and investigate the existence of high value chemicals in the aqueous phase. The HTC method is effective in creating an energy dense, solid hydrochar from both whole algae and LEA at lower temperatures as compared to lignocellulosic feedstocks, and is effective at reducing the ash content in the resulting hydrochar. However, under the treatment temperatures investigated, less than 1% of the starting dry algae mass was recovered as an identified high-value chemical in the aqueous phase.

  19. Bromophycoic acids: bioactive natural products from a Fijian red alga Callophycus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, Margaret E; Shearer, Tonya L; Engel, Sebastian; Alexander, Troy S; Fairchild, Craig R; Prudhomme, Jacques; Torres, Manuel; Le Roch, Karine; Aalbersberg, William; Hay, Mark E; Kubanek, Julia

    2012-09-21

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of extracts from a Fijian red alga in the genus Callophycus resulted in the isolation of five new compounds of the diterpene-benzoate class. Bromophycoic acids A-E (1-5) were characterized by NMR and mass spectroscopic analyses and represent two novel carbon skeletons, one with an unusual proposed biosynthesis. These compounds display a range of activities against human tumor cell lines, malarial parasites, and bacterial pathogens including low micromolar suppression of MRSA and VREF.

  20. Selection of microalgae and cyanobacteria strains for bicarbonate-based integrated carbon capture and algae production system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhanyou; Elloy, Farah; Xie, Yuxiao; Hu, Yucai; Chen, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    Using microalgae to capture CO2 from flue gas is an ideal way to reduce CO2 emission, but this is challenged by the high cost of carbon capture and transportation. To address this problem, a bicarbonate-based integrated carbon capture and algae production system (BICCAPS) has been proposed, in which bicarbonate is used for algae culture, and the regenerated carbonate from this process can be used to capture more CO2. High-concentration bicarbonate is obligate for the BICCAPS. Thus, different strains of microalgae and cyanobacteria were tested in this study for their capability to grow in high-concentration NaHCO3. The highest NaHCO3 concentrations they are tolerant to were determined as 0.30 M for Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, 0.60 M for Cyanothece sp., 0.10 M for Chlorella sorokiniana, 0.60 M for Dunaliella salina, and 0.30 M for Dunaliella viridis and Dunaliella primolecta. In further study, biomass production from culture of D. primolecta in an Erlenmeyer flask with either 0.30 M NaHCO3 or 2 % CO2 bubbling was compared, and no significant difference was detected. This indicates BICCAPS can reach the same biomass productivity as regular CO2 bubbling culture, and it is promising for future application.

  1. Biofuels and algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    Bio-fuels based on micro-algae are promising, their licensing for being used in plane fuels in a mix containing 50% of fossil kerosene is expected in the coming months. In United-States research on bio-fuels has been made more important since 2006 when 2 policies were launched: 'Advanced energy initiative' and 'Twenty-in-ten', the latter aiming to develop alternative fuels. In Europe less investment has been made concerning micro-algae fuels but research programs were launched in Spain, United-Kingdom and France. In France 3 important projects were launched: SHAMASH (2006-2010) whose aim is to produce lipidic fuels from micro-algae, ALGOHUB (2008-2013) whose aim is to use micro-algae as a raw material for humane and animal food, medicine and cosmetics, SYMBIOSE (2009-2011) whose aim is the optimization of the production of methane through the anaerobic digestion of micro-algae, SALINALGUE (2010-2016) whose aim is to grow micro-algae for the production of bio-energies and bio-products. (A.C.)

  2. Analysis on biomass and productivity of epilithic algae and their relations to environmental factors in the Gufu River basin, Three Gorges Reservoir area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jiwen; Wu, Shuyuan; Touré, Dado; Cheng, Lamei; Miao, Wenjie; Cao, Huafen; Pan, Xiaoying; Li, Jianfeng; Yao, Minmin; Feng, Liang

    2017-12-01

    The main purpose of this study conducted from August 2010 was to find biomass and productivity of epilithic algae and their relations to environmental factors and try to explore the restrictive factors affecting the growth of algae in the Gufu River, the one of the branches of Xiangxi River located in the Three Gorges Reservoir of the Yangtze River, Hubei Province, Central China. An improved method of in situ primary productivity measurement was utilized to estimate the primary production of the epilithic algae. It was shown that in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs, algae are the main primary producers and have a central role in the ecosystem. Chlorophyll a concentration and ash-free dry mass (AFDM) were estimated for epilithic algae of the Gufu River basin in Three Gorges Reservoir area. Environmental factors in the Gufu River ecosystem highlighted differences in periphyton chlorophyll a ranging from 1.49 mg m -2 (origin) to 69.58 mg m -2 (terminal point). The minimum and maximum gross primary productivity of epilithic algae were 96.12 and 1439.89 mg C m -2  day -1 , respectively. The mean net primary productivity was 290.24 mg C m -2  day -1 . The mean autotrophic index (AFDM:chlorophyll a) was 407.40. The net primary productivity, community respiration ratio (P/R ratio) ranged from 0.98 to 9.25 with a mean of 2.76, showed that autotrophic productivity was dominant in the river. Relationship between physicochemical characteristics and biomass was discussed through cluster and stepwise regression analysis which indicated that altitude, total nitrogen (TN), NO 3 - -N, and NH 4 + -N were significant environmental factors affecting the biomass of epilithic algae. However, a negative logarithmic relationship between altitude and the chlorophyll a of epilithic algae was high. The results also highlighted the importance of epilithic algae in maintaining the Gufu River basin ecosystems health.

  3. Temperature dependence of production of structured triacylglycerols in the alga Trachydiscus minutus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Lukavský, Jaromír; Sigler, Karel; Nedbalová, Linda; Vítová, Milada

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 110, FEB 2015 (2015), s. 37-45 ISSN 0031-9422 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/0215; GA ČR GA14-00227S; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0110; GA TA ČR TE01020080 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:67985939 Keywords : Alga * Trachydiscus minutus * Eustigmatophyceae Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics; EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics (BU-J) Impact factor: 2.779, year: 2015

  4. Estudi de la viabilitat comercial de productes alimentaris elaborats amb l'alga ulva spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Olària Pisa, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Algae represent an important part of the marine resources exploited on our planet and open a world of possibilities. These are organisms that do not need arable land or fresh water to grow, resources that are increasingly scarce. Ulva spp. is widely used as a biofilter, Ulva ohnoi species is being used for this purpose at Escola Superior d'Agricultura of Barcelona in the pilot plant. In addition, it is grown to be marketed as food and given its nutritional value has been increased its commerc...

  5. Phlorotannins from Brown Algae: inhibition of advanced glycation end products formation in high glucose induced Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakambari, Ganeshan; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem; Varalakshmi, Perumal

    2015-06-01

    Advanced Glycation End products (AGE) generated in a non enzymatic protein glycation process are frequently associated with diabetes, aging and other chronic diseases. Here, we explored the protective effect of phlorotannins from brown algae Padina pavonica, Sargassum polycystum and Turbinaria ornata against AGEs formation. Phlorotannins were extracted from brown algae with methanol and its purity was analyzed by TLC and RP-HPLC-DAD. Twenty five grams of P. pavonica, S. polycystum, T. ornata yielded 27.6 ± 0.8 μg/ml, 37.7 μg/ml and 37.1 ± 0.74 μg/ml of phloroglucinol equivalent of phlorotannins, respectively. Antioxidant potentials were examined through DPPH assay and their IC50 values were P. pavonica (30.12 ± 0.99 μg), S. polycystum (40.9 ± 1.2 μg) and T. ornata (22.9 ± 1.3 μg), which was comparatively lesser than the control ascorbic acid (46 ± 0.2 μg). Further, anti-AGE activity was examined in vitro by BSA-glucose assay with the extracted phlorotannins of brown algae (P. pavonica, 15.16 ± 0.26 μg/ml; S. polycystum, 35.245 ± 2.3 μg/ml; T. ornata, 22.7 ± 0.3 μg/ml), which revealed the required concentration to inhibit 50% of albumin glycation (IC50) were lower for extracts than controls (phloroglucinol, 222.33 ± 4.9 μg/ml; thiamine, 263 μg/ml). Furthermore, brown algal extracts containing phlorotannins (100 μl) exhibited protective effects against AGE formation in vivo in C. elegans with induced hyperglycemia.

  6. Green energy from marine algae: biogas production and composition from the anaerobic digestion of Irish seaweed species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, C H; Bartlett, J

    2013-01-01

    Marine algae have emerged as an alternative feedstock for the production of a number of renewable fuels, including biogas. In addition to energy potential, other characteristics make them attractive as an energy source, including their ability to absorb carbon dioxide (CO2), higher productivity rates than land-based crops and the lack of water use or land competition. For Ireland, biofuels from marine algae can play an important role by reducing imports of fossil fuels as well as providing the necessary energy in rural communities. In this study, five potential seaweed species common in Irish waters, Saccorhiza polyschides, Ulva sp., Laminaria digitata, Fucus serratus and Saccharina latissima, were co-digested individually with bovine slurry. Batch reactors of 120ml and 1000ml were set up and incubated at 35 degrees C to investigate their suitability for production of biogas. Digesters fed with S. latissima produced the maximum methane yield (335 ml g volatile solids(-1) (g(VS)(-1) followed by S. polyschides with 255 ml g(VS)(-1). L. digitata produced 246ml g(VS)(-1) and the lowest yields were from the green seaweed Ulva sp. 191ml g(VS)(-1). The methane and CO2 percentages ranged between 50-72% and 10-45%, respectively. The results demonstrated that the seaweed species investigated are good feedstocks candidates for the production of biogas and methane as a source of energy. Their use on a large-scale process will require further investigation to increase yields and reduce production costs.

  7. The Study of Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushforth, Samuel R.

    1977-01-01

    Included in this introduction to the study of algae are drawings of commonly encountered freshwater algae, a summary of the importance of algae, descriptions of the seven major groups of algae, and techniques for collection and study of algae. (CS)

  8. Study of bio-oil and bio-char production from algae by slow pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaiwong, K.; Kiatsiriroat, T.; Vorayos, N.; Thararax, C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined bio-oil and bio-char fuel produced from Spirulina Sp. by slow pyrolysis. A thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) was used to investigate the pyrolytic characteristics and essential components of algae. It was found that the temperature for the maximum degradation, 322 °C, is lower than that of other biomass. With our fixed-bed reactor, 125 g of dried Spirulina Sp. algae was fed under a nitrogen atmosphere until the temperature reached a set temperature between 450 and 600 °C. It was found that the suitable temperature to obtain bio-char and bio-oil were at approximately 500 and 550 °C respectively. The bio-oil components were identified by a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The saturated functional carbon of the bio-oil was in a range of heavy naphtha, kerosene and diesel oil. The energy consumption ratio (ECR) of bio-oil and bio-char was calculated, and the net energy output was positive. The ECR had an average value of 0.49. -- Highlights: •Bio-oil and bio-char fuel produced from Spirulina Sp. by slow pyrolysis. •Suitable temperature to obtained bio-oil and bio-char were at about 550 and 500 °C. •Saturated functional carbon of bio-oil was heavy naphtha, kerosene, diesel oil. •ECR had an average value of 0.49

  9. Production of brown algae pyrolysis oils for liquid biofuels depending on the chemical pretreatment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joonhyuk; Choi, Jae-Wook; Suh, Dong Jin; Ha, Jeong-Myeong; Hwang, Ji Won; Jung, Hyun Wook; Lee, Kwan-Young; Woo, Hee-Chul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis of Saccharina japonica, brown algae to produce hydrocarbons. • Sulfuric acid pretreatment of macroalgae to remove inorganic elements. • CaCl 2 treatment of macroalgae to remove valuable fucoidan. • Sulfuric acid pretreatment suppressed the formation of large biochar chunks. • The pretreatment methods allowed the continuous operation of pyrolysis. - Abstract: Based on observations of rapidly growing biochar in fluidization beds, kelp (Saccharina japonica), a species of brown algae, was pretreated for the efficient operation of pyrolysis processes to produce pyrolysis oils. The removal of catalytically active inorganic minerals and the softening of polymeric seaweed structures were performed by means of chemical treatments, including a CaCl 2 treatment to isolate valuable and sticky fucoidan and a sulfuric acid treatment to remove catalytically active minerals. The sulfuric acid pretreatment significantly reduced the inorganic elements but did not significantly affect the properties of the pyrolysis oil compared to the non-treated kelp pyrolysis oil. Whereas the non-treated kelp produced significantly large chunks of biochar, which hindered the continuous operation of pyrolysis, the kelp treated with sulfuric acid did not produce aggregated large particles of biochar, thereby offering a means of developing reliable continuous pyrolysis processes

  10. Production of microscopic algae for its consequent use as aviation fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, T.; Akamatsu, N. [Research Inst. of Tsukuba Bio-tech Corp., Ibaraki (Japan); Jia, J.; Intabon, K. [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan); Terazawa, Y. [Nakamura Gakuen Univ. Fukuoka (Japan). Nourishment Science Dept.

    2010-07-01

    There is a large market for aviation fuel in Japan's aviation industry whose annual demand for aviation fuel is 12 million KL. In this study, a biofuel was produced from microscopic algae for use as jet fuel at an industrial scale. In order to comply with the cap-and-trade environmental policy of the European Union, algal oil as a biomass fuel must represent 3 per cent , 5 per cent and 10 per cent of total annual demand by 2011, 2013, and 2020, respectively. The microscopic algae Euglena gracilis was used in this study. Its lipid concentration was about 20 per cent. The extraction residue contains a high-density protein that can be used in animal feed. The electricity required to supply the light needed to cultivate E. gracilis ranged from 180 MW to 900 MW for 4 L of bioreactor medium. The maximum quantity of photons needed in the cultivation liquid was determined along with the light intensity required during the start up period for the cultivation of E. gracilis. Continuous harvesting in high yields of E. gracilis kept the density of the dry matter of E. gracilis between 0.5 g/l to1.5 g/l. It was concluded that the liquid used to cultivate E. gracilis should be sterilized by maintaining a low pH level by blowing carbon dioxide into the liquid.

  11. Brown Algae Polyphenol, a Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Inhibitor, Prevents Obesity by Inhibiting the Differentiation of Stem Cells into Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Atsuko; Saeki, Toshiyuki; Ikuji, Hiroko; Uchida, Chiyoko; Uchida, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    While screening for an inhibitor of the peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase, Pin1, we came across a brown algae polyphenol that blocks the differentiation of fibroblasts into adipocytes. However, its effectiveness on the accumulation of fat in the body has never been studied. Oral administration of brown algae polyphenol to mice fed with a high fat diet, suppressed the increase in fat volume to a level observed in mice fed with a normal diet. We speculate that Pin1 might be required for the differentiation of stem cell to adipocytes. We established wild type (WT) and Pin1-/- (Pin1-KO) adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ASC) lines and found that WT ASCs differentiate to adipocytes but Pin1-KO ASCs do not. Oral administration of brown algae polyphenol, a Pin1 inhibitor, reduced fat buildup in mice. We showed that Pin1 is required for the differentiation of stem cells into adipocytes. We propose that oral intake of brown algae polyphenol is useful for the treatment of obesity.

  12. Brown Algae Polyphenol, a Prolyl Isomerase Pin1 Inhibitor, Prevents Obesity by Inhibiting the Differentiation of Stem Cells into Adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Suzuki

    Full Text Available While screening for an inhibitor of the peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase, Pin1, we came across a brown algae polyphenol that blocks the differentiation of fibroblasts into adipocytes. However, its effectiveness on the accumulation of fat in the body has never been studied.Oral administration of brown algae polyphenol to mice fed with a high fat diet, suppressed the increase in fat volume to a level observed in mice fed with a normal diet. We speculate that Pin1 might be required for the differentiation of stem cell to adipocytes. We established wild type (WT and Pin1-/- (Pin1-KO adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ASC lines and found that WT ASCs differentiate to adipocytes but Pin1-KO ASCs do not.Oral administration of brown algae polyphenol, a Pin1 inhibitor, reduced fat buildup in mice. We showed that Pin1 is required for the differentiation of stem cells into adipocytes. We propose that oral intake of brown algae polyphenol is useful for the treatment of obesity.

  13. Effects of different algae in diet on growth and interleukin (IL-10 production of juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Anisuzzaman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of different algae in diet on growth, survival, and interleukin-10 productions of sea cucumber. At first, a 9-week feeding trail was conducted to evaluate the growth performance and survival of the sea cucumber fed one of the six experimental diets containing ST (Sargassum thunbergii, UL (Ulva lactuca, UP (Undaria pinnatifida, LJ (Laminaria japonica, SS (Schizochytrium sp., and NO (Nannochloropsis oculata in a recirculating aquaculture system. The result showed that survival was not significantly different among the dietary treatments, and the specific growth rate (SGR of sea cucumber fed the UL diet (1.58% d−1 was significantly higher than that of sea cucumber fed the other diets (P < 0.05, except for the LJ and NO diets. Secondly, interleukin (IL-10 gene expression was determined where mice splenocytes were stimulated with 10 μg ml−1 of sea cucumber extracts for 2 h. The result showed that IL-10 gene expression levels were significantly increased in UL, LJ, and NO diets fed sea cucumber extracts compared to other experimental diets. The results suggest that dietary inclusion with Ulva lactuca, Laminaria japonica, and Nannochloropsis oculata algae may improve the growth of juvenile sea cucumber and could upregulate IL-10 gene expression in mice splenocytes. Such detailed information could be helpful in further development of more appropriate diets for sea cucumber culture.

  14. Extreme Low Light Requirement for Algae Growth Underneath Sea Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancke, Kasper; Lund-Hansen, Lars C.; Lamare, Maxim L.

    2018-01-01

    Microalgae colonizing the underside of sea ice in spring are a key component of the Arctic foodweb as they drive early primary production and transport of carbon from the atmosphere to the ocean interior. Onset of the spring bloom of ice algae is typically limited by the availability of light......, and the current consensus is that a few tens-of-centimeters of snow is enough to prevent sufficient solar radiation to reach underneath the sea ice. We challenge this consensus, and investigated the onset and the light requirement of an ice algae spring bloom, and the importance of snow optical properties...... for light penetration. Colonization by ice algae began in May under >1 m of first-year sea ice with approximate to 1 m thick snow cover on top, in NE Greenland. The initial growth of ice algae began at extremely low irradiance (...

  15. Total lipid production of the green alga Nannochloropsis sp. QII under different nitrogen regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suen, Yu.; Hubbard, J.S.; Holzer, G.; Tornabene, T.G.

    1987-01-01

    The green alga Nannochloropsis sp. QII was cultivated in media with sufficient and growth-limiting levels of nitrogen (nitrate). Nitrogen deficiency promoted lipid synthesis yielding cells with lipids comprising 55% of the biomass. The major lipids were triacylglycerols (79%), polar lipids (9%) and hydrocarbons (2.5%). The polar lipids consisted of a broad range of phospholipids, glycolipids and sulfolipids. Other lipids identified were pigments, free fatty acids, saponifiable and unsaponifiable sterol derivatives, various glycerides, a family of alkyl-1, 4-dioxane derivatives and a series of alkyl- and hydroxy-alkyl-dimethyl-acetals. Experiments in which 14 CO 2 was provided at different times in the growth cycle demonstrated that enhanced lipid biosynthesis at low nitrogen levels resulted principally from de novo CO 2 fixation

  16. Food production and gas exchange system using blue-green alga (spirulina) for CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Otsubo, Koji; Nitta, Keiji; Hatayama, Shigeki

    1987-01-01

    In order to reduce the cultivation area required for the growth of higher plants in space adoption of algae, which have a higher photosynthetic ability, seems very suitable for obtaining oxygen and food as a useful source of high quality protein. The preliminary cultivation experiment for determining optimum cultivation conditions and for obtaining the critical design parameters of the cultivator itself was conducted. Spirulina was cultivated in the 6 liter medium containing a sodium hydrogen carbonate solution and a cultivation temperature controlled using a thermostat. Generated oxygen gas was separated using a polypropyrene porous hollow fiber membrane module. Through this experiment, oxygen gas (at a concentration of more than 46 percent) at a rate of 100 to approx. 150 ml per minute could be obtained.

  17. Fast pyrolysis of Saccharina japonica alga in a fixed-bed reactor for bio-oil production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ly, Hoang Vu; Kim, Seung-Soo; Choi, Jae Hyung; Woo, Hee Chul; Kim, Jinsoo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Fas pyrolysis of Saccharina japonica was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor. • Effects of pyrolysis temperature and sweeping-gas flow rate were investigated. • The highest liquid yield was obtained at the temperature in range of 350–500 °C with a sweeping gas flow rate of 300 ml/min. • The HHVs of pyrolysis bio-oils from S. japonica were in the range of 32.97–33.26 MJ/kg. - Abstract: Macro-algae are recognized as a potential feedstock for renewable energy and fuel production. Saccharina japonica is a kind of macro-algae that has been extensively cultivated in Korea. Through pyrolysis, S. japonica can be converted into bio-oil, gas, and char. In this study, we investigated the fast pyrolysis of S. japonica in a fixed-bed reactor at different temperatures from 350 to 550 °C with sweeping-gas flow rates of 100, 300, and 500 ml/min. As the pyrolysis temperature was increased from 350 °C to 500 °C, the bio-oil yields decreased while the gas yields increased. The highest liquid yield (40.91 wt%) was obtained at a pyrolysis temperature of 350 °C with a sweeping-gas velocity of 300 ml/min. The major compositions in the bio-oil were di-anhydromannitol (34.45%), iso-sorbide (19.84%), and 2-methyl furyl ketone (8.43%). The gas products (including CO, CO 2 , H 2 , and hydrocarbon gases from C 1 to C 4 ), were analyzed by gas chromatography with an FID and a TCD. The bio-chars contained a high carbonaceous content can be used as a pollution-free solid fuel or for the production of activated carbon and other chemicals.

  18. Nutrient removal and energy production from aqueous phase of bio-oil generated via hydrothermal liquefaction of algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Saravanan R; Adhikari, Sushil; Shakya, Rajdeep

    2017-04-01

    Removal of nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen) as struvite from bio-oil aqueous phase generated via hydrothermal liquefaction of algae was evaluated in this study. Effect of process parameters such as pH, temperature and reaction time on struvite formation was studied. More than 99% of phosphorus and 40-100% ammonium nitrogen were removed under all experimental conditions. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of struvite, and the struvite recovered from bio-oil aqueous phase can be used as a slow-release fertilizer. Biogas production from struvite recovered bio-oil aqueous phase showed 3.5 times higher CH 4 yield (182±39mL/g COD) as compared to non-struvite recovered aqueous phase. The results from this study indicate that both struvite and methane can be produced from bio-oil aqueous phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of Fatty Acid Production and Release in Benthic Algae: Could Parallel Allelopathy Be Explained with Plant Defence Theories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Joey L; Ten-Hage, Loïc; Leflaive, Joséphine

    2018-04-01

    Many organisms produce chemical compounds, generally referred as secondary metabolites, to defend against predators and competitors (allelopathic compounds). Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the interaction between environmental factors and secondary metabolites production. However, microalgae commonly use simple metabolites having a role in primary metabolism as allelopathic compounds. The aim of this study was to determine whether classical theories of plant chemical defences could be applied to microalgae producing allelochemicals derived from the primary metabolism. Our study was designed to investigate how growth phase, algal population density, nutrient limitation and carbon assimilation affect the production and release of allelopathic free fatty acids (FFAs) among other FFAs. The model species used was Uronema confervicolum, a benthic filamentous green alga that produces two allelopathic FFAs (linoleic and α-linolenic acids) inhibiting diatom growth. FFAs have been quantified in algal biomass and in culture medium. Our results were analysed according to two classical plant defence theories: the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH) and the optimal defence theory (ODT), based on the metabolic capacities for defence production and on the need for defence, respectively. While a higher production of allelopathic compounds under increased light conditions supports the use of GDBH with this microalga, the observation of a negative feedback mechanism mostly supports ODT. Therefore, both theories were insufficient to explain all the observed effects of environmental factors on the production of these allelochemicals. This highlights the needs of new theories and models to better describe chemical interactions of microalgae.

  20. Evaluation of Marine Brown Algae and Sponges from Brazil as Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzi Meneses Ribeiro

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The ischemic disorders, in which platelet aggregation and blood coagulation are involved, represent a major cause of disability and death worldwide. The antithrombotic therapy has unsatisfactory performance and may produce side effects. So, there is a need to seek molecules with antithrombotic properties. Marine organisms produce substances with different well defined ecological functions. Moreover, some of these molecules also exhibit pharmacological properties such as antiviral, anticancer, antiophidic and anticoagulant properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate, through in vitro tests, the effect of two extracts of brown algae and ten marine sponges from Brazil on platelet aggregation and blood coagulation. Our results revealed that most of the extracts were capable of inhibiting platelet aggregation and clotting measured by plasma recalcification tests, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and fibrinogenolytic activity. On the other hand, five of ten species of sponges induced platelet aggregation. Thus, the marine organisms studied here may have molecules with antithrombotic properties, presenting biotechnological potential to antithrombotic therapy. Further chemical investigation should be conducted on the active species to discover useful molecules for the development of new drugs to treat clotting disorders.

  1. Nannochloropsis algae pyrolysis with ceria-based catalysts for production of high-quality bio-oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aysu, Tevfik; Sanna, Aimaro

    2015-10-01

    Pyrolysis of Nannochloropsis was carried out in a fixed-bed reactor with newly prepared ceria based catalysts. The effects of pyrolysis parameters such as temperature and catalysts on product yields were investigated. The amount of bio-char, bio-oil and gas products, as well as the compositions of the resulting bio-oils was determined. The results showed that both temperature and catalyst had significant effects on conversion of Nannochloropsis into solid, liquid and gas products. The highest bio-oil yield (23.28 wt%) and deoxygenation effect was obtained in the presence of Ni-Ce/Al2O3 as catalyst at 500°C. Ni-Ce/Al2O3 was able to retain 59% of the alga starting energy in the bio-oil, compared to only 41% in absence of catalyst. Lower content of acids and oxygen in the bio-oil, higher aliphatics (62%), combined with HHV show promise for production of high-quality bio-oil from Nannochloropsis via Ni-Ce/Al2O3 catalytic pyrolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An integrated production, inventory and preventive maintenance model for a multi-product production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xuejuan; Wang, Wenbin; Peng, Rui

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers a production system that can produce multiple products alternately. Products go through the system in a sequence and a complete run of all products forms a production cycle. An integrated production, inventory and preventive maintenance model is constructed, which is characterized by the delay-time concept. Two different situations are studied based on whether the unqualified products and downtime caused by the failures of the system, set-up and preventive maintenance can be ignored or not. Three cases are considered for each situation, depending on the position of the preventive maintenance epochs: the first case, where preventive maintenance is carried out at the end of each production cycle; the second case, where preventive maintenance is carried out at each set-up time of the products; and the third case, where preventive maintenance is carried out at some set-up times only, since it may not always be optimal to carry out preventive maintenance at the end of the production cycle or at each set-up time. The modeling objectives are to find the optimal number of production cycles per year and the optimal position of preventive maintenance that will maximize the expected profit per unit time. Numerical examples, using real data, are presented to illustrate the model. - Highlights: • We propose an integrated economic production quantity and preventive maintenance model. • The situation that multiple products are produced on the same system alternately is studied. • Two situations are studied based on whether the downtime and the product quality can be ignored or not. • We use enumeration method and analytical method to select the optimal preventive maintenance policy, respectively. • We use the delay-time concept to model the preventive maintenance policy

  3. Global assessment of research and development for algae biofuel production and its potential role for sustainable development in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adenle, Ademola A.; Haslam, Gareth E.; Lee, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of economically deriving fuel from cultivating algae biomass is an attractive addition to the range of measures to relieve the current reliance on fossil fuels. Algae biofuels avoid some of the previous drawbacks associated with crop-based biofuels as the algae do not compete with food crops. The favourable growing conditions found in many developing countries has led to a great deal of speculation about their potentials for reducing oil imports, stimulating rural economies, and even tackling hunger and poverty. By reviewing the status of this technology we suggest that the large uncertainties make it currently unsuitable as a priority for many developing countries. Using bibliometric and patent data analysis, we indicate that many developing countries lack the human capital to develop their own algae industry or adequately prepare policies to support imported technology. Also, we discuss the potential of modern biotechnology, especially genetic modification (GM) to produce new algal strains that are easier to harvest and yield more oil. Controversy surrounding the use of GM and weak biosafety regulatory system represents a significant challenge to adoption of GM technology in developing countries. A range of policy measures are also suggested to ensure that future progress in algae biofuels can contribute to sustainable development. - Highlights: • Algae biofuels can make positive contribution to sustainable development in developing countries. • Bibliometric and patent data indicate that many lack the human capital to develop their own algae industry. • Large uncertainties make algae biofuels currently unsuitable as a priority for many developing countries

  4. Evaluation of three herbicide resistance genes for use in genetic transformations and for potential crop protection in algae production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggeman, Andrew J; Kuehler, Daniel; Weeks, Donald P

    2014-09-01

    Genes conferring resistance to the herbicides glyphosate, oxyfluorfen and norflurazon were developed and tested for use as dominant selectable markers in genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and as potential tools for the protection of commercial-scale algal production facilities against contamination by organisms sensitive to these broad-spectrum herbicides. A synthetic glyphosate acetyltransferase (GAT) gene, when fitted with a strong Chlamydomonas promoter, conferred a 2.7×-fold increase in tolerance to the EPSPS inhibitor, glyphosate, in transgenic cells compared with progenitor WT cells. A mutant Chlamydomonas protoporphyrinogen oxidase (protox, PPO) gene previously shown to produce an enzyme insensitive to PPO-inhibiting herbicides, when genetically engineered, generated transgenic cells able to tolerate up to 136× higher levels of the PPO inhibitor, oxyfluorfen, than nontransformed cells. Genetic modification of the Chlamydomonas phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene-based gene sequences found in various norflurazon-resistant organisms allowed production of transgenic cells tolerant to 40× higher levels of norflurazon than nontransgenic cells. The high efficiency of all three herbicide resistance genes in producing transgenic cells demonstrated their suitability as dominant selectable markers for genetic transformation of Chlamydomonas and, potentially, other eukaryotic algae. However, the requirement for high concentrations of glyphosate and its associated negative effects on cell growth rates preclude its consideration for use in large-scale production facilities. In contrast, only low doses of norflurazon and oxyfluorfen (~1.5 μm and ~0.1 μm, respectively) are required for inhibition of cell growth, suggesting that these two herbicides may prove effective in large-scale algal production facilities in suppressing growth of organisms sensitive to these herbicides. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and

  5. Development of Value-Added Products from Residual Algae to Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Craig [Sapphire Energy, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-02-29

    DOE Award # EE0000393 was awarded to fund research into the development of beneficial uses of surplus algal biomass and the byproducts of biofuel production. At the time of award, Sapphire’s intended fuel production pathway was a fairly conventional extraction of lipids from biomass, resulting in a defatted residue which could be processed using anaerobic digestion. Over the lifetime of the award, we conducted extensive development work and arrived at the conclusion that anaerobic digestion presented significant technical challenges for this high-nitrogen, high-ash, and low carbon material. Over the same timeframe, Sapphire’s fuel production efforts came to focus on hydrothermal liquefaction. As a result of this technology focus, the residue from fuel production became unsuitable for either anaerobic digestion (or animal feed uses). Finally, we came to appreciate the economic opportunity that the defatted biomass could represent in the animal feed space, as well as understanding the impact of seasonal production on a biofuels extraction plant, and sought to develop uses for surplus biomass produced in excess of the fuel production unit’s capacity.

  6. Application of Plackett–Burman design for the high production of some valuable metabolites in marine alga Nannochloropsis oculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa M. El-Sheekh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae have efficient nutritional influence to obtain high survival growth and quality of fish larvae and to promote the growth of brine shrimp. In this work the Plackett–Burman statistical design was applied to specify which nutrient factor(s optimize the nutritional contents [protein, carbohydrate, β-carotene, ascorbic acid and free radical scavenging activity (DPPH] in the marine alga Nannochloropsis oculata used in aquaculture to maximize marine hatchery production. N. oculata was cultured on F/2 medium (as control to reach its maximum growth. The obtained results showed that the maximum growth, chlorophyll-a,b and carotenoid contents were attained after 10 days. The contents of all studied parameters in N. oculata grown on the optimized medium after10 days increased significantly (P ⩽ 0.1 than those on control with low concentration of PO4 (2.5 g l−1 and with high concentration of NO3 (112.5 g l−1 except for cell numbers and DPPH. Significant increases in the protein, carbohydrate, ascorbic acid, β-carotene and DPPH in Artemia franciscana enriched with N. oculata cultured on the newly optimized medium were observed.

  7. Production of Bacillus subtilis-fermented red alga Porphyra dentata suspension with fibrinolytic and immune-enhancing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong-Ting Victor; Hwang, Pai-An; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Tsai, Guo-Jane

    2014-01-01

    The fermented marine alga Porphyra dentata suspension was tested for its fibrinolytic and immune-enhancing activities. An isolated Bacillus subtilis N2 strain was selected for its fibrinolytic activity on fibrin plates. After investigating the effects of biomass amounts of P. dentata powder in water, various additives including sugars, nitrogen-containing substances, lipids and minerals, and cultural conditions of temperature and agitation in flask, the highest fibrinolytic activity in the cultural filtrate was obtained by cultivating N2 strain in 3% (w/v) P. dentata powder suspension containing 1% peanut oil at 37 °C, 150 rpm for 48 h. A fermentor system was further established using the same medium with controlled pH value of 7.0 at 37 °C, 150 rpm, 2.0 vvm for 48 h for the best fibrinolytic activity. The fermented product also showed its immune-enhancing activity by increasing cell proliferation and stimulating the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in J774.1 cells.

  8. Impact of heterotrophically stressed algae for biofuel production via hydrothermal liquefaction and catalytic hydrotreating in continuous-flow reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, Karl O.; Zhu, Yunhua; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Billing, Justin M.; Hart, Todd R.; Jones, Susanne B.; Maupin, Gary; Hallen, Richard; Ahrens, Toby; Anderson, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Two algal feedstocks were prepared for direct comparison of their properties when converted to liquid hydrocarbon fuel. The first feedstock was prepared by growing an algal strain phototrophically using a bio-film based approach. The second feedstock employed the same algal strain but was stressed heterotrophically to significantly increase the lipid concentration. The algal feedstocks were converted to liquid hydrocarbon fuels. First, the whole algae (i.e. not defatted or lipid extracted) were converted to an intermediate biocrude using continuous hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) at 350°C and 3000 psig. The biocrudes were subsequently upgraded via catalytic hydrotreating (HT) at 400°C and 1500 psig to remove oxygen and nitrogen as well as increase the hydrogen-to-carbon ratio. The yield and composition of the products from HTL and HT processing of the feedstocks are compared. A techno-economic analysis of the process for converting each feedstock to liquid fuels was also conducted. The capital and operating costs associated with converting the feedstocks to finished transportation fuels are reported. A fuel minimum selling price is presented as a function of the cost of the algal feedstock delivered to the HTL conversion plant.

  9. Natural Products and Dietary Prevention of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concept of cancer prevention was first introduced in studies using the natural form of vitamin A in the prevention of epithelial cancers. Ever since, research on cancer prevention has grown and become a rather specialized field study. Cancer is a multistage process, and takes several years for...

  10. Optimal Design of Algae Biorefinery Processing Networks for the production of Protein, Ethanol and Biodiesel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheali, Peam; Vivion, Anthony; Gernaey, Krist V.

    2015-01-01

    analysis such as microalgae production cost, composition of microalgae (e.g. oil content) and biodiesel/bioethanol market prices is considered. New optimal processing paths are found with potential of producing higher amount of biodiesel. Last, the methodology is intended as decision support tool for early...

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of algae energy production in the EU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacevic, V.; Wesseler, J.H.H.

    2010-01-01

    Today’s society relies heavily on fossil fuels as a main energy source. Global energy demand increase, energy security and climate change are the main drivers of the transition towards alternative energy sources. This paper analyses algal biodiesel production for the EU road transportation and

  12. Improvement of lipid content in green algae for subsequent use in bio-fuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mojtaba Azma; Raha Abdul Rahim; Rosfarizan Mohamad; Arbakariya Ariff

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Heterotrophic cultivation technique of microalgae, Tetraselmis suecica, in shake flask under different medium composition and culture conditions were developed aimed at improvement of the cell composition and biomass production for subsequent used in bio diesel synthesis. Heterotrophic microalgae cell was developed from the adaptation of the photo trophic cell by photo periodic, manipulation of medium and culture conditions. The performance of heterotrophic cultivation of T. suecica was substantially improved in term of growth rate, final cell concentration, specific growth rate and productivity as well as cell composition especially totals lipid concentration. The cultivation time to reach maximum cell concentration was decreased from 408 hr in photoautotrophic to 142 hr in heterotrophic cultivation. The final cell concentration (24.3 g/L) was increased more than three times in heterotrophic cultivation as compared to that obtained in photoautotrophic cultivation (8.4 g/L). In addition, the maximum productivity (0.17 g/L.h -1 ) for heterotrophic cultivation was nine times higher than photoautotrophic cultivation (0.02 g/L.h -1 ). Moreover the among of protein decreased from 47.7 percentage of dry cell weight in photoautotrophic to 10.5 percent in heterotrophic cells. On the other side the total lipid (53.8) and carbohydrate (14.8) percentage of dry cell weight in heterotrophic cells increased more than two times compare with photoautotrophic cells (24.5 and 7.4 respectively) that is very important from bio fuel production viewpoint. (author)

  13. Microalgae to biofuels: life cycle impacts of methane production of anaerobically digested lipid extracted algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jason C; Hanif, Asma; Sharvelle, Sybil; Bradley, Thomas H

    2014-11-01

    This study presents experimental measurements of the biochemical methane production for whole and lipid extracted Nannochloropsis salina. Results show whole microalgae produced 430 cm(3)-CH4 g-volatile solids(-1) (g-VS) (σ=60), 3 times more methane than was produced by the LEA, 140 cm(3)-CH4 g-VS(-1) (σ=30). Results illustrate current anaerobic modeling efforts in microalgae to biofuel assessments are not reflecting the impact of lipid removal. On a systems level, the overestimation of methane production is shown to positively skew the environmental impact of the microalgae to biofuels process. Discussion focuses on a comparison results to those of previous anaerobic digestion studies and quantifies the corresponding change in greenhouse gas emissions of the microalgae to biofuels process based on results from this study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacterial laminarinase for application in ethanol production from brown algae Sargassum sp. using halotolerant yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.T. Perez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Macroalgae are known to have many industrial applications, with current research targeting the potential of macroalgal biomass as feedstock in production of biofuels. Marine algal biomass is rich in storage carbohydrates, laminarin, and cellulose, which can be converted to fermentable sugars using appropriate enzymes, for fermentation to ethanol. This study focused on ethanol production from macroalgae using only enzymatic treatment for saccharification of algal biomass. This involved the isolation and identification of cellulase and laminarinase-producing microorganisms from mangrove area in the Philippines and production of partially purified enzymes for algal biomass saccharification. Results showed that the partially purified laminarinase produced from Bacillus sp. was capable of hydrolyzing the laminarin present in the macroalage. Fermentation of the algal hydrolysate yielded only small amount of ethanol due to lack of other pre-treatment methods, however, it was observed that higher ethanol was produced in saccharification treatments using a combination of cellulase and laminarinase which implies a possible synergistic effect between the two enzymes.

  15. Review: prospects for the use of extracts and polysaccharides from marine algae to prevent and treat the diseases caused by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besednova, Natalya N; Zaporozhets, Tatyana S; Somova, Larisa M; Kuznetsova, Tatyana A

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori possesses a broad spectrum of pathogenic factors that allow it to survive and colonize the gastric mucosa, and thus, the pathogenetic targets, which have the same diversity, require search for and the development of alternative, effective, and innocuous means for the eradication of H. pylori. In recent years, fucoidans have been extensively studied due to the numerous interesting biological activities, including the anti-adhesive, anti-oxidative, antitoxic, immunomodulatory, anticoagulant, and anti-infection effects. This review summarizes the data on the effects of extracts and sulfated polysaccharides of marine algae, mainly fucoidans, on pathogenic targets in Helicobacter infection. The pathogenetic targets for therapeutic agents after H. pylori infection, such as flagellas, urease, and other enzymes, including adhesins, cytotoxin A (VacA), phospholipase, and L-8, are characterized here. The main target for the sulfated polysaccharides of seaweed is cell receptors of the gastric mucosa. This review presents the published data about the pleiotropic anti-inflammatory effects of polysaccharides on the gastric mucosa. It is known that fucoidan and other sulfated polysaccharides from algae have anti-ulcer effects, prevent the adhesion of H. pylori to, and reduce the formation of biofilm. The authors speculate that the effect of sulfated polysaccharides on the infectious process caused by H. pylori is related to their action on innate and adaptive immunity cells, and also anti-oxidant and antitoxic potential. Presented in the review are materials indicated for the study of extracts and sulfated polysaccharides from seaweed during H. pylori infection, as these compounds are characterized by multimodality actions. Based on the analysis of literary materials in recent years, the authors concluded that fucoidan can be attributed to the generation of new candidates to create drugs intended for the inclusion in the scheme of eradication therapy of

  16. Enzymatic hydrolysis and production of bioethanol from common macrophytic green alga Ulva fasciata Delile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Nitin; Gupta, Vishal; Reddy, C R K; Jha, Bhavanath

    2013-12-01

    The green seaweed Ulva which proliferates fast and occurs abundantly worldwide was used as a feedstock for production of ethanol following enzymatic hydrolysis. Among the different cellulases investigated for efficient saccharification, cellulase 22119 showed the highest conversion efficiency of biomass into reducing sugars than Viscozyme L, Cellulase 22086 and 22128. Pre-heat treatment of biomass in aqueous medium at 120°C for 1h followed by incubation in 2% (v/v) enzyme for 36 h at 45°C gave a maximum yield of sugar 206.82±14.96 mg/g. The fermentation of hydrolysate gave ethanol yield of 0.45 g/g reducing sugar accounting for 88.2% conversion efficiency. These values are substantially higher than those of reported so far for both agarophytes and carrageenophytes. It was also confirmed that enzyme can be used twice without compromising on the saccharification efficiency. The findings of this study reveal that Ulva can be a potential feedstock for bioethanol production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of algae and cyanobacteria in the production and release of odorants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jechan; Rai, Prabhat Kumar; Jeon, Young Jae; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kwon, Eilhann E

    2017-08-01

    This review covers literatures pertaining to algal and cyanobacterial odor problems that have been published over the last five decades. Proper evaluation of algal and cyanobacterial odors may help establish removal strategies for hazardous metabolites while enhancing the recyclability of water. A bloom of microalgae is a sign of an anthropogenic disturbance in aquatic systems and can lead to diverse changes in ecosystems along with increased production of odorants. In general, because algal and cyanobacterial odors vary in chemistry and intensity according to blooming pattern, it is necessary to learn more about the related factors and processes (e.g., changes due to differences in taxa). This necessitates systematic and transdisciplinary approaches that require the cooperation of chemists, biologists, engineers, and policy makers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Media on Algae Growth for Bio-Fuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriharsha KARAMPUDI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bio-fuels are commonly produced from oleaginous crops, such as rapeseed, soybean, sunflower and oil palm. However, microalgae can be an attractive alternative feedstock for future biofuels because some of the species contain very high amounts of oil, which can be used to extract and be processed into transportation fuels. Their growth rate is very high and faster, can be cultivated in non-agricultural land and waste water. In addition, production of microalgae is not seasonal and they can be harvested routinely as needed. Two strains of Scenedesmus dimorphus (fresh water microalgae were tested for their growth in proteose medium and Modified Bold 3N medium with different levels of nitrogen and glycerol and growth rates were measured using cell count, fresh and dry weight. The growth of S. dimorphus was better in proteose medium with half of the nitrogen source recommended by the UTEX than other media tested. ANOVA table showed significant differences between days, between media, and day � media interaction. When compared to dry weight of S. dimorphus in all media, the growth was better in proteose medium with 10 mL/L glycerol.

  19. Effect of Media on Algae Growth for Bio-Fuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriharsha KARAMPUDI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bio-fuels are commonly produced from oleaginous crops, such as rapeseed, soybean, sunflower and oil palm. However, microalgae can be an attractive alternative feedstock for future biofuels because some of the species contain very high amounts of oil, which can be used to extract and be processed into transportation fuels. Their growth rate is very high and faster, can be cultivated in non-agricultural land and waste water. In addition, production of microalgae is not seasonal and they can be harvested routinely as needed. Two strains of Scenedesmus dimorphus (fresh water microalgae were tested for their growth in proteose medium and Modified Bold 3N medium with different levels of nitrogen and glycerol and growth rates were measured using cell count, fresh and dry weight. The growth of S. dimorphus was better in proteose medium with half of the nitrogen source recommended by the UTEX than other media tested. ANOVA table showed significant differences between days, between media, and day media interaction. When compared to dry weight of S. dimorphus in all media, the growth was better in proteose medium with 10 mL/L glycerol.

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis of algae energy production in the EU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacevic, Vujadin; Wesseler, Justus

    2010-01-01

    Today's society relies heavily on fossil fuels as a main energy source. Global energy demand increase, energy security and climate change are the main drivers of the transition towards alternative energy sources. This paper analyses algal biodiesel production for the EU road transportation and compares it to the fossil fuels and 1st generation biofuels. A cost-effectiveness analysis was used to aggregate private and external costs and derive the social cost of each fuel. The following externalities were internalized: emissions (GHG and non-GHG), food prices impact, pesticides/fertilizers use and security of supply. Currently the social cost of producing algal biodiesel at 52.3 EUR GJ -1 is higher than rapeseed biodiesel (36.0 EUR GJ -1 ) and fossil fuels (15.8 EUR GJ -1 ). Biotechnology development, high crude oil prices and high carbon value are the key features of the scenario where algal biodiesel outcompetes all other fuels. A substantial investment into the biotechnology sector and comprehensive environmental research and policy are required to make that scenario a reality. (author)

  1. Stoichiometrically controlled production of bimetallic Gold-Silver alloy colloids using micro-alga cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahoumane, Si Amar; Wijesekera, Kushlani; Filipe, Carlos D M; Brennan, John D

    2014-02-15

    This paper reports the production of well-defined, highly stable Ag-Au alloy nanoparticles (NPs) using living cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, with the composition of the bimetallic alloys being solely determined by the stoichiometric ratio in which the metal salts were added to the cultures. The NPs exhibited a single, well-defined surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band confirming that they were made of a homogeneous population of bimetallic alloys. Particle creation by the cells occurred in three stages: (1) internalization of the noble metals by the cells and their reduction resulting in the formation of the NPs; (2) entrapment of the NPs in the extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding the cells, where they are colloidally stabilized; and (3) release of the NPs from the ECM to the culture medium. We also investigated the effect of the addition of the metals salts on cell viability and the impact on characteristics of the NPs formed. When silver was added to the cultures, cell viability was decreased and this resulted in a ~30nm red shift on the SPR band due to changes in the surrounding environment into which the NPs were released. The same observations (in SPR and cell viability) was made when gold was added to a final concentration of 2 × 10(-4)M, but not when the concentration was equal to 10(-4)M, where cell viability was high and the red shift was negligible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA: A System for Biofuel Production, Wastewater Treatment, and CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan; Embaye, Tsegereda; Buckwalter, Patrick; Richardson, Tra-My; Kagawa, Hiromi; Reinsch, Sigrid; Martis, Mary

    2010-01-01

    We are developing Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA). OMEGAs are closed photo-bioreactors constructed of flexible, inexpensive, and durable plastic with small sections of semi-permeable membranes for gas exchange and forward osmosis (FO). Each OMEGA modules is filled with municipal wastewater and provided with CO2 from coastal CO2 sources. The OMEGA modules float just below the surface, and the surrounding seawater provides structural support, temperature control, and mixing for the freshwater algae cultures inside. The salinit7 gradient from inside to outside drives forward osmosis through the patches of FO membranes. This concentrates nutrients in the wastewater, which enhances algal growth, and slowly dewaters the algae, which facilitates harvesting. Thy concentrated algal biomass is harvested for producing biofuels and fertilizer. OMEGA system cleans the wastewater released into the surrounding coastal waters and functions as a carbon sequestration system.

  3. Addressing unknown constants and metabolic network behaviors through petascale computing: understanding H2 production in green algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Christopher; Alber, David; Graf, Peter; Kim, Kwiseon; Seibert, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Genomics Revolution has resulted in a massive and growing quantity of whole-genome DNA sequences, which encode the metabolic catalysts necessary for life. However, gene annotations can rarely be complete, and measurement of the kinetic constants associated with the encoded enzymes can not possibly keep pace, necessitating the use of careful modeling to explore plausible network behaviors. Key challenges are (1) quantitatively formulating kinetic laws governing each transformation in a fixed model network; (2) characterizing the stable solution (if any) of the associated ordinary differential equations (ODEs); (3) fitting the latter to metabolomics data as it becomes available; and (4) optimizing a model output against the possible space of kinetic parameters, with respect to properties such as robustness of network response, or maximum consumption/production. This SciDAC-2 project addresses this large-scale uncertainty in the genome-scale metabolic network of the water-splitting, H 2 -producing green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Each metabolic transformation is formulated as an irreversible steady-state process, such that the vast literature on known enzyme mechanisms may be incorporated directly. To start, glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and basic fermentation pathways have been encoded in Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) with careful annotation and consistency with the KEGG database, yielding a model with 3 compartments, 95 species, 38 reactions, and 109 kinetic constants. To study and optimize such models with a view toward larger models, we have developed a system which takes as input an SBML model, and automatically produces C code that when compiled and executed optimizes the model's kinetic parameters according to test criteria. We describe the system and present numerical results. Further development, including overlaying of a parallel multistart algorithm, will allow optimization of thousands of parameters on high-performance systems

  4. Effect of a Klamath algae product ("AFA-B12") on blood levels of vitamin B12 and homocysteine in vegan subjects: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Luciana; Scoglio, Stefano; Benedetti, Serena; Bonetto, Chiara; Pagliarani, Silvia; Benedetti, Yanina; Rocchi, Marco; Canestrari, Franco

    2009-03-01

    Vitamin B12 is a critical nutrient that is often inadequate in a plant-based (vegan) diet, thus the inclusion of a reliable vitamin B12 source in a vegan diet is recommended as essential. Unfortunately, many natural sources of vitamin B12 have been proven to contain biologically inactive vitamin B12 analogues, inadequate for human supplementation. The aim of this non-randomized open trial was to determine whether supplementation with a natural Klamath algae-based product ("AFA-B12", Aphanizomenon flos-aquae algae plus a proprietary mix of enzymes) could favorably affect the vitamin B12 status of a group of 15 vegan subjects. By assessing blood concentration of vitamin B12, folate, and more importantly homocysteine (Hcy, a reliable marker in vegans of their B12 absorption), the vitamin B12 status of the participants at the end of the 3-month intervention period, while receiving the Klamath-algae supplement (T2), was compared with their vitamin B12 status at the end of the 3-month control period (T1), when they were not receiving any supplement, having stopped taking their usual vitamin B12 supplement at the beginning of the study (T0). Compared to the control period, in the intervention period participants improved their vitamin B12 status, significantly reducing Hcy blood concentration (p=0.003). In conclusion, the Klamath algae product AFA-B12 appears to be, in a preliminary study, an adequate and reliable source of vitamin B12 in humans.

  5. Fuel From Algae: Scaling and Commercialization of Algae Harvesting Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by CEO Ross Youngs, AVS has patented a cost-effective dewatering technology that separates micro-solids (algae) from water. Separating micro-solids from water traditionally requires a centrifuge, which uses significant energy to spin the water mass and force materials of different densities to separate from one another. In a comparative analysis, dewatering 1 ton of algae in a centrifuge costs around $3,400. AVS’s Solid-Liquid Separation (SLS) system is less energy-intensive and less expensive, costing $1.92 to process 1 ton of algae. The SLS technology uses capillary dewatering with filter media to gently facilitate water separation, leaving behind dewatered algae which can then be used as a source for biofuels and bio-products. The biomimicry of the SLS technology emulates the way plants absorb and spread water to their capillaries.

  6. Bioagents and Commercial Algae Products as Integrated Biocide Treatments for Controlling Root Rot Diseases of Some Vegetables under Protected Cultivation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtar M. Abdel-Kader

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrated commercial blue-green algae extracts and bioagents treatments against vegetables root rot incidence when used as soil drench under greenhouse and plastic house conditions were evaluated. All applied treatments reduced significantly root rot incidence at both pre- and postemergence growth stages of cucumber, cantaloupe, tomato, and pepper plants compared with untreated check control. In pot experiment, the obtained results showed that treatments of Trichoderma harzianum or Bacillus subtilis either alone or combined with commercial algae extracts were significantly superior for reducing root rot disease for two tested vegetable plants compared with the other tested treatments as well as control. It is also observed that rising concentrations of either algae products, Oligo-X or Weed-Max, were reflected in more disease reduction. Promising treatments for controlling root rot disease incidence were applied under plastic houses conditions. As for field trails carried out under plastic houses conditions at different locations, the obtained results revealed that the applied combined treatments significantly reduced root rot incidence compared with fungicide and check control treatments. At all locations it was observed that Weed-Max (2 g/L + Bacillus subtilis significantly reduced disease incidence of grown vegetables compared with Oligo-X (2 mL/L + Trichoderma harzianum treatments. An obvious yield increase in all treatments was significantly higher than in the control. Also, the harvested yield in applied combined treatments at all locations was significantly higher than that in the fungicide and control treatments.

  7. Treatment with algae extracts promotes flocculation, and enhances growth and neutral lipid content in Nannochloropsis oculata--a candidate for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rebecca L; Rand, Jonathan D; Caldwell, Gary S

    2012-12-01

    Marine microalgae represent a potentially valuable feedstock for biofuel production; however, large-scale production is not yet economically viable. Optimisation of productivity and lipid yields is required and the cost of biomass harvesting and dewatering must be significantly reduced. Microalgae produce a wide variety of biologically active metabolites, many of which are involved in inter- and intra-specific interactions (the so-called infochemicals). The majority of infochemicals remain unidentified or uncharacterised. Here, we apply known and candidate (undefined extracts) infochemicals as a potential means to manipulate the growth and lipid content of Nannochloropsis oculata-a prospective species for biofuel production. Five known infochemicals (β-cyclocitral, trans,trans-2,4-decadienal, hydrogen peroxide, norharman and tryptamine) and crude extracts prepared from Skeletonema marinoi and Dunaliella salina cultures at different growth stages were assayed for impacts on N. oculata over 24 h. The neutral lipid content of N. oculata increased significantly with exposure to three infochemicals (β-cyclocitral, decadienal and norharman); however the effective concentrations affected a significant decrease in growth. Exposure to particular crude extracts significantly increased both growth and neutral lipid levels. In addition, water-soluble extracts of senescent S. marinoi cultures induced a degree of flocculation in the N. oculata. These preliminary results indicate that artificial manipulation of N. oculata cultures by application of algae infochemicals could provide a valuable tool towards achieving economically viable large-scale algae biofuel production.

  8. Water-splitting-based, sustainable and efficient H2 production in green algae as achieved by substrate limitation of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Valéria; Podmaniczki, Anna; Vidal-Meireles, André; Tengölics, Roland; Kovács, László; Rákhely, Gábor; Scoma, Alberto; Tóth, Szilvia Z

    2018-01-01

    Photobiological H 2 production has the potential of becoming a carbon-free renewable energy source, because upon the combustion of H 2 , only water is produced. The [Fe-Fe]-type hydrogenases of green algae are highly active, although extremely O 2 -sensitive. Sulphur deprivation is a common way to induce H 2 production, which, however, relies substantially on organic substrates and imposes a severe stress effect resulting in the degradation of the photosynthetic apparatus. We report on the establishment of an alternative H 2 production method by green algae that is based on a short anaerobic induction, keeping the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle inactive by substrate limitation and preserving hydrogenase activity by applying a simple catalyst to remove the evolved O 2 . Cultures remain photosynthetically active for several days, with the electrons feeding the hydrogenases mostly derived from water. The amount of H 2 produced is higher as compared to the sulphur-deprivation procedure and the process is photoautotrophic. Our protocol demonstrates that it is possible to sustainably use algal cells as whole-cell catalysts for H 2 production, which enables industrial application of algal biohydrogen production.

  9. Inhibitory effects of brown algae extracts on histamine production in mackerel muscle via inhibition of growth and histidine decarboxylase activity of Morganella morganii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Koth Bong Woo Ri; Cho, Ji Young; Ahn, Dong Hyun

    2014-04-01

    This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of brown algae extracts on histamine production in mackerel muscle. First, antimicrobial activities of brown algae extracts against Morganella morganii were investigated using a disk diffusion method. An ethanol extract of Ecklonia cava (ECEE) exhibited strong antimicrobial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ECEE was 2 mg/ml. Furthermore, the brown algae extracts were examined for their ability to inhibit crude histidine decarboxylase (HDC) of M. morganii. The ethanol extract of Eisenia bicyclis (EBEE) and ECEE exhibited significant inhibitory activities (19.82% and 33.79%, respectively) at a concentration of 1 mg/ml. To obtain the phlorotannin dieckol, ECEE and EBEE were subjected to liquid-liquid extraction, silica gel column chromatography, and HPLC. Dieckol exhibited substantial inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.61 mg/ml, and exhibited competitive inhibition. These extracts were also tested on mackerel muscle. The viable cell counts and histamine production in mackerel muscle inoculated with M. morganii treated with ≥2.5 MIC of ECEE (weight basis) were highly inhibited compared with the untreated sample. Furthermore, treatment of crude HDC-inoculated mackerel muscle with 0.5% ECEE and 0.5% EBEE (weight basis), which exhibited excellent inhibitory activities against crude HDC, reduced the overall histamine production by 46.29% and 56.89%, respectively, compared with the untreated sample. Thus, these inhibitory effects of ECEE and EBEE should be helpful in enhancing the safety of mackerel by suppressing histamine production in this fish species.

  10. Inhibitory effects of soluble algae products (SAP) released by Scenedesmus sp. LX1 on its growth and lipid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Yu, Yin; Wu, Yin-Hu; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2013-10-01

    Soluble algal products (SAP) accumulated in culture medium via water reuse may affect the growth of microalga during the cultivation. Scenedesmus sp. LX1, a freshwater microalga, was used in this study to investigate the effect of SAP on growth and lipid production of microalga. Under the SAP concentrations of 6.4-25.8 mg L(-1), maximum algal density (K) and maximum growth rate (Rmax) of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 were decreased by 50-80% and 35-70% compared with the control group, respectively. The effect of SAP on lipid accumulation of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 was non-significant. According to hydrophilic-hydrophobic and acid-base properties, SAP was fractionized into six fractions. All of the fractions could inhibit the growth of Scenedesmus sp. LX1. Organic bases (HIB, HOB) and hydrophilic acids (HIA) showed the strongest inhibition. HIA could also decrease the lipid content of Scenedesmus sp. LX1 by 59.2%. As the inhibitory effect, SAP should be seriously treated before water reuse. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Contributions of algae to GPP and DOC production in an Alaskan fen: effects of historical water table manipulations on ecosystem responses to a natural flood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Kevin H; Turetsky, Merritt R; Rober, Allison R; Giroldo, Danilo; Kane, Evan S; Stevenson, R Jan

    2012-07-01

    The role of algae in the metabolism of northern peatlands is largely unknown, as is how algae will respond to the rapid climate change being experienced in this region. In this study, we examined patterns in algal productivity, nutrients, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) during an uncharacteristically wet summer in an Alaskan rich fen. Our sampling was conducted in three large-scale experimental plots where water table position had been manipulated (including both drying and wetting plots and a control) for the previous 4 years. This study allowed us to explore how much ecosystem memory of the antecedent water table manipulations governed algal responses to natural flooding. Despite no differences in water table position between the manipulated plots at the time of sampling, algal primary productivity was consistently higher in the lowered water table plot compared to the control or raised water table plots. In all plots, algal productivity peaked immediately following seasonal maxima in nutrient concentrations. We found a positive relationship between algal productivity and water-column DOC concentrations (r (2) = 0.85, P flooding.

  12. Modulation of Neurogenesis through the Promotion of Energy Production Activity Is behind the Antidepressant-Like Effect of Colonial Green Alga,Botryococcus braunii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kazunori; Othman, Mahmoud B; Demura, Mikihide; Watanabe, Makoto; Isoda, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Algae have been recognized as important resources providing functional components due to their capacity to exert beneficial effects on health. Therefore, there is increasing interest in investigating the biological activity of algae. In this study, we evaluated the antidepressant-like effect of the administration of 100 mg/kg/day of the ethanol extract of colonial green alga Botryococcus braunii (EEB) for 14 consecutive days in the forced swimming test (FST)-induced depression in imprinting control region (ICR) mice. Imipramine, a commercial antidepressant drug, was used as a positive control. In addition, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of EEB by measuring ATP production and by assessing any change in gene expression at the end of the treatment using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microarray assays. We showed that the immobility time in the water-administered control (FST stress) group gradually increased from day 1 to day 14. However, treatment with EEB caused a significant decrease of immobility time in the FST compared with that in the FST stress group. Microarray and real-time PCR results revealed that EEB treatment induced variation in the expression of several genes associated with neurogenesis, energy metabolism, and dopamine synthesis. Interestingly, we revealed that only EEB treatment enhanced the promotion of energy production, while treatment with imipramine was ineffective. Our study provides the first evidence that B. braunii enhances energy production, which may contribute to the modulation of neurogenesis and to the enhancement of dopaminergic function, in turn potentially underlying the antistress- and antidepressant-like effects that we observed.

  13. New methodologies for integrating algae with CO2 capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez Mireles, I.; Stel, R.W. van der; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2014-01-01

    It is generally recognized, that algae could be an interesting option for reducing CO2 emissions. Based on light and CO2, algae can be used for the production various economically interesting products. Current algae cultivation techniques, however, still present a number of limitations. Efficient

  14. Preventing Cooperative Knowledge Production From Falling Apart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christer Theandersson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to analyze why work life representatives are engaging themselves in joint knowledge production with academia. We intend to deepen our understanding of how the practitioners’ trust in academia is constituted, that is what trust-building practices conditions their trust. The article is based on interviews with practitioners who are cooperating with a Swedish research center. The result indicates that practitioners’ trust in cooperation is based on a combination of different trust-building practices, among which the academy as a dependable supplier of objective and authoritative knowledge production is still important. At the same time, practitioners’ trust is also dependent on the existence of shared and integrated knowledge production relevant to their professions. The main conclusion of the study is that academia has to manage a set of different conditions demanding that different trust-building practices be combined and managed for trust to be maintained.

  15. Advances in genetic engineering of marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Song; Lin, Hanzhi; Jiang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Algae are a component of bait sources for animal aquaculture, and they produce abundant valuable compounds for the chemical industry and human health. With today's fast growing demand for algae biofuels and the profitable market for cosmetics and pharmaceuticals made from algal natural products, the genetic engineering of marine algae has been attracting increasing attention as a crucial systemic technology to address the challenge of the biomass feedstock supply for sustainable industrial applications and to modify the metabolic pathway for the more efficient production of high-value products. Nevertheless, to date, only a few marine algae species can be genetically manipulated. In this article, an updated account of the research progress in marine algal genomics is presented along with methods for transformation. In addition, vector construction and gene selection strategies are reviewed. Meanwhile, a review on the progress of bioreactor technologies for marine algae culture is also revisited. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cars will be fed on algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltier, G.

    2012-01-01

    The development of the first and second generations of bio-fuels has led to a rise in food prices and the carbon balance sheet is less good than expected. Great hopes have been put on unicellular algae for they can synthesize oils, sugar and even hydrogen and the competition with food production is far less harsh than with actual bio-fuels. Moreover, when you grow micro-algae, the loss of water through evaporation is less important than in the case of intensive farm cultures. In 2009 10.000 tonnes of micro-algae were produced worldwide, they were mainly used for the production of fish food and of complements for humane food (fat acids and antioxidants). Different research programs concern unicellular algae: they aim at modifying micro-algae genetically in order to give them a higher productivity or to make them produce an oil more adapted for motor fuel or more easily recoverable. (A.C.)

  17. Integrated system for capturing CO2 as feedstock for algae production: 13th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, GHGT 2016, 14-18 November 2016, Lausanne, Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Könst, P.M.; Hernandez Mireles, I.; Stel, R.W. van der; Os, P.M van; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2017-01-01

    In view of its promise as sustainable process for CO2 capture and its potential in the production of feed, food and natural high value products such as omega-3 fatty acids and anti-oxidants such as astaxanthin, large scale algae cultivation is gaining commercial interest. Currently, most systems are

  18. Inventory of North-West European algae initiatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, J.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012 an inventory of North-West European (NWE) algae initiatives was carried out to get an impression of the market and research activities on algae production and refinery, especially for bioenergy purposes. A questionnaire was developed that would provide the EnAlgae project with information on

  19. Marine Polysaccharides from Algae with Potential Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus Raposo, Maria Filomena; de Morais, Alcina Maria Bernardo; de Morais, Rui Manuel Santos Costa

    2015-01-01

    There is a current tendency towards bioactive natural products with applications in various industries, such as pharmaceutical, biomedical, cosmetics and food. This has put some emphasis in research on marine organisms, including macroalgae and microalgae, among others. Polysaccharides with marine origin constitute one type of these biochemical compounds that have already proved to have several important properties, such as anticoagulant and/or antithrombotic, immunomodulatory ability, antitumor and cancer preventive, antilipidaemic and hypoglycaemic, antibiotics and anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, making them promising bioactive products and biomaterials with a wide range of applications. Their properties are mainly due to their structure and physicochemical characteristics, which depend on the organism they are produced by. In the biomedical field, the polysaccharides from algae can be used in controlled drug delivery, wound management, and regenerative medicine. This review will focus on the biomedical applications of marine polysaccharides from algae. PMID:25988519

  20. Marine polysaccharides from algae with potential biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus Raposo, Maria Filomena; de Morais, Alcina Maria Bernardo; de Morais, Rui Manuel Santos Costa

    2015-05-15

    There is a current tendency towards bioactive natural products with applications in various industries, such as pharmaceutical, biomedical, cosmetics and food. This has put some emphasis in research on marine organisms, including macroalgae and microalgae, among others. Polysaccharides with marine origin constitute one type of these biochemical compounds that have already proved to have several important properties, such as anticoagulant and/or antithrombotic, immunomodulatory ability, antitumor and cancer preventive, antilipidaemic and hypoglycaemic, antibiotics and anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, making them promising bioactive products and biomaterials with a wide range of applications. Their properties are mainly due to their structure and physicochemical characteristics, which depend on the organism they are produced by. In the biomedical field, the polysaccharides from algae can be used in controlled drug delivery, wound management, and regenerative medicine. This review will focus on the biomedical applications of marine polysaccharides from algae.

  1. Marine Polysaccharides from Algae with Potential Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Filomena de Jesus Raposo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a current tendency towards bioactive natural products with applications in various industries, such as pharmaceutical, biomedical, cosmetics and food. This has put some emphasis in research on marine organisms, including macroalgae and microalgae, among others. Polysaccharides with marine origin constitute one type of these biochemical compounds that have already proved to have several important properties, such as anticoagulant and/or antithrombotic, immunomodulatory ability, antitumor and cancer preventive, antilipidaemic and hypoglycaemic, antibiotics and anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, making them promising bioactive products and biomaterials with a wide range of applications. Their properties are mainly due to their structure and physicochemical characteristics, which depend on the organism they are produced by. In the biomedical field, the polysaccharides from algae can be used in controlled drug delivery, wound management, and regenerative medicine. This review will focus on the biomedical applications of marine polysaccharides from algae.

  2. Joint optimization of production scheduling and machine group preventive maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Lei; Song, Sanling; Chen, Xiaohui; Coit, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Joint optimization models were developed combining group preventive maintenance of a series system and production scheduling. In this paper, we propose a joint optimization model to minimize the total cost including production cost, preventive maintenance cost, minimal repair cost for unexpected failures and tardiness cost. The total cost depends on both the production process and the machine maintenance plan associated with reliability. For the problems addressed in this research, any machine unavailability leads to system downtime. Therefore, it is important to optimize the preventive maintenance of machines because their performance impacts the collective production processing associated with all machines. Too lengthy preventive maintenance intervals may be associated with low scheduled machine maintenance cost, but may incur expensive costs for unplanned failure due to low machine reliability. Alternatively, too frequent preventive maintenance activities may achieve the desired high reliability machines, but unacceptably high scheduled maintenance cost. Additionally, product scheduling plans affect tardiness and maintenance cost. Two results are obtained when solving the problem; the optimal group preventive maintenance interval for machines, and the assignment of each job, including the corresponding start time and completion time. To solve this non-deterministic polynomial-time problem, random keys genetic algorithms are used, and a numerical example is solved to illustrate the proposed model. - Highlights: • Group preventive maintenance (PM) planning and production scheduling are jointed. • Maintenance interval and assignment of jobs are decided by minimizing total cost. • Relationships among system age, PM, job processing time are quantified. • Random keys genetic algorithms (GA) are used to solve the NP-hard problem. • Random keys GA and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) are compared.

  3. A Community Prevention Model to Prevent Children from Inhaling and Ingesting Harmful Legal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. W.; Grube, J. W.; Ogilvie, K. A.; Collins, D.; Courser, M.; Dirks, L. G.; Ogilvie, D.; Driscoll, D.

    2012-01-01

    Children's misuse of harmful legal products (HLPs), including inhaling or ingesting everyday household products, prescription drugs, and over-the-counter drugs, constitutes a serious health problem for American society. This article presents a community prevention model (CPM) focusing on this problem among pre and early adolescents. The model,…

  4. Magnetic separation of algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Pulak; Twary, Scott N.

    2016-04-26

    Described herein are methods and systems for harvesting, collecting, separating and/or dewatering algae using iron based salts combined with a magnetic field gradient to separate algae from an aqueous solution.

  5. Integrated preventive maintenance and production decisions for imperfect processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourelfath, Mustapha; Nahas, Nabil; Ben-Daya, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This paper integrates production, maintenance, and quality for an imperfect process in a multi-period multi-product capacitated lot-sizing context. The production system is modeled as an imperfect machine, whose the status is considered to be either in-control or out-of-control. When the machine is out of control, it produces a fraction of nonconforming items. During each period, this machine is inspected and imperfect preventive maintenance activities are simultaneously performed to reduce its age, proportional to the preventive maintenance level. The objective is to minimize the total cost, while satisfying the demand for all products. Our optimization model allows for a joint selection of the optimal values of production plan, and the maintenance policy, while taking into account quality related costs. A solution algorithm is developed and illustrative numerical examples are presented. It is found that the increase in PM level leads to reductions in quality control costs. Furthermore, if the cost of performing PM is high to the point where it is not compensated for by reductions in the quality related costs, then performing PM is not justifiable. Finally, using non-periodic preventive maintenance with the possibility of different preventive maintenance levels may result in an improvement of the total cost. - Highlights: • We integrate production, maintenance, and quality. • We evaluate all the expected costs. • Our model allows for a joint selection of the optimal values. • A solution algorithm is developed. • Increasing PM level will decrease quality control costs.

  6. Hydrate prevention in petroleum production sub sea system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Paula L.F.; Rocha, Humberto A.R. [Universidade Estacio de Sa (UNESA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rodrigues, Antonio P. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    In spite of the merits of the several hydrate prevention techniques used nowadays, such as: chemical product injection for inhibition and use of thick thermal insulate lines; hydrates per times happen and they are responsible for considerable production losses. Depressurization techniques can be used so much for prevention as in the remediation. Some hydrate removal techniques need a rig or vessel, resources not readily available and with high cost, reason that limits such techniques just for remediation and not for prevention. In the present work it is proposed and described an innovative depressurization system, remote and resident, for hydrate prevention and removal, applicable as for individual sub sea wells as for grouped wells by manifold. Based on low cost jet pumps, without movable parts and with a high reliability, this technique allows hydrate prevention or remediation in a fast and remote way, operated from the production unit. The power fluid line and fluid return line can be integrated in the same umbilical or annulus line structure, without significant increase in the construction costs and installation. It is not necessary to wait for expensive resource mobilization, sometimes not available quickly, such as: vessels or rigs. It still reduces the chemical product consumption and permits to depressurized stopped lines. Other additional advantage, depressurization procedure can be used in the well starting, removing fluid until riser emptying. (author)

  7. Mutualism between the territorial intertidal limpet Patella longicosta and the crustose alga Ralfsia verrucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Christopher D; Froneman, Pierre W

    1993-10-01

    Mutualistic relations between plants and animals are well documented on land but have received less attention in marine systems. This study examined the relationship between the territorial intertidal limpet Patella longicosta and the crustose brown alga Ralfsia verrucosa. Adult Patella are found exclusively in association with Ralfsia, on which they feed, while Ralfsia occurs primarily, but not exclusively, in Patella territories. Ralfsia benefits directly from both the presence and the territorial behaviour of Patella. Algal productivity was assessed by measuring oxygen evolution and utilization in situ and deriving photosynthesis/irradiance curves. Productivity was increased by about 30% by the presence of Patella in both summer (P max of grazed algae 0.0098; ungrazed algae 0.0063 mg C · cm -2 · h -1 ) and winter (P max grazed algae 0.0081; ungrazed algae 0.0053 mg -2 · C · h -1 ). Algal growth rates were not significantly increased by the application of limpet mucus in the laboratory. We did not examine nutrient regeneration by the limpet, but the increase in photosynthetic rate may depend on the limpet's grazing pattern which creates secondary sites for growth. Ralfsia also benefited from the territorial behaviour of Patella. The effects of different grazing regimes were investigated in different seasons by removing territorial limpets and either excluding all limpets using copper-based antifouling paint, or allowing access to non-territorial limpets (mostly P. oculus) using partial paint barriers. Exclusion of all limpets resulted in rapid overgrowth of Ralfsia plants by the foliose green alga Ulva sp.. Where non-territorial limpets had access to the plants overgrowth was reduced but Ralfsia plants were entirely removed by destructive grazing. Non-territorial grazers removed 90% of Ralfsia plants within 4 weeks in summer and 60% in winter. In control treatments P. longicosta prevented overgrowth by Ulva and actively excluded vagrant grazers, preventing

  8. Productivity savings from colorectal cancer prevention and control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Cathy J; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Yabroff, K Robin; Dahman, Bassam; Mariotto, Angela; Feuer, Eric J; Brown, Martin L

    2011-08-01

    Lost productivity represents a considerable portion of the total economic burden of colorectal cancer (CRC), but cost-effectiveness studies of CRC prevention and control have not included these costs and therefore underestimate potential savings from CRC prevention and control. To use microsimulation modeling study to estimate and project productivity costs of CRC and to model the savings from four approaches to reducing CRC incidence and mortality: risk factor reduction, improved screening, improved treatment, and a simultaneous approach where all three strategies are implemented. A model was developed to project productivity losses from CRC using the U.S. population with CRC incidence and mortality projected through the year 2020. Outcome measures were CRC mortality, morbidity, and productivity savings. With 2005 levels in risk factors, screening, and treatment, 48,748 CRC deaths occurred in 2010, amounting to $21 billion of lost productivity. Using prevention and treatment strategies simultaneously, 3586 deaths could have been avoided in 2010, leading to a savings of $1.4 billion. Cumulatively, by 2020, simultaneous strategies that reduce risk factors and increase screening and treatment could result in 101,353 deaths avoided and $33.9 billion in savings in reduced productivity loss. Improved screening rates alone led to nearly $14.7 billion in savings between 2005 and 2020, followed by risk factor reduction ($12.4 billion) and improved treatment ($8.4 billion). The savings in productivity loss from strategies to reduce CRC incidence and mortality are substantial, providing evidence that CRC prevention and control strategies are likely to be cost-saving. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica Louise.

    2013-01-01

    This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

  10. Potential biomedical applications of marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Min David; Li, Xiao-Chun; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2017-11-01

    Functional components extracted from algal biomass are widely used as dietary and health supplements with a variety of applications in food science and technology. In contrast, the applications of algae in dermal-related products have received much less attention, despite that algae also possess high potential for the uses in anti-infection, anti-aging, skin-whitening, and skin tumor treatments. This review, therefore, focuses on integrating studies on algae pertinent to human skin care, health and therapy. The active compounds in algae related to human skin treatments are mentioned and the possible mechanisms involved are described. The main purpose of this review is to identify serviceable algae functions in skin treatments to facilitate practical applications in this high-potential area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modulation of platelet aggregation-related eicosanoid production by dietary F-fucoidan from brown alga Laminaria japonica in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Rendong; Azuma, Yosuke; Ojima, Takao; Hashimoto, Takashi; Mizuno, Masashi; Nishitani, Yosuke; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi; Kanazawa, Kazuki

    2013-09-14

    Laminaria japonica is traditionally eaten in Japan as a beneficial food for thrombosis. The alga contains two specific ingredients, a xanthophyll fucoxanthin (FX) and a polysaccharide, F-fucoidan (FD). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether FX or FD exhibited anti-thrombotic effects. For this purpose, three types of capsules, containing 1 mg FX, 400 mg fucoidan, and both, were prepared from the alga and administered to volunteers for 5 weeks. The dose of FD or FD+FX significantly shortened lysis time (LT) of the thrombus measured by a global thrombosis test in the blood, but FX did not. Examining the mechanism, dietary FD increased H2O2 and the secretion of prostacyclin (PGI2), a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation, in the blood, although FD was under the detection limit in the blood, determining with its monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, in mouse experiments, dietary FD was totally excreted into the faeces and was not incorporated into the blood. We then employed a co-culture system of a Caco-2 cell monolayer with fresh human blood. The addition of FD to Caco-2 cells stimulated the expression of NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) and dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) mRNA and secreted H2O2 onto the blood side accompanied by a significant increase in serum PGI2 production. These effects were invalidated by the combined addition of FD with its monoclonal antibody. The results suggested that dietary FD stimulated the expression of H2O2-producing enzymes in intestinal epithelial cells and released H2O2 into the blood, which played a signalling role to increase PGI2 production and then shortened LT for thrombi.

  12. Pathways of Lipid Metabolism in Marine Algae, Co-Expression Network, Bottlenecks and Candidate Genes for Enhanced Production of EPA and DHA in Species of Chromista

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Mühlroth

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs for human health has received more focus the last decades, and the global consumption of n-3 LC-PUFA has increased. Seafood, the natural n-3 LC-PUFA source, is harvested beyond a sustainable capacity, and it is therefore imperative to develop alternative n-3 LC-PUFA sources for both eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3. Genera of algae such as Nannochloropsis, Schizochytrium, Isochrysis and Phaedactylum within the kingdom Chromista have received attention due to their ability to produce n-3 LC-PUFAs. Knowledge of LC-PUFA synthesis and its regulation in algae at the molecular level is fragmentary and represents a bottleneck for attempts to enhance the n-3 LC-PUFA levels for industrial production. In the present review, Phaeodactylum tricornutum has been used to exemplify the synthesis and compartmentalization of n-3 LC-PUFAs. Based on recent transcriptome data a co-expression network of 106 genes involved in lipid metabolism has been created. Together with recent molecular biological and metabolic studies, a model pathway for n-3 LC-PUFA synthesis in P. tricornutum has been proposed, and is compared to industrialized species of Chromista. Limitations of the n-3 LC-PUFA synthesis by enzymes such as thioesterases, elongases, acyl-CoA synthetases and acyltransferases are discussed and metabolic bottlenecks are hypothesized such as the supply of the acetyl-CoA and NADPH. A future industrialization will depend on optimization of chemical compositions and increased biomass production, which can be achieved by exploitation of the physiological potential, by selective breeding and by genetic engineering.

  13. Effect of chromium oxide (III) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species and photosystem II activity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Cristina Henning da; Perreault, François; Oukarroum, Abdallah; Melegari, Sílvia Pedroso; Popovic, Radovan; Matias, William Gerson

    2016-01-01

    With the growth of nanotechnology and widespread use of nanomaterials, there is an increasing risk of environmental contamination by nanomaterials. However, the potential implications of such environmental contamination are hard to evaluate since the toxicity of nanomaterials if often not well characterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of a chromium-based nanoparticle, Cr 2 O 3 -NP, used in a wide diversity of industrial processes and commercial products, on the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The deleterious impacts of Cr 2 O 3 -NP were characterized using cell density measurements, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), esterase enzymes activity, and photosystem II electron transport as indicators of toxicity. Cr 2 O 3 -NP exposure inhibited culture growth and significantly lowered cellular Chlorophyll a content. From cell density measurements, EC50 values of 2.05 ± 0.20 and 1.35 ± 0.06 g L −1 Cr 2 O 3 -NP were obtained after 24 and 72 h of exposure, respectively. In addition, ROS levels were increased to 160.24 ± 2.47% and 59.91 ± 0.15% of the control value after 24 and 72 h of exposition to 10 g L −1 Cr 2 O 3 -NP. At 24 h of exposure, the esterase activity increased to 160.24% of control value, revealing a modification of the short-term metabolic response of algae to Cr 2 O 3 -NP exposure. In conclusion, the metabolism of C. reinhardtii was the most sensitive to Cr 2 O 3 -NP after 24 h of treatment. - Highlights: • Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles are unstable and form large aggregates in the medium. • EC50 for growth inhibition of C. reinhardtii is 1.35 g L −1 at 72 h. • Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles increase ROS levels at 10 g L −1 . • Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles affect photosynthetic electron transport.

  14. Algae: putting carbon dioxide in a bind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewers, J.; Wiechers, G. [RWE Power (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    German utility RWE Power has initiated a cutting edge project that is investigating the use of marine microalgae to capture carbon dioxide produced during lignite combustion. At its Niederaussem power plant, a pilot plant has been erected for the production of microalgae. Flue gas is withdrawn from the lignite-based power plant and transported through polyethylene pipes to the microalgae production plant. The CO{sub 2} in the flue gas is dissolved in the algae suspension and adsorbed by the algae for growth in photobioreactors, developed by Noragreen Projektmanagement GmbH. The photobioreactors which consist of clear plastic hoses, fixed in V shape to supports. The study is aiming to optimise the entire algae production process and subsequent conversion and use of the algae biomass produced. Uses being investigated include hydrothermal carbonization to obtain hydrocarbon products. 1 figs., 1 photo.

  15. Dietary Natural Products for Prevention and Treatment of Liver Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is the most common malignancy of the digestive system with high death rate. Accumulating evidences suggests that many dietary natural products are potential sources for prevention and treatment of liver cancer, such as grapes, black currant, plum, pomegranate, cruciferous vegetables, French beans, tomatoes, asparagus, garlic, turmeric, ginger, soy, rice bran, and some edible macro-fungi. These dietary natural products and their active components could affect the development and progression of liver cancer in various ways, such as inhibiting tumor cell growth and metastasis, protecting against liver carcinogens, immunomodulating and enhancing effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the potential prevention and treatment activities of dietary natural products and their major bioactive constituents on liver cancer, and discusses possible mechanisms of action.

  16. Sustainable Use Of Macro-Algae For Biogas Production In Latvian Conditions: A Preliminary Study Through An Integrated Mca And Lca Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastare Laura

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on sustainability evaluation of an algae-based energy system in Latvia with a holistic and integrated approach of multi-criteria analysis combined with life cycle assessment (including a practical side - biogas yield experiments of locally available algae.

  17. Optimal production of 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid from alginate for brown macro algae saccharification by combining endo- and exo-type alginate lyases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da Mao; Kim, Hee Taek; Yun, Eun Ju; Kim, Do Hyoung; Park, Yong-Cheol; Woo, Hee Chul; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2014-10-01

    Algae are considered as third-generation biomass, and alginate is the main component of brown macroalgae. Alginate can be enzymatically depolymerized by alginate lyases into uronate monomers, such as mannuronic acid and guluronic acid, which are further nonenzymatically converted to 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH). We have optimized an enzymatic saccharification process using two recombinant alginate lyases, endo-type Alg7D and exo-type Alg17C, for the efficient production of DEH from alginate. When comparing the sequential and simultaneous additions of Alg7D and Alg17C, it was found that the final yield of DEH was significantly higher when the enzymes were added sequentially. The progress of saccharification reactions and production of DEH were verified by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Our results showed that the two recombinant enzymes could be exploited for the efficient production of DEH that is the key substrate for producing biofuels from brown macro algal biomass.

  18. Method and apparatus for processing algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2012-07-03

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells. The lysate separates into at least two layers including a lipid-containing hydrophobic layer and an ionic liquid-containing hydrophilic layer. A salt or salt solution may be used to remove water from the ionic liquid-containing layer before the ionic liquid is reused. The used salt may also be dried and/or concentrated and reused. The method can operate at relatively low lysis, processing, and recycling temperatures, which minimizes the environmental impact of algae processing while providing reusable biofuels and other useful products.

  19. Plasmodesmata of brown algae

    OpenAIRE

    Terauchi, Makoto; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are intercellular connections in plants which play roles in various developmental processes. They are also found in brown algae, a group of eukaryotes possessing complex multicellularity, as well as green plants. Recently, we conducted an ultrastructural study of PD in several species of brown algae. PD in brown algae are commonly straight plasma membrane-lined channels with a diameter of 10?20?nm and they lack desmotubule in contrast to green plants. Moreover, branched PD ...

  20. The effect of buffering dairy cow diets with limestone, calcareous marine algae, or sodium bicarbonate on ruminal pH profiles, production responses, and rumen fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruywagen, C W; Taylor, S; Beya, M M; Calitz, T

    2015-08-01

    Six ruminally cannulated Holstein cows were used to evaluate the effect of 2 dietary buffers on rumen pH, milk production, milk composition, and rumen fermentation parameters. A high concentrate total mixed ration [35.2% forage dry matter (DM)], formulated to be potentially acidotic, was used to construct 3 dietary treatments in which calcareous marine algae (calcified remains of the seaweed Lithothamnium calcareum) was compared with limestone (control) and sodium bicarbonate plus limestone. One basal diet was formulated and the treatment diets contained either 0.4% of dietary DM as Acid Buf, a calcified marine algae product (AB treatment), or 0.8% of dietary DM as sodium bicarbonate and 0.37% as limestone (BC treatment), or 0.35% of dietary DM as limestone [control (CON) treatment]. Cows were randomly allocated to treatments according to a double 3×3 Latin square design, with 3 treatments and 3 periods. The total experimental period was 66 d during which each cow received each treatment for a period of 15 d before the data collection period of 7 d. Rumen fluid was collected to determine volatile fatty acids, lactic acid, and ammonia concentrations. Rumen pH was monitored every 10min for 2 consecutive days using a portable data logging system fitted with in-dwelling electrodes. Milk samples were analyzed for solid and mineral contents. The effect of treatment on acidity was clearly visible, especially from the period from midday to midnight when rumen pH dropped below 5.5 for a longer period of time (13 h) in the CON treatment than in the BC (8.7 h) and AB (4 h) treatments. Daily milk, 4% fat-corrected milk, and energy-corrected milk yields differed among treatments, with AB being the highest, followed by BC and CON. Both buffers increased milk fat content. Treatment had no effect on milk protein content, but protein yield was increased in the AB treatment. Total rumen volatile fatty acids and acetate concentrations were higher and propionate was lower in the AB

  1. RNAi knock-down of LHCBM1, 2 and 3 increases photosynthetic H2 production efficiency of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Oey

    Full Text Available Single cell green algae (microalgae are rapidly emerging as a platform for the production of sustainable fuels. Solar-driven H2 production from H2O theoretically provides the highest-efficiency route to fuel production in microalgae. This is because the H2-producing hydrogenase (HYDA is directly coupled to the photosynthetic electron transport chain, thereby eliminating downstream energetic losses associated with the synthesis of carbohydrate and oils (feedstocks for methane, ethanol and oil-based fuels. Here we report the simultaneous knock-down of three light-harvesting complex proteins (LHCMB1, 2 and 3 in the high H2-producing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant Stm6Glc4 using an RNAi triple knock-down strategy. The resultant Stm6Glc4L01 mutant exhibited a light green phenotype, reduced expression of LHCBM1 (20.6% ±0.27%, LHCBM2 (81.2% ±0.037% and LHCBM3 (41.4% ±0.05% compared to 100% control levels, and improved light to H2 (180% and biomass (165% conversion efficiencies. The improved H2 production efficiency was achieved at increased solar flux densities (450 instead of ∼100 µE m(-2 s(-1 and high cell densities which are best suited for microalgae production as light is ideally the limiting factor. Our data suggests that the overall improved photon-to-H2 conversion efficiency is due to: 1 reduced loss of absorbed energy by non-photochemical quenching (fluorescence and heat losses near the photobioreactor surface; 2 improved light distribution in the reactor; 3 reduced photoinhibition; 4 early onset of HYDA expression and 5 reduction of O2-induced inhibition of HYDA. The Stm6Glc4L01 phenotype therefore provides important insights for the development of high-efficiency photobiological H2 production systems.

  2. Treatment of dairy manure effluent using freshwater algae: algal productivity and recovery of manure nutrients using pilot-scale algal turf scrubbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulbry, Walter; Kondrad, Shannon; Pizarro, Carolina; Kebede-Westhead, Elizabeth

    2008-11-01

    Cultivating algae on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in animal manure effluents presents an alternative to the current practice of land application. The objective of this study was to determine values for productivity, nutrient content, and nutrient recovery using filamentous green algae grown in outdoor raceways at different loading rates of raw and anaerobically digested dairy manure effluent. Algal turf scrubber raceways (30m2 each) were operated in central Maryland for approximately 270 days each year (roughly April 1-December 31) from 2003 to 2006. Algal biomass was harvested every 4-12 days from the raceways after daily additions of manure effluent corresponding to loading rates of 0.3 to 2.5g total N (TN) and 0.08 to 0.42g total P (TP) m(-2)d(-1). Mean algal productivity values increased from approximately 2.5g DW m(-2)d(-1) at the lowest loading rate (0.3g TN m(-2)d(-1)) to 25g DW m(-2)d(-1) at the highest loading rate (2.5g TN m(-2)d(-1)). Mean N and P contents in the dried biomass increased 1.5-2.0-fold with increasing loading rate up to maximums of 7% N and 1% P (dry weight basis). Although variable, algal N and P accounted for roughly 70-90% of input N and P at loading rates below 1g TN, 0.15g TP m(-2)d(-1). N and P recovery rates decreased to 50-80% at higher loading rates. There were no significant differences in algal productivity, algal N and P content, or N and P recovery values from raceways with carbon dioxide supplementation compared to values from raceways without added carbon dioxide. Projected annual operational costs are very high on a per animal basis ($780 per cow). However, within the context of reducing nutrient inputs in sensitive watersheds such as the Chesapeake Bay, projected operational costs of $11 per kgN are well below the costs cited for upgrading existing water treatment plants.

  3. Extreme Low Light Requirement for Algae Growth Underneath Sea Ice: A Case Study From Station Nord, NE Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancke, Kasper; Lund-Hansen, Lars C.; Lamare, Maxim L.; Højlund Pedersen, Stine; King, Martin D.; Andersen, Per; Sorrell, Brian K.

    2018-02-01

    Microalgae colonizing the underside of sea ice in spring are a key component of the Arctic foodweb as they drive early primary production and transport of carbon from the atmosphere to the ocean interior. Onset of the spring bloom of ice algae is typically limited by the availability of light, and the current consensus is that a few tens-of-centimeters of snow is enough to prevent sufficient solar radiation to reach underneath the sea ice. We challenge this consensus, and investigated the onset and the light requirement of an ice algae spring bloom, and the importance of snow optical properties for light penetration. Colonization by ice algae began in May under >1 m of first-year sea ice with ˜1 m thick snow cover on top, in NE Greenland. The initial growth of ice algae began at extremely low irradiance (algae growth below the sea ice. This was supported by radiative-transfer modeling of light attenuation. Implications are an earlier productivity by ice algae in Arctic sea ice than recognized previously.

  4. Sulfated polysaccharides as bioactive agents from marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Dai-Hung; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-11-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid by consumers toward natural bioactive compounds as functional ingredients in nutraceuticals. Marine algae are considered as valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds. Marine algae are rich in sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) such as carrageenans in red algae, fucoidans in brown algae and ulvans in green algae. These SPs exhibit many health beneficial nutraceutical effects such as antioxidant, anti-allergic, anti-human immunodeficiency virus, anticancer and anticoagulant activities. Therefore, marine algae derived SPs have great potential to be further developed as medicinal food products or nutraceuticals in the food industry. This contribution presents an overview of nutraceutical effects and potential health benefits of SPs derived from marine algae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The production of sulfonated chitosan-sodium alginate found in brown algae (Sargassum sp.) composite membrane as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafiroh, Siti; Pudjiastuti, Pratiwi; Sari, Ilma Indana

    2016-03-01

    The majority of energy was used in this period is from fossil fuel, which getting decreased in the future. The objective of this research is production and characterization of sulfonated chitosan-sodium alginate found in brown algae (Sargassum sp.) composite membrane as Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) for alternative energy. PEMFC was produced with 4 variations (w/w) ratio between chitosan and sodium alginate, 8 : 0, 8 : 1, 8 : 2, 8 : 4 (w/w). The production of membrane was mixed sodium alginate solution into chitosan solution and sulfonated with H2SO4 0.72 N. The characterization of the PEM was uses Modulus Young analysis, water swelling, ion exchange capacity, FTIR, SEM, DTA, methanol permeability and proton conductivity. The result of the research, showed that the optimum membrane was with ratio 8 : 2 (w/w) that the Modulus Young 8564 kN/m2, water swelling 31.86%, ion exchange capacity 1.020 meq/g, proton conductivity 8,8 × 10-6 S/cm, methanol permeability 1.90 × 10-8 g/cm2s and glass transition temperature (Tg) 100.9 °C, crystalline temperature (Tc) 227.6 °C, and the melting temperature (Tm) 267.9 °C.

  6. Assessment of Meat and Poultry Product Recalls Due to Salmonella Contamination: Product Recovery and Illness Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seys, Scott A; Sampedro, Fernando; Hedberg, Craig W

    2017-08-01

    Data from the recalls of meat and poultry products from 2000 through 2012 due to Salmonella contamination were used to assess the factors associated with the recovery of the recalled product and to develop quantitative models to estimate the number of illnesses prevented by recalls. The percentage of product recovered following a recall action was not dependent on establishment size, recall expansions, complexity of the distribution chain, type of distribution, amount of time between the production and recall dates, or number of pounds of product recalled. However, illness-related recalls were associated with larger amounts of recalled product, smaller percentages of recalled product recovered, a greater number of days between the production date and recall date, and nationwide distribution than were recalls that were not illness related. In addition, the detection of recall-associated illnesses appeared to be enhanced in states with strong foodborne illness investigation systems. The number of Salmonella illnesses prevented by recalls was based on the number of illnesses occurring relative to the number of pounds consumed, which was then extrapolated to the number of pounds of recalled product recovered. A simulation using a program evaluation and review technique probability distribution with illness-related recalls from 2003 through 2012 estimated that there were 19,000 prevented Salmonella illnesses, after adjusting for underdiagnosis. Recalls not associated with illnesses from 2000 through 2012 prevented an estimated additional 8,300 Salmonella illnesses, after adjusting for underdiagnosis. Although further improvements to ensure accurate and complete reporting should be undertaken, our study demonstrates that recalls are an important tool for preventing additional Salmonella illnesses. Moreover, additional training resources dedicated to public health agencies for enhancing foodborne illness detection, investigations, and rapid response and reporting would

  7. Benthic Ecology from Space: Optics and Net Primary Production in Seagrass and Benthic Algae Across the Great Bahama Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    both the local ecol- ogy and biogeochemical cycles, however, also depends on how much production is left unremineralized by herbivores and decomposers to...leaf per m2 seafloor. Pg:R: ratio of gross production to respiration; DW: dry weight Producer Gross oxygen evolution , Pg Pg:R Areal average NPP (µmol O2... evolution measurements in this analysis, however, epi- phytes were left intact and NPP estimates should be inclusive of both leaf and epiphyte productivity

  8. Effect of chromium oxide (III) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species and photosystem II activity in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Cristina Henning da [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Perreault, François [School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-3005 (United States); Oukarroum, Abdallah [Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec in Montréal, 2101, Jeanne Mance Street, Station Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H2X 2J6 (Canada); Melegari, Sílvia Pedroso [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Center of Marine Studies, Federal University of Parana, Beira-mar Avenue, 83255-976, Pontal do Parana, PR (Brazil); Popovic, Radovan [Department of Chemistry, University of Quebec in Montréal, 2101, Jeanne Mance Street, Station Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H2X 2J6 (Canada); Matias, William Gerson, E-mail: william.g.matias@ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário, CEP: 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    With the growth of nanotechnology and widespread use of nanomaterials, there is an increasing risk of environmental contamination by nanomaterials. However, the potential implications of such environmental contamination are hard to evaluate since the toxicity of nanomaterials if often not well characterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of a chromium-based nanoparticle, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP, used in a wide diversity of industrial processes and commercial products, on the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The deleterious impacts of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP were characterized using cell density measurements, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), esterase enzymes activity, and photosystem II electron transport as indicators of toxicity. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP exposure inhibited culture growth and significantly lowered cellular Chlorophyll a content. From cell density measurements, EC50 values of 2.05 ± 0.20 and 1.35 ± 0.06 g L{sup −1} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP were obtained after 24 and 72 h of exposure, respectively. In addition, ROS levels were increased to 160.24 ± 2.47% and 59.91 ± 0.15% of the control value after 24 and 72 h of exposition to 10 g L{sup −1} Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP. At 24 h of exposure, the esterase activity increased to 160.24% of control value, revealing a modification of the short-term metabolic response of algae to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP exposure. In conclusion, the metabolism of C. reinhardtii was the most sensitive to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NP after 24 h of treatment. - Highlights: • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles are unstable and form large aggregates in the medium. • EC50 for growth inhibition of C. reinhardtii is 1.35 g L{sup −1} at 72 h. • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles increase ROS levels at 10 g L{sup −1}. • Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles affect photosynthetic electron transport.

  9. [Harmful algae and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaanpää, Harri T

    2011-01-01

    Harmful algae are a worldwide problem. Phycotoxins is a general term for toxic compounds produced by harmful species of the phytoplankton. This review deals with the occurrence of harmful algae and phycotoxins in the Baltic Sea and other domestic waters, the ways of getting exposed to them, and their effects. Advice on how to avoid the exposure is provided.

  10. Photobiological hydrogen production with the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under process engineering aspects; Photobiologische Wasserstoffproduktion mit der einzelligen Gruenalge Chlamydomonas reinhardtii unter verfahrenstechnischen Aspekten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, Stephanie

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen is of high interest as a clean and environmentally friendly energy source as its combustion only emits water and energy. However, currently hydrogen is produced in energy demanding processes by the consumption of fossil fuels. An alternative way of sustainable and non-polluting hydrogen production could be provided by use of photosynthetic active microalgae. Within this work, the photobiological hydrogen production with the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is investigated under the aspects of bioprocess-engineering and economics. Objectives are, besides the increase of the photochemical efficiency, the cultivation of the algae and subsequent hydrogen production under cost-free sunlight. It could be demonstrated that outdoor cultivation of C. reinhardtii is possible in Central Europe throughout the year by using e.g. waste heat. Similar cell numbers in the range from 1,2.10{sup 7} cells ml{sup -1} to 1,7.10{sup 7} cells ml{sup -1} could be achieved in closed photobioreactors of the type Photobioreactor Screening Module under controlled laboratory conditions and both continuous illumination (200 {mu}mol.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}) and simulated outdoor conditions according to the light intensity of idealized summer day as well as in outdoor experiments (up to 2000 {mu}mol.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}).The use of 10 % CO{sub 2} corresponding to the CO{sub 2} content in flue gas led to a doubling of cell numbers under continuous illumination to 4,2.10{sup 7} cells ml{sup -1}, compared to the reference culture bubbled with 3 % CO{sub 2}. A significant increase of cell numbers under the light profiles of an idealized summer day could not be achieved. The cultivation under the light profile of a winter day at 25 C reduced cell growth to 54 %, compared to the summer simulation. In open 30 L outdoor ponds, only 0,26.10{sup 7} cells ml{sup -1} could be achieved under photoheterotrophic conditions during the summer months, which corresponds to 20 % of the cell

  11. Algae Derived Biofuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahan, Kauser [Rowan Univ., Glassboro, NJ (United States)

    2015-03-31

    One of the most promising fuel alternatives is algae biodiesel. Algae reproduce quickly, produce oils more efficiently than crop plants, and require relatively few nutrients for growth. These nutrients can potentially be derived from inexpensive waste sources such as flue gas and wastewater, providing a mutual benefit of helping to mitigate carbon dioxide waste. Algae can also be grown on land unsuitable for agricultural purposes, eliminating competition with food sources. This project focused on cultivating select algae species under various environmental conditions to optimize oil yield. Membrane studies were also conducted to transfer carbon di-oxide more efficiently. An LCA study was also conducted to investigate the energy intensive steps in algae cultivation.

  12. Suppression of Tla1 gene expression for improved solar conversion efficiency and photosynthetic productivity in plants and algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Anastasios; Mitra, Mautusi

    2010-06-29

    The invention provides method and compositions to minimize the chlorophyll antenna size of photosynthesis by decreasing TLA1 gene expression, thereby improving solar conversion efficiencies and photosynthetic productivity in plants, e.g., green microalgae, under bright sunlight conditions.

  13. Product diversification in the sugarcane biorefinery through algae growth and supercritical CO 2 extraction: Thermal and economic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Albarelli, Juliana Q.; Santos, Diego T.; Ensinas, Adriano V.; Marechal, François; Cocero, María J.; Meireles, M. Angela A.

    2017-01-01

    The sugarcane sector in Brazil has undergone a major modernization in the last thirty years. Embracing the biorefinery concept, this sector is investigating bioproduct diversification and mostly putting a lot of effort and investment on second generation ethanol production. In this context, the investigation of the integration of a third generation biofuel production using microalgae to the sugarcane biorefinery seems an important starting point. This study evaluates the integration of microa...

  14. [Effect of probiotic product containing bifidobacteria and biogel from brown algae on the intestinal microflora and parameters of innate immunity in mice with experimental drug dysbacteriosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, T A; Makarenkova, I D; Koneva, E L; Aminina, N M; Yakush, E V

    2015-01-01

    The article represents the results of studying the effect of a new fermented product (FP) containing the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium bifidum 791 and Biogel from brown algae Laminariajaponica on the composition of intestinal microflora and parameters of innate immunity in mice with experimental dysbacteriosis, induced by administration of gentamicin in dose of 25 mg per kg body weight during 7 days. The experimental animals received for 6 weeks in addition to the diet FP, which was 2% of the average volume of feed intake. The FP influence was manifested by more rapid reduction of dyspepsia symptoms, restoration of body weight and balance the intestinal microbiocenosis (increasing of bifido- and lactobacteria, typical E. coli, reducing of the bacteria genus Proteus and Clostridium, elimination of S. aureus). As the results of FP administration we observed the statistically significant reduction of endogenous intoxication values and increasing of the phagocyte activity of neutrophils, related to effector cells of innate immunity, compared with animals not receiving FP. Identified effects of FP are due to both its probiotic properties through the presence of bifidobacteria and immunomodulating and enteral sorbtion activities of alginate component.

  15. Growing swimming algae for bioenergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croze, Ottavio

    Biofuel production from photosynthetic microalgae is not commercially viable due to high processing costs. New engineering and biological solutions are being sought to reduce these costs by increasing processing efficiency (productivity per energy input). Important physics, however, is ignored. For example, the fluid dynamics of algal suspensions in photobioreactors (ponds or tube arrays) is non-trivial, particularly if the algae swim. Cell reorientation by passive viscous and gravitational torques (gyrotaxis) or active reorientation by light (phototaxis) cause swimming algae in suspension to structure in flows, even turbulent ones. This impacts the distribution and dispersion of swimmers, with significant consequences for photobioreactor operation and design. In this talk, I will describe a theory that predicts swimmer dispersion in laminar pipe flows. I will then then present experimental tests of the theory, as well as new results on the circadian suspension dynamics of the algaChlamydomonas reinhardtii in lab-scale photobioreactors. Finally, I will briefly consider the implications of our work, and related active matter research, for improving algal bioprocessing efficiency. Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability.

  16. Parasites in algae mass culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd William Lane

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Parasites are now known to be ubiquitous across biological systems and can play an important role in modulating algal populations. However, there is a lack of extensive information on their role in artificial ecosystems such as algal production ponds and photobioreactors. Parasites have been implicated in the demise of algal blooms. Because individual mass culture systems often tend to be unialgal and a select few algal species are in wide scale application, there is an increased potential for parasites to have a devastating effect on commercial scale monoculture. As commercial algal production continues to expand with a widening variety of applications, including biofuel, food and pharmaceuticals, the parasites associated with algae will become of greater interest and potential economic impact. A number of important algal parasites have been identified in algal mass culture systems in the last few years and this number is sure to grow as the number of commercial algae ventures increases. Here, we review the research that has identified and characterized parasites infecting mass cultivated algae, the techniques being proposed and or developed to control them, and the potential impact of parasites on the future of the algal biomass industry.

  17. Enzyme-Enhanced Extraction of Antioxidant Ingredients from Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adalbjörnsson, Björn V; Jónsdóttir, Rósa

    2015-01-01

    Marine algae are not only a rich source of dietary fibre, proteins, vitamins, and minerals, but also contain a great variety of secondary metabolites with diverse biological activities. Marine macroalgae are a rich source of various natural antioxidants such as polyphenols, especially phlorotannins (made of polyphloroglucinol units) derived from brown algae, which play an important role in preventing lipid peroxidation. In recent years, a number of potent antioxidant compounds have been isolated and identified from different types of edible seaweeds. Extraction methods commonly used for the isolation of antioxidants are based on conventional water or organic solvent extractions. However, recent advances have shown that enzymatic hydrolysis can achieve higher yield of bioactive compounds from algae. Here we describe a method based on enzymatic hydrolysis which both increases yield and decreases cost associated with organic solvents. This method achieves cell wall disruption and breakdown of internal storage components for more effective release of intracellular bioactive compounds. In addition, hydrolysis of proteins produces peptides which may have antioxidant properties, thus enhancing the bioactivity of the algal extract. The method described can be used for production of extracts from red and brown macroalgal species.

  18. The green alga Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides biomass and polysaccharides production determined using cultivation in crossed gradients of temperature and light

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, D.; Kvíderová, J.; Kaštánek, P.; Lukavský, Jaromír

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 9 (2017), s. 1030-1038 ISSN 1618-0240 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020080 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides * Biomass * Crossed gradients Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics OBOR OECD: Bioproducts (products that are manufactured using biological material as feedstock) biomaterials, bioplastics, biofuels, bioderived bulk and fine chemicals, bio-derived novel materials Impact factor: 1.698, year: 2016

  19. Method and apparatus for iterative lysis and extraction of algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Geoffrey; Boggs, Tabitha; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Doherty, Stephen J.

    2015-12-01

    A method and system for processing algae involves the use of an ionic liquid-containing clarified cell lysate to lyse algae cells. The resulting crude cell lysate may be clarified and subsequently used to lyse algae cells. The process may be repeated a number of times before a clarified lysate is separated into lipid and aqueous phases for further processing and/or purification of desired products.

  20. Chemical analysis and biorefinery of red algae Kappaphycus alvarezii for efficient production of glucose from residue of carrageenan extraction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masarin, Fernando; Cedeno, Fernando Roberto Paz; Chavez, Eddyn Gabriel Solorzano; de Oliveira, Levi Ezequiel; Gelli, Valéria Cress; Monti, Rubens

    2016-01-01

    Biorefineries serve to efficiently utilize biomass and their by-products. Algal biorefineries are designed to generate bioproducts for commercial use. Due to the high carbohydrate content of algal biomass, biorefinery to generate biofuels, such as bioethanol, is of great interest. Carrageenan is a predominant polysaccharide hydrocolloid found in red macroalgae and is widely used in food, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. In this study, we report the biorefinery of carrageenan derived from processing of experimental strains of the red macroalgae Kappaphycus alvarezii. Specifically, the chemical composition and enzymatic hydrolysis of the residue produced from carrageenan extraction were evaluated to determine the conditions for efficient generation of carbohydrate bioproducts. The productivity and growth rates of K. alvarezii strains were assessed along with the chemical composition (total carbohydrates, ash, sulfate groups, proteins, insoluble aromatics, galacturonic acid, and lipids) of each strain. Two strains, brown and red, were selected based on their high growth rates and productivity and were treated with 6 % KOH for extraction of carrageenan. The yields of biomass from treatment with 6 % KOH solution of the brown and red strains were 89.3 and 89.5 %, respectively. The yields of carrageenan and its residue were 63.5 and 23 %, respectively, for the brown strain and 60 and 27.8 %, respectively, for the red strain. The residues from the brown and red strains were assessed to detect any potential bioproducts. The galactan, ash, protein, insoluble aromatics, and sulfate groups of the residue were reduced to comparable extents for the two strains. However, KOH treatment did not reduce the content of glucan in the residue from either strain. Glucose was produced by enzymatic hydrolysis for 72 h using both strains. The glucan conversion was 100 % for both strains, and the concentrations of glucose from the brown and red strains were 13.7 and 11.5 g L(-1

  1. Coccidiosis in poultry: anticoccidial products, vaccines and other prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, H W; Landman, W J M

    2011-09-01

    Coccidiosis in chickens is a parasitic disease with great economic significance, which has been controlled successfully for decades using mainly anticoccidial products. However, large-scale and long-term use of anticoccidial drugs has led to the worldwide development of resistance against all these drugs. In order to minimize the occurrence of resistance, the rotation of various anticoccidial drugs in single and/or shuttle programmes is used. Unfortunately, this has not solved the anticoccidial resistance problem. Recently, live anticoccidial vaccines have been incorporated into rotation programmes, resulting in an increasing incidence of anticoccidial drug-sensitive Eimeria spp. field isolates, which may ameliorate the efficacy of anticoccidial drugs. Nevertheless, possible upcoming bans restricting the use of anticoccidials as feed additives, consumer concerns on residues and increasing regulations have prompted the quest for alternative coccidiosis control strategies. Although management and biosecurity measures could halt the introduction of Eimeria spp. to a farm, in practice they do not suffice to prevent coccidiosis outbreaks. Phytotherapy, aromatherapy and pre- and probiotics either show conflicting, non-consistent or non-convincing results, and have therefore not been applied at a large scale in the field. So far, live attenuated and non-attenuated anticoccidial vaccines have proved to be the most solid and successful coccidiosis prevention and control strategy. Despite the drawbacks associated with their production and use, their popularity is increasing. If with time, the immunogenicity of subunit vaccines can be improved, they could represent the next generation of highly efficient and low-cost anticoccidial strategies.

  2. Bee products prevent agrichemical-induced oxidative damage in fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Ferreira

    Full Text Available In southern South America and other parts of the world, aquaculture is an activity that complements agriculture. Small amounts of agrichemicals can reach aquaculture ponds, which results in numerous problems caused by oxidative stress in non-target organisms. Substances that can prevent or reverse agrichemical-induced oxidative damage may be used to combat these effects. This study includes four experiments. In each experiment, 96 mixed-sex, 6-month-old Rhamdia quelen (118±15 g were distributed into eight experimental groups: a control group that was not exposed to contaminated water, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products plus tebuconazole (TEB; Folicur 200 CE™ and a group that was exposed to 0.88 mg L(-1 of TEB alone (corresponding to 16.6% of the 96-h LC50. We show that waterborne bee products, including royal jelly (RJ, honey (H, bee pollen (BP and propolis (P, reversed the oxidative damage caused by exposure to TEB. These effects were likely caused by the high polyphenol contents of these bee-derived compounds. The most likely mechanism of action for the protective effects of bee products against tissue oxidation and the resultant damage is that the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and glutathione-S-transferase (GST are increased.

  3. Bee Products Prevent Agrichemical-Induced Oxidative Damage in Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daiane; Rocha, Helio Carlos; Kreutz, Luiz Carlos; Loro, Vania Lucia; Marqueze, Alessandra; Koakoski, Gessi; Santos da Rosa, João Gabriel; Gusso, Darlan; Oliveira, Thiago Acosta; de Abreu, Murilo Sander; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2013-01-01

    In southern South America and other parts of the world, aquaculture is an activity that complements agriculture. Small amounts of agrichemicals can reach aquaculture ponds, which results in numerous problems caused by oxidative stress in non-target organisms. Substances that can prevent or reverse agrichemical-induced oxidative damage may be used to combat these effects. This study includes four experiments. In each experiment, 96 mixed-sex, 6-month-old Rhamdia quelen (118±15 g) were distributed into eight experimental groups: a control group that was not exposed to contaminated water, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products, three groups that were exposed to various concentrations of bee products plus tebuconazole (TEB; Folicur 200 CE™) and a group that was exposed to 0.88 mg L−1 of TEB alone (corresponding to 16.6% of the 96-h LC50). We show that waterborne bee products, including royal jelly (RJ), honey (H), bee pollen (BP) and propolis (P), reversed the oxidative damage caused by exposure to TEB. These effects were likely caused by the high polyphenol contents of these bee-derived compounds. The most likely mechanism of action for the protective effects of bee products against tissue oxidation and the resultant damage is that the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) are increased. PMID:24098336

  4. New methodologies for the integration of power plants with algae ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, K.; Gijp, S. van der; Stel, R.W van der; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally recognized that algae could be an interesting option for reducing CO2 emissions. Based on light and CO2, algae can be used for the production various economically interesting products. Current algae cultivation techniques, however, still present a number of limitations. Efficient

  5. Retrofitting hetrotrophically cultivated algae biomass as pyrolytic feedstock for biogas, bio-char and bio-oil production encompassing biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Omprakash; Agarwal, Manu; Naresh Kumar, A; Venkata Mohan, S

    2015-02-01

    Algal biomass grown hetrotrophically in domestic wastewater was evaluated as pyrolytic feedstock for harnessing biogas, bio-oil and bio-char. Freshly harvested microalgae (MA) and lipid extracted microalgae (LEMA) were pyrolysed in packed bed reactor in the presence and absence of sand as additive. MA (without sand additive) depicted higher biogas (420 ml/g; 800 °C; 3 h) and bio-oil (0.70 ml/g; 500 °C; 3 h). Sand addition enhanced biogas production (210 ml/g; 600 °C; 2 h) in LEMA operation. The composition of bio-gas and bio-oil was found to depend on the nature of feedstock as well as the process conditions viz., pyrolytic-temperature, retention time and presence of additive. Sand additive improved the H2 composition while pyrolytic temperature increment caused a decline in CO2 fraction. Bio-char productivity increased with increasing temperature specifically with LEMA. Integration of thermo-chemical process with microalgae cultivation showed to yield multiple resources and accounts for environmental sustainability in the bio-refinery framework. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhancement of Biodiesel Production from Marine Alga, Scenedesmus sp. through In Situ Transesterification Process Associated with Acidic Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga Vin Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to increase the yield of biodiesel produced by Scenedesmus sp. through in situ transesterification by optimizing various process parameters. Based on the orthogonal matrix analysis for the acidic catalyst, the effects of the factors decreased in the order of reaction temperature (47.5% > solvent quantity (26.7% > reaction time (17.5% > catalyst amount (8.3%. Based on a Taguchi analysis, the effects of the factors decreased in the order of solvent ratio (34.36% > catalyst (28.62% > time (19.72% > temperature (17.32%. The overall biodiesel production appeared to be better using NaOH as an alkaline catalyst rather than using H2SO4 in an acidic process, at 55.07 ± 2.18% (based on lipid weight versus 48.41 ± 0.21%. However, in considering the purified biodiesel, it was found that the acidic catalyst was approximately 2.5 times more efficient than the alkaline catalyst under the following optimal conditions: temperature of 70°C (level 2, reaction time of 10 hrs (level 2, catalyst amount of 5% (level 3, and biomass to solvent ratio of 1 : 15 (level 2, respectively. These results clearly demonstrated that the acidic solvent, which combined oil extraction with in situ transesterification, was an effective catalyst for the production of high-quantity, high-quality biodiesel from a Scenedesmus sp.

  7. Enhancement of Biodiesel Production from Marine Alga, Scenedesmus sp. through In Situ Transesterification Process Associated with Acidic Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ga Vin; Choi, WoonYong; Kang, DoHyung; Lee, ShinYoung; Lee, HyeonYong

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to increase the yield of biodiesel produced by Scenedesmus sp. through in situ transesterification by optimizing various process parameters. Based on the orthogonal matrix analysis for the acidic catalyst, the effects of the factors decreased in the order of reaction temperature (47.5%) > solvent quantity (26.7%) > reaction time (17.5%) > catalyst amount (8.3%). Based on a Taguchi analysis, the effects of the factors decreased in the order of solvent ratio (34.36%) > catalyst (28.62%) > time (19.72%) > temperature (17.32%). The overall biodiesel production appeared to be better using NaOH as an alkaline catalyst rather than using H2SO4 in an acidic process, at 55.07 ± 2.18% (based on lipid weight) versus 48.41 ± 0.21%. However, in considering the purified biodiesel, it was found that the acidic catalyst was approximately 2.5 times more efficient than the alkaline catalyst under the following optimal conditions: temperature of 70°C (level 2), reaction time of 10 hrs (level 2), catalyst amount of 5% (level 3), and biomass to solvent ratio of 1 : 15 (level 2), respectively. These results clearly demonstrated that the acidic solvent, which combined oil extraction with in situ transesterification, was an effective catalyst for the production of high-quantity, high-quality biodiesel from a Scenedesmus sp. PMID:24689039

  8. Metabolic responses and β-carotene production by the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina exposed to leaf extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Einali

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present work investigated the effects of aqueous extracts of eucalyptus ( Eucalyptus globulus and elderberry ( Sambucus ebulus leaves on β-carotene productivity in Dunaliella salina, a green microalga. Leaf extracts from eucalyptus have greater amounts of phenolics and flavonoids, as well as greater ferric reducing antioxidant potential than elderberry. The extracts of both species greatly inhibited growth of algal suspensions. However, chlorophyll and β-carotene concentration increased in cells treated with leaf extracts, and the highest values were detected in 1 % eucalyptus and 2 % elderberry extracts. Fresh weight, total sugar, and protein content significantly increased following exposure of cells to different doses of leaf extracts. However, in doses containing more than 2 % eucalyptus, the upward trend for total sugar and protein ceased and remained statistically unchanged. These results suggest that metabolic modifications enable D. salina cells to tolerate the stress induced by the leaf extracts through allocating carbon flux to the synthesis of osmolytes and putative antioxidant molecules (e.g. sugars and β-carotene. Therefore, the use of leaf extracts holds potential to be a promising and effective way to improve D. salina cultivation for β-carotene production and other biotechnological and industrial applications.

  9. Viral infection of the marine alga Emiliania huxleyi triggers lipidome remodeling and induces the production of highly saturated triacylglycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malitsky, Sergey; Ziv, Carmit; Rosenwasser, Shilo; Zheng, Shuning; Schatz, Daniella; Porat, Ziv; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Aharoni, Asaph; Vardi, Assaf

    2016-04-01

    Viruses that infect marine photosynthetic microorganisms are major ecological and evolutionary drivers of microbial food webs, estimated to turn over more than a quarter of the total photosynthetically fixed carbon. Viral infection of the bloom-forming microalga Emiliania huxleyi induces the rapid remodeling of host primary metabolism, targeted towards fatty acid metabolism. We applied a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based lipidomics approach combined with imaging flow cytometry and gene expression profiling to explore the impact of viral-induced metabolic reprogramming on lipid composition. Lytic viral infection led to remodeling of the cellular lipidome, by predominantly inducing the biosynthesis of highly saturated triacylglycerols (TAGs), coupled with a significant accumulation of neutral lipids within lipid droplets. Furthermore, TAGs were found to be a major component (77%) of the lipidome of isolated virions. Interestingly, viral-induced TAGs were significantly more saturated than TAGs produced under nitrogen starvation. This study highlights TAGs as major products of the viral-induced metabolic reprogramming during the host-virus interaction and indicates a selective mode of membrane recruitment during viral assembly, possibly by budding of the virus from specialized subcellular compartments. These findings provide novel insights into the role of viruses infecting microalgae in regulating metabolism and energy transfer in the marine environment and suggest their possible biotechnological application in biofuel production. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Antioxidant Activity of Hawaiian Marine Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D. Wright

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that could be a potential natural source of such antioxidants. The total antioxidant activity of organic extracts of 37 algal samples, comprising of 30 species of Hawaiian algae from 27 different genera was determined. The activity was determined by employing the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assays. Of the algae tested, the extract of Turbinaria ornata was found to be the most active. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of a variety of different carotenoids as the active principles. The major bioactive antioxidant compound was identified as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. These results show, for the first time, that numerous Hawaiian algae exhibit significant antioxidant activity, a property that could lead to their application in one of many useful healthcare or related products as well as in chemoprevention of a variety of diseases including cancer.

  11. Antioxidant activity of Hawaiian marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Dovi; Posner, Ellen Kromkowski; McDermid, Karla J; Tabandera, Nicole K; Wright, Patrick R; Wright, Anthony D

    2012-02-01

    Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that could be a potential natural source of such antioxidants. The total antioxidant activity of organic extracts of 37 algal samples, comprising of 30 species of Hawaiian algae from 27 different genera was determined. The activity was determined by employing the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power) assays. Of the algae tested, the extract of Turbinaria ornata was found to be the most active. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of a variety of different carotenoids as the active principles. The major bioactive antioxidant compound was identified as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. These results show, for the first time, that numerous Hawaiian algae exhibit significant antioxidant activity, a property that could lead to their application in one of many useful healthcare or related products as well as in chemoprevention of a variety of diseases including cancer.

  12. Synthetic polyester from algae oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesle, Philipp; Stempfle, Florian; Hess, Sandra K; Zimmerer, Julia; Río Bártulos, Carolina; Lepetit, Bernard; Eckert, Angelika; Kroth, Peter G; Mecking, Stefan

    2014-06-23

    Current efforts to technically use microalgae focus on the generation of fuels with a molecular structure identical to crude oil based products. Here we suggest a different approach for the utilization of algae by translating the unique molecular structures of algae oil fatty acids into higher value chemical intermediates and materials. A crude extract from a microalga, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, was obtained as a multicomponent mixture containing amongst others unsaturated fatty acid (16:1, 18:1, and 20:5) phosphocholine triglycerides. Exposure of this crude algae oil to CO and methanol with the known catalyst precursor [{1,2-(tBu2 PCH2)2C6H4}Pd(OTf)](OTf) resulted in isomerization/methoxycarbonylation of the unsaturated fatty acids into a mixture of linear 1,17- and 1,19-diesters in high purity (>99 %). Polycondensation with a mixture of the corresponding diols yielded a novel mixed polyester-17/19.17/19 with an advantageously high melting and crystallization temperature. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Blue-Green Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with hepatitis C or hepatitis B. HIV/AIDS. Research on the effects of blue-green algae in people with HIV/AIDS has been inconsistent. Some early research shows that taking 5 grams of blue-green ...

  14. Mitosis-targeting natural products for cancer prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chinthalapally V; Kurkjian, Carla D; Yamada, Hiroshi Y

    2012-12-01

    Mitosis is a complex process resulting in division of a cell into two daughter cells, and its failure often results in the death of the daughter cells (via apoptotic, necrotic, or proliferative/senescent death). Many chemicals that inhibit the mitotic process (anti-mitotic drugs) have proven effective for killing cancer cells in vitro and in clinical settings. Among the most studied anti-mitotic drugs are plant-origin natural products including taxanes (e.g. paclitaxel, docetaxel) and vinca alkaloids (e.g. vincristine, vinblastine), whose validated target is the spindle microtubules. With the success of these agents, efforts have been made to develop other spindle poisons as well as to improve efficacy of existing spindle poisons with structural modifications. Novel drugs and natural products that inhibit other proteins involved in mitosis (nonmicrotubule targets) have been sought in hopes of expanding available cancer-directed therapies. Recently, significant advances have been made in the understanding of mitotic mechanisms in tumor cells as well as in normal epithelial cells. These advances help us to identify and develop potential natural agents for the prevention and treatment of cancer. This review will focus on natural products that target mitotic process and/or proteins involved in mitotic progression.

  15. Oil and Gas Production Wastewater: Soil Contamination and Pollution Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Pichtel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During oil and natural gas production, so-called “produced water” comprises the largest byproduct stream. In addition, many oil and gas operations are augmented via injection of hydraulic fracturing (HF fluids into the formation. Both produced water and HF fluids may contain hundreds of individual chemicals, some known to be detrimental to public health and the environment. Oil and gas production wastewater may serve a range of beneficial purposes, particularly in arid regions, if managed correctly. Numerous treatment technologies have been developed that allow for injection, discharge to the land surface, or beneficial reuse. Although many papers have addressed the effects of oil and gas production wastewater (OGPW on groundwater and surface water quality, significantly less information is available on the effects of these fluids on the soil resource. This review paper compiles fundamental information on numerous chemicals used and produced during oil and gas development and their effects on the soil environment. Additionally, pollution prevention technologies relating to OGPW are presented. An understanding of the effects of OGPW on soil chemical, physical, and biological properties can provide a foundation for effective remediation of OGPW-affected soils; additionally, sustainable reuse of oil and gas water for irrigation and industrial purposes may be enhanced.

  16. Method and apparatus for lysing and processing algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2013-03-05

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells at lower temperatures than existing algae processing methods. A salt or salt solution is used as a separation agent and to remove water from the ionic liquid, allowing the ionic liquid to be reused. The used salt may be dried or concentrated and reused. The relatively low lysis temperatures and recycling of the ionic liquid and salt reduce the environmental impact of the algae processing while providing biofuels and other useful products.

  17. Enrichment of poultry products with omega3 fatty acids by dietary supplementation with the alga Nannochloropsis and mantur oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsan, Z; Mokady, S; Sukenik, A

    1999-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of the microalga Nannochloropsis sp. (Nanno.), as a supplement to laying hens' diet, for the production of enriched eggs and meat with omega3 fatty acids (FA). Nanno. has a unique FA composition, namely, the occurrence of a high concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5 omega3) and the absence of other omega3 FA. The effect of supplementing diets with Nanno. on omega3 FA levels in eggs, plasma, liver, and thigh muscle was compared to that of mantur oil, high in alpha-linolenic acid (LNA; 18:3 omega3). Nanno. is rich also in carotenoids, which may be useful for egg yolk pigmentation. The observed effect of Nanno. supplementation on yolk pigmentation was dose responsive, in both the rate of coloration and the color intensity. Addition of enzyme preparations (glucanase plus cellulase or glucanase plus pectinase) slightly elevated the yolk color score. The most prominent changes in the level of omega3 FA in egg yolk were evident when the diets were supplemented with 1% Nanno. or mantur lipid extracts. Levels of dietary algal meal (0.1-1.0%) had low and inconsistent effects on the level of yolk omega3 FA. Algal EPA is not accumulated in the liver or in the egg yolk; it is apparently converted and deposited as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). LNA from mantur oil was partially converted to DHA, and both DHA and LNA were deposited in egg yolks and livers. It is suggested that the absence of DHA and EPA from thigh muscle is due to the small amount of dietary omega3 FA used in this work, compared to other studies, and to the possibility that in laying hens the egg yolk has a priority on dietary FA over that of muscles.

  18. Modeling and optimization of algae growth

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, Anthony Richard; Weinhart, Thomas; Bokhove, Onno; Zhang, Bowen; van der Sar, Dick M.; Kumar, Kundan; Pisarenco, Maxim; Rudnaya, Maria; Savceno, Valeriu; Rademacher, Jens; Zijlstra, Julia; Szabelska, Alicja; Zyprych, Joanna; van der Schans, Martin; Timperio, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    The wastewater from greenhouses has a high amount of mineral contamination and an environmentally-friendly method of removal is to use algae to clean this runo water. The algae consume the minerals as part of their growth process. In addition to cleaning the water, the created algal bio-mass has a variety of applications including production of bio-diesel, animal feed, products for pharmaceutical and cosmetic purposes, or it can even be used as a source of heating or electricity. The aim of t...

  19. Modeling and optimization of algae growth

    OpenAIRE

    Thornton, A; Weinhart, T; Bokhove, O; Zhang, B; Sar, van der, DM; Kumar, K Kundan; Pisarenco, M Maxim; Rudnaya, M Maria; Savcenco, V Valeriu; Rademacher, JDM; Zijlstra, J; Szabelska, A; Zyprych, J; Schans, van der, M Martin; Timperio, V

    2010-01-01

    The wastewater from greenhouses has a high amount of mineral contamination and an environmentally-friendly method of removal is to use algae to clean this runoff water. The algae consume the minerals as part of their growth process. In addition to cleaning the water, the created algal bio-mass has a variety of applications including production of bio-diesel, animal feed, products for pharmaceutical and cosmetic purposes, or it can even be used as a source of heating or electricity . The aim o...

  20. Optimal control of algae growth by controlling CO 2 and nutrition flow using Pontryagin Maximum Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardlijah; Jamil, Ahmad; Hanafi, Lukman; Sanjaya, Suharmadi

    2017-09-01

    There are so many benefit of algae. One of them is using for renewable energy and sustainable in the future. The greater growth of algae will increasing biodiesel production and the increase of algae growth is influenced by glucose, nutrients and photosynthesis process. In this paper, the optimal control problem of the growth of algae is discussed. The objective function is to maximize the concentration of dry algae while the control is the flow of carbon dioxide and the nutrition. The solution is obtained by applying the Pontryagin Maximum Principle. and the result show that the concentration of algae increased more than 15 %.

  1. Method and apparatus using an active ionic liquid for algae biofuel harvest and extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

    2012-11-06

    The invention relates to use of an active ionic liquid to dissolve algae cell walls. The ionic liquid is used to, in an energy efficient manner, dissolve and/or lyse an algae cell walls, which releases algae constituents used in the creation of energy, fuel, and/or cosmetic components. The ionic liquids include ionic salts having multiple charge centers, low, very low, and ultra low melting point ionic liquids, and combinations of ionic liquids. An algae treatment system is described, which processes wet algae in a lysing reactor, separates out algae constituent products, and optionally recovers the ionic liquid in an energy efficient manner.

  2. Monetary value of the impacts of filamentous green algae on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents estimates of the monetary value of the impact of eutrophication (algae) on commercial agriculture in two different catchments in South Africa. A production function approach is applied to estimate the monetary value of the impact of filamentous green algae on commercial agriculture in the Dwars River, ...

  3. Effect of ferrate on green algae removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiňáková, Emília; Híveš, Ján; Gál, Miroslav; Fašková, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Green algae Cladophora aegagropila, present in cooling water of thermal power plants, causes many problems and complications, especially during summer. However, algae and its metabolites are rarely eliminated by common removal methods. In this work, the elimination efficiency of electrochemically prepared potassium ferrate(VI) on algae from cooling water was investigated. The influence of experimental parameters, such as Fe(VI) dosage, application time, pH of the system, temperature and hydrodynamics of the solution on removal efficiency, was optimized. This study demonstrates that algae C. aegagropila can be effectively removed from cooling water by ferrate. Application of ferrate(VI) at the optimized dosage and under the suitable conditions (temperature, pH) leads to 100% removal of green algae Cladophora from the system. Environmentally friendly reduction products (Fe(III)) and coagulation properties favour the application of ferrate for the treatment of water contaminated with studied microorganisms compared to other methods such as chlorination and use of permanganate, where harmful products are produced.

  4. Physiological function of bromoperoxidase in the red marine alga, Corallina pilulifera: production of bromoform as an allelochemical and the simultaneous elimination of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, N; Ogata, Y; Okada, N; Itoh, N

    2001-11-01

    The physiological function of vanadium-bromoperoxidase (BPO) in the marine red alga, Corallina pilulifera, has been characterized from the viewpoint of allelochemical formation. The algae emit bromoform (CHBr3) depending on the enzyme activity level in vivo (Itoh, N., Shinya, M., 1994. Seasonal evolution of bromomethanes from coralline algae and its effect on atmospheric ozone. Marine Chemistry 45, 95-103). We demonstrated that bromoform produced by C. pilulifera played an important role in eliminating epiphytic organisms, especially microalgae on the surface. Such data suggest a strong relationship between the coralline algae and the coralline flat (deforested area in the marine environment: called isoyake in Japanese). Lithophyllum yessoense, the main inhabitant of coralline flats in Japan, produced a lower level of CHBr3 than C. pilulifera, and showed BPO activity. On the other hand, the seasonal change of BPO activity in C. pilulifera in vivo was in proportion to superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and in inverse proportion to catalase activity. The phenomenon implies that BPO could be a potential substitute for catalase, because the enzyme catalyzes an efficient Br(-)-dependent catalase reaction.

  5. Highly efficient lipid production in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri: draft genome and transcriptome endorsed by whole-cell 3D ultrastructure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ota, S.; Oshima, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Kim, S.; Yu, Z.; Yoshihara, M.; Takeda, K.; Takeshita, T.; Hirata, A.; Bišová, Kateřina; Zachleder, Vilém; Hattori, M.; Kawano, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 13 (2016), s. 13 ISSN 1754-6834 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : 3D-TEM * Green alga * Parachlorella kessleri * RNA-seq Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.203, year: 2016

  6. Anticoagulant effect of marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Wijesekara, Isuru

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries to isolate natural anticoagulant compounds from marine resources. Among marine resources, marine algae are valuable sources of novel bioactive compounds with anticoagulant effect. Phlorotannins and sulfated polysaccharides such as fucoidans in brown algae, carrageenans in red algae, and ulvans in green algae have been recognized as potential anticoagulant agents. Therefore, marine algae-derived phlorotannins and SPs have great potential for developing as anticoagulant drugs in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas. This chapter focuses on the potential anticoagulant agents in marine algae and presents an overview of their anticoagulant effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasmodesmata of brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Makoto; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are intercellular connections in plants which play roles in various developmental processes. They are also found in brown algae, a group of eukaryotes possessing complex multicellularity, as well as green plants. Recently, we conducted an ultrastructural study of PD in several species of brown algae. PD in brown algae are commonly straight plasma membrane-lined channels with a diameter of 10-20 nm and they lack desmotubule in contrast to green plants. Moreover, branched PD could not be observed in brown algae. In the brown alga, Dictyota dichotoma, PD are produced during cytokinesis through the formation of their precursor structures (pre-plasmodesmata, PPD). Clustering of PD in a structure termed "pit field" was recognized in several species having a complex multicellular thallus structure but not in those having uniseriate filamentous or multiseriate one. The pit fields might control cell-to-cell communication and contribute to the establishment of the complex multicellular thallus. In this review, we discuss fundamental morphological aspects of brown algal PD and present questions that remain open.

  8. Radiation sterilization of harmful algae in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byung Chull An; Jae-Sung Kim; Seung Sik Lee; Shyamkumar Barampuram; Eun Mi Lee; Byung Yeoup Chung

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: Drinking water, water used in food production and for irrigation, water for fish farming, waste water, surface water, and recreational water have been recently recognized as a vector for the transmission of harmful micro-organisms. The human and animal harmful algae is a waterborne risk to public health and economy because the algae are ubiquitous and persistent in water and wastewater, not completely removed by physical-chemical treatment processes, and relatively resistant to chemical disinfection. Gamma and electron beam radiation technology is of growing in the water industry since it was demonstrated that gamma and electron beam radiation is very effective against harmful algae. Materials and Methods: Harmful algae (Scenedesmus quadricauda(Turpin) Brebisson 1835 (AG10003), Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck 1896 (AG30007) and Chlamydomonas sp. (AG10061)) were distributed from Korean collection for type cultures (KCTC). Strains were cultured aerobically in Allen's medium at 25□ and 300 umol/m2s for 1 week using bioreactor. We investigated the disinfection efficiency of harmful algae irradiated with gamma (0.05 to 10 kGy for 30 min) and electron beam (1 to 19 kGy for 5 sec) rays. Results and Conclusion: We investigated the disinfection efficiency of harmful algae irradiated with gamma and electron beam rays of 50 to 19000 Gy. We established the optimum sterilization condition which use the gamma and electron beam radiation. Gamma ray disinfected harmful algae at 400 Gy for 30 min. Also, electron beam disinfected at 1000 Gy for 5 sec. This alternative disinfection practice had powerful disinfection efficiency. Hence, the multi-barrier approach for drinking water treatment in which a combination of various disinfectants and filtration technologies are applied for removal and inactivation of different microbial pathogens will guarantee a lower risk of microbial contamination.

  9. Algae Biofuel in the Nigerian Energy Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elegbede Isa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The issue of energy consumption is one of the issues that have significantly become recognized as an important topic of global discourse. Fossil fuels production reportedly experiencing a gradual depletion in the oil-producing nations of the world. Most studies have relatively focused on biofuel development and adoption, however, the awareness of a prospect in the commercial cultivation of algae having potential to create economic boost in Nigeria, inspired this research. This study aims at exploring the potential of the commercialization of a different but commonly found organism, algae, in Nigeria. Here, parameters such as; water quality, light, carbon, average temperature required for the growth of algae, and additional beneficial nutrients found in algae were analysed. A comparative cum qualitative review of analysis was used as the study made use of empirical findings on the work as well as the author’s deductions. The research explored the cultivation of algae with the two major seasonal differences (i.e. rainy and dry in Nigeria as a backdrop. The results indicated that there was no significant difference in the contribution of algae and other sources of biofuels as a necessity for bioenergy in Nigeria. However, for an effective sustainability of this prospect, adequate measures need to be put in place in form of funding, provision of an economically-enabling environment for the cultivation process as well as proper healthcare service in the face of possible health hazard from technological processes. Further studies can seek to expand on the potential of cultivating algae in the Harmattan season.

  10. Algae of economic importance that accumulate cadmium and lead: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Priscila O.; Ferreira, Lizângela R.; Pires, Natanael R. X.; S. Filho, Pedro J.; Duarte, Fabio A.; Pereira, Claudio M. P.; Mesko, Márcia F.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, algae and algae products are extensively applied in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries. Algae are the main organisms that take up and store heavy metals. Therefore, the use of compounds derived from algae by the pharmaceutical industry should be closely monitored for possible contamination. The pollution generated by heavy metals released by industrial and domestic sources causes serious changes in the aquatic ecosystem, resulting in a loss of biological diversity and...

  11. PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF DIMETHYLAMINE VAPORS EMISSION: HERBICIDE PRODUCTION PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorana Arsenijević

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The widely used herbicide, dimethylamine salt of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D-DMA, is usually prepared by mixing a dimethylamine (DMA aqueous solution with a solid 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D. The vapors of the both, reactants and products, are potentially hazardous for the environment. The contribution of DMA vapors in overall pollution from this process is most significant, concerning vapor pressures data of these pollutants. Therefore, the control of the air pollution in the manufacture and handling of methylamines is very important. Within this paper, the optimal air pollution control system in preparation of 2,4-D-DMA was developed for the pesticides manufacturing industry. This study employed the simple pollution prevention concept to reduce the emission of DMA vapors at the source. The investigations were performed on the pilot plant scale. To reduce the emission of DMA vapors, the effluent gases from the herbicide preparation zone were passed through the packed bed scrubber (water - scrubbing medium, and the catalytic reactor in sequence. The end result is a substantially improved air quality in the working area, as well as in the urbanized areas located near the chemical plant.

  12. Radiation effects on algae and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Rakesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The effects of radiation on algae have been summarized in this article. Today, algae are being considered to have the great potential to fulfill the demand of food, fodder, fuel and various pharmaceutical products. Red algae are particularly rich in the content of polysaccharides present in their cell wall. For isolation of these polysaccharides, separation of cells cemented together by middle lamella is essential. The gamma rays are known to bring about biochemical changes in the cell wall and cause the breakdown of the middle lamella. These rays ate also known to speed up the starch sugar inter-conversion in the cells which is very useful for the tapping the potential of algae to be used as biofuel as well as in pharmaceutical industries. Cyanobacteria, among algae and other plants are more resistant to the radiation. In some cyanobacteria the radiation treatment is known to enhance the resistance against the antibiotics. Radiation treatment is also known to enhance the diameter of cell and size of the nitrogen fixing heterocyst. (author)

  13. Use of calcareous algae and monensin in Nellore cattle subjected to an abrupt change in diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Ferreira Carvalho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Additives are used in high concentrate diets to prevent metabolic disorders in cattle. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of calcium sources and monensin on the control of ruminal acidosis in Nellore cattle that were abruptly shifted to a high (92.3% concentrate diet. Eight cannulated steers were randomly assigned to two contemporary 4x4 Latin square. Treatments involved the addition of a calcium source, either limestone (LI or a product derived from calcareous algae (CA, to the basic diet with or without the presence of monensin. Calcareous alga (Lithothamnium calcareum is a natural and renewable product and a source of calcium carbonate. The quantity of added limestone, calcareous algae and monensin was 7.1g kg-1, 7.4g kg-1 and 30mg kg-1 DM, respectively. There was no effect of calcium source (P=0.607 or monensin (P=0.294 on feed intake or on the concentration of short chain fatty acids. Treatments with calcareous algae resulted in a higher mean ruminal pH (P=0.039, a shorter amount of time with the ruminal pH under 5.2 (P<0.001 and a better control of blood pH (P=0.006. Treatments with monensin also resulted in a shorter amount of time with the ruminal pH below 5.2 (P=0.023. Calcareous algae were shown to be effective in controlling adverse changes in the rumen and in blood variables for Nellore cattle that were subjected to an abrupt change to a high concentrate diet.

  14. Washington State University Algae Biofuels Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    chen, Shulin [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering; McCormick, Margaret [Targeted Growth, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Sutterlin, Rusty [Inventure Renewables, Inc., Gig Harbor, WA (United States)

    2012-12-29

    The goal of this project was to advance algal technologies for the production of biofuels and biochemicals by establishing the Washington State Algae Alliance, a collaboration partnership among two private companies (Targeted Growth, Inc. (TGI), Inventure Chemicals (Inventure) Inc (now Inventure Renewables Inc) and Washington State University (WSU). This project included three major components. The first one was strain development at TGI by genetically engineering cyanobacteria to yield high levels of lipid and other specialty chemicals. The second component was developing an algal culture system at WSU to produce algal biomass as biofuel feedstock year-round in the northern states of the United States. This system included two cultivation modes, the first one was a phototrophic process and the second a heterotrophic process. The phototrophic process would be used for algae production in open ponds during warm seasons; the heterotrophic process would be used in cold seasons so that year-round production of algal lipid would be possible. In warm seasons the heterotrophic process would also produce algal seeds to be used in the phototrophic culture process. Selected strains of green algae and cyanobacteria developed by TGI were tested in the system. The third component was downstream algal biomass processing by Inventure that included efficiently harvesting the usable fuel fractions from the algae mass and effectively isolating and separating the usable components into specific fractions, and converting isolated fractions into green chemicals.

  15. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    The red alga Gracilaria tikvahiae may be grown outdoors year-round in central Florida with yields averaging 35.5 g dry wt/m/sup 2/.day, greater than the most productive terrestrial plants. This occurs only when the plants are in a suspended culture, with vigorous aeration and an exchange of 25 or more culture volumes of enriched seawater per day, which is not cost-effective. A culture system was designed in which Gracilaria, stocked at a density of 2 kg wet wt/m/sup 2/, grows to double its biomass in one to two weeks; it is then harvested to its starting density, and anaerobically digested to methane. The biomass is soaked for 6 hours in the digester residue, storing enough nutrients for two weeks' growth in unenriched seawater. The methane is combusted for energy and the waste gas is fed to the culture to provide mixing and CO/sub 2/, eliminating the need for aeration and seawater exchange. The green alga Ulva lactuca, unlike Gracilaria, uses bicarbonate as a photosynthesis carbon source, and can grow at high pH, with little or no free CO/sub 2/. It can therefore produce higher yields than Gracilaria in low water exchange conditions. It is also more efficiently converted to methane than is Gracilaria, but cannot tolerate Florida's summer temperatures so cannot be grown year-round. Attempts are being made to locate or produce a high-temperature tolerant strain.

  16. Research for Developing Renewable Biofuels from Algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Paul N. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Task A. Expansion of knowledge related to lipid production and secretion in algae A.1 Lipid biosynthesis in target algal species; Systems biology approaches are being used in combination with recent advances in Chlorella and Chlamydomonas genomics to address lipid accumulation in response to defined nutrient regimes. The UNL Algal Group continues screening additional species of Chlorella and other naturally occurring algae for those with optimal triglyceride production; Of the strains examined by the DOE's Aquatic Species Program, green algae, several species of Chlorella represent the largest group from which oleaginous candidates have been identified; A.1.1. Lipid profiling; Neutral lipid accumulation is routinely monitored by Nile red and BODIPY staining using high throughput strategies to screen for naturally occurring algae that accumulate triglyceride. These strategies complement those using spectrofluorometry to quantify lipid accumulation; Neutral lipid accumulation is routinely monitored by high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of lipid extracts in conjunction with; Carbon portioning experiments have been completed and the data currently are being analyzed and prepared for publication; Methods in the Black lab were developed to identify and quantify triacylglycerol (TAG), major membrane lipids [diacylglycerol trimethylhomoserine, phosphatidylethanolamine and chloroplast glycolipids], biosynthetic intermediates such as diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid and lysophospholipids and different species of acyl-coenzyme A (acyl CoA).

  17. Accelerator production of tritium pollution prevention design assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, R.; Nowacki, P.; Sheetz, S.O.; Lanik, P.

    1997-01-01

    This Pollution Prevention Design Assessment (PPDA) provides data for cost-benefit analysis of the potential environmental impact of the APT, is an integral part of pollution prevention/waste minimization, and is required by DOE for any activity generating radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. It will also better position the APT to meet future requirements, since it is anticipated that regulatory and other requirements will continue to become more restrictive and demanding

  18. Accelerator production of tritium pollution prevention design assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, R.; Nowacki, P.; Sheetz, S.O. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Lanik, P. [Burns and Roe Engineering Inc. (United States)

    1997-09-18

    This Pollution Prevention Design Assessment (PPDA) provides data for cost-benefit analysis of the potential environmental impact of the APT, is an integral part of pollution prevention/waste minimization, and is required by DOE for any activity generating radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. It will also better position the APT to meet future requirements, since it is anticipated that regulatory and other requirements will continue to become more restrictive and demanding.

  19. Algae-Derived Dietary Ingredients Nourish Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In the 1980s, Columbia, Maryland-based Martek Biosciences Corporation worked with Ames Research Center to pioneer the use of microalgae as a source of essential omega-3 fatty acids, work that led the company to develop its highly successful Formulaid product. Now the Nutritional Products Division of Royal DSM, the company also manufactures DHAgold, a nutritional supplement for pets, livestock and farm-raised fish that uses algae to deliver docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

  20. Photophysiology and cellular composition of sea ice algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizotte, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The productivity of sea ice algae depends on their physiological capabilities and the environmental conditions within various microhabitats. Pack ice is the dominant form of sea ice, but the photosynthetic activity of associated algae has rarely been studied. Biomass and photosynthetic rates of ice algae of the Weddell-Scotia Sea were investigated during autumn and winter, the period when ice cover grows from its minimum to maximum. Biomass-specific photosynthetic rates typically ranged from 0.3 to 3.0 μg C · μg chl -1 · h -1 higher than land-fast ice algae but similar to Antarctic phytoplankton. Primary production in the pack ice during winter may be minor compared to annual phytoplankton production, but could represent a vital seasonal contribution to the Antarctic ecosystem. Nutrient supply may limit the productivity of ice algae. In McMurdo Sound, congelation ice algae appeared to be more nutrient deficient than underlying platelet ice algae based on: lower nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, and protein:carbohydrate; and 14 C-photosynthate distribution to proteins and phospholipids was lower, while distribution to polysaccharides and neutral lipids was higher. Depletion of nitrate led to decreased nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, protein:carbohydrate, and 14 C-photosynthate to proteins. Studied were conducted during the spring bloom; therefore, nutrient limitation may only apply to dense ice algal communities. Growth limiting conditions may be alleviated when algae are released into seawater during the seasonal recession of the ice cover. To continue growth, algae must adapt to the variable light field encountered in a mixed water column. Photoadaptation was studied in surface ice communities and in bottom ice communities

  1. Clean recovery of antioxidant compounds from plant foods, by-products and algae assisted by ultrasounds processing. Modeling approaches to optimize processing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roselló-Soto, Elena; Galanakis, Charis M.; Brnčić, Mladen

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound treatment is an alternative affordable, effective and reproducible method for the improved recovery of bioactive compounds from various processing streams. The objective of this review is to discuss the impact of ultrasound-assisted extraction on the recovery of polyphenols, carotenoids...... and chlorophylls from vegetal and algae matters. Optimization strategies will need to focus on appropriate equipment design and configuration of ultrasonic components, and extrinsic and intrinsic control parameters including ultrasonic power, temperature and extraction time to maximize the yield and biological...... activity of the extract. Modeling strategies to characterize and optimize ultrasound processes are also be highlighted in the manuscript....

  2. Algae as a Biofuel: Renewable Source for Liquid Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kant Pandey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels produced by algae may provide a feasible alternative to fossil fuels like petroleum sourced fuels. However, looking to limited fossil fuel associated with problems, intensive efforts have been given to search for alternative biofuels like biodiesel. Algae are ubiquitous on earth, have potential to produce biofuel. However, technology of biofuel from algae facing a number of hurdles before it can compete in the fuel market and be broadly organized. Different challenges include strain identification and improvement of algal biomass, both in terms of biofuel productivity and the production of other products to improve the economics of the entire system. Algal biofuels could be made more cost effective by extracting other valuable products from algae and algal strains. Algal oil can be prepared by culture of algae on municipal and industrial wastewaters. Photobioreactors methods provide a controlled environment that can be tailored to the specific demands of high production of algae to attain a consistently good yield of biofuel. The algal biomass has been reported to yield high oil contents and have good amount of the biodiesel production capacity. In this article, it has been attempted to review to elucidate the approaches for making algal biodiesel economically competitive with respect to petrodiesel. Consequently, R & D work has been carried out for the growth, harvesting, oil extraction and conversion to biodiesel from algal sources.

  3. Genomics of Volvocine Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umen, James G.; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Volvocine algae are a group of chlorophytes that together comprise a unique model for evolutionary and developmental biology. The species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri represent extremes in morphological diversity within the Volvocine clade. Chlamydomonas is unicellular and reflects the ancestral state of the group, while Volvox is multicellular and has evolved numerous innovations including germ-soma differentiation, sexual dimorphism, and complex morphogenetic patterning. The Chlamydomonas genome sequence has shed light on several areas of eukaryotic cell biology, metabolism and evolution, while the Volvox genome sequence has enabled a comparison with Chlamydomonas that reveals some of the underlying changes that enabled its transition to multicellularity, but also underscores the subtlety of this transition. Many of the tools and resources are in place to further develop Volvocine algae as a model for evolutionary genomics. PMID:25883411

  4. Biofuels from algae for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirbas, M. Fatih

    2011-01-01

    Microalgae are photosynthetic microorganisms that can produce lipids, proteins and carbohydrates in large amounts over short periods of time. These products can be processed into both biofuels and useful chemicals. Two algae samples (Cladophora fracta and Chlorella protothecoid) were studied for biofuel production. Microalgae appear to be the only source of renewable biodiesel that is capable of meeting the global demand for transport fuels. Microalgae can be converted to biodiesel, bioethanol, bio-oil, biohydrogen and biomethane via thermochemical and biochemical methods. Industrial reactors for algal culture are open ponds, photobioreactors and closed systems. Algae can be grown almost anywhere, even on sewage or salt water, and does not require fertile land or food crops, and processing requires less energy than the algae provides. Microalgae have much faster growth-rates than terrestrial crops. the per unit area yield of oil from algae is estimated to be from 20,000 to 80,000 liters per acre, per year; this is 7-31 times greater than the next best crop, palm oil. Algal oil can be used to make biodiesel for cars, trucks, and airplanes. The lipid and fatty acid contents of microalgae vary in accordance with culture conditions. The effect of temperature on the yield of hydrogen from two algae (C. fracta and C. protothecoid) by pyrolysis and steam gasification were investigated in this study. In each run, the main components of the gas phase were CO 2 , CO, H 2 , and CH 4 .The yields of hydrogen by pyrolysis and steam gasification processes of the samples increased with temperature. The yields of gaseous products from the samples of C. fracta and C. protothecoides increased from 8.2% to 39.2% and 9.5% to 40.6% by volume, respectively, while the final pyrolysis temperature was increased from 575 to 925 K. The percent of hydrogen in gaseous products from the samples of C. fracta and C. protothecoides increased from 25.8% to 44.4% and 27.6% to 48.7% by volume

  5. Transcriptomics in brown algae

    OpenAIRE

    Heinrich, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Brown algae are distributed worldwide on rocky shores. They are importenet components of ecosystems, they provide habitat, shelter and serve as nurseries for various marine organisms. The geographic as well as depth distribution of macroalgae is constrained by abiotic factors, especially light and temperature. It is therefore likely that due to the global change, distribution patterns of these organisms will change. In this work the molecular acclimation of two prominent brown macroalgae, Sac...

  6. Algae-Produced Pfs25 Elicits Antibodies That Inhibit Malaria Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, James A.; Li, Fengwu; Tomosada, Lauren M.; Cox, Chesa J.; Topol, Aaron B.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Mayfield, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Subunit vaccines are significantly more expensive to produce than traditional vaccines because they are based primarily on recombinant proteins that must be purified from the expression system. Despite the increased cost, subunit vaccines are being developed because they are safe, effective, and can elicit antibodies that confer protection against diseases that are not currently vaccine-preventable. Algae are an attractive platform for producing subunit vaccines because they are relatively inexpensive to grow, genetically tractable, easily scaled to large volumes, have a short generation time, and are devoid of inflammatory, viral, or prion contaminants often present in other systems. We tested whether algal chloroplasts can produce malaria transmission blocking vaccine candidates, Plasmodium falciparum surface protein 25 (Pfs25) and 28 (Pfs28). Antibodies that recognize Pfs25 and Pfs28 disrupt the sexual development of parasites within the mosquito midgut, thus preventing transmission of malaria from one human host to the next. These proteins have been difficult to produce in traditional recombinant systems because they contain tandem repeats of structurally complex epidermal growth factor-like domains, which cannot be produced in bacterial systems, and because they are not glycosylated, so they must be modified for production in eukaryotic systems. Production in algal chloroplasts avoids these issues because chloroplasts can fold complex eukaryotic proteins and do not glycosylate proteins. Here we demonstrate that algae are the first recombinant system to successfully produce an unmodified and aglycosylated version of Pfs25 or Pfs28. These antigens are structurally similar to the native proteins and antibodies raised to these recombinant proteins recognize Pfs25 and Pfs28 from P. falciparum. Furthermore, antibodies to algae-produced Pfs25 bind the surface of in-vitro cultured P. falciparum sexual stage parasites and exhibit transmission blocking activity. Thus

  7. Biodiesel and poly-unsaturated fatty acids production from algae and crop plants - a rapid and comprehensive workflow for lipid analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhashi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Fragner, Lena; Roustan, Valentin; Schön, Verena; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-10-01

    Fatty acid methyl ester analysis (FAME) by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a widely used technique in biodiesel/bioproduct (e.g. poly-unsaturated fatty acids, PUFA) research but typically does not allow distinguishing between bound and free fatty acids. To understand and optimize biosynthetic pathways, however, the origin of the fatty acid is an important information. Furthermore the annotation of PUFAs is compromised in classical GC-EI-MS because the precursor molecular ion is missing. In the present protocol an alkaline methyl esterification step with TMS derivatization enabling the simultaneous analysis of bound and free fatty acids but also further lipids such as sterols in one GC-MS chromatogram is combined. This protocol is applied to different lipid extracts from single cell algae to higher plants: Chlorella vulgaris, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Coffea arabica, Pisum sativum and Cuscuta japonica. Further, field ionization (GC-FI-MS) is introduced for a better annotation of fatty acids and exact determination of the number of double bonds in PUFAs. The proposed workflow provides a convenient strategy to analyze algae and other plant crop systems with respect to their capacity for third generation biodiesel and high-quality bioproducts for nutrition such as PUFAs. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Dinitrogen fixation by blue-green algae from paddy fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Joseph

    1977-01-01

    Recent work using radioactive nitrogen on the blue-green algae of paddy fields has been reviewed. These algae fix dinitrogen and photoassimilate carbon evolving oxygen, thereby augmenting nitrogen and carbon status of the soil and also providing oxygen to the water-logged rice paddies. Further studies using radioactive isotopes 13 N, 24 Na and 22 Na on their nitrogen fixation, nitrogen assimilation pathways; regulation of nitrogenase, heterocysts production and sporulation and sodium transport and metabolism have been carried out and reported. The field application of blue green algae for N 2 fixation was found to increase the status of soil nitrogen and yield of paddy. (M.G.B.)

  9. Selenium accumulation and metabolism in algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Michela; Ertani, Andrea; Parrasia, Sofia; Vecchia, Francesca Dalla

    2017-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an intriguing element because it is metabolically required by a variety of organisms, but it may induce toxicity at high doses. Algae primarily absorb selenium in the form of selenate or selenite using mechanisms similar to those reported in plants. However, while Se is needed by several species of microalgae, the essentiality of this element for plants has not been established yet. The study of Se uptake and accumulation strategies in micro- and macro-algae is of pivotal importance, as they represent potential vectors for Se movement in aquatic environments and Se at high levels may affect their growth causing a reduction in primary production. Some microalgae exhibit the capacity of efficiently converting Se to less harmful volatile compounds as a strategy to cope with Se toxicity. Therefore, they play a crucial role in Se-cycling through the ecosystem. On the other side, micro- or macro-algae enriched in Se may be used in Se biofortification programs aimed to improve Se content in human diet via supplementation of valuable food. Indeed, some organic forms of selenium (selenomethionine and methylselenocysteine) are known to act as anticarcinogenic compounds and exert a broad spectrum of beneficial effects in humans and other mammals. Here, we want to give an overview of the developments in the current understanding of Se uptake, accumulation and metabolism in algae, discussing potential ecotoxicological implications and nutritional aspects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Micro-algae: French players discuss the matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouveret, T.

    2013-01-01

    About 75000 species of algae have been reported so far, the domains of application are huge and investment are increasing all around the world. One of the difficulties is to find the most appropriate algae to a specific application. Some development programs have failed scientifically or economically for instance the production of protein for animal food from the chlorella algae or the production of bio-fuel from C14-C18 chains, from zeaxanthine and from phycoerytrine. On the other side some research programs have led to promising industrial applications such as the production of food for fish and farm animals. Some research fields are completely innovative such as the use of micro-algae for the construction of bio-walls for buildings. Micro-algae are diverse and fragile. Photo-bioreactors have been designed to breed fragile algae like some types of chlorophycees used in bio-fuel and in cosmetics, a prototype has been tested for 15 months and its production is about 2 kg of dry matter a day. (A.C.)

  11. Exploring the potential of using algae in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Min David; Chen, Ching-Chun; Huynh, Pauline; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-05-01

    The applications of microalgae in cosmetic products have recently received more attention in the treatment of skin problems, such as aging, tanning and pigment disorders. There are also potential uses in the areas of anti-aging, skin-whitening, and pigmentation reduction products. While algae species have already been used in some cosmetic formulations, such as moisturizing and thickening agents, algae remain largely untapped as an asset in this industry due to an apparent lack of utility as a primary active ingredient. This review article focuses on integrating studies on algae pertinent to skin health and beauty, with the purpose of identifying serviceable algae functions in practical cosmetic uses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. UF6 overfilling prevention at Eurodif production Georges Besse plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reneaud, J.M. [Eurodif Production, Pierrelatte (France)

    1991-12-31

    Risk of overfilling exists on different equipments of Georges BESSE Plant: cylinders, desublimers and intermediate tanks. The preventive measures are composed of technical devices: desublimers weighing, load monitoring alarms, automatic controls ... and procedures, training, safety organization. In thirteen years of operation, some incidents have occurred but none of them has caused any personal injuries. They are related and discussed. The main factors involved in the Sequoyah fuel facility accident on 1/4/1986 have been analyzed and taken into account.

  13. Functional properties of carotenoids originating from algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christaki, Efterpi; Bonos, Eleftherios; Giannenas, Ilias; Florou-Paneri, Panagiota

    2013-01-15

    Carotenoids are isoprenoid molecules which are synthesised de novo by photosynthetic plants, fungi and algae and are responsible for the orange, yellow and some red colours of various fruits and vegetables. Carotenoids are lipophilic compounds, some of which act as provitamins A. These compounds can be divided into xanthophylls and carotenes. Many macroalgae and microalgae are rich in carotenoids, where these compounds aid in the absorption of sunlight. Industrially, these carotenoids are used as food pigments (in dairy products, beverages, etc.), as feed additives, in cosmetics and in pharmaceuticals, especially nowadays when there is an increasing demand by consumers for natural products. Production of carotenoids from algae has many advantages compared to other sources; for example, their production is cheap, easy and environmentally friendly; their extraction is easier, with higher yields, and there is no lack of raw materials or limited seasonal variation. Recently, there has been considerable interest in dietary carotenoids with respect to their antioxidant properties and their ability to reduce the incidence of some chronic diseases where free radicals are involved. Possibly, carotenoids protect cells from oxidative stress by quenching singlet oxygen damage with various mechanisms. Therefore, carotenoids derived from algae could be a leading natural resource in the research for potential functional ingredients. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Antibacterial activities of bioactive compounds extracted from Marine algae Gracilaria salicornia against Aeromonas hydrophila

    OpenAIRE

    Somayeh Rasooli; Masoud Sattari; Zohreh Ramezanpour; Javid Imanpour Namin

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicinal products have attracted significant research interest in recent years. Considering the efficiency of algae products in controlling pathogenic bacteria and also easy access to large resources of algae, this study was conducted to evaluate the effects of methanolic, chloroformic and aqueous extracts of Gracilaria salicornia against Aeromonas hydrophila, a heterotrophic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium found mainly in warm climate. Algae samples were collected from Qeshm Isl...

  15. Preventive maintenance program for a research and production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rico, N.A.

    1990-01-01

    This program proposes a simple, rapid and efficient methodology for the task of developing a really preventive maintenance discipline. Moreover, the lower cost of its application -since it must satisfy the plant's budget-. To this purpose, an extremely economical and easily obtainable infrastructure is proposed. The following stage is referred to the commissioning system, subsequent supervision and follow-up. The experience gained from the two reactors as RA-6 (Bariloche Atomic Center) and NUR (RAE) of Argelia. Finally, the interacting characteristic of this program, since it may be rapidly adapted to different dimensions of plants, laboratories, etc., must be pointed out. (Author) [es

  16. Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

    2012-12-03

    The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on green fuels which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PI's have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

  17. Biofuels and algae; Biocarburants, la promesse des algues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2011-07-15

    Bio-fuels based on micro-algae are promising, their licensing for being used in plane fuels in a mix containing 50% of fossil kerosene is expected in the coming months. In United-States research on bio-fuels has been made more important since 2006 when 2 policies were launched: 'Advanced energy initiative' and 'Twenty-in-ten', the latter aiming to develop alternative fuels. In Europe less investment has been made concerning micro-algae fuels but research programs were launched in Spain, United-Kingdom and France. In France 3 important projects were launched: SHAMASH (2006-2010) whose aim is to produce lipidic fuels from micro-algae, ALGOHUB (2008-2013) whose aim is to use micro-algae as a raw material for humane and animal food, medicine and cosmetics, SYMBIOSE (2009-2011) whose aim is the optimization of the production of methane through the anaerobic digestion of micro-algae, SALINALGUE (2010-2016) whose aim is to grow micro-algae for the production of bio-energies and bio-products. (A.C.)

  18. Preventing an increase in Verticillium wilt incidence in spinach seed production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Merete Halkjær; Deleuran, Lise Christina; Gislum, René

    2014-01-01

    A semifield assay was conducted from 2009 to 2011 to distinguish between different preventive methods of reducing Verticillium spp. in spinach seed production. The seed treatments for controlling seed infection levels included Thiram, Signum, Trichoderma harzianum, Gliocladium roseum and Natural ...

  19. Preventive maintenance and the interval availability distribution of an unreliable production system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijkhuizen, G.C.; van der Heijden, Matthijs C.

    1998-01-01

    Traditionally, the optimal preventive maintenance interval for an unreliable production system has been determined by maximizing its limiting availability. Nowadays, it is widely recognized that this performance measure does not always provide relevant information for practical purposes. This is

  20. Disaster Prevention Coastal Map Production by MMS & C3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatake, Shuhei; Kohori, Yuki; Watanabe, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    In March 2011, Eastern Japan suffered serious damage of Tsunami caused by a massive earthquake. In 2012, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport published "Guideline of setting assumed areas of inundation by Tsunami" to establish the conditions of topography data used for simulation of Tsunami. In this guideline, the elevation data prepared by Geographical Survey Institute of Japan and 2m/5m/10m mesh data of NSDI are adopted for land area, while 500m mesh data of Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of Japan Coast Guard and sea charts are adopted for water area. These data, however, do not have continuity between land area and water area. Therefore, in order to study the possibility of providing information for coastal disaster prevention, we have developed an efficient method to acquire continuous topography over land and water including tidal zone. Land area data are collected by Mobile Mapping System (MMS) and water area depth data are collected by interferometry echo sounder (C3D), and both data are simultaneously acquired on a same boat. Elaborate point cloud data of 1m or smaller are expected to be used for realistic simulation of Tsunami waves going upstream around shoreline. Tests were made in Tokyo Bay (in 2014) and Osaka Bay (in 2015). The purpose the test in Osaka Bay is to make coastal map for disaster prevention as a countermeasure for predicted Nankai massive earthquake. In addition to Tsunami simulation, the continuous data covering land and marine areas are expected to be used effectively for maintenance and repair of aged port and river facilities, maintenance and investigation of dykes, and ecosystem preservation.

  1. Application of Algae as Cosubstrate To Enhance the Processability of Willow Wood for Continuous Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sintamarean, Iulia-Maria; Pedersen, Thomas Helmer; Zhao, Xueli

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes a novel strategy to improve the continuous processing of wood slurries in hydrothermal liquefaction systems by coprocessing with algae. Of all algae tested, brown seaweeds and microalgae perform best in preventing slurries dewatering, the main reason for pumpability issues...... with wood slurries. Rheological tests (viscosity–shear rate profile) indicate that the addition of these two algae to the wood slurry causes the highest increase in viscosity, which coincides with improved wood slurries stability and pumpability. Hydrothermal liquefaction of wood-algae slurries at 400 °C...

  2. Hepatoprotective efficiency of methanol extract of red algae against chromium-induced oxidative damage in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan Subbiah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the hepatoprotective activity of red algae Portieria hornemannii (Lyngbye Silva (P. hornemannii and Spyridia fusiformis Boergesen (S. fusiformis by using the chromium treated rat liver as the animal model. Methods: The extract of red algae at a dosage of 0.200 g/kg of whole body weight was orally administrated to Cr (VI intoxicated rats for 28 consecutive days. The effect of drug in rats was evaluated by comparing the degree of the production of enzymes responsible for antioxidant activity such lipid peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione with Cr (VI analogs in the absence of any secondary treatment. The overall damage of liver was detected by measuring serum enzymes such as aspartate amino transferase and alanine aminotransferase activities which released into the blood from the damaged cells. Results: It was observed that these enzyme levels were noticed in the animals treated with methanol extracts of red algae (200 mg/kg through preventing the leakage of the above enzymes into the blood. The hepatoprotection obtained using LIV 52 (standard reference drug appeared relatively higher. The antihepatotoxic potential of red algae P. hornemannii and S. fusiformis might be due to their antioxidative and membrane stabilizing activities. Conclusions: Our results indicated that the extract of P. hornemannii and S. fusiformis obtained from methanol could be a promising hepatoprotective agent against chromium (VI-induced liver damage.

  3. The role of algae in agriculture: a mathematical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, P K; Misra, A K; Venturino, Ezio

    2017-06-01

    Synthetic fertilizers and livestock manure are nowadays widely used in agriculture to improve crop yield but nitrogen and phosphorous runoff resulting from their use compromises water quality and contributes to eutrophication phenomena in waterbeds within the countryside and ultimately in the ocean. Alternatively, algae could play an important role in agriculture where they can be used as biofertilizers and soil stabilizers. To examine the possible reuse of the detritus generated by dead algae as fertilizer for crops, we develop three mathematical models building upon each other. A system is proposed in which algae recover waste nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) for reuse in agricultural production. The results of our study show that in so doing, the crop yield may be increased and simultaneously the density of algae in the lake may be reduced. This could be a way to mitigate and possibly solve the environmental and economic issues nowadays facing agriculture.

  4. Yogurt and dairy product consumption to prevent cardiometabolic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Arne

    2014-01-01

    , such as cheese, do not exert the negative effects on blood lipids as predicted solely by the content of saturated fat. Calcium and other bioactive components may modify the effects on LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Apart from supplying valuable dairy nutrients, yogurt may also exert beneficial probiotic...... effects. The consumption of yogurt, and other dairy products, in observational studies is associated with a reduced risk of weight gain and obesity as well as of CVD, and these findings are, in part, supported by randomized trials....

  5. Adherence of preventive oral care products in the Syrian market to evidence-based international recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habes, D; Mahzia, R; Nakhleh, K; Joury, E

    2016-09-25

    No study has investigated the availability and adherence of preventive oral care products on the Syrian market to evidence-based international recommendations. Data were collected in 2012, and updated in 2016, in terms of availability, characteristics and adherence to evidence-based international recommendations. Few preventive products adhered to the recommendations. Despite the large decrease in the number of oral care products on the Syrian market, due to the Syrian crisis, nonadherence of some of the available products is still present. A multisectorial approach at a policy level is needed to address such important limitations. The Syrian Ministry of Health should reform regulations for fluoride products to become subject to drug monitoring systems; the Syrian Arab Committee for Measurements and Standards needs to update its standards; and the Syrian General Dental Association should distribute a preventive booklet to dental practitioners.

  6. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  7. Characterization of the Kootenai River Algae Community and Primary Productivity Before and After Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2004–2007 [Chapter 2, Kootenai River Algal Community Characterization, 2009 KTOI REPORT].

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holderman, Charlie [Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Bonners Ferry, ID; Anders, Paul [Cramer Fish Sciences; Moscow, ID; Shafii, Bahman [Statistical Consulting Services; Clarkston, WA

    2009-07-01

    , and a meandering reach. The study design included 14 sampling sites: an upstream, unimpounded reference site (KR-14), four control (non-fertilized) canyon sites downstream from Libby Dam, but upstream from nutrient addition (KR-10 through KR-13), two treatment sites referred to collectively as the nutrient addition zone (KR-9 and KR-9.1, located at and 5 km downstream from the nutrient addition site), two braided reach sites (KR-6 and KR-7), and four meander reach sites (KR-1 through KR-4). A series of qualitative evaluations and quantitative analyses were used to assess baseline conditions and effects of experimental nutrient addition treatments on chlorophyll, primary productivity, and taxonomic composition and metric arrays for the diatom and green algae communities. Insufficient density in the samples precluded analyses of bluegreen algae taxa and metrics for pre- and post-nutrient addition periods. Chlorophyll a concentration (mg/m{sup 2}), chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d), total chlorophyll concentration (chlorophyll a and b) (mg/m{sup 2}), and total chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d) were calculated. Algal taxa were identified and grouped by taxonomic order as Cyanophyta (blue-greens), Chlorophyta (greens), Bacillariophyta (diatoms), Chrysophyta (goldens), and dominant species from each sample site were identified. Algal densities (number/ml) in periphyton samples were calculated for each sample site and sampling date. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed to reduce the dimension of diatom and algae data and to determine which taxonomic groups and metrics were contributing significantly to the observed variation. PCA analyses were tabulated to indicate eigenvalues, proportion, and cumulative percent variation, as well as eigenvectors (loadings) for each of the components. Biplot graphic displays of PCA axes were also generated to characterize the pattern and structure of the underlying variation. Taxonomic data and a series of

  8. Shewanella algae in acute gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella algae is an emerging bacteria rarely implicated as a human pathogen. Previously reported cases of S. algae have mainly been associated with direct contact with seawater. Here we report the isolation of S. algae as the sole etiological agent from a patient suffering from acute gastroenteritis with bloody diarrhoea. The bacterium was identified by automated identification system and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Our report highlights the importance of looking for the relatively rare aetiological agents in clinical samples that does not yield common pathogens. It also underscores the usefulness of automated systems in identification of rare pathogens.

  9. Forage seeding in rangelands increases production and prevents weed invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Davy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing forage productivity in the Sierra foothill rangelands would help sustain the livestock industry as land availability shrinks and lease rates rise, but hardly any studies have been done on forage selections. From 2009 to 2014, in one of the first long-term and replicated studies of seeding Northern California's Mediterranean annual rangeland, we compared the cover of 22 diverse forages to determine their establishment and survivability over time. Among the annual herbs, forage brassica (Brassica napus L. and chicory (Cichorium intybus L. proved viable options. Among the annual grasses, soft brome (Bromus hordeaceus and annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum performed well. However, these species will likely require frequent reseeding to maintain dominance. Long-term goals of sustained dominant cover (> 3 years are best achieved with perennial grasses. Perennial grasses that persisted with greater than 50% cover were Berber orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata, Flecha tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum and several varieties of hardinggrass (Phalaris aquatica L., Perla koleagrass, Holdfast, Advanced AT. In 2014, these successful perennials produced over three times more dry matter (pounds per acre than the unseeded control and also suppressed annual grasses and yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis L. cover.

  10. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  11. Prokaryotic community profiling of local algae wastewaters using advanced 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limayem, Alya; Micciche, Andrew; Nayak, Bina; Mohapatra, Shyam

    2018-01-01

    Algae biomass-fed wastewaters are a promising source of lipid and bioenergy manufacture, revealing substantial end-product investment returns. However, wastewaters would contain lytic pathogens carrying drug resistance detrimental to algae yield and environmental safety. This study was conducted to simultaneously decipher through high-throughput advanced Illumina 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing, the cultivable and uncultivable bacterial community profile found in a single sample that was directly recovered from the local wastewater systems. Samples were collected from two previously documented sources including anaerobically digested (AD) municipal wastewater and swine wastewater with algae namely Chlorella spp. in addition to control samples, swine wastewater, and municipal wastewater without algae. Results indicated the presence of a significant level of Bacteria in all samples with an average of approximately 95.49% followed by Archaea 2.34%, in local wastewaters designed for algae cultivation. Taxonomic genus identification indicated the presence of Calothrix, Pseudomonas, and Clostridium as the most prevalent strains in both local municipal and swine wastewater samples containing algae with an average of 17.37, 12.19, and 7.84%, respectively. Interestingly, swine wastewater without algae displayed the lowest level of Pseudomonas strains algae indicates potential coexistence between these strains and algae microenvironment, suggesting further investigations. This finding was particularly relevant for the earlier documented adverse effects of some nosocomial Pseudomonas strains on algae growth and their multidrug resistance potential, requiring the development of targeted bioremediation with regard to the beneficial flora.

  12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Radiation Hazard Scale Data Product Review Feedback Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askin, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Buddemeier, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alai, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-20

    In support of the Department of Energy (DOE) National nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) assisted in the development of new data templates for disseminating and communicating FRMAC1 data products using the CDC Radiation Hazard Scale communication tool. To ensure these data products will be useful to stakeholders during a radiological emergency, LLNL facilitated opportunities for product socialization and review.

  13. Algae: America's Pathway to Independence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Custer, James

    2007-01-01

    .... Oil dependency is an unacceptable risk to U.S. national strategy. This paper advocates independence from foreign oil by converting the national transportation fleet to biodiesel derived from algae...

  14. Biological importance of marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gamal, Ali A

    2010-01-01

    Marine organisms are potentially prolific sources of highly bioactive secondary metabolites that might represent useful leads in the development of new pharmaceutical agents. Algae can be classified into two main groups; first one is the microalgae, which includes blue green algae, dinoflagellates, bacillariophyta (diatoms)… etc., and second one is macroalgae (seaweeds) which includes green, brown and red algae. The microalgae phyla have been recognized to provide chemical and pharmacological novelty and diversity. Moreover, microalgae are considered as the actual producers of some highly bioactive compounds found in marine resources. Red algae are considered as the most important source of many biologically active metabolites in comparison to other algal classes. Seaweeds are used for great number of application by man. The principal use of seaweeds as a source of human food and as a source of gums (phycocollides). Phycocolloides like agar agar, alginic acid and carrageenan are primarily constituents of brown and red algal cell walls and are widely used in industry.

  15. Sustainable MSD prevention: management for continuous improvement between prevention and production. Ergonomic intervention in two assembly line companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroly, S; Coutarel, F; Landry, A; Mary-Cheray, I

    2010-07-01

    To increase output and meet customers' needs, companies have turned to the development of production management systems: Kaizen, one piece flow, Kanban, etc. The aim of such systems is to accelerate decisions, react to environmental issues and manage various productions. In the main, this type of management system has led to the continuous improvement of production performance. Consequently, such production management systems can have unexpected negative effects on operators' health and safety. Conversely, regulation and control systems focusing on work-related risks have obliged firms to implement health and safety management systems such as OHSAS 18001. The purpose of this type of system, also based on continuous improvement, is to reduce risks, facilitate work-related activities and identify solutions in terms of equipment and tools. However, the prevention actions introduced through health and safety systems often result in other unexpected and unwanted effects on production. This paper shows how companies can improve the way they are run by taking into account both types of management system. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Lipid oxidation in base algae oil and water-in-algae oil emulsion: Impact of natural antioxidants and emulsifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingcan; Rao, Jiajia; Ding, Yangping; McClements, David Julian; Decker, Eric Andrew

    2016-07-01

    The impact of natural hydrophilic antioxidants, metal chelators, and hydrophilic antioxidant/metal chelator mixture on the oxidative stability of base algae oil and water-in-algae oil emulsion was investigated. The results showed that green tea extract and ascorbic acid had greatest protective effect against algae oil oxidation and generated four day lag phase, whereas rosmarinic acid, grape seed extract, grape seed extract polymer, deferoxamine (DFO), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) had no significant protective effect. Besides, there was no synergistic effect observed between natural antioxidants and ascorbic acid. The emulsifiers are critical to the physicochemical stability of water-in-algae oil emulsions. Polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) promoted the oxidation of emulsion. Conversely, the protective effect on algae oil oxidation was appreciated when defatted soybean lecithin (PC 75) or defatted lyso-lecithin (Lyso-PC) was added. The role of hydrophilic antioxidants in emulsion was similar to that in algae oil except EDTA which demonstrated strong antioxidative effect in emulsion. The results could provide information to build up stable food products containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effectiveness Of Defect Prevention In I.T. For Product Development

    OpenAIRE

    V., Suma; Nair, T. R. Gopalakrishnan

    2010-01-01

    Defect Prevention is the most critical but most neglected component of the software quality assurance in any project. If applied at all stages of software development, it can reduce the time, cost and resources required to engineer a high quality product. Software inspection has proved to be the most effective and efficient technique enabling defect detection and prevention. Inspections carried at all phases of software life cycle have proved to be most beneficial and value added to the attri...

  18. Role of algae in water quality regulation in NPP water reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klenus, V.G.; Kuz'menko, M.I.; Nasvit, O.I.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations, carried out in Chernobyl NPP water reservoir, show that sewage water inflow, being not sufficiently purified, enriched by mineral and organic substances, is accompanied by a considerable increase of algae productivity. The algae play a determining role in accumulation of radionuclides and their transformation into bottom depositions. Comparative investigation of accumulation intensity in alga cells 12 C and 14 C gives evidence that the rate of radioactive nuclide inclusions is practically adequate to the rate of inclusions of their stable analogues. Bacterial destruction of organic contaminations occurs more intensively under aerobic conditions, which are mainly provided due to photosynthetizing activity of algae

  19. Aligning product development and user perspectives: social-behavioural dimensions of multipurpose prevention technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, M; Tolley, E

    2014-10-01

    Multipurpose prevention technologies provide a compelling response to the multiple and reinforcing sexual and reproductive health risks faced by women globally. To ensure that this potential is realised, product-specific characteristics and their social-behavioural correlates must be considered early in the product development process. This paper provides an overview of the key user-related social and behavioural dimensions of three broad categories of multipurpose prevention technologies: 1) sustained release vaginal rings, 2) pericoital vaginal products, and 3) co-formulated or co-administered injectables. The authors build upon the broad parameters of Target Product Profiles for such products, aligning them with user perspective considerations. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. Interactions between arsenic species and marine algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    The arsenic concentration and speciation of marine algae varies widely, from 0.4 to 23 ng.mg/sup -1/, with significant differences in both total arsenic content and arsenic speciation occurring between algal classes. The Phaeophyceae contain more arsenic than other algal classes, and a greater proportion of the arsenic is organic. The concentration of inorganic arsenic is fairly constant in macro-algae, and may indicate a maximum level, with the excess being reduced and methylated. Phytoplankton take up As(V) readily, and incorporate a small percentage of it into the cell. The majority of the As(V) is reduced, methylated, and released to the surrounding media. The arsenic speciation in phytoplankton and Valonia also changes when As(V) is added to cultures. Arsenate and phosphate compete for uptake by algal cells. Arsenate inhibits primary production at concentrations as low as 5 ..mu..g.1/sup -1/ when the phosphate concentration is low. The inhibition is competitive. A phosphate enrichment of > 0.3 ..mu..M alleviates this inhibition; however, the As(V) stress causes an increase in the cell's phosphorus requirement. Arsenite is also toxic to phytoplankton at similar concentrations. Methylated arsenic species did not affect cell productivity, even at concentrations of 25 ..mu..g.1/sup -1/. Thus, the methylation of As(V) by the cell produces a stable, non-reactive compound which is nontoxic. The uptake and subsequent reduction and methylation of As(V) is a significant factor in determining the arsenic biogeochemistry of productive systems, and also the effect that the arsenic may have on algal productivity. Therefore, the role of marine algae in determining the arsenic speciation of marine systems cannot be ignored. (ERB)

  1. Nicorandil prevents sirolimus-induced production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial dysfunction, and thrombus formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Aizawa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sirolimus (SRL is widely used to prevent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. However, its beneficial effect is hampered by complications of thrombosis. Several studies imply that reactive oxygen species (ROS play a critical role in endothelial dysfunction and thrombus formation. The present study investigated the protective effect of nicorandil (NIC, an anti-angina agent, on SRL-associated thrombosis. In human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs, SRL stimulated ROS production, which was prevented by co-treatment with NIC. The preventive effect of NIC on ROS was abolished by 5-hydroxydecanoate but not by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. NIC also inhibited SRL-induced up-regulation of NADPH oxidase subunit p22phox mRNA. Co-treatment with NIC and SRL significantly up-regulated superoxide dismutase 2. NIC treatment significantly improved SRL-induced decrease in viability of HCAECs. The functional relevance of the preventive effects of NIC on SRL-induced ROS production and impairment of endothelial viability was investigated in a mouse model of thrombosis. Pretreatment with NIC inhibited the SRL-induced acceleration of FeCl3-initiated thrombus formation and ROS production in the testicular arteries of mice. In conclusion, NIC prevented SRL-induced thrombus formation, presumably due to the reduction of ROS and to endothelial protection. The therapeutic efficacy of NIC could represent an additional option in the prevention of SRL-related thrombosis.

  2. Marine renewable energies. When researchers consider the ocean as an energy source. Offshore wind power. The thermal energy of seas, a solar resource to be no longer neglected. Lipid biofuels production by micro-algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruer, J.; Gauthier, M.; Zaharia, R.; Cadoret, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    In the present day context of search for renewable energy sources, it is surprising that the oceans energy, potentially enormous, is poorly taken into consideration with respect to the other renewable energy sources, while France has been a pioneer in this domain with the construction of the Rance tidal power plant in the 1960's, and still in operation today. However, the scientific community, and in particular the IFREMER institute in France, is developing R and D programs on marine energy technologies. On the other hand, the development of wind power is growing up rapidly with a worldwide installed capacity exceeding today 94000 MW and supplying 3% of the electricity consumed in Europe. The development of offshore wind farms represents today 1122 MW and should grow up very fast in the coming years. The ocean is also a huge reservoir of thermal energy which can be exploited to generate electricity and desalinated water. Finally, the cultivation of micro-algae for the enhanced production of lipids may be a more ecological alternative to the terrestrial production of biofuels, strongly criticized today for its long term environmental impacts. (J.S.)

  3. Joint optimization of economic production quantity and preventive maintenance with considering multi-products and reserve time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xuejuan; Wang, Binrong

    2017-07-01

    Purpose: We deal with the problem of the joint determination of optimal economic production quantity (EPQ) and optimal preventive maintenance (PM) for a system that can produce multiple products alternately. The objective is to find the optimal number of production cycles and the PM policy simultaneously by minimizing the cost model. Design/methodology/approach: Considering the products go through the system in a sequence and a complete run of all products forms a production cycle. In each cycle, beyond production time we also consider some reserve time for maintenance and setup, shortage and overproduction may occur. We study the integrated problem based on two PM policies, and explain the situation with the other PM policies. The delay – time concept is used to model PM decisions. Findings: Using the integrated EPQ and PM model, we can calculate the optimal production planning and PM schedule simultaneously, especially we consider multiple products in each production cycle, which is more practical and economic than previous works. Originality/value: In modern companies, the production planning and maintenance schedule share the same system, and traditional research about two activities is separated, that always generate conflicts, such as inadequate or excessive maintenance, and shortages, etc., so we develop the integrated EPQ and PM model to avoid these undesirable effects.

  4. Joint optimization of economic production quantity and preventive maintenance with considering multi-products and reserve time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xuejuan; Wang, Binrong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We deal with the problem of the joint determination of optimal economic production quantity (EPQ) and optimal preventive maintenance (PM) for a system that can produce multiple products alternately. The objective is to find the optimal number of production cycles and the PM policy simultaneously by minimizing the cost model. Design/methodology/approach: Considering the products go through the system in a sequence and a complete run of all products forms a production cycle. In each cycle, beyond production time we also consider some reserve time for maintenance and setup, shortage and overproduction may occur. We study the integrated problem based on two PM policies, and explain the situation with the other PM policies. The delay – time concept is used to model PM decisions. Findings: Using the integrated EPQ and PM model, we can calculate the optimal production planning and PM schedule simultaneously, especially we consider multiple products in each production cycle, which is more practical and economic than previous works. Originality/value: In modern companies, the production planning and maintenance schedule share the same system, and traditional research about two activities is separated, that always generate conflicts, such as inadequate or excessive maintenance, and shortages, etc., so we develop the integrated EPQ and PM model to avoid these undesirable effects.

  5. Halogenated furanones from the red alga, Delisea pulchra, inhibit carbapenem antibiotic synthesis and exoenzyme virulence factor production in the phytopathogen Erwinia carotovora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manefield, M.; Welch, M.; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2001-01-01

    activity. We have tested the effects of a halogenated furanone on the production of carbapenem, cellulase and protease in E. carotovora. Despite differences in the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbapenem and exoenzyme production each was inhibited by the algal metabolite. We present evidence...... to suggest that the furanone dependent inhibition of carbapenem production is a result of the disruption of the 3-oxo-C6-HSL dependent expression of the carABCDEFGH operon....

  6. Biogas performance from co-digestion of Taihu algae and kitchen wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Ming-Xing; Ruan, Wen-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Co-digestion mode improves the biogas yield of Taihu algae and kitchen wastes. • Neutral protease enzyme reached maximum in algae only group. • The activity of dehydrogenase enzyme in mixed substrate groups was higher than that of algae and kitchen wastes only group. - Abstract: Co-digestion of Taihu algae with high carbon content substrate can balance the nutrients in the fermentation process. In this study, optimal mixing ratio for co-digestion of Taihu algae and kitchen wastes were investigated in order to improve biogas production potential. The results indicated that the biogas yield reached 388.6 mL/gTS at C/N15:1 group, which was 1.29 and 1.18 times of algae and kitchen wastes only. The maximum concentration of VFA reached 4239 mg/L on 8th day in kitchen wastes group, which was 1.21 times of algae group. Neutral protease enzyme activity in algae group reached maximum of 904.2 μg/(gTS h), while dehydrogenase enzyme at C/N 15:1 group reached maximum of 3402.2 μgTF/(gTS h). The feasibility of adjusting the C/N with co-digestion of Taihu algae and kitchen wastes to increase biogas production was demonstrated. Remarkably, the C/N of 15:1 was found to be the most appropriate ratio

  7. Anti-phytopathogenic activities of macro-algae extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Edra; Dorta, Fernando; Medina, Cristian; Ramírez, Alberto; Ramírez, Ingrid; Peña-Cortés, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanolic extracts obtained from nine Chilean marine macro-algae collected at different seasons were examined in vitro and in vivo for properties that reduce the growth of plant pathogens or decrease the injury severity of plant foliar tissues following pathogen infection. Particular crude aqueous or organic extracts showed effects on the growth of pathogenic bacteria whereas others displayed important effects against pathogenic fungi or viruses, either by inhibiting fungal mycelia growth or by reducing the disease symptoms in leaves caused by pathogen challenge. Organic extracts obtained from the brown-alga Lessonia trabeculata inhibited bacterial growth and reduced both the number and size of the necrotic lesion in tomato leaves following infection with Botrytis cinerea. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the red-alga Gracillaria chilensis prevent the growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi, showing a response which depends on doses and collecting-time. Similarly, aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the brown-alga Durvillaea antarctica were able to diminish the damage caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in tobacco leaves, and the aqueous procedure is, in addition, more effective and seasonally independent. These results suggest that macro-algae contain compounds with different chemical properties which could be considered for controlling specific plant pathogens.

  8. Anti-Phytopathogenic Activities of Macro-Algae Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Ramírez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous and ethanolic extracts obtained from nine Chilean marine macro-algae collected at different seasons were examined in vitro and in vivo for properties that reduce the growth of plant pathogens or decrease the injury severity of plant foliar tissues following pathogen infection. Particular crude aqueous or organic extracts showed effects on the growth of pathogenic bacteria whereas others displayed important effects against pathogenic fungi or viruses, either by inhibiting fungal mycelia growth or by reducing the disease symptoms in leaves caused by pathogen challenge. Organic extracts obtained from the brown-alga Lessonia trabeculata inhibited bacterial growth and reduced both the number and size of the necrotic lesion in tomato leaves following infection with Botrytis cinerea. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the red-alga Gracillaria chilensis prevent the growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi, showing a response which depends on doses and collecting-time. Similarly, aqueous and ethanolic extracts from the brown-alga Durvillaea antarctica were able to diminish the damage caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV in tobacco leaves, and the aqueous procedure is, in addition, more effective and seasonally independent. These results suggest that macro-algae contain compounds with different chemical properties which could be considered for controlling specific plant pathogens.

  9. Cars will be fed on algae; Quand nos voitures rouleront aux algues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltier, G. [CEA-CNRS, Laboratoire de bioenergetique des bacteries et microalgues, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-les-Durance (France)

    2012-02-15

    The development of the first and second generations of bio-fuels has led to a rise in food prices and the carbon balance sheet is less good than expected. Great hopes have been put on unicellular algae for they can synthesize oils, sugar and even hydrogen and the competition with food production is far less harsh than with actual bio-fuels. Moreover, when you grow micro-algae, the loss of water through evaporation is less important than in the case of intensive farm cultures. In 2009 10.000 tonnes of micro-algae were produced worldwide, they were mainly used for the production of fish food and of complements for humane food (fat acids and antioxidants). Different research programs concern unicellular algae: they aim at modifying micro-algae genetically in order to give them a higher productivity or to make them produce an oil more adapted for motor fuel or more easily recoverable. (A.C.)

  10. The current potential of algae biofuels in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    In spite of future uncertainties about industrial algae biofuel production, the UAE is planning to become "a world leader in biofuels from the algae industry by 2020;" thus joining major countries which have already started producing renewable energy and biofuels (biodiesel and bioethanol) from rene...

  11. Sublethal concentrations of ichthyotoxic alga Prymnesium parvum affect rainbow trout susceptibility to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted; Lorenzen, Ellen; Boutrup, Torsten Snogdal

    2016-01-01

    concentrations of the ichthyotoxic alga Prymnesium parvum affect the susceptibility of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). During exposure to sublethal algal concentrations, the fish increased production of mucus on their gills. When fish were exposed to the algae...

  12. Possible future effects of large-scale algae cultivation for biofuels on coastal eutrophication in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaas, H.; Kroeze, C.

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel is increasingly considered as an alternative for fossil diesel. Biodiesel can be produced from rapeseed, palm, sunflower, soybean and algae. In this study, the consequences of large-scale production of biodiesel from micro-algae for eutrophication in four large European seas are analysed.

  13. How Embryophytic is the Biosynthesis of Phenylpropanoids and their Derivatives in Streptophyte Algae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jan; de Vries, Sophie; Slamovits, Claudio H; Rose, Laura E; Archibald, John M

    2017-05-01

    The origin of land plants from algae is a long-standing question in evolutionary biology. It is becoming increasingly clear that many characters that were once assumed to be 'embryophyte specific' can in fact be found in their closest algal relatives, the streptophyte algae. One such case is the phenylpropanoid pathway. While biochemical data indicate that streptophyte algae harbor lignin-like components, the phenylpropanoid core pathway, which serves as the backbone of lignin biosynthesis, has been proposed to have arisen at the base of the land plants. Here we revisit this hypothesis using a wealth of new sequence data from streptophyte algae. Tracing the biochemical pathway towards lignin biogenesis, we show that most of the genes required for phenylpropanoid synthesis and the precursors for lignin production were already present in streptophyte algae. Nevertheless, phylogenetic analyses and protein structure predictions of one of the key enzyme classes in lignin production, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), suggest that CADs of streptophyte algae are more similar to sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenases (SADs). This suggests that the end-products of the pathway leading to lignin biosynthesis in streptophyte algae may facilitate the production of lignin-like compounds and defense molecules. We hypothesize that streptophyte algae already possessed the genetic toolkit from which the capacity to produce lignin later evolved in vascular plants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Design and construction of the microalgal pilot facility AlgaePARC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, R.; Vree, de J.H.; Slegers, P.M.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Barbosa, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae gained much interest from industry as promising sustainable feedstock for the production of food, feed, bulk chemicals, and biofuels. Pilot scale research on microalgae is needed to bridge the gap between laboratory scale research and commercial applications. The AlgaePARC (Algae

  15. 8,8'-Bieckol, isolated from edible brown algae, exerts its anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of NF-κB signaling and ROS production in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yeong-In; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2014-12-01

    Ecklonia cava (E. cava) is an abundant brown alga that contains high levels of phlorotannins, which are unique marine polyphenolic compounds. It has been suggested that E. cava phlorotannins exert anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effects and underlying molecular mechanism exerted by 8,8'-bieckol isolated from E. cava have not been reported. Thus, in this study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of 8,8'-bieckol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated primary macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages. We found that 8,8'-bieckol suppressed key inflammatory mediator [i.e., nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)] production in both primary and RAW 264.7 macrophages. 8,8'-Bieckol inhibited NO by suppressing LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at the mRNA and protein levels in primary macrophages and RAW 264.7 cells. In addition, 8,8'-bieckol decreased the production and mRNA expression of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), but not tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, in RAW 264.7 cells. Moreover, 8,8'-bieckol treatment diminished transactivation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit and suppressed LPS-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in macrophages. Furthermore, 8,8'-bieckol markedly reduced mortality in LPS-induced septic mice. Taken together, these data indicate that the anti-inflammatory properties of 8,8'-bieckol are associated with the suppression of NO, PGE2, and IL-6 via negative regulation of the NF-κB pathway and ROS production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Moreover, 8,8'-bieckol protects mice from endotoxin shock. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  17. Extraction, characterization and application of antioxidants from the Nordic brown alga Fucus vesiculosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermund, Ditte Baun

    the phlorotannin content and radical scavenging capacity of extracts derived from Nordic F. vesiculosus. Radical scavenging capacity is an important antioxidant property in terms of preventing the oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. The high content of antioxidative phlorotannins in F. vesiculosus therefore...... makes this alga particularly attractive for the development of new natural antioxidants. While the in vitro antioxidant properties of F. vesiculosus extracts are widely studied, studies evaluating the antioxidant efficacy of such extracts in food and skin care products are scarce. This PhD study...... investigated the possibilities of using extracts from Nordic F. vesiculosus as natural antioxidants in food and skin care products. All tested food products were fortified with fish oil rich in polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids. The fish oil was added specifically in order to examine the effectiveness...

  18. Multipurpose prevention technologies for sexual and reproductive health: mapping global needs for introduction of new preventive products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelar, Erin; Polis, Chelsea B; Essam, Timothy; Looker, Katharine J; Bruni, Laia; Chrisman, Cara J; Manning, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, women face sexual and reproductive health (SRH) risks including unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. Multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) combine protection against two or more SRH risks into one product. Male and female condoms are the only currently available MPT products, but several other forms of MPTs are in development. We examined the global distribution of selected SRH issues to determine where various risks have the greatest geographical overlap. We examined four indicators relevant to MPTs in development: HIV prevalence, herpes simplex virus type 2 prevalence (HSV-2), human papillomavirus prevalence (HPV) and the proportion of women with unmet need for modern contraception. Using ArcGIS Desktop, we mapped these indicators individually and in combination on choropleth and graduated symbol maps. We conducted a principal components analysis to reduce data and enable visual mapping of all four indicators on one graphic to identify overlap. Our findings document the greatest overlapping risks in Sub-Saharan Africa, and we specify countries in greatest need by specific MPT indication. These results can inform strategic planning for MPT introduction, market segmentation and demand generation; data limitations also highlight the need for improved (non-HIV) STI surveillance globally. MPTs are products in development with the potential to empower women to prevent two or more SRH risks. Geographic analysis of overlapping SRH risks demonstrates particularly high need in Sub-Saharan Africa. This study can help to inform strategic planning for MPT introduction, market segmentation and demand generation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sustainability of algae derived biodiesel: a mass balance approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfromm, Peter H; Amanor-Boadu, Vincent; Nelson, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A rigorous chemical engineering mass balance/unit operations approach is applied here to bio-diesel from algae mass culture. An equivalent of 50,000,000 gallons per year (0.006002 m3/s) of petroleum-based Number 2 fuel oil (US, diesel for compression-ignition engines, about 0.1% of annual US consumption) from oleaginous algae is the target. Methyl algaeate and ethyl algaeate diesel can according to this analysis conceptually be produced largely in a technologically sustainable way albeit at a lower available diesel yield. About 11 square miles of algae ponds would be needed with optimistic assumptions of 50 g biomass yield per day and m2 pond area. CO2 to foster algae growth should be supplied from a sustainable source such as a biomass-based ethanol production. Reliance on fossil-based CO2 from power plants or fertilizer production renders algae diesel non-sustainable in the long term. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Diterpenes from the Brown Alga Dictyota crenulata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Laneuville Teixeira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The crude extract of the Brazilian brown alga Dictyota crenulata was analyzed by NMR spectroscopy and HRGC-MS techniques. Seven diterpenes were identified: pachydictyol A, dictyodial, 4β-hydroxydictyodial A, 4β-acetoxydictyodial A, isopachydictyol A, dictyol C and dictyotadiol. Xeniane diterpenes have previously been found in D. crenulata from the Pacific Ocean. The results characterize D. crenulata as a species that provides prenylated guaiane (group I and xeniane diterpenes (group III, thus making it a new source of potential antiviral products.

  1. Algae-Based Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haoyang, Cai

    2018-03-01

    Our civilization is facing a series of environmental problems, including global warming and climate change, which are caused by the accumulation of green house gases in the atmosphere. This article will briefly analyze the current global warming problem and propose a method that we apply algae cultivation to absorb carbon and use shellfish to sequestrate it. Despite the importance of decreasing CO2 emissions or developing carbon-free energy sources, carbon sequestration should be a key issue, since the amount of carbon dioxide that already exists in the atmosphere is great enough to cause global warming. Algae cultivation would be a good choice because they have high metabolism rates and provides shellfish with abundant food that contains carbon. Shellfish’s shells, which are difficult to be decomposed, are reliable storage of carbon, compared to dead organisms like trees and algae. The amount of carbon that can be sequestrated by shellfish is considerable. However, the sequestrating rate of algae and shellfish is not high enough to affect the global climate. Research on algae and shellfish cultivation, including gene technology that aims to create “super plants” and “super shellfish”, is decisive to the solution. Perhaps the baton of history will shift to gene technology, from nuclear physics that has lost appropriate international environment after the end of the Cold War. Gene technology is vital to human survival.

  2. Does the distribution of ready to use food products for the prevention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sustainable interventions lie in the development of more productive local agricultural, a more diverse mix of nutritious crops, and a greater public awareness regarding feasible, low-cost, and local approaches to a healthy diet. RUF has little to no role to play in the prevention of undernutrition. Interventions implemented to ...

  3. ENERGY PRODUCTION AND POLLUTION PREVENTION AT SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS USING FUEL CELL POWER PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses energy production and pollution prevention at sewage treatment plants using fuel cell power plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at waste water treatment plants during the anaerobic treatment of sewage to reduce solids. The major constituents are...

  4. Natural Products for the Prevention and Alleviation of Risk Factors for Diabetes: Chromium and Cinnamon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural products are widespread for the alleviation and prevention of the risk factors of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. We have shown that glucose, insulin, cholesterol, and hemoglobin A1c levels are all improved in people with type 2 diabetes following chromium supplementation in a double-b...

  5. Effect of lyophilized water extracts of Melissa officinalis on the stability of algae and linseed oil-in-water emulsion to be used as a functional ingredient in meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ciriano, Mikel García-Iñiguez; Rehecho, Sheyla; Calvo, Maria Isabel; Cavero, Rita Yolanda; Navarro, Iñigo; Astiasarán, Iciar; Ansorena, Diana

    2010-06-01

    Previous work pointed out the possibility to enhance the nutritional value of meat products using long chain omega-3 PUFA enriched emulsions. Oil-in-water emulsions elaborated with a mixture of algae and linseed oils (15:10) in order to be used as functional ingredient were stabilized with BHA (butylhydroxyanisol) or with a lyophilized water extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Lemon balm). The lipid profile of the oil mixture showed a high amount of DHA (31.7%), oleic (25.4%) and alpha-linolenic acid (12.7%) resulting in a very low omega-6/omega-3 ratio (0.12). The lyophilized extract of M. officinalis showed a high antioxidant activity (being 62ppm of the lyophilized water extract of Melissa equivalent to 200ppm of BHA, using the DPPH assay as reference), and high total phenolic content. Studying the oxidation process in the emulsions during 15days at room temperature, it could be concluded that this extract was as efficient as BHA in order to control the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Toxicity of Coptis chinensis Rhizome Extracts to Green Algae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-nan; Yuan, Ling

    2015-05-01

    Coptis chinensis contains antiseptic alkaloids and thus its rhizomes and preparations are widely used for the treatment of.fish diseases. In order to realize the risk of water ecosystems produced by this medical herb and preparations used in aquaculture, the present experiment was carried out to study the toxicity of Coptis chinensis rhizome extract (CRE) to Scenedesmus oblique and Chlorella pyrenoidosa grown in culture solution with 0.00 (CK), 0.088 (Tl), 0.44 (T2) and 1.76 mg · L(-1) (T3) of CRE, respectively. The results show that low concentration of CRE (T1) inhibited the growth rate of the alga and high CRE (T2 and T3) ceased growth and reproductions. CRE also decreased the chlorophyll and proteins in alga cells, indicating the inhibition of photosynthesis and protein biosynthesis, which could be direct reasons for the low growth rate and death of green alga. The efflux of protons and substances from alga cells led to pH reduction and conductivity increment in culture solution with CRE. Furthermore, the activity of superoxide dismutase in alga increased at the beginning of CRE in T1 and T2 treatments but decreased as time prolonged which was in contrast to high CRE treatment. And the long exposure to low CRE treatment behaved otherwise. This suggests that the low concentration of CRE could induce the resistant reactions in alga at initial time but high CRE concentration or long exposure even at low CRE concentration could inhibit the enzyme synthesis. Similarly, malondialdehyde in alga increased as CRE concentrations increased in culture solutions, implying the damage and high permeability of cell membrane. In general, Chlorella pyrenoidosa was more sensitive to CRE. The abuse of rhizomes and preparations in aquaculture and intensive cultivation of Coptis chinensis plants in a large scale might produce ecological risks to primary productivity of water ecosystems.

  7. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  8. Algae of economic importance that accumulate cadmium and lead: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila O. Souza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, algae and algae products are extensively applied in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries. Algae are the main organisms that take up and store heavy metals. Therefore, the use of compounds derived from algae by the pharmaceutical industry should be closely monitored for possible contamination. The pollution generated by heavy metals released by industrial and domestic sources causes serious changes in the aquatic ecosystem, resulting in a loss of biological diversity and a magnification and bioaccumulation of toxic agents in the food chain. Since algae are at the bottom of the aquatic food chain, they are the most important vector for transfer of pollution to upper levels of the trophic chain in aquatic environments. Moreover, microalgae are also used for the bioremediation of wastewater, a process that does not produce secondary pollution, that enables efficient recycling of nutrients and that generates biomass useful for the production of bioactive compounds and biofuel.

  9. Algae of economic importance that accumulate cadmium and lead: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila O. Souza

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, algae and algae products are extensively applied in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries. Algae are the main organisms that take up and store heavy metals. Therefore, the use of compounds derived from algae by the pharmaceutical industry should be closely monitored for possible contamination. The pollution generated by heavy metals released by industrial and domestic sources causes serious changes in the aquatic ecosystem, resulting in a loss of biological diversity and a magnification and bioaccumulation of toxic agents in the food chain. Since algae are at the bottom of the aquatic food chain, they are the most important vector for transfer of pollution to upper levels of the trophic chain in aquatic environments. Moreover, microalgae are also used for the bioremediation of wastewater, a process that does not produce secondary pollution, that enables efficient recycling of nutrients and that generates biomass useful for the production of bioactive compounds and biofuel.

  10. Hazard analysis and possibilities for preventing botulism originating from meat products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilev Dragan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the more important data on the bacteria Clostridium botulinum, the appearance of botulism, hazard analysis and the possibilities for preventing botulism. Proteolytic strains of C.botulinum Group I, whose spores are resistant to heat, create toxins predominantly in cans containing slightly sour food items, in the event that the spores are not inactivated in the course of sterilization. Non-proteolytic strains of Group II are more sensitive to high temperatures, but they have the ability to grow and create toxins at low temperatures. Type E most often creates a toxin in vacuum-packed smoked fish, and the non-proteolytic strain type B in dried hams and certain pasteurized meat products. The following plays an important role in the prevention of botulism: reducing to a minimum meat contamination with spores of clostridia, implementing good hygiene measures and production practice during the slaughter of animals, the inactivation of spores of C. botulinum during sterilization (F>3, and, in dried hams and pasteurized products, the prevention of bacterial growth and toxin forming by maintaining low temperatures in the course of production and storage, as well as the correct use of substances that inhibit the multiplication of bacteria and the production of toxins (nitrites, table salt, etc..

  11. Natural Products for the Prevention and Treatment of Hangover and Alcohol Use Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and spirits are widely consumed around the world. However, alcohol and its metabolite acetaldehyde are toxic and harmful to human beings. Chronic alcohol use disorder or occasional binge drinking can cause a wide range of health problems, such as hangover, liver damage and cancer. Some natural products such as traditional herbs, fruits, and vegetables might be potential dietary supplements or medicinal products for the prevention and treatment of the problems caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of effective natural products for the prevention and treatment of hangover and alcohol use disorder, and special emphasis is paid to the possible functional component(s and related mechanism(s of action.

  12. Algae Bloom in a Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sanabria

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to determine the likelihood of an algae bloom in a particular lake located in upstate New York. The growth of algae in this lake is caused by a high concentration of phosphorous that diffuses to the surface of the lake. Our calculations, based on Fick's Law, are used to create a mathematical model of the driving force of diffusion for phosphorous. Empirical observations are also used to predict whether the concentration of phosphorous will diffuse to the surface of this lake within a specified time and under specified conditions.

  13. Microscopic Gardens: A Close Look at Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Mary Ann

    1983-01-01

    Describes classroom activities using algae, including demonstration of eutrophication, examination of mating strains, and activities with Euglena. Includes on algal morphology/physiology, types of algae, and field sources for collecting these organisms. (JN)

  14. A National-Scale Comparison of Resource and Nutrient Demands for Algae-Based Biofuel Production by Lipid Extraction and Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2014-03-01

    Algae’s high productivity provides potential resource advantages over other fuel crops. However, demand for land, water, and nutrients must be minimized to avoid impacts on food production. We apply our national-scale, open-pond, growth and resource models to assess several biomass to fuel technological pathways based on Chlorella. We compare resource demands between hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and lipid extraction (LE) to meet 1.89E+10 and 7.95E+10 L yr-1 biofuel targets. We estimate nutrient demands where post-fuel biomass is consumed as co-products and recycling by anaerobic digestion (AD) or catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG). Sites are selected through prioritization based on fuel value relative to a set of site-specific resource costs. The highest priority sites are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast, but potential sites exist nationwide. We find that HTL reduces land and freshwater consumption by up to 46% and saline groundwater by around 70%. Without recycling, nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) demand is reduced 33%, but is large relative to current U.S. agricultural consumption. The most nutrient-efficient pathways are LE+CHG for N and HTL+CHG for P (by 42%). Resource gains for HTL+CHG are offset by a 344% increase in N consumption relative to LE+CHG (with potential for further recycling). Nutrient recycling is essential to effective use of alternative nutrient sources. Modeling of utilization availability and costs remains, but we find that for HTL+CHG at the 7.95E+10 L yr-1 production target, municipal sources can offset 17% of N and 40% of P demand and animal manures can generally meet demands.

  15. Algae-bacteria interactions: Evolution, ecology and emerging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanan, Rishiram; Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Algae and bacteria have coexisted ever since the early stages of evolution. This coevolution has revolutionized life on earth in many aspects. Algae and bacteria together influence ecosystems as varied as deep seas to lichens and represent all conceivable modes of interactions - from mutualism to parasitism. Several studies have shown that algae and bacteria synergistically affect each other's physiology and metabolism, a classic case being algae-roseobacter interaction. These interactions are ubiquitous and define the primary productivity in most ecosystems. In recent years, algae have received much attention for industrial exploitation but their interaction with bacteria is often considered a contamination during commercialization. A few recent studies have shown that bacteria not only enhance algal growth but also help in flocculation, both essential processes in algal biotechnology. Hence, there is a need to understand these interactions from an evolutionary and ecological standpoint, and integrate this understanding for industrial use. Here we reflect on the diversity of such relationships and their associated mechanisms, as well as the habitats that they mutually influence. This review also outlines the role of these interactions in key evolutionary events such as endosymbiosis, besides their ecological role in biogeochemical cycles. Finally, we focus on extending such studies on algal-bacterial interactions to various environmental and bio-technological applications. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evolution of reproductive development in the volvocine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Armin

    2011-06-01

    The evolution of multicellularity, the separation of germline cells from sterile somatic cells, and the generation of a male-female dichotomy are certainly among the greatest innovations of eukaryotes. Remarkably, phylogenetic analysis suggests that the shift from simple to complex, differentiated multicellularity was not a unique progression in the evolution of life, but in fact a quite frequent event. The spheroidal green alga Volvox and its close relatives, the volvocine algae, span the full range of organizational complexity, from unicellular and colonial genera to multicellular genera with a full germ-soma division of labor and male-female dichotomy; thus, these algae are ideal model organisms for addressing fundamental issues related to the transition to multicellularity and for discovering universal rules that characterize this transition. Of all living species, Volvox carteri represents the simplest version of an immortal germline producing specialized somatic cells. This cellular specialization involved the emergence of mortality and the production of the first dead ancestors in the evolution of this lineage. Volvocine algae therefore exemplify the evolution of cellular cooperation from cellular autonomy. They also serve as a prime example of the evolution of complex traits by a few successive, small steps. Thus, we learn from volvocine algae that the evolutionary transition to complex, multicellular life is probably much easier to achieve than is commonly believed. © The Author(s) 2010. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com

  17. Algogroup: Towards a Shared Vision of the Possible Deployment of Algae to Biofuels

    OpenAIRE

    Montagne, Xavier; Porot, Pierre; Aymard, Caroline; Querleu, Cecile; Bouter, Anne; Lorne, Daphne; Cadoret, Jean-paul; Lombaert-valot, Isabelle; Petillon, Odile

    2013-01-01

    A strong interest has been focused from several years on the algae pathway for energy production, especially for transportation fuels called third generation biofuel or G3 biofuel, and mainly from microalgae route, considering it could be a high potential alternative strategy for renewable energy and fuel production. Algae, and especially microalgae, present significant advantages compared with land resources, such as much higher productivity and lack of competition with food application...

  18. Algae-Based Biofuel Distribution System to Service the Department of Defense in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    photobioreactor for pond algae growth called Alduo. The technology for microalgae has been successful however research is still in a small-scale production ...biofuel to DoD assets. One cohort tackled the cultivation and production of algae-based biofuel and the second cohort investigated the transportation...Rhoades and Professor Brigitte Kwinn, for their guidance, good humor, and fidelity to making sure that the Capstone team provided a quality product . They

  19. Symbiotic Blue Green Algae (Azolla): A Potential Bio fertilizer for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Symbiotic Blue Green Algae (Azolla): A Potential Bio fertilizer for Paddy Rice Production in Fogera Plain, Northwestern Ethiopia. ... They were maintained and multiplied in plastic containers at Adet in a greenhouse and then inoculated into concrete tanks for testing their adaptability. Both strains were well adapted to Adet ...

  20. Transesterification of oil extracted from different species of algae for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the current study, biodiesel production efficiency of Chlorella vulgaris, Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum and mixed algae culture was measured by transesterification process. Growth rate of algal species was measured on the basis of increase in their dry matter in various media. Protein, carbohydrates and lipids in all ...

  1. Possible future effects of large-scale algae cultivation for biofuels on coastal eutrophication in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaas, Harry; Kroeze, Carolien

    2014-10-15

    Biodiesel is increasingly considered as an alternative for fossil diesel. Biodiesel can be produced from rapeseed, palm, sunflower, soybean and algae. In this study, the consequences of large-scale production of biodiesel from micro-algae for eutrophication in four large European seas are analysed. To this end, scenarios for the year 2050 are analysed, assuming that in the 27 countries of the European Union fossil diesel will be replaced by biodiesel from algae. Estimates are made for the required fertiliser inputs to algae parks, and how this may increase concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus in coastal waters, potentially leading to eutrophication. The Global NEWS (Nutrient Export from WaterSheds) model has been used to estimate the transport of nitrogen and phosphorus to the European coastal waters. The results indicate that the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus in the coastal waters may increase considerably in the future as a result of large-scale production of algae for the production of biodiesel, even in scenarios assuming effective waste water treatment and recycling of waste water in algae production. To ensure sustainable production of biodiesel from micro-algae, it is important to develop cultivation systems with low nutrient losses to the environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Specht

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for molecular pharming in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae are poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, and they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally-delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered – from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and system immune reactivity.

  3. Energy from algae using microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Velasquez-Orta, Sharon B.

    2009-08-15

    Bioelectricity production froma phytoplankton, Chlorella vulgaris, and a macrophyte, Ulva lactuca was examined in single chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). MFCs were fed with the two algae (as powders), obtaining differences in energy recovery, degradation efficiency, and power densities. C. vulgaris produced more energy generation per substrate mass (2.5 kWh/kg), but U. lactuca was degraded more completely over a batch cycle (73±1% COD). Maximum power densities obtained using either single cycle or multiple cycle methods were 0.98 W/m2 (277 W/m3) using C. vulgaris, and 0.76 W/m2 (215 W/m3) using U. lactuca. Polarization curves obtained using a common method of linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) overestimated maximum power densities at a scan rate of 1 mV/s. At 0.1 mV/s, however, the LSV polarization data was in better agreement with single- and multiple-cycle polarization curves. The fingerprints of microbial communities developed in reactors had only 11% similarity to inocula and clustered according to the type of bioprocess used. These results demonstrate that algae can in principle, be used as a renewable source of electricity production in MFCs. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Elizabeth A.; Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for “molecular pharming” in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered – from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity. PMID:24596570

  5. Flavonoid compounds from the red marine alga Alsidium corallinum protect against potassium bromate-induced nephrotoxicity in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Saad, Hajer; Gargouri, Manel; Kallel, Fatma; Chaabene, Rim; Boudawara, Tahia; Jamoussi, Kamel; Magné, Christian; Mounir Zeghal, Khaled; Hakim, Ahmed; Ben Amara, Ibtissem

    2017-05-01

    Potassium bromate (KBrO 3 ), an environmental pollutant, is a well-known human carcinogen and a potent nephrotoxic agent. Currently, natural products have built a well-recognized role in the management of many diseases induced by pollutants. As potent natural sources of bioactive compounds, marine algae have been demonstrated to be rich in novel secondary metabolites with a broad range of biological functions. In this study, adults male mice were orally treated for 15 days with KBrO 3 (0.5 g/L) associated or not with extract of Alsidium corallinum, a red Mediterranean alga. In vitro study demonstrated that algal extract has antioxidant efficacy attributable to the presence of flavonoids and polyphenols. Among these, Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed A. corallinum is rich in kaempferol, apigenin, catechin, and quercetin flavonoids. In vivo study showed that supplementation with the alga significantly prevented KBrO 3 -induced nephrotoxicity as indicated by plasma biomarkers (urea, uric acid, and creatinin levels) and oxidative stress related parameters (malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, vitamin C, hydrogen peroxide, protein oxidation products) in kidney tissue. The corrective effect of A. corallinum on KBrO 3 -induced kidney injury was also supported by molecular and histopathological observations. In conclusion, it was established that the red alga, thanks to its bioactive compounds, effectively counteracts toxic effects of KBrO 3 and could be a useful coadjuvant agent for treatment of this pollutant poisonings. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1475-1486, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Evaluation of the contamination of marine algae (seaweed) from the St. Lawrence River and likely to be consumed by humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaneuf, D.; Cote, I.; Dumas, P.; Ferron, L.A.; LeBlanc, A. [CHUQ, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Toxicologie du Quebec

    1999-02-01

    The goal of the study was to assess the contamination of marine algae (seaweeds) growing in the St. Lawrence River estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence and to evaluate the risks to human health from the consumption of these algae. Algae were collected by hand at low tide. A total of 10 sites on the north and south shores of the St. Lawrence as well as in Baie des Chaleurs were sampled. The most frequently collected species of algae were Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Laminaria Longicruris, Palmaria palmata, Ulva lactuca, and Fucus distichus. Alga samples were analyzed for metals iodine, and organochlorines. A risk assessment was performed using risk factors. In general, concentrations in St. Lawrence algae were not very high. Consequently, health risks associated with these compounds in St. Lawrence algae were very low. Iodine concentration, on the other hand, could be of concern with regard to human health. Regular consumption of algae, especially of Laminaria sp., could result in levels of iodine sufficient to cause thyroid problems. For regular consumers, it would be preferable to choose species with low iodine concentrations, such as U. lactuca and P. palmata, in order to prevent potential problems. Furthermore, it would also be important to assess whether preparation for consumption or cooking affects the iodine content of algae. Algae consumption may also have beneficial health effects. Scientific literature has shown that it is a good source of fiber and vitamins, especially vitamin B{sub 12}.

  7. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1120 Brown algae. (a) Brown algae are seaweeds of the species Analipus...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1121 Red algae. (a) Red algae are seaweeds of the species Gloiopeltis...

  9. User input in iterative design for prevention product development: leveraging interdisciplinary methods to optimize effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Kate M; Rosen, Rochelle K; Vargas, Sara E; Guillen, Melissa; Steger, Arielle L; Getz, Melissa L; Smith, Kelley A; Ramirez, Jaime J; Kojic, Erna M

    2017-10-01

    The development of HIV-preventive topical vaginal microbicides has been challenged by a lack of sufficient adherence in later stage clinical trials to confidently evaluate effectiveness. This dilemma has highlighted the need to integrate translational research earlier in the drug development process, essentially applying behavioral science to facilitate the advances of basic science with respect to the uptake and use of biomedical prevention technologies. In the last several years, there has been an increasing recognition that the user experience, specifically the sensory experience, as well as the role of meaning-making elicited by those sensations, may play a more substantive role than previously thought. Importantly, the role of the user-their sensory perceptions, their judgements of those experiences, and their willingness to use a product-is critical in product uptake and consistent use post-marketing, ultimately realizing gains in global public health. Specifically, a successful prevention product requires an efficacious drug, an efficient drug delivery system, and an effective user. We present an integrated iterative drug development and user experience evaluation method to illustrate how user-centered formulation design can be iterated from the early stages of preclinical development to leverage the user experience. Integrating the user and their product experiences into the formulation design process may help optimize both the efficiency of drug delivery and the effectiveness of the user.

  10. Algae. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    The plants and plantlike organisms informally grouped together as algae show great diversity of form and size and occur in a wide variety of habitats. These extremely important photosynthesizers are also economically significant. For example, some species contaminate water supplies; others provide food for aquatic animals and for man; still others…

  11. Macroalgae Laminaria digitata and Saccharina latissima as Potential Biomasses for Biogas and Total Phenolics Production: Focusing on Seasonal and Spatial Variations of the Algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Este, Martina; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Ciofalo, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Laminaria digitata (L. digitata) and Saccharina latissima (S. latissima) are the most common species of macroalgae in the north Atlantic and north Pacific. Because of their interesting composition, they have recently attracted attention as useful biomass for various purposes such as for biochemic......Laminaria digitata (L. digitata) and Saccharina latissima (S. latissima) are the most common species of macroalgae in the north Atlantic and north Pacific. Because of their interesting composition, they have recently attracted attention as useful biomass for various purposes...... such as for biochemicals and bioenergy production. Nevertheless their composition varies according to the season and to the local environmental conditions. Therefore, in this study different samples harvested throughout a year and in different locations in Denmark were analyzed. The aim of the study was identifying...... in summer when the sugar level and the light intensity reached their maximum....

  12. Algae in fish feed: performances and fatty acid metabolism in juvenile Atlantic Salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Norambuena

    Full Text Available Algae are at the base of the aquatic food chain, producing the food resources that fish are adapted to consume. Previous studies have proven that the inclusion of small amounts (<10% of the diet of algae in fish feed (aquafeed resulted in positive effects in growth performance and feed utilisation efficiency. Marine algae have also been shown to possess functional activities, helping in the mediation of lipid metabolism, and therefore are increasingly studied in human and animal nutrition. The aim of this study was to assess the potentials of two commercially available algae derived products (dry algae meal, Verdemin (derived from Ulva ohnoi and Rosamin (derived from diatom Entomoneis spp. for their possible inclusion into diet of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar. Fish performances, feed efficiency, lipid metabolism and final product quality were assessed to investigated the potential of the two algae products (in isolation at two inclusion levels, 2.5% and 5%, or in combination, in experimental diets specifically formulated with low fish meal and fish oil content. The results indicate that inclusion of algae product Verdemin and Rosamin at level of 2.5 and 5.0% did not cause any major positive, nor negative, effect in Atlantic Salmon growth and feed efficiency. An increase in the omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 LC-PUFA content in whole body of fish fed 5% Rosamin was observed.

  13. Guidelines used in Japan to prevent the contamination of feed products with undesirable substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Sugiura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As Japan depends on imports for most ingredients used to manufacture feed products, close co-operation is indispensable between importers and manufacturers of feed and feed ingredients to effectively mitigate the risk associated with feed safety. Guidelines were issued by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF in March 2008 to prevent feed products from being contaminated with undesirable substances. These guidelines identify the responsibilities of feed ingredient importers, feed manufacturers and distributors, as well as the roles of the MAFF and the Food and Agricultural Materials Inspection Centre.

  14. Perceptibility and the "Choice Experience": User Sensory Perceptions and Experiences Inform Vaginal Prevention Product Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Kate Morrow; Dunsiger, Shira; Vargas, Sara E; Fava, Joseph L; Shaw, Julia G; Rosen, Rochelle K; Kiser, Patrick F; Kojic, E Milu; Friend, David R; Katz, David F

    The development of pericoital (on demand) vaginal HIV prevention technologies remains a global health priority. Clinical trials to date have been challenged by nonadherence, leading to an inability to demonstrate product efficacy. The work here provides new methodology and results to begin to address this limitation. We created validated scales that allow users to characterize sensory perceptions and experiences when using vaginal gel formulations. In this study, we sought to understand the user sensory perceptions and experiences (USPEs) that characterize the preferred product experience for each participant. Two hundred four women evaluated four semisolid vaginal formulations using the USPE scales at four randomly ordered formulation evaluation visits. Women were asked to select their preferred formulation experience for HIV prevention among the four formulations evaluated. The scale scores on the Sex-associated USPE scales (e.g., Initial Penetration and Leakage) for each participant's selected formulation were used in a latent class model analysis. Four classes of preferred formulation experiences were identified. Sociodemographic and sexual history variables did not predict class membership; however, four specific scales were significantly related to class: Initial Penetration, Perceived Wetness, Messiness, and Leakage. The range of preferred user experiences represented by the scale scores creates a potential target range for product development, such that products that elicit scale scores that fall within the preferred range may be more acceptable, or tolerable, to the population under study. It is recommended that similar analyses should be conducted with other semisolid vaginal formulations, and in other cultures, to determine product property and development targets.

  15. Prevention of incontinence-related skin breakdown for acute and critical care patients: comparison of two products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Mary; Droegemueller, Carol; Rivers, Sonja; Deuser, William E

    2012-01-01

    Perineal protection products were compared for their efficacy in preventing skin breakdown in the hospitalized patient with urinary and/or fecal incontinence. Each product was used for the duration of the hospital stay with daily observations for perineal skin condition. Results indicated the spray product and wipe product were comparable in rate of skin breakdown prevention. Findings suggest the wipe product is more cost-effective for use during hospitalization, and the spray product preserves skin integrity over a longer period of time, beyond average hospitalization duration.

  16. Mechanisms of pediatric electrical injury. New implications for product safety and injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabban, J T; Blair, J A; Rosen, C L; Adler, J N; Sheridan, R L

    1997-07-01

    To determine age-specific mechanisms of electrical injury in children, to examine product safety regulation of the major sources of electrical injury hazard, and to assess the adequacy of current prevention strategies. Case series of 144 pediatric and adolescent electrical injuries in patients seen in the specialized burn center and tertiary care hospital between 1970 and 1995, examination of Consumer Product Safety Commission product recall reports for electrical injury hazards between 1973 and 1995, and review of the National Electric Code. Eighty-six cases of electrical injuries resulted from low-voltage (products identified by the Consumer Product Safety Commission to be electrical injury hazards, 119 were appliance cords, extension cords, or holiday stringed light sets. Several products numbered more than 1.5 million units in US household distribution prior to the investigation by the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Household electrical cords are the major electrocution hazard for children younger than 12 years, yet no federal safety mandates exist. Despite voluntary standards, noncompliant manufacturers can introduce vast numbers of unsafe cords onto the US household market every year. Conversion of existing voluntary safety guidelines into federally legislated standards may be the most effective intervention against pediatric electrocutions.

  17. Experiences with preventive procedures application in the process of beer production in Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kotovicová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Food-processing industry is an intriguing field regarding prevention procedures application. All food-processing operations have common fundamental spheres of problems – wastewater polluted by organic substances, solid waste of biological origin and losses during source material processing. Beer production process is a representative of food-processing sphere. The brewing industry has an ancient tradition and is still a dynamic sector open to new developments in technology and scientific progress. A case study of beer production in Czech Republic has been performed. During the work on the project, there were utilized methodical procedures of Cleaner Production, best available technologies (BAT utilization and hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP, optimization of final technology operation.

  18. Characterization of Black Raspberry Functional Food Products for Cancer Prevention Human Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Junnan; Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer H.; Riedl, Kenneth M.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Clinton, Steven K.; Vodovotz, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Our team is designing and fully characterizing black raspberry (BRB) food products suitable for long-term cancer prevention studies. The processing, scale-up, and storage effects on the consistency, quality, bioactive stability, and sensory acceptability of two BRB delivery systems of various matrices are presented. BRB dosage, pH, water activity, and texture were consistent in the scale-up production. Confections retained >90% of anthocyanins and ellagitannin after processing. Nectars had >69% of anthocyanins and >66% of ellagitannin retention, which varied with BRB dosage due to the processing difference. Texture remained unchanged during storage. BRB products consumed in a prostate cancer clinical trial were well accepted in sensory tests. Thus, this study demonstrates that two different BRB foods can be formulated to meet quality standards with a consistent bioactive pattern and successfully scaled up for a large human clinical trial focusing on cancer risk and other health outcomes. PMID:24345009

  19. Preventive and therapeutic application of molecular hydrogen in situations with excessive production of free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezák, J; Kura, B; Frimmel, K; Zálešák, M; Ravingerová, T; Viczenczová, C; Okruhlicová, Ľ; Tribulová, N

    2016-09-19

    Excessive production of oxygen free radicals has been regarded as a causative common denominator of many pathological processes in the animal kingdom. Hydroxyl and nitrosyl radicals represent the major cause of the destruction of biomolecules either by a direct reaction or by triggering a chain reaction of free radicals. Scavenging of free radicals may act preventively or therapeutically. A number of substances that preferentially react with free radicals can serve as scavengers, thus increasing the internal capacity/activity of endogenous antioxidants and protecting cells and tissues against oxidative damage. Molecular hydrogen (H(2)) reacts with strong oxidants, such as hydroxyl and nitrosyl radicals, in the cells, that enables utilization of its potential for preventive and therapeutic applications. H(2) rapidly diffuses into tissues and cells without affecting metabolic redox reactions and signaling reactive species. H(2) reduces oxidative stress also by regulating gene expression, and functions as an anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic agent. There is a growing body of evidence based on the results of animal experiments and clinical observations that H(2) may represent an effective antioxidant for the prevention of oxidative stress-related diseases. Application of molecular hydrogen in situations with excessive production of free radicals, in particular, hydroxyl and nitrosyl radicals is relatively simple and effective, therefore, it deserves special attention.

  20. Iron encrustations on filamentous algae colonized by Gallionella-related bacteria in a metal-polluted freshwater stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, J. F.; Neu, T. R.; Lu, S.; Händel, M.; Totsche, K. U.; Küsel, K.

    2015-09-01

    Filamentous macroscopic algae were observed in slightly acidic to circumneutral (pH 5.9-6.5), metal-rich stream water that leaked out from a former uranium mining district (Ronneburg, Germany). These algae differed in color and morphology and were encrusted with Fe-deposits. To elucidate their potential interaction with Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), we collected algal samples at three time points during summer 2013 and studied the algae-bacteria-mineral compositions via confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, and a 16S and 18S rRNA gene-based bacterial and algae community analysis. Surprisingly, sequencing analysis of 18S rRNA gene regions of green and brown algae revealed high homologies with the freshwater algae Tribonema (99.9-100 %). CLSM imaging indicated a loss of active chloroplasts in the algae cells, which may be responsible for the change in color in oxidation under the putative oxygen-saturated conditions that occur in association with photosynthetic algae. Quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction) revealed even higher Gallionella-related 16S rRNA gene copy numbers on the surface of green algae compared to the brown algae. The latter harbored a higher microbial diversity, including some putative predators of algae. A loss of chloroplasts in the brown algae could have led to lower photosynthetic activities and reduced EPS production, which is known to affect predator colonization. Collectively, our results suggest the coexistence of oxygen-generating algae Tribonema sp. and strictly microaerophilic neutrophilic FeOB in a heavy metal-rich environment.

  1. Design parameters of high rate algal ponds using filamentous algae matrix for treating rural stream water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T E; Chung, W M; Lim, B S

    2002-01-01

    High rate algal ponds (HRAP) with a filamentous algae matrix (FAM) as the predominant species, were operated to evaluate the characteristics of FAM and the basic design parameters for treating polluted rural stream water. The porous and gelatinous FAM was formed like a sponge, which functions to prevent excessive loss of the algae in the effluent and can easily be retrieved from the ponds. The organic fraction of harvested FAM was about 88%, which is suitable for use as fertilizer. The HRAP system using FAM was found to be an effective nutrient removal process not requiring any artificial carbon sources for nitrification. At HRT 4 days, the T-N and T-P removal efficiencies were 85.9% and 65.8%, respectively. When the pH and water temperature were maintained above 9 and 15 degrees C, HRT required for achieving a 70% T-N removal efficiency could be reduced by about 3 days. The oxygen production rate by FAM was calculated as 1.45 mgO2/L/m2. The design surface area of HRAP needed per rural inhabitant was about 2.72 m2.

  2. Gastroprotective Effects of Sulphated Polysaccharides from the Alga Caulerpa mexicana Reducing Ethanol-Induced Gastric Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gerardo Carneiro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the gastric lesion is complex and the result of the imbalance between aggressive and protective factors, involving the generation of free radicals and disturbance in nitric oxide (NO production. Sulphated polysaccharides (SP, from marine algae, are widely used in biotechnological and pharmaceutical areas. In this study, we evaluated the effects of SP from the green marine alga Caulerpa mexicana (Cm-SP in ethanol-induced gastric damage models in mice. Cm-SP (2, 20, or 200 mg/kg, administered p.o., significantly reduced gastric damage, and these effects were inhibited through pretreatment with indomethacin. Cm-SP (200 mg/kg prevented the ethanol-induced decline in glutathione and restored its normal level. Moreover, it was able to normalize the elevated thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels. However, Cm-SP did not show any significant effects on NO2/NO3 level, when compared to the ethanol group. The pretreatment with L- NAME induced gastric mucosal damage and did not inhibit the gastroprotective effect of Cm-SP (200 mg/kg. In conclusion, the gastroprotective effects of Cm-SP in mice involve prostaglandins and reduction in the oxidative stress and are independent of NO.

  3. Gastroprotective Effects of Sulphated Polysaccharides from the Alga Caulerpa mexicana Reducing Ethanol-Induced Gastric Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, José Gerardo; Holanda, Ticiana de Brito Lima; Quinderé, Ana Luíza Gomes; Frota, Annyta Fernandes; Soares, Vitória Virgínia Magalhães; Sousa, Rayane Siqueira de; Carneiro, Manuela Araújo; Martins, Dainesy Santos; Gomes Duarte, Antoniella Souza; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2018-01-20

    The development of the gastric lesion is complex and the result of the imbalance between aggressive and protective factors, involving the generation of free radicals and disturbance in nitric oxide (NO) production. Sulphated polysaccharides (SP), from marine algae, are widely used in biotechnological and pharmaceutical areas. In this study, we evaluated the effects of SP from the green marine alga Caulerpa mexicana (Cm-SP) in ethanol-induced gastric damage models in mice. Cm-SP (2, 20, or 200 mg/kg), administered p.o., significantly reduced gastric damage, and these effects were inhibited through pretreatment with indomethacin. Cm-SP (200 mg/kg) prevented the ethanol-induced decline in glutathione and restored its normal level. Moreover, it was able to normalize the elevated thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels. However, Cm-SP did not show any significant effects on NO₂/NO₃ level, when compared to the ethanol group. The pretreatment with L- NAME induced gastric mucosal damage and did not inhibit the gastroprotective effect of Cm-SP (200 mg/kg). In conclusion, the gastroprotective effects of Cm-SP in mice involve prostaglandins and reduction in the oxidative stress and are independent of NO.

  4. Indigenous algae: Potential factories for biodiesel production

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maharajh, Dheepak M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The environmental effects of burning fossil fuels and the increased crude oil prices have triggered increased interest in biofuels. Biodiesel is traditionally produced from oil seed crops, which have lower yields per land area and threaten food...

  5. Stand alone biofuel production from algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijffels, R.H.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Barbosa, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this feature, leading researchers in the field of microbial biotechnology speculate on the technical and conceptual developments that will drive innovative research and open new vistas over the next few years

  6. Thicker three-dimensional tissue from a "symbiotic recycling system" combining mammalian cells and algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Yuji; Kagawa, Yuki; Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2017-01-31

    In this paper, we report an in vitro co-culture system that combines mammalian cells and algae, Chlorococcum littorale, to create a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue. While the C2C12 mouse myoblasts and rat cardiac cells consumed oxygen actively, intense oxygen production was accounted for by the algae even in the co-culture system. Although cell metabolism within thicker cardiac cell-layered tissues showed anaerobic respiration, the introduction of innovative co-cultivation partially changed the metabolism to aerobic respiration. Moreover, the amount of glucose consumption and lactate production in the cardiac tissues and the amount of ammonia in the culture media decreased significantly when co-cultivated with algae. In the cardiac tissues devoid of algae, delamination was observed histologically, and the release of creatine kinase (CK) from the tissues showed severe cardiac cell damage. On the other hand, the layered cell tissues with algae were observed to be in a good histological condition, with less than one-fifth decline in CK release. The co-cultivation with algae improved the culture condition of the thicker tissues, resulting in the formation of 160 μm-thick cardiac tissues. Thus, the present study proposes the possibility of creating an in vitro "symbiotic recycling system" composed of mammalian cells and algae.

  7. Natural Abundance 14C Content of Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP from Three Marine Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyo Ukai

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Analysis of the natural abundance 14C content of dibutyl phthalate (DBP from two edible brown algae, Undaria pinnatifida and Laminaria japonica, and a green alga, Ulva sp., revealed that the DBP was naturally produced. The natural abundance 14C content of di-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP obtained from the same algae was about 50-80% of the standard sample and the 14C content of the petrochemical (industrial products of DBP and DEHP were below the detection limit.

  8. Assessment of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O157 Illnesses Prevented by Recalls of Beef Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seys, Scott A; Sampedro, Fernando; Hedberg, Craig W

    2015-09-01

    Beef product recall data from 2005 through 2012 associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 contamination were used to develop quantitative models to estimate the number of illnesses prevented by recalls. The number of illnesses prevented was based on the number of illnesses that occurred relative to the number of pounds consumed, then extrapolated to the number of pounds of recalled product recovered. A simulation using a Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) probability distribution with illness-related recalls estimated 204 (95% credible interval, 117-333) prevented STEC O157 illnesses from 2005 through 2012. Recalls not associated with illnesses had more recalled product recovered and prevented an estimated 83 additional STEC O157 illnesses. Accounting for underdiagnosis resulted in an estimated total of 7500 STEC O157 illnesses prevented over 8 years. This study demonstrates that recalls, although reactive in nature, are an important tool for averting further exposure and illnesses.

  9. Hydrothermal Treatment (HTT) of Microalgae: Evaluation of the Process As Conversion Method in an Algae Biorefinery Concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Alba, Laura; Torri, C.; Samori, C.; van der Spek, J.J.; Fabbri, D.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The hydrothermal treatment (HTT) technology is evaluated for its potential as a process to convert algae and algal debris into a liquid fuel, within a sustainable algae biorefinery concept in which, next to fuels (gaseous and liquid), high value products are coproduced, nutrients and water are

  10. Modeling the Role of Zebra Mussels in the Proliferation of Blue-green Algae in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under model assumptions from Saginaw Bay 1991, selective rejection of blue-green algae by zebra mussels appears to be a necessary factor in the enhancement of blue-green algae production in the presence of zebra mussels. Enhancement also appears to depend on the increased sedime...

  11. Bacterial Enhancement of Vinyl Fouling by Algae

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Paul E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of bacteria in the development of algae on low-density vinyl was investigated. Unidentified bacterial contaminants in unialgal stock cultures of Phormidium faveolarum and Pleurochloris pyrenoidosa enhanced, by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, colonization of vinyl by these algae, as determined by epifluorescence microscopy counts and chlorophyll a in extracts of colonized vinyl. Colonization by bacteria always preceded that by algae. Scanning electron microscopy of the colonized Phormidiu...

  12. Antioxidant Activity of Hawaiian Marine Algae

    OpenAIRE

    Kelman, Dovi; Posner, Ellen Kromkowski; McDermid, Karla J.; Tabandera, Nicole K.; Wright, Patrick R.; Wright, Anthony D.

    2012-01-01

    Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that cou...

  13. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-15

    We consider the development of harmful algae blooms (HABs) in a lake with uncertain nutrients inflow. Two general frameworks, Fokker-Planck equation and the PDF methods, are developed to quantify the resultant concentration uncertainty of various algae groups, via deriving a deterministic equation of their joint probability density function (PDF). A computational example is examined to study the evolution of cyanobacteria (the blue-green algae) and the impacts of initial concentration and inflow-outflow ratio.

  14. [The place of chemical products in oral hygiene for the prevention and treatment of periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamagate, A; Kone, D; Coulibaly, N T; Ahnqux, A; Sixou, M

    2004-06-01

    The mechanical elimination of the bacteria plaque is the basis of the prevention and the treatment of gingivitis and periodontitis. Chemicals products used in the control of supra and subgingival plaque show a great importance because of individual and professional difficulties which constitute an impediment to the effective elimination of the bacteria plaque. However, by this time, there's no miracle product for oral hygiene capable at long term to take over from the tooth-brush and paste. The use at long term of chemicals in the bacteria plaque control can't be recommended because of their following effects and their slight effectivity-cost ratio. Nevertheless, oral hygiene chemicals combined with mechanical treatment provide very good results. Particularly, when used in the form of subgingival irrigation or slow liberation materials set in the periodontal pocket.

  15. Money-back guarantee warranty policy with preventive maintenance strategy for sensor-embedded remanufactured products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Ammar Y.; Gupta, Surendra M.

    2018-01-01

    In today's global environment, technology is constantly evolving. Being able to stay up-to-date with the very latest technological advances can be extremely hard to accomplish. As a result of these changes and developments in technology, which often come unexpectedly, consumers are frequently tempted to update their devices to the very latest model. The result is that the life cycle of a product is becoming shorter and shorter than before. Manufacturers attempt to respond to consumers' concerns involving environmental issues as well as the more governmentally stringent environmental legislations by establishing facilities which include the minimization of the totality of waste relocated to landfills by recovering materials and components from returned, or End-Of-Life products and reuse them to build a remanufactured product, and/or novel components. With the rapid growth of interest in remanufactured products' market, offering warranty for remanufactured products and components is becoming a necessity for remanufacturer in order to meet customers' requirement and as a marketing mechanism. During that process, maintenance policies are of great importance in order to reduce the warranty cost on the remanufacturer. In this paper, an optimization simulation model for remanufactured items sold with one-dimensional non-renewing money-back guarantee (MBG) warranty policy is proposed from the view of remanufacturer, in which, an End-Of-Life product is subjected to upgrade action at the end of its past life and during the warranty period, preventive maintenance actions are carried out when the remaining life of the product reaches a pre-specified value so that the remanufacturer's expected profit can be maximized. Finally, a numerical example and design of experiment analysis are provided to demonstrate the proposed approach.

  16. Pressurized thermal and hydrothermal decomposition of algae, wood chip residue, and grape marc: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subagyono, Dirgarini J.N.; Marshall, Marc; Jackson, W. Roy; Chaffee, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    Pressurized thermal decomposition of two marine algae, Pinus radiata chip residue and grape marc using high temperature, high pressure reactions has been studied. The yields and composition of the products obtained from liquefactions under CO of a mixture of biomass and H 2 O (with or without catalyst) were compared with products from liquefaction of dry biomass under N 2 , at different temperatures, gas pressures and for CO runs, water to biomass ratios. Thermochemical reactions of algae produced significantly higher dichloromethane solubles and generally higher product yields to oil and asphaltene than Pinus radiata and grape marc under the reaction conditions used. Furthermore, the biofuels derived from algae contained significant concentrations of aliphatic hydrocarbons as opposed to those from radiata pine and grape marc which were richer in aromatic compounds. The possibility of air transport fuel production from algae thus appears to have considerable advantages over that from radiata pine and grape marc. - Highlights: • Liquefaction of algae gave more oil than that of Pinus radiata and grape marc. • Reactions under CO/H 2 O produced higher yields of oil than N 2 . • Water to biomass ratio had little effect on the yields. • Bio-oil from algae contained substantial amounts of aliphatic hydrocarbons. • Pinus radiata oil was low in N but high in O

  17. Oleate Prevents Palmitate-Induced Atrophy via Modulation of Mitochondrial ROS Production in Skeletal Myotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojun Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of saturated fatty acids contributes to lipotoxicity-related insulin resistance and atrophy in skeletal muscle. Conversely, unsaturated fatty acids like docosahexaenoic acid were proven to preserve muscle mass. However, it is not known if the most common unsaturated oleate will protect skeletal myotubes against palmitate-mediated atrophy, and its specific mechanism remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the effects of oleate on atrophy-related factors in palmitate-conditioned myotubes. Exposure of myotubes to palmitate, but not to oleate, led to an induction of fragmented nuclei, myotube loss, atrophy, and mitochondrial superoxide in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of oleate to myotubes attenuated production of palmitate-induced mitochondrial superoxide in a dose-dependent manner. The treatment of oleate or MitoTEMPO to palmitate-conditioned myotubes led to inhibition of palmitate-induced mRNA expression of proinflammatory (TNF-α and IL6, mitochondrial fission (Drp1 and Fis1, and atrophy markers (myostatin and atrogin1. In accordance with the gene expression data, our immunocytochemistry experiment demonstrated that oleate and MitoTEMPO prevented or attenuated palmitate-mediated myotube shrinkage. These results provide a mechanism indicating that oleate prevents palmitate-mediated atrophy via at least partial modulation of mitochondrial superoxide production.

  18. Impact of nanotechnology on the delivery of natural products for cancer prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Imtiaz A; Sanna, Vanna

    2016-06-01

    Chemoprevention of human cancer by dietary products is a practical approach of cancer control, especially when chemoprevention is involved during the early stages of the carcinogenesis process. Research over the last few decades has clearly demonstrated the efficacy of dietary products for chemoprevention in cell culture and preclinical animal model systems. However, these in vitro and in vivo effects have not been able to be translated to bedside for clinical use. Among many reasons, inefficient systemic delivery and bioavailability of promising chemopreventive agents are considered to significantly contribute to such a disconnection. Since its advent in the field of cancer, nanotechnology has provided researchers with expertise to explore new avenues for diagnosis, prevention, and therapy of the disease. In a similar trait, we introduced a novel concept in which nanotechnology was utilized for enhancing the outcome of chemoprevention (Cancer Res. 2009; 69:1712-1716). This idea, which we termed as 'nanochemoprevention', was exploited by several laboratories and has now become an advancing field in chemoprevention research. This review summarizes some of these applications of nanotechnology in medicine, particularly focused on controlled and sustained release of bioactive compounds with emphasis on current and future utilization of nanochemoprevention for prevention and therapy of cancer. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Bee products prevent VEGF-induced angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishima Satoshi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is a key regulator of pathogenic angiogenesis in diseases such as cancer and diabetic retinopathy. Bee products [royal jelly (RJ, bee pollen, and Chinese red propolis] from the honeybee, Apis mellifera, have been used as traditional health foods for centuries. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-angiogenic effects of bee products using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Methods In an in vitro tube formation assay, HUVECs and fibroblast cells were incubated for 14 days with VEGF and various concentrations of bee products [RJ, ethanol extract of bee pollen, ethanol extract of Chinese red propolis and its constituent, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE]. To clarify the mechanism of in vitro angiogenesis, HUVEC proliferation and migration were induced by VEGF with or without various concentrations of RJ, bee pollen, Chinese red propolis, and CAPE. Results RJ, bee pollen, Chinese red propolis, and CAPE significantly suppressed VEGF-induced in vitro tube formation in the descending order: CAPE > Chinese red propolis >> bee pollen > RJ. RJ and Chinese red propolis suppressed both VEGF-induced HUVEC proliferation and migration. In contrast, bee pollen and CAPE suppressed only the proliferation. Conclusion Among the bee products, Chinese red propolis and CAPE in particular showed strong suppressive effects against VEGF-induced angiogenesis. These findings indicate that Chinese red propolis and CAPE may have potential as preventive and therapeutic agents against angiogenesis-related human diseases.

  20. Detection of Cyanotoxins in Algae Dietary Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Roy-Lachapelle

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Algae dietary supplements are marketed worldwide as natural health products. Although their proprieties have been claimed as beneficial to improve overall health, there have been several previous reports of contamination by cyanotoxins. These products generally contain non-toxic cyanobacteria, but the methods of cultivation in natural waters without appropriate quality controls allow contamination by toxin producer species present in the natural environment. In this study, we investigated the presence of total microcystins, seven individual microcystins (RR, YR, LR, LA, LY, LW, LF, anatoxin-a, dihydroanatoxin-a, epoxyanatoxin-a, cylindrospermopsin, saxitoxin, and β-methylamino-l-alanine in 18 different commercially available products containing Spirulina or Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Total microcystins analysis was accomplished using a Lemieux oxidation and a chemical derivatization using dansyl chloride was needed for the simultaneous analysis of cylindrospermopsin, saxitoxin, and β-methylamino-l-alanine. Moreover, the use of laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC both coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS enabled high performance detection and quantitation. Out of the 18 products analyzed, 8 contained some cyanotoxins at levels exceeding the tolerable daily intake values. The presence of cyanotoxins in these algal dietary supplements reinforces the need for a better quality control as well as consumer’s awareness on the potential risks associated with the consumption of these supplements.

  1. Use of Anion Exchange Resins for One-Step Processing of Algae from Harvest to Biofuel

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica Jones; Cheng-Han Lee; James Wang; Martin Poenie

    2012-01-01

    Some microalgae are particularly attractive as a renewable feedstock for biodiesel production due to their rapid growth, high content of triacylglycerols, and ability to be grown on non-arable land. Unfortunately, obtaining oil from algae is currently cost prohibitive in part due to the need to pump and process large volumes of dilute algal suspensions. In an effort to circumvent this problem, we have explored the use of anion exchange resins for simplifying the processing of algae to biofuel...

  2. Fabrication of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Algae and their Toxic Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-01-01

    Of all the aquatic organisms, algae are a good source of biomolecules. Since algae contain pigments, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, nucleic acids and secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, some aromatic compounds, macrolides, peptides and terpenes, they act as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles from metal salts without producing any toxic by-product. Once the algal biomolecules are identified, the nanoparticles of desired shape or size may be fabricated. The metal and metal oxide nano...

  3. Alpha-amylase inhibitory activity and sterol composition of the marine algae, Sargassum glaucescens

    OpenAIRE

    Nasrin Payghami; Shahla Jamili; Abdolhossein Rustaiyan; Soodabeh Saeidnia; Marjan Nikan; Ahmad Reza Gohari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sargassum species (phaeophyceae) are economically important brown algae in southern parts of Iran. Sargassum is mainly harvested as a row material in alginate production industries and is a source of plant foods or plant bio-stimulants even a component of animal foods. Objective: In this study, Sargassum glaucescens, collected from the seashore of Chabahar, was employed for phytochemical and biological evaluations. Materials and Methods: For that purpose, the dried algae was extra...

  4. Detection of Chronic Stress in Corals Exposed to Invasive Algae Mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindorf, V.; Richmond, R. H.

    2016-02-01

    Invasive algae mats like those common in Kāne`ohe Bay, O`ahu, are known to negatively affect coral health and recruitment through a variety of mechanisms including shading, abrasion, oxidative stress, and allelopathic interactions. Algae-induced stress has thus far been documented through changes in photosynthetic efficiency and coloration (bleaching) of the coral, and these studies have been largely accomplished through experimental manipulation, inflicting acute stress on coral nubbins. Few studies have investigated the stress response of corals chronically exposed to algae-induced stress, and fewer have used molecular methods to demonstrate and quantify this stress. This study focuses on Porites compressa colonies in chronic contact with the invasive alga Kappaphycus alvarezii on naturally occurring patch reefs in Kāne`ohe Bay, O`ahu, Hawai`i. Our findings demonstrate the ability of these methods to detect and monitor coral stress before outward signs of stress such as bleaching are evident, which will allow for more proactive management of at-risk coral reef ecosystems. The differential expression of genes and gene products (proteins) between corals in long-term contact with invasive algae and those not in contact with algae highlight the specific metabolic pathways involved in algae-induced stress response of corals and lays the foundation for understanding mechanisms of acclimation and resilience towards these stressors.

  5. Rh(O)D immune globulin products for prevention of alloimmunization during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Samuel L; Tichy, Eric M

    2015-02-15

    The pharmacologic properties of Rhesus (Rh) immune globulin (RhIG) and clinical data on its effectiveness in preventing Rh-antigen alloimmunization in pregnant women are reviewed. RhIG is a human plasma derivative that targets red blood cells (RBCs) positive for Rh(O) antigen (also called D antigen). In the United States and other countries, the widespread use of RhIG has markedly reduced the occurrence of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), a devastating condition caused by D-antigen sensitization of a pregnant woman via exposure to fetal RBCs (usually during detachment of the placenta in labor) that results in a maternal immune response leading to severe hemolysis in the fetus. Routine administration of RhIG at 26-30 weeks' gestation and again within 72 hours of delivery has been shown to be highly effective in preventing maternal Rh alloimmunization, with very low rates of D-antigen sensitization (in the range of 0-2.2%) reported in multiple studies of at-risk women. The four RhIG products currently available in the United States have common clinical indications but differ in certain attributes. Pharmacists can play an important role in guiding other clinicians on the rationale for the use of RhIG, important differences between products, and appropriate timing of RhIG therapy. Routine administration of RhIG to women at risk for Rh alloimmunization is clinically effective and has made HDFN a rare clinical event. The available RhIG products are not the same and should be carefully reviewed to ensure that they are administered safely. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling and optimization of algae growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thornton, Anthony Richard; Weinhart, Thomas; Bokhove, Onno; Zhang, Bowen; van der Sar, Dick M.; Kumar, Kundan; Pisarenco, Maxim; Rudnaya, Maria; Savceno, Valeriu; Rademacher, Jens; Zijlstra, Julia; Szabelska, Alicja; Zyprych, Joanna; van der Schans, Martin; Timperio, Vincent; Veerman, Frits; Frank, J.; van der Mei, R.; den Boer, A.; Bosman, J.; Bouman, N.; van Dam, S.; Verhoef, C.

    2010-01-01

    The wastewater from greenhouses has a high amount of mineral contamination and an environmentally-friendly method of removal is to use algae to clean this runo water. The algae consume the minerals as part of their growth process. In addition to cleaning the water, the created algal bio-mass has a

  7. SSMILes: Measuring the Nutrient Tolerance of Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgepeth, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity integrating mathematics and science intended to introduce students to the use of metric measurement of mass as a way to increase the meaningfulness of observations about variables in life sciences. Involves measuring the nutrient tolerance of algae. Contains a reproducible algae nutrient graph. (Author/MKR)

  8. Modeling and optimization of algae growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thornton, Anthony Richard; Weinhart, Thomas; Bokhove, Onno; Zhang, Bowen; van der Sar, Dick M.; Kumar, Kundan; Pisarenco, Maxim; Rudnaya, Maria; Savcenco, Valeriu; Rademacher, Jens; Zijlstra, Julia; Szabelska, Alicja; Zyprych, Joanna; van der Schans, Martin; Timperio, Vincent; Veerman, Frits

    2010-01-01

    The wastewater from greenhouses has a high amount of mineral contamination and an environmentally-friendly method of removal is to use algae to clean this runoff water. The algae consume the minerals as part of their growth process. In addition to cleaning the water, the created algal bio-mass has a

  9. Algae commensal community in Genlisea traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Wołowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The community of algae occurring in Genlisea traps and on the external traps surface in laboratory conditions were studied. A total of 29 taxa were found inside the traps, with abundant diatoms, green algae (Chlamydophyceae and four morphotypes of chrysophytes stomatocysts. One morphotype is described as new for science. There are two ways of algae getting into Genlisea traps. The majority of those recorded inside the traps, are mobile; swimming freely by flagella or moving exuding mucilage like diatoms being ablate to colonize the traps themselves. Another possibility is transport of algae by invertebrates such as mites and crustaceans. In any case algae in the Genlisea traps come from the surrounding environment. Two dominant groups of algae (Chladymonas div. and diatoms in the trap environment, show ability to hydrolyze phosphomonoseters. We suggest that algae in carnivorous plant traps can compete with plant (host for organic phosphate (phosphomonoseters. From the spectrum and ecological requirements of algal species found in the traps, environment inside the traps seems to be acidic. However, further studies are needed to test the relations between algae and carnivorous plants both in laboratory conditions and in the natural environment. All the reported taxa are described briefly and documented with 74 LM and SEM micrographs.

  10. Coccolithophorid algae culture in closed photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moheimani, Navid R; Isdepsky, Andreas; Lisec, Jan; Raes, Eric; Borowitzka, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    The feasibility of growth, calcium carbonate and lipid production of the coccolithophorid algae (Prymnesiophyceae), Pleurochrysis carterae, Emiliania huxleyi, and Gephyrocapsa oceanica, was investigated in plate, carboy, airlift, and tubular photobioreactors. The plate photobioreactor was the most promising closed cultivation system. All species could be grown in the carboy photobioreactor. However, P. carterae was the only species which grew in an airlift photobioreactor. Despite several attempts to grow these coccolithophorid species in the tubular photobioreactor (Biocoil), including modification of the airlift and sparger design, no net growth could be achieved. The shear produced by turbulence and bubble effects are the most likely reasons for this failure to grow in the Biocoil. The highest total dry weight, lipid and calcium carbonate productivities achieved by P. carterae in the plate photobioreactors were 0.54, 0.12, and 0.06 g L(-1) day(-1) respectively. Irrespective of the type of photobioreactor, the productivities were P. carterae > E. huxleyi > G. oceanica. Pleurochrysis carterae lipid (20-25% of dry weight) and calcium carbonate (11-12% of dry weight) contents were also the highest of all species tested. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imène Achour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE, the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. We also investigated OLE’s ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model.

  12. Streptophyte algae and the origin of embryophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Burkhard; Marin, Birger

    2009-05-01

    Land plants (embryophytes) evolved from streptophyte green algae, a small group of freshwater algae ranging from scaly, unicellular flagellates (Mesostigma) to complex, filamentous thalli with branching, cell differentiation and apical growth (Charales). Streptophyte algae and embryophytes form the division Streptophyta, whereas the remaining green algae are classified as Chlorophyta. The Charales (stoneworts) are often considered to be sister to land plants, suggesting progressive evolution towards cellular complexity within streptophyte green algae. Many cellular (e.g. phragmoplast, plasmodesmata, hexameric cellulose synthase, structure of flagellated cells, oogamous sexual reproduction with zygote retention) and physiological characters (e.g. type of photorespiration, phytochrome system) originated within streptophyte algae. Phylogenetic studies have demonstrated that Mesostigma (flagellate) and Chlorokybus (sarcinoid) form the earliest divergence within streptophytes, as sister to all other Streptophyta including embryophytes. The question whether Charales, Coleochaetales or Zygnematales are the sister to embryophytes is still (or, again) hotly debated. Projects to study genome evolution within streptophytes including protein families and polyadenylation signals have been initiated. In agreement with morphological and physiological features, many molecular traits believed to be specific for embryophytes have been shown to predate the Chlorophyta/Streptophyta split, or to have originated within streptophyte algae. Molecular phylogenies and the fossil record allow a detailed reconstruction of the early evolutionary events that led to the origin of true land plants, and shaped the current diversity and ecology of streptophyte green algae and their embryophyte descendants. The Streptophyta/Chlorophyta divergence correlates with a remarkably conservative preference for freshwater/marine habitats, and the early freshwater adaptation of streptophyte algae was a major

  13. Costs and benefits of chemical defence in the Red Alga Bonnemaisonia hamifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göran M Nylund

    Full Text Available A number of studies have shown that the production of chemical defences is costly in terrestrial vascular plants. However, these studies do not necessarily reflect the costs of defence production in macroalgae, due to structural and functional differences between vascular plants and macroalgae. Using a specific culturing technique, we experimentally manipulated the defence production in the red alga Bonnemaisonia hamifera to examine if the defence is costly in terms of growth. Furthermore, we tested if the defence provides fitness benefits by reducing harmful bacterial colonisation of the alga. Costly defences should provide benefits to the producer in order to be maintained in natural populations, but such benefits through protection against harmful bacterial colonisation have rarely been documented in macroalgae. We found that algae with experimentally impaired defence production, but with an externally controlled epibacterial load, grew significantly better than algae with normal defence production. We also found that undefended algae exposed to a natural epibacterial load experienced a substantial reduction in growth and a 6-fold increase in cell bleaching, compared to controls. Thus, this study provides experimental evidence that chemical defence production in macroalgae is costly, but that the cost is outweighed by fitness benefits provided through protection against harmful bacterial colonisation.

  14. The Use of the Schizonticidal Agent Quinine Sulfate to Prevent Pond Crashes for Algal-Biofuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Xu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Algal biofuels are investigated as a promising alternative to petroleum fuel sources to satisfy transportation demand. Despite the high growth rate of algae, predation by rotifers, ciliates, golden algae, and other predators will cause an algae in open ponds to crash. In this study, Chlorella kessleri was used as a model alga and the freshwater rotifer, Brachionus calyciflorus, as a model predator. The goal of this study was to test the selective toxicity of the chemical, quinine sulfate (QS, on both the alga and the rotifer in order to fully inhibit the rotifer while minimizing its impact on algal growth. The QS LC50 for B. calyciflorus was 17 µM while C. kessleri growth was not inhibited at concentrations <25 µM. In co-culture, complete inhibition of rotifers was observed when the QS concentration was 7.7 µM, while algal growth was not affected. QS applications to produce 1 million gallons of biodiesel in one year are estimated to be $0.04/gallon or ~1% of Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO projected cost of $5/gge (gallon gasoline equivalent. This provides algae farmers an important tool to manage grazing predators in algae mass cultures and avoid pond crashes.

  15. The Significance of Forests and Algae in CO2 Balance: A Hungarian Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Bai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the sequestration and emissions of forests and algae related to CO2 while providing a comparison to other biomass sources (arable crops, short rotation coppices. The goal of the paper is to analyze the impact of the current CO2 balance of forests and the future prospects for algae. Our calculations are based on data, not only from the literature but, in the case of algae, from our own previous experimental work. It was concluded that the CO2 sequestration and natural gas saving of forests is typically 3.78 times higher than the emissions resulting from the production technology and from the burning process. The economic and environmental protection-related efficiency operate in opposite directions. The CO2 sequestration ability of algae can primarily be utilized when connected to power plants. The optimal solution could be algae production integrated with biogas power plants, since plant sizes are smaller and algae may play a role, not only in the elimination of CO2 emissions and the utilization of heat but also in wastewater purification.

  16. The blue water footprint and land use of biofuels from algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbens-Leenes, P. W.; Xu, L.; de Vries, G. J.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2014-11-01

    Biofuels from microalgae are potentially important sources of liquid renewable energy. Algae are not yet produced on a large scale, but research shows promising results. This study assesses the blue water footprint (WF) and land use of algae-based biofuels. It combines the WF concept with an energy balance approach to determine the blue WF of net energy. The study considers open ponds and closed photobioreactors (PBRs). All systems have a positive energy balance, with output-input ratios ranging between 1.13 and 1.98. This study shows that the WF of algae-based biofuels lies between 8 and 193 m3/GJ net energy provided. The land use of microalgal biofuels ranges from 20 to 200 m2/GJ net energy. For a scenario in which algae-based biofuels provide 3.5% of the transportation fuels in the European Union in 2030, the system with the highest land productivity needs 17,000 km2 to produce the 850 PJ/yr. Producing all algae-based biofuels through the system with the highest water productivity would lead to a blue WF of 7 Gm3/yr, which is equivalent to 15% of the present blue WF in the EU28. A transition to algae-based transportation fuels will substantially increase competition over water and land resources.

  17. FRESH-WATER GREEN ALGAE (CHLOROPHYTA AS A NATURAL PIGMENT FOR MOJOSARI DUCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Indarsih

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An experiment in a completely randomize design was undertaken to study the use of fresh-watergreen algae as a yolk coloring agent in Mojosari ducks during a laying period on productiveperformance and egg quality from 36 to 44 wk of age. A total of 80 thirty-six wk–old laying ducks weredivided into four dietary treatments and each of four replicates with 5 birds. Diets were formulated witha commercial concentrate, rice bran and yellow corn (2:4:4 according to a commercial standard diet asa control, and three other dietary treatments with 2, 4 or 8% of green algae were included. Fresh watergreen algae had a significant effect on the feed uptake, egg production, and feed conversion ratio (FCR(p<0.05. Egg production and FCR improved at added 2 and 4% green algae. No differences wereobserved in egg yolk index, albumen index, Haugh Unit, and egg shell thickness (P>0.05 except eggyolk color. The yolk color increased within 7 days after feeding with the test diets. The present studyindicated that fresh-water green algae could be used as a natural coloring agent in laying ducks and at8% of green algae showed the highest score of (Roche Yellow Color-15.

  18. An updated comprehensive techno-economic analysis of algae biodiesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Sanjay; Chou, Siaw Kiang; Cao, Shenyan; Wu, Chen; Zhou, Zhi

    2013-10-01

    Algae biodiesel is a promising but expensive alternative fuel to petro-diesel. To overcome cost barriers, detailed cost analyses are needed. A decade-old cost analysis by the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory indicated that the costs of algae biodiesel were in the range of $0.53-0.85/L (2012 USD values). However, the cost of land and transesterification were just roughly estimated. In this study, an updated comprehensive techno-economic analysis was conducted with optimized processes and improved cost estimations. Latest process improvement, quotes from vendors, government databases, and other relevant data sources were used to calculate the updated algal biodiesel costs, and the final costs of biodiesel are in the range of $0.42-0.97/L. Additional improvements on cost-effective biodiesel production around the globe to cultivate algae was also recommended. Overall, the calculated costs seem promising, suggesting that a single step biodiesel production process is close to commercial reality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mycoalgae biofilm: development of a novel platform technology using algae and fungal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Aravindan; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae is considered a promising source for biofuel and bioenergy production, bio-remediation and production of high-value bioactive compounds, but harvesting microalgae is a major bottleneck in the algae based processes. The objective of this research is to mimic the growth of natural lichen and develop a novel biofilm platform technology using filamentous fungi and microalgae to form a lichen type of biofilm "mycoalgae" in a supporting polymer matrix. The possibility of co-existence of Chlorella vulgaris with various fungal cultures was tested to identify the best strain combination for high algae harvest efficiency. The effect of different matrices for cell attachment and biofilm formation, cell surface characterization of mycoalgae biofilm, kinetics of the process with respect to the algae-fungi cell distribution and total biomass production was studied. Mycoalgae biofilm with algae attachment efficiency of 99.0 % and above was achieved in a polymer-cotton composite matrix with glucose concentration of 2 g/L in the growth medium and agitation intensity of 150 rpm at 27 °C. The total biomass in the co-culture with the selected strain combination (Mucor sp. and Chlorella sp.) was higher than the axenic cultures of fungi and algae at the conditions tested. The results show that algae can be grown with complete attachment to a bio-augmenting fungal surface and can be harvested readily as a biofilm for product extraction from biomass. Even though, interaction between heterotrophic fungi and phototrophic algae was investigated in solid media after prolonged contact in a report, this research is the first of its kind in developing an artificial lichen type biofilm called "mycoalgae" biofilm completely attached on a matrix in liquid cultures. The mycoalgae biofilm based processes, propounds the scope for exploring new avenues in the bio-production industry and bioremediation.

  20. Advanced emission control system: CO2 sequestration using algae integrated management system (AIMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Isa Syed Alwi; Mohd Norsham Che Yahya; Ruzanna Abdul Rahman

    2010-01-01

    One of the companies under Algae tech, Sasaran Bio fuel Sdn. Bhd. provides project management, technology transfer and technical expertise to develop a solution to minimize and mitigate Carbon Dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions through the diversion of the CO 2 to open algal ponds and enclosed photo-bioreactors as algal propagation technologies to consume CO 2 waste stream. The company is presently consulting a listed company from Indonesia to address the technology know-how and implementation of microalgae development from the flue gas of the Groups power plants. Nowadays, one of the aspects that contribute to the air pollution is the emission of flue gases from the factories. So, we provide a system that can reduce the emission of flue gas to the atmosphere and at the same time, cultivate certain strain of algae. With the technology, Algae Integrated Management System (AIMS), it will be for sure a new beginning for way to reduce air pollution. The utilization of power plant resources for growing selected microalgae at a low energy cost for valuable products and bio-fuels while providing CO 2 sequestering. In the same time, it also a low cost algae agriculture. By doing so, it provides all year algae production which can be an income. This residual energy used CO 2 produced from power stations and industrial plants to feed the process (CO 2 recycling and bio-fixation) in cultivation of algae. This will be a low cost flue gas (CO 2 ) to the developer. In a nutshell, CO 2 Sequestration by algae reactors is a potential to reduce greenhouse gas emission by using the CO 2 in the stack gases to produce algae. (author)

  1. Cranberry products in the prevention of urinary tract infections: examining the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowack R

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rainer Nowack, Rainer Birck Nephrology/Dialysis Clinic, Lindau, Germany Abstract: Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon juice and extracts are widely used and recommended as folk remedy for prophylaxis of urinary tract infections (UTIs. Its putative mechanism is an anti-adhesive effect that prevents docking of bacteria on host tissues. The anti-adhesion quality is attributed to A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs, a group of polyphenols that has a restricted occurrence in cranberries and a few related plants. Clinical trials with cranberry have provided a mixed evidence on behalf of UTI prophylaxis. In some trials, a benefit could not be detected due to lower than calculated UTI recurrence rates, in others failure had retrospectively been blamed on underdosing of cranberry products. To circumvent such problems, cranberry products need to be standardized for the bioactive principle of PAC and administered at a sufficient dose. Further characterization of PAC bioavailability, improvement of the currently inconvenient prescriptions, and above all of the palatability for patients is strongly recommended. Larger staged trials should then be carried out in patients with relevant UTI risks. Keywords: cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton, urinary tract infection, proanthocyanidins, anti-adhesion, p-fimbriae

  2. Exopolysaccharide Production and Prevention of Syneresis in Starch Using Encapsulated Probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindhumol Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Encapsulation of probiotic bacteria with a matrix can increase their survival rate by protecting them from adverse conditions and at the same time without affecting the production of metabolites. An effort has been made to encapsulate the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum using calcium alginate. Box-Behnken model of response surface methodology (RSM was employed in the optimization of major encapsulation conditions such as concentration of sodium alginate, calcium chloride and curing time. The second-order quadratic model with the optimum conditions (sodium alginate 2 % (by mass per volume, calcium chloride 0.5 M and curing time 3 h resulted in a maximum titre of (0.9±0.1 g/L of exopolysaccharides (EPS at 72 h. The nearness of the coefficient of determination (R²=0.97 to 1 ensures the satisfactory adjustment of the quadratic model to the experimental data. The efficiency of EPS production by encapsulated cells was compared with free cells. The efficacy of secreted EPS in the prevention of syneresis in starch was investigated.

  3. Natural product formulations for prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease: a patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koynova, Rumiana; Tenchov, Boris

    2017-12-07

    Although considerable efforts have been made to develop effective therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD), neither a consensus concerning the pathogenesis of the disease nor a successful therapy for its treatment is available. The natural product chemistry brings tremendous diversity and abundant resource for medical needs. The present review summarizes recent patents on natural extracts and derived drugs as agents for prevention and treatment of AD. It also sums up the suggested mechanisms of action of the formulated natural remedies. It is becoming now well accepted that multiple factors contribute to the progression of AD. The pathogenesis of the disease involves amyloid-β cascade, tau hyperphosphorylation, oxidative stress, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, protein misfolding, gene mutation, etc. It has been suggested that the multifactorial nature of AD pathogenesis requires the design of medicines with a wide spectrum of activity. Medicinal herbs are known to consist of multiple compounds and may influence multiple mechanisms, thus being advantageous over the simple single-target drugs in the treatment of complex diseases. Indeed, natural products attract increased attention. In the last decades they have become a major focus in the quest for AD remedies and may represent a real promise for curing the disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Algae biodiesel - a feasibility report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Yihe

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Algae biofuels have been studied numerous times including the Aquatic Species program in 1978 in the U.S., smaller laboratory research projects and private programs. Results Using Molina Grima 2003 and Department of Energy figures, captial costs and operating costs of the closed systems and open systems were estimated. Cost per gallon of conservative estimates yielded $1,292.05 and $114.94 for closed and open ponds respectively. Contingency scenarios were generated in which cost per gallon of closed system biofuels would reach $17.54 under the generous conditions of 60% yield, 50% reduction in the capital costs and 50% hexane recovery. Price per gallon of open system produced fuel could reach $1.94 under generous assumptions of 30% yield and $0.2/kg CO2. Conclusions Current subsidies could allow biodiesel to be produced economically under the generous conditions specified by the model.

  5. Algae biodiesel - a feasibility report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Algae biofuels have been studied numerous times including the Aquatic Species program in 1978 in the U.S., smaller laboratory research projects and private programs. Results Using Molina Grima 2003 and Department of Energy figures, captial costs and operating costs of the closed systems and open systems were estimated. Cost per gallon of conservative estimates yielded $1,292.05 and $114.94 for closed and open ponds respectively. Contingency scenarios were generated in which cost per gallon of closed system biofuels would reach $17.54 under the generous conditions of 60% yield, 50% reduction in the capital costs and 50% hexane recovery. Price per gallon of open system produced fuel could reach $1.94 under generous assumptions of 30% yield and $0.2/kg CO2. Conclusions Current subsidies could allow biodiesel to be produced economically under the generous conditions specified by the model. PMID:22540986

  6. Integrating Hazardous Materials Characterization and Assessment Tools to Guide Pollution Prevention in Electronic Products and Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Carl

    Due to technology proliferation, the environmental burden attributed to the production, use, and disposal of hazardous materials in electronics have become a worldwide concern. The major theme of this dissertation is to develop and apply hazardous materials assessment tools to systematically guide pollution prevention opportunities in the context of electronic product design, manufacturing and end-of-life waste management. To this extent, a comprehensive review is first provided on describing hazard traits and current assessment methods to evaluate hazardous materials. As a case study at the manufacturing level, life cycle impact assessment (LCIA)-based and risk-based screening methods are used to quantify chemical and geographic environmental impacts in the U.S. printed wiring board (PWB) industry. Results from this industrial assessment clarify priority waste streams and States to most effectively mitigate impact. With further knowledge of PWB manufacturing processes, select alternative chemical processes (e.g., spent copper etchant recovery) and material options (e.g., lead-free etch resist) are discussed. In addition, an investigation on technology transition effects for computers and televisions in the U.S. market is performed by linking dynamic materials flow and environmental assessment models. The analysis forecasts quantities of waste units generated and maps shifts in environmental impact potentials associated with metal composition changes due to product substitutions. This insight is important to understand the timing and waste quantities expected and the emerging toxic elements needed to be addressed as a consequence of technology transition. At the product level, electronic utility meter devices are evaluated to eliminate hazardous materials within product components. Development and application of a component Toxic Potential Indicator (TPI) assessment methodology highlights priority components requiring material alternatives. Alternative

  7. Xylitol-containing products for preventing dental caries in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Philip; Moore, Deborah; Ahmed, Farooq; Sharif, Mohammad O; Worthington, Helen V

    2015-03-26

    Dental caries is a highly prevalent chronic disease which affects the majority of people. It has been postulated that the consumption of xylitol could help to prevent caries. The evidence on the effects of xylitol products is not clear and therefore it is important to summarise the available evidence to determine its effectiveness and safety. To assess the effects of different xylitol-containing products for the prevention of dental caries in children and adults. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 14 August 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2014, Issue 7), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 14 August 2014), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 14 August 2014), CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 14 August 2014), Web of Science Conference Proceedings (1990 to 14 August 2014), Proquest Dissertations and Theses (1861 to 14 August 2014). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register (http://clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We included randomised controlled trials assessing the effects of xylitol products on dental caries in children and adults. Two review authors independently screened the results of the electronic searches, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. We attempted to contact study authors for missing data or clarification where feasible. For continuous outcomes, we used means and standard deviations to obtain the mean difference and 95% confidence interval (CI). We used the continuous data to calculate prevented fractions (PF) and 95% CIs to summarise the percentage reduction in caries. For dichotomous outcomes, we reported risk ratios (RR) and 95% CIs. As there were less than four studies included in the meta-analysis, we used a fixed-effect model. We planned

  8. ALDUO(TM) Algae Cultivation Technology for Delivering Sustainable Omega-3s, Feed, and Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xuemei [Cellana LLC

    2012-09-24

    * ALDUO(TM) Algae Production Technology Cellana?s Proprietary, Photosynthetic, & Proven * ALDUO(TM) Enables Economic Algae Production Unencumbered by Contamination by Balancing Higher-Cost PBRs with Lower-Cost Open Ponds * ALDUO(TM) Advantages * ALDUO(TM) Today o Large collection of strains for high value co-products o Powerful Mid-scale Screening & Optimization System o Solution to a Conflicting Interest o Split Pond Yield Enhancement o Heterotrophy & mixotrophy as a "finishing step" o CO2 Mitigation-flue Gas Operation o Worldwide Feed Trials with Livestock & Aquatic Species * ALDUO(TM) Technology Summarized

  9. Influence of the Brown Marine Algae on the Physicochemical and Sensory Characteristcs of the Sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Dan Sălăgean

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  The aim of this study was to asses the influence of the brown algae on the quality in manufacturing of a certain halfsmoked sausages assortment.  Exploiting the natural plant resources as well as reducing the animal fat in the finished product by replacing it with proteins, fibers and minerals (provided by the brown marine algae were also intended. Two technological variants with different ratios of algae (V1-10% respectively V2-15% from those 25% of fat (the remaining of 75% beeing represented, in each case, by beef were experienced and compared with the control sample (VM, without algae, 75% beef and 25% fat. The finished products were analyzed in terms of organoleptic and physicochemical, in different stages of storage, at 24 hours after obtaining and seven days of storage at 10 to 12 degrees. The correlations between investigated quality parameters and the ratios of algae were also established. The physicochemical analysis highlighted the highest values regarding the protein, moisture, sodium chloride and the lowest fat content values in the case of the V2 variant compared to the V1 and VM variants. Furthermore, an increase in protein, fat, sodium chloride and a decrease of the moisture content have been found in all variants observed during the storage. The shelf life of the product was not negatively affected by the addition of algae due to their antimicrobial activity. The addition of algae in combination with beef components led to obtaining a higher quality product with functional characteristics.

  10. Errors When Extracting Oil from Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, E.; Treat, R.; Ichiuji, T.

    2014-12-01

    Oil is in popular demand, but the worldwide amount of oil is decreasing and prices for it are steadily increasing. Leading scientists have been working to find a solution of attaining oil in an economically and environmentally friendly way. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have determined that "a small mixture of algae and water can be turned into crude oil in less than an hour" (Sheehan, Duhahay, Benemann, Poessler). There are various ways of growing the algae, such as closed loop and open loop methods, as well as processes of extracting oil, such as hydrothermal liquefaction and the hexane-solvent method. Our objective was to grow the algae (C. reinhardtii) and extract oil from it using NaOH and HCl, because we had easy access to those specific chemicals. After two trials of attempted algae growth, we discovered that a bacteria was killing off the algae. This led us to further contemplation on how this dead algae and bacteria are affecting our environment, and the organisms within it. Eutrophication occurs when excess nutrients stimulate rapid growth of algae in an aquatic environment. This can clog waterways and create algal blooms in blue-green algae, as well as neurotoxic red tide phytoplankton. These microscopic algae die upon consumption of the nutrients in water and are degraded by bacteria. The bacteria respires and creates an acidic environment with the spontaneous conversion of carbon dioxide to carbonic acid in water. This process of degradation is exactly what occurred in our 250 mL flask. When the phytoplankton attacked our algae, it created a hypoxic environment, which eliminated any remaining amounts of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and nutrients in the water, resulting in a miniature dead zone. These dead zones can occur almost anywhere where there are algae and bacteria, such as the ocean, and make it extremely difficult for any organism to survive. This experiment helped us realize the

  11. Evaluation of the contamination of marine algae (Seaweed) from the St. Lawrence River and likely to be consumed by humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaneuf, D; Côté, I; Dumas, P; Ferron, L A; LeBlanc, A

    1999-02-01

    The goal of the study was to assess the contamination of marine algae (seaweeds) growing in the St. Lawrence River estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence and to evaluate the risks to human health from the consumption of these algae. Algae were collected by hand at low tide. A total of 10 sites on the north and south shores of the St. Lawrence as well as in Baie des Chaleurs were sampled. The most frequently collected species of algae were Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Laminaria longicruris, Palmaria palmata, Ulva lactuca, and Fucus distichus. Alga samples were analyzed for metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn), iodine, and organochlorines. A risk assessment was performed using risk factors (e.g., RfD of the U.S. EPA, ADI of Health Canada, etc.). In general, concentrations in St. Lawrence algae were not very high. This was especially true for mercury and the organochlorines, concentrations of which were very low or below detection limits. Consequently, health risks associated with these compounds in St. Lawrence algae were very low. Iodine concentration, on the other hand, could be of concern with regard to human health. Regular consumption of algae, especially of Laminaria sp., could result in levels of iodine sufficient to cause thyroid problems. For regular consumers, it would be preferable to choose species with low iodine concentrations, such as U. lactuca and P. palmata, in order to prevent potential problems. Furthermore, it would also be important to assess whether preparation for consumption or cooking affects the iodine content of algae. Algae consumption may also have beneficial health effects. Scientific literature has shown that it is a good source of fiber and vitamins, especially vitamin B12. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  12. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture broth...

  13. 21 CFR 73.185 - Haematococcus algae meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Haematococcus algae meal. 73.185 Section 73.185... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.185 Haematococcus algae meal. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive haematococcus algae meal consists of the comminuted and dried cells of the alga...

  14. Micro-algae as a source of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, E W

    2007-01-01

    About five decades ago, the mass production of certain protein-rich micro-algae was considered as a possibility to close the predicted so called "protein gap". Comprehensive analyses and nutritional studies have demonstrated that these algal proteins are of high quality and comparable to conventional vegetable proteins. However, due to high production costs as well as technical difficulties to incorporate the algal material into palatable food preparations, the propagation of algal protein is still in its infancy. To date, the majority of micro-algal preparations are marketed as health food, as cosmetics or as animal feed.

  15. Management of autotrophic mass cultures of micro-algae

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Toerien, DF

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available . Elsevier/North-Holland Biomedical Press, Amsterdam, pp. 217?227. Bassham, J.A., 1977. Synthesis of organic compounds from carbon dioxide in land plants. In: A. Mitsui, S. Miyachi, S. San Pietro and S. Tumura (Editors), Biological Solar Energy.../North Holland Biomedical Press, Amsterdam, pp. 35?50. Ben Amotz, A. and Avron, M., 1980. Glycerol, carotene and dry algal meal production by commercial cultivation of Dunaliella. In: G. Shelef and C.J. Soeder (Editors), Algae Biowass: Production and Use...

  16. Recent Advances in Outdoor High-Density Cultivation of Novelty Micro-Algae Strain with High Content of Lipids

    OpenAIRE

    Kaštánek, Petr

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was the pilot plant examination of a newly developed integrated process for autotrophic cultivation of useful micro-algae. The process utilizes waste carbon dioxide as a source of carbon and yields simultaneously products that can be utilized in food and cosmetic industries, turned into biodiesel and/or used as a supplement in animal feed. At present, the cultivation of micro-algae merely for the production of biofuels is not economically viable. In the proposed pr...

  17. An overlooked effect of glycine betaine on fermentation: prevents caramelization and increases the L-lysine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzhong; Xia, Xiuhua; Zhang, Junlan; Guo, Yanfeng; Zhang, Weiguo

    2014-10-01

    This article focuses on the effects of glycine betaine on preventing caramelization, and increasing DCW and L-lysine production. The additional glycine betaine not only decreased the browning intensity (decreased 4 times), and the concentrations of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (decreased 7.8 times) and furfural (decreased 12 times), but also increased the availability of glucose (increased 17.5%) for L-lysine production. The DCW and L-lysine production were increased by adding no more than 20 mM glycine betaine, whereas the DCW and L-lysine production were decreased with the reduction of pH values, although pH had a better response to prevent caramelization than did glycine betaine. For L-lysine production, the highest increase (40%) was observed on the media with 20 mM glycine betaine. The crucial enzymes in glycolysis and L-lysine biosynthesis pathway were investigated. The results indicated that additional glycine betaine increases the activity of enzymes in glycolysis, in contrast to the effect of pH. All the results indicated that glycine betaine can be used to prevent caramelization and increase the L-lysine production. By applying this strategy, glucose would not be have to be separated from the culture media during autoclaving so that factories can save production costs and shorten the fermentation period.

  18. Phytosterol structured algae oil nanoemulsions and powders: improving antioxidant and flavor properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Wei; Chen, Ya-Jun; Wang, Jin-Mei; Guo, Jian; Yin, Shou-Wei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2016-09-14

    Algae oil, enriched with omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 LC-PUFA), is known for its health benefits. However, protection against lipid oxidation as well as masking of unpleasant fishy malodors in algae oil enriched foods is a big challenge to achieve. In this study, we firstly achieved a one-pot ultrasound emulsification strategy (alternative heating-homogenization) to prepare phytosterol structured thermosensitive algae oil-in-water nanoemulsion stabilized by quillaja saponin. After spray drying, the resulting algae oil powders from the structured nanoemulsion templates exhibit an excellent reconstructed behavior, even after 30 d of storage. Furthermore, an enhanced oxidative stability was obtained by reducing both the primary and secondary oxidation products through formulation with β-sitosterol and γ-oryzanol, which are natural antioxidants. Following the results of headspace volatiles using dynamic headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DHS-GC-MS), it was clear that the structured algae oil-loaded nanoemulsion and powder had lower levels of fishy off-flavour (e.g., (Z)-heptenal, decanal, ethanone, and hexadecenoic acid), whereas the control emulsion and oil powder without structure performed worse. This study demonstrated that the structure from phytosterols is an effective strategy to minimize the fishy off-flavour and maximize oxidative stability of both algae oil nanoemulsions and spray-dried powders, and opens up the possibility of formulation design in polyunsaturated oil encapsulates as novel delivery systems to apply in functional foods and beverages.

  19. Direct bioconversion of brown algae into ethanol by thermophilic bacterium Defluviitalea phaphyphila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shi-Qi; Wang, Bing; Lu, Ming; Li, Fu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Brown algae are promising feedstocks for biofuel production with inherent advantages of no structural lignin, high growth rate, and no competition for land and fresh water. However, it is difficult for one microorganism to convert all components of brown algae with different oxidoreduction potentials to ethanol. Defluviitalea phaphyphila Alg1 is the first characterized thermophilic bacterium capable of direct utilization of brown algae. Defluviitalea phaphyphila Alg1 can simultaneously utilize mannitol, glucose, and alginate to produce ethanol, and high ethanol yields of 0.47 g/g-mannitol, 0.44 g/g-glucose, and 0.3 g/g-alginate were obtained. A rational redox balance system under obligate anaerobic condition in fermenting brown algae was revealed in D. phaphyphila Alg1 through genome and redox analysis. The excess reducing equivalents produced from mannitol metabolism were equilibrated by oxidizing forces from alginate assimilation. Furthermore, D. phaphyphila Alg1 can directly utilize unpretreated kelp powder, and 10 g/L of ethanol was accumulated within 72 h with an ethanol yield of 0.25 g/g-kelp. Microscopic observation further demonstrated the deconstruction process of brown algae cell by D. phaphyphila Alg1. The integrated biomass deconstruction system of D. phaphyphila Alg1, as well as its high ethanol yield, provided us an excellent alternative for brown algae bioconversion at elevated temperature.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide prevents vascular calcification induced ROS production by regulating Nrf-2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wensong; Li, Yi; Ding, Hanlu; Du, Yaqin; Wang, Li

    2016-08-01

    Although vascular calcification in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) represents a ubiquitous human health problem, effective therapies with limited side effects are still lacking, and the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. The Nrf-2/ARE pathway is a pivotal to regulate anti-oxidative responses in vascular calcification upon ESRD. Although Nrf-2 plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis, pulmonary fibrosis, and brain ischemia, the effect of Nrf-2 and oxidative stress on vascular calcification in ESRD patients is still unclear. The aim of this research was to study the protective role of hydrogen peroxide in vascular calcification and the mechanism of Nrf-2 and oxidative stress on vascular calcification. Here we used the rat vascular smooth muscle cell model of β-glycerophosphate-induced calcification resembling vascular calcification in ESRD to investigate the therapeutic effect of 0.01 mM hydrogen peroxide on vascular calcification and further explores the possible underlying mechanisms. Our current report shows the in vitro role of 0.01 mM hydrogen peroxide in protecting against intracellular ROS accumulation upon vascular calcification. Both hydrogen peroxide and sulforaphane pretreatment reduced ROS production, increased the expression of Nrf-2, and decreased the expression of Runx2 following calcification. Our study demonstrates that 0.01 mM hydrogen peroxide can effectively protect rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells against oxidative stress by preventing vascular calcification induced ROS production through Nrf-2 pathway. These data might define an antioxidant role of hydrogen peroxide in vascular calcification upon ESRD.

  1. Multicellularity in green algae: Upsizing in a walled complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Domozych

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern green algae constitute a large and diverse taxonomic assemblage that encompasses many multicellular phenotypes including colonial, filamentous and parenchymatous forms. In all multicellular green algae, each cell is surrounded by an extracellular matrix, most often in the form of a cell wall. Volvocalean taxa like Volvox have an elaborate, gel-like, hydroxyproline rich glycoprotein covering that contains the cells of the colony. In ulvophytes, uronic acid-rich and sulfated polysaccharides are the likely adhesion agents that maintain the multicellular habit. Charophytes also produce polysaccharide-rich cell walls and in late divergent taxa, pectin plays a critical role in cell-adhesion in the multicellular complex. Cell walls are products of coordinated interaction of membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal dynamics and the cell’s signal transduction machinery responding both to precise internal clocks and external environmental cues. Most often, these activities must be synchronized with the secretion, deposition and remodeling of the polymers of the extracellular matrix. Rapid advances in molecular genetics, cell biology and cell wall biochemistry of green algae will soon provide new insights into the evolution and subcellular processes leading to multicellularity.

  2. Multicellularity in green algae: upsizing in a walled complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domozych, David S; Domozych, Catherine E

    2014-01-01

    Modern green algae constitute a large and diverse taxonomic assemblage that encompasses many multicellular phenotypes including colonial, filamentous, and parenchymatous forms. In all multicellular green algae, each cell is surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM), most often in the form of a cell wall. Volvocalean taxa like Volvox have an elaborate, gel-like, hydroxyproline rich glycoprotein covering that contains the cells of the colony. In "ulvophytes," uronic acid-rich and sulfated polysaccharides are the likely adhesion agents that maintain the multicellular habit. Charophytes also produce polysaccharide-rich cell walls and in late divergent taxa, pectin plays a critical role in cell adhesion in the multicellular complex. Cell walls are products of coordinated interaction of membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal dynamics and the cell's signal transduction machinery responding both to precise internal clocks and external environmental cues. Most often, these activities must be synchronized with the secretion, deposition and remodeling of the polymers of the ECM. Rapid advances in molecular genetics, cell biology and cell wall biochemistry of green algae will soon provide new insights into the evolution and subcellular processes leading to multicellularity.

  3. Extraction, Purification, and NMR Analysis of Terpenes from Brown Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaysinski, Marc; Ortalo-Magné, Annick; Thomas, Olivier P; Culioli, Gérald

    2015-01-01

    Algal terpenes constitute a wide and well-documented group of marine natural products with structures differing from their terrestrial plant biosynthetic analogues. Amongst macroalgae, brown seaweeds are considered as one of the richest source of biologically and ecologically relevant terpenoids. These metabolites, mostly encountered in algae of the class Phaeophyceae, are mainly diterpenes and meroditerpenes (metabolites of mixed biogenesis characterized by a toluquinol or a toluquinone nucleus linked to a diterpene moiety).In this chapter, we describe analytical processes commonly employed for the isolation and structural characterization of the main terpenoid constituents obtained from organic extracts of brown algae. The successive steps include (1) extraction of lipidic content from algal samples; (2) purification of terpenes by column chromatography and semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography; and (3) structure elucidation of the isolated terpenes by means of 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). More precisely, we propose a representative methodology which allows the isolation and structural determination of the monocyclic meroditerpene methoxybifurcarenone (MBFC) from the Mediterranean brown alga Cystoseira amentacea var. stricta. This methodology has a large field of applications and can then be extended to terpenes isolated from other species of the family Sargassaceae.

  4. Towards tradable permits for filamentous green algae pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, W J; Botha, A M; Oberholster, P J

    2016-09-01

    Water pollution permit systems are challenging to design and implement. Operational systems that has maintained functionality remains few and far between, particularly in developing countries. We present current progress towards developing such a system for nutrient enrichment based water pollution, mainly from commercial agriculture. We applied a production function approach to first estimate the monetary value of the impact of the pollution, which is then used as reference point for establishing a reserve price for pollution permits. The subsequent market making process is explained according to five steps including permit design, terms, conditions and transactional protocol, the monitoring system, piloting and implementation. The monetary value of the impact of pollution was estimated at R1887 per hectare per year, which not only provide a "management budget" for filamentous green algae mitigation strategies in the study area, but also enabled the calculation of a reserve price for filamentous green algae pollution permits, which was estimated between R2.25 and R111 per gram filamentous algae and R8.99 per gram at the preferred state. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Extremophilic micro-algae and their potential contribution in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Prachi; Mikulic, Paulina; Vonshak, Avigad; Beardall, John; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2015-05-01

    Micro-algae have potential as sustainable sources of energy and products and alternative mode of agriculture. However, their mass cultivation is challenging due to low survival under harsh outdoor conditions and competition from other, undesired, species. Extremophilic micro-algae have a role to play by virtue of their ability to grow under acidic or alkaline pH, high temperature, light, CO2 level and metal concentration. In this review, we provide several examples of potential biotechnological applications of extremophilic micro-algae and the ranges of tolerated extremes. We also discuss the adaptive mechanisms of tolerance to these extremes. Analysis of phylogenetic relationship of the reported extremophiles suggests certain groups of the Kingdom Protista to be more tolerant to extremophilic conditions than other taxa. While extremophilic microalgae are beginning to be explored, much needs to be done in terms of the physiology, molecular biology, metabolic engineering and outdoor cultivation trials before their true potential is realized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fluorescence spectroscopy of algae commonly found on stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechet, Eric; McStay, Daniel; Wakefield, Rachael D.; Sweet, M. A. S.

    1997-05-01

    Algal growth on stones, together with the deposition of other soiling layers, cause major conservation problems for buildings and monuments, as it not only covers the surface with a green layer, but also accelerates stone decay. In recent years laser ablation techniques have been used to clean masonry as they are potentially less destructive than chemical or physical techniques due to the high selectivity in removing the coating covering the stone and the absence of secondary products as with conventional techniques such as use of chemicals or of sandblasting. Whilst laser ablation cleaning is finding favor in removal of surface layers from stones there has been little or no reported work relating to the effect of the laser radiation on the algae found on stones. In order to optimize any cleaning or preservation technique for algae covered stones it is necessary to have a detailed knowledge of such effects. In this paper we report some initial results from the analysis of several algae commonly found on masonry before and after irradiation at different wavelengths using two lasers, a nitrogen laser and a Nd:YAG laser.

  7. The Biology of blue-green algae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carr, Nicholas G; Whitton, B. A

    1973-01-01

    .... Their important environmental roles, their part in nitrogen fixation and the biochemistry of phototrophic metabolism are some of the attractions of blue-geen algae to an increasing number of biologists...

  8. Collection, Isolation and Culture of Marine Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Daniel E.

    1984-01-01

    Methods of collecting, isolating, and culturing microscopic and macroscopic marine algae are described. Three different culture media list of chemicals needed and procedures for preparing Erdschreiber's and Provasoli's E. S. media. (BC)

  9. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Joyce [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Algae Platform Review meeting.

  10. Dipeptides from the red alga Acanthopora spicifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S; De; Kamat, S

    An investigation of red alga Acanthophora spicifera afforded the known peptide, aurantiamide acetate and a new diastereoisomer of this dipeptide (dia-aurantiamide acetate). This is a first report of aurantiamide acetate from a marine source...

  11. Algae in fish feed: performances and fatty acid metabolism in juvenile Atlantic Salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norambuena, Fernando; Hermon, Karen; Skrzypczyk, Vanessa; Emery, James A; Sharon, Yoni; Beard, Alastair; Turchini, Giovanni M

    2015-01-01

    Algae are at the base of the aquatic food chain, producing the food resources that fish are adapted to consume. Previous studies have proven that the inclusion of small amounts (Ulva ohnoi) and Rosamin (derived from diatom Entomoneis spp.) for their possible inclusion into diet of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar). Fish performances, feed efficiency, lipid metabolism and final product quality were assessed to investigated the potential of the two algae products (in isolation at two inclusion levels, 2.5% and 5%, or in combination), in experimental diets specifically formulated with low fish meal and fish oil content. The results indicate that inclusion of algae product Verdemin and Rosamin at level of 2.5 and 5.0% did not cause any major positive, nor negative, effect in Atlantic Salmon growth and feed efficiency. An increase in the omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 LC-PUFA) content in whole body of fish fed 5% Rosamin was observed.

  12. Nudging to prevent the purchase of incompatible digital products online: An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Gabriele; Hernández, Penélope; van Bavel, René; Vila, José

    2017-01-01

    Ensuring safe and satisfactory online shopping activity, especially among vulnerable consumers such as elderly and less educated citizens, is part of a larger set of consumer policy objectives seeking to strengthen trust in the electronic marketplace. This article contributes to that goal by testing the effectiveness of nudges intended to prevent the purchase of 'incompatible' digital products (i.e., those which cannot be used with the devices owned by consumers or the systems they operate). We ran a computerised lab experiment (n = 626) examining three types of nudges, the effects of age and education, and interaction effects between these variables and the nudges. Results show that emotive warning messages and placing incompatibility information at the checkout page rather than earlier in the purchasing process were effective in reducing the purchase of incompatible goods. Age was also a relevant factor: older participants were more likely to purchase incompatible goods. In addition, there was an interaction effect between all nudges and age: two nudges exacerbated the effect of age, while another mitigated it. These results suggest nudges can be an effective policy tool, confirm a generational gap in online behaviour, and highlight how nudges can moderate the effect of socio-demographic variables. PMID:28282401

  13. Nudging to prevent the purchase of incompatible digital products online: An experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Esposito

    Full Text Available Ensuring safe and satisfactory online shopping activity, especially among vulnerable consumers such as elderly and less educated citizens, is part of a larger set of consumer policy objectives seeking to strengthen trust in the electronic marketplace. This article contributes to that goal by testing the effectiveness of nudges intended to prevent the purchase of 'incompatible' digital products (i.e., those which cannot be used with the devices owned by consumers or the systems they operate. We ran a computerised lab experiment (n = 626 examining three types of nudges, the effects of age and education, and interaction effects between these variables and the nudges. Results show that emotive warning messages and placing incompatibility information at the checkout page rather than earlier in the purchasing process were effective in reducing the purchase of incompatible goods. Age was also a relevant factor: older participants were more likely to purchase incompatible goods. In addition, there was an interaction effect between all nudges and age: two nudges exacerbated the effect of age, while another mitigated it. These results suggest nudges can be an effective policy tool, confirm a generational gap in online behaviour, and highlight how nudges can moderate the effect of socio-demographic variables.

  14. Nudging to prevent the purchase of incompatible digital products online: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Gabriele; Hernández, Penélope; van Bavel, René; Vila, José

    2017-01-01

    Ensuring safe and satisfactory online shopping activity, especially among vulnerable consumers such as elderly and less educated citizens, is part of a larger set of consumer policy objectives seeking to strengthen trust in the electronic marketplace. This article contributes to that goal by testing the effectiveness of nudges intended to prevent the purchase of 'incompatible' digital products (i.e., those which cannot be used with the devices owned by consumers or the systems they operate). We ran a computerised lab experiment (n = 626) examining three types of nudges, the effects of age and education, and interaction effects between these variables and the nudges. Results show that emotive warning messages and placing incompatibility information at the checkout page rather than earlier in the purchasing process were effective in reducing the purchase of incompatible goods. Age was also a relevant factor: older participants were more likely to purchase incompatible goods. In addition, there was an interaction effect between all nudges and age: two nudges exacerbated the effect of age, while another mitigated it. These results suggest nudges can be an effective policy tool, confirm a generational gap in online behaviour, and highlight how nudges can moderate the effect of socio-demographic variables.

  15. Phage therapy as an approach to prevent Vibrio anguillarum infections in fish larvae production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda J Silva

    Full Text Available Fish larvae in aquaculture have high mortality rates due to pathogenic bacteria, especially the Vibrio species, and ineffective prophylactic strategies. Vaccination is not feasible in larvae and antibiotics have reduced efficacy against multidrug resistant bacteria. A novel approach to controlling Vibrio infections in aquaculture is needed. The potential of phage therapy to combat vibriosis in fish larvae production has not yet been examined. We describe the isolation and characterization of two bacteriophages capable of infecting pathogenic Vibrio and their application to prevent bacterial infection in fish larvae. Two groups of zebrafish larvae were infected with V. anguillarum (∼106 CFU mL-1 and one was later treated with a phage lysate (∼108 PFU mL-1. A third group was only added with phages. A fourth group received neither bacteria nor phages (fish control. Larvae mortality, after 72 h, in the infected and treated group was similar to normal levels and significantly lower than that of the infected but not treated group, indicating that phage treatment was effective. Thus, directly supplying phages to the culture water could be an effective and inexpensive approach toward reducing the negative impact of vibriosis in larviculture.

  16. Phage therapy as an approach to prevent Vibrio anguillarum infections in fish larvae production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Yolanda J; Costa, Liliana; Pereira, Carla; Mateus, Cristiana; Cunha, Angela; Calado, Ricardo; Gomes, Newton C M; Pardo, Miguel A; Hernandez, Igor; Almeida, Adelaide

    2014-01-01

    Fish larvae in aquaculture have high mortality rates due to pathogenic bacteria, especially the Vibrio species, and ineffective prophylactic strategies. Vaccination is not feasible in larvae and antibiotics have reduced efficacy against multidrug resistant bacteria. A novel approach to controlling Vibrio infections in aquaculture is needed. The potential of phage therapy to combat vibriosis in fish larvae production has not yet been examined. We describe the isolation and characterization of two bacteriophages capable of infecting pathogenic Vibrio and their application to prevent bacterial infection in fish larvae. Two groups of zebrafish larvae were infected with V. anguillarum (∼106 CFU mL-1) and one was later treated with a phage lysate (∼108 PFU mL-1). A third group was only added with phages. A fourth group received neither bacteria nor phages (fish control). Larvae mortality, after 72 h, in the infected and treated group was similar to normal levels and significantly lower than that of the infected but not treated group, indicating that phage treatment was effective. Thus, directly supplying phages to the culture water could be an effective and inexpensive approach toward reducing the negative impact of vibriosis in larviculture.

  17. X-ray irradiation on blood products for the purpose of prevention of PT-GVHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayama, Tatsuya; Naohara, Tooru; Haneda, Kenji; Juji, Takeo.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray irradiation on blood products is a common method to prevent the risk of inducing PT-GVHD, and has recently become to be used in Japan. We have tried X-ray irradiation on WB, CRC and PC using HITACHI X-ray Irradiation Apparatus MBR1520R, and studied its practical usefulness. In case of irradiation on blood bags as the minimum dose of 1,500 rads, these conditions are thought to be practical: 1) the use of 1.0 mm Al filter, 2) the distance of 550 nm from X-ray source, and 3) irradiation on 4 bags at the same time. But, it has also been noticed that total doses and qualities of X-ray absorbed into blood were different between upper and lower side of the bag. Bloods on upper side absorbed much doses and a wide range of X-ray, on the other hand, bloods on lower side absorbed less doses and hard X-ray. In these conditions, irradiated lymphocytes showed a complete inhibition of thymidine uptake in MLC test, still had 15% of activity in PHA stimulation. The qualities of other blood components have not changed before and after irradiation. X-ray irradiation is useful in a routine work of blood center, but problems of proper doses and a uniformity of irradiation are remained to be solved. (author)

  18. Adsorption of copper onto char derived macro alga, Undaria pinnatifida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hye Jung; Ko, Jeong Huy; Heo, Hyeon Su; Park, Hye Jin; BAe, Yoon Ju; Kim, Jung Hwan; Park, Young-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Full text: A release of heavy metals into the environment by industrial activities raises much environmental problems because they tend to remain indefinitely, circulating and eventually accumulating throughout the food chain. Copper is essential to human life and health but, like all heavy metals, is potentially toxic as well. The excessive intakes of copper result in its accumulation in the liver and produce gastrointestinal problems, kidney damage, anemia, and continued inhalation of copper-containing sprays is linked with an increase in lung cancer among exposed people. Consequently, we need to eliminate the copper in drinking water. Also, growth rates of marine macro algae far exceed those of terrestrial biomass, without water limitations, so annual primary production rates are higher for the major marine macro algae than for most terrestrial biomass. According to these reasons, we try to use the macro alga, Undaria pinnatifida. Adsorption of heavy metals is one of the possible technologies involved in the removal of toxic metals from industrial waste streams and mining waste water using low-cost adsorbents. In recent years, many low-cost adsorbents such as seaweeds, activated carbon, etc. have been investigated, but the char by macro alga, Undaria pinnatifida, have not proven to be the most effective and promising substrates. The aim of this study is to remove copper from its aqueous solution by Undaria pinnatifida char for various parameters like pH, contact time, and Cu(II) concentration. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II) by Undaria pinnatifida char was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, and Cu(II) concentration at room temperature. And it was verified using equilibrium studies. (author)

  19. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-03

    We consider a general framework to predict the development of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in a lake driven by uncertain parameters. To quantify the concentration uncertainty of those algae groups via their joint probabilistic density function (PDF), we explore an approach based on the Fokker-Planck equation. Our result is presented in an example where abundant nutrients contribute to the proliferation of cyanobacteria and other minor algae groups.

  20. Light dependence of quantum yields for PSII charge separation and oxygen evolution in eucaryotic algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flameling, I.A.; Kromkamp, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum yields of photosystem II (PSII) charge separation (Phi(P)) and oxygen production (Phi(O2)) were determined by simultaneous measurements of oxygen production and variable fluorescence in four different aquatic microalgae representing three different taxonomic groups: the freshwater alga

  1. A scoping review of the public health impact of vitamin D-fortified dairy products for fracture prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiligsmann, Mickael; Neuprez, Audrey; Buckinx, Fanny; Locquet, Médéa; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2017-12-01

    Dairy products are rich in nutrients that positively influence bone health and hence fracture risk, and have therefore been recommended and used for fracture prevention. To help decision makers to efficiently allocate scare resources, it is further important to assess the public health and economic impact of any health intervention. In recent years, several studies have been conducted to estimate the public health and/or economic impact of dairy products but no overview is currently available. This article aims therefore to summarize evidence and review articles that estimated the public health and/or economic impact of vitamin D-fortified dairy products for fracture prevention. A literature review was conducted using PubMed to identify original studies that assessed the public health and/or economic impact of dairy products (or of calcium/vitamin D supplementation) for fracture prevention up to January 15, 2017. Seven articles were identified. Different strategies were used by the authors to model the economic/public health impact of dairy products. The four studies assessing the public health impact of dairy products revealed a substantial benefit in terms of fracture prevented, life years, disability-adjusted life years and/or quality-adjusted life years gained. Studies assessing the cost-effectiveness revealed that the use of dairy products is generally cost-effective in the general population aged above 70 years, and from the age of 60 years in populations at high risk of fractures. This systematic review suggests that the use of dairy products could substantially reduce the burden of osteoporotic fractures and seem to be an economically beneficial strategy.

  2. Fluorescence Properties of Chlorella sp. Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Teplicky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Water quality and its fast and reliable monitoring is the challenge of the future. Design of appropriate biosensors that would be capable of non-invasive identification of water pollution is an important prerequisite for such challenge. Chlorophylls are pigments, naturally presented in all plants that absorb light. The main forms of chlorophyll in algae are chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b, other pigments include xantophylls and beta-carotenes. Our aim was to characterize endogenous fluorescence of the Chlorella sp. algae, present naturally in drinking water. We recorded spatial, spectral and lifetime fluorescence distribution in the native algae. We noted that the fluorescence was evenly distributed in the algae cytosol, but lacked in the nucleus and reached maximum at 680-690 nm. Fluorescence decay of chlorella sp. was double-exponential, and clearly shorter than that of its isolated pigments. For the first time, fluorescence lifetime image of the algae is presented. Study of the fluorescence properties of algae is aimed at the improvement of water supply contamination detection and cleaning.

  3. Comparison and correction of three satellite precipitation estimates products to improve flood prevention in French Guiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufort, Aurélien; Gibier, Florian; Palany, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    biases: 6.2 mm; RMSE: 13.2 mm). Two corrections methods have significantly improved satellite precipitation estimates products: the additive correction of residuals by inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation and the correction by power transformation (PT). These two corrections led to obtain absolute biases lower than 10 mm for each rainfall satellite products. RMSEs calculated after correction by IDW of biases and by PT were less than 15 mm. Rainfall estimates by satellite images were better at stations located along the coast at the north of French Guiana with absolute biases lower than 7 mm. Daily rainfall estimates with GPM obtained the better performance after correction with a mean RMSE of 10 mm and a clearly better estimation of heavy rain in comparison with TRMM and H-E. To conclude, the correction method of satellite precipitation estimates could be easily implemented in an operational case with the aim to prevent flood and protect population. A first test was conducted and the corrected daily rainfall has been introduced in the lumped rainfall-runoff model GR4J in order to simulate the discharge of 8 rivers in French Guiana. The model has shown a good capacity to simulate the daily discharge with a Nash-Sutcliffe criterion higher than 75% for the three satellite products (period 2015-2016).

  4. Thicker three-dimensional tissue from a “symbiotic recycling system” combining mammalian cells and algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Yuji; Kagawa, Yuki; Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report an in vitro co-culture system that combines mammalian cells and algae, Chlorococcum littorale, to create a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue. While the C2C12 mouse myoblasts and rat cardiac cells consumed oxygen actively, intense oxygen production was accounted for by the algae even in the co-culture system. Although cell metabolism within thicker cardiac cell-layered tissues showed anaerobic respiration, the introduction of innovative co-cultivation partially changed the metabolism to aerobic respiration. Moreover, the amount of glucose consumption and lactate production in the cardiac tissues and the amount of ammonia in the culture media decreased significantly when co-cultivated with algae. In the cardiac tissues devoid of algae, delamination was observed histologically, and the release of creatine kinase (CK) from the tissues showed severe cardiac cell damage. On the other hand, the layered cell tissues with algae were observed to be in a good histological condition, with less than one-fifth decline in CK release. The co-cultivation with algae improved the culture condition of the thicker tissues, resulting in the formation of 160 μm-thick cardiac tissues. Thus, the present study proposes the possibility of creating an in vitro “symbiotic recycling system” composed of mammalian cells and algae. PMID:28139713

  5. Use of the Term “Shock” in Swimming Pool, Hot Tubs, and Spa Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has determined that shock treatment and super-chlorination are terms usually used to describe claims to kill or control visible algae growth. Claims to kill, prevent or control algae or bacteria are pesticide claims.

  6. Herbivorous snails can increase water clarity by stimulating growth of benthic algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiufeng; Taylor, William D; Rudstam, Lars G

    2017-11-01

    Eutrophication in shallow lakes is characterized by a switch from benthic to pelagic dominance of primary productivity that leads to turbid water, while benthification is characterized by a shift in primary production from the pelagic zone to the benthos associated with clear water. A 12-week mesocosm experiment tested the hypothesis that the herbivorous snail Bellamya aeruginosa stimulates the growth of pelagic algae through grazing on benthic algae and through accelerating nutrient release from sediment. A tube-microcosm experiment using 32 P-PO 4 as a tracer tested the effects of the snails on the release of sediment phosphorus (P). The mesocosm experiment recorded greater total nitrogen (TN) concentrations and a higher ratio of TN:TP in the overlying water, and a higher light intensity and biomass of benthic algae as measured by chlorophyll a (Chl a) in the snail treatment than in the control. Concentrations of total phosphorus (TP), total suspended solids (TSSs), and inorganic suspended solids (ISSs) in the overlying water were lower in the snail treatment than in the control, though no significant difference in Chl a of pelagic algae between the snail treatment and control was observed. In the microcosm experiment, 32 P activity in the overlying water was higher in the snail treatment than in the control, indicating that snails accelerated P release from the sediment. Our interpretation of these results is that snails enhanced growth of benthic algae and thereby improved water clarity despite grazing on the benthic algae and enhancing P release from the sediment. The rehabilitation of native snail populations may therefore enhance the recovery of eutrophic shallow lakes to a clear water state by stimulating growth of benthic algae.

  7. Ice Algae-Produced Carbon Is Critical for Overwintering of Antarctic Krill Euphausia superba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Kohlbach

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic krill Euphausia superba (“krill” constitute a fundamental food source for Antarctic seabirds and mammals, and a globally important fisheries resource. The future resilience of krill to climate change depends critically on the winter survival of young krill. To survive periods of extremely low production by pelagic algae during winter, krill are assumed to rely partly on carbon produced by ice algae. The true dependency on ice algae-produced carbon, however, is so far unquantified. This confounds predictions on the future resilience of krill stocks to sea ice decline. Fatty acid (FA analysis, bulk stable isotope analysis (BSIA, and compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA of diatom- and dinoflagellate-associated marker FAs were applied to quantify the dependency of overwintering larval, juvenile, and adult krill on ice algae-produced carbon (αIce during winter 2013 in the Weddell-Scotia Confluence Zone. Our results demonstrate that the majority of the carbon uptake of the overwintering larval and juvenile krill originated from ice algae (up to 88% of the carbon budget, and that the dependency on ice algal carbon decreased with ontogeny, reaching <56% of the carbon budget in adults. Spatio-temporal variability in the utilization of ice algal carbon was more pronounced in larvae and juvenile krill than in adults. Differences between αIce estimates derived from short- vs. long-term FA-specific isotopic compositions suggested that ice algae-produced carbon gained importance as the winter progressed, and might become critical at the late winter-spring transition, before the phytoplankton bloom commences. Where the sea ice season shortens, reduced availability of ice algae might possibly not be compensated by surplus phytoplankton production during wintertime. Hence, sea ice decline could seriously endanger the winter survival of recruits, and subsequently overall biomass of krill.

  8. Hyperspectral imaging of snow algae and green algae from aeroterrestrial habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Andreas; Allen, Michael C.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-01-01

    Snow algae and green algae living in aeroterrestrial habitats are ideal obbjects to study adaptation to high light irradiation. Here, we used a detailed description of the spectral properties as a proxy for photo-acclimation/protection in snow algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis, Chlainomonas sp. and Chloromonas sp.) and charopyhte green algae (Zygnema sp., Zygogonium ericetorum and Klebsormidium crenulatum). The hyperspectral microscopic mapping and imaging technique allowed us to acquire total absorbance spectra of these microalgae in the waveband of 400-900 nm. Particularly in Chlamydomonas nivalis and Chlainomonas sp., a high absorbance in the wave band of 400-550 nm was observed, due to naturally occurring secondary carotenoids; in Chloromonas sp. and in the charopyhte algae this was missing, the latter being close relatives to land plants. To investigate if cellular water loss has an influence on the spectral properties, the cells were plasmolysed in sorbitol or desiccated at ambient air. While in snow algae, these treatments did not change the spectral properties, in the charopyhte algae the condensation of the cytoplasm and plastids increased the absorbance in the lower waveband of 400 – 500 nm. These changes might be ecologically relevant and photoprotective, as aeroterrestrial algae are naturally exposed to occasional water limitation, leading to desiccation, which are conditions usually occurring together with higher irradiation. PMID:27442511

  9. Hyperspectral imaging of snow algae and green algae from aeroterrestrial habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Andreas; Allen, Michael C; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2016-09-01

    Snow algae and green algae living in aeroterrestrial habitats are ideal objects to study adaptation to high light irradiation. Here, we used a detailed description of the spectral properties as a proxy for photo-acclimation/protection in snow algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis, Chlainomonas sp. and Chloromonas sp.) and charophyte green algae (Zygnema sp., Zygogonium ericetorum and Klebsormidium crenulatum). The hyperspectral microscopic mapping and imaging technique allowed us to acquire total absorption spectra of these microalgae in the waveband of 400-900nm. Particularly in Chlamydomonas nivalis and Chlainomonas sp., a high absorbance between 400-550nm was observed, due to naturally occurring secondary carotenoids; in Chloromonas sp. and in the charopyhte algae this high absorbance was missing, the latter being close relatives to land plants. To investigate if cellular water loss has an influence on the spectral properties, the cells were plasmolysed in sorbitol or desiccated at ambient air. While in snow algae, these treatments did hardly change the spectral properties, in the charopyhte algae the condensation of the cytoplasm and plastids increased the absorbance in the lower waveband of 400-500nm. These changes might be ecologically relevant and photoprotective, as aeroterrestrial algae are naturally exposed to occasional water limitation, leading to desiccation, which are conditions usually occurring together with higher irradiation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide Prevents Advanced Glycation End-Products Induced Activation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiushi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs are complex and heterogeneous compounds implicated in diabetes. Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC at the distal nephron plays an important role in diabetic hypertension. Here, we report that H2S antagonizes AGEs-induced ENaC activation in A6 cells. ENaC open probability (PO in A6 cells was significantly increased by exogenous AGEs and that this AGEs-induced ENaC activity was abolished by NaHS (a donor of H2S and TEMPOL. Incubating A6 cells with the catalase inhibitor 3-aminotriazole (3-AT mimicked the effects of AGEs on ENaC activity, but did not induce any additive effect. We found that the expression levels of catalase were significantly reduced by AGEs and both AGEs and 3-AT facilitated ROS uptake in A6 cells, which were significantly inhibited by NaHS. The specific PTEN and PI3K inhibitors, BPV(pic  and LY294002, influence ENaC activity in AGEs-pretreated A6 cells. Moreover, after removal of AGEs from AGEs-pretreated A6 cells for 72 hours, ENaC PO remained at a high level, suggesting that an AGEs-related “metabolic memory” may be involved in sodium homeostasis. Our data, for the first time, show that H2S prevents AGEs-induced ENaC activation by targeting the ROS/PI3K/PTEN pathway.

  11. Induced thyme product prevents VEGF-induced migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krill, Diane; Madden, John; Huncik, Kevin; Moeller, Peter D

    2010-12-17

    Compounds with anti-angiogenic properties are useful in combating cancer by preventing new blood vessel formation to support the tumor. In this report we introduce a rapid method for screening potential anti-angiogenic compounds in a model system that stimulates the production of secondary defense chemicals in plants. This methodology identified an inducible vascular factor (IVF3), which was found to be inhibitory in all of the model systems tested. Thyme plants were exposed to highly vascular mint plants and the methanol extracts were analyzed by reverse phase HPLC. The thyme compounds induced by the invading mint tissue, and not present in the thyme plants grown alone, were tested in a vertical plate assay measuring root length as a quantitative assay for drug sensitivity. The HPLC-purified extract, referred to as IVF3, reduced the growth of root vascular tissue compared to the control and vehicle control, and 50% as well as known angiogenesis inhibitors, VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and amiloride hydrochloride. Extracted compounds that were effective inhibitors of plant roots were assayed in Madin Darby canine kidney epithelial cells (MDCK) for toxicity, and in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) for their effect on migration. IVF3 was effective at limiting HUVEC migration in VEGF-stimulated cultures. In vivo video capture of intersegmental vessel circulation between 48 and 72 h post fertilization in the developing vasculature of zebrafish embryos showed IVF3 also significantly reduced ISV functional circulation. This report demonstrates the anti-angiogenic effects of IVF3 extract in endothelial cells and in an intact vertebrate model for angiogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Preventive effect of fermented Maillard reaction products from milk proteins in cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, N S; Kwon, H S; Lee, H A; Joung, J Y; Lee, J Y; Lee, K B; Shin, Y K; Baick, S C; Park, M R; Kim, Y; Lee, K W; Kim, S H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the dual effect of Maillard reaction and fermentation on the preventive cardiovascular effects of milk proteins. Maillard reaction products (MRP) were prepared from the reaction between milk proteins, such as whey protein concentrates (WPC) and sodium caseinate (SC), and lactose. The hydrolysates of MRP were obtained from fermentation by lactic acid bacteria (LAB; i.e., Lactobacillus gasseri H10, L. gasseri H11, Lactobacillus fermentum H4, and L. fermentum H9, where human-isolated strains were designated H1 to H15), which had excellent proteolytic and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activities (>20%). The antioxidant activity of MRP was greater than that of intact proteins in assays of the reaction with 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt and trivalent ferric ions; moreover, the effect of MRP was synergistically improved by fermentation. The Maillard reaction dramatically increased the level of antithrombotic activity and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) inhibitory effect of milk proteins, but did not change the level of activity for micellar cholesterol solubility. Furthermore, specific biological properties were enhanced by fermentation. Lactobacillus gasseri H11 demonstrated the greatest activity for thrombin and HMGR inhibition in Maillard-reacted WPC, by 42 and 33%, respectively, whereas hydrolysates of Maillard-reacted SC fermented by L. fermentum H9 demonstrated the highest reduction rate for micellar cholesterol solubility, at 52%. In addition, the small compounds that were likely released by fermentation of MRP were identified by size-exclusion chromatography. Therefore, MRP and hydrolysates of fermented MRP could be used to reduce cardiovascular risks. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Research gaps related to tobacco product marketing and sales in the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribisl, Kurt M

    2012-01-01

    This paper is part of a collection that identifies research priorities that will help guide the efforts of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as it regulates tobacco products. This paper examines the major provisions related to tobacco product advertising, marketing, sales, and distribution included in Public Law 111-31, the "Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act". This paper covers 5 areas related to (a) marketing regulations (e.g., ban on color and imagery in ads, ban on nontobacco gifts with purchase); (b) granting FDA authority over the sale, distribution, accessibility, advertising, and promotion of tobacco and lifting state preemption over advertising; (c) remote tobacco sales (mail order and Internet); (d) prevention of illicit and cross-border trade; and (e) noncompliant export products. Each of the 5 sections of this paper provides a description and brief history of regulation, what is known about this regulatory strategy, and research opportunities.

  14. Counter-Productive Counter-Terrorism. How is the dysfunctional discourse of Prevent failing to restrain radicalisation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Powell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores why the Prevent strand of the UK Government’s counter-terrorism strategy, CONTEST, is failing to achieve success in reducing radicalisation of young Muslims. By refusing to engage with extremists, and denying ‘extreme’ ideas a platform for expression, this paper will explain how the importance of cultural-linguistic epistemologies, and their role in extremism, has been overlooked. Rather than striving to understand how socio-political factors influence one’s reading of religious doctrines or interpretation of ideology, Prevent understands ideology to be the core radicalising agent, used by influential figures who can exploit the grievances of the vulnerable. The problematic repercussions of this will be addressed throughout, highlighting the various, and extensive, criticisms that Prevent has faced from academics, practitioners and commentators – primarily that it is counter-productive. The importance of the post-9/11 neoconservative paradigm in underpinning Prevent will be explained, but a Neo-Weberian approach, as a better lens through which to understand radicalisation, will be proposed, to ultimately trump the simplistic, yet currently dominant, ‘Conveyor Belt’ theory. Based on this, recommendations are made for an improved Prevent, rooted in the notion that radicalisation, extremism, or terrorism cannot be prevented, without knowing the motives, the views, and the assumptions of the radicals, the extremists, and those vulnerable to engaging with them.

  15. Cholesterol oxidized products in foods: potential health hazards and the role of antioxidants in prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieto, Susana

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a molecule with a double bond in its structure, and therefore it is susceptible to oxidation leading to the formation of oxysterols. These oxidation products are found in many commonly consumed foods and are formed during their manufacture and/or processing. Concern about the consumption of oxysterols arises from the potentially cytotoxic, mutagenic, atherogenic, and possibly carcinogenic effects of some of them. Eggs and egg-derived products are the main dietary sources of oxysterols. Thermally processed milk and milk-derived products are also another source of oxysterols in our diet. Fried meats, and other miscellaneous foods, such as French fried potatoes, when prepared using vegetable/animal frying oil, are another important source of oxysterols in the western diet. Efforts to prevent or to reduce cholesterol oxidation are directed to the application of antioxidants of either synthetic or natural origin. Antioxidants cannot only inhibit triglyceride oxidation, but some of them can also inhibit cholesterol oxidation. Among synthetic antioxidants, 2,6-di-ter tiarybutyl-4-methylphenol (BHT and ter tiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ , can eff icient ly inhibit the thermal-induced oxidation of cholesterol. Among natural antioxidants, alpha- and gamma-tocopherol, rosemary extracts, and flavonoid quercetin, show the strongest inhibitory action against cholesterol oxidation.El colesterol es una molécula con un doble enlace en su estructura; por lo tanto es susceptible a la oxidación y su transformación en oxiesteroles. Estos productos de oxidación se encuentran en gran diversidad de alimentos y se forman durante la manufactura y procesamiento. Algunos de los oxiesteroles son potencialmente citotóxicos, mutagénicos, aterogénicos y carcinogénicos. Los huevos y productos derivados del huevo constituyen la principal fuente en la dieta de oxiesteroles. También se encuentran oxiesteroles en derivados lácteos y leche sometida a altas

  16. Biological toxicity of lanthanide elements on algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Peidong; Zhao, Qing; Su, Dan; Li, Peijun; Stagnitti, Frank

    2010-08-01

    The biological toxicity of lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was investigated. The specific objective of this research was to establish the relationship between the abundance in the seawater of lanthanides and their biological toxicities on marine monocellular algae. The results showed that all single lanthanides had similar toxic effects on Skeletonema costatum. High concentrations of lanthanides (29.04+/-0.61 micromol L(-1)) resulted in 50% reduction in growth of algae compared to the controls (0 micromol L(-1)) after 96 h (96 h-EC50). The biological toxicity of 13 lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was unrelated with the abundance of different lanthanide elements in nature, and the "Harkins rule" was not appropriate for the lanthanides. A mixed solution that contained equivalent concentrations of each lanthanide element had the same inhibition effect on algae cells as each individual lanthanide element at the same total concentration. This phenomenon is unique compared to the groups of other elements in the periodic table. Hence, we speculate that the monocellular organisms might not be able to sufficiently differentiate between the almost chemically identical lanthanide elements. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Phospholipids of New Zealand Edible Brown Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyssotski, Mikhail; Lagutin, Kirill; MacKenzie, Andrew; Mitchell, Kevin; Scott, Dawn

    2017-07-01

    Edible brown algae have attracted interest as a source of beneficial allenic carotenoid fucoxanthin, and glyco- and phospholipids enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Unlike green algae, brown algae contain no or little phosphatidylserine, possessing an unusual aminophospholipid, phosphatidyl-O-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl) glycine], PHEG, instead. When our routinely used technique of 31 P-NMR analysis of phospholipids was applied to the samples of edible New Zealand brown algae, a number of signals corresponding to unidentified phosphorus-containing compounds were observed in total lipids. NI (negative ion) ESI QToF MS spectra confirmed the presence of more familiar phospholipids, and also suggested the presence of PHEG or its isomers. The structure of PHEG was confirmed by comparison with a synthetic standard. An unusual MS fragmentation pattern that was also observed prompted us to synthesise a number of possible candidates, and was found to follow that of phosphatidylhydroxyethyl methylcarbamate, likely an extraction artefact. An unexpected outcome was the finding of ceramidephosphoinositol that has not been reported previously as occurring in brown algae. An uncommon arsenic-containing phospholipid has also been observed and quantified, and its TLC behaviour studied, along with that of the newly synthesised lipids.

  18. Controlled regular locomotion of algae cell microrobots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuangxi; Jiao, Niandong; Tung, Steve; Liu, Lianqing

    2016-06-01

    Algae cells can be considered as microrobots from the perspective of engineering. These organisms not only have a strong reproductive ability but can also sense the environment, harvest energy from the surroundings, and swim very efficiently, accommodating all these functions in a body of size on the order of dozens of micrometers. An interesting topic with respect to random swimming motions of algae cells in a liquid is how to precisely control them as microrobots such that they swim according to manually set routes. This study developed an ingenious method to steer swimming cells based on the phototaxis. The method used a varying light signal to direct the motion of the cells. The swimming trajectory, speed, and force of algae cells were analyzed in detail. Then the algae cell could be controlled to swim back and forth, and traverse a crossroad as a microrobot obeying specific traffic rules. Furthermore, their motions along arbitrarily set trajectories such as zigzag, and triangle were realized successfully under optical control. Robotize algae cells can be used to precisely transport and deliver cargo such as drug particles in microfluidic chip for biomedical treatment and pharmacodynamic analysis. The study findings are expected to bring significant breakthrough in biological drives and new biomedical applications.

  19. Algae-facilitated chemical phosphorus removal during high-density Chlorella emersonii cultivation in a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Bernards, Matthew; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2014-02-01

    An algae-based membrane bioreactor (A-MBR) was evaluated for high-density algae cultivation and phosphorus (P) removal. The A-MBR was seeded with Chlorella emersonii and operated at a hydraulic retention time of 1day with minimal biomass wastage for about 150days. The algae concentration increased from initially 385mg/L (or 315mg biomass COD/L) to a final of 4840mg/L (or 1664mg COD/L), yielding an average solids (algae biomass+minerals) production rate of 32.5gm(-3)d(-1) or 6.2gm(-2)d(-1). The A-MBR was able to remove 66±9% of the total P from the water while the algal biomass had an average of 7.5±0.2% extracellular P and 0.4% of intracellular P. The results suggest that algae-induced phosphate precipitation by algae is key to P removal and high-density algae cultivation produces P-rich algal biomass with excellent settling properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolation of a bacterial strain, Acinetobacter sp. from centrate wastewater and study of its cooperation with algae in nutrients removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Lu, Qian; Wang, Qin; Liu, Wen; Wei, Qian; Ren, Hongyan; Ming, Caibing; Min, Min; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2017-07-01

    Algae were able to grow healthy on bacteria-containing centrate wastewater in a pilot-scale bioreactor. The batch experiment indicated that the co-cultivation of algae and wastewater-borne bacteria improved the removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand and total phosphorus in centrate wastewater to 93.01% and 98.78%, respectively. A strain of beneficial aerobic bacteria, Acinetobacter sp., was isolated and its biochemical characteristics were explored. Synergistic cooperation was observed in the growth of algae and Acinetobacter sp. Removal efficiencies of some nutrients were improved significantly by the co-cultivation of algae and Acinetobacter sp. After treatment, residual nutrients in centrate wastewater reached the permissible discharge limit. The cooperation between algae and Acinetobacter sp. was in part attributed to the exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen between the algae and bacteria. This synergetic relationship between algae and Acinetobacter sp. provided a promising way to treat the wastewater by improving the nutrients removal and biomass production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 40 CFR 112.9 - Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure Plan Requirements for onshore oil production...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Requirements for Petroleum Oils and Non-Petroleum Oils, Except Animal Fats and Oils and Greases, and Fish and Marine Mammal Oils; and Vegetable Oils (Including Oils from...

  2. Measuring of the Chlorophyll a Fluorescence in Calcium Alginate-Encapsulated Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibeth Paola Delgadillo Rodríguez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Immobilization of algae has many applications, such as water bioremediation and production of metabolites. One of the variables that can be determined in the immobilized algae is chlorophyll a fluorescence, because this parameter is related to the physiological response of these organisms. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore a method for measuring the chlorophyll a fluorescence in calcium alginate-encapsulated algae. To do this, two species of microalgae (Scenedesmus ovalternus LAUN 001 and Parachlorella kessleri LAUN 002 were grown in monocultures in both free culture conditions (10 mL of algae preparation in 250 mL of Basal Bold Medium and encapsulated (250 spheres in 250 mL of Basal Bold Medium. Different measurement protocols of chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PSII were performed by varying a the preadaptation time to darkness (10, 15 and 30 min, b the light intensity of the non-modulated fluorometer (between 1000 and 3500 μmoles m-2s-1, and c the time of exposure to actinic light (1, 2 and 5 s. The optimal conditions for the measurement of the maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm in encapsulated algae were established as follow: a 30 min of preadaptation time; b 3000 μmoles m-2s-1 of the fluorometer light intensity; and c 1 to 2 s of exposure to actinic light. The following values in the photochemical activity of algae in non-stressful conditions were found: 0.760 – 0.764 for S. ovalternus, and 0.732 – 0.748 for P. kessleri. This methodology allows to observe some changes in the photochemical activity related with variations in the factors under which are the immobilized algae.

  3. Drifting algae and zoobenthos — Effects on settling and community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsdorff, Erik

    Shallow (5 to 10 m) sandy bottoms in the Baltic Sea are important areas for zoobenthic production. The infaunal communities are generally governed by the hydrographical conditions are transport of the sediment through wind effects. With increasing eutrophication in the Baltic Sea, drifting mats of annual algae ( Cladophora, Stictyosiphon, Polysiphonia, Rhodemela, Sphacelaria, Pilayella, Furcellaria, Ceramium, etc) have become increasingly common, adding to the structuring and regulating factors for the infauna. In 1990 and 91, a field-study (SCUBA diving; zoobenthos and algae sampling) was carried out in the Åland archipelogo, in thennorthern and their structuring effect on the zoobenthos. Algal biomass increased from 150 ± 19 g DW·m -2 in 1990 to 832±60 g DW·m -2 in 1991, having no effect on oxygen saturation in 1990, but showing signs of reduced oxygen saturation in 1991. Organic content of the sediment remained stable (0.60 to 0.74%) during the entire study period. The zoobenthic community showed significant responses to the drifting algae at population level and in terms of community structure (by 1991: significantly reduced species number; low similarity values (40 to 65%) between bare sand and under the algae). The main species affected were the dominating bivalve Macoma balthica, the polychaetes Pygospio elegans and Manayunkia aestuarina, and the amphipod Corophium volutator. The settlement of M. balthica spat was significantly reduced by the algae (>70% in 1990/91), and no individuals of the dominating polychaetes were recorded under the mat. C. volutator, however, benefited from the algae, and greatly increased in numbers. The results clearly demonstrate the types of physical effects drift-algae will have no sandy-bottom benthos, and show that significant changes in the communities over large areas can be expected with increasing eutrophication.

  4. Multispectral sorter for rapid, nondestructive optical bioprospecting for algae biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ryan W.; Wu, Hauwen; Singh, Seema

    2014-03-01

    Microalgal biotechnology is a nascent yet burgeoning field for developing the next generation of sustainable feeds, fuels, and specialty chemicals. Among the issues facing the algae bioproducts industry, the lack of efficient means of cultivar screening and phenotype selection represents a critical hurdle for rapid development and diversification. To address this challenge, we have developed a multi-modal and label-free optical tool which simultaneously assesses the photosynthetic productivity and biochemical composition of single microalgal cells, and provides a means for actively sorting attractive specimen (bioprospecting) based on the spectral readout. The device integrates laser-trapping micro-Raman spectroscopy and pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry of microalgal cells in a flow cell. Specifically, the instrument employs a dual-purpose epi-configured IR laser for single-cell trapping and Raman spectroscopy, and a high-intensity VISNIR trans-illumination LED bank for detection of variable photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence. Micro-Raman scatter of single algae cells revealed vibrational modes corresponding to the speciation and total lipid content, as well as other major biochemical pools, including total protein, carbohydrates, and carotenoids. PSII fluorescence dynamics provide a quantitative estimate of maximum photosynthetic efficiency and regulated and non-regulated non-photochemical quenching processes. The combined spectroscopic readouts provide a set of metrics for subsequent optical sorting of the cells by the laser trap for desirable biomass properties, e.g. the combination of high lipid productivity and high photosynthetic yield. Thus the device provides means for rapid evaluation and sorting of algae cultures and environmental samples for biofuels development.

  5. Determination of the distribution of shallow-water seagrass and drift algae communities with acoustic seafloor discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Riegl

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of seagrass and algae communities can be difficult to determine in large,shallow lagoon systems where high turbidity prevents the use of optical methods like aerial photography or satellite imagery.Further complications can arise when algae are not permanently attached to the substratum and drift with tides and currents.A study using acoustic seafloor discrimination was conducted in the Indian River Lagoon (Florida,USAto determine the extent of drift algae and seagrass.Acoustic surveys using the QTC View V system based on 50 and 200 kHz transducers were conducted near Sebastian Inlet.Results indicate that areas of seagrass can be identified,and are mixed with a high abundance of drift algae.Nearest-neighbor extrapolation was used to fill in spaces between survey lines and thus obtain spatially cohesive maps.These maps were then ground-truthed using data from towed video and compared using confusion matrices.The maps showed a high level of agreement (60%with the actual distribution of algae,however some confusion existed between bare sand and algae as well as seagrass.La distribución espacial de comunidades de pastos marinos y algas puede ser difícil de determinar en sistema lagunares grandes y someros donde la alta turbidez no permite el uso de métodos ópticos,como fotografías aéreas e imágenes satelitales. Complicaciones adicionales pueden surgir cuando las algas no están adheridas permanentemente al sustrato y derivan con las mareas y corrientes.Se realizó un estudio utilizando discriminación acústica del fondo marino en el Indian River Lagoon (Florida,EUA para determinar la cantidad de algas y pastos que derivan. Se realizaron sondeos acústicos en el Sebastian Inlet con el sistema QTC View V y transductores de 50 y 200 kHz.Las áreas de pastos marinos pudieron ser identificadas,y están mezcladas con una gran cantidad de algas a la deriva.Se rellenó los espacios sin datos con extrapolaciones basadas en la

  6. Freshwater algae of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.D.; Giles, K.R.

    1979-06-01

    Fifty-two species of freshwater algae were identified in samples collected from the eight known natural springs of the Nevada Test Site. Although several species were widespread, 29 species were site specific. Diatoms provided the greatest variety of species at each spring. Three-fifths of all algal species encountered were diatoms. Well-developed mats of filamentous green algae (Chlorophyta) were common in many of the water tanks associated with the springs and accounted for most of the algal biomass. Major nutrients were adequate, if not abundant, in most spring waters - growth being limited primarily by light and physical habitat. There was some evidence of cesium-137 bioconcentration by algae at several of the springs

  7. Freshwater algae of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, W.D.; Giles, K.R.

    1979-06-01

    Fifty-two species of freshwater algae were identified in samples collected from the eight known natural springs of the Nevada Test Site. Although several species were widespread, 29 species were site specific. Diatoms provided the greatest variety of species at each spring. Three-fifths of all algal species encountered were diatoms. Well-developed mats of filamentous green algae (Chlorophyta) were common in many of the water tanks associated with the springs and accounted for most of the algal biomass. Major nutrients were adequate, if not abundant, in most spring waters - growth being limited primarily by light and physical habitat. There was some evidence of cesium-137 bioconcentration by algae at several of the springs.

  8. Behaviour of technetium in marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Kirchmann, R.; Van Baelen, J.; Hurtger, C.; Cogneau, M.; Van der Ben, D.; Verthe, C.; Bouquegneau, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Uptake and distribution of technetium were studied in several green (Acetabularia acetabulum, Boergesenia forbesii, Ulva lactuca) and brown (Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus serratus, Fucus spiralis and Fucus vesiculosus) marine algae. Technetium was supplied to the algae as Tc-95m-pertechnetate. Under laboratory conditions, the algae were capable of accumulating technetium, with the exception, however, of Boergesenia, which showed concentration factors (C.F.) comprised between 0.28 and 0.71. The concentration of technetium-99 in Fucus spiralis, collected along the Belgian coast, was measured by a radiochemical procedure. The intracellular distribution of technetium was studied by differential centrifugation in Acetabularia and by the puncturing technique in Boergesenia. The chemical forms of technetium penetrated into the cells were investigated by selective chemical extractions, molecular sieving and thin layer chromatography

  9. Behaviour of technetium in marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Kirchmann, R.; Baelen, J. van; Hurtgen, C.; Cogneau, M.; Ben, D. van der; Verthe, C.; Bouquegneau, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Uptake and distribution of technetium were studied in several green (Acetabularia acetabulum, Boergesenia forbesii, Ulva lactuca) and brown (Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus serratus, Fucus spiralis and Fucus vesiculosus) marine algae. Technetium was supplied to the algae as Tc-95-pertechnetate. Under laboratory conditions, the algae were capable of accumulating technetium, with the exception, however, of Boergesenia, which showed concentration factors (C.F.) comprised between 0.28 and 0.71. The concentration of technetium-99 in Fucus spiralis, collected along the Belgian coast, was measured by a radiochemical procedure. The intracellular distribution of technetium was studied by differential centrifugation in Acetabularia and by the puncturing technique in Boergesenia. The chemical forms of technetium penetrated into the cells were investigated by selective chemical extractions, molecular sieving and thin layer chromatography. (author)

  10. Study of metal bioaccumulation by nuclear microprobe analysis of algae fossils and living algae cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, P.; Wang, J.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.; Reinert, T.; Heitmann, J.; Spemann, D.; Vogt, J.; Flagmeyer, R.-H.; Butz, T.

    2000-01-01

    Microscopic ion-beam analysis of palaeo-algae fossils and living green algae cells have been performed to study the metal bioaccumulation processes. The algae fossils, both single cellular and multicellular, are from the late Neoproterozonic (570 million years ago) ocean and perfectly preserved within a phosphorite formation. The biosorption of the rare earth element ions Nd 3+ by the green algae species euglena gracilis was investigated with a comparison between the normal cells and immobilized ones. The new Leipzig Nanoprobe, LIPSION, was used to produce a proton beam with 2 μm size and 0.5 nA beam current for this study. PIXE and RBS techniques were used for analysis and imaging. The observation of small metal rich spores (<10 μm) surrounding both of the fossils and the living cells proved the existence of some specific receptor sites which bind metal carrier ligands at the microbic surface. The bioaccumulation efficiency of neodymium by the algae cells was 10 times higher for immobilized algae cells. It confirms the fact that the algae immobilization is an useful technique to improve its metal bioaccumulation

  11. Determination of Volatile Compounds in Four Commercial Samples of Japanese Green Algae Using Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Yamamoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Green algae are of great economic importance. Seaweed is consumed fresh or as seasoning in Japan. The commercial value is determined by quality, color, and flavor and is also strongly influenced by the production area. Our research, based on solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS, has revealed that volatile compounds differ intensely in the four varieties of commercial green algae. Accordingly, 41 major volatile compounds were identified. Heptadecene was the most abundant compound from Okayama (Ulva prolifera, Tokushima (Ulva prolifera, and Ehime prefecture (Ulva linza. Apocarotenoids, such as ionones, and their derivatives were prominent volatiles in algae from Okayama (Ulva prolifera and Tokushima prefecture (Ulva prolifera. Volatile, short chained apocarotenoids are among the most potent flavor components and contribute to the flavor of fresh, processed algae, and algae-based products. Benzaldehyde was predominant in seaweed from Shizuoka prefecture (Monostroma nitidum. Multivariant statistical analysis (PCA enabled simple discrimination of the samples based on their volatile profiles. This work shows the potential of SPME-GC-MS coupled with multivariant analysis to discriminate between samples of different geographical and botanical origins and form the basis for development of authentication methods of green algae products, including seasonings.

  12. Determination of volatile compounds in four commercial samples of Japanese green algae using solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Baldermann, Susanne; Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Fujita, Akira; Mase, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2014-01-01

    Green algae are of great economic importance. Seaweed is consumed fresh or as seasoning in Japan. The commercial value is determined by quality, color, and flavor and is also strongly influenced by the production area. Our research, based on solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS), has revealed that volatile compounds differ intensely in the four varieties of commercial green algae. Accordingly, 41 major volatile compounds were identified. Heptadecene was the most abundant compound from Okayama (Ulva prolifera), Tokushima (Ulva prolifera), and Ehime prefecture (Ulva linza). Apocarotenoids, such as ionones, and their derivatives were prominent volatiles in algae from Okayama (Ulva prolifera) and Tokushima prefecture (Ulva prolifera). Volatile, short chained apocarotenoids are among the most potent flavor components and contribute to the flavor of fresh, processed algae, and algae-based products. Benzaldehyde was predominant in seaweed from Shizuoka prefecture (Monostroma nitidum). Multivariant statistical analysis (PCA) enabled simple discrimination of the samples based on their volatile profiles. This work shows the potential of SPME-GC-MS coupled with multivariant analysis to discriminate between samples of different geographical and botanical origins and form the basis for development of authentication methods of green algae products, including seasonings.

  13. EPQ model for imperfect production processes with rework and random preventive machine time for deteriorating items and trended demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Nita H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic production quantity (EPQ model has been analyzed for trended demand, and units in inventory are subject to constant rate. The system allows rework of imperfect units, and preventive maintenance time is random. A search method is used to study the model. The proposed methodology is validated by a numerical example. The sensitivity analysis is carried out to determine the critical model parameters. It is observed that the rate of change of demand, and the deterioration rate have a significant impact on the decision variables and the total cost of an inventory system. The model is highly sensitive to the production and demand rate.

  14. Serpins in plants and green algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, Thomas Hugh; Hejgaard, Jørn

    2008-01-01

    . Serpins have been found in diverse species of the plant kingdom and represent a distinct clade among serpins in multicellular organisms. Serpins are also found in green algae, but the evolutionary relationship between these serpins and those of plants remains unknown. Plant serpins are potent inhibitors...... of mammalian serine proteinases of the chymotrypsin family in vitro but, intriguingly, plants and green algae lack endogenous members of this proteinase family, the most common targets for animal serpins. An Arabidopsis serpin with a conserved reactive centre is now known to be capable of inhibiting...

  15. [Comparative chemical composition of the Barents Sea brown algae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obluchinskaia, E D

    2008-01-01

    Comparative study of phytochemical compositions of the most widespread brown algae species (one laminarian and four fucoid algae) from Barents Sea has been performed. A modified technique for mannitol determination in brown algae is proposed. It was revealed that fucus algae (fam. Fucaceae) contain 3% (of total dry weight) less mannitol than laminaria (Laminaria saccharina). The contents of alginic acid and laminaran in the Barents Sea fucoids are more than 10% less compared to laminaria. The alga L. saccharina contains almost two times more iodine than the species of fam. Fucaceae. The amounts of fucoidan and sum lipids in the Barents Sea fucoid algae is higher than in Laminaria saccharina (4-7% and 1-3%, respectively). In terms of contents of main biologically active compounds, fucus and laminarian algae from Barents Sea are inferior to none of the Far-Eastern species. The Barents Sea algae may become an important source of biologically active compounds.

  16. WASP7 BENTHIC ALGAE - MODEL THEORY AND USER'S GUIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The standard WASP7 eutrophication module includes nitrogen and phosphorus cycling, dissolved oxygen-organic matter interactions, and phytoplankton kinetics. In many shallow streams and rivers, however, the attached algae (benthic algae, or periphyton, attached to submerged substr...

  17. Association of thraustochytrids and fungi with living marine algae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; Nagarkar, S.; Raghukumar, S.

    only in C. clavulatum, Sargassum cinereum and Padina tetrastromatica whilst mycelial fungi occurred in all. Growth experiments in the laboratory indicated that the growth of thraustochytrids was inhibited on live algae, whereas killed algae supported...

  18. PYOMELANIN IS PRODUCED BY SHEWANELLA ALGAE BRY AND EFFECTED BY EXOGENOUS IRON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Frank Caccavo, F; Jr., J; Louis S. Tisa, L

    2006-11-29

    Melanin production by S. algae BrY occurred during late/post-exponential growth in lactate-basal-salts liquid medium supplemented with tyrosine or phenylalanine. The antioxidant ascorbate inhibited melanin production, but not production of the melanin precursor, homogentisic acid. In the absence of ascorbate, melanin production was inhibited by the 4-hydroxyplenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitor, sulcotrione and Fe(II) (>0.2mM). These data support the hypothesis that pigment production by S. algae BrY was a result the conversion of tyrosine or phenylalanine to homogentisic acid which was excreted, auto-oxidized and self-polymerized to form pyomelanin. The inverse relationship between Fe(II) concentration and pyomelanin production has implications that pyomelanin may play a role in iron assimilation under Fe(II) limiting conditions.

  19. Extracts of marine algae show inhibitory activity against osteoclast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells that play a crucial role in bone resorption. The imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation results in osteoporosis. Therefore, substances that can suppress osteoclast formation are potential candidate materials for drug development or functional foods. There have been reports that extracts or purified compounds from marine micro- and macroalgae can suppress osteoclast differentiation. Symbioimine, isolated from the cultured dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp., had suppressive effects against osteoclast differentiation in osteoclast-like cells. Norzoanthamine, isolated from the colonial zoanthid Zoanthas sp., has been shown to have antiosteoporosis activity in ovariectomized mice. With regard to marine extracts, the fucoxanthin-rich component from brown algae has been shown to have suppressive effects against osteoclast differentiation. An extract of Sargassum fusiforme has recently been shown to have antiosteoporosis activity. This extract suppressed both osteoclast differentiation and accelerated osteoblast formation in separate in vitro experiments. It also showed antiosteoporosis activity in ovariectomized mice by regulating the balance between bone resorption and bone formation. These marine algae and their extracts may be sources of marine medicinal foods for the prevention of osteoporosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Grape-seed procyanidins prevent the cafeteria-diet-induced decrease of glucagon-like peptide-1 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Abuín, Noemi; Martínez-Micaelo, Neus; Blay, Mayte; Ardévol, Anna; Pinent, Montserrat

    2014-02-05

    Grape-seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) has been reported to improve insulin resistance in cafeteria rats. Because glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is involved in glucose homeostasis, the preventive effects of GSPE on GLP-1 production, secretion, and elimination were evaluated in a model of diet-induced insulin resistance. Rats were fed a cafeteria diet for 12 weeks, and 25 mg of GSPE/kg of body weight was administered concomitantly. Vehicle-treated cafeteria-fed rats and chow-fed rats were used as controls. The cafeteria diet decreased active GLP-1 plasma levels, which is attributed to a decreased intestinal GLP-1 production, linked to reduced colonic enteroendocrine cell populations. Such effects were prevented by GSPE. In the same context, GSPE avoided the decrease on intestinal dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4) activity and modulated the gene expression of GLP-1 and its receptor in the hypothalamus. In conclusion, the preventive treatment with GSPE abrogates the effects of the cafeteria diet on intestinal GLP-1 production and DPP4 activity.

  1. Successful large-scale hatchery culture of sandfish (Holothuria scabra using micro-algae concentrates as a larval food source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thane A. Militz

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports methodology for large-scale hatchery culture of sandfish, Holothuria scabra, in the absence of live, cultured micro-algae. We demonstrate how commercially-available micro-algae concentrates can be incorporated into hatchery protocols as the sole larval food source to completely replace live, cultured micro-algae. Micro-algae concentrates supported comparable hatchery production of sandfish to that of live, cultured micro-algae traditionally used in large-scale hatchery culture. The hatchery protocol presented allowed a single technician to achieve production of more than 18,800 juvenile sandfish at 40 days post-fertilisation in a low-resource hatchery in Papua New Guinea. Growth of auricularia larvae fed micro-algae concentrates was represented by the equation length (μm = 307.8 × ln(day + 209.2 (R2 = 0.93 while survival over the entire 40 day hatchery cycle was described by the equation survival = 2 × day−1.06 (R2 = 0.74. These results show that micro-algae concentrates have great potential for simplifying hatchery culture of sea cucumbers by reducing infrastructural and technical resources required for live micro-algae culture. The hatchery methodology described in this study is likely to have applicability to low-resource hatcheries throughout the Indo-Pacific and could support regional expansion of sandfish hatchery production.

  2. Callophycoic acids and callophycols from the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Amy L; Stout, Elizabeth P; Hay, Mark E; Prusak, Anne C; Hardcastle, Kenneth; Fairchild, Craig R; Franzblau, Scott G; Le Roch, Karine; Prudhomme, Jacques; Aalbersberg, William; Kubanek, Julia

    2007-09-14

    Callophycoic acids A-H (1-8) and callophycols A and B (9 and 10) were isolated from extracts of the Fijian red alga Callophycus serratus, and identified by NMR, X-ray, and mass spectral analyses. These natural products represent four novel carbon skeletons, providing the first examples of diterpene-benzoic acids and diterpene-phenols in macroalgae. Compounds 1-10 exhibited antibacterial, antimalarial, and anticancer activity, although they are less bioactive than diterpene-benzoate macrolides previously isolated from this red alga.

  3. Biofilm forming cyanobacteria, algae and fungi on two historic monuments in Belgrade, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljaljević-Grbić Milica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm on the sandstone substrata of the bridge 'Brankov most' and on the granite substrata of the 'Monument of the Unknown Hero' contains a complex consortia of cyanobacteria, algae, and fungi. Coccoid and filamentous cyanobacteria, green algae and diatoms make up the photosynthetic part of the biofilm while hyphal fragments, chlamydospores, fruiting bodies and spores take part as fungal components. These structures make a dense layer by intertwining and overlapping the stone surface. Five cyanobacterial, 11 algal and 23 fungal taxa were found. The interaction of the biofilm's constituents results in the bioweathering of the stone substrata through mechanical penetration, acid corrosion and the production of secondary mycogenic biominerals. .

  4. Diel tuning of photosynthetic systems in ice algae at Saroma-ko Lagoon, Hokkaido, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Shimpei; Hattori, Hiroshi; Gomi, Yasushi; Watanabe, Kentaro; Kudoh, Sakae; Kashino, Yasuhiro; Satoh, Kazuhiko

    Ice algae are the major primary producers in seasonally ice-covered oceans during the cold season. Diurnal change in solar radiation is inevitable for ice algae, even beneath seasonal sea ice in lower-latitude regions. In this work, we focused on the photosynthetic response of ice algae under diurnally changing irradiance in Saroma-ko Lagoon, Japan. Photosynthetic properties were assessed by pulse-amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorometry. The species composition remained almost the same throughout the investigation. The maximum electron transport rate ( rETRmax), which indicates the capacity of photosynthetic electron transport, increased from sunrise until around noon and decreased toward sunset, with no sign of the afternoon depression commonly observed in other photosynthetic organisms. The level of non-photochemical quenching, which indicates photoprotection activity by dissipating excess light energy via thermal processes, changed with diurnal variations in irradiance. The pigment composition appeared constant, except for xanthophyll cycle pigments, which changed irrespective of irradiance. These results indicate that ice algae tune their photosynthetic system harmonically to achieve efficient photosynthesis under diurnally changing irradiance, while avoiding damage to photosystems. This regulation system may be essential for productive photosynthesis in ice algae.

  5. Rapid Aggregation of Biofuel-Producing Algae by the Bacterium Bacillus sp. Strain RP1137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    Algal biofuels represent one of the most promising means of sustainably replacing liquid fuels. However, significant challenges remain before alga-based fuels become competitive with fossil fuels. One of the largest challenges is the ability to harvest the algae in an economical and low-energy manner. In this article, we describe the isolation of a bacterial strain, Bacillus sp. strain RP1137, which can rapidly aggregate several algae that are candidates for biofuel production, including a Nannochloropsis sp. This bacterium aggregates algae in a pH-dependent and reversible manner and retains its aggregation ability after paraformaldehyde fixation, opening the possibility for reuse of the cells. The optimal ratio of bacteria to algae is described, as is the robustness of aggregation at different salinities and temperatures. Aggregation is dependent on the presence of calcium or magnesium ions. The efficiency of aggregation of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is between 70 and 95% and is comparable to that obtained by other means of harvest; however, the rate of harvest is fast, with aggregates forming in 30 s. PMID:23892750

  6. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-05

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Physical structure and algae community of summer upwelling off eastern Hainan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Liu, S.; Xie, Q.; Hong, B.; Long, T.

    2017-12-01

    The upwelling system is the most productive ecosystem along the continental shelf of the northern South China Sea Shelf. It brings nutrient from bottom to surface and blooms biotic community driven by summer monsoon. In this study, we present observed results of physical and biotic community structures during August, 2015 in the upwelling system along Hainan eastern coast, which is one the strongest upwelling systems in the northern South China Sea. By using hydrological data collected by CTD, we found a significant cold water tongue with high salinity which extended from offshore to 100 m isobaths. However, dissolved oxygen (DO) showed a sandwich structure in which high core of DO concentration appeared at the layer from 5 m to 30 m. It possibly was caused by the advection transport of high DO from adjacent area. Basically, this upwelling system was constrained at northern area of 18.8ºN in horizontal due to the weakening summer monsoon in August. In addition, we collected water sample at the upwelling area and measured algae categories and concentration by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results show the biotic community was dominated by five types of algae mainly, they were diatoms, dinoflagellates, green algae, prokaryotes and prochlorococcus. And different patterns of different algae were demonstrated. In the upwelling area, diatoms and prokaryotes show opposite structures, and more complex pattern for the rest three algae indicating an active biotic community in the upwelling system.

  8. Uptake, elimination, and biotransformation of 17α-ethinylestradiol by the freshwater alga Desmodesmus subspicatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Hanna Maja; Maletz, Sibylle Xenia; Ratte, Hans Toni; Hollender, Juliane; Schaeffer, Andreas

    2014-10-21

    Bioconcentration and transformation of the potent and persistent xeno-estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) by organisms at the basis of the food web have received only little research attention. In this study, uptake, elimination, and biotransformation of radiolabeled EE2 ((14)C-EE2) by the freshwater green alga Desmodesmus subspicatus were investigated. The alga highly incorporated radioactivity following (14)C-EE2 exposure. Up to 68% of the test compound was removed from the medium by D. subspicatus within a rather short time period (72 h C(algae)/C(water): 2200 L/kg wet weight). When the algae were transported to clear medium, a two-stage release pattern was observed with an initially quick elimination phase following slower clearance afterward. Interestingly, D. subspicatus brominated EE2 when bromide was available in the medium, a transformation process demonstrated to occur abiotically but not by algae. The consequence of the presence of more hydrophobic mono- and dibrominated EE2 in the environment remains to be further investigated, as these products were shown to have a lower estrogenic potency but are expected to have a higher bioaccumulation potential and to be more toxic than the mother compound.

  9. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for green algae growth inhibition by polymer particles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte, Tom M; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Hendriks, A Jan; van de Meent, Dik

    After use and disposal of chemical products, many types of polymer particles end up in the aquatic environment with potential toxic effects to primary producers like green algae. In this study, we have developed Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) for a set of highly structural

  10. Mass out-door culture of the micro-alga Chaetoceros gracilis | Ayinla ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mass culture of the micro-alga, Chaetoceros gracilis, a live-food for feeding the larval stages of Black Tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, was carried out in the in-door shrimp hatchery of Nigerian Institute for Oceanography and Marine Research. Guillard modified f/2 medium was used in the production of starter culture ...

  11. A Simple Approach to the Study of Attached Micro-Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Derek; Bell, J. Wendy

    1980-01-01

    Describes a modification in the use of artificial substrates to study attached micro-algae. Apparatus is based on glass microscope slides immersed in natural water environments; biomass and primary productivity are assessed by measurement of alpha-chlorophyll. Describes use in studies of colonization, succession, and populational fluctuation. (CS)

  12. Algae, Electronics and Ginger Beer: Explorations in Biotechnology at the Governor's School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, John; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a variety of projects that were used in a summer program for gifted high school students to help teach biotechnical concepts and applications. Presents six projects utilizing algae as tool for solving problems. Also presents five production-oriented projects with hydroponics and fermentation as research and development themes. (PR)

  13. Detection of weed algae in open pond cultures of Cyanobacterium aponinum using PAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Winckelmann

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The potential use of non-arable land in the al-Wusta region of the Sultanate of Oman for the production of algae biomass was examined. Brackish cleaned production water from oil production supplemented with commercial fertilizer was used as growth medium. The indigenous isolate Cyanobacterium aponinum WP7(1 was grown in open ponds using batch or semi-continuous cultivation. Biomass production rates of 15–24 g/m2/day were achieved. The change of salinity due to evaporation, which was thought to be a major challenge, did not exceed 35 ppt. All cultures showed contaminations with weed algae. Contaminations with green algae or diatoms were detectable using fluorescence pattern excited by four different wavelengths using a pulse-amplitude-modulation chlorophyll fluorometer (PAM. It is possible to estimate the health level and the mayor groups of which a culture is composed using the PAM method. Therefore, the fluorescence of the photosynthetically inactive sample is compared with the fluorescence after all copies of photosystem II were closed by exposing the sample to a high-intensity light beam. A detection limit of one weed algae cell in a hundred cells was achieved.

  14. Harmful impact of filamentous algae (Spirogyra sp.) on juvenile crayfish

    OpenAIRE

    Ulikowski Dariusz; Chybowski Łucjan; Traczuk Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of filamentous algae on the growth and survival of juvenile narrow-clawed crayfish, Astacus leptodactylus (Esch.), in rearing basins. Three stocking variants were used: A - basins with a layer of filamentous algae without imitation mineral substrate; B - basins with a layer of filamentous algae with imitation mineral substrate; C - basins without filamentous algae but with mineral substrate. The crayfish were reared from June 12 to October 10 ...

  15. EVALUACIÓN POR MÉTODO ECOMÉTRICO DE AGAR OBTENIDO DE ALGAS ROJAS COLOMBIANAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Villalobos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the productivity on agar-agar of two species of red algae of thegenera Gracilaria belonging from the Colombiam Caribean coast (G. cylindrica and G. mammillarisobtained in laboratory. Productivity of culture media elaborated with base agar - agar was determinedusing the ecometric method with 20 different bacterial species. Results obtained from ICA and ICRshowed that agar extracted from Gracilaria cylindrica and Gracillaria mammillaris are equally productive,this shows that both species can be used for agar production. For better results, it is still necessary tooptimize extraction processes and purification of agar in both species of algae.

  16. Evaluation of lipid extractability after flash hydrolysis of algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teymouri, Ali; Adams, Kameron J.; Dong, Tao; Kumar, Sandeep

    2018-07-01

    Microalgae is identified as a promising feedstock for producing renewable liquid transportation fuels; however, lipids extraction from microalgae for downstream processing to biofuels is one of the important challenges for algal based biorefineries. This work aims at evaluating the potential of applying flash hydrolysis (FH) as a chemical-free technique to increase the lipids extractability of algal biomass as well as its integration with the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of microalgae to enhance the biocrude yields and characteristics for fuel production. To this aim, the FH process was performed on three different algal species (Scenedesmus sp., Nannochloropsis sp., and Chlorella vulgaris) at 280 degrees C and 10 s of residence time. Following FH, in addition to the nutrients rich hydrolysate, approximately, 40 wt% of solids containing almost all (>90 wt%) the lipids termed as biofuels intermediates (BI), were recovered. Kinetics study on lipids extractability from the BI and their lipid profile analyses were conducted for each algal species. The results showed that the FH process had significantly enhanced the lipids extractability. For all three algae species, lipid yields from BI were higher than that of the raw algae. Lipid yields of Chlorella vulgaris in the first 15 min were more than five times higher (52.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 10.7 +/- 0.9 wt%) than that of raw algae during n-hexane based solvent extraction. The kinetics of lipids extractability followed a zero-order reaction rate for all wet raw microalgae and the BI of Scenedesmus sp., while the BI recovered from the other two algal species were determined as a second-order reaction. Comparison of fatty acids profiles indicated the contribution of the FH process in saturating fatty acids. Subsequent to lipids extraction, a conventional hydrothermal liquefaction was performed at 350 degrees C and 1 h to compare the biocrude yields from raw versus BI of Chlorella vulgaris microalgae. The results showed that the

  17. Extracting and purifying R-phycoerythrin from Mediterranean red algae Corallina elongata Ellis & Solander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, R; Ungaro, N; D'Ambrosio, A; Liuzzi, G M; Riccio, P

    2003-03-20

    R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE) is a protein acting as a photosynthetic accessory pigment in red algae (Rodophyta). This protein has gained importance in many biotechnological applications in food science, immunodiagnostic, therapy, cosmetics, protein and cell labelling, and analytical processes. In this paper we report on a new, one step procedure for the extraction and purification of R-PE from a new source: the Mediterranean red algae Corallina elongata Ellis & Solander. This red algae contains mainly R-PE and is suitable for the production in culture. No other contaminating phycobiliproteins could be detected in the extracts. The method we propose for the purification is based on the use of hydroxyapatite, a chromatographic resin that can be produced in the laboratory at very low cost and can be used batch-wise with large amounts of extracts, alternative to chromatography, and therefore can be scaled up. Both the yield and the purity of R-PE are very good.

  18. ALGAE PROLIFERATION ON SUBSTRATES IMMERSED IN BIOLOGICALLY TREATED SEWAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Garbowski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due fast biomass production, high affinity for N and P and possibilities to CO2 sequestration microalgae are currently in the spotlight, especially in renewable energy technologies sector. The majority of studies focus their attention on microalgae cultivation with respect to biomass production. Fuel produced from algal biomass can contribute to reducing consumption of conventional fossil fuels and be a remedy for a rising energy crisis and global warming induced by air pollution. Some authors opt for possibilities of using sewage as a nutrient medium in algae cultivation. Other scientists go one step further and present concepts to introduce microalgal systems as an integral part of wastewater treatment plants. High costs of different microalgal harvesting methods caused introduction of the idea of algae immobilization in a form of periphyton on artificial substrates. In the present study the attention has focused on possibilities of using waste materials as substrates to proliferation of periphyton in biologically treated sewage that contained certain amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus.

  19. Protective effect of edible marine algae, Laminaria japonica and Porphyra haitanensis, on subchronic toxicity in rats induced by inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanhua; Wang, Lianzhu; Yao, Lin; Liu, Zhantao; Gao, Hua

    2013-09-01

    Arsenic, a potent environmental toxic agent, causes various hazardous effects on human health. This study was performed to evaluate the protective effects of edible marine algae, Laminaria japonica and Porphyra haitanensis, on subchronic stress of rats induced by arsenic trioxide (As2O3). The co-treatment of marine algae could slightly increase the growth rates of body weights compared to the As2O3-treated group. The marine algae application restored liver and renal function by preventing the increment in the activities of alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase, and the levels of total protein, blood urea nitrogen, and creatinine. The increase in the contents of total cholesterol, triglyceride, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and decrease in the contents of high density lipoprotein cholesterol were observed in algae co-treated groups which indicated that marine algae could reverse the abnormal lipid metabolisms induced by arsenic. Moreover, these algae could protect the rats from lipid peroxidation by restoring the depletion of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities and sulfhydryl group contents, and lowering the enhanced malondialdehyde contents. Therefore, evidences indicate that L. japonica and P. haitanensis can serve as an effective regimen for treating arsenic poisoning.

  20. KAROTENOID PADA ALGAE: KAJIAN TENTANG BIOSINTESIS, DISTRIBUSI SERTA FUNGSI KAROTENOID

    OpenAIRE

    Merdekawati, Windu; Karwur, Ferry F.; Susanto, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRAK   Karotenoid terdistribusi pada archaea, bakteri, jamur, tumbuhan, hewan serta algae. Karotenoid dihasilkan dari komponen isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) yang mengalami proses secara bertahap untuk membentuk beragam jenis karotenoid. Terdapat dua kelompok karotenoid yaitu karoten dan xantofil dengan berbagai jenis turunannya. Struktur kimia pada karotenoid algae yaitu allene, acetylene serta acetylated carotenoids. Algae mempunyai karotenoid spesifik yang menarik untuk dipe...