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Sample records for preventing glycaemic relapse

  1. Relapse prevention and smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J R; Glaros, A G

    1986-01-01

    A multicomponent smoking relapse prevention treatment based on Marlatt and Gordon's (1980) model of the relapse process was developed and evaluated. Behavior-analytic methods were used to develop assessment instruments, training situations, and coping responses. The prevention components were presented in the context of a basic broad-spectrum stop-smoking program, and were compared with the basic program plus discussion control, and the basic program alone. Smoking-related dependent variables generally did not differ between groups at any time from pre-treatment to 12 month follow-up. Only the subjects in the relapse prevention condition improved problem-solving and social skills needed to cope with high-risk situations. These subjects also tended to take longer to relapse and smoke fewer cigarettes at the time of relapse. Subjects above the median level of competence on measures of social skill at post-treatment remained abstinent significantly longer. Maintenance of non-smoking was found to be related to the degree of competence with which individuals deal with high-risk situations. Results are discussed in relation to models of compliance with therapeutic regimens.

  2. Prevention of relapsing backache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raspe, Heiner

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The condition of non-specific back pain is characterized by high prevalence, non satisfactory therapeutic options and severe socioeconomic consequences. Therefore prevention seems an attractive option to downsize the problem. However, the construction of effective preventive measures is complicated by the obscure aetiology of the condition, the multidimensionality of risk and prognostic factors (bio psychosocial model! and the variability of its natural as well as clinical course. This led to the development of a wide variety of preventive measures: e. g. exercise programs, educational measures (including back school, ergonomic modification of the work environment, mechanical supports (e. g. back belts as well as multidisciplinary interventions. For two reasons the workplace seems to be a suitable setting for prevention. First, because a number of strong risk factors are associated with working conditions and second, because it allows addressing a large proportion of the adult population. Against this background the assessment at hand sets out to answer the following questions: What is the amount and methodological quality of the available scientific literature on the effectiveness of back pain prevention in the workplace environment? What are effective measures for the prevention of back pain and its consequences in the workplace environment and how effective are they? Is back pain prevention in the workplace environment cost-effective? Is there a need for more research? As primary outcomes for effectiveness the assessment will focus on time lost from work and the frequency and duration of episodes with back pain. The preventive measures assessed belong to the following categories: exercise programs, educational and information measures, multidimensional interventions, back belts, lifting teams and ergonomic interventions. Methods: The assessment is based on a systematic review of the published literature according to the

  3. Preventing Relapse to Cigarette Smoking by Behavioral Skill Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sharon M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Crossed two relapse prevention conditions (skills training-vs-discussion control) with two levels of aversive smoking in volunteer subjects (N=123). Results indicated that relapse-prevention skill training did prevent relapse among cigarette smokers. Lighter smokers were more favorably influenced. (LLL)

  4. Peri-operative glycaemic control regimens for preventing surgical site infections in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Lillian S; Meeks, Derek; Moyer, Virginia A; Lally, Kevin P

    2009-07-08

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization and are potentially preventable. Peri-operative hyperglycaemia has been associated with increased SSIs and previous recommendations have been to treat glucose levels above 200 mg/dL. However, recent studies have questioned the optimal glycaemic control regimen to prevent SSIs. Whether the benefits of strict or intensive glycaemic control with insulin infusion as compared to conventional management outweigh the risks remains controversial. To summarise the evidence for the impact of glycaemic control in the peri-operative period on the incidence of surgical site infections, hypoglycaemia, level of glycaemic control, all-cause and infection-related mortality, and hospital length of stay and to investigate for differences of effect between different levels of glycaemic control. A search strategy was developed to search the following databases: Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 25 March 2009), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1; Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to March Week 2 2009); Ovid EMBASE (1980 to 2009 Week 12) and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to March Week 3 2009). The search was not limited by language or publication status. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible for inclusion if they evaluated two (or more) glycaemic control regimens in the peri-operative period (within one week pre-, intra-, and/or post-operative) and reported surgical site infections as an outcome. The standard method for conducting a systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane Wounds Group was used. Two review authors independently reviewed the results from the database searches and identified relevant studies. Two review authors extracted study data and outcomes from each study and reviewed each study for methodological quality. Any disagreement was resolved by discussion or by referral to a third review author. Five

  5. Relapse prevention in anorexia nervosa: Experiences of patients and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berends, Tamara; van de Lagemaat, Marleen; van Meijel, Berno; Coenen, Jasmijn; Hoek, Hans W; van Elburg, Annemarie A

    2018-03-24

    One of the main aims of treatment after successful recovery from anorexia nervosa (AN) is to prevent a relapse. The Guideline Relapse Prevention (GRP) Anorexia Nervosa offers a structured approach to relapse prevention. This study explores how patients and their parents experience working with the guideline. It also describes the factors that support or hinder successful application of the guideline. A descriptive qualitative research design was chosen involving in-depth interviews with seventeen patients with anorexia nervosa and six sets of parents. Patients and family members were generally satisfied with the support provided by the GRP. It contributed significantly to a better understanding of the personal process of relapse. Patients and families valued being able to keep in touch with their professional during the aftercare programme. The GRP supports the patient's use of self-management strategies for relapse prevention. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  6. A Motion Videogame for Opioid Relapse Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abroms, Lorien C; Leavitt, Leah E; Van Alstyne, Judy M; Schindler-Ruwisch, Jennifer M; Fishman, Marc J; Greenberg, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a body motion-activated videogame, targeting the prevention of opioid relapse among youth in the context of outpatient treatment. Participants attended four weekly gameplay sessions. Surveys were conducted at baseline and following each week's gameplay and assessed satisfaction with gameplay, craving intensity, and self-efficacy to refuse opioids. Participants expressed a high level of satisfaction with the videogame throughout the 4 weeks and agreed with the statement that they would be more likely to attend treatment sessions if the game was present (mean=4.6; standard deviation [SD]=0.7) and would recommend the videogame to other people in treatment (mean=4.2; SD=0.8). All participants recommended playing the videogame as part of treatment at least weekly, with a third recommending playing daily. Self-reported cravings declined over the 4-week period from baseline (mean=12.7; SD=8.4) to Week 4 (mean=9.8; SD=8.3), although the decline was not significant. Although participants stated that they liked the game, one-third of participants had dropped out of the study by the fourth session of gameplay. Preliminary evidence indicates that a motion videogame for addiction recovery may be feasible and acceptable within the context of outpatient treatment, although additional efforts are needed to keep youth in treatment. Future studies are needed to assess the impact of the game on long-term abstinence, treatment adherence, and engagement.

  7. Pharmacological interventions for alcohol relapse prevention

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    Health NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK ... ABSTRACT: Alcohol dependence is a chronic, debilitating disorder that is an important .... hours, or as long as alcohol remains in the blood. ... term and slightly improving days to relapse.

  8. Relapse prevention in patients with schizophrenia : A nursing intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijel, Berno van

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes a study into the development and testing of a nursing intervention with a view to preventing psychotic relapses in patients suffering from schizophrenia or a related disorder. The purpose of the intervention is to recognise the early signs of an oncoming psychotic relapse. If

  9. An intervention study to prevent relapse in patients with schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meijel, B.; Kruitwagen, C.; van der Gaag, M.; Kahn, R.S.; Grypdonck, M.H.E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the use of relapse prevention plans (RPPs) in nursing practice is an effective intervention in reducing relapse rates among patients with schizophrenia. Design and Methods: Experimental design. Patients with schizophrenia (or a related psychotic disorder) and nurses

  10. Preventing postpartum smoking relapse: an opportunity for neonatal nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Sharron

    2009-08-01

    Smoking during pregnancy and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke have harmful and sometimes devastating effects on the health of the newborn. Although interventions for smoking cessation during pregnancy demonstrate effectiveness for increasing smoking abstinence, the majority of women relapse in the postpartum period. However, modifying contributing factors for relapse may improve the success of sustained abstinence. Many parents are eager to quit smoking and willing to participate in smoking cessation interventions. Through a population-based approach to healthcare, neonatal nurses are in an ideal position to prevent relapse and to promote smoking abstinence; they can coordinate and lead efforts for establishing smoking cessation strategies that integrate obstetric, newborn, and pediatric services.

  11. Preventing relapse after incentivized choice treatment: A laboratory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Mark E; Thrailkill, Eric A; Bergeria, Cecilia L; Davis, Danielle R

    2017-08-01

    Two experiments with rats examined relapse of an operant behavior that occurred after the behavior was suppressed by reinforcing (incentivizing) an alternative behavior. In the first phase, a target response (R1) was reinforced. In a treatment phase, R1 was still reinforced, but a new response (R2) was introduced and associated with a larger reinforcer. As in human contingency management treatments, incentivizing R2 this way was effective at suppressing R1. However, when R2's reinforcement was discontinued, there was a robust and immediate relapse to R1. Experiment 1 found that the strength of R1 during relapse testing was not different from that seen in a no treatment control. Experiment 2 found that relapse could nevertheless be reduced by presenting reinforcers not contingent on responding during the test. Either the reinforcer for R1 or the reinforcer for R2 (which were qualitatively different types of food pellets) were effective. The experiments introduce a laboratory method for studying relapse and how to prevent it after contingency management treatments, and suggest at least one treatment that discourages relapse. The incentivized choice paradigm differs from other models of relapse of operant behavior (e.g., resurgence, renewal, reinstatement) in that it does not focus on the return of behaviors that are inhibited by extinction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention in opioid Dependence Treatment &Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Findings: therapy compliance, retention in treatment, decrease in somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction and increase in health was significantly in both combination of psychological intervention method than the Naltroxan group. Mindfulness-based on relapse prevention was more effective than CBT relapse prevention in decreasing of, social dysfunction, relapse prevention, increase of therapy compliance, and health. Results: Mindfulness based relapse prevention was superior to CBT and Naltroxan and considerably increased effectiveness of opioid relapse prevention therapy.

  13. Relapse Prevention: An Overview of Marlatts Cognitive- Behavioral Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Relapse prevention(RPis an important component of alcoholism treatment. The RP model proposed by Marlatt and Gordon suggests that both immediate determinants (e.g.,high- risk situations, coping skills, outcome expectancies, and the abstinence violation effect and covert antecedents (e.g., lifestyle factor and urges and cravings can contribute to relapse.The RP model also incorporates numerous specific and global intervention strategies that allow therapist and client to address each step of the relapse process. Specific interventions include identifying specific high-risk situations for each client and enhancing the client's skills for coping with those situations, increasing the client's self- efficacy, eliminating myths regarding alcohol's effects, managing lapses, and restructuring the client's perceptions of the relapse process. Global strategies comprise balancing the client's lifestyle and helping him or her develop positive addictions, employing stimulus control techniques and urgemanagement techniques, and developing relapse road maps. Several studies have provided theoretical and practical support for the RP model.

  14. Preventing Postpartum Smoking Relapse: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Michele D; Cheng, Yu; Marcus, Marsha D; Kalarchian, Melissa A; Emery, Rebecca L

    2016-04-01

    Most women who quit smoking during pregnancy will relapse postpartum. Previous efforts to prevent postpartum relapse have been unsuccessful at increasing rates of sustained abstinence. To evaluate the relative efficacy of 2 different approaches to prevent postpartum smoking relapse. Pregnant women who recently had quit smoking were recruited before the end of pregnancy. Intervention sessions were conducted through a combination of telephone calls and in-person visits beginning at delivery and continuing through 24 weeks postpartum. Participants completed assessments at the prenatal baseline and at 12, 24, and 52 weeks postpartum. Participants were recruited between March 2008 and December 2012. The dates of the analysis were April 2014 to February 2015. Women received postpartum-adapted, behavioral smoking relapse prevention intervention and were randomly assigned to an enhanced cognitive behavioral intervention that included additional specialized strategies and content focused on women's postpartum concerns about mood, stress, and weight (Strategies to Avoid Returning to Smoking [STARTS]) or a supportive, time and attention-controlled comparison (SUPPORT). Intervention began before delivery and continued through 24 weeks postpartum. The primary outcome was biochemically confirmed sustained tobacco abstinence at 52 weeks postpartum. Secondary outcomes were self-reported mood, levels of perceived stress, and degree of concern about smoking-related weight gain. The study cohort comprised 300 participants (150 randomly assigned to each group). Their mean (SD) age was 24.99 (5.65) years. Overall, 38.0% (114 of 300), 33.7% (101 of 300), and 24.0% (72 of 300) of the sample maintained abstinence at 12, 24, and 52 weeks' postpartum, respectively. There were no differences between the intervention groups in abstinence or time to relapse. Self-reported depressive symptoms and perceived stress significantly improved over time, and improvements were similar for both

  15. Breaking the rhythm of depression : Cognitive Behavior Therapy and relapse prevention for depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bockting, Claudi L.H.

    2010-01-01

    A crucial part of the treatment of depression is the prevention of relapse and recurrence. Psychological interventions, especially cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) are helpful in preventing relapse and recurrence in depression. The effectivity of four types of relapse prevention cognitive behavior

  16. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Relapse in Pediatric Responders to Pharmacotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Emslie, Graham J.; Mayes, Taryn L.; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jones, Jessica M.; Tao, Rongrong; Stewart, Sunita M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2008-01-01

    The outcome of a sequential treatment strategy that included cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the prevention of major depressive disorder relapse among 46 youths is examined. Results show that youths under the antidepressant medication management plus relapse prevention CBT treatment was at lower risk for relapse than those under the…

  17. Hypnosis for Smoking Relapse Prevention: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Timothy P; Duncan, Carol L; Solkowitz, Sharon N; Huggins, Joy; Simon, Joel A

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether hypnosis would be more effective than standard behavioral counseling in helping smokers to remain abstinent. A total of 140 current smokers were enrolled in a randomized controlled smoking cessation trial at an urban Veterans Affairs medical center. Participants (n = 102) who were able to quit for at least 3 days received either a hypnosis or behavioral relapse prevention intervention. Both relapse prevention interventions consisted of two 60 min face-to-face sessions and four 20 min follow-up phone calls (two phone calls per week). At 26 weeks, the validate\\d point-prevalence quit rate was 35% for the hypnosis group and 42% for the behavioral counseling group (relative risk = 0.85; 95% confidence interval: 0.52-1.40). At 52 weeks, the validated quit rate was 29% for the hypnosis group and 28% for the behavioral group (relative risk  = 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 0.56-1.91). It was concluded that hypnosis warrants further investigation as an intervention for facilitating maintenance of quitting.

  18. [Relapse prevention group therapy for paedophiles: French adaptation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J; Petibon, C

    2005-01-01

    Psychotherapy for sex offenders has only very recently started to develop in France. The French law on compulsory treatment for sex offenders was voted in 1998, and many mental health practitioners are not trained to treat such patients yet. In our ambulatory forensic consultation, sex offenders have been treated since 1992 and group psychotherapy has been offered to them since 1994. Our first therapeutic models were the North-American behavioural-cognitive therapy and Pithers' relapse prevention model. Behavioural-cognitive theory describes paedophilia as an acquired sexual preference maintained by positive reinforcement. Pithers (1990) considered that relapse only occurs in high-risk situations, and that high-risk situations always come after offence precursors. In North America, relapse prevention consists in helping paedophiles spot their high-risk situations and offence precursors, and enhance their skills to cope with such situations or to prevent them. Therapy programs were developed according to these models, aiming to help offenders develop such skills, ie empathy, social skills, cognitive restructuring, self-esteem, etc. Trying to apply these therapy programs in France, our team quickly realised that we would have to adapt them to French culture. On the one hand, behavioural-cognitive theory did not seem satisfactory enough in explaining paedophilic behaviour and paedophilic preference. On the other hand, behavioural-cognitive therapy made patients into children too much and increased resistance. Therapy based on programs seemed too rigid for French patients and therapists, and we often felt we were working on an issue that would have been much more accurate to work on a few sessions earlier, when this issue was spontaneously brought up by a patient. We believe change occurs all the more as issues are worked on at the right moment for the patient. Moreover, on a cultural point of view, we also realised the use of programs in psychotherapy was difficult to

  19. The effectiveness of mindfulness-based relapse prevention on the prevention of relapse, craving and self-control in opiate-dependent individuals

    OpenAIRE

    alireza maredpour; Mahmmod Najafy; Farangiss amiri

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: the aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of mindfulness-based relapse prevention on the prevention of relapse, craving and self-control in opiate-dependent individuals in Yasuj. Methodology: This quasi-experimental study applied pretest - posttest and a control group. The sample included 30 male patients with drug addiction in Yasuj who were chosen from addiction clinics based on criterion sampling. To collect the required data the short form of Self-Co...

  20. Smoking Cessation and Relapse Prevention among Undergraduate Students: A Pilot Demonstration Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Jim; Hoffmann, Anne

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of college students' tobacco use is widely recognized, but successful cessation and relapse-prevention programs for these smokers have drawn little attention. The authors, who explored the feasibility of training peers to lead cessation and relapse-prevention programs for undergraduates, found a quit rate of 88.2%, suggesting that…

  1. Anca associated vasculitis : occurrence, prediction, prevention, and outcome of relapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Maarten Michiel

    2001-01-01

    During follow-up, relapses of disease activity occur in the majority of patients with ANCA associated vasculitis. The general objective brought together in this thesis was to further elucidate the characteristics and consequences of these relapses. Investigated items are the occurrence, the

  2. An Integrative Ambient Agent Model for Unipolar Depression Relapse Prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aziz, A.A.; Klein, M.C.A.; Treur, J.

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges for persons with a history of unipolar depression is to stay healthy throughout their lifetime. In principle, having more severe prior onset cases escalates the risk to fall into a relapse. In this article, first a domain model of the process of depression, recovery and relapse

  3. Increasing the efficacy of cue exposure treatment in preventing relapse of addictive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermans, Remco C; Jansen, Anita T M

    2003-07-01

    Theoretically, cue exposure treatment should be able to prevent relapse by extinguishing conditioned drug responding (e.g. cue-elicited craving). According to contemporary learning theory, though, extinction does not eliminate conditioned responding. Analogous cue exposure with response prevention (CERP) as a treatment of addictive behavior might not eliminate the learned relation between drug-related cues and drug use. This does not necessarily mean that cue exposure cannot successfully prevent relapse. Various suggestions for increasing the efficacy of cue exposure treatment are being discussed from a contemporary learning theory perspective. It is suggested that cue exposure treatment incorporating retrieval cues can be a beneficial treatment in preventing relapse of addictive behavior.

  4. Application of Neurolinguistic Programming for Treatment and Relapse Prevention of Addictive Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Daya Singh

    The dilemma of relapse exists for a number of addictive behaviors, and mental health authorities agree that keeping addictive behaviors off permanently is much more difficult than treating the behaviors initially. Several relapse prevention models have been posited and environmental, physiological, behavioral, cognitive, and affective factors have…

  5. A randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet versus no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of fetal macrosomia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer

    2010-04-23

    Abstract Background Maternal weight and maternal weight gain during pregnancy exert a significant influence on infant birth weight and the incidence of macrosomia. Fetal macrosomia is associated with an increase in both adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome, and also confers a future risk of childhood obesity. Studies have shown that a low glycaemic diet is associated with lower birth weights, however these studies have been small and not randomised 1 2 . Fetal macrosomia recurs in a second pregnancy in one third of women, and maternal weight influences this recurrence risk 3 . Methods\\/Design We propose a randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet vs. no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of fetal macrosomia. Secundigravid women whose first baby was macrosomic, defined as a birth weight greater than 4000 g will be recruited at their first antenatal visit. Patients will be randomised into two arms, a control arm which will receive no dietary intervention and a diet arm which will be commenced on a low glycaemic index diet. The primary outcome measure will be the mean birth weight centiles and ponderal indices in each group. Discussion Altering the source of maternal dietary carbohydrate may prove to be valuable in the management of pregnancies where there has been a history of fetal macrosomia. Fetal macrosomia recurs in a second pregnancy in one third of women. This randomised control trial will investigate whether or not a low glycaemic index diet can affect this recurrence risk. Current Controlled Trials Registration Number ISRCTN54392969

  6. Clinical Trials and Tribulations: Lessons Learned from Recruiting Pregnant Ex-Smokers for Relapse Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Elena N.; Simmons, Vani Nath; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Meade, Cathy D.; Chirikos, Thomas N.; Brandon, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    The development of smoking cessation and relapse-prevention interventions for pregnant and postpartum women is a public health priority. However, researchers have consistently reported substantial difficulty in accruing this population into clinical trials. The problem is particularly acute for relapse-prevention studies, which must recruit women who have already quit smoking because of their pregnancy. Although an important target for tobacco control efforts, these individuals represent an e...

  7. Prevention and treatment of relapse after stem cell transplantation by cellular therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenburg, Fred; Ruggiero, Eliana; Bonini, Chaira; Porter, David; Miller, Jeff; Malard, Floran; Mohty, Mohamad; Kröger, Nicolaus; Kolb, Hans Jochem

    2018-05-24

    Despite recent advances in reducing therapy-related mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) relapse remains the major cause of treatment failure and little progress has been achieved in the last decades. At the 3rd International Workshop on Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse held in Hamburg/Germany in November 2016 international experts presented and discussed recent developments in the field. Here, the potential of cellular therapies including unspecific and specific T cells, genetically modified T cells, CAR-T cells, NK-cells, and second allografting in prevention and treatment of relapse after alloSCT are summarized.

  8. Does Extended Telephone Callback Counselling Prevent Smoking Relapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segan, C. J.; Borland, R.

    2011-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial tested whether extended callback counselling that proactively engaged ex-smokers with the task of embracing a smoke-free lifestyle (four to six calls delivered 1-3 months after quitting, i.e. when craving levels and perceived need for help had declined) could reduce relapse compared with a revised version of…

  9. An Ambient Agent To Support Depression Relapse Prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aziz, A.A.; Klein, M.C.A.; Treur, J.; Boldi, P.; Vizzari, G.

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges for the patients with a history of unipolar depression is to stay healthy throughout their lifetime. In principle, with more prior onset cases, it escalates the risk of the patients to fall into a relapse. In this paper, an ambient agent based model to support patients from

  10. Saccharomyces boulardii does not prevent relapse of Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourreille, Arnaud; Cadiot, Guillaume; Le Dreau, Gérard; Laharie, David; Beaugerie, Laurent; Dupas, Jean-Louis; Marteau, Philippe; Rampal, Patrick; Moyse, Dominique; Saleh, Ashraf; Le Guern, Marie-Emmanuelle; Galmiche, Jean-Paul

    2013-08-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii is a probiotic yeast that has been shown to have beneficial effects on the intestinal epithelial barrier and digestive immune system. There is preliminary evidence that S boulardii could be used to treat patients with Crohn's disease (CD). We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effects of S boulardii in patients with CD who underwent remission during therapy with steroids or aminosalicylates. We performed a prospective study of 165 patients who achieved remission after treatment with steroids or salicylates; they were randomly assigned to groups given S boulardii (1 g/day) or placebo for 52 weeks. The primary end point was the percentage of patients in remission at week 52. Time to relapse, Crohn's disease activity index scores, and changes in parameters of inflammation were secondary end points. CD relapsed in 80 patients, 38 in the S boulardii group (47.5%) and 42 in the placebo group (53.2%, a nonsignificant difference). The median time to relapse did not differ significantly between patients given S boulardii (40.7 weeks) vs placebo (39.0 weeks). There were no significant differences between groups in mean Crohn's disease activity index scores or erythrocyte sedimentation rates or in median levels of C-reactive protein. In a post hoc analysis, nonsmokers given S boulardii were less likely to experience a relapse of CD than nonsmokers given placebo, but this finding requires confirmation. Although the probiotic yeast S boulardii is safe and well tolerated, it does not appear to have any beneficial effects for patients with CD in remission after steroid or salicylate therapies. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Provision of relapse prevention interventions in UK NHS Stop Smoking Services: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McEwen Andy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background UK NHS Stop Smoking Services provide cost effective smoking cessation interventions but, as yet, there has been no assessment of their provision of relapse prevention interventions. Methods Electronic questionnaire survey of 185 UK Stop Smoking Services Managers. Results Ninety six Stop Smoking Service managers returned completed questionnaires (52% response rate. Of these, 58.3% (n = 56 ran NHS Stop Smoking Services which provided relapse prevention interventions for clients with the most commonly provided interventions being behavioural support: telephone (77%, group (73%, and individual (54%. Just under half (48%, n = 27 offered nicotine replacement therapy (NRT, 21.4% (n = 12 bupropion; 19.6% (n = 11 varenicline. Over 80% of those providing relapse prevention interventions do so for over six months. Nearly two thirds of all respondents thought it was likely that they would either continue to provide or commence provision of relapse prevention interventions in their services. Of the remaining respondents, 66.7% (n = 22 believed that the government focus on four-week quit rates, and 42.9% (14 services believed that inadequate funding for provision of relapse prevention interventions, were major barriers to introducing these interventions into routine care. Conclusions Just over half of UK managers of NHS Stop Smoking Services who responded to the questionnaire reported that, in their services, relapse prevention interventions were currently provided for clients, despite, at that time, there being a weak evidence base for their effectiveness. The most commonly provided relapse prevention interventions were those for which there was least evidence. If these interventions are found to be effective, barriers would need to be removed before they would become part of routine care.

  12. Breaking the Rhythm of Depression: Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Relapse Prevention for Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudi L.H. Bockting

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A crucial part of the treatment of depression is the prevention of relapse and recurrence. Psychological interventions, especially cognitive behavior therapy (CBT are helpful in preventing relapse and recurrence in depression. The effectivity of four types of relapse prevention cognitive behavior therapy strategies will be addressed, i.e. acute prophylactic cognitive behavior therapy, continuation cognitive behavior therapy, sequential cognitive behavior therapy and cognitive behavior therapy in partial remission.Specific ingredients of three sequential cognitive behavior therapy programs (well-being cognitive therapy, preventive cognitive therapy, and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy will be discussed as applied after remission in patients that experienced previous depressive episodes. Sequential preventive cognitive behavior therapy after acute treatment may be an attractive alternative treatment for many patients who currently use antidepressants for years and years to prevent relapse and recurrence. This is an extremely challenging issue to research thoroughly. Future studies must rule out what intervention for whom is the best protection against relapse and recurrence in depression.

  13. Relapse Prevention: An Introduction to Marlatt’s Cognitive – Behavior Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Nemati

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available High rate of relapse after apparently successful treatment is a common problem facing with most approaches to treatment of drug dependency. This has led to the development of a variety of strategies for relapse prevention. Among these, Marlatt’s cognitive – behavioural model has received a good deal of attention. It is based on two major axes: Identification of warning sings and development of necessary skills for coping with risk situations. In fact, client’s perception relating to their abilities to cope with high - risk situations can lead to lapse. Relapes is a function of client’s reaction to this initial lapes.Since formal training for addiction counsellors typically includes instruction on Marlatt’s relapes taxonomy and intervention strategies have been designed based on his classification systems of high – risk stimuli, it is nececsary for addiction counsellors to become familiar with this system. This paper presents an overview of Marlatts taxonomy of high – risk situations for relapse and his approach to relapse prevention. Special attention is given to definition of relapse, stages of relaps and relapse prevention strategies.

  14. A randomized controlled trial to prevent glycemic relapse in longitudinal diabetes care: Study protocol (NCT00362193

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Dianne

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a common disease with self-management a key aspect of care. Large prospective trials have shown that maintaining glycated hemoglobin less than 7% greatly reduces complications but translating this level of control into everyday clinical practice can be difficult. Intensive improvement programs are successful in attaining control in patients with type 2 diabetes, however, many patients experience glycemic relapse once returned to routine care. This early relapse is, in part, due to decreased adherence in self-management behaviors. Objective This paper describes the design of the Glycemic Relapse Prevention study. The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal frequency of maintenance intervention needed to prevent glycemic relapse. The primary endpoint is glycemic relapse, which is defined as glycated hemoglobin greater than 8% and an increase of 1% from baseline. Methods The intervention consists of telephonic contact by a nurse practitioner with a referral to a dietitian if indicated. This intervention was designed to provide early identification of self-care problems, understanding the rationale behind the self-care lapse and problem solve to find a negotiated solution. A total of 164 patients were randomized to routine care (least intensive, routine care with phone contact every three months (moderate intensity or routine care with phone contact every month (most intensive. Conclusion The baseline patient characteristics are similar across the treatment arms. Intervention fidelity analysis showed excellent reproducibility. This study will provide insight into the important but poorly understood area of glycemic relapse prevention.

  15. Glycaemic Control amongst Persons with Diabetes Mellitus in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study has shown that poor glycaemic control is common amongst persons with diabetes mellitus in Benin City. Studies have shown that good glycaemic control prevents and delays the complications of diabetes mellitus. We therefore recommend that health education on the benefits of good glycaemic ...

  16. Sequential treatment with fluoxetine and relapse--prevention CBT to improve outcomes in pediatric depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennard, Betsy D; Emslie, Graham J; Mayes, Taryn L; Nakonezny, Paul A; Jones, Jessica M; Foxwell, Aleksandra A; King, Jessica

    2014-10-01

    The authors evaluated a sequential treatment strategy of fluoxetine and relapse-prevention cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to determine effects on remission and relapse in youths with major depressive disorder. Youths 8-17 years of age with major depression were treated openly with fluoxetine for 6 weeks. Those with an adequate response (defined as a reduction of 50% or more on the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised [CDRS-R]) were randomly assigned to receive continued medication management alone or continued medication management plus CBT for an additional 6 months. The CBT was modified to address residual symptoms and was supplemented by well-being therapy. Primary outcome measures were time to remission (with remission defined as a CDRS-R score of 28 or less) and rate of relapse (with relapse defined as either a CDRS-R score of 40 or more with a history of 2 weeks of symptom worsening, or clinical deterioration). Of the 200 participants enrolled in acute-phase treatment, 144 were assigned to continuation treatment with medication management alone (N=69) or medication management plus CBT (N=75). During the 30-week continuation treatment period, time to remission did not differ significantly between treatment groups (hazard ratio=1.26, 95% CI=0.87, 1.82). However, the medication management plus CBT group had a significantly lower risk of relapse than the medication management only group (hazard ratio=0.31, 95% CI=0.13, 0.75). The estimated probability of relapse by week 30 was lower with medication management plus CBT than with medication management only (9% compared with 26.5%). Continuation-phase relapse-prevention CBT was effective in reducing the risk of relapse but not in accelerating time to remission in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder.

  17. The Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management on Relapse Prevention in Substance Dependent Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Karimian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral stress management on relapse prevention in men who are substance dependent. Method: In a experimental study, 30 individuals who settled in Esfahan therapeutic community center were accidently divided in to an experimental (15 subjects and a control (15 subjects group. The experimental group underwent ten 90 minutes sessions of cognitive-behavioral stress management and the control group didn't receive any particular treatment. All participants underwent urine tests at the beginning of the study, completion of treatment and three months following the completion of treatment. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and X2 test. Findings: results showed significant difference in relapse rates of two groups in the following stage. Conclusion: Cognitive-behavioral stress management is effective in relapse prevention in men who are substance dependent.

  18. Comparing Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention with Treatment as Usual on Impulsivity and Relapse for Methadone-Treated Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghubi, Mehdi; Zargar, Fatemeh; Akbari, Hossein

    2017-07-01

    Impulsivity is one of the causes of relapse that can affect treatment outcomes. Studies have shown that addiction treatments can reduce impulsivity in drug-dependent individuals. Studies also have suggested that mindfulness is associated with impulsivity. However, no study has investigated the effectiveness of the mindfulness-based intervention on impulsivity in opioid-dependent individuals. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) with treatment as usual (TAU) in terms of impulsivity and relapse for methadone-treated patients. The present randomized controlled clinical trial was performed in Kashan, Iran, in 2015. The study population was opioid-dependent patients referred to Maintenance Treatment Centers. Seventy patients were selected by random sampling and were assigned in two groups (MBRP and TAU) randomly. The participants of two groups filled out Barratt impulsivity scale (BIS-11) as a pre-test and 8 weeks later as post-test and 2 months later as a follow-up. Both groups received methadone-therapy. The MBRP group received 8 sessions of group therapy, while the control group did not receive any group psychotherapy session. Finally, data from 60 patients were analyzed statistically. The MBRP group had decreased impulsivity significantly (P relapse frequency (P relapse probability. These findings suggest that MBRP is useful for opioid-dependent individuals with high-level impulsivity, and relapse prevention.

  19. Pharmacotherapy Relapse Prevention in Body Dysmorphic Disorder: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A; Keshaviah, Aparna; Dougherty, Darin D; Stout, Robert L; Menard, William; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2016-09-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder is common, distressing, and often severely impairing. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors appear efficacious, but the few existing pharmacotherapy studies were short term (≤4 months), and no relapse prevention studies or continuation phase studies have been conducted to the authors' knowledge. The authors report results from the first relapse prevention study in body dysmorphic disorder. Adults (N=100) with DSM-IV body dysmorphic disorder received open-label escitalopram for 14 weeks (phase 1); 58 responders were then randomized to double-blind continuation treatment with escitalopram versus switch to placebo for 6 months (phase 2). Reliable and valid outcome measures were utilized. In phase 1, 67.0% of treated subjects and 81.1% of subjects who completed phase 1 responded to escitalopram. Body dysmorphic disorder severity (in both the intent-to-treat and the completer groups) and insight, depressive symptoms, psychosocial functioning, and quality of life significantly improved from baseline to end of phase 1. In phase 2, time to relapse was significantly longer with escitalopram than with placebo treatment (hazard ratio=2.72, 95% CI=1.01-8.57). Phase 2 relapse proportions were 18% for escitalopram and 40% for placebo. Among escitalopram-treated subjects, body dysmorphic disorder severity significantly decreased over time during the continuation phase, with 35.7% of subjects showing further improvement. There were no significant group differences in body dysmorphic disorder severity or insight, depressive symptoms, psychosocial functioning, or quality of life. Continuation-phase escitalopram delayed time to relapse, and fewer escitalopram-treated subjects relapsed than did placebo-treated subjects. Body dysmorphic disorder severity significantly improved during 6 additional months of escitalopram treatment following acute response; more than one-third of escitalopram-treated subjects experienced further improvement.

  20. Dynamics of myeloid cell populations during relapse-preventive immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydström, Anna; Hallner, Alexander; Aurelius, Johan; Sander, Frida Ewald; Bernson, Elin; Kiffin, Roberta; Thoren, Fredrik Bergh; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Martner, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Relapse of leukemia in the postchemotherapy phase contributes to the poor prognosis and survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In an international phase IV trial (ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT01347996), 84 patients with AML in first complete remission who had not undergone transplantation received immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) and low-dose IL-2 with the aim of preventing relapse. The dynamics of myeloid cell counts and expression of activation markers was assessed before and after cycles of immunotherapy and correlated with clinical outcome in terms of relapse risk and survival. During cycles, a pronounced increase in blood eosinophil counts was observed along with a reduction in monocyte and neutrophil counts. A strong reduction of blood monocyte counts during the first HDC/IL-2 treatment cycle predicted leukemia-free survival. The HDC component of the immunotherapy exerts agonist activity at histamine type 2 receptors (H2Rs) that are expressed by myeloid cells. It was observed that the density of H 2 R expression in blood monocytes increased during cycles of immunotherapy and that high monocyte H 2 R expression implied reduced relapse risk and improved overall survival. Several other activation markers, including HLA-DR, CD86, and CD40, were induced in monocytes and dendritic cells during immunotherapy but did not predict clinical outcome. In addition, expression of HLA-ABC increased in all myeloid populations during therapy. A low expression of HLA-ABC was associated with reduced relapse risk. These results suggest that aspects of myeloid cell biology may impact clinical benefit of relapse-preventive immunotherapy in AML. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  1. [Mindfulness-based-relapse prevention (MBRP): Evaluation of the impact of a group of Mindfulness Therapy in alcohol relapse prevention for alcohol use disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, D; Romo, L; Bouthillon-Heitzmann, P; Limosin, F

    2015-12-01

    For several years, the learning of mindfulness has developed in a psychological intervention perspective, particularly in the field of addiction. Presently, the management of addictions with substances is centered on two questions: the motivation in the change of behaviour and in a significant change in alcohol consumption. Concerning alcohol dependence, the evolution of behaviour is variable and characterized by forgiveness episodes and relapses. Over many years, a treatment for the abuse of substance associated with techniques based on full consciousness (Kabat-Zinn, 1990; Segal et al., 2002) Mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) was developed by Marlatt et al. (2011). The prevention of the relapse therapy, based on full consciousness, is a program of eight sessions integrating techniques of "mindfulness" into the techniques of prevention of the relapse. However, not much research has focused on the MBRP, the publication of the manual regarding this intervention is too recent (Bowen S et al., 2011). We are interested in the active mechanisms, which are at stake in the MBRP. Indeed, the meditation acts presents many mechanisms in the addicting disorders. Our non-controlled research was based on a protocol in order to evaluate the alcohol consummation, mindfulness, impulsiveness, automatic thoughts, anxiety and abilities to cope. The first results are interesting: reduction of alcohol consummation, increase of mindfulness, reduction of trigger relapse, increasing cognitive flexibility and high degree of satisfaction among participants. An intervention MBRP was proposed to 26 patients who were assigned to three groups. They were questioned about their alcohol consumption and assessed by a protocol of seven evaluations before and after the group MBRP: Five Facets Mindfulness (FFMQ), Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS), Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ II), State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-A, STAI-B), Questionnaire of the automatic thoughts (QPA), and

  2. Efficacy of etanercept in preventing relapse of uveitis controlled by methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C Stephen; Tufail, Fehma; Waheed, Nadia Khalida; Chu, David; Miserocchi, Elisabetta; Baltatzis, Stefanos; Vredeveld, Cindy M

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of etanercept vs placebo in preventing relapses of uveitis in patients taking methotrexate with control of uveitis and whose methotrexate dosage was being tapered. Patients with chronic or recurrent noninfectious uveitis with inflammation controlled by low-dose methotrexate were randomized to either the drug or placebo group in a double-masked manner, given a methotrexate taper schedule, and followed for 24 weeks. The main outcome measures were control of inflammation, visual acuity, and adverse reactions. Data were analyzed both as an attempt-to-treat analysis and an analysis only of those patients who completed the study. A total of 20 patients were randomized to the drug and placebo groups. Relapse of uveitis occurred in 3 of 10 patients in the treatment group and 5 of 10 patients in the control group. Two patients in the treatment group withdrew prematurely from the study due to adverse effects. There was no significant difference between the treatment and placebo groups with regard to the rate of relapse and the final visual acuity. No patient suffered from any irreversible, long-term morbidity or mortality. Etanercept has no significant efficacy over placebo in preventing relapses of uveitis in patients being tapered from methotrexate.

  3. Combination treatment with risperidone long-acting injection and psychoeducational approaches for preventing relapse in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Yueren Zhao,1–3 Taro Kishi,1 Nakao Iwata,1 Manabu Ikeda3,4 1Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Okehazama Hospital Fujita Kokoro Care Center, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan; 3Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto, Japan; 4Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto, Japan Abstract: A recent meta-analysis showed that long-acting injectable (LAI antipsychotics were not superior to oral antipsychotics for preventing relapse in patients with schizophrenia. We therefore designed a treatment strategy combining risperidone LAI and COMPASS (COMprehensive Psycho-educational Approach and Scheme Set, an original psychoeducational program supporting treatment with risperidone LAI and evaluating subjective treatment satisfaction, transition of symptoms, and effectiveness in preventing symptomatic relapse. The aim of this study was to examine whether addition of COMPASS to risperidone LAI was more effective in preventing relapse in schizophrenia patients than risperidone LAI alone, with the latter group consisting of patients enrolled in a Phase III trial of risperidone LAI in Japan. Patients were followed up for 6 months, with COMPASS continuously implemented from the transition to the observation phase. The primary efficacy measurements were relapse rate (rates of rehospitalization and discontinuation due to inefficacy. Secondary efficacy measurements were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF scores. Of the 96 patients originally enrolled, 19 (19.8% were discontinued from all causes. During the 6-month study period, ten of the 96 patients (10.4% relapsed, compared with a 12.2% relapse rate in patients enrolled in a Phase III trial of risperidone LAI in Japan. Patients showed significant improvements in BPRS total

  4. Relapse Prevention in Major Depressive Disorder: Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Versus an Active Control Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallcross, Amanda J.; Gross, James J.; Visvanathan, Pallavi D.; Kumar, Niketa; Palfrey, Amy; Ford, Brett Q.; Dimidjian, Sona; Shirk, Stephen; Holm-Denoma, Jill; Goode, Kari M.; Cox, Erica; Chaplin, William; Mauss, Iris B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the comparative effectiveness of Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) versus an active control condition (ACC) for depression relapse prevention, depressive symptom reduction, and improvement in life satisfaction. Method Ninety-two participants in remission from Major Depressive Disorder with residual depressive symptoms were randomized to either an 8-week MBCT or a validated ACC that is structurally equivalent to MBCT and controls for non-specific effects (e.g., interaction with a facilitator, perceived social support, treatment outcome expectations). Both interventions were delivered according to their published manuals. Results Intention-to-treat analyses indicated no differences between MBCT and ACC in depression relapse rates or time to relapse over a 60-week follow-up. Both groups experienced significant and equal reductions in depressive symptoms and improvements in life satisfaction. A significant quadratic interaction (group x time) indicated that the pattern of depressive symptom reduction differed between groups. The ACC experienced immediate symptom reduction post-intervention and then a gradual increase over the 60-week follow-up. The MBCT group experienced a gradual linear symptom reduction. The pattern for life satisfaction was identical but only marginally significant. Conclusions MBCT did not differ from an ACC on rates of depression relapse, symptom reduction, or life satisfaction, suggesting that MBCT is no more effective for preventing depression relapse and reducing depressive symptoms than the active components of the ACC. Differences in trajectory of depressive symptom improvement suggest that the intervention-specific skills acquired may be associated with differential rates of therapeutic benefit. This study demonstrates the importance of comparing psychotherapeutic interventions to active control conditions. PMID:26371618

  5. The Effectiveness of Transactional Behavior Analytic Group Therapy on the Prevention of Relapse among Detoxified People

    OpenAIRE

    S Mousa Kafi; Rahim Mollazadeh Esfanaji; Morteza Nori; Ertaj Salehi

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Addiction Phenomenon among detoxified people is an important therapeutic problem for substance abusers. The aim of this research was the study of effectiveness of transactional behavior analytic group therapy on prevention of relapse of detoxified people. Method: the research design was quasi experimental with witness group. By using of available sampling of detoxified people who referred to government centers for maintenance therapy with Methadone, 24 subjects that divided to t...

  6. Does internet-based prevention reduce the risk of relapse for anorexia nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichter, Manfred M; Quadflieg, Norbert; Nisslmüller, Kerstin; Lindner, Susanne; Osen, Bernhard; Huber, Thomas; Wünsch-Leiteritz, Wally

    2012-03-01

    Technological advancements allow new approaches to psychotherapy via electronic media. The eating disorder literature currently contains no studies on internet intervention in anorexia nervosa (AN). This study presents a RCT on an internet-based relapse prevention program (RP) over nine months after inpatient treatment for AN. The sample comprised 258 women, randomized to the RP or treatment as usual (TAU). Expert- and self-ratings were evaluated by intent-to-treat analyses. Concerning age, age at onset and comorbidity, both groups were comparable at randomization. During the RP, the intervention group gained weight while the TAU group had minimal weight loss. RP completers gained significantly more body weight than patients in the TAU condition. Group-by-time comparisons for eating-related cognitions and behaviors and general psychopathology showed a significantly more favorable course in the RP program for "sexual anxieties" and "bulimic symptoms" (interview), and "maturity fears" and "social insecurity" (EDI-2). General psychopathology showed no significant group-by-time interaction. Important factors for successful relapse prevention were adherence to the intervention protocol and increased spontaneity. Considering the unfavorable course and chronicity of anorexia nervosa (AN), internet-based relapse prevention in AN following inpatient treatment appears a promising approach. Future internet-based programs may be further improved and enhanced. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Engaging Parents Who Quit Smoking in Antismoking Socialization of Children: A Novel Approach to Relapse Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Kim A.; Dickinson, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Data from a randomized controlled trial designed primarily to test the effect of an antismoking socialization parenting program on child initiation of smoking were used to test the subsidiary hypothesis that providing antismoking socialization to children would lower the odds of relapse within a sub-sample of parents who had recently quit smoking. Methods: Over 13 months, 11 state Quitlines provided contact information for callers who were parents of 8- to 10-year-old children. Of 1604 parents enrolled in the trial, 689 (344 treatment; 345 control) had quit smoking cigarettes for at least 24 hours after calling a Quitline. Their data were used to test for group differences in 30-day abstinence measured using telephone interviews conducted 7 and 12 months post-baseline. Analyses of parents with complete follow-up data and intent-to-treat analyses incorporating parents lost to follow-up are presented. Results: Among 465 parents with complete follow-up data, treatment group parents had twice the odds of being abstinent 12 months post-baseline (adjusted OR = 2.01; P = .001) relative to controls. Intent-to-treat analysis with all 689 parents, in which those lost to follow-up were coded as having relapsed, showed a smaller though significant treatment effect on 30-day abstinence at 12 months (adjusted OR = 1.58; P = .017). Conclusions: This study is the first to observe that engaging parents who have quit smoking in antismoking socialization of children can lower their odds of relapse. Additional research is needed to replicate this finding and to identify the psychological mechanisms underlying the observed effect. Implications: There is a clear the need for research to develop new relapse prevention strategies. This study is the first to observe that engaging parents who have quit smoking in antismoking socialization of children can lower their odds of relapse. PMID:26416824

  8. Prevention of relapse of Graves' disease by treatment with an intrathyroid injection of dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao-Ming; Li, Hui-Qin; Li, Qian; Li, Dong-Mei; Xie, Xiao-Jing; Yin, Guo-Ping; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Xiang-Hong; Wu, Jin-Dan; Chen, Song-Wang; Wang, Shu-Kui

    2009-12-01

    Antithyroid drugs are widely used in the treatment of Graves' disease (GD), but the relapse rate is very high after therapy withdrawal. We evaluated the reduction effects of intrathyroid injection of dexamethasone (IID) on the relapse rate of hyperthyroidism in patients with newly diagnosed GD. A total of 191 patients with GD completed the study. After 6 months of treatment with methimazole (MMI), the patients were randomly assigned to receive either MMI (96 patients) alone or MMI combined with IID (MMI+IID; 95 patients) treatment for 3 months, followed by continuing a dose of MMI that would maintain euthyroidism for the next 9 months in all of the patients. After withdrawal of the medical therapy, patients were followed for 24 months, and the relapse rate of hyperthyroidism was evaluated. No statistical difference was observed in the levels of serum FT(4), TSH, or TSH receptor antibodies (TR-Ab), the thyroid volume, or the TR-Ab positive rate between the two groups at month 6. After the next 3 months of treatment with MMI+IID or MMI alone, the levels of TSH increased significantly, and the levels of serum TR-Ab, the TR-Ab positive rate, and thyroid volume decreased significantly in the MMI+IID group compared with the MMI group. Seven patients (7.4%) experienced a relapse of overt hyperthyroidism in the MMI+IID group and 49 patients (51%) in MMI group during the 2-yr follow-up period (P prevent relapse of hyperthyroidism in GD after medical therapy withdrawal.

  9. Effectiveness of mindfulness-based stress reduction in drug relapse prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hamedi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of mindfulness in the prevention of relapse in drug abusers. Method: Using a quasi experimental design, 90 male drug abusers who had undergone detoxification were selected from among all detoxified individuals referred to drug rehabilitation centers in the City of Tehran. Patients were placed randomly in three groups: Mindfulness training intervention, behavioral drug reduction counseling and a control group in which no intervention was applied. Diagnosis of drug abuse was made using structured clinical interview for diagnosing axis I disorders on DSMIV (SCID-I as well as tests to measure morphine levels in the blood. Fisher test was used to compare groups. Patients were assessed two weeks and two months after the intervention as follow up measure. Findings: Results show that both intervention groups were effective in preventing relapse as compared to the control group. Furthermore, the effectiveness of mindfulness training and BDRC was about the same. There were no significant differences between patients with and without experience of drug abuse and married and single patients. Conclusion: Both mindfulness training and BDRC may be considered effective practical methods in reducing the risk of relapse in male drug abusers.

  10. Prescription procedures in medication for relapse prevention after inpatient treatment for alcohol use disorders in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Caroline; Moggi, Franz; Giovanoli, Anna; Strik, Werner

    2007-01-01

    In randomized controlled trials with high internal validity, pharmacotherapy using acamprosate, naltrexone, and, to a somewhat lesser extent, disulfiram has proved effective in preventing relapse in patients with alcohol use disorders (AUD). There remains, however, a paucity of studies with sufficient external validity in which the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy in clinical practice is investigated. This study aimed to make a contribution to close this gap in research. In this naturalistic, prospective study, a comparison on indices of substance use, psychiatric symptoms, and treatment service utilization was carried out using samples of 92 patients who received pharmacotherapy and 323 patients who did not receive pharmacotherapy following discharge from 12 residential AUD programmes (index stay). Patients that received pharmacotherapy were more likely to use alcohol during the index stay and at the 1-year follow-up. Moreover, this patient group more readily utilized treatment services during a 2-year period prior to and a 1-year period following index stay than patients who were not given pharmacotherapy. Nevertheless, when pharmacotherapy was prescribed before first post-treatment alcohol use, it was associated with delay of alcohol use, fewer relapses, and a reduced need for inpatient treatment. In many cases, however, medication was not prescribed until alcohol use and relapse had occurred. The length of time to first alcohol use was longer, and the cumulative abstinence rate higher, for disulfiram than for acamprosate, the latter being generally prescribed for more severely alcohol-dependent patients. There is a need for further studies to probe the reasons why medication for relapse prevention is not prescribed upon discharge from residential treatment and for less severely alcohol-dependent patients.

  11. Efficacy and Cost-Effectiveness of a Minimal Intervention to Prevent Smoking Relapse: Dismantling the Effects of Amount of Content Versus Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Thomas H.; Meade, Cathy D.; Herzog, Thaddeus A.; Chirikos, Thomas N.; Webb, Monica S.; Cantor, Alan B.

    2004-01-01

    Relapse prevention remains a major challenge to smoking cessation efforts. T. H. Brandon, B. N. Collins, L. M. Juliano, and A. B. Lazev (2000) found that a series of 8 empirically based relapse-prevention booklets mailed to ex-smokers over 1 year significantly reduced relapse. This study dismantled 2 components of that intervention: the amount of…

  12. A lifetime approach to major depressive disorder: The contributions of psychological interventions in preventing relapse and recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockting, Claudi L; Hollon, Steven D; Jarrett, Robin B; Kuyken, Willem; Dobson, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is highly disabling and typically runs a recurrent course. Knowledge about prevention of relapse and recurrence is crucial to the long-term welfare of people who suffer from this disorder. This article provides an overview of the current evidence for the prevention of relapse and recurrence using psychological interventions. We first describe a conceptual framework to preventive interventions based on: acute treatment; continuation treatment, or; prevention strategies for patients in remission. In brief, cognitive-behavioral interventions, delivered during the acute phase, appear to have an enduring effect that protects patients against relapse and perhaps others from recurrence following treatment termination. Similarly, continuation treatment with either cognitive therapy or perhaps interpersonal psychotherapy appears to reduce risk for relapse and maintenance treatment appears to reduce risk for recurrence. Preventive relapse strategies like preventive cognitive therapy or mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) applied to patients in remission protects against subsequent relapse and perhaps recurrence. There is some preliminary evidence of specific mediation via changing the content or the process of cognition. Continuation CT and preventive interventions started after remission (CBT, MBCT) seem to have the largest differential effects for individuals that need them the most. Those who have the greatest risk for relapse and recurrence including patients with unstable remission, more previous episodes, potentially childhood trauma, early age of onset. These prescriptive indications, if confirmed in future research, may point the way to personalizing prevention strategies. Doing so, may maximize the efficiency with which they are applied and have the potential to target the mechanisms that appear to underlie these effects. This may help make this prevention strategies more efficacious. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  13. A couple-focused intervention to prevent postnatal smoking relapse: PRISM study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghea, Cristian Ioan; Brînzaniuc, Alexandra; Mihu, Dan; Iuhas, Cristian Ioan; Stamatian, Florin; Caracostea, Gabriela; Sidor, Alexandra; Alexa, Paula Mădălina; Brînza, Cătălina; Pop, Oana Maria; Cherecheș, Răzvan Mircea

    2015-03-01

    Maternal smoking is one of the most modifiable factors with clear adverse effects for the fetus and the entire family. Addressing the dearth of pregnancy smoking interventions with partner support, PRISM (Prevent Relapse In SMoking) is a partnership between a research institution and the two largest state-owned obstetrics and gynecology clinics in Cluj-Napoca, Romania. The study will assess the efficacy of a couple-focused telephone-counseling program to prevent smoking relapse among mothers who quit smoking closely before or during pregnancy. The intervention is a program for couples based on motivational interviewing delivered over the phone after birth. The study is an ongoing randomized controlled trial of 250 Romanian women recruited soon after childbirth, who quit smoking in the six months before pregnancy or no later than the end of the first pregnancy trimester and remained abstinent (which was biochemically verified) until delivery. Participants were randomized to: (1) a control arm (usual care); and (2) an intervention arm consisting of up to 4 postnatal counseling calls for mothers and their partners using motivational interviewing to encourage the woman to remain smoke-free and the partner to support her decision. The primary outcome is maternal smoking abstinence at 6 months postpartum (biochemically verified). PRISM has the potential to identify strategies to reduce maternal postnatal relapse and increase partner quitting. If successful, the program may be an effective method to prevent and reduce smoking, which may lead to improved child, mother, and partner health both in the short and the long term. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reducing cannabinoid abuse and preventing relapse by enhancing endogenous brain levels of kynurenic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justinova, Zuzana; Mascia, Paola; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Secci, Maria E.; Redhi, Godfrey H.; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Scherma, Maria; Barnes, Chanel; Parashos, Alexandra; Zara, Tamara; Fratta, Walter; Solinas, Marcello; Pistis, Marco; Bergman, Jack; Kangas, Brian D.; Ferré, Sergi; Tanda, Gianluigi; Schwarcz, Robert; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    In the reward circuitry of the brain, alpha-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) modulate effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), marijuana’s main psychoactive ingredient. Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an endogenous negative allosteric modulator of α7nAChRs. Here we report that the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) inhibitor Ro 61-8048 increases brain KYNA levels and attenuates cannabinoid-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in reward-related brain areas. In the self-administration model of drug abuse, Ro 61-8048 reduced the rewarding effects of THC and the synthetic cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 in squirrel monkeys and rats, respectively, and it also prevented relapse to drug-seeking induced by re-exposure to cannabinoids or cannabinoid-associated cues. The effects of enhancing endogenous KYNA levels with Ro 61-8048 were prevented by positive allosteric modulators of α7nAChRs. Despite a clear need, there are currently no medications approved for treatment of marijuana dependence. Modulation of KYNA provides a novel pharmacological strategy for achieving abstinence from marijuana and preventing relapse. PMID:24121737

  15. An open trial of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for the prevention of perinatal depressive relapse/recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimidjian, Sona; Goodman, Sherryl H; Felder, Jennifer N; Gallop, Robert; Brown, Amanda P; Beck, Arne

    2015-02-01

    Pregnant women with histories of depression are at high risk of depressive relapse/recurrence during the perinatal period, and options for relapse/recurrence prevention are limited. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) has strong evidence among general populations but has not been studied among at-risk pregnant women to prevent depression. We examined the feasibility, acceptability, and clinical outcomes of depression symptom severity and relapse/recurrence associated with MBCT adapted for perinatal women (MBCT-PD). Pregnant women with depression histories were recruited from obstetrics clinics in a large health maintenance organization at two sites and enrolled in MBCT-PD (N = 49). Self-reported depressive symptoms and interview-based assessments of depression relapse/recurrence status were measured at baseline, during MBCT-PD, and through 6-months postpartum. Pregnant women reported interest, engagement, and satisfaction with the program. Retention rates were high, as were rates of completion of daily homework practices. Intent to treat analyses indicated a significant improvement in depression symptom levels and an 18 % rate of relapse/recurrence through 6 months postpartum. MBCT-PD shows promise as an acceptable, feasible, and clinically beneficial brief psychosocial prevention option for pregnant women with histories of depression. Randomized controlled trials are needed to examine the efficacy of MBCT-PD for the prevention of depressive relapse/recurrence during pregnancy and postpartum.

  16. Glycaemic Index and Glycaemic Load of Pounded yam in Diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incremental area under the blood glucose curve (IAUC) was used to determine the glycaemic index. Glycaemic load was determined using the percentage of available carbohydrate in the meal multiplied by the glycaemic index. Result: The glycaemic index of pounded yam was 61 and 59 in the diabetic type-2 and healthy ...

  17. The impact of social media-based support groups on smoking relapse prevention in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onezi, Hamidi Al; Khalifa, Mohamed; El-Metwally, Ashraf; Househ, Mowafa

    2018-06-01

    Tobacco smoking remains a major preventable cause of mortality and morbidity across the globe. People who attempt to quit smoking often experience episodes of relapse before finally quitting. Understanding the part that social networking sites and social media can play in smoking cessation and prevention of relapse is important to aid the development of novel techniques to curb the smoking epidemic. This study investigated the use of extra-treatment provided outside of the formal healthcare setting, bolstered by online social support in order to prevent smoking relapse in Saudi Arabia. This cross-sectional study included 473 smokers taking part in smoking cessation intervention programs run by the Riyadh branch of King Abdul-Aziz Medical City and PURITY, a Saudi anti-smoking association. Only subjects who expressed an interest in quitting smoking, and those attempting to quit, were considered for inclusion. The sample was divided into three groups: subjects who subscribed to support groups on Twitter (n = 150), and WhatsApp (n = 150), and a control group of subjects who had not subscribed to any social media support groups (n = 173). A significant difference was found between the mean average numbers of people who quit smoking among the three groups, with social media support proving to be more effective than other traditional methods. Our findings imply that Twitter and WhatsApp users found it easier to quit smoking than those who did not take part in these social media groups. Social media provides a good platform to discuss smoking cessation treatment, and thus reduce smoking relapses. Our findings support the suggestion that more social media support groups should be developed to help people to effectively cease smoking after abstinence. Individuals who struggle to quit smoking should be encouraged to join support groups on their social media platform of choice to increase their likelihood of quitting. Future studies should assess the effectiveness

  18. Nonmuscle myosin IIB as a therapeutic target for the prevention of relapse to methamphetamine use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Erica J.; Blouin, Ashley M.; Briggs, Sherri B.; Sillivan, Stephanie E.; Lin, Li; Cameron, Michael D.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A.

    2015-01-01

    Memories associated with drug use increase vulnerability to relapse in substance use disorder (SUD) and there are no pharmacotherapies for the prevention of relapse. Previously, we reported a promising finding that storage of memories associated with methamphetamine (METH), but not memories for fear or food reward, is vulnerable to disruption by actin depolymerization in the basolateral amygdala complex (BLC). However, actin is not a viable therapeutic target because of its numerous functions throughout the body. Here we report the discovery of a viable therapeutic target, nonmuscle myosin II (NMIIB), a molecular motor that supports memory by directly driving synaptic actin polymerization. A single intra-BLC treatment with Blebbistatin, a small molecule inhibitor of class II myosin isoforms, including NMIIB, produced a long-lasting disruption of context-induced drug seeking (at least 30 days). Further, post-consolidation genetic knockdown of Myh10, the heavy chain of the most highly expressed NMII in the BLC, was sufficient to produce METH-associated memory loss. Blebbistatin was found to be highly brain penetrant. A single systemic injection of the compound selectively disrupted the storage of METH-associated memory and reversed the accompanying increase in BLC spine density. This effect was specific to METH-associated memory, as it had no effect on an auditory fear memory. The effect was also independent of retrieval, as METH-associated memory was disrupted twenty-four hours after a single systemic injection of Blebbistatin delivered in the home cage. Together, these results argue for the further development of small molecule inhibitors of nonmuscle myosin II as potential therapeutics for the prevention of SUD relapse triggered by drug associations. PMID:26239291

  19. The Effectiveness of Psychodrama in Relapse Prevention and Reducing Depression among Opiate-Dependent Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    s dehnavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The current study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of psychodrama therapy in relapse prevention (RP and the reduction of depression among opiate-dependent male patients. Method: A quasi-experimental research design along with pre-post tests and follow-up and control group was employed for this study. Using convenience sampling method, the number of 20 opiate-dependent men who had referred to addiction treatment clinics in Kermanshah (Iran and successfully passed detoxification program was randomly selected as the participants of the study. The experimental group participated in a twelve-session therapy plan during six weeks. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was used for data collection purposes. Results: The results of ANCOVA revealed the existence of a significant difference between the two groups in the post-test and follow-up scores. Conclusion: According to the findings, it can be argued that psychodrama intervention can be used as an effective program in the reduction of depression and relapse prevention among opiate-dependent men.

  20. Translation and adaptation of smoking relapse-prevention materials for pregnant and postpartum Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Vani Nath; Cruz, Ligia M; Brandon, Thomas H; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2011-01-01

    Quitting smoking is one of the most important behavior changes a pregnant woman can make, with health benefits extending beyond pregnancy for the woman and her child. Increasing numbers of pregnant women are quitting smoking; however, the majority resume smoking later in their pregnancy or shortly after giving birth. Previous research has demonstrated the efficacy of self-help smoking relapse-prevention booklets; however, there is a dearth of materials available in Spanish for Hispanic smokers. The goal of the present study was to translate and adapt existing, theoretically based, smoking relapse-prevention materials for pregnant and postpartum Hispanic women. This article describes the transcreation approach used to ensure the Forever Free for Baby and Me booklets were linguistically and culturally relevant for the heterogeneous populations of Hispanic women. The authors conducted multistage formative research to adapt the booklets and modify vignettes and graphics. Compared with previous research conducted with pregnant non-Hispanic women, results revealed the following: (a) a lack of association or concern about smoking and weight gain, (b) the importance of family approval of behavior, and (c) stress related to difficulties surrounding the immigration experience. The authors' qualitative findings confirm and extend past research that has suggested ways to enhance the cultural relevance and acceptability of a health intervention.

  1. Preventing smoking relapse via Web-based computer-tailored feedback: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfeddali, Iman; Bolman, Catherine; Candel, Math J J M; Wiers, Reinout W; de Vries, Hein

    2012-08-20

    Web-based computer-tailored approaches have the potential to be successful in supporting smoking cessation. However, the potential effects of such approaches for relapse prevention and the value of incorporating action planning strategies to effectively prevent smoking relapse have not been fully explored. The Stay Quit for You (SQ4U) study compared two Web-based computer-tailored smoking relapse prevention programs with different types of planning strategies versus a control group. To assess the efficacy of two Web-based computer-tailored programs in preventing smoking relapse compared with a control group. The action planning (AP) program provided tailored feedback at baseline and invited respondents to do 6 preparatory and coping planning assignments (the first 3 assignments prior to quit date and the final 3 assignments after quit date). The action planning plus (AP+) program was an extended version of the AP program that also provided tailored feedback at 11 time points after the quit attempt. Respondents in the control group only filled out questionnaires. The study also assessed possible dose-response relationships between abstinence and adherence to the programs. The study was a randomized controlled trial with three conditions: the control group, the AP program, and the AP+ program. Respondents were daily smokers (N = 2031), aged 18 to 65 years, who were motivated and willing to quit smoking within 1 month. The primary outcome was self-reported continued abstinence 12 months after baseline. Logistic regression analyses were conducted using three samples: (1) all respondents as randomly assigned, (2) a modified sample that excluded respondents who did not make a quit attempt in conformance with the program protocol, and (3) a minimum dose sample that also excluded respondents who did not adhere to at least one of the intervention elements. Observed case analyses and conservative analyses were conducted. In the observed case analysis of the randomized sample

  2. Role of regulatory T cells in acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing relapse-preventive immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Frida Ewald; Nilsson, Malin; Rydström, Anna; Aurelius, Johan; Riise, Rebecca E; Movitz, Charlotta; Bernson, Elin; Kiffin, Roberta; Ståhlberg, Anders; Brune, Mats; Foà, Robin; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B; Martner, Anna

    2017-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (T regs ) have been proposed to dampen functions of anti-neoplastic immune cells and thus promote cancer progression. In a phase IV trial (Re:Mission Trial, NCT01347996, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov ) 84 patients (age 18-79) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR) received ten consecutive 3-week cycles of immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) and low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) to prevent relapse of leukemia in the post-consolidation phase. This study aimed at defining the features, function and dynamics of Foxp3 + CD25 high CD4 + T regs during immunotherapy and to determine the potential impact of T regs on relapse risk and survival. We observed a pronounced increase in T reg counts in peripheral blood during initial cycles of HDC/IL-2. The accumulating T regs resembled thymic-derived natural T regs (nT regs ), showed augmented expression of CTLA-4 and suppressed the cell cycle proliferation of conventional T cells ex vivo. Relapse of AML was not prognosticated by T reg counts at onset of treatment or after the first cycle of immunotherapy. However, the magnitude of T reg induction was diminished in subsequent treatment cycles. Exploratory analyses implied that a reduced expansion of T regs in later treatment cycles and a short T reg telomere length were significantly associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Our results suggest that immunotherapy with HDC/IL-2 in AML entails induction of immunosuppressive T regs that may be targeted for improved anti-leukemic efficiency.

  3. Factors Influencing Suicidal Tendencies of Patients with Diagnosis of Attempted Suicide in Medical History and Potential Prevention of Relapse Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrbová, Kvetoslava; Dóci, Ivan; Hamplová, Lidmila; Dvořák, Vít; Selingerová, Šárka; Růžičková, Veronika; Chmelařová, Šárka

    2017-12-01

    consumption is the highest-risk factor in connection with relapsing suicide. In case of psychiatric patients with attempted suicide in their medical history, all verified preventive and therapeutic procedures that can contribute to prevention of relapses should be used within follow-up professional care. Specific approach of the closest social environment, medical literacy of the population and state safety measures are important. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2017

  4. The Effectiveness of Transactional Behavior Analytic Group Therapy on the Prevention of Relapse among Detoxified People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mousa Kafi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Addiction Phenomenon among detoxified people is an important therapeutic problem for substance abusers. The aim of this research was the study of effectiveness of transactional behavior analytic group therapy on prevention of relapse of detoxified people. Method: the research design was quasi experimental with witness group. By using of available sampling of detoxified people who referred to government centers for maintenance therapy with Methadone, 24 subjects that divided to two control and witness groups (12 subjects for each group selected of Bojnord city. Each subjects completed the write's relapse prediction scale as pretest. Post test administered after group therapy and after 5 months follow up test administered among two groups. Morphine test has done with follow up test simultaneously. Independent samples t-test and covariance analysis has run for analyzing of data. Results: The results of covariance showed that tempting of substance use was significantly differed in post test and follow up, but there was not significant difference in probability of substance use. Conclusion: Finding of this research showed, the transactional behavior analytic group therapy may be effective in tempting of substance use among detoxified people and it can considered by specialists.

  5. Botulinum toxin as a therapeutic agent to prevent relapse in deep bite patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücke, Thomas; Löffel, Anja; Kanatas, Anastasios; Karnezi, Sandy; Rana, Majeed; Fichter, Andreas; Haarmann, Stephan; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Loeffelbein, Denys John

    2016-05-01

    The etiology of deep bite is multifactorial. One of the causes is increased muscular activity. This makes the treatment of deep bite malocclusions difficult and often results in relapse in many cases. In this work we compared patients with surgical orthognathic treatment only and surgical orthognathic treatment with additional injections of botulinum toxin after mandibular advancement for class II division 2 malocclusion. This is a prospective study. Adult patients were assessed pretreatment (T1), posttreatment (T2), and long-term after 1 year (T3). In total, 32 patients (mean age, 30.7 years; 23 women and 9 men) reached the study end point (T3); 24 patients were treated without botulinum toxin and 8 patients received preoperative injections of botulinum toxin. Significant differences between both groups were observed, with a more stable result for the experimental group treated with botulinum toxin. In a selective group of adult patients with a class II division II incisor relationship and with a class II skeletal base, botulinum toxin injections can effectively prevent relapse. This may present an alternative to a conventional myotomy. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Varenicline in prevention of relapse to smoking: effect of quit pattern on response to extended treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajek, Peter; Tønnesen, Philip; Arteaga, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    AIM: While older behavioural and pharmacological approaches to preventing relapse to smoking show little efficacy, a recent randomized trial of an extended course of varenicline reported positive results. In this secondary analysis, trial data were examined to see whether smokers who manage......, 44% of the 12-week abstainers were abstinent from the target quit date (TQD), while the rest stopped smoking later. We examined the relationship between quit pattern and the varenicline versus placebo difference in continuous abstinence rates at week 52 and contributions of baseline patient...... characteristics. RESULTS: With increasing delay in initial quitting, 12-month success rates declined. Participants who had their last cigarette at week 11 of open-label treatment had quit rates at 52 weeks of 5.7% compared with 54.9% in those who last smoked in week 1 [odds ratio (OR) 20.3 (6.3, 65.9); P

  7. Virtual reality cue exposure for the relapse prevention of tobacco consumption: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovancarli, Camille; Malbos, Eric; Baumstarck, Karine; Parola, Nathalie; Pélissier, Marie-Florence; Lançon, Christophe; Auquier, Pascal; Boyer, Laurent

    2016-02-19

    Successful interventions have been developed for smoking cessation, but the success of smoking relapse prevention interventions has been limited. In particular, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been hampered by a high relapse rate. Because relapses can be due to the presence of conditions associated with tobacco consumption (such as drinking in bars with friends), virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) can generate synthetic environments that represent risk situations for the patient in the context of relapse prevention. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of CBT coupled with VRET, in comparison to CBT alone, in the prevention of smoking relapse. The secondary objectives are to assess the impact of CBT coupled with VRET on anxiety, depression, quality of life, self-esteem and addictive comorbidities (such as alcohol, cannabis, and gambling). A third objective examines the feasibility and acceptability of VR use considering elements such as presence, cybersickness and number of patients who complete the VRET program. The present study is a 14-month (2 months of therapy followed by 12 months of follow-up), prospective, comparative, randomized and open clinical trial, involving two parallel groups (CBT coupled with VRET versus CBT alone). The primary outcome is the proportion of individuals with tobacco abstinence at 6 months after the end of the therapy. Abstinence is defined by the total absence of tobacco consumption assessed during a post-test interview and with an apparatus that measures the carbon monoxide levels expired. A total of 60 individuals per group will be included. This study is the first to examine the efficacy of CBT coupled with VRET in the prevention of smoking relapse. Because VRET is simple to use and has a low cost, this interactive therapeutic method might be easily implemented in clinical practice if the study confirms its efficacy. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02205060 (registered 25 July 2014).

  8. Depression, Craving and Substance Use Following a Randomized Trial of Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Bowen, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Objective A strong relation between negative affect and craving has been demonstrated in laboratory and clinical studies, with depressive symptomatology showing particularly strong links to craving and substance abuse relapse. Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention (MBRP), shown to be efficacious for reduction of substance use, uses mindfulness-based practices to teach alternative responses to emotional discomfort and lessen the conditioned response of craving in the presence of depressive symptoms. The goal of the current study was to examine the relation between measures of depressive symptoms, craving, and substance use following MBRP. Methods Individuals with substance use disorders (N=168; age 40.45, (SD=10.28); 36.3% female; 46.4% nonwhite) were recruited after intensive stabilization, then randomly assigned to either eight weekly sessions of MBRP or a treatment-as-usual control group. Approximately 73% of the sample was retained at the final four-month follow-up assessment. Results Results confirmed a moderated-mediation effect, whereby craving mediated the relation between depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory) and substance use (Time Line Follow Back) among the treatment-as-usual group, but not among MBRP participants. Specifically, MBRP attenuated the relation between postintervention depressive symptoms and craving (Penn Alcohol Craving Scale) two months following the intervention (f2=.21). This moderation effect predicted substance use four-months following the intervention (f2=.18). Conclusion MBRP appears to influence cognitive and behavioral responses to depressive symptoms, partially explaining reductions in postintervention substance use among the MBRP group. Although preliminary, the current study provides evidence for the value of incorporating mindfulness practice into substance abuse treatment and identifies one potential mechanism of change following MBRP. PMID:20515211

  9. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) for treatment of alcohol withdrawal and prevention of relapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Maurizio A; Vigna-Taglianti, Federica; Avanzi, Giancarlo; Brambilla, Romeo; Faggiano, Fabrizio

    2010-02-17

    Chronic excessive alcohol consumption may lead to dependence, and to alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) in case of abrupt drinking cessation. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) can prevent and suppress withdrawal symptoms, and improve the medium-term abstinence rate. A clear balance between effectiveness and harmfulness has not been yet established. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of GHB for treatment of AWS and prevention of relapse We searched Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group' Register of Trials (October 2008), PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL (January 2005 - October 2008), EconLIT (1969 to February 2008), reference list of retrieved articles Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and Controlled Prospective Studies (CPS) evaluating the efficacy and the safety of GHB vs placebo or other pharmacological treatments. Three authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of studies. Thirteen RCTs were included. Eleven studies were conducted in Italy.For withdrawal syndrome, comparing GHB 50mg with placebo, results from 1 study, 23 participants favour GHB for withdrawal symptoms: WMD -12.1 (95% CI, -15.9 to -8.29) and side effects were more frequent in the placebo group: RR 16.2 (95% CI, 1.04 to 254.9).In the comparison with Chlormetiazole, for GHB 50mg, results from 1 study, 21 participants favour GHB for withdrawal symptoms: MD -3.40 (95% CI -5.09 to -1.71), for GHB 100mg, results from 1 study, 98 participants favour anticonvulsants for side effects: RR 1.84 (95% CI 1.19 to 2.85).At mid-term, comparing GHB with placebo, results favour GHB for abstinence rate (RR 5.35; 1.28-22.4), controlled drinking (RR 2.13; 1.07-5.54), relapses (RR 0.36; 0.21-0.63), and number of daily drinks (WMD -4.60; -6.18 to -3.02). GHB performed better than NTX and Disulfiram on abstinence (RR 2.59; 1.35-4.98, RR 1.66; 0.99-2.80 respectively). The association of GHB and NTX was better than NTX on abstinence (RR 12.2; 1.79-83.9), as well was the association of NTX, GHB and

  10. Aripiprazole for relapse prevention and craving in alcohol use disorder: current evidence and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinotti, Giovanni; Orsolini, Laura; Fornaro, Michele; Vecchiotti, Roberta; De Berardis, Domenico; Iasevoli, Felice; Torrens, Marta; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Among other approaches, the modulation of the dopaminergic pathway has been advocated in the therapeutic management of Alcohol Use Disorders (AUD). A potential avenue toward the modulation of the dopaminergic pathway across varying substance disorders seems to be provided by aripiprazole, a second-generation antipsychotic characterized by a peculiar pharmacodynamics signature. In this review, the authors provided a qualitative synthesis and a critical perspective on the efficacy of aripiprazole in relapse prevention and craving in AUD. A systematic search was carried out through MEDLINE/Embase/PsycINFO/Cochrane Library from inception until September 2015, combining free terms and MESH headings for the topics of AUD and aripiprazole as following: (((Alcohol use Disorder) OR (Alcohol use)) AND aripiprazole). Based both on a qualitative synthesis and a critical interpretation of the evidence, the authors submit that aripiprazole would promote alcohol abstinence and reduce the alcohol seeking behaviour possibly via dopaminergic and serotoninergic modulations at the fronto-subcortical circuits underpinning alcohol reward and craving, impulsive behaviour as well as reduce alcohol-related anxiety/low mood and anhedonia. However, due to the lack of published studies, a conclusive statement about any direct effect of aripiprazole in the prevention of craving and/or alcohol consumption is not possible.

  11. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin as postconsolidation therapy does not prevent relapse in children with AML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik

    2012-01-01

    neutropenia followed 95% and febrile neutropenia 40% of the GO courses. Only a moderate decline in platelet count and a minor decrease in hemoglobin occurred. Relapse occurred in 24 and 25 of those randomized to GO or no further therapy. The median time to relapse was 16 months versus 10 months...

  12. The Feasibility and Acceptability of "Arise": An Online Substance Abuse Relapse Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Rebecca Polley; Bartel, Chelsea M

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and acceptability of a novel online adolescent substance abuse relapse prevention tool, "Arise" (3C Institute, Cary, NC). The program uses an innovative platform including interactive instructional segments and skill-building games to help adolescents learn and practice coping skills training strategies. We conducted a pilot test with nine adolescents in substance abuse treatment (44 percent female) and a feasibility test with treatment providers (n=8; 50 percent female). Adolescents interacted with the program via a secure Web site for approximately 30 minutes for each of two instructional units. Treatment providers reviewed the same material at their own pace. All participants completed a questionnaire with items assessing usability, acceptability, understanding, and subjective experience of the program. Regarding feasibility, recruitment of this population within the study constraints proved challenging, but participant retention in the trial was high (no attrition). Adolescents and treatment providers completed the program with no reported problems, and overall we were able to collect data as planned. Regarding acceptability, the program received strong ratings from both adolescents and providers, who found the prototype informative, engaging, and appealing. Both groups strongly recommended continuing development. We were able to deliver the intervention as intended, and acceptability ratings were high, demonstrating the feasibility and acceptability of online delivery of engaging interactive interventions. This study contributes to our understanding of how interactive technologies, including games, can be used to modify behavior in substance abuse treatment and other health areas.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of family psychoeducation to prevent relapse in major depression: Results from a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimodera Shinji

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family psychoeducation is a relatively simple and straightforward intervention whose prophylactic effectiveness and cost-effectiveness is well-established for schizophrenia. We have recently demonstrated its effectiveness for unipolar depression, but its cost-effectiveness has never been examined. We hereby report a cost-effectiveness analysis alongside a randomized controlled trial in order to assess its cost-effectiveness for preventing relapse/recurrence in depression. Methods Fifty-seven patients diagnosed with major depression and undergoing its maintenance treatment, and their primary family members were randomized to treatment as usual (TAU only or to TAU plus family psychoeducation, which consisted of four 2-hour multiple-family sessions consisting of didactic lectures about depression (30 minutes and group discussion and problem solving (60–90 minutes. The economic analyses were undertaken from the perspective of the National Health Insurance (NHI, assuming the most reasonable price of US$50 per psychoeducation session per patient. The main outcome measures included relapse-free days and direct costs to the NHI. Results The intervention group enjoyed 272 (SD: 7.1 relapse-free days, while the control group spent 214 (SD: 90.8 relapse-free days (Cox proportional hazard ratio = 0.17, 95%CI: 0.04 to 0.75, p = 0.002. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves suggested that the family psychoeducation has 90% or more chances of being cost-effective if the decision-maker is prepared to pay US$20 for one additional relapse-free day. This cost-effectiveness finding was robust when the price for family psychoeducation ranged between 50% to 150% of the baseline scenario in sensitivity analyses. If a relapse-free day is considered to be worth $30 or more, all the pricing scenarios have a close to 100% probability of being cost-effective. Conclusion Family psychoeducation is effective in the relapse prevention of

  14. Joint hyperlaxity prevents relapses in clubfeet treated by Ponseti method-preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosma, Dan Ionuţ; Corbu, Andrei; Nistor, Dan Viorel; Todor, Adrian; Valeanu, Madalina; Morcuende, Jose; Man, Sorin

    2018-05-07

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of joint hyperlaxity (by Beighton score) as a protective factor for clubfoot relapse. Patients with idiopathic clubfoot treated with the Ponseti method between January 2004 and December 2012, without other congenital foot deformity, and not previously treated by open surgery were included in either the Relapse group (n = 23) if it was a clubfoot relapse or the Control group (n = 19) if no relapse was noted. Joint laxity was evaluated using the Beighton score at the latest follow-up against the Normal group (n = 22, children matched by sex and age without clubfoot deformity). We found a significantly higher joint laxity in the Control group (4.58, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.1-7.06) as compared to the Relapse (3.17, 95% CI: 1.53-4.81, p = 0.032) and Normal (3.14, 95% CI: 1.78-4.5, p = 0.03) groups. The univariate logistic regression showed a 5.28-times increase in the risk of relapse for a Beighton score lower than 4/9 points (odds ratio = 5.28; 95% CI = 1.29-21.5; p = 0.018). Joint hyperlaxity could be a protective factor for clubfoot relapse.

  15. Proceedings from the National Cancer Institute's Second International Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Part I. Biology of relapse after transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, Ronald E; Miller, Jeffrey S; Battiwalla, Minoo; Bishop, Michael R; Giralt, Sergio A; Hardy, Nancy M; Kröger, Nicolaus; Wayne, Alan S; Landau, Dan A; Wu, Catherine J

    2013-11-01

    In the National Cancer Institute's Second Workshop on the Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, the Scientific/Educational Session on the Biology of Relapse discussed recent advances in understanding some of the host-, disease-, and transplantation-related contributions to relapse, emphasizing concepts with potential therapeutic implications. Relapse after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents tumor escape, from the cytotoxic effects of the conditioning regimen and from immunologic control mediated by reconstituted lymphocyte populations. Factors influencing the biology of the therapeutic graft-versus-malignancy (GVM) effect-and relapse-include conditioning regimen effects on lymphocyte populations and homeostasis, immunologic niches, and the tumor microenvironment; reconstitution of lymphocyte populations and establishment of functional immune competence; and genetic heterogeneity within the malignancy defining potential for clonal escape. Recent developments in T cell and natural killer cell homeostasis and reconstitution are reviewed, with implications for prevention and treatment of relapse, as is the application of modern genome sequencing to defining the biologic basis of GVM, clonal escape, and relapse after HSCT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Implementing long-term EAP follow-up with clients and family members to help prevent relapse-With implications for primary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, A; Googins, B; Moriarty, M; Sandonato, C; Nadolski, J; Jefferson, C

    1994-12-01

    This paper reports on a study in progress which involves (a) regular post-treatment contact by employee assistance program (EAP) staff with employees who seek help through the EAP, and (b) contact with a family member or other support person designated by the employee. The contacts are designed to provide support for maintenance of therapeutic gains, assistance in adjusting to current life situations, and early identification and prevention of relapse. The study will evaluate the process of initiating these contacts and will examine their effectiveness at reducing relapse. Factors associated with implementing these services in an EAP context are discussed.

  17. Facilitating Smoking Cessation and Preventing Relapse in Primary Care: Minimizing Weight Gain by Reducing Alcohol Consumption

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sobell, Mark B; Peterson, Alan; Sobell, Linda C; Hunter, Christopher; Hunter, Christine

    2008-01-01

    .... Participants are randomly assigned to BCAP or to a Self-Guided Program (SGP) where they receive NRT and a pamphlet discussing change strategies for tobacco cessation, minimizing weight gain, and how to plan for and deal with possible relapses...

  18. A bio-behavioral model of addiction treatment: applying dual representation theory to craving management and relapse prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matto, Holly

    2005-01-01

    A bio-behavioral approach to drug addiction treatment is outlined. The presented treatment model uses dual representation theory as a guiding framework for understanding the bio-behavioral processes activated during the application of expressive therapeutic methods. Specifically, the treatment model explains how visual processing techniques can supplement traditional relapse prevention therapy protocols, to help clients better manage cravings and control triggers in hard-to-treat populations such as chronic substance-dependent persons.

  19. Effectiveness and economic evaluation of self-help educational materials for the prevention of smoking relapse: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Annie; Maskrey, Vivienne; Notley, Caitlin; Barton, Garry R; Brown, Tracey J; Aveyard, Paul; Holland, Richard; Bachmann, Max O; Sutton, Stephen; Leonardi-Bee, Jo; Brandon, Thomas H; Song, Fujian

    2015-07-01

    Most people who quit smoking successfully for a short period will return to smoking again in 12 months. A previous exploratory meta-analysis indicated that self-help booklets may be effective for smoking relapse prevention in unaided quitters. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a set of self-help educational booklets to prevent smoking relapse in people who had stopped smoking with the aid of behavioural support. This is an open, randomised controlled trial and qualitative process evaluation. Trial participants were randomly allocated to one of two groups, using a simple randomisation process without attempts to stratify by participant characteristics. The participant allocation was 'concealed' because the recruitment of quitters occurred before the random allocation. Short-term quitters were recruited from NHS Stop Smoking Clinics, and self-help educational materials were posted to study participants at home. A total of 1407 carbon monoxide (CO)-validated quitters at 4 weeks after quit date in NHS Stop Smoking Clinics. The trial excluded pregnant women and quitters who were not able to read the educational materials in English. Participants in the experimental group (n = 703) received a set of eight revised Forever Free booklets, and participants in the control group (n = 704) received a single leaflet that is currently given to NHS patients. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted 3 and 12 months after quit date. The primary outcome was prolonged, CO-verified abstinence from months 4 to 12 during which time no more than five cigarettes were smoked. The secondary outcomes included self-reported abstinence during the previous 7 days at 3 and 12 months, CO-verified abstinence at 12 months, costs (NHS and NHS and participant medication costs perspectives) and quality-adjusted life-years. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate effect-modifying variables. A simultaneous qualitative process evaluation was conducted to help

  20. The Effectiveness of Matrix Treatment to Relapse prevention and Increase Self-Efficacy in People Withdrawing Methamphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Ghasemnezhad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Given the prevalence of narcotic substances and their effect on mental health of society people, it is important to pay attention the matter and adopt an approach for its treatment. The research objective is to examine the effectiveness of matrix treatment on prevent relapsing and increase self-efficacy in people withdrawing methamphetamine. In a quasi-experimental design, methamphetamine users who referred to addiction treatment centers on west of Gilanin 2015 and were eligible for involving criteria completed theself efficacy questionnaire. Then among those who got low scores on this questionnaire, there were randomly selected 30 patients that were divided into experimental and control groups (15 patients for each group. The experimental group was treated for 18 weeks and two sessions per week (36 sessions using matrix therapeutic model. The control group remained on waiting list. Both groups completed self-efficacy questionnaire at baseline, end and 90 days later (follow-up stage with urine test. The control group remained on waiting list and there were assigned only common drug treatment in the withdrawal centers. The research data was analyzed using covariance analysis and SPSS22 software. The results showed efficiency of matrix treatment method in preventing relapse and increasing self-efficacy for people withdrawal methamphetamine, which this difference was statistically significant (p<0.5. Matrix-based treatmentis effective for relapse prevention and increasing self-efficacy for people withdrawal methamphetamine.

  1. The Effectiveness of Interventions based on Positive Psychotherapy on Improving Coping Styles, Relapse Prevention in Individuals with Substance Use Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maryam kadivar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions based on positive psychotherapy on improving coping styles, relapse prevention in individuals diagnosed with substance use disorder. The research design was quasi-experimental with pretest-posttest, a month Follow-up and control group. Thirty-one individuals with substance use disorder, who were admitted to addiction treatment centers in Zahedan city, were selected through purposeful sampling method and were randomly assigned to an experimental (14 persons and control (17 persons groups. Both groups were asked to respond to Coping Styles Questionnaire by Billings and Mouse, at the pretest stage. In later stages of research, the experimental group received an intervention based on positive psychotherapy for ten sessions each session60 minutes. Data was analyzed using covariance and chi-square test. The results showed that intervention based on positive psychotherapy improved the coping styles and relapse prevention in the experimental group and the effect of the intervention was significant in post-test and follow-up stages. The result also showed that interventions based on positive psychotherapy could be used as an efficient technique to improve coping skills and relapse prevention in patients with substance use disorder.

  2. A pilot assessment of relapse prevention for heroin addicts in a Chinese rehabilitation center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Zhao; Xu, Li; Chen, Hanhui; Ding, Xu; Yi, Zhang; Mingyuang, Zhang

    2011-05-01

    To conduct a pilot assessment of relapse prevention (RP) group therapy for heroin-dependent patients in a drug rehabilitation center in China. A randomized case-control study was conducted to assess the efficacy of RP delivered over a 2-month period to male heroin addicts (n = 50, RP group) in the Shanghai Labor Drug Rehabilitation Center (LDRC) compared with an equal number of participants (n = 50, labor rehabilitation (LR) group) in the LDRC program receiving standard-of-care treatment. Outcomes were assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), the Self-Efficacy Scale (SE), and the Self-Esteem Scale (SES) after completion of RP, and by the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) and abstinence rates of heroin use at 3-month follow-up post release from the LDRC for both groups. Significant improvements in scores on SAS, SE, and SES were found in the RP group after completion of the 2-month RP group therapy compared with the LR group (SAS 7.85 ± 6.20 vs 1.07 ± 5.42, SE 3.88 ± 3.60 vs .08 ± 2.89, and SES 3.83 ± 3.31 vs .78 ± 2.55). At 3-month follow-up, the RP group participants had more improvements on ASI scores in most domains and had higher abstinence rates than that in the LR group (37.2% vs 16.7%). An RP component can be effective in increasing abstinence rates among post-program heroin-dependent individuals and may help reduce anxiety and improve self-esteem and self-efficacy during and following treatment. This study suggests RP as a potentially effective component of treatment for heroin addicts.

  3. The Effectiveness of Matrix Model in Relapse Prevention and Coping Skills Enhancement in Participants with Substance Dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Farnam

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of Matrix model in relapse prevention and enhancement of coping skills in participants with opiate substance dependency. Method: In a semi-experimental study, 23 participants with diagnosis of opiate dependency who successfully detoxified, selected by cluster random sampling and they were divided into two experimental and control groups. The experimental group received 32 sessions of Matrix model training and the control group did not receive any treatment. All subjects were assessed by alcohol abuse coping response inventory (AACRI and Morphine test before treatment, randomly during treatment, after treatment, and after 3-months follow up stage. Results: The results showed that experimental and control groups had a significant differed in relapse rates. In addition, Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA showed a significant difference between two groups in coping skills enhancement at periods of post test and follow up. Conclusion: With consideration of the results of the present study indicated that matrix model is effective in relapse prevention and coping skills enhancement in people with opiate substance dependency.

  4. Efficacy of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy in Prevention of Depressive Relapse: An Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis From Randomized Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuyken, W.; Warren, F.C.; Taylor, R.S.; Whalley, B.; Crane, C.; Bondolfi, G.; Hayes, R.; Huijbers, M.J.; Ma, H.; Schweizer, S.; Segal, Z.; Speckens, A.E.M.; Teasdale, J.D.; Heeringen, K. Van; Williams, M.; Byford, S.; Byng, R.; Dalgleish, T.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Relapse prevention in recurrent depression is a significant public health problem, and antidepressants are the current first-line treatment approach. Identifying an equally efficacious nonpharmacological intervention would be an important development. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a

  5. [Relapse prevention program consisting of coping skills training, cue exposure treatment, and letter therapy for Japanese alcoholic men who relapsed after standard cognitive-behavioral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Akira; Matsushita, Sachio; Toyama, Tomomi; Nakayama, Hideki; Takimura, Tsuyoshi; Kimura, Mitsuru; Yoneda, Junichi; Maesato, Hitoshi; Mizukami, Takeshi; Higuchi, Susumu; Yokoyama, Tetsuji

    2015-04-01

    Coping skills training (CST) and cue exposure treatment (CET) have yielded favorable outcomes when used to treat alcoholics. We conducted 6-week inpatient programs that consisted of 9 CST group sessions (n = 117) during 2005-2009 and 9 CST group sessions plus 4 CET group sessions (n = 49) during 2009-2011 and subsequent 1-year letter therapy for Japanese alcoholic men who had relapsed and been readmitted after standard cognitive-behavioral inpatient therapy. When patients received a letter containing encouraging words every 2 weeks, they were asked to reread their CST and CET records and to respond to the letter by marking drinking days on a calendar and naming the skills on a list of the 9 CST themes and CET that were useful for maintaining abstinence during that 2-week period. The estimated percentages of achievement of 30 or fewer drinking days during the one year of letter therapy were 36.1 - 45.8%. 'Non-smoking', '2nd admission', and 'After age-limit job retirement' were significant factors in achieving good outcomes. The 'usefulness' responses for 'Increasing pleasant activities', 'CET', 'Anger management', ' Managing negative thinking', 'Problem solving', and ' Seemingly irrelevant decisions' as percentages of overall responses to the letters were significantly higher, in order of decreasing percentages, in the achiever group than in the non-achiever group, but the differences between the groups in ' Managing urges to drink', ' Drink refusal skills', ' Planning for emergencies', and ' Receiving criticism about drinking' were not significant. The odds ratios for achievement of 30 or fewer drinking days during the 1-year period increased significantly by 1.15 -1.31 fold per 10% increment in the 'usefulness' ratio for 'Increasing pleasant activities'. The difference in percentage achievement between the group treated by CST alone and the group treated by CST plus CET was not significant. In conclusion, some coping skills were more useful for relapse prevention

  6. The promises and pitfalls of retrieval-extinction procedures in preventing relapse to drug seeking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavan P McNally

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Relapse to drug seeking after treatment or a period of abstinence remains a fundamental challenge for drug users. The retrieval – extinction procedure offers promise in augmenting the efficacy of exposure based treatment for drug use and for protecting against relapse to drug seeking. Preceding extinction training with a brief retrieval or reminder trial, retrieval – extinction training, has been shown to reduce reinstatement of extinguished drug seeking in animal models and also to produce profound and long lasting decrements in cue-induced craving in human heroin users. However, the mechanisms that mediate these effects of retrieval - extinction training are unclear. Moreover, under some circumstances, the retrieval – extinction procedure can significantly increase vulnerability to reinstatement in animal models.

  7. A randomised control trial of low glycaemic index carbohydrate diet versus no dietary intervention in the prevention of recurrence of macrosomia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Maternal weight and maternal weight gain during pregnancy exert a significant influence on infant birth weight and the incidence of macrosomia. Fetal macrosomia is associated with an increase in both adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome, and also confers a future risk of childhood obesity. Studies have shown that a low glycaemic diet is associated with lower birth weights, however these studies have been small and not randomised 12. Fetal macrosomia recurs in a second pregnancy in one third of women, and maternal weight influences this recurrence risk 3.

  8. Efficacy of Group Cognitive–behavioral Therapy in Maintenance Treatment and Relapse Prevention for Bipolar Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroor Arman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite conducting wide-ranging of pharmacotherapy for bipolar adolescents, many of them are showing a deficit in functioning with high relapse rate. The aim of the current study was to develop a manual and investigate the efficacy of group cognitive–behavioral therapy (G-CBT for female bipolar adolescents. Materials and Methods: During the first qualitative phase of a mixed-methods study, a manual of G-CBT was developed. Then, 32 female bipolar adolescents aged 12–19 years old, receiving usual maintenance medications (UMM, were selected. Participants were randomized to the control (UMM and intervention group (5, 2 h weekly sessions based on G-CBT manual with UMM. The parents in intervention group participated in three parallel sessions. All participants filled the following questionnaires before 1, 3, and 6 months after the initiation of the study: Young Mania Rating Scale, Children Depression Inventory and Global Assessment of Functioning. The results were analyzed using SPSS 21 software. The concurrent qualitative phase was analyzed through thematic analysis. Results: The results showed no significant differences in all questionnaires' scores through intervention and follow-up sessions (P > 0.05. However, using cutoff point of CDI, G-CBT was effective for intervention group (relapse rate: 25% vs. 44.4%. Two themes were extracted from the second qualitative phase: emotion recognition and emotion regulation, especially in anger control. Conclusions: The results showed that the addition of G-CBT to UMM leads to decrease in the depressive scores but has no effect on manic symptoms and relapse rate.

  9. Efficacy of Group Cognitive-behavioral Therapy in Maintenance Treatment and Relapse Prevention for Bipolar Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Soroor; Golmohammadi, Farnaz; Maracy, Mohammadreza; Molaeinezhad, Mitra

    2018-01-01

    Despite conducting wide-ranging of pharmacotherapy for bipolar adolescents, many of them are showing a deficit in functioning with high relapse rate. The aim of the current study was to develop a manual and investigate the efficacy of group cognitive-behavioral therapy (G-CBT) for female bipolar adolescents. During the first qualitative phase of a mixed-methods study, a manual of G-CBT was developed. Then, 32 female bipolar adolescents aged 12-19 years old, receiving usual maintenance medications (UMM), were selected. Participants were randomized to the control (UMM) and intervention group (5, 2 h weekly sessions based on G-CBT manual with UMM). The parents in intervention group participated in three parallel sessions. All participants filled the following questionnaires before 1, 3, and 6 months after the initiation of the study: Young Mania Rating Scale, Children Depression Inventory and Global Assessment of Functioning. The results were analyzed using SPSS 21 software. The concurrent qualitative phase was analyzed through thematic analysis. The results showed no significant differences in all questionnaires' scores through intervention and follow-up sessions ( P > 0.05). However, using cutoff point of CDI, G-CBT was effective for intervention group (relapse rate: 25% vs. 44.4%). Two themes were extracted from the second qualitative phase: emotion recognition and emotion regulation, especially in anger control. The results showed that the addition of G-CBT to UMM leads to decrease in the depressive scores but has no effect on manic symptoms and relapse rate.

  10. Melatonin reduces motivation for cocaine self-administration and prevents relapse-like behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tatiane T; Vengeliene, Valentina; Spanagel, Rainer

    2017-06-01

    Melatonin is a hormone involved in the entrainment of circadian rhythms, which appears dysregulated in drug users. Further, it has been demonstrated that melatonin can modulate the reinforcing effects of several drugs of abuse and may therefore play a role in drug addiction. Here, we investigated whether administration of melatonin reduces relapse-like behavior and the motivation to seek cocaine in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were submitted to long-term cocaine self-administration training. Thereafter, melatonin effects were assessed on: (1) the motivation to work for cocaine in the break point test, (2) the relapse-like behavior in the cue-induced reinstatement test, (3) the distance traveled in the open field test, and (4) sucrose preference in a two-bottle choice paradigm. Melatonin, 25 or 50 mg/kg, was injected 3-4 h after the dark phase onset, 30 min prior to each test. Both doses of melatonin decreased the number of active pokes in both break point and cue-induced reinstatement tests, demonstrating that melatonin can reduce the cocaine-seeking behavior and the motivation to work for cocaine. Administration of the higher dose of this hormone, however, significantly reduced the number of inactive pokes during the cue-induced reinstatement test and tended to reduce animals' locomotor activity in the open field test. Sucrose preference was unchanged in both vehicle- and melatonin-treated animal groups. Our data suggest that melatonin administration may lower the risk of relapse triggered by cues in cocaine-experienced animals.

  11. Relapse Prevention in Major Depressive Disorder After Successful Acute Electroconvulsive Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, K; Larsen, E R; Licht, R W

    2015-01-01

    the study period, and one third completed. Discussion: Due to small sample size, no valid efficacy inferences could be made. The outcome was poor, probably due to tapering off of non-study psychotropic drugs after randomisation; this has implications for future study designs. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier...... randomised (20% of the planned sample size). No statistically significant between-group differences could be detected. When all patients receiving escitalopram were compared with those receiving nortriptyline, a marginal superiority of nortriptyline was found (p=0.08). One third of patients relapsed during...

  12. Online Social Support for the Prevention of Smoking Relapse: A Content Analysis of the WhatsApp and Facebook Social Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yee Tak Derek; Chan, Ching Han Helen; Wang, Man Ping; Li, Ho Cheung William; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2017-06-01

    Online social groups have been increasingly used for smoking cessation intervention. This study aimed to explore the social support components of the online discussion through WhatsApp and Facebook, how these components addressed the need of relapse prevention, and how the participants evaluated this intervention. We coded and analyzed the posts (N = 467) by the 82 recent quitters in WhatsApp and Facebook social groups, who were recruited from the eight smoking cessation clinics in Hong Kong to participate in a pragmatic randomized trial of relapse prevention. Participants' postintervention feedback was collected from the 13 qualitative interviews after the intervention. The WhatsApp social groups had more participants' posts than the Facebook counterparts. The participants' posts in the online social groups could be classified as sharing views and experiences (55.5%), encouragement (28.7%), and knowledge and information (15.8%). About half of the participants' posts (52.9%) addressed the themes listed in the U.S. Clinical Practice Guideline for preventing smoking relapse. The participants perceived the posts as useful reminders for smoking cessation, but avoidance of reporting relapse, inactive discussions, and uninteresting content were barriers to the success of the intervention. Online social groups provided a useful platform for the delivery of cessation support and encouragement of reporting abstinence, which support relapse prevention. The effectiveness of such intervention can be improved by encouraging more self-report of relapse, active discussions, sharing of interesting content, and using an appropriate discussion platform. Quitters who participate in the online social groups can benefit from peer support and information sharing, and hence prevent smoking relapse.

  13. HLA-haploidentical transplantation with regulatory and conventional T-cell adoptive immunotherapy prevents acute leukemia relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Massimo F; Di Ianni, Mauro; Ruggeri, Loredana; Falzetti, Franca; Carotti, Alessandra; Terenzi, Adelmo; Pierini, Antonio; Massei, Maria Speranza; Amico, Lucia; Urbani, Elena; Del Papa, Beatrice; Zei, Tiziana; Iacucci Ostini, Roberta; Cecchini, Debora; Tognellini, Rita; Reisner, Yair; Aversa, Franco; Falini, Brunangelo; Velardi, Andrea

    2014-07-24

    Posttransplant relapse is still the major cause of treatment failure in high-risk acute leukemia. Attempts to manipulate alloreactive T cells to spare normal cells while killing leukemic cells have been unsuccessful. In HLA-haploidentical transplantation, we reported that donor-derived T regulatory cells (Tregs), coinfused with conventional T cells (Tcons), protected recipients against graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The present phase 2 study investigated whether Treg-Tcon adoptive immunotherapy prevents posttransplant leukemia relapse. Forty-three adults with high-risk acute leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia 33; acute lymphoblastic leukemia 10) were conditioned with a total body irradiation-based regimen. Grafts included CD34(+) cells (mean 9.7 × 10(6)/kg), Tregs (mean 2.5 × 10(6)/kg), and Tcons (mean 1.1 × 10(6)/kg). No posttransplant immunosuppression was given. Ninety-five percent of patients achieved full-donor type engraftment and 15% developed ≥grade 2 acute GVHD. The probability of disease-free survival was 0.56 at a median follow-up of 46 months. The very low cumulative incidence of relapse (0.05) was significantly better than in historical controls. These results demonstrate the immunosuppressive potential of Tregs can be used to suppress GVHD without loss of the benefits of graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity. Humanized murine models provided insights into the mechanisms underlying separation of GVL from GVHD, suggesting the GVL effect is due to largely unopposed Tcon alloantigen recognition in bone marrow. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  14. [A Group Cognitive-Behavioural Intervention to Prevent Depression Relapse in Individuals Having Recently Returned to Work: Protocol and Feasibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Tania; Corbière, Marc

    Workplace depression is one of the major causes for sick leave and loss of productivity at work. Many studies have investigated factors predicting return to work for people with depression, including studies evaluating return to work programs and organizational factors. Yet, a paucity of studies have targeted the prevention of depressive relapses at work, even though more than half of those having had a depression will have a depressive relapse in the near future.Objectives This article describes a research protocol involving a novel group intervention based on cognitive behavioural principles with the aim to optimize return to work and diminish risk of depressive relapses.Method This pilot study follows a randomized controlled trial design, with half the participants (N=25) receiving the group intervention and the other half (N=25) receiving usual services. The theoretical and empirical underpinnings of the intervention are described, along with a detailed presentation of the intervention and of the study's objectives. The group intervention consists of 8 sessions whereby Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) principles and techniques are applied to the following themes: (1) Coping with stress at work; (2) Recognizing and modifying my dysfunctional beliefs linked to work; (3) Overcoming obstacles linked to work functioning and maintaining work; (4) Negotiating needed work adjustments with the support of the immediate supervisor; (5) Finding my strengths and competencies related to work; (6) Accepting criticism and asserting myself appropriately at work; (7) Uncovering my best coping strategies for work.Results Qualitative information pertaining to the first two cohorts' participants' subjective appreciation of the group experience revealed that the intervention was perceived as very useful by all, with group support, namely harmony and interpersonal support, as well as CBT strategies being mentioned specifically.Conclusion Finally, the potential relevance of the

  15. Estimated medical cost reductions for paliperidone palmitate vs placebo in a randomized, double-blind relapse-prevention trial of patients with schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, K; Lin, J; Lingohr-Smith, M; Fu, D J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this economic model was to estimate the difference in medical costs among patients treated with paliperidone palmitate once-monthly injectable antipsychotic (PP1M) vs placebo, based on clinical event rates reported in the 15-month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of paliperidone palmitate evaluating time to relapse in subjects with schizoaffective disorder. Rates of psychotic, depressive, and/or manic relapses and serious and non-serious treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were obtained from the long-term paliperidone palmitate vs placebo relapse prevention study. The total annual medical cost for a relapse from a US payer perspective was obtained from published literature and the costs for serious and non-serious TEAEs were based on Common Procedure Terminology codes. Total annual medical cost differences for patients treated with PP1M vs placebo were then estimated. Additionally, one-way and Monte Carlo sensitivity analyses were conducted. Lower rates of relapse (-18.3%) and serious TEAEs (-3.9%) were associated with use of PP1M vs placebo as reported in the long-term paliperidone palmitate vs placebo relapse prevention study. As a result of the reduction in these clinical event rates, the total annual medical cost was reduced by $7140 per patient treated with PP1M vs placebo. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that variations in relapse rates had the greatest impact on the estimated medical cost differences (range: -$9786, -$4670). Of the 10,000 random cycles of Monte Carlo simulations, 100% showed a medical cost difference schizoaffective disorder was associated with a significantly lower rate of relapse and a reduction in medical costs compared to placebo. Further evaluation in the real-world setting is warranted.

  16. Effects of EAP follow-up on prevention of relapse among substance abuse clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, A; Erfurt, J C

    1991-05-01

    Clients entering an employee assistance program (EAP) of a large manufacturing plant in 1985 who were assessed as having an alcohol or drug abuse problem (N = 325) were randomized into an experimental "special follow-up" group and a control "regular care" group. The regular care group received follow-up only as needed (following the usual practice of the EAP), while a follow-up counselor was hired to make routine contacts with the special follow-up group. Study intake continued through 1985, and follow-up continued through the end of 1986. Data collected on study subjects included EAP participation data, absenteeism, number of hospitalizations, health care claims paid and disability claims paid. The major study hypothesis was that EAP clients randomly allocated to special follow-up would show better results than regular care clients (i.e., would have fewer relapses, better job attendance and lower health benefit utilization during the follow-up year). The follow-up intervention was incompletely implemented due to a variety of organizational problems. Differences between the two groups on the six outcome measures were not statistically significant, although clients in the special follow-up group did show better results than clients in the regular care group on the three measures related to substance abuse. Differences on these three measures were marginally significant in regression analyses after controlling for the effects of number of follow-up visits, age, race and chronicity.

  17. Effectiveness of Relapse Prevention Cognitive-Behavioral Model in Opioid-Dependent Patients Participating in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaei, Tahereh; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas; Ghazitabatabae, Mahmoud; Moeeni, Maryam; Rajati, Fatemeh; M Razzaghi, Emran

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a relapse prevention cognitive-behavioral model, based on Marlatt treatment approach, in Opioid-dependent patients participating in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) in Iran. The study consisted of 92 individuals treated with methadone in Iranian National Center of Addiction Studies (INCAS). Participants were randomized into two groups: educational intervention group (N=46) and control group (N=46). The intervention was comprised of 10 weekly 90 minute sessions, done during a period of 2.5 months based on the most high risk situations determined using Inventory Drug Taking Situation instrument. Relapse was defined as not showing up for MMT, drug use for at least 5 continuous days, and a positive urinary morphine test. While, only 36.4% of the intervention group relapsed into drug use, 63.6% of the control group relapsed. The result of the logistic regressions showed that the odd ratio of the variable of intervention program for the entire follow up period was 0.43 (P<0.01). Further, the odd ratio of this variable in one month, three months, and 195 days after the therapy were 0.48 (P<.03), 0.31 (P<.02), and 0.13 (P<.02) respectively that revealed that on average, the probability of relapse among individuals in the intervention group was lower than patients in control group. Relapse prevention model based on Marlatt treatment approach has an effective role in decreasing relapse rate. This model can be introduced as a complementary therapy in patients treated with methadone maintenance.

  18. A randomised controlled trial to prevent smoking relapse among recently quit smokers enrolled in employer and health plan sponsored quitlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Anna M; Vickerman, Katrina A; Stump, Timothy E; Monahan, Patrick O; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Weaver, Michael T; Carlini, Beatriz H; Champion, Victoria L; Zbikowski, Susan M

    2015-06-29

    To test adding an interactive voice response (IVR)-supported protocol to standard quitline treatment to prevent relapse among recently quit smokers. Parallel randomised controlled trial with three arms: standard quitline, standard plus technology enhanced quitline with 10 risk assessments (TEQ-10), standard plus 20 TEQ assessments (TEQ-20). Quit For Life (QFL) programme. 1785 QFL enrolees through 19 employers or health plans who were 24+ h quit. QFL is a 5-call telephone-based cessation programme including medications and web-based support. TEQ interventions included 10 or 20 IVR-delivered relapse risk assessments over 8 weeks with automated transfer to counselling for those at risk. Self-reported 7-day and 30-day abstinence assessed at 6-month and 12-month post-enrolment (response rates: 61% and 59%, respectively). Missing data were imputed. 1785 were randomised (standard n=592, TEQ-10 n=602, TEQ-20 n=591). Multiple imputation-derived, intent-to-treat 30-day quit rates (95% CI) at 6 months were 59.4% (53.7% to 63.8%) for standard, 62.3% (57.7% to 66.9%) for TEQ-10, 59.4% (53.7% to 65.1%) for TEQ-20 and 30-day quit rates at 12 months were 61.2% (55.6% to 66.8%) for standard, 60.6% (56.0% to 65.2%) for TEQ-10, 54.9% (49.0% to 60.9%) for TEQ-20. There were no significant differences in quit rates. 73.3% of TEQ participants were identified as at-risk by IVR assessments; on average, participants completed 0.41 IVR-transferred counselling calls. Positive risk assessments identified participants less likely (OR=0.56, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.76) to be abstinent at 6 months. Standard treatment was highly effective, with 61% remaining abstinent at 12 months using multiple imputation intent-to-treat (intent-to-treat missing=smoking quit rate: 38%). TEQ assessments identified quitters at risk for relapse. However, adding IVR-transferred counselling did not yield higher quit rates. Research is needed to determine if alternative designs can improve outcomes. NCT00888992. Published by

  19. Development and Pilot Evaluation of an Online Relapse-Prevention Program Based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Chronic Pain Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fledderus, M.; Schreurs, Karlein Maria Gertrudis; Bohlmeijer, Ernst Thomas; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2015-01-01

    Background: A significant number of chronic pain patients experience a decline in therapeutic effects after rehabilitation. As face-to-face contacts with health care professionals are not always feasible after treatment, new, innovative, fully automated relapse-prevention programs are highly needed.

  20. Development of a Virtual Reality Coping Skills Game to Prevent Post-Hospitalization Smoking Relapse in Tobacco Dependent Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Paul; Burkhalter, Jack; Lewis, Shireen; Hendrickson, Tinesha; Chiu, Ophelia; Fearn, Paul; Perchick, Wendy; Ostroff, Jamie

    2009-08-01

    may have potential to provide low-cost, effective behavioral rehearsal to prevent relapse to smoking in hospitalized patients.

  1. Maintaining Treatment Fidelity of Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention Intervention for Alcohol Dependence: A Randomized Controlled Trial Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra E. Zgierska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Treatment fidelity is essential to methodological rigor of clinical trials evaluating behavioral interventions such as Mindfulness Meditation (MM. However, procedures for monitoring and maintenance of treatment fidelity are inconsistently applied, limiting the strength of such research. Objective. To describe the implementation and findings related to fidelity monitoring of the Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention for Alcohol Dependence (MBRP-A intervention in a 26-week randomized controlled trial. Methods. 123 alcohol dependent adults were randomly assigned to MM (MBRP-A and home practice, adjunctive to usual care; N=64 or control (usual care alone; N=59. Treatment fidelity assessment strategies recommended by the National Institutes of Health Behavior Change Consortium for study/intervention design, therapist training, intervention delivery, and treatment receipt and enactment were applied. Results. Ten 8-session interventions were delivered. Therapist adherence and competence, assessed using the modified MBRP Adherence and Competence Scale, were high. Among the MM group participants, 46 attended ≥4 sessions; over 90% reported at-home MM practice at 8 weeks and 72% at 26 weeks. They also reported satisfaction with and usefulness of MM for maintaining sobriety. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions. A systematic approach to assessment of treatment fidelity in behavioral clinical trials allows determination of the degree of consistency between intended and actual delivery and receipt of intervention.

  2. Sativex Associated With Behavioral-Relapse Prevention Strategy as Treatment for Cannabis Dependence: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Jose M; Soliman, Alexandra; Staios, Gregory; Quilty, Lena; Fischer, Benedikt; George, Tony P; Rehm, Jürgen; Selby, Peter; Barnes, Allan J; Huestis, Marilyn A; Le Foll, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug; a substantial minority of users develop dependence. The current lack of pharmacological treatments for cannabis dependence warrants the use of novel approaches and further investigation of promising pharmacotherapy. In this case series, we assessed the use of self-titrated dosages of Sativex (1:1, Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol [THC]/cannabidiol [CBD] combination) and motivational enhancement therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy (MET/CBT) for the treatment of cannabis dependence among 5 treatment-seeking community-recruited cannabis-dependent subjects. Participants underwent a 3-month open-label self-titration phase with Sativex (up to 113.4 of THC/105 mg of CBD) and weekly MET/CBT, with a 3-month follow-up. Sativex was well-tolerated by all participants (average dosage 77.5 THC/71.7 mg CBD). The combination of Sativex and MET/CBT reduced the amount of cannabis use and progressively reduced craving and withdrawal scores. THC/CBD metabolite concentration indicated reduced cannabis use and compliance with medication. In summary, this pilot study found that with Sativex in combination with MET/CBT reduced cannabis use while preventing increases in craving and withdrawal in the 4 participants completing the study. Further systematic exploration of Sativex as a pharmacological treatment option for cannabis dependence should be performed.

  3. Web-Based Cognitive Behavioral Relapse Prevention Program With Tailored Feedback for People With Methamphetamine and Other Drug Use Problems: Development and Usability Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Ayumi; Miyamoto, Yuki; Kawakami, Norito; Matsumoto, Toshihiko

    2016-01-06

    Although drug abuse has been a serious public health concern, there have been problems with implementation of treatment for drug users in Japan because of poor accessibility to treatment, concerns about stigma and confidentiality, and costs. Therapeutic interventions using the Internet and computer technologies could improve this situation and provide more feasible and acceptable approaches. The objective of the study was to show how we developed a pilot version of a new Web-based cognitive behavioral relapse prevention program with tailored feedback to assist people with drug problems and assessed its acceptance and usability. We developed the pilot program based on existing face-to-face relapse prevention approaches using an open source Web application to build an e-learning website, including relapse prevention sessions with videos, exercises, a diary function, and self-monitoring. When users submitted exercise answers and their diary, researchers provided them with personalized feedback comments using motivational interviewing skills. People diagnosed with drug dependence were recruited in this pilot study from a psychiatric outpatient ward and nonprofit rehabilitation facilities and usability was evaluated using Internet questionnaires. Overall, website usability was assessed by the Web Usability Scale. The adequacy of procedures in the program, ease of use, helpfulness of content, and adverse effects, for example, drug craving, mental distress, were assessed by original structured questionnaires and descriptive form questions. In total, 10 people participated in the study and completed the baseline assessment, 60% completed all relapse prevention sessions within the expected period. The time needed to complete one session was about 60 minutes and most of the participants took 2 days to complete the session. Overall website usability was good, with reasonable scores on subscales of the Web Usability Scale. The participants felt that the relapse prevention

  4. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy is effective as relapse prevention for patients with recurrent depression in Scandinavian primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Josefine L; Zelleroth, Clara; Axberg, Ulf; Norlander, Torsten

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in primary care for patients with recurrent depression (major depressive disorder: MDD). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), MDD is now the leading cause of disease burden in middle- and high-income countries. Patients (N = 45) with three or more previous depressive episodes were recruited to participate in MBCT as a preventative intervention. Using a benchmarking approach, outcome data was compared with data from a recent efficacy study. The methodology is a rigorous approach to assessing effectiveness when evidence-based UK protocols are transferred into the existing Scandinavian service delivery. Additionally, a person-centred methodological approach was used to assess clinical significance on the Reliable Change Index (RCI). The analysis revealed comparable or larger effects from pre-test to post-test in reduced psychiatric symptoms, increased quality of life and level of mindfulness, and the effects were maintained over 14 months. Analysis of the relapse rate in the current study (16%) compared to the TAU in the efficacy study (68%) yielded an h value of 0.78, a moderate effect size. Only 13% dropped out of the treatment. According to the RCI findings, 65% to 67% of participants in the clinical group improved, no individual worsened, and women showed a significantly greater improvement of depression and anxiety than men. Therapeutic alliance and motivation had no impact on the outcome. The overall result suggests that MBCT can be implemented successfully in Scandinavian primary health care as a preventive intervention for patients with recurrent depression. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Relapse: causes and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P

    2013-09-01

    Relapse after a first episode of schizophrenia is the recurrence of acute symptoms after a period of partial or complete remission. Due to its variable aspects, there is no operational definition of relapse able to modelise the outcome of schizophrenia and measure how the treatment modifies the disease. Follow-up studies based on proxys such as hospital admission revealed that 7 of 10 patients relapsed after a first episode of schizophrenia. The effectiveness of antipsychotic medications on relapse prevention has been widely demonstrated. Recent studies claim for the advantages of atypical over first generation antipsychotic medication. Non-adherence to antipsychotic represents with addictions the main causes of relapse long before some non-consensual factors such as premorbid functioning, duration of untreated psychosis and associated personality disorders. The consequences of relapse are multiple, psychological, biological and social. Pharmaco-clinical studies have demonstrated that the treatment response decreases with each relapse. Relapse, even the first one, will contribute to worsen the outcome of the disease and reduce the capacity in general functionning. Accepting the idea of continuing treatment is a complex decision in which the psychiatrist plays a central role besides patients and their families. The development of integrated actions on modifiable risk factors such as psychosocial support, addictive comorbidities, access to care and the therapeutic alliance should be promoted. Relapse prevention is a major goal of the treatment of first-episode schizophrenia. It is based on adherence to the maintenance treatment, identification of prodromes, family active information and patient therapeutical education. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  6. Twice-daily versus once-daily applications of pimecrolimus cream 1% for the prevention of disease relapse in pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruer-Mulard, Mireille; Aberer, Werner; Gunstone, Anthony; Kekki, Outi-Maria; López Estebaranz, Jose Luis; Vertruyen, André; Guettner, Achim; Hultsch, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare twice-daily and once-daily applications of pimecrolimus cream 1% for prevention of atopic dermatitis relapses in pediatric patients. This multicenter trial enrolled 300 outpatients aged 2 to 17 years, with mild-to-severe atopic dermatitis. The patients were initially treated with twice-daily topical pimecrolimus until complete clearance or for up to 6 weeks (open-label period). Those who achieved a decrease of at least 1 point in the Investigator's Global Assessment score were then randomized to double-blind treatment with pimecrolimus cream 1% either twice daily or once daily for up to 16 weeks. Study medication was discontinued during periods of disease remission (Investigator's Global Assessment = 0). The primary efficacy end point of the double-blind phase was disease relapse (worsening requiring topical corticosteroids or additional/alternative therapy and confirmed by Investigator's Global Assessment score > or = 3 and pruritus score > or = 2). Of the 300 patients enrolled in the study, 268 were randomized to treatment with pimecrolimus cream 1% either twice daily or once daily (n = 134 in each group). The relapse rate was lower in the twice-daily dose group (9.9%) than that in the once-daily dose group (14.7%), but analysis of the time to disease relapse, using a Cox proportional model to adjust for confounding variables, did not show a statistically significant difference between treatment arms (hazard ratio: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.31-1.30). Treatment of active atopic dermatitis lesions with pimecrolimus cream 1% twice daily, followed by the once-daily dosing regimen, was sufficient to prevent subsequent atopic dermatitis relapses over 16 weeks in pediatric patients.

  7. Long-acting injectable paliperidone palmitate versus oral paliperidone extended release: a comparative analysis from two placebo-controlled relapse prevention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Michael; Fu, Dong-Jing; Levitan, Bennett; Gopal, Srihari; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Alphs, Larry

    2013-07-11

    Increasing availability and use of long-acting injectable antipsychotics have generated a need to compare these formulations with their oral equivalents; however, a paucity of relevant data is available. This post hoc comparison of the long-term efficacy, safety and tolerability of maintenance treatment with paliperidone palmitate (PP) versus oral paliperidone extended release (ER) used data from two similarly designed, randomised, double-blind (DB), placebo-controlled schizophrenia relapse prevention trials. Assessments included measures of time to relapse, symptom changes/functioning and treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs). Time to relapse between treatment groups was evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards model. Between-group differences for continuous variables for change scores during the DB phase were assessed using analysis of co-variance models. Categorical variables were evaluated using Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. No adjustment was made for multiplicity. Approximately 45% of enrolled subjects in both trials were stabilised and randomised to the DB relapse prevention phase. Risk of relapse was higher in subjects treated with paliperidone ER than in those treated with PP [paliperidone ER/PP hazard ratio (HR), 2.52; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.46-4.35; p 70, both approximately 58.5%; p = 1.000] compared with a 10.9% decrease for paliperidone ER (58.5% vs 47.6%, respectively; p = 0.048). The least squares mean change for Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score at DB end point in these previously stabilised subjects was 3.5 points in favour of PP (6.0 vs 2.5; p = 0.025). The rates of TEAEs and AEs of interest appeared similar. This analysis supports maintenance of effect with the injectable compared with the oral formulation of paliperidone in patients with schizophrenia. The safety profile of PP was similar to that of paliperidone ER. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  8. Louse-borne relapsing fever (Borrelia recurrentis) diagnosed in 15 refugees from northeast Africa: epidemiology and preventive control measures, Bavaria, Germany, July to October 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Martin; Wieser, Andreas; Löscher, Thomas; Margos, Gabriele; Pürner, Friedrich; Zühl, Jürgen; Seilmaier, Michael; Balzer, Lukas; Guggemos, Wolfgang; Rack-Hoch, Anita; von Both, Ulrich; Hauptvogel, Katja; Schönberger, Katharina; Hautmann, Wolfgang; Sing, Andreas; Fingerle, Volker

    2015-01-01

    We report 15 imported louse-borne relapsing fever (LBRF) cases in refugees in Bavaria, Germany. One patient died. Epidemiological findings confirmed that all were young males from the Horn of Africa (12 from Somalia), who had similar migration routes converging in Sudan continuing through Libya and Italy. The majority likely acquired their infection during migration. Healthcare workers should be aware of LBRF in refugees passing through north Africa to ensure correct treatment and preventive measures.

  9. Effectiveness of Hope Therapy on Reducing Depressive Symptoms and Preventing of Relapse in Cure-Seeker Women with Dependency to Narcotic Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Akram S Raesian; Mahmood Golzari; Ahmad Borjali

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present research was the investigation of the effectiveness of hope therapy on reduction of the degree of depression symptoms and prevention of relapse in cure-seeker women with dependency to narcotic drugs. Method: In semi-experimental research method 20 clients who diagnosed as substance abuse disorder that completed detoxification period successfully, and they were scored more than 14 in depression symptoms (Beck depression questionnaire, second edition) select...

  10. Moderate Partially Reduplicated Conditioned Stimuli as Retrieval Cue Can Increase Effect on Preventing Relapse of Fear to Compound Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjiao Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory of memory reconsolidation argues that consolidated memory is not unchangeable. Once a memory is reactivated it may go back into an unstable state and need new protein synthesis to be consolidated again, which is called “memory reconsolidation”. Boundary studies have shown that interfering with reconsolidation through pharmacologic or behavioral intervention can lead to the updating of the initial memory, for example, erasing undesired memories. Behavioral procedures based on memory reconsolidation interference have been shown to be an effective way to inhibit fear memory relapse after extinction. However, the effectiveness of retrieval–extinction differs by subtle differences in the protocol of the reactivation session. This represents a challenge with regard to finding an optimal operational model to facilitate its clinical use for patients suffering from pathogenic memories such as those associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. Most of the laboratory models for fear learning have used a single conditioned stimulus (CS paired with an unconditioned stimulus (US. This has simplified the real situation of traumatic events to an excessive degree, and thus, limits the clinical application of the findings based on these models. Here, we used a basic visual compound CS model as the CS to ascertain whether partial repetition of the compound CSs in conditioning can reactivate memory into reconsolidation. The results showed that the no retrieval group or the 1/3 ratio retrieval group failed to open the memory reconsolidation time window. The 2/3 repetition retrieval group and the whole repetition retrieval group were able to prevent fear reinstatement, whereas only a 2/3 ratio repetition of the initial compound CS as a reminder could inhibit spontaneous recovery. We inferred that a retrieval–extinction paradigm was also effective in a more complex model of fear if a sufficient prediction error (PE could be generated in the

  11. Moderate Partially Reduplicated Conditioned Stimuli as Retrieval Cue Can Increase Effect on Preventing Relapse of Fear to Compound Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjiao; Chen, Wei; Caoyang, Jingwen; Wu, Wenli; Jie, Jing; Xu, Liang; Zheng, Xifu

    2017-01-01

    The theory of memory reconsolidation argues that consolidated memory is not unchangeable. Once a memory is reactivated it may go back into an unstable state and need new protein synthesis to be consolidated again, which is called “memory reconsolidation”. Boundary studies have shown that interfering with reconsolidation through pharmacologic or behavioral intervention can lead to the updating of the initial memory, for example, erasing undesired memories. Behavioral procedures based on memory reconsolidation interference have been shown to be an effective way to inhibit fear memory relapse after extinction. However, the effectiveness of retrieval–extinction differs by subtle differences in the protocol of the reactivation session. This represents a challenge with regard to finding an optimal operational model to facilitate its clinical use for patients suffering from pathogenic memories such as those associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. Most of the laboratory models for fear learning have used a single conditioned stimulus (CS) paired with an unconditioned stimulus (US). This has simplified the real situation of traumatic events to an excessive degree, and thus, limits the clinical application of the findings based on these models. Here, we used a basic visual compound CS model as the CS to ascertain whether partial repetition of the compound CSs in conditioning can reactivate memory into reconsolidation. The results showed that the no retrieval group or the 1/3 ratio retrieval group failed to open the memory reconsolidation time window. The 2/3 repetition retrieval group and the whole repetition retrieval group were able to prevent fear reinstatement, whereas only a 2/3 ratio repetition of the initial compound CS as a reminder could inhibit spontaneous recovery. We inferred that a retrieval–extinction paradigm was also effective in a more complex model of fear if a sufficient prediction error (PE) could be generated in the reactivation period

  12. Assessing informed consent in an opioid relapse prevention study with adults under current or recent criminal justice supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ashleigh A; Chen, Donna T; Bonnie, Richard J; Ko, Tomohiro M; Suratt, Colleen E; Lee, Joshua D; Friedmann, Peter D; Gordon, Michael; McDonald, Ryan; Murphy, Sean M; Boney, Tamara Y; Nunes, Edward V; O'Brien, Charles P

    2017-10-01

    Concerns persist that individuals with substance use disorders who are under community criminal justice supervision experience circumstances that might compromise their provision of valid, informed consent for research participation. These concerns include the possibilities that desire to obtain access to treatment might lead individuals to ignore important information about research participation, including information about risks, or that cognitive impairment associated with substance use might interfere with attending to important information. We report results from a consent quiz (CQ) administered in a multisite randomized clinical trial of long-acting naltrexone to prevent relapse to opioid use disorder among adults under community criminal justice supervision-a treatment option difficult to access by this population of individuals. Participants were required to answer all 11 items correctly before randomization. On average, participants answered 9.8 items correctly (89%) at baseline first attempt (n=306). At week 21 (n=212), participants scored 87% (9.5 items correct) without review. Performance was equivalent to, or better than, published results from other populations on a basic consent quiz instrument across multiple content domains. The consent quiz is an efficient method to screen for adequate knowledge of consent information as part of the informed consent process. Clinical researchers who are concerned about these issues should consider using a consent quiz with corrected feedback to enhance the informed consent process. Overall, while primarily useful as an educational tool, employing a CQ as part of the gateway to participation in research may be particularly important as the field continues to advance and tests novel experimental treatments with significant risks and uncertain potential for benefit. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. [Qualitative evaluation of TAMARPP, the relapse prevention program for substance abusers at the Mental Health and Welfare Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniai, Tomoko; Yottsuji, Naomi; Okuda, Hidemi; Karibe, Haruo; Miura, Kasumi; Hiraga, Masasi; Kondo, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Toshihiko

    2014-12-01

    The development of an effective treatment system for patients with addiction-related problems like substance abuse or pathological gambling is urgently needed. The purpose of this study was to clarify the therapeutic factors of the Tama Mental Health and Welfare Center Relapse Prevention Program (TAMARPP). The program is provided at the Tama Comprehensive Center for Mental Health and Welfare, which is operated publicly by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government. Seven personnel (3 clinical psychologists, 2 public health nurses, and 2 recovering counselors) searched the consultation records of 31 participants who had continued treatment longer than 1 year, and made a list of qualitative factors that may positively impact participant outcome. The following six factors were extracted: 1) a "no-blame" atmosphere that makes participants feel safe and free; 2) a mutual helping process that enables participants to empathize with one another; 3) an individual-centered approach that focuses on a participant's motivation to recover; 4) a psycho-educational process that establishes treatment goals; 5) a treatment goal that involves some type of social role; and 6) the referral of graduates to another long-term treatment program such as Narcotics Anonymous. Our results suggest the need of personnel to provide treatment as follows: 1) keep the circumstances safe; 2) use a method that matches the participant's motivation; 3) refer graduates to another in-depth treatment program; 4) emphasize the relationship between thinking, emotion, and behavior; and 5) improve the quality of life of the participant. The missions of our center, an official institution that runs such a program, are as follows: 1) to be the first place at which addicts seek aid during the early stage; 2) to cooperate with other facilities in order to provide social resources that support recovery; and 3) to support patients suffering from both addiction and comorbid psychiatric diseases.

  14. Mindfulness-based relapse prevention combined with virtual reality cue exposure for methamphetamine addiction: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, XiJing; Wang, Dongmei; Zhou, Lidan; Winkler, Markus; Pauli, Paul; Sui, Nan; Li, Yonghui

    2018-04-18

    Mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) is a method that combines cognitive behavioral relapse prevention with mindfulness practice. Research shows that MBRP can effectively reduce negative emotions and craving in people with substance use disorders (SUDs). An important part of MBRP is to practice mindfulness meditation to cope with high-risk situations for relapse, such as stimuli and situations associated with drug taking. Virtual reality cue exposure (VRCE) may be a complementary approach to MBRP as it allows for controlled and graded presentations of various high-risk situations with distal and proximal drug cues. The aim of the study is to investigate the effects of MBRP combined with VRCE, in comparison to MBRP alone or treatment as usual, on craving and emotional responses in people with methamphetamine use disorders. The study is a parallel randomized controlled study including 180 participants with methamphetamine use disorders. Three parallel groups will receive 8 weeks of MBRP combined with VRCE, MBRP alone, or treatment as usual, respectively. Craving, virtual cue reactivity, anxiety, depression, emotion regulation, mindfulness and drug-related attention bias will be assessed at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 3 and 6 months of follow-up. This innovative study aims at investigating the effects of MBRP combined with VRCE in people with SUDs. The combined intervention may have important clinical implications for relapse prevention due to its ease of application and high cost-effectiveness. This study may also stimulate research on the neuronal and psychological mechanisms of MBRP in drug addiction. ChiCTR-INR-17013041. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Treatment with a barrier-strengthening moisturizer prevents relapse of hand-eczema. An open, randomized, prospective, parallel group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodén, Marie; Wirén, Karin; Smerud, Knut; Meland, Nils; Hønnås, Helge; Mørk, Gro; Lützow-Holm, Claus; Funk, Jörgen; Meding, Birgitta

    2010-11-01

    Hand eczema influences the quality of life. Management strategies include the use of moisturizers. In the present study the time to relapse of eczema during treatment with a barrier-strengthening moisturizer (5% urea) was compared with no treatment (no medical or non-medicated preparations) in 53 randomized patients with successfully treated hand eczema. The median time to relapse was 20 days in the moisturizer group compared with 2 days in the no treatment group (p = 0.04). Eczema relapsed in 90% of the patients within 26 weeks. No difference in severity was noted between the groups at relapse. Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) increased significantly in both groups; from 4.7 to 7.1 in the moisturizer group and from 4.1 to 7.8 in the no treatment group (p < 0.01) at the time of relapse. Hence, the application of moisturizers seems to prolong the disease-free interval in patients with controlled hand eczema. Whether the data is applic-able to moisturizers without barrier-strengthening properties remains to be elucidated.

  16. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy compared with maintenance antidepressant treatment in the prevention of depressive relapse or recurrence (PREVENT): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyken, Willem; Hayes, Rachel; Barrett, Barbara; Byng, Richard; Dalgleish, Tim; Kessler, David; Lewis, Glyn; Watkins, Edward; Brejcha, Claire; Cardy, Jessica; Causley, Aaron; Cowderoy, Suzanne; Evans, Alison; Gradinger, Felix; Kaur, Surinder; Lanham, Paul; Morant, Nicola; Richards, Jonathan; Shah, Pooja; Sutton, Harry; Vicary, Rachael; Weaver, Alice; Wilks, Jenny; Williams, Matthew; Taylor, Rod S; Byford, Sarah

    2015-07-04

    Individuals with a history of recurrent depression have a high risk of repeated depressive relapse or recurrence. Maintenance antidepressants for at least 2 years is the current recommended treatment, but many individuals are interested in alternatives to medication. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) has been shown to reduce risk of relapse or recurrence compared with usual care, but has not yet been compared with maintenance antidepressant treatment in a definitive trial. We aimed to see whether MBCT with support to taper or discontinue antidepressant treatment (MBCT-TS) was superior to maintenance antidepressants for prevention of depressive relapse or recurrence over 24 months. In this single-blind, parallel, group randomised controlled trial (PREVENT), we recruited adult patients with three or more previous major depressive episodes and on a therapeutic dose of maintenance antidepressants, from primary care general practices in urban and rural settings in the UK. Participants were randomly assigned to either MBCT-TS or maintenance antidepressants (in a 1:1 ratio) with a computer-generated random number sequence with stratification by centre and symptomatic status. Participants were aware of treatment allocation and research assessors were masked to treatment allocation. The primary outcome was time to relapse or recurrence of depression, with patients followed up at five separate intervals during the 24-month study period. The primary analysis was based on the principle of intention to treat. The trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials, ISRCTN26666654. Between March 23, 2010, and Oct 21, 2011, we assessed 2188 participants for eligibility and recruited 424 patients from 95 general practices. 212 patients were randomly assigned to MBCT-TS and 212 to maintenance antidepressants. The time to relapse or recurrence of depression did not differ between MBCT-TS and maintenance antidepressants over 24 months (hazard ratio 0·89, 95% CI 0·67-1·18

  17. Using WhatsApp and Facebook Online Social Groups for Smoking Relapse Prevention for Recent Quitters: A Pilot Pragmatic Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ching Han Helen; Lai, Chi-Keung Jonah; Chan, Wai Fung Vivian; Wang, Man Ping; Li, Ho Cheung William; Chan, Sophia Siu Chee; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2015-01-01

    Background Quit attempters often have episodes of smoking relapse before they eventually quit. Interactive text messaging through mobile phones has been shown to increase abstinence. This service can be potentially applied on the platform of a social networking service to help quitters maintain abstinence. Objective Our aim was to determine if the group discussion and reminders via the WhatsApp or Facebook social group were effective to prevent smoking relapse in quitters who had stopped smoking recently. Methods This was a single-blinded, parallel, 3-arm pilot cluster randomized controlled trial allocating recent quitters, who had completed an 8-week treatment and reported abstinence for at least 7 days, to WhatsApp (n=42), Facebook (n=40), and a control group (n=54). The 2 intervention groups participated in a 2-month online group discussion with either WhatsApp or Facebook moderated by a trained smoking cessation counselor and received a self-help booklet on smoking cessation. The control group only received the booklet. The primary outcome was the 2- and 6-month relapse rates, defined as the proportion of participants who smoked at least 5 cigarettes in 3 consecutive days. Results Fewer participants in the WhatsApp group (17%, 7/42) reported relapse than the control group (42.6%, 23/54) at 2-month (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.10-0.71) and 6-month (40.5%, 17/42 vs 61.1%, 33/54; OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.19-0.99) follow-ups. The Facebook group (30.0%, 12/40) had an insignificantly lower relapse rate than the control group (42.6%, 23/54) at 2-month (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.24-1.37) and 6-month (52.5%, 13/40 vs 61.1%, 33/54; OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.31-1.61) follow-ups. The WhatsApp social groups had more moderators’ posts (median 60, IQR 25 vs median 32, IQR 7; P=.05) and participants’ posts (median 35, IQR 50 vs median 6, IQR 9; P=.07) than their Facebook counterparts, but the difference was insignificant. Conclusions The intervention via the WhatsApp social group was effective in reducing

  18. Using WhatsApp and Facebook Online Social Groups for Smoking Relapse Prevention for Recent Quitters: A Pilot Pragmatic Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yee Tak Derek; Chan, Ching Han Helen; Lai, Chi-Keung Jonah; Chan, Wai Fung Vivian; Wang, Man Ping; Li, Ho Cheung William; Chan, Sophia Siu Chee; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2015-10-22

    Quit attempters often have episodes of smoking relapse before they eventually quit. Interactive text messaging through mobile phones has been shown to increase abstinence. This service can be potentially applied on the platform of a social networking service to help quitters maintain abstinence. Our aim was to determine if the group discussion and reminders via the WhatsApp or Facebook social group were effective to prevent smoking relapse in quitters who had stopped smoking recently. This was a single-blinded, parallel, 3-arm pilot cluster randomized controlled trial allocating recent quitters, who had completed an 8-week treatment and reported abstinence for at least 7 days, to WhatsApp (n=42), Facebook (n=40), and a control group (n=54). The 2 intervention groups participated in a 2-month online group discussion with either WhatsApp or Facebook moderated by a trained smoking cessation counselor and received a self-help booklet on smoking cessation. The control group only received the booklet. The primary outcome was the 2- and 6-month relapse rates, defined as the proportion of participants who smoked at least 5 cigarettes in 3 consecutive days. Fewer participants in the WhatsApp group (17%, 7/42) reported relapse than the control group (42.6%, 23/54) at 2-month (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.10-0.71) and 6-month (40.5%, 17/42 vs 61.1%, 33/54; OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.19-0.99) follow-ups. The Facebook group (30.0%, 12/40) had an insignificantly lower relapse rate than the control group (42.6%, 23/54) at 2-month (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.24-1.37) and 6-month (52.5%, 13/40 vs 61.1%, 33/54; OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.31-1.61) follow-ups. The WhatsApp social groups had more moderators' posts (median 60, IQR 25 vs median 32, IQR 7; P=.05) and participants' posts (median 35, IQR 50 vs median 6, IQR 9; P=.07) than their Facebook counterparts, but the difference was insignificant. The intervention via the WhatsApp social group was effective in reducing relapse probably because of enhanced discussion and

  19. Effectiveness of Hope Therapy on Reducing Depressive Symptoms and Preventing of Relapse in Cure-Seeker Women with Dependency to Narcotic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram S Raesian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the present research was the investigation of the effectiveness of hope therapy on reduction of the degree of depression symptoms and prevention of relapse in cure-seeker women with dependency to narcotic drugs. Method: In semi-experimental research method 20 clients who diagnosed as substance abuse disorder that completed detoxification period successfully, and they were scored more than 14 in depression symptoms (Beck depression questionnaire, second edition selected by available sampling and assigned to two experimental (n=10 and witness (n=10 groups randomly. Experimental group was trained for 8 sessions under training of hope therapy and witness group was not under any training. The experimental peple were evaluated by Snyder Hope scale and Beck depression questionnaire and morphine test before beginning of therapy. After it and after the completition of the two months follow-up period. For analyzing of data chi square test, Z test, and ANCOVA were applied. Results: The results showed that hope therapy education could create considerable reduction in degree of depression symptoms of women suffering from addiction. In addition, results of chi square test indicated significant difference between the number of relapsed women in experimental and witness groups. Conclusion: in general, results of this survey show that hope therapy education is effective in reduction of degree of depression symptoms and prediction of relapse in cure-seeker women suffering from addiction.

  20. The Effectiveness of Marlaat’s Cognitive Behavior Intervention and Group Treatment Based on Change Stages for Recovery and Relapse Prevention Rates in Male Heroin Crack Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khodadust

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was the Study of effectiveness of Marlaat’s cognitive behavior intervention and group treatment based on change stages for recovery and relapse rates in male heroin crack addictions. Method: In a experimental research design, 45 men addictions, who were diagnosed as the dependence of the heroin crack on the basis of DSM-IV-TR criteria, were chosen after successfully detoxified. They were divided two experimental groups (30 participants and a control group (15 participants that have been selected by random sampling. The first experimental group was undergone group treatment based on change stages underwent 16 sessions of 1.5 hours, totally 24 hours and the second experimental groups who were undergone Marlaat’s cognitive behavior intervention has been held 15 sessions of 2 hours, totally 24 hours. The control group were just received MMT without any psychotherapy. All participants were assessed by structured interview, urine test, before treatment, after treatment and after 3 months follow up. Results: Results showed that both psychotherapy treatments were affected on recovery and relapse rates. Conclusion: It seems that psychological problems and conflicts before addiction and after addiction could be caused for individuals’ tendency to narcotics consumption. Therefore, applying of psychotherapy could be useful in relapse prevention.

  1. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy compared with maintenance antidepressant treatment in the prevention of depressive relapse/recurrence: results of a randomised controlled trial (the PREVENT study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyken, Willem; Hayes, Rachel; Barrett, Barbara; Byng, Richard; Dalgleish, Tim; Kessler, David; Lewis, Glyn; Watkins, Edward; Morant, Nicola; Taylor, Rod S; Byford, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Individuals with a history of recurrent depression have a high risk of repeated depressive relapse/recurrence. Maintenance antidepressant medication (m-ADM) for at least 2 years is the current recommended treatment, but many individuals are interested in alternatives to m-ADM. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) has been shown to reduce the risk of relapse/recurrence compared with usual care but has not yet been compared with m-ADM in a definitive trial. To establish whether MBCT with support to taper and/or discontinue antidepressant medication (MBCT-TS) is superior to and more cost-effective than an approach of m-ADM in a primary care setting for patients with a history of recurrent depression followed up over a 2-year period in terms of preventing depressive relapse/recurrence. Secondary aims examined MBCT's acceptability and mechanism of action. Single-blind, parallel, individual randomised controlled trial. UK general practices. Adult patients with a diagnosis of recurrent depression and who were taking m-ADM. Participants were randomised to MBCT-TS or m-ADM with stratification by centre and symptomatic status. Outcome data were collected blind to treatment allocation and the primary analysis was based on the principle of intention to treat. Process studies using quantitative and qualitative methods examined MBCT's acceptability and mechanism of action. The primary outcome measure was time to relapse/recurrence of depression. At each follow-up the following secondary outcomes were recorded: number of depression-free days, residual depressive symptoms, quality of life, health-related quality of life and psychiatric and medical comorbidities. In total, 212 patients were randomised to MBCT-TS and 212 to m-ADM. The primary analysis did not find any evidence that MBCT-TS was superior to m-ADM in terms of the primary outcome of time to depressive relapse/recurrence over 24 months [hazard ratio (HR) 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67 to 1.18] or for any

  2. Social settings and addiction relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, M A; Reischl, T M; Ramanthan, C S

    1995-01-01

    Despite addiction theorists' acknowledgment of the impact of environmental factors on relapse, researchers have not adequately investigated these influences. Ninety-six substance users provided data regarding their perceived risk for relapse, exposure to substances, and involvement in reinforcing activities. These three setting attributes were assessed in their home, work, and community settings. Reuse was assessed 3 months later. When controlling for confounding variables, aspects of the home settings significantly distinguished abstainers from reusers; perceived risk for relapse was the strongest predictor of reuse. Exposure to substances and involvement in reinforcing activities were not robust reuse indicators. The work and community settings were not significant determinants of reuse. These findings offer some initial support for the utility of examining social settings to better understand addiction relapse and recovery. Identification of setting-based relapse determinants provides concrete targets for relapse prevention interventions.

  3. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... without symptoms of which the person is aware. What happens in RRMS? Relapsing-remitting MS is defined ... a different mechanism of action in order to control the disease activity more effectively and help prevent ...

  4. Disrupting the rhythm of depression: design and protocol of a randomized controlled trial on preventing relapse using brief cognitive therapy with or without antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huibers Marcus JH

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintenance treatment with antidepressants is the leading strategy to prevent relapse and recurrence in patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD who have responded to acute treatment with antidepressants (AD. However, in clinical practice most patients (up to 70-80% are not willing to take this medication after remission or take too low dosages. Moreover, as patients need to take medication for several years, it may not be the most cost-effective strategy. The best established effective and available alternative is brief cognitive therapy (CT. However, it is unclear whether brief CT while tapering antidepressants (AD is an effective alternative for long term use of AD in recurrent depression. In addition, it is unclear whether the combination of AD to brief CT is beneficial. Methods/design Therefore, we will compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of brief CT while tapering AD to maintenance AD and the combination of CT with maintenance AD. In addition, we examine whether the prophylactic effect of CT was due to CT tackling illness related risk factors for recurrence such as residual symptoms or to its efficacy to modify presumed vulnerability factors of recurrence (e.g. rigid explicit and/or implicit dysfunctional attitudes. This is a multicenter RCT comparing the above treatment scenarios. Remitted patients on AD with at least two previous depressive episodes in the past five years (n = 276 will be recruited. The primary outcome is time related proportion of depression relapse/recurrence during minimal 15 months using DSM-IV-R criteria as assessed by the Structural Clinical Interview for Depression. Secondary outcome: economic evaluation (using a societal perspective and number, duration and severity of relapses/recurrences. Discussion This will be the first trial to investigate whether CT is effective in preventing relapse to depression in recurrent depression while tapering antidepressant treatment

  5. Potential for smoke-free policies in social venues to prevent smoking uptake and reduce relapse: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Melanie; Cameron, Melissa; Murphy, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to better understand the utility of smoking in pubs/bars and nightclubs and explore perceptions of how smoke-free policies might influence smoking behavior. Qualitative focus group methodology was used involving young social smokers and older regular smokers. Pubs/bars and nightclubs were valued as the few remaining indoor public places where people could relax and smoke. These venues were perceived to provide encouragement for smoking more cigarettes by increasing smoking rate and facilitating smoking relapse. For young social smokers, smoking provided an opportunity to be part of a "cool" in-group. Older regular smokers felt pubs/bars provided strong cues for smoking relapse. Smokers felt they would adapt to smoke-free policies and expected these policies to reduce their smoking or assist quitting. Smoke-free policies in pubs/bars and nightclubs may assist smokers to quit and make it less likely that young social smokers will progress to regular smoking.

  6. A next-generation social media-based relapse prevention intervention for youth depression: Qualitative data on user experience outcomes for social networking, safety, and clinical benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Santesteban-Echarri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD has a high prevalence and relapse rate among young people. For many individuals depression exhibits a severe course, and it is therefore critical to invest in innovative online interventions for depression that are cost-effective, acceptable and feasible. At present, there is a scarcity of research reporting on qualitative data regarding the subjective user experience of young people using social networking-based interventions for depression. This study provides in-depth qualitative insights generated from 38 semi-structured interviews, and a follow-up focus group, with young people (15–25 years after the implementation of a moderated online social therapy intervention for depression relapse prevention (“Rebound”. Exploratory analysis identified patterns of content from interview data related to three main themes: 1 preferred content compared to perceived helpfulness of the online platform, 2 interest in social networking, and 3 protective environment. Two clear groups emerged; those who perceived the social networking component of the intervention as the most helpful component; and those who preferred to engage in therapy content, receiving individualized content suggested by moderators. The Rebound intervention was shown to be acceptable for young people with major depression. Integration of social networking features appears to enhance intervention engagement for some young people recovering from depression.

  7. The Comparison of Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy Based on Coping Skills and Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Improvement of Emotional Regulation Strategies and Relapse Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghorbany

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study compared the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy based on coping skills (CBT and methadone maintenance therapy (MMT in improvement of emotional regulation strategies and prevention of relapse. Method: The method of the present study was semi-experimental research design (pre-test-post-test with witness group. For sampling 45 substance abuse people who had referred to addiction treatment centers were selected and assigned to three groups of cognitive behavior therapy, methadone maintenance treatment and witness group randomly. The participants in all three groups completed the emotional intelligence questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed by covariance method. Results: The results showed that cognitive-behavior therapy in comparison to methadone maintenance therapy and witness group led to significant improvement of emotional regulation in substance abusers, but there was no significant difference between the methadone maintenance treatment group and control group. Also, the rate of relapse in individuals who assigned to cognitive-behavior therapy group in comparison to methadone maintenance therapy and the witness group was significantly lower, but there was no significant difference between methadone therapy and witness. Conclusion: Cognitive-behavior therapy was an effective treatment that can change the cognitive and behavioral variables related to substance abuse, such as emotional regulation strategies. Thus, results suggested that drug abuse treatment programs must target these mediator variables.

  8. Neuro-chemical activation of brain reward meso-limbic circuitry is associated with relapse prevention and drug hunger: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Gold, Mark S

    2011-04-01

    drug use in adolescents. Exploration of various treatment approaches for the most part reveal poor outcomes in terms of relapse prevention and continued drug hunger. The authors are proposing a new paradigm shift in residential, non-residential and aftercare involving the incorporation of genetic testing to identify risk alleles coupled with D2 receptor stimulation using neuroadatogen amino acid precursor enkephlinase--catecholamine-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibition therapy. A natural but therapeutic nutraceutical formulation potentially induces DA release could cause the induction of D2-directed mRNA and proliferation of D2 receptors in the human. We further hypothesize that this proliferation of D2 receptors in turn will induce the attenuation of drug-like craving behavior. Finally, pharmacological therapies have had limited success because these powerful agents have focused on maintenance or interference with drug euphoria rather than correcting or compensating for pre-morbid dopamine system deficits These concepts await further confirmation via required neuro-imaging studies. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Contributors to dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load in the Netherlands: the role of beer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluik, D.; Atkinson, Fiona S.; Brand-Miller, J.; Fogelholm, M.; Raben, A.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Diets high in glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) have been associated with a higher diabetes risk. Beer explained a large proportion of variation in GI in a Finnish and an American study. However, few beers have been tested according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO)

  10. Overall glycaemic index and glycaemic load of habitual diet and risk of heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau, Katrine; Tetens, Inge; Bjørnsbo, Kirsten S

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that diets with high glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) increase the risk of heart disease. Design Overall GI and GL were assessed from 7 d diet records or diet history interviews. Setting Information on hospitalization and death due to CVD and CHD was o...

  11. Model of Management (Mo.Ma) for the patient with schizophrenia: crisis control, maintenance, relapse prevention, and recovery with long-acting injectable antipsychotics (LAIs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnoli, Roberto; Rapinesi, Chiara; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Marcellusi, Andrea; Mennini, Francesco S; De Filippis, Sergio; Carrus, Dario; Ballerini, Andrea; Francomano, Antonio; Ducci, Giuseppe; Del Casale, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disease that affects approximately 1% of the population with a relevant chronic impact on social and occupational functioning and daily activities. People with schizophrenia are 2-2.5 times more likely to die early than the general population. Non-adherence to antipsychotic medications, both in chronic and first episode schizophrenia, is one of the most important risk factors for relapse and hospitalization, that consequently contributes to increased costs due to psychiatric hospitalization. Atypical long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics can improve treatment adherence and decrease re-hospitalization rates in patients with schizophrenia since its onset. The primary goals in the management of schizophrenia are directed not only at symptom reduction in the short and long term, but also at maintaining physical and mental functioning, improving quality of life, and promoting patient recovery. To propose a scientific evidence-based integrated model that provides an algorithm for recovery of patients with schizophrenia and to investigate the effectiveness and safety of antipsychotics LAI in the treatment, maintenance, relapse prevention, and recovery of schizophrenia. After an accurate literature review we identified, collected and analyzed the crucial points in taking care schizophrenia patients, through which we defined the steps described in the model of management and the choice of the better treatment option. Results. In the management model we propose, the choice of a second generation long acting antipsychotic, could allow from the earliest stages of illness better patient management, especially for young individuals with schizophrenia onset, a better recovery and significant reductions of relapse and health care costs. LAI formulations of antipsychotics are valuable, because they help patients to remain adherent to their medication through regular contact with healthcare professionals and to prevent covert non-adherence. The

  12. Spacing extinction sessions as a behavioral technique for preventing relapse in an animal model of voluntary actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Gamboa, Rodolfo; Gámez, A Matías; Nieto, Javier

    2018-06-01

    Instrumental extinction has been proposed as a model for understanding the suppression of problematic voluntary actions. Consequently, it has been suggested that response recovery after extinction could model relapse. Four experiments with rats used a free operant procedure to explore the impact of spacing extinction sessions on spontaneous recovery, renewal, reinstatement, and rapid reacquisition of extinguished lever-pressing. Initially, in all experiments, hungry rats were trained to perform two responses (R1 and R2) for food. Then, all responses underwent extinction. For R1, rats experienced a longer intersession interval (72 h) than for R2 (24 h). During the final restoration test, it was observed that using spaced extinction sessions reduced spontaneous recovery, renewal, and reinstatement. However, implementing a longer intersession interval throughout extinction exposure did not slow the rate of reacquisition of operant responses. The present findings suggest that in most cases extinction is more enduring when the extinction sessions are spaced. Since expanding the intersession interval during extinction might be interpreted as conducting extinction in multiple temporal contexts, the overall pattern of results was explained based on contextual modulation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial comparing mindfulness-based cognitive therapy with maintenance anti-depressant treatment in the prevention of depressive relapse/recurrence: the PREVENT trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes Rachel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a common and distressing mental health problem that is responsible for significant individual disability and cost to society. Medication and psychological therapies are effective for treating depression and maintenance anti-depressants (m-ADM can prevent relapse. However, individuals with depression often express a wish for psychological help that can help them recover from depression in the long-term. We need to develop psychological therapies that prevent depressive relapse/recurrence. A recently developed treatment, Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT, see http://www.mbct.co.uk shows potential as a brief group programme for people with recurring depression. In two studies it has been shown to halve the rates of depression recurring compared to usual care. This trial asks the policy research question, is MBCT superior to m-ADM in terms of: a primary outcome of preventing depressive relapse/recurrence over 24 months; and, secondary outcomes of (a depression free days, (b residual depressive symptoms, (c antidepressant (ADM usage, (d psychiatric and medical co-morbidity, (e quality of life, and (f cost effectiveness? An explanatory research question asks is an increase in mindfulness skills the key mechanism of change? Methods/Design The design is a single blind, parallel RCT examining MBCT vs. m-ADM with an embedded process study. To answer the main policy research question the proposed trial compares MBCT plus ADM-tapering with m-ADM for patients with recurrent depression. Four hundred and twenty patients with recurrent major depressive disorder in full or partial remission will be recruited through primary care. Depressive relapse/recurrence over two years is the primary outcome variable. The explanatory question will be addressed in two mutually informative ways: quantitative measurement of potential mediating variables pre/post-treatment and a qualitative study of service users' views and experiences

  14. Glycaemic responses of some legumes in Nigeria using non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It is established that legumes generally have a low glycaemic index (GI) which means that they raise blood glucose levels very little. However, the glycaemic responses to normal subjects and the GI of these local legumes are not yet established. Objective: This work determined the postprandial glycaemic ...

  15. The Effectiveness of Training in Communicative Skills Training with A Cognitive – Behaviorist Approach on Spouses ’Marital Adjustment and the Prevention of Addicts from Relapsing in Male Addicts in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Findings: The result showed that training in communicative skills with a cognitive-behaviorist approach influences positively general adjustment. No positive effect was noticed in marital satisfaction and mutual correlation factors. There is positive effect of training skills on mutual agreement and love expression factors. Furthermore, the prevention of addicts from relapsing in male addicts, the number of relapse in control group is more than experimental group but this different was not significant. Results: In general, communicative skills training with a cognitive – behaviorist approach effects spouses adjustment of male addicts.

  16. Relapse prevention and residual symptoms: a closer analysis of placebo-controlled continuation studies with escitalopram in major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Per; Lönn, Sara L; Overø, Kerstin F

    2010-02-01

    Analyses of data from 4 relapse-prevention studies with escitalopram were conducted in order to compare patients with and without residual symptoms with regard to relapse rates and global illness during double-blind, 24-week continuation periods. Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness scores and relapse status in 4 studies published from 2005 to 2007, 1 each in major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), were analyzed using mixed-effects model repeated measures as a function of Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores on items 1, 3, and 7 at randomization. All studies showed a statistically significant (P 0) and without residual symptoms (MADRS score = 0) at the start of continuation treatment were defined by how patients scored on 3 core items of the MADRS: depressed mood (observed), inner or psychic tension, and lassitude. At randomization, patients with a residual symptom were globally more ill than patients without such a symptom. Patients who did not continue active treatment worsened, even if they were initially free of a residual symptom. In contrast, patients who continued receiving escitalopram remained stable or further improved, regardless of residual symptoms or diagnosis. No clear picture emerged regarding whether patients with residual symptoms had a higher relapse rate. The presence of residual symptoms is associated with significantly worse overall illness severity in all 4 diagnostic groups and with a higher (although not significantly) risk of relapse for patients with MDD or OCD. The greatest difference in all of the studies was between patients treated with escitalopram (relapse rates ~ 20%) and placebo (relapse rates of about 50%). Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  17. Web-based cognitive behavioral relapse prevention program with tailored feedback for people with methamphetamine and other drug use problems: protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Ayumi; Miyamoto, Yuki; Kawakami, Norito; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Shinozaki, Tomohiro; Sugimoto, Takashi

    2016-04-04

    Despite the effectiveness of psychosocial programs for recovery from drug use problems, there have been challenges in implementation of treatment. Internet-based and computerized approaches have been known to be effective in treatment dissemination. The study purpose is to assess the effects of a web-based psychosocial relapse prevention program with a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Recruitment began in January 2015 for outpatient participants diagnosed with drug abuse or dependence who have used a primary abused drug in the past year at psychiatric hospitals and a clinic. Participants are randomized either to a web-based relapse prevention program or a self-monitoring group. The intervention is a web-based relapse prevention program named "e-SMARPP" that consists of six relapse prevention program modules with tailored feedback from health care professionals and 8 weeks of self-monitoring. The content is adapted from a face-to-face relapse prevention program which is based on cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational enhancement. The primary outcomes are relapse risk assessed by the Stimulant Relapse Risk Scale (baseline, 2-, 5- and 8-month) and the longest duration of consecutive abstinent days from primary abused drug during the intervention. Secondary outcomes will include motivation to change, self-efficacy for drug use and craving, abstinent days in the past 28 or 56 days, quality of life, sense of coherence, cost of substance use, medical cost, retention of treatment and use of self-help group. Completion, usability and satisfaction of the program will be also assessed to explore feasibility. This study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of The University of Tokyo and each recruiting hospital and clinic. To our knowledge, this study is the first clinical trial to assess the effects of a web-based therapeutic program for drug users in Japan. If successful, this program is a promising approach for drug user treatment in Japan, where the

  18. Efficacy and safety of the glycine transporter-1 inhibitor org 25935 for the prevention of relapse in alcohol-dependent patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bejczy, Andrea; Nations, Kari R; Szegedi, Armin; Schoemaker, Joep; Ruwe, Frank; Söderpalm, Bo

    2014-09-01

    Org 25935 is a glycine transporter inhibitor that increases extracellular glycine levels and attenuates alcohol-induced dopaminergic activity in the nucleus accumbens. In animal models, Org 25935 has dose-dependent effects on ethanol intake, preference, and relapse-like behavior without tolerance. The current study aimed to translate these animal findings to humans by examining whether Org 25935 prevents relapse in detoxified alcohol-dependent patients. This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Adult patients diagnosed with alcohol dependence were randomly assigned to receive Org 25935 12 mg twice a day or placebo for 84 days. The primary end point was percentage heavy drinking days (defined as ≥ 5 standard drinks per day for men and ≥ 4 for women). Secondary end points included other measures of relapse-related drinking behavior (e.g., drinks per day, time to relapse), as well as measures of global functioning, alcohol-related thoughts and cravings, and motivation. A total of 140 subjects were included in the intent-to-treat analysis. The trial was stopped approximately midway after a futility analysis showing that the likelihood of detecting a signal at study term was Org 25935 and placebo on percentage heavy drinking days or any other measure of relapse-related drinking behavior. Org 25935 showed no safety issues and was fairly well tolerated, with fatigue, dizziness, and transient visual events as the most commonly occurring side effects. Org 25935 demonstrated no benefit over placebo in preventing alcohol relapse. Study limitations and implications are discussed. Copyright © 2014 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  19. Targeting intensive glycaemic control versus targeting conventional glycaemic control for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Lund, Søren; Gluud, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality compared to the background population. Observational studies report an association between reduced blood glucose and reduced risk of both micro- and macrovascular complications in patients...... with T2D. Our previous systematic review of intensive glycaemic control versus conventional glycaemic control was based on 20 randomised clinical trials that randomised 29 ,986 participants with T2D. We now report our updated review....

  20. Can bread processing conditions alter glycaemic response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Evelyn; Soong, Yean Yean; Zhou, Weibiao; Henry, Jeyakumar

    2015-04-15

    Bread is a staple food that is traditionally made from wheat flour. This study aimed to compare the starch digestibility of western baked bread and oriental steamed bread. Four types of bread were prepared: western baked bread (WBB) and oriental steamed bread (OSB), modified baked bread (MBB) made with the OSB recipe and WBB processing, and modified steamed bread (MSB) made with the WBB recipe and OSB processing. MBB showed the highest starch digestibility in vitro, followed by WBB, OSB and MSB. A similar trend was observed for glycaemic response in vivo. MBB, WBB, OSB and MSB had a glycaemic index of 75±4, 71±5, 68±5 and 65±4, respectively. Processing differences had a more pronounced effect on starch digestibility in bread, and steamed bread was healthier in terms of glycaemic response. The manipulation of processing conditions could be an innovative route to alter the glycaemic response of carbohydrate-rich foods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of extended release naltrexone to prevent relapse among criminal justice-involved individuals with a history of opioid use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean M; Polsky, Daniel; Lee, Joshua D; Friedmann, Peter D; Kinlock, Timothy W; Nunes, Edward V; Bonnie, Richard J; Gordon, Michael; Chen, Donna T; Boney, Tamara Y; O'Brien, Charles P

    2017-08-01

    Criminal justice-involved individuals are highly susceptible to opioid relapse and overdose-related deaths. In a recent randomized trial, we demonstrated the effectiveness of extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX; Vivitrol ® ) in preventing opioid relapse among criminal justice-involved US adults with a history of opioid use disorder. The cost of XR-NTX may be a significant barrier to adoption. Thus, it is important to account for improved quality of life and downstream cost-offsets. Our aims were to (1) estimate the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained for XR-NTX versus treatment as usual (TAU) and evaluate it relative to generally accepted value thresholds; and (2) estimate the incremental cost per additional year of opioid abstinence. Economic evaluation of the aforementioned trial from the taxpayer perspective. Participants were randomized to 25 weeks of XR-NTX injections or TAU; follow-up occurred at 52 and 78 weeks. Five study sites in the US Northeast corridor. A total of 308 participants were randomized to XR-NTX (n = 153) or TAU (n = 155). Incremental costs relative to incremental economic and clinical effectiveness measures, QALYs and abstinent years, respectively. The 25-week cost per QALY and abstinent-year figures were $162 150 and $46 329, respectively. The 78-week figures were $76 400/QALY and $16 371/abstinent year. At 25 weeks, we can be 10% certain that XR-NTX is cost-effective at a value threshold of $100 000/QALY and 62% certain at $200 000/QALY. At 78 weeks, the cost-effectiveness probabilities are 59% at $100 000/QALY and 76% at $200 000/QALY. We can be 95% confident that the intervention would be considered 'good value' at $90 000/abstinent year at 25 weeks and $500/abstinent year at 78 weeks. While extended-release naltrexone appears to be effective in increasing both quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and abstinence, it does not appear to be cost-effective using generally accepted value

  2. Effectiveness, relapse prevention and mechanisms of change of cognitive therapy vs. interpersonal therapy for depression: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Lotte H J M; Arntz, Arnoud; Peeters, Frenk P M L; Hollon, Steven D; Roefs, Anne; Huibers, Marcus J H

    2011-06-14

    Major depression is a common mental disorder that substantially impairs quality of life and has high societal costs. Although psychotherapies have proven to be effective antidepressant treatments, initial response rates are insufficient and the risk of relapse and recurrence is high. Improvement of treatments is badly needed. Studying the mechanisms of change in treatment might be a good investment for improving everyday mental health care. However, the mechanisms underlying therapeutic change remain largely unknown. The objective of the current study is to assess both the effectiveness of two commonly used psychotherapies for depression in terms of reduction of symptoms and prevention of relapse on short and long term, as well as identifying underlying mechanisms of change. In a randomised trial we will compare (a) Cognitive Therapy (CT) with (b) Interpersonal therapy (IPT), and (c) an 8-week waiting list condition followed by treatment of choice. One hundred eighty depressed patients (aged 18-65) will be recruited in a mental health care centre in Maastricht (the Netherlands). Eligible patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three intervention groups. The primary outcome measure of the clinical evaluation is depression severity measured by the Beck Depression Intenvory-II (BDI-II). Other outcomes include process variables such as dysfunctional beliefs, negative attributions, and interpersonal problems. All self-report outcome assessments will take place on the internet at baseline, three, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve and twenty-four months. At 24 months a retrospective telephone interview will be administered. Furthermore, a rudimentary analysis of the cost-effectiveness will be embedded. The study has been ethically approved and registered. By comparing CT and IPT head-to-head and by investigating multiple potential mediators and outcomes at multiple time points during and after therapy, we hope to provide new insights in the effectiveness

  3. Effectiveness, relapse prevention and mechanisms of change of cognitive therapy vs. interpersonal therapy for depression: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roefs Anne

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depression is a common mental disorder that substantially impairs quality of life and has high societal costs. Although psychotherapies have proven to be effective antidepressant treatments, initial response rates are insufficient and the risk of relapse and recurrence is high. Improvement of treatments is badly needed. Studying the mechanisms of change in treatment might be a good investment for improving everyday mental health care. However, the mechanisms underlying therapeutic change remain largely unknown. The objective of the current study is to assess both the effectiveness of two commonly used psychotherapies for depression in terms of reduction of symptoms and prevention of relapse on short and long term, as well as identifying underlying mechanisms of change. Methods In a randomised trial we will compare (a Cognitive Therapy (CT with (b Interpersonal therapy (IPT, and (c an 8-week waiting list condition followed by treatment of choice. One hundred eighty depressed patients (aged 18-65 will be recruited in a mental health care centre in Maastricht (the Netherlands. Eligible patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three intervention groups. The primary outcome measure of the clinical evaluation is depression severity measured by the Beck Depression Intenvory-II (BDI-II. Other outcomes include process variables such as dysfunctional beliefs, negative attributions, and interpersonal problems. All self-report outcome assessments will take place on the internet at baseline, three, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve and twenty-four months. At 24 months a retrospective telephone interview will be administered. Furthermore, a rudimentary analysis of the cost-effectiveness will be embedded. The study has been ethically approved and registered. Discussion By comparing CT and IPT head-to-head and by investigating multiple potential mediators and outcomes at multiple time points during and after therapy, we

  4. Predicting Relapse among Young Adults: Psychometric Validation of the Advanced Warning of Relapse (AWARE) Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John F.; Hoeppner, Bettina B.; Urbanoski, Karen A.; Slaymaker, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Objective Failure to maintain abstinence despite incurring severe harm is perhaps the key defining feature of addiction. Relapse prevention strategies have been developed to attenuate this propensity to relapse, but predicting who will, and who will not, relapse has stymied attempts to more efficiently tailor treatments according to relapse risk profile. Here we examine the psychometric properties of a promising relapse risk measure - the Advance WArning of RElapse scale (AWARE) scale (Miller and Harris, 2000) in an understudied but clinically important sample of young adults. Method Inpatient youth (N=303; Age 18-24; 26% female) completed the AWARE scale and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI) at the end of residential treatment, and at 1-, 3-, and 6-months following discharge. Internal and convergent validity was tested for each of these four timepoints using confirmatory factor analysis and correlations (with BSI scores). Predictive validity was tested for relapse 1, 3, and 6 months following discharge, as was incremental utility, where AWARE scores were used as predictors of any substance use while controlling for treatment entry substance use severity and having spent time in a controlled environment following treatment. Results Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a single, internally consistent, 25-item factor that demonstrated convergent validity and predicted subsequent relapse alone and when controlling for other important relapse risk predictors. Conclusions The AWARE scale may be a useful and efficient clinical tool for assessing short-term relapse risk among young people and, thus, could serve to enhance the effectiveness of relapse prevention efforts. PMID:21700396

  5. Predicting relapse among young adults: psychometric validation of the Advanced WArning of RElapse (AWARE) scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, John F; Hoeppner, Bettina B; Urbanoski, Karen A; Slaymaker, Valerie

    2011-10-01

    Failure to maintain abstinence despite incurring severe harm is perhaps the key defining feature of addiction. Relapse prevention strategies have been developed to attenuate this propensity to relapse, but predicting who will, and who will not, relapse has stymied attempts to more efficiently tailor treatments according to relapse risk profile. Here we examine the psychometric properties of a promising relapse risk measure-the Advance WArning of RElapse (AWARE) scale (Miller & Harris, 2000) in an understudied but clinically important sample of young adults. Inpatient youth (N=303; Ages 18-24; 26% female) completed the AWARE scale and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI) at the end of residential treatment, and at 1-, 3-, and 6-months following discharge. Internal and convergent validity was tested for each of these four timepoints using confirmatory factor analysis and correlations (with BSI scores). Predictive validity was tested for relapse 1, 3, and 6 months following discharge, as was incremental utility, where AWARE scores were used as predictors of any substance use while controlling for treatment entry substance use severity and having spent time in a controlled environment following treatment. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a single, internally consistent, 25-item factor that demonstrated convergent validity and predicted subsequent relapse alone and when controlling for other important relapse risk predictors. The AWARE scale may be a useful and efficient clinical tool for assessing short-term relapse risk among young people and, thus, could serve to enhance the effectiveness of relapse prevention efforts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Low glycaemic index, or low glycaemic load, diets for diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Diana; Elliott, Elizabeth J

    2009-01-21

    The aim of diabetes management is to normalise blood glucose levels, since improved blood glucose control is associated with reduction in development, and progression, of complications. Nutritional factors affect blood glucose levels, however there is currently no universal approach to the optimal dietary treatment for diabetes. There is controversy about how useful the glycaemic index (GI) is in diabetic meal planning. Improved glycaemic control through diet could minimise medications, lessen risk of diabetic complications, improve quality of life and increase life expectancy. To assess the effects of low glycaemic index, or low glycaemic load, diets on glycaemic control in people with diabetes. We performed electronic searches of The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL with no language restriction. We assessed randomised controlled trials of four weeks or longer that compared a low glycaemic index, or low glycaemic load, diet with a higher glycaemic index, or load, or other diet for people with either type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus, whose diabetes was not already optimally controlled. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study population, intervention and outcomes for each included study, using standardised data extraction forms. Eleven relevant randomised controlled trials involving 402 participants were identified. There was a significant decrease in the glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) parallel group of trials, the weighted mean difference (WMD) was -0.5% with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of - 0.9 to -0.1, P = 0.02; and in the cross-over group of trials the WMD was -0.5% with a 95% CI of -1.0 to -0.1, P = 0.03. Episodes of hypoglycaemia were significantly fewer with low compared to high GI diet in one trial (difference of -0.8 episodes per patient per month, P low-GI diet compared to measured carbohydrate exchange diet in another study (35% versus 66%, P = 0.006). No study reported on mortality, morbidity or costs. A low-GI diet can improve

  7. Evaluation of a new type of smoking cessation intervention – „SQUIN“, an online- and smartphone-based social-serious-game with mindfulness based relapse prevention module

    OpenAIRE

    Zeidler, Willi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The newly developed online group smoking cessation program SQUIN is examined in the context of a first process- and outcome-evaluation in this work. Specific modules and features such as mindfulness based content and relapse prevention are investigated. Also, certain components that reach beyond the official guidelines for smoking cessation and the „Rauchfrei-Programm“ (the actual German gold standard for offline smoking cessation) such as the reduction of psychological addiction and the...

  8. Metabolic effects of low glycaemic index diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusu Emilia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The persistence of an epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes suggests that new nutritional strategies are needed if the epidemic is to be overcome. A promising nutritional approach suggested by this thematic review is metabolic effect of low glycaemic-index diet. The currently available scientific literature shows that low glycaemic-index diets acutely induce a number of favorable effects, such as a rapid weight loss, decrease of fasting glucose and insulin levels, reduction of circulating triglyceride levels and improvement of blood pressure. The long-term effect of the combination of these changes is at present not known. Based on associations between these metabolic parameters and risk of cardiovascular disease, further controlled studies on low-GI diet and metabolic disease are needed.

  9. A classification framework for drug relapse prediction | Salleh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mining algorithms, Artificial Intelligence Neural Network (ANN) is one of the best algorithms to predict relapse among drug addicts. This may help the rehabilitation center to predict relapse individually and the prediction result is hoped to prevent drug addicts from relapse. Keywords: classification; artificial neural network; ...

  10. Contributors to dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load in the Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sluik, Diewertje; Atkinson, Fiona S; Brand-Miller, Jennie

    2016-01-01

    Diets high in glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) have been associated with a higher diabetes risk. Beer explained a large proportion of variation in GI in a Finnish and an American study. However, few beers have been tested according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO......, coffee and tea. The results were more pronounced in men than in women. In conclusion, beer is a high-GI food. Despite its relatively low carbohydrate content (approximately 4-5 g/100 ml), it still made a contribution to dietary GL, especially in men. Next to potatoes, bread, sugar and sugar...

  11. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin as Post-Consolidation Therapy Does Not Prevent Relapse In Children with AML. Results of the NOPHO-AML 2004 Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Henrik; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik

    . No significant decrease in hemoglobin was observed whereas severe neutropenia occurred in 96% of the patients. Recovery to neutrophils > 0.5 lasted a median of 15 days. Febrile neutropenia followed 39% of the GO courses but none were life-threatening. A moderate decline in platelet count was noted with platelets...... with severe neutropenia, modest thrombocytopenia and no clinical liver toxicity. GO did not change the frequency of relapses but there was a non-significant delay in the time to relapse from 10 to 16 months for patients randomized to GO....

  12. The Effect of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Prevention of Relapse in Recurrent Major Depressive Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piet, Jacob; Hougaard, Esben

    2011-01-01

    Background: Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a group-based clinical intervention program designed to reduce relapse or recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) by means of systematic training in mindfulness meditation combined with cognitive-behavioral methods. Objective: By means...

  13. The effect of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for prevention of relapse in recurrent major depressive disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piet, Jacob; Hougaard, Esben

    Background: Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a group-based clinical intervention program designed to reduce relapse or recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) by means of systematic training in mindfulness meditation combined with cognitive-behavioral methods. Objective: By means...

  14. The effect of the glycaemic response of three commonly consumed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-30

    Jun 30, 2015 ... classifying glycaemic response to carbohydrate-containing foods. The GI is defined as ... of conducting this study was to evaluate the glycaemic response of some commonly ... basis was determined according to the Association of Analytic ... medical laboratory scientist using the glucose oxidation method.

  15. [Evaluation of the relapse prevention guidance for drug-dependent inmates: the intervention using self-teach workbook and group therapy in a "private finance initiative" prison--the first report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Imamura, Fumie; Kobayashi, Ohji; Wada, Kiyoshi; Ozaki, Shiro; Takeuchi, Yoshio; Hasegawa, Masahiko; Imamura, Yoko; Tania, Yuko; Adachi, Yasumori

    2011-04-01

    In Japan, methamphetamine (MAP) abuse has been a serious problem for 60 years, and many of MAP abusers have been incarcerated in prisons as a violator of the Stimulant Control Law in Japan. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate effectiveness of the relapse prevention guidance for drug-dependent inmates using a self-teaching workbook for drug-abusing adolescents and group therapy, conducted in the Harima Rehabilitation Program Center, one of the new prisons which the Ministry of Justice founded cooperating private enterprises as a "Private Finance Initiative" project. We provided for 89 male drug-dependent inmates, incarcerated in the Harima Rehabilitation Program Center, with the relapse prevention guidance consisting of a self-teaching workbook and group therapy, and implement pre-and post-evaluations by the Self-efficacy Scale for Drug Dependence (SES) and the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale, 8th version for Drug Dependence (SOCRATES-8D). After a waiting term, the participants were provided with a self-teaching program, subsequently with a group program. At the point of completing the waiting term, no significant changes were observed in the SES and SOCRATES-8D scores. However, at the point of completing the self-teaching program, the SES scores significantly fell, while the total SOCRATES-8D score and the scores of the two subscales, the "Recognition" and "Ambivalence," significantly rose. Further, at the point of completing the group program, the total scores of the SES and SOCRATES-8D, and the score of the two SOCRATES-8D subscales, the "Recognition" and "Taking Steps," significantly rose. The relapse prevention guidance consisting of a self-teaching workbook and group therapy, conducted in the Harima Rehabilitation Program Center, were supposed to bring same internal changes as the "Stage of Changes" model, proposed by Prochaska and DiClemente, to drug-dependent inmates.

  16. Quality of glycaemic control in ambulatory diabetics at the out-patient clinic of Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otieno, C F; Kariuki, M; Ng'ang'a, L

    2003-08-01

    Treatment of diabetes mellitus is based on the evidence that lowering blood glucose as close to normal range as possible is a primary strategy for reducing or preventing complications or early mortality from diabetes. This suggests poorer glycaemic control would be associated with excess of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. This presumption is suspected to reach high proportions in developing countries where endemic poverty abets poor glycaemic control. There is no study published on Kenyan patients with diabetes mellitus about their glycaemic control as an audit of diabetes care. To determine the glycaemic control of ambulatory diabetic patients. Cross-sectional study on each clinic day of a randomly selected sample of both type 1 and 2 diabetic patients. Kenyatta National Hospital. Over a period of six months, January 1998 to June 1998. During routine diabetes care in the clinic, mid morning random blood sugar and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) were obtained. A total of 305 diabetic patients were included, 52.8% were females and 47.2% were males. 58.3% were on Oral Hypoglycaemic Agent (OHA) only, 22.3% on insulin only; 9.2% on OHA and insulin and 4.6% on diet only. 39.5% had mean HbA1c or = 8%. Patients on diet-only therapy had the best mean HbA1c = 7.04% while patients on OHA-only had the worst mean HbA1c = 9.06%. This difference was significant (p=0.01). The former group, likely, had better endogenous insulin production. The influence of age, gender and duration of diabetes on the level of glycaemic control observed did not attain statistically significant proportions. The majority of ambulatory diabetic patients attending the out-patient diabetic clinic had poor glycaemic control. The group with the poorest level of glycaemic control were on OHA-only, while best control was observed amongst patients on diet-only, because of possible fair endogenous insulin production. Poor glycaemic control was presumed to be due to sub-optimal medication and

  17. Dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load in Danish children in relation to body fatness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B. M.; Bjørnsbo, K. B.; Tetens, Inge

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe dietary glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) values in the diets of Danish children, and to examine the associations between dietary GI, GL and body fatness. Data were collected during 1997-8 as part of the European Youth Heart Study. The study...... population comprised 485 children aged 10 years and 364 children aged 16 years from Odense County, Denmark. Dietary GI and GL were estimated using international food tables, and the associations between energy-adjusted dietary GI, GL and body fatness were analysed by multiple linear regression. The mean...... associations were observed between dietary GI and Sigma SF (beta=0 center dot 60, SE=0 center dot 21, P=0 center dot 006), and between dietary GL and Sigma SF (beta=0 center dot 15, SE=0.06, P=0 center dot 009). In conclusion, dietary GI and GL were positively associated with body fatness among Danish boys...

  18. The DARE study of relapse prevention in depression: design for a phase 1/2 translational randomised controlled trial involving mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and supported self monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawyer Frances

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a common condition that typically has a relapsing course. Effective interventions targeting relapse have the potential to dramatically reduce the point prevalence of the condition. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT is a group-based intervention that has shown efficacy in reducing depressive relapse. While trials of MBCT to date have met the core requirements of phase 1 translational research, there is a need now to move to phase 2 translational research - the application of MBCT within real-world settings with a view to informing policy and clinical practice. The aim of this trial is to examine the clinical impact and health economics of MBCT under real-world conditions and where efforts have been made to assess for and prevent resentful demoralization among the control group. Secondary aims of the project involve extending the phase 1 agenda to an examination of the effects of co-morbidity and mechanisms of action. Methods/Design This study is designed as a prospective, multi-site, single-blind, randomised controlled trial using a group comparison design between involving the intervention, MBCT, and a self-monitoring comparison condition, Depression Relapse Active Monitoring (DRAM. Follow-up is over 2 years. The design of the study indicates recruitment from primary and secondary care of 204 participants who have a history of 3 or more episodes of Major Depression but who are currently well. Measures assessing depressive relapse/recurrence, time to first clinical intervention, treatment expectancy and a range of secondary outcomes and process variables are included. A health economics evaluation will be undertaken to assess the incremental cost of MBCT. Discussion The results of this trial, including an examination of clinical, functional and health economic outcomes, will be used to assess the role that this treatment approach may have in recommendations for treatment of depression in Australia and

  19. Glycaemic Response to Quality Protein Maize Grits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonora N. Panlasigui

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Carbohydrates have varied rates of digestion and absorption that induces different hormonal and metabolic responses in the body. Given the abundance of carbohydrate sources in the Philippines, the determination of the glycaemic index (GI of local foods may prove beneficial in promoting health and decreasing the risk of diabetes in the country. Methods. The GI of Quality Protein Maize (QPM grits, milled rice, and the mixture of these two food items were determined in ten female subjects. Using a randomized crossover design, the control bread and three test foods were given on separate occasions after an overnight fast. Blood samples were collected through finger prick at time intervals of 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min and analyzed for glucose concentrations. Results. The computed incremental area under the glucose response curve (IAUC varies significantly across test foods (P<.0379 with the pure QPM grits yielding the lowest IAUC relative to the control by 46.38. Resulting GI values of the test foods (bootstrapped were 80.36 (SEM 14.24, 119.78 (SEM 18.81, and 93.17 (SEM 27.27 for pure QPM grits, milled rice, and rice-QPM grits mixture, respectively. Conclusion. Pure QPM corn grits has a lower glycaemic response compared to milled rice and the rice-corn grits mixture, which may be related in part to differences in their dietary fibre composition and physicochemical characteristics. Pure QPM corn grits may be a more health beneficial food for diabetic and hyperlipidemic individuals.

  20. Glycaemic control in a cardiothoracic surgical population: Exploring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glycaemic control constitutes an important component in the management of critically ill ... protocols simplifies processes, standardises care, facilitates patient safety, .... Shift work, and in particular working night shifts, is recognised as a source.

  1. Assessment of nutritional quality, glycaemic index, antidiabetic and sensory properties of plantain (Musa paradisiaca)-based functional dough meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famakin, Opeyemi; Fatoyinbo, Akindele; Ijarotimi, Oluwole Steve; Badejo, Adebanjo Ayobamidele; Fagbemi, Tayo Nathaniel

    2016-11-01

    Nutrition transition to high energy-dense foods has been implicated as the major causes of diet related diseases. Plantain-based dough meals supplemented with soybean cake and cassava fibre were developed by combining them in different proportions using response surface methodology. The flour blends were analyzed for the nutritional composition while the glycaemic index, antidiabetic potentials and protein digestibility of the dough meals were determined in wistar rats. The nutritional and essential amino acid contents of the flour blends were comparable to that of cerolina (a commercially available food product commonly recommended for diabetic patients). The rats fed with the formulated dough meals had lower glycaemic index and glycaemic load, and the blood glucose was significantly reduced compared to cerolina and metformin (a synthetic antidiabetic drug). All the plantain-based dough meals were comparable to cerolina and metformin in terms of nutritional quality and blood glycaemic control activities, respectively. Hence, the formulated plantain-based dough meals have potential to be used for the prevention and management of diabetes mellitus.

  2. [Research and control of relapse tuberculosis cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Fumio; Toyota, Makoto

    2009-12-01

    lesions in chest X-p, sputum smear positive and heavy alcohol-drinkers. The factors leading to defaulting of the treatment were lack in understanding of the treatment and their economic problems. Reexamination of the treatment and support of the patients are important to prevent the retreatment of the pulmonary tuberculosis. 6. Proportion of drug resistance among relapse tuberculosis cases, summary of Ryoken studies 1977-2002: Takashi YOSHIYAMA (Fukujuji Hospital). We have no historical analysis of the proportion of drug resistance among relapse TB cases. Therefore we would like to analyze the proportion of drug resistance among relapse cases in Japan. Re-analysis of the data of drug susceptibility survey of Ryoken from 1977 to 2002. The proportion of relapse cases among Ryoken has decreased in 1982-1987 and that proportion was 10% in 2002. The average age of relapse cases was 5 years older than the new cases and it was 66 years in 2002. The proportion of drug resistance among relapse cases has decreased form 39% (in 1977) to 16% (in 2002) for isoniazid, was stable and around 10% for rifampicin with 7.5% in 2002. The risk factors for drug resistance were younger age, foreigners and part time job. The proportion of drug resistance was higher among cases that were failure with previous treatment, then default with previous treatment and lower among cases with cure/completion at the previous treatment but this tendency was without significance.

  3. Randomised controlled trial of the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a peer-delivered self-management intervention to prevent relapse in crisis resolution team users: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sonia; Mason, Oliver; Osborn, David; Milton, Alyssa; Henderson, Claire; Marston, Louise; Ambler, Gareth; Hunter, Rachael; Pilling, Stephen; Morant, Nicola; Gray, Richard; Weaver, Tim; Nolan, Fiona; Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor

    2017-10-27

    Crisis resolution teams (CRTs) provide assessment and intensive home treatment in a crisis, aiming to offer an alternative for people who would otherwise require a psychiatric inpatient admission. They are available in most areas in England. Despite some evidence for their clinical and cost-effectiveness, recurrent concerns are expressed regarding discontinuity with other services and lack of focus on preventing future relapse and readmission to acute care. Currently evidence on how to prevent readmissions to acute care is limited. Self-management interventions, involving supporting service users in recognising and managing signs of their own illness and in actively planning their recovery, have some supporting evidence, but have not been tested as a means of preventing readmission to acute care in people leaving community crisis care. We thus proposed the current study to test the effectiveness of such an intervention. We selected peer support workers as the preferred staff to deliver such an intervention, as they are well-placed to model and encourage active and autonomous recovery from mental health problems. The CORE (CRT Optimisation and Relapse Prevention) self-management trial compares the effectiveness of a peer-provided self-management intervention for people leaving CRT care, with treatment as usual supplemented by a booklet on self-management. The planned sample is 440 participants, including 40 participants in an internal pilot. The primary outcome measure is whether participants are readmitted to acute care over 1 year of follow-up following entry to the trial. Secondary outcomes include self-rated recovery at 4 and at 18 months following trial entry, measured using the Questionnaire on the Process of Recovery. Analysis will follow an intention to treatment principle. Random effects logistic regression modelling with adjustment for clustering by peer support worker will be used to test the primary hypothesis. The CORE self-management trial was approved

  4. Strengths of families to limit relapse in mentally ill family members ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Relapse prevention in mental health care is important. Utilising the strengths of families can be a valuable approach in relapse prevention. Studies on family strengths have been conducted but little has been done on the strengths of family members to help limit relapse in mental health care users. The purpose ...

  5. The Comparison of the Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavior Therapy and Methadone Maintenance Therapy on Changing Beliefs Related to Substance and Relapse Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taherh Ghorbani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was aimed to compare of the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy and methadone maintenance therapy on changing beliefs toward substance abuse among addicted people. Method: The research method was a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest with witness group. 30 addicted people who were referred to the addiction treatment centers selected by available sampling, and they randomly assigned to three groups namely: cognitive-behavioral therapy, methadone maintenance therapy and witness groups. Substance abuse beliefs questionnaire was administered among all participants before and after intervention. Results: Results showed that in both experimental groups, beliefs toward drug was reduced significantly in comparison with witness group. Conclusion: Cognitive-behavioral therapy can be changed on cognitive mediator variables, like beliefs toward substance therefore, it can reduce the risk of relapse. However, the programs of treatment of substance abuse should be targeted this type of intermediate variables.

  6. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy versus supportive therapy in affective relapse prevention in bipolar patients with a history of trauma: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Alcázar, Ana; Radua, Joaquim; Landín-Romero, Ramon; Blanco, Laura; Madre, Mercè; Reinares, Maria; Comes, Mercè; Jiménez, Esther; Crespo, Jose Manuel; Vieta, Eduard; Pérez, Victor; Novo, Patricia; Doñate, Marta; Cortizo, Romina; Valiente-Gómez, Alicia; Lupo, Walter; McKenna, Peter J; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; Amann, Benedikt L

    2017-04-04

    Up to 60% of patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have a history of traumatic events, which is associated with greater episode severity, higher risk of comorbidity and higher relapse rates. Trauma-focused treatment strategies for BD are thus necessary but studies are currently scarce. The aim of this study is to examine whether Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy focusing on adherence, insight, de-idealisation of manic symptoms, prodromal symptoms and mood stabilization can reduce episode severity and relapse rates and increase cognitive performance and functioning in patients with BD. This is a single-blind, randomized controlled, multicentre trial in which 82 patients with BD and a history of traumatic events will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of two treatment arms: EMDR therapy or supportive therapy. Patients in both groups will receive 20 psychotherapeutic sessions, 60 min each, during 6 months. The primary outcome is a reduction of affective episodes after 12 and 24 months in favour of the EMDR group. As secondary outcome we postulate a greater reduction in affective symptoms in the EMDR group (as measured by the Bipolar Depression Rating Scale, the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression Scale modified for BD), and a better performance in cognitive state, social cognition and functioning (as measured by the Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Psychiatry, The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test and the Functioning Assessment Short Test, respectively). Traumatic events will be evaluated by The Holmes-Rahe Life Stress Inventory, the Clinician-administered PTSD Scale and the Impact of Event Scale. The results of this study will provide evidence whether a specific EMDR protocol for patients with BD is effective in reducing affective episodes, affective symptoms and functional, cognitive and trauma symptoms. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT02634372 . Registered on

  7. Glycaemic index and glycaemic load of selected popular foods consumed in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijuan; Lee, Davina Elizabeth Mei; Tan, Wei Jie Kevin; Ranawana, Dinesh Viren; Quek, Yu Chin Rina; Goh, Hui Jen; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2015-03-14

    The objective of the present study was to determine the glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) values of standard portion sizes of Southeast Asian traditional foods. A total of fifteen popular Southeast Asian foods were evaluated. Of these foods, three were soft drinks, while the other twelve were solid foods commonly consumed in this region. In total, forty-seven healthy participants (eighteen males and twenty-nine females) volunteered to consume either glucose at least twice or one of the fifteen test foods after a 10-12 h overnight fast. Blood glucose concentrations were analysed before consumption of the test food, and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after food consumption, using capillary blood samples. The GI value of each test food was calculated by expressing the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve (IAUC) value of the test food as a percentage of each participant's average IAUC value, with glucose as the reference food. Among the fifteen foods tested, six belonged to low-GI foods (Ice Green Tea, Beehoon, Pandan Waffle, Curry Puff, Youtiao and Kaya Butter Toast), three belonged to medium-GI foods (Barley Drink, Char Siew Pau and Nasi Lemak), and the other six belonged to high-GI foods (Ice Lemon Tea, Chinese Carrot Cake, Chinese Yam Cake, Chee Cheong Fun, Lo Mai Gai and Pink Rice Cake). The GI and GL values of these traditional foods provide valuable information to consumers, researchers and dietitians on the optimal food choice for glycaemic control. Moreover, our dataset provides GI values of fifteen foods that were not previously tested extensively, and it presents values of foods commonly consumed in Southeast Asia.

  8. Impact of dietary fibre-enriched ready-to-eat extruded snacks on the postprandial glycaemic response of non-diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Margaret A; Derbyshire, Emma J; Brennan, Charles S; Tiwari, Brijesh K

    2012-05-01

    Food intervention is a financially sensible way for prevention and treatment of diabetes. Extruded snack foods are considered high glycaemic products. Our previous research illustrated that postprandial glycaemic responses to snacks are manipulated by altering dietary fibre and starch contents. The current research assessed the effect of psyllium and oat bran on postprandial glycaemia and in vitro digestibility. Addition of psyllium fibre to extruded snack products significantly reduced both the in vitro and in vivo glycaemic responses of products compared to a control snack product recipe. Oat bran inclusion reduced in vitro starch digestibility but not in vivo glycaemic response. The inclusion of oat bran into the snack products appeared to extend the glycaemic response of individuals compared to the control snack, suggesting a possibility of prolonging glucose release and potentially affecting satiety responses. The positive effect in attenuating glucose response means that psyllium fibre could be a target for inclusion by the snack food industry to effectively manipulate postprandial glucose response of individuals. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Factors associated with relapse in schizophrenia | Kazadi | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. Early identification and prevention of relapse in patients with schizophrenia has significant therapeutic and socioeconomic implications. The aim of this study was to determine the factors, if any, that may be associated with relapse in a group of patients in Johannesburg. Method. Patients were recruited from mental ...

  10. Glycaemic index and glycaemic load values of a selection of popular foods consumed in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Kris Y; Chan, Ruth; Chan, Dicken; Li, Liz; Leung, Grace; Woo, Jean; Lightowler, Helen J; Henry, C Jeya K

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the present paper is to provide glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) values for a variety of foods that are commonly consumed in Hong Kong and expand on the international GI table of Chinese foods. Fasted healthy subjects were given 50 g of available carbohydrate servings of a glucose reference, which was tested twice, and test foods of various brands of noodles (n 5), instant cereals (n 3) and breads (n 2), which were tested once, on separate occasions. For each test food, tests were repeated in ten healthy subjects. Capillary blood glucose was measured via finger-prick samples in fasting subjects ( - 5, 0 min) and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min after the consumption of each test food. The GI of each test food was calculated geometrically by expressing the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve (IAUC) of each test food as a percentage of each subject's average IAUC for the reference food. GL was calculated as the product of the test food's GI and the amount of available carbohydrate in a reference serving size. The majority of GI values of foods tested were medium (a GI value of 56-69) to high (a GI value of 70 or more) and compared well with previously published values. More importantly, our dataset provides GI values of ten foods previously untested and presents values for foods commonly consumed in Hong Kong.

  11. Multiple Sclerosis Relapses: Epidemiology, Outcomes and Management. A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalincik, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Relapses (episodic exacerbations of neurological signs or symptoms) are a defining feature of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), the most prevalent MS phenotype. While their diagnostic value relates predominantly to the definition of clinically definite MS, their prognostic value is determined by their relatively high associated risk of incomplete remission resulting in residual disability. The mechanisms governing a relapse incidence are unknown, but numerous modifiers of relapse risk have been described, including demographic and clinical characteristics, many of which represent opportunities for improved disease management. Also relapse phenotypes have been associated with patient and disease characteristics and an individual predisposition to certain phenotypic presentations may imply individual neuroanatomical disease patterns. While immunomodulatory therapies and corticosteroids represent the mainstay of relapse prevention and acute management, respectively, their effect has only been partial and further search for more efficient relapse therapies is warranted. Other areas of research include pathophysiology and determinants of relapse incidence, recurrence and phenotypes, including the characteristics of the relapsing and non-relapsing multiple sclerosis variants and their responsiveness to therapies. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Relapsing polychondritis: commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D. Altman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Relapsing Polychondritis (RP is a multisystem disease of unknown etiology characterized by episodic inflammation of cartilage and potentially progressive degeneration of cartilaginous tissue, such as auricular, nasal and laryngotracheobronchial cartilage. However, many other proteoglycan- rich structures may be involved, such as inner ear, eyes, blood vessels, heart and kidneys (1- 4. RP was first described by Jacksh-Wartenhorst in 1923, who named it “polychondropathia” (5. Pearson et al. (6 introduced the term “relapsing polychondritis” in 1960...

  13. Contributors to dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load in the Netherlands: the role of beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluik, Diewertje; Atkinson, Fiona S; Brand-Miller, Jennie C; Fogelholm, Mikael; Raben, Anne; Feskens, Edith J M

    2016-04-14

    Diets high in glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) have been associated with a higher diabetes risk. Beer explained a large proportion of variation in GI in a Finnish and an American study. However, few beers have been tested according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) methodology. We tested the GI of beer and estimated its contribution to dietary GI and GL in the Netherlands. GI testing of pilsner beer (Pilsner Urquell) was conducted at The University of Sydney according to ISO international standards with glucose as the reference food. Subsequently, GI and GL values were assigned to 2556 food items in the 2011 Dutch food composition table using a six-step methodology and consulting four databases. This table was linked to dietary data from 2106 adults in the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey 2007-2010. Stepwise linear regression identified contribution to inter-individual variation in dietary GI and GL. The GI of pilsner beer was 89 (SD 5). Beer consumption contributed to 9·6 and 5·3% inter-individual variation in GI and GL, respectively. Other foods that contributed to the inter-individual variation in GI and GL included potatoes, bread, soft drinks, sugar, candy, wine, coffee and tea. The results were more pronounced in men than in women. In conclusion, beer is a high-GI food. Despite its relatively low carbohydrate content (approximately 4-5 g/100 ml), it still made a contribution to dietary GL, especially in men. Next to potatoes, bread, sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages, beer captured a considerable proportion of between-person variability in GI and GL in the Dutch diet.

  14. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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  15. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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  16. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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  17. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Relapsing-remitting MS ( ... Start Here Colophon Stay Informed Join Us Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Pinterest MS Connection About the Society ...

  18. Glycaemic adverse drug reactions from anti-neoplastics used in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    235625 records ... Glycaemic adverse drug reactions from anti-neoplastics used in treating pancreatic cancer. ... Based on the emphasized nine antineoplastic drugs with high hyperglycemic ADR incidence, we found: fluorouracil, sorafenib and pemetrexed with high ADR record of metabolism and nutrition disorders; ...

  19. Glycaemic and insulinemic response to dietary carbohydrates in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøkner, Christine; Austbø, Dag; Næsset, Jon A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dietary sugar and starch affect plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. Little information is available about the effect of dietary fibre on plasma glucose and insulin concentration. It is hypothesized that different dietary fibre compositions will alter post-prandial glycaemic- an...

  20. Chapter 11: The approach to achieving glycaemic control*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-08

    Nov 8, 2012 ... therapy.3–7 The concept of patient-centred care incorporates patients as ... The SEMDSA approach to glycaemic control does not lose focus of ... patient. South African Family Practice 2018; 60(2):8-16 ... pancreatic cancer.

  1. Role of footcare education in diabetic foot status and glycaemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prevalence of type 2 diabetes among the adult population is rising globally. As the case detection rates of diabetes increase in adult Nigerians, managing the attendant (foot) complications has become an important health challenge. Poor practice of foot care and poor glycaemic control is potential risk for ...

  2. Glycaemic Index Of Boiled Cocoyam And Stew | Alegbejo | Sahel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cocoyam can be processed in several ways. It contains digestible starch, protein and other valuable nutrients. Consumption of cocoyam is very high all over Nigeria. This study was undertaken to determine the glycaemic response of diabetic and healthy subjects to equal amounts of carbohydrate in the form of boiled ...

  3. A case with relapsed transient neonatal diabetes mellitus treated with sulfonylurea, ending chronic insulin requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Ando

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a woman with diabetes mellitus caused by a genetic defect in ABCC8-coding sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1, a subunit of the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP channel protein. She was diagnosed with diabetes at 7 days after birth. After intravenous insulin drip for 1 month, her hyperglycaemia remitted. At the age of 13 years, her diabetes relapsed, and after that she had been treated by intensive insulin therapy for 25 years with relatively poor glycaemic control. She was switched to oral sulfonylurea therapy and attained euglycaemia. In addition, her insulin secretory capacity was ameliorated gradually.

  4. Postpartum smoking relapse--a thematic synthesis of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notley, Caitlin; Blyth, Annie; Craig, Jean; Edwards, Alice; Holland, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Many women quit smoking during pregnancy, but relapse after the baby is born. To understand why and identify ways of preventing this, this study reviewed the qualitative literature on women's experience of postpartum smoking relapse. A systematic review of qualitative studies and process evaluations of trials. We undertook a thematic synthesis of published qualitative data. We screened 1336 papers. Twenty-two papers reporting on 16 studies were included, reporting on the views of 1031 postpartum women. Factors affecting relapse and barriers and facilitators to relapse prevention were identified around the key themes of beliefs, social influences, motivation, physiological factors and identity. Women's beliefs about smoking as a means of coping with stress and the need for social support, especially from a partner, emerged as important. Extrinsic motivation to quit during the pregnancy (for the health of the fetus) appeared to be a factor in prompting relapse after the baby was born. During the immediate postpartum period women believed that physiological changes influence cigarette cravings. The stress of caring for a newborn, sleeplessness and adjusting to a new mothering identity were also reported to be important. Among women who quit smoking during pregnancy, those who relapse postpartum talk commonly about no longer needing to protect the baby and the effects of stress. Partner support and a sense of changed identity are cited as factors preventing relapse. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Kiwifruit Non-Sugar Components Reduce Glycaemic Response to Co-Ingested Cereal in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Mishra

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Kiwifruit (KF effects on the human glycaemic response to co-ingested wheat cereal were determined. Participants (n = 20 consumed four meals in random order, all being made to 40 g of the same available carbohydrate, by adding kiwifruit sugars (KF sug; glucose, fructose, sucrose 2:2:1 to meals not containing KF. The meals were flaked wheat biscuit (WB+KFsug, WB+KF, WB+guar gum+KFsug, WB+guar gum+KF, that was ingested after fasting overnight. Blood glucose was monitored 3 h and hunger measured at 180 min post-meal using a visual analogue scale. KF and guar reduced postprandial blood glucose response amplitude, and prevented subsequent hypoglycaemia that occurred with WB+KFsug. The area between the blood glucose response curve and baseline from 0 to 180 min was not significantly different between meals, 0–120 min areas were significantly reduced by KF and/or guar. Area from 120 to 180 min was positive for KF, guar, and KF+guar, while the area for the WB meal was negative. Hunger at 180 min was significantly reduced by KF and/or guar when compared with WB. We conclude that KF components other than available carbohydrate may improve the glycaemic response profile to co-ingested cereal food.

  6. Extinction of relapsed fear does not require the basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingawi, Nura W; Westbrook, R Frederick; Laurent, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    It is well established that extinguished fears are restored with the passage of time or a change in physical context. These fear restoration phenomena are believed to mimic the conditions under which relapse occurs in patients that have been treated for anxiety disorders by means of cue-exposure therapy. Here, we used a rodent model to extinguish relapsed fear and assess whether this new extinction prevents further relapse. We found that activity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) is required to initially extinguish conditioned fear, but this activity was not necessary to subsequently extinguish relapsed fear. That is, extinction of spontaneously recovered or renewed fear was spared by BLA inactivation. Yet, this BLA-independent learning of extinction did not protect against further relapse: extinction of relapsed fear conducted without BLA activity was still likely to return after the passage of time or a shift in physical context. These findings have important clinical implications. They indicate that pharmacological agents with anxiolytic properties may disrupt initial cue-exposure therapy but may be useful when therapy is again needed due to relapse. However, they also suggest that these agents will not protect against further relapse, implying the need for developing drugs that target other brain regions involved in fear inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Smoking relapse situations among a community-recruited sample of Spanish daily smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro, Bárbara; López-Durán, Ana; Martínez-Vispo, Carmela; Fernández Del Río, Elena; Martínez, Úrsula; Rodríguez-Cano, Rubén; Míguez, M Carmen; Becoña, Elisardo

    2017-12-01

    Relapse is a common factor within the behavior change process. However, there is scarce and limited knowledge of smoking relapse situations in population-based samples. The aim of this study was to identify smoking relapse situations among a sample of Spanish relapsers from the general population. A sample of 775 relapsers was recruited among the general population using a snowball method. Participants completed a survey including sociodemographic, smoking-related and psychopathology variables. Smoking relapse situations were identified through specific questions assessing different aspects related to the last relapse episode. The majority of smoking relapse situations were attributed to positive affect (36.6%) and negative affect (34.3%), followed by lack of control (10.1%), smoking habit (6.7%), craving or nicotine withdrawal (6.3%), and social pressure (5.9%). Being unemployed and having a mental disorder in the past increased the likelihood of relapse in situations of negative affect. Being single and having quit smoking to save money were associated with an increased likelihood of relapse in situations of positive affect. Affect plays a significant role in smoking relapse among a community sample of unassisted Spanish smokers. Relapse may be much more of an affective and situational process than a habit, physiological or social pressure. Findings from this study may help develop tailored community smoking relapse prevention strategies or programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Recurrence and Relapse in Bipolar Mood Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gh Mousavi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy in acute phase of bipolar mood disorder, patients often experience relapses or recurrent episodes. Hospitalization of patients need a great deal of financial and humanistic resources which can be saved through understanding more about the rate of relapse and factors affecting this rate. Methods: In a descriptive analytical study, 380 patients with bipolar disorder who were hospitalized in psychiatric emergency ward of Noor hospital, Isfahan, Iran, were followed. Each patient was considered for; the frequency of relapse and recurrence, kind of pharmachotherapy, presence of psychotherapeutic treatments, frequency of visits by psychiatrist and the rank of present episode. Results: The overall prevalence of recurrence was 42.2%. Recurrence was lower in patients using lithium carbonate or sodium valproate or combined therapy (about 40%, compared to those using carbamazepine (80%. Recurrence was higher in patients treated with only pharmacotherapy (44.5% compared to those treated with both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (22.2%. Patients who were visited monthy by psychiatrist had lower rate of recurrence compared to those who had irregular visits. Conclusion: The higher rate of recurrence observed in carbamazepine therapy may be due to its adverse reactions and consequently poor compliance to this drug. Lower rates of recurrence with psychotherapy and regular visits may be related to the preventive effects of these procedures and especially to the effective management of stress. Keywords: Bipolar Mood Disorder, Recurrence, Relapse.

  9. Influence of bread volume on glycaemic response and satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Pat; Lightowler, Helen J

    2006-11-01

    The role of carbohydrates in health and disease has received a high profile in recent years, in particular the glycaemic index (GI) as a physiological classification of carbohydrate foods. A common carbohydrate source in the UK is white bread, which is considered to have a high GI value and low satiety value. In the present study, the possibility of favourably altering the GI of white bread by manipulating bread structure (loaf form) was investigated. In a randomised repeated-measures design, ten subjects were tested for glycaemic and satiety responses to four loaves of varying volume, but of consistent macronutrient content. Peak plasma glucose levels and GI values were shown to be significantly reduced by lowering loaf volume (P=0.007, Pbread, which is generally considered to be high-GI and low-SI, can favourably alter metabolic and appetite responses. Relatively small differences in the GI of regularly consumed starch foods have been shown to have beneficial effects on health.

  10. Pharmacological interventions for alcohol relapse prevention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internet Journal of Medical Update - EJOURNAL. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10, No 2 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. Relapsing Polychondritis Following Alopecia Areata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Starr

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of alopecia areata followed by relapsing polychondritis is presented. Similar cases from the literature are reviewed and speculation about the relationship of these diseases is offered. Although the occurrence of these diseases together could be coincidental, an association seems immunologically plausible. Thus, relapsing polychondritis might be an unusual systemic manifestation of alopecia areata.

  12. Intra and interpersonal determinants for relapse in drug addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cristina Zerwes Ferreira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive qualitative research conducted with 20 drug addicts during treatment at a Center of Psychosocial Attention for Alcohol and other Drugs, aimed to identify intra and interpersonal determinants of relapse perceived by the drug addict. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews, submitted to Content Analysis, and organized into categories following predictive determinants for relapse. The relapse occurred by intrapersonal determinants, as self-efficacy expressed by self-confidence in interrupting the drug consumption; the result expectation by anticipation of pleasurable drug effects; the motivation by the absence of volition to interrupt the consumption; coping with the difficulty to confront daily problems; negative and positive emotional states; and craving. Interpersonal determinants expressed by social support were related to the influence of thirds. The identification of these determinants during treatment to favor relapse prevention and effective rehabilitation.

  13. Persistent poor glycaemic control in adult Type 1 diabetes. A closer look at the problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeVries, J. H.; Snoek, F. J.; Heine, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Around 25% of the adult Type 1 diabetes population is in persistent poor glycaemic control and thus at increased risk of developing microvascular complications. We here discuss correlates of long-standing poor glycaemic control and review the efficacy of clinical strategies designed to overcome

  14. quality of glycaemic control in ambulatory diabetics at the out-patient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2003-08-08

    Aug 8, 2003 ... Conclusion: The majority of ambulatory diabetic patients attending the out-patient diabetic clinic had poor glycaemic control. The group with the poorest level of glycaemic control were on OHA-only, while best control was observed amongst patients on diet-only, because of possible fair endogenous insulin ...

  15. Glycaemic response of proso millet-based (Panicum miliaceum) products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, Matthew B; Ferenc, Agota; Smolkova, Katarina; Lazier, Alexander; Tucker, Amy; Seetharaman, Koushik; Wright, Amanda; Duizer, Lisa M; Ramdath, D Dan

    2017-11-01

    The glycaemic response of millet foods and the effect of processing are not known. Therefore, decorticated proso millet was used to produce four types of common food products (biscuits, couscous, porridge and an extruded snack). Postprandial blood glucose response of these products (all containing 50 g of total starch) was compared to the same foods produced with refined corn, in a crossover human study with 12 healthy male participants (age 26.3 ± 3.8 yr; BMI 23.3 ± 2.8 kg/m 2 ). Capillary blood samples were collected and glycaemic response was determined; differences were assessed using repeat measures ANOVA. Overall, the mean (±SEM) incremental area under the blood glucose response curve (mmol min/l) of the proso millet products was different from the corn products, but individual products (couscous = 66.7 ± 11.6, biscuit = 82.6 ± 13.7, extrudate = 198.7 ± 20.9, porridge = 40.1 ± 5.8) were not significantly lower (couscous = 43.5 ± 5.8, biscuit = 102.0 ± 10.3, extrudate = 198.7 ± 20.9, porridge = 52.2 ± 8.1) (p > .05). Glycaemic response of the products was not dependent on the grain type, but rather product matrix.

  16. 4-aminopyridyl-based lead compounds targeting CYP51 prevent spontaneous parasite relapse in a chronic model and improve cardiac pathology in an acute model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Claudia Magalhaes; Choi, Jun Yong; Thomas, Diane; Suzuki, Brian; Hirata, Ken; Lostracco-Johnson, Sharon; de Mesquita, Liliane Batista; Nogueira, Alanderson; Meuser-Batista, Marcelo; Silva, Tatiana Araujo; Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage; Roush, William R; de Souza Pereira, Mirian Claudia; McKerrow, James H; Podust, Larissa M

    2017-12-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is the leading cause of heart failure in Latin America. The clinical treatment of Chagas disease is limited to two 60 year-old drugs, nifurtimox and benznidazole, that have variable efficacy against different strains of the parasite and may lead to severe side effects. CYP51 is an enzyme in the sterol biosynthesis pathway that has been exploited for the development of therapeutics for fungal and parasitic infections. In a target-based drug discovery program guided by x-ray crystallography, we identified the 4-aminopyridyl-based series of CYP51 inhibitors as being efficacious versus T.cruzi in vitro; two of the most potent leads, 9 and 12, have now been evaluated for toxicity and efficacy in mice. Both acute and chronic animal models infected with wild type or transgenic T. cruzi strains were evaluated. There was no evidence of toxicity in the 28-day dosing study of uninfected animals, as judged by the monitoring of multiple serum and histological parameters. In two acute models of Chagas disease, 9 and 12 drastically reduced parasitemia, increased survival of mice, and prevented liver and heart injury. None of the compounds produced long term sterile cure. In the less severe acute model using the transgenic CL-Brenner strain of T.cruzi, parasitemia relapsed upon drug withdrawal. In the chronic model, parasitemia fell to a background level and, as evidenced by the bioluminescence detection of T. cruzi expressing the red-shifted luciferase marker, mice remained negative for 4 weeks after drug withdrawal. Two immunosuppression cycles with cyclophosphamide were required to re-activate the parasites. Although no sterile cure was achieved, the suppression of parasitemia in acutely infected mice resulted in drastically reduced inflammation in the heart. The positive outcomes achieved in the absence of sterile cure suggest that the target product profile in anti-Chagasic drug discovery should be revised in favor of

  17. Glycaemic indices of different varieties of rice grown in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettiarachchi, P; Jiffry, M T; Jansz, E R; Wickramasinghe, A R; Fernando, D J

    2001-03-01

    Varieties of red raw rice are widely believed to have a better nutritional quality. The physiological effects of consuming different varieties of rice may not be so. The glycaemic index has been developed as an indicator of the physiological effect of foods. It is the glycaemic response of a 50 g carbohydrate portion of food expressed as a percentage of that of a standard. The objective of this study was to determine the glycaemic indices of different varieties of rice grown in Sri Lanka. Digestible carbohydrate content of 11 varieties of rice flour and bread were determined. Fasting blood samples followed by half-hourly samples for two hours were drawn after giving portions of either cooked rice or bread containing 50 g carbohydrate each. Fibre mill in Gampaha district. Twenty-two fibre mill workers aged between 25 and 50 years. The area under the blood glucose curve (AUC) for varieties of rice for a subject was calculated. Average AUC of 3 values for bread were calculated. Glycaemic index of each variety of rice was determined from the above variables. Glycaemic indices of varieties of rice differ. The glycaemic indices of varieties of red raw rice varied between 56 and 73 and the variety Bg 350 had the lowest glycaemic index. There was no significant difference between mean glycaemic index of varieties of white raw and some varieties of red raw rice (p = 0.2). Parboiled varieties of red raw rice had a significantly lower glycaemic index than white raw rice (p = 0.04) and some of the red raw rice (p = 0.005). The glycaemic index cannot be predicted from the colour of the rice grain. Red parboiled varieties of rice and Bg 350 can be recommended for patients with diabetes.

  18. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in RRMS; however, each person's experience with RRMS will be unique. Following a relapse, the new symptoms ... and worsening, you and your MS care provider will likely want to consider a more aggressive treatment ...

  19. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... course – is characterized by clearly defined attacks of new or increasing neurologic symptoms. These attacks – also called ... either active (with relapses and/or evidence of new MRI activity) or not active , as well as ...

  20. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... defined attacks of new or increasing neurologic symptoms. These attacks – also called relapses or exacerbations – are followed ... as well as the nerve fibers themselves. During these inflammatory attacks, activated immune cells cause small, localized ...

  1. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Treating MS Comprehensive Care Find an MS Care Provider Medications Managing Relapses Rehabilitation Complementary & Alternative Medicines For Clinicians Resources & Support Library & Education Programs Find Support Advanced Care ...

  2. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Rule Out For Clinicians Treating MS Comprehensive Care Find an MS Care Provider Medications Managing Relapses Rehabilitation ... Medicines For Clinicians Resources & Support Library & Education Programs Find Support Advanced Care Needs Resources for Specific Populations ...

  3. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... the periods of remission. At different points in time, RRMS can be further characterized as either active ( ... increase in disability over a specified period of time following a relapse) or not worsening . An increase ...

  4. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... attacks of inflammation (relapses) in the CNS, progressive forms of MS involve much less of this type ... and memory or information processing). People with progressive forms of MS are more likely to experience gradually ...

  5. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... Team Make the Most of Your Doctor Visits Advance Medical Directives d Find an MS Care Provider ... in RRMS; however, each person's experience with RRMS will be unique. Following a relapse, the new symptoms ...

  6. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

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    Full Text Available ... as shown by the arrows, often occur as part of a relapse. However, new MRI lesions indicating ... course of your disease at different points in time helps you and your MS care provider discuss ...

  7. Snack bar compositions and their acute glycaemic and satiety effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mary R; Parsons, Andrew; Whalley, Gillian A; Kelleher, John; Rush, Elaine C

    Maintaining blood glucose within homeostatic limits and eating foods that sup-press hunger and promote satiety have beneficial impacts for health. This study investigated the glycaemic re-sponse and satiety effects of a serving size of a healthier snack bar, branded Nothing Else, that met the required nutrient profiling score criteria for a health claim, in comparison to two top-selling commercial snack bars. In an experimental study, 24 participants aged >=50 years were recruited. On three different days blood glucose concentration was measured twice at baseline and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after consumption of a serving size of each bar. Satiety effects were self-reported hunger, fullness, desire to eat, and amount could eat ratings on visual analogue scales. The incremental area under the blood glucose response curve (iAUC) over two hours for the Nothing Else bar was 30% lower than commercial Bar 2 (pbar induced the highest fullness rating and lowest hunger rating among the three snack bars. At two hours, fullness induced by the Nothing Else bar was twice that of Bar 2 (p=0.019), but not different to Bar 1 (p=0.212). The Nothing Else snack bar developed using the nutrient profiling scheme as a guideline, with its high protein and dietary fibre contents, had a lower glycaemic impact and induced a higher subjective satiety than the two commercial snack bars of equal weight.

  8. Dietary glycaemic load associated with cognitive performance in elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Susan E; O'Connor, Eibhlís M; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine; O'Toole, Paul W; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Jeffery, Ian B

    2015-06-01

    Ageing is associated with loss of cognitive function and an increased risk of dementia which is expected to place growing demands on health and long-term care providers. Among multiple causative factors, evidence suggests that cognitive impairment in older subjects may be influenced by diet. The objective of this study was to examine the association between dietary patterns, dietary glycaemic load (GL) and cognition in older Irish adults. Community-dwelling subjects (n 208; 94 males and 114 females; aged 64-93 years) were analysed. Dietary intake was assessed using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Cognitive capacity was tested using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The data were clustered to derive patterns of dietary intake. Multivariable-adjusted logistic and Poisson regression models were used to examine the relationship between dietary GL and MMSE score. Elderly subjects consuming 'prudent' dietary patterns (high in fruit, vegetables, fish, low-fat dairy and salad dressings and low in red meat and white bread) had higher MMSE scores (better cognitive function) than those consuming 'Western' dietary pattern (high in red meat and white bread and low in fruit and vegetables; P nutritional status, residential property price, cardiovascular medications and energy intake. In this community-dwelling elderly Irish cohort, consumption of a high glycaemic diet is associated with poorer cognitive performance as assessed by the MMSE.

  9. Understanding barriers to glycaemic control from the patient's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janes R

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To better understand barriers to glycaemic control from the patient's perspective. METHODS: An interpretative phenomenological approach was used to study the experiences of 15 adults with Type 2 diabetes. Participants each gave a semi-structured interview of their experiences of living with diabetes. Interviews were transcribed, and themes extracted and organised using a patientcentred framework. FINDINGS: Participants' stories confirmed many of the barriers in the literature, particularly those related to context, such as family, finances, work. Barriers also related to negative emotional reactions to diabetes: fear of new events (diagnosis, starting pills/insulin; guilt about getting diabetes and not controlling it; and shame about having diabetes. Barriers also related to unscientific beliefs and personal beliefs. There were additional barriers related to poor clinician-patient relationships. Overall, participants had a poor understanding of diabetes, and complained that their clinician simply 'told them what to do'. CONCLUSION: Using a patient-centred approach, this study identified many barriers to glycaemic control. We suggest that a key barrier is clinician ignorance of their patients' fears, beliefs, expectations, context; of what constitutes a positive therapeutic relationship; and of the limitations of a biomedical approach to patient non-adherence. Faced with both a worsening diabetes epidemic and increasing health care workforce shortages, clinicians urgently need to understand that it is they, not their patients, who must change their approach if diabetes care is to be improved.

  10. Intestinal Microbiota and Relapse After Hematopoietic-Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Jonathan U; Devlin, Sean M; Staffas, Anna; Lumish, Melissa; Khanin, Raya; Littmann, Eric R; Ling, Lilan; Kosuri, Satyajit; Maloy, Molly; Slingerland, John B; Ahr, Katya F; Porosnicu Rodriguez, Kori A; Shono, Yusuke; Slingerland, Ann E; Docampo, Melissa D; Sung, Anthony D; Weber, Daniela; Alousi, Amin M; Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Ponce, Doris M; Barker, Juliet N; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Giralt, Sergio A; Taur, Ying; Pamer, Eric G; Jenq, Robert R; van den Brink, Marcel R M

    2017-05-20

    Purpose The major causes of mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (allo-HCT) are relapse, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and infection. We have reported previously that alterations in the intestinal flora are associated with GVHD, bacteremia, and reduced overall survival after allo-HCT. Because intestinal bacteria are potent modulators of systemic immune responses, including antitumor effects, we hypothesized that components of the intestinal flora could be associated with relapse after allo-HCT. Methods The intestinal microbiota of 541 patients admitted for allo-HCT was profiled by means of 16S ribosomal sequencing of prospectively collected stool samples. We examined the relationship between abundance of microbiota species or groups of related species and relapse/progression of disease during 2 years of follow-up time after allo-HCT by using cause-specific proportional hazards in a retrospective discovery-validation cohort study. Results Higher abundance of a bacterial group composed mostly of Eubacterium limosum in the validation set was associated with a decreased risk of relapse/progression of disease (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82 per 10-fold increase in abundance; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.95; P = .009). When the patients were categorized according to presence or absence of this bacterial group, presence also was associated with less relapse/progression of disease (HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.87; P = .01). The 2-year cumulative incidences of relapse/progression among patients with and without this group of bacteria were 19.8% and 33.8%, respectively. These associations remained significant in multivariable models and were strongest among recipients of T-cell-replete allografts. Conclusion We found associations between the abundance of a group of bacteria in the intestinal flora and relapse/progression of disease after allo-HCT. These might serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets to prevent relapse and improve survival after allo-HCT.

  11. Enhanced gamma interferon responses of mouse spleen cells following immunotherapy for tuberculosis relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Olga; Vilaplana, Cristina; Guirado, Evelyn; Díaz, Jorge; Cáceres, Neus; Singh, Mahavir; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2008-11-01

    Gamma interferon responses of spleen cells in mice were examined during postchemotherapy relapse of intraperitoneally induced latent tuberculous infection. The mycobacterial extract RUTI, which prevented the relapse, significantly enhanced the immune responses to secreted and structural recombinant mycobacterial antigens, suggesting that RUTI-mediated protection was mediated by activated T cells.

  12. Glycaemic index and glycaemic load of breakfast predict cognitive function and mood in school children: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micha, Renata; Rogers, Peter J; Nelson, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The macronutrient composition of a breakfast that could facilitate performance after an overnight fast remains unclear. As glucose is the brain's major energy source, the interest is in investigating meals differing in their blood glucose-raising potential. Findings vary due to unaccounted differences in glucoregulation, arousal and cortisol secretion. We investigated the effects of meals differing in glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) on cognition and mood in school children. A total of seventy-four school children were matched and randomly allocated either to the high-GL or low-GL group. Within each GL group, children received high-GI and low-GI breakfasts. Cognitive function (CF) and mood were measured 95-140 min after breakfast. Blood glucose and salivary cortisol were measured at baseline, before and after the CF tests. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used to identify differences in CF, mood, glucose and cortisol levels between the breakfasts. Low-GI meals predicted feeling more alert and happy, and less nervous and thirsty (P breakfast, and high-GI meals increased cortisol levels (P breakfast may help to improve learning, and of potential value in informing government education policies relating to dietary recommendations and implementation concerning breakfast.

  13. Adding glycaemic index and glycaemic load functionality to DietPLUS, a Malaysian food composition database and diet intake calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Sangeetha; Wai, Tony Ng Kock; Arshad, Fatimah

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the methodology to add glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) functionality to food DietPLUS, a Microsoft Excel-based Malaysian food composition database and diet intake calculator. Locally determined GI values and published international GI databases were used as the source of GI values. Previously published methodology for GI value assignment was modified to add GI and GL calculators to the database. Two popular local low GI foods were added to the DietPLUS database, bringing up the total number of foods in the database to 838 foods. Overall, in relation to the 539 major carbohydrate foods in the Malaysian Food Composition Database, 243 (45%) food items had local Malaysian values or were directly matched to International GI database and another 180 (33%) of the foods were linked to closely-related foods in the GI databases used. The mean ± SD dietary GI and GL of the dietary intake of 63 women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus, calculated using DietPLUS version3 were, 62 ± 6 and 142 ± 45, respectively. These values were comparable to those reported from other local studies. DietPLUS version3, a simple Microsoft Excel-based programme aids calculation of diet GI and GL for Malaysian diets based on food records.

  14. Relapse in Schizophrenia: Definitively not a Bolt from the Blue

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Španiel, F.; Bakstein, E.; Anýž, J.; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Sieger, T.; Hrdlička, J.; Görnerová, N.; Höschl, C.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 669, 16 March (2018), s. 68-74 ISSN 0304-3940 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NT14387 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : schizophrenia * early warning signs * relapse * prevention * telemedicine * information technology Subject RIV: FL - Psychiatry, Sexuology Impact factor: 2.180, year: 2016

  15. Anti-HBV DNA vaccination does not prevent relapse after discontinuation of analogues in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B: a randomised trial--ANRS HB02 VAC-ADN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, H; Kahi, S; Chazallon, C; Bourgine, M; Varaut, A; Buffet, C; Godon, O; Meritet, J F; Saïdi, Y; Michel, M L; Scott-Algara, D; Aboulker, J P; Pol, S

    2015-01-01

    The antiviral efficacy of nucleos(t)ide analogues whose main limitation is relapse after discontinuation requires long-term therapy. To overcome the risk of relapse and virological breakthrough during long-term therapy, we performed a phase I/II, open, prospective, multicentre trial using a HBV envelope-expressing DNA vaccine. 70 patients treated effectively with nucleos(t)ide analogues for a median of 3 years (HBV DNA 120 IU/mL) or impossibility of stopping treatment at week 48. Reactivation occurred in 97% of each group after a median 28 days without liver failure but with an HBV DNA <2000 IU/mL in 33%; 99% of adverse reactions were mild to moderate. Immune responses were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot and proliferation assays: there was no difference in the percentage of patients with interferon-γ secreting cells and a specific T-cell proliferation to HBcAg but not to HBsAg after reactivation in each group. Although it is fairly well tolerated, the HBV DNA vaccine does not decrease the risk of relapse in HBV-treated patients or the rate of virological breakthrough, and does not restore the anti-HBV immune response despite effective viral suppression by analogues. NCT00536627. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. A Low Glycaemic Index Diet in Pregnancy Induces DNA Methylation Variation in Blood of Newborns: Results from the ROLO Randomised Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisling A. Geraghty

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The epigenetic profile of the developing fetus is sensitive to environmental influence. Maternal diet has been shown to influence DNA methylation patterns in offspring, but research in humans is limited. We investigated the impact of a low glycaemic index dietary intervention during pregnancy on offspring DNA methylation patterns using a genome-wide methylation approach. Sixty neonates were selected from the ROLO (Randomised cOntrol trial of LOw glycaemic index diet to prevent macrosomia study: 30 neonates from the low glycaemic index intervention arm and 30 from the control, whose mothers received no specific dietary advice. DNA methylation was investigated in 771,484 CpG sites in free DNA from cord blood serum. Principal component analysis and linear regression were carried out comparing the intervention and control groups. Gene clustering and pathway analysis were also explored. Widespread variation was identified in the newborns exposed to the dietary intervention, accounting for 11% of the total level of DNA methylation variation within the dataset. No association was found with maternal early-pregnancy body mass index (BMI, infant sex, or birthweight. Pathway analysis identified common influences of the intervention on gene clusters plausibly linked to pathways targeted by the intervention, including cardiac and immune functioning. Analysis in 60 additional samples from the ROLO study failed to replicate the original findings. Using a modest-sized discovery sample, we identified preliminary evidence of differential methylation in progeny of mothers exposed to a dietary intervention during pregnancy.

  17. The effects of corn silk on glycaemic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianyou; Liu, Tongjun; Han, Linna; Liu, Yongmei

    2009-11-23

    Corn silk contains proteins, vitamins, carbohydrates, Ca, K, Mg and Na salts, fixed and volatile oils, steroids such as sitosterol and stigmasterol, alkaloids, saponins, tannins, and flavonoids. Base on folk remedies, corn silk has been used as an oral antidiabetic agent in China for decades. However, the hypoglycemic activity of it has not yet been understood in terms of modern pharmacological concepts. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of corn silk on glycaemic metabolism. Alloxan and adrenalin induced hyperglycemic mice were used in the study. The effects of corn silk on blood glucose, glycohemoglobin (HbA1c), insulin secretion, damaged pancreatic beta-cells, hepatic glycogen and gluconeogenesis in hyperglycemic mice were studied respectively. After the mice were orally administered with corn silk extract, the blood glucose and the HbA1c were significantly decreased in alloxan-induced hyperglycemic mice (p corn silk extract 15 days later. Also, the body weight of the alloxan-induced hyperglycemic mice was increased gradually. However, ascension of blood glucose induced by adrenalin and gluconeogenesis induced by L-alanine were not inhibited by corn silk extract treatment (p > 0.05). Although corn silk extract increased the level of hepatic glycogen in the alloxan-induced hyperglycemic mice, there was no significant difference between them and that of the control group(p > 0.05). Corn silk extract markedly reduced hyperglycemia in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. The action of corn silk extract on glycaemic metabolism is not via increasing glycogen and inhibiting gluconeogenesis but through increasing insulin level as well as recovering the injured beta-cells. The results suggest that corn silk extract may be used as a hypoglycemic food or medicine for hyperglycemic people in terms of this modern pharmacological study.

  18. Insulinaemic and glycaemic responses to three forages in ponies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carslake, H B; Argo, C McG; Pinchbeck, G L; Dugdale, A H A; McGowan, C M

    2018-05-01

    Reduction of the hyperinsulinaemic response to feeding is central to the management of insulin dysregulation (ID). The aim of this study was to compare insulinaemic and glycaemic responses to soaked hay, dry hay and haylage in ponies. Twelve ponies of mixed breeds were maintained under identical management conditions. A randomised four-way crossover trial was conducted, in which fasted animals were fed a meal of 0.25% body weight as dry matter intake soaked hay, dry hay or haylage, or administered an oral glucose test (OGT). Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations were measured before and at 2h following OGT, and regularly for 5h following forage meals. Median and interquartile range (IQR) area under the curve (AUC) for insulin (AUC i ) was greater for haylage (median 6495; IQR 17352) vs. dry hay (2932; IQR 5937; P=0.019) and soaked hay (1066; IQR 1753; P=0.002), and greater for dry hay vs. soaked hay (P=0.002). The AUC for glucose (AUC g ) was lower for soaked hay (1021; IQR 99) vs. dry hay (1075; IQR 105; P=0.002) and haylage (1107; IQR 221; P=0.003). Six ponies were classified as having ID based on the OGT. AUC i was greater in ID vs. non-ID ponies after all forages. In contrast, there was no detectable effect of ID status on AUC g . On an equivalent dry matter basis, soaked hay produced the lowest insulinaemic and glycaemic responses to feeding, while haylage produced the highest responses. The insulinaemic effects of all forages were greater in ponies with ID. These data support the practice of soaking hay with water to reduce postprandial insulinaemic responses in ponies. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of corn silk on glycaemic metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Linna

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corn silk contains proteins, vitamins, carbohydrates, Ca, K, Mg and Na salts, fixed and volatile oils, steroids such as sitosterol and stigmasterol, alkaloids, saponins, tannins, and flavonoids. Base on folk remedies, corn silk has been used as an oral antidiabetic agent in China for decades. However, the hypoglycemic activity of it has not yet been understood in terms of modern pharmacological concepts. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of corn silk on glycaemic metabolism. Methods Alloxan and adrenalin induced hyperglycemic mice were used in the study. The effects of corn silk on blood glucose, glycohemoglobin (HbA1c, insulin secretion, damaged pancreatic β-cells, hepatic glycogen and gluconeogenesis in hyperglycemic mice were studied respectively. Results After the mice were orally administered with corn silk extract, the blood glucose and the HbA1c were significantly decreased in alloxan-induced hyperglycemic mice (p 0.05. Although corn silk extract increased the level of hepatic glycogen in the alloxan-induced hyperglycemic mice, there was no significant difference between them and that of the control group(p > 0.05. Conclusion Corn silk extract markedly reduced hyperglycemia in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. The action of corn silk extract on glycaemic metabolism is not via increasing glycogen and inhibiting gluconeogenesis but through increasing insulin level as well as recovering the injured β-cells. The results suggest that corn silk extract may be used as a hypoglycemic food or medicine for hyperglycemic people in terms of this modern pharmacological study.

  20. Contribution of liver nerves, glucagon, and adrenaline to the glycaemic response to exercise in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Gertjan; Balkan, B.; Lindfeldt, J.; Bouws, G.; Scheurink, A.J.W.; Ahrén, B.; Steffens, A.B.

    1994-01-01

    The contribution of hepatic sympathetic innervation, glucagon and adrenaline to the glycaemic response to exercise was investigated in rats. Hepatically denervated (LDX) or sham operated (SHAM) rats with permanent catheters were therefore submitted to swimming with or without infusion of

  1. Depression relapse and ethological measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hale, WWH; Jansen, JHC; Bouhuys, AL; vandenHoofdakker, RH

    1997-01-01

    Within the framework of interactional theories on depression, the question is raised whether depression relapse can be predicted by observable behavior of remitted patients and their interviewer during an interaction (i.e. discharge interview). Thirty-four patients were interviewed at hospital

  2. Neurocognitive Predictors of Drug Relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Marhe (Reshmi)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide, about 35 million people, that is 0.8% of the world’s adult population, use heroin and/or cocaine and more than 10-13% of these drug users are or will become drug dependent (UNODC, World Drug Report, 2012). Drug dependency is characterized as a chronic relapsing disorder

  3. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treating MS d Comprehensive Care Developing a Healthcare Team Make the Most of Your Doctor Visits Advance Medical Directives d Find an MS Care Provider Partners in MS Care d Managing Relapses Plasmapheresis d Rehabilitation Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) ...

  4. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Become an MS Activist Take Action Current Advocacy Issues Advocacy Results Advocacy News d Raise Awareness d ... MS are more likely to experience gradually worsening problems with walking and mobility, along with whatever other symptoms they may have. Diagnosing relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) Learn More Learn More ... Room MS Prevalence ...

  5. Carbohydrate, dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load, and colorectal cancer risk: a case-control study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Fang, Yu-Jing; Xu, Ming; Luo, Hong; Zhang, Nai-Qi; Huang, Wu-Qing; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Chen, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Cai-Xia

    2018-04-01

    A carbohydrate-rich diet results in hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia; it may further induce the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer. However, epidemiological evidence among Chinese population is quite limited. The aim of this study was to investigate total carbohydrate, non-fibre carbohydrate, total fibre, starch, dietary glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) in relation to colorectal cancer risk in Chinese population. A case-control study was conducted from July 2010 to April 2017, recruiting 1944 eligible colorectal cancer cases and 2027 age (5-year interval) and sex frequency-matched controls. Dietary information was collected by using a validated FFQ. The OR and 95 % CI of colorectal cancer risk were assessed by multivariable logistic regression models. There was no clear association between total carbohydrate intake and colorectal cancer risk. The adjusted OR was 0·85 (95 % CI 0·70, 1·03, P trend=0·08) comparing the highest with the lowest quartile. Total fibre was related to a 53 % reduction in colorectal cancer risk (adjusted ORquartile 4 v. 1 0·47; 95 % CI 0·39, 0·58). However, dietary GI was positively associated with colorectal cancer risk, with an adjusted ORquartile 4 v. 1 of 3·10 (95 % CI 2·51, 3·85). No significant association was found between the intakes of non-fibre carbohydrate, starch and dietary GL and colorectal cancer risk. This study indicated that dietary GI was positively associated with colorectal cancer risk, but no evidence supported that total carbohydrate, non-fibre carbohydrate, starch or high dietary GL intake were related to an increased risk of colorectal cancer in a Chinese population.

  6. Glycaemic variability in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock admitted to an Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, L M; Basile-Filho, A; Nicolini, E A; Dessotte, C A M; Aguiar, G C S; Stabile, A M

    2017-08-01

    Sepsis is associated with morbidity and mortality, which implies high costs to the global health system. Metabolic alterations that increase glycaemia and glycaemic variability occur during sepsis. To verify mean body glucose levels and glycaemic variability in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Retrospective and exploratory study that involved collection of patients' sociodemographic and clinical data and calculation of severity scores. Glycaemia measurements helped to determine glycaemic variability through standard deviation and mean amplitude of glycaemic excursions. Analysis of 116 medical charts and 6730 glycaemia measurements revealed that the majority of patients were male and aged over 60 years. Surgical treatment was the main reason for ICU admission. High blood pressure and diabetes mellitus were the most usual comorbidities. Patients that died during the ICU stay presented the highest SOFA scores and mean glycaemia; they also experienced more hypoglycaemia events. Patients with diabetes had higher mean glycaemia, evaluated through standard deviation and mean amplitude of glycaemia excursions. Organic impairment at ICU admission may underlie glycaemic variability and lead to a less favourable outcome. High glycaemic variability in patients with diabetes indicates that monitoring of these individuals is crucial to ensure better outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of glycaemic status on left ventricular diastolic function in normotensive type 2 diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameedullah; Faheem, M.; Bahadar, S.; Hafizullah, M.; Najeeb, S.

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with Left ventricular diastolic and systolic dysfunction known as diabetic cardiomyopathy. Echocardiography is helpful for the detection of diastolic dysfunction and Echocardiographic screening for asymptomatic diabetic cardiomyopathy should be performed in all asymptomatic diabetic subjects. Identification of diabetic cardiomyopathy should result in the initiation of therapies to prevent the progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The objectives of this Descriptive case series was to determine the effect of glycaemic status on left ventricular diastolic function in normotesive type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: This study was performed at Cardiology department, PGMI Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar from March 2007 to September 2007. Sixty normotesive type 2 diabetic patients were enrolled, 20 well control, 20 moderately control and 20 poorly control (Group- 3). Main outcome measures was Left ventricular diastolic function determined by Echocardiography. Results: Out of 60 patients there were 32 (53.3%) males and 28 (46.7%) females. Mean E/A ratio in Group 1 was 1.38.0.29, in Group 2 was 1.16.0.39 and in Group 3 was 0.60.0.15 (p<0.05). IVRT in Group-1 was 91.7.87 mSec, in Group-2 was 100.7.83 mSec and in Group-3 was 109.6.45 mSec (p<0.05). DT in Group 1 was 207.2 +- 12.6 mSec, in Group 2 was 218.11.3 mSec and in Group 3 was 229.7+- 9.52 mSec (p<0.05). Mean Em at mitral annulus in Group-1 was 0.14 +- 0.04 m/Sec, in Group-2 was 0.11+- 0.04 m/Sec and in Group-3 was 0.10 +- 0.03 m/Sec (p=0.002). Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was documented in 4 (25%) patients in Group-1, 9 (45%) patients in Group-2 and 16 (80%) patients in Group-3 (p<0.05). There was Strong correlation between HbA1c level and diastolic indexes (p<0.05). Conclusion: Diastolic dysfunction is more frequent in poorly controlled diabetic patients and its severity is correlated with glycaemic control. (author)

  8. Relapse prevention and residual symptoms: a closer analysis of placebo-controlled continuation studies with escitalopram in major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Lönn, Sara L; Overø, Kerstin F

    2010-01-01

    -Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores on items 1, 3, and 7 at randomization. RESULTS: All studies showed a statistically significant (P ...-Severity of Illness scores and relapse status in 4 studies published from 2005 to 2007, 1 each in major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), were analyzed using mixed-effects model repeated measures as a function of Montgomery...... > 0) and without residual symptoms (MADRS score = 0) at the start of continuation treatment were defined by how patients scored on 3 core items of the MADRS: depressed mood (observed), inner or psychic tension, and lassitude. At randomization, patients with a residual symptom were globally more ill...

  9. Relapse prevention and residual symptoms: a closer analysis of placebo-controlled continuation studies with escitalopram in major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Lönn, Sara L; Overø, Kerstin F

    2010-01-01

    -Severity of Illness scores and relapse status in 4 studies published from 2005 to 2007, 1 each in major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), were analyzed using mixed-effects model repeated measures as a function of Montgomery......-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores on items 1, 3, and 7 at randomization. RESULTS: All studies showed a statistically significant (P ... > 0) and without residual symptoms (MADRS score = 0) at the start of continuation treatment were defined by how patients scored on 3 core items of the MADRS: depressed mood (observed), inner or psychic tension, and lassitude. At randomization, patients with a residual symptom were globally more ill...

  10. The Cost of Relapse in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Mark; McCrone, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and debilitating mental illness characterised by periods of relapse that require resource intensive management. Quantifying the cost of relapse is central to the evaluation of the cost effectiveness of treating schizophrenia. We aimed to undertake a comprehensive search of the available literature on the cost of relapse. We performed a search on multiple databases (MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and Health Management Information Consortium) for any study reporting a cost of relapse or data from which such a cost could be calculated. Costs are reported in 2015 international dollars. We found 16 studies reporting costs associated with relapse over a defined period of time and identified a cost associated with hospitalisation for relapse in 43 studies. Eight clinical decision analyses also provided cost estimates. Studies from the US report excess costs of relapse of $6033-$32,753 (2015 Purchasing Power Parity dollars [PPP$]) over periods of 12-15 months. European studies report excess costs of $8665-$18,676 (2015 PPP$) over periods of 6-12 months. Estimates of the cost of hospitalisation for relapse are more diverse, and associated with marked differences in typical length of stay across jurisdictions. Wide ranges in the estimated cost of relapse may reflect differences in sample section and relapse definition as well as practice styles and differences in resource costs. Selection of the most appropriate cost estimate should be guided by the definition of relapse and the analysis setting.

  11. IL-6 RESPONSES TO GLYCAEMIC INDEX DURING RECOVERY FROM EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Hasani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study examined the effect of meal with different glycaemic index (GI on plasma IL-6 concentration and glucose metabolism after maximal lengthening contractions of the knee extensors. Using a cross-over design, Material : 10 healthy males completed 5 sets of 10 lengthening (eccentric contractions at 120% 1 repetition-maximum. Subjects were randomized to consume the GI beverage (high-GI, low-GI (15% weight per volume; 3 g/kg BM or placebo in three times within 10 min following exercise, and again at 50 and 110 min during recovery time. Blood samples were collected before exercise and after 0.60, 180 min and 24 h of recovery. Results: Concentration of plasma IL-6 in HGI group was less than LGI and Pla groups. IL-6 tended to significantly increase after exercise in recovery time in 3 groups (all P < 0.05, except for 24 hours (P = 1.00, furthermore there was significant difference for IL-6 between placebo and high glycemic groups in 3hours after exercise (P=.016. Concentration of serum CK in HGI group was less than LGI and Pla groups, CK was significantly elevated at all times points during recovery in 3 groups (all P < 0.05, except for 1 hour after exercise in HGI group (P = 0.31, but there was no significant difference for CK between groups. Conclusion: In summary, consuming HGI carbohydrate during recovery from exercise attenuate plasma IL-6 concentration.

  12. A Low Glycaemic Index Diet Incorporating Isomaltulose Is Associated with Lower Glycaemic Response and Variability, and Promotes Fat Oxidation in Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiani Jeyakumar Henry

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Low glycaemic index (GI foods minimize large blood glucose fluctuations and have been advocated to enhance fat oxidation and may contribute to weight management. We determined whether the inclusion of isomaltulose compared to sucrose in a low/high GI meal sequence can modulate the glycaemic response and substrate oxidation in an Asian population. Twenty Chinese men (body mass index (BMI: 17–28 kg/m2 followed a 24 h low GI (isomaltulose, PalatinoseTM or high GI (sucrose diet in a randomized double-blind, controlled cross-over design. Treatment meals included dinner (day 1, breakfast, lunch, and snack (day 2. Continuous glucose monitoring provided incremental area under the curve (iAUC and mean amplitude of glycaemic excursion (MAGE and 10 h indirect calorimetry (whole body calorimeter (day 2 provided energy expenditure and substrate oxidation. Our results demonstrated that the low GI diet resulted in lower 24 h glucose iAUC (502.5 ± 231.4 vs. 872.6 ± 493.1 mmol/L; p = 0.002 and lower 24 h glycaemic variability (MAGE: 1.67 ± 0.53 vs. 2.68 ± 1.13 mmol/L; p < 0.001. Simultaneously, 10 h respiratory quotient increased more during high GI (p = 0.014 and fat oxidation was higher after low GI breakfast (p = 0.026, lunch (p < 0.001 and snack (p = 0.013. This indicates that lower GI mixed meals incorporating isomaltulose are able to acutely reduce the glycaemic response and variability and promote fat oxidation.

  13. Relapse of imported Plasmodium vivax malaria is related to primaquine dose: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Townell Nicola

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relapsing Plasmodium vivax infection results in significant morbidity for the individual and is a key factor in transmission. Primaquine remains the only licensed drug for prevention of relapse. To minimize relapse rates, treatment guidelines have recently been revised to recommend an increased primaquine dose, aiming to achieve a cumulative dose of ≥6 mg/kg, i.e. ≥420 mg in a 70 kg patient. The aims of this study were to characterize the epidemiology of P. vivax infection imported into Queensland Australia, to determine the rates of relapse, to investigate the use of primaquine therapy, and its efficacy in the prevention of relapse. Methods A retrospective study was undertaken of laboratory confirmed P. vivax infection presenting to the two major tertiary hospitals in Queensland, Australia between January 1999 and January 2011. Primaquine dosing was classified as no dose, low dose ( Results Twenty relapses occurred following 151 primary episodes of P. vivax infection (13.2%. Relapses were confirmed among 3/21 (14.2%, 9/50 (18.0%, 1/54 (1.9% and 7/18 (38.9% of patients administered no dose, low dose, high dose and unknown primaquine dose respectively. High dose primaquine therapy was associated with a significantly lower rate of relapse compared to patients who were prescribed low dose therapy (OR 11.6, 95% CI 1.5-519, p = 0.005. Conclusions Relapse of P. vivax infection is more likely in patients who received low dose primaquine therapy. This study supports the recommendations that high dose primaquine therapy is necessary to minimize relapse of P. vivax malaria.

  14. Alcohol consumption and symptoms as predictors for relapse of DSM-5 alcohol use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuithof, Marlous; ten Have, Margreet; van den Brink, Wim; Vollebergh, Wilma; de Graaf, Ron

    2014-07-01

    Alcohol consumption levels and alcohol use disorder (AUD) symptoms may serve as easily quantifiable markers for AUD relapse after remission and might help prevention workers identify at-risk individuals. We investigated the predictive value of alcohol consumption and AUD symptoms on relapse. Data are from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2 (NEMESIS-2). We selected 506 people in ≥12-month DSM-5 AUD remission at baseline and assessed their status at 3-year follow-up. AUD symptoms and drinking patterns were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 3.0. Time since remission was assessed retrospectively at baseline and ranged from 1 to 48 years. Predictors for relapse were examined using Cox regression analysis. Cumulative AUD relapse rate was 5.6% at 5 years, 9.1% at 10 years and 12.0% at 20 years. Relapse was predicted by both medium (15-28/22-42 drinks weekly for women/men) and high (≥29/43) past alcohol intake, 6+ lifetime AUD symptoms, 'impaired control over use', and at-risk (≥8/15) current intake. The risk of relapse was especially high when medium or high past intake or 6+ lifetime symptoms coincided with current at-risk drinking. Only a minority of people in DSM-5 AUD remission relapsed, but the risk of relapse increased substantially with the presence of at least one of the risk factors. Moreover, at-risk current drinking coupled with other risk factors substantially increased the likelihood of relapse. Therefore, current drinking may provide an adequate reference point for relapse prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mastication effects on the glycaemic index: impact on variability and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranawana, V; Leow, M K-S; Henry, C J K

    2014-01-01

    Glycaemic variability challenges the accuracy and use of the glycaemic index (GI). The purpose of the current study was to determine the role of mastication on GI. Using a randomized, controlled, crossover, non-blind design, 15 healthy young subjects returned on 5 separate days for three glucose and two rice test sessions. At the rice sessions, subjects chewed each mouthful either 15 or 30 times. Rice chewed 15 times produced a total glycaemic response (GR; 155 mmol min/l), peak GR (2.4 mmol/l) and GI (68) significantly lower than when chewed for longer (30 times) (184 mmol min/l, 2.8 mmol/l and 88, respectively). The study shows that the GI of rice is affected by the degree of mastication. Chewing 15 times compared with 30 times significantly attenuates the GI, suggesting that mastication may potentially contribute to the glycaemic variability of rice. While future work must establish the extent and limits to which mastication affects glycaemia, it could also explore the potential of using mastication to reduce the glycaemic load of rice.

  16. Comparative study on resistant starch, amilose content and glycaemic index after precooked process in white rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiwi, V. N.

    2018-03-01

    Rice is a staple food and regarded as a useful carbohydrate source. In general rice is high in glycaemic index (GI) and low colonic fermentation. People are aware of the alterations in blood glucose levels or glycaemic index after consuming rice. Resistant starch (RS) and amylose content play an important role in controlling GI. GI and RS content have been established as important indicators of starch digestibility. The aim of this study was to determine the precooked process with hydrothermal (boiling at 80°C, 10 minutes) and cooling process with low temperature (4°C, 1 h) to increase potential content of RS and decrease of glycaemic index of white rice. There were two stages of this research, 1) preparation of white rice with precooked process; 2) analysis of precooked white rice characteristics (resistant starch, amylose content, and estimated glycaemic index). The result of analysis on precooked white rice showed an increased RS content (1.11%) and white rice (0.99%), but the difference was not statistically significant. The amylose content increased significantly after precooked process in white rice (24.70%) compared with white rice (20.89%). Estimated glycaemic index (EGI) decreased after precooked proses (65.63%) but not significant as compared to white rice (66.47%). From the present study it was concluded that precooked process had no significant impact on increasing RS and decreasing EGI of white rice. This may be due to the relatively short cooling time (1hour) in 4°C.

  17. Revisão sobre o uso da terapia cognitiva-comportamental na prevenção de recaídas e recorrências depressivas: a review Cognitive-behavioral therapy in prevention of depression relapses and recurrences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Moreira de Almeida

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Fazer um levantamento das teorias e revisar as evidências existentes sobre o papel da terapia cognitiva-comportamental (TCC na prevenção de recaídas e recorrências de episódios depressivos. MÉTODO: Revisão dos ensaios clínicos randomizados e controlados que investigam a eficácia da TCC na prevenção de recaídas e/ou recorrências depressivas. As bases de dados consultadas foram o Medline, Lilacs, Cochrane, Biosis e a Embase. Foram verificadas as referências bibliográficas dos artigos selecionados, de artigos de revisão e de livros sobre o tema. RESULTADOS: Foram encontrados 15 estudos de desenhos heterogêneos e vários deles com problemas metodológicos. A maioria comparou o uso de TCC e antidepressivos apenas na fase aguda. Em 12 deles a TCC diminuiu a taxa de recorrência/recaídas de modo estatisticamente significativo. As publicações mais recentes apontam para a utilidade da TCC nos sintomas depressivos residuais como estratégia preventiva de recorrências. CONCLUSÕES: A TCC mostrou-se eficaz na redução de recaídas depressivas, mas ainda precisam ser mais bem investigadas sua eficácia em relação ao uso de antidepressivos e qual estratégia de TCC (seu uso apenas na fase aguda, na fase aguda e manutenção, na manutenção após antidepressivo na fase aguda ou o enfoque nos sintomas residuais após antidepressivo na fase aguda é mais eficaz para cada tipo de paciente.OBJECTIVES: To revise theories and the available evidence about Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT role on the relapse and recurrence prevention of depressive episodes. METHODS: Review of random and controlled clinical trials that investigated CBT efficacy on the relapse and recurrence prevention of depressive episodes. The following databases were used: Medline, Lilacs, Cochrane, Biosis and Embase. The reference sections of the selected articles, review articles and specialized books were consulted. RESULTS: Fifteen studies with different

  18. Intensive glycaemic control for patients with type 2 diabetes: systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis of randomised clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Lund, Søren; Gluud, Christian Nyfeldt

    2011-01-01

    To assess the effect of targeting intensive glycaemic control versus conventional glycaemic control on all cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality, non-fatal myocardial infarction, microvascular complications, and severe hypoglycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes.......To assess the effect of targeting intensive glycaemic control versus conventional glycaemic control on all cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality, non-fatal myocardial infarction, microvascular complications, and severe hypoglycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes....

  19. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  20. Breakfast replacement with a low-glycaemic response liquid formula in patients with type 2 diabetes : a randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenvers, Dirk J; Schouten, Lydia J; Jurgens, Jordy; Endert, Erik; Kalsbeek, A.; Fliers, Eric; Bisschop, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    Low-glycaemic index diets reduce glycated Hb (HbA1c) in patients with type 2 diabetes, but require intensive dietary support. Using a liquid meal replacement with a low glycaemic response (GR) may be an alternative dietary approach. In the present study, we investigated whether breakfast replacement

  1. Breakfast replacement with a low-glycaemic response liquid formula in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenvers, Dirk J.; Schouten, Lydia J.; Jurgens, Jordy; Endert, Erik; Kalsbeek, Andries; Fliers, Eric; Bisschop, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Low-glycaemic index diets reduce glycated Hb (HbA1c) in patients with type 2 diabetes, but require intensive dietary support. Using a liquid meal replacement with a low glycaemic response (GR) may be an alternative dietary approach. In the present study, we investigated whether breakfast replacement

  2. Glycaemic Control and Associated Self-Management Behaviours in Diabetic Outpatients: A Hospital Based Observation Study in Lusaka, Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Mwila Musenge

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The control of diabetes mellitus depends on several factors that also include individual lifestyles. We assessed glycaemic control status and self-management behaviours that may influence glycaemic control among diabetic outpatients. Methods. This cross-sectional study among 198 consenting randomly selected patients was conducted at the University Teaching Hospital diabetic clinic between September and December 2013 in Lusaka, Zambia. A structured interview schedule was used to collect data on demographic characteristics, self-management behaviours, and laboratory measurements. Binary logistic regression analysis using IBM SPSS for Windows version 20.0 was carried out to predict behaviours that were associated with glycaemic control status. Results. The proportion of patients that had good glycaemic control status (HbA1c≤ 48 mmol/mol was 38.7% compared to 61.3% that had poor glycaemic control status (HbA1c≥ 49 mmol/mol. Adherence to antidiabetic treatment and fasting plasma glucose predicted glycaemic control status of the patients. However, self-blood glucose monitoring, self-blood glucose monitoring means and exercise did not predict glycaemic control status of the patients.  Conclusion. We find evidence of poor glycaemic control status among most diabetic patients suggesting that health promotion messages need to take into account both individual and community factors to promote behaviours likely to reduce nonadherence.

  3. Patient characteristics do not predict poor glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudswaard, AN; Stolk, RP; Zuithoff, P; Rutten, GEHM

    Many diabetic patients in general practice do not achieve good glycaemic control. The aim of this study was to assess which characteristics of type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care predict poor glycaemic control (HbA(1c) greater than or equal to7%). Data were collected from the medical

  4. Targeting intensive versus conventional glycaemic control for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kähler, Pernille; Grevstad, Berit; Almdal, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the benefits and harms of targeting intensive versus conventional glycaemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. DESIGN: A systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. DATA SOURCES: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE......, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded and LILACS to January 2013. STUDY SELECTION: Randomised clinical trials that prespecified different targets of glycaemic control in participants at any age with type 1 diabetes mellitus were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two authors independently assessed studies...... for inclusion and extracted data. RESULTS: 18 randomised clinical trials included 2254 participants with type 1 diabetes mellitus. All trials had high risk of bias. There was no statistically significant effect of targeting intensive glycaemic control on all-cause mortality (risk ratio 1.16, 95% CI 0.65 to 2...

  5. Effect of dietary curries on the glycaemic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirasath, S; Thayaananthan, K; Balakumar, S; Arasaratnam, V

    2010-12-01

    Determination of the glycaemic index (GI) of different basic foods in combination with different curries. METHODS; Healthy volunteers (n = 20) of 21.05 (+/- 0.92) years old, 53.90 (+/- 9.36) kg in body weight, 153.92 (+/- 9.15) cm in height and 20.55 (+/- 2.22) kgm(-2) of body mass index were included. After overnight fasting, 75g of glucose and each test food containing 75g of digestible carbohydrate were administered and blood glucose level measured half hourly for two hours. The GI was calculated and analysed by randomised complete block design using SAS analytical package. The mean GI values of parboiled rice ('Mottaikarupan') either with green leaf curry (Amaranthus) or gravy (soya meat) or green leaf curry and gravy were 47.47 (+/- 11.21), 56.30 (+/- 9.31) and 54.67 (+/- 10.03) % respectively. The mean GI of 'kurakkan pittu' (Eleucine coracana) with the above curries were 57.51 (+/- 5.52), 63.25 (+/- 8.86) and 59.25 (+/- 5.49) % respectively. The mean GI of 'atta pittu' (whole wheat grain flour) with the above curries were 44.40 (+/-14.27), 50.80 (+/- 9.35) and 46.29 (+/- 8.90) % respectively. The GI of parboiled rice or 'kurakkan pittu' or 'atta pittu' with green leaf curry differed significantly (p gravy or green leaf curry and gravy did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) among them. 'Kurakkan pittu' is inferior to 'atta pittu' and parboiled rice. Including curries to basic foods altered the GI. Therefore, when dietary advice is given to diabetic patients, not only the basic foods, but also the curries to be consumed have to be considered.

  6. Breakfast glycaemic index and exercise: combined effects on adolescents' cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Simon B; Bandelow, Stephan; Nute, Maria L; Morris, John G; Nevill, Mary E

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the combined effects of breakfast glycaemic index (GI) and a mid-morning bout of exercise on adolescents' cognitive function. Participants were randomly allocated to a high or low GI breakfast group in a mixed research design, where each participant completed two experimental trials (exercise and resting). Forty-two adolescents (12.4±0.5 years old), undertook a bout of exercise (ten repeats of level one of the multi-stage fitness test; exercise trial) or continued to rest (resting trial) following consumption of either a high or low GI breakfast. A battery of cognitive function tests (visual search test, Stroop test and Sternberg paradigm) was completed 30 min before and 45 min following the exercise. Average heart rate during exercise was 170±15 beats·min(-1). On the complex level of the Stroop test, response times improved across the morning following the low GI breakfast on both the exercise and resting trials, though the improvement was greatest on the exercise trial. However, response times only improved on the resting trial following the high GI breakfast (p=0.012). On the 5 letter level of the Sternberg paradigm, response times improved across the morning following the low GI breakfast (regardless of exercise) and only on the exercise trial following the high GI breakfast (p=0.019). The findings of the present study suggest that the combined effects of breakfast GI and exercise in adolescents depend upon the component of cognitive function examined. A low GI breakfast and mid-morning bout of exercise were individually beneficial for response times on the Sternberg paradigm, whereas they conferred additional benefits for response times on the Stroop test. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Glycaemic control and associated factors among patients with diabetes at public health clinics in Johor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, M I; Daud, Faiz; Ismail, Aniza

    2016-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of glycaemic control and factors associated with poor glycaemic control [glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥6.5%] among patients with type 2 diabetes treated in public health clinics in Johor, Malaysia. Cross-sectional study. A review of all patients aged over 18 years and with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes for >1 year. The National Diabetic Registry was used as the database for attendees at public health clinics in Johor Bahru between January and December 2013. A required sample of 660 was calculated, and a random sampling method was applied to acquire patient information across the 13 public health clinics in Johor Bahru. All relevant information (e.g. HbA1c, type of treatment and other parameters for glycaemic control) were abstracted from the registry. Sixty-eight percent of 706 patients had HbA1c >6.5%, and mean HbA1c was 7.8%. Younger patients (72.3%) had poorer glycaemic control than older patients (63.0%), and most patients with poor glycaemic control were obese (79.2%). Approximately 31.7% of patients did not achieve the target blood pressure 5 years), body mass index (obese), type of treatment (diet therapy vs combination therapy) and abnormal lipid profile were significantly associated with increased odds of HbA1C >6.5%. More than half (68%) of the patients with diabetes had HbA1c >6.5%. This highlights the importance of providing organized care to manage patients with diabetes in the primary care setting, such as weight reduction programmes, proper prescribing treatment, and age- and gender-specific groups to ensure good glycaemic control. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tumor relapse present in oncologic nasal repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvez Chavez, Julio Cesar; Sanchez Wals, Lenia; Monzon Fernandez, Abel Nicolas; Morales Tirado, Roxana

    2009-01-01

    Tumor relapse is one of the more fearsome complications of the oncologic course and also to obscure the life prognosis, causing the loss of many reconstructions and of exhausting the repairing surgical possibilities. The aim of this study was to determine the relapse frequency, the repercussion on the repair and the subsequent medical course of patients operated on malign nasal tumors

  9. Rising methods and leavening agents used in the production of bread do not impact the glycaemic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredensborg, Monica Hardman; Perry, Tracy; Mann, Jim; Chisholm, Alex; Rose, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the glycaemic index of breads produced using different rising methods and leavening agents. Eleven bread varieties were selected based on method of production, and divided between three groups of ten participants (mean +/- SD age 30.0 +/- 10.7 years and BMI 22.9 +/- 2.8). Standard glycaemic index testing protocol was implemented after an overnight fast, using glucose as the reference food, and collecting blood samples over a two-hour period. Glycemic index was calculated using the usual method. Additionally, incremental area under the curve data were log transformed and glycaemic index was calculated using regression analysis. Mean glycaemic index values of the breads in ascending order were as follows: Swiss Rye; 60, Long oat; 68, Sourdough+oats; 71, Long rye; 76, Short oat; 77, Short whole meal; 78, Long whole meal; 80, Sourdough; 82, Short rye; 82, Yeast; 88, and Desem; 92. There were significant differences in mean glycaemic index values between Swiss Rye and Yeast (p = 0.010), Swiss Rye and Desem (p = 0.007) and Sourdough+oats and Desem (p = 0.043). The rising method and leavening agents used in this study did not impact on the glycaemic index of the breads tested. Other factors, such as increased bread density, and the addition of whole grains may be required to produce bread with a low glycaemic index.

  10. Impact of glycaemic control on the effect of direct renin inhibition in the AVOID study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Lewis, Julia B; Lewis, Edmund J

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia induces development and progression of microvascular complications in diabetes. A direct link between high glucose levels and intrarenal renin-angiotensin activation has been demonstrated. This post-hoc analysis assessed the influence of baseline glycaemic control on the reduction ...

  11. Glycaemic control status among type 2 diabetic patients and the role ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetes coping behaviours were measured using the revised version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities measure (SDSCA) and the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8#), while glycaemic control status was based on the HbA1c level. Results: Mean HbA1c was 8.9 (92.1), and of the 523 ...

  12. Effect of fat type in baked bread on amylose-lipid complex formation and glycaemic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Evelyn; Zhou, Weibiao; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2016-06-01

    The formation of amylose-lipid complexes (ALC) had been associated with reduced starch digestibility. A few studies have directly characterised the extent of ALC formation with glycaemic response. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of using fats with varying degree of saturation and chain length on ALC formation as well as glycaemic and insulinaemic responses after consumption of bread. Healthy men consumed five test breads in a random order: control bread without any added fats (CTR) and breads baked with butter (BTR), coconut oil (COC), grapeseed oil (GRP) or olive oil (OLV). There was a significant difference in glycaemic response between the different test breads (P=0·002), primarily due to COC having a lower response than CTR (P=0·016), but no significant differences between fat types were observed. Insulinaemic response was not altered by the addition of fats/oils. Although BTR was more insulinotropic than GRP (Pfats/oils, with coconut oil showing the greatest attenuation of glycaemic response.

  13. Evaluation of knowledge regarding gestational diabetes mellitus and its association with glycaemic level: A Malaysian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Zahid; Yusoff, Zuraidah Mohd; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge about GDM and its corresponding relation with glycaemic level in GDM patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in antenatal clinic of Hospital Pulau Pinang, Malaysia from June 2013 to December 2013 using Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Knowledge Questionnaire (GDMKQ) on the sample of 175 GDM patients. Three most recent fasting plasma glucose (FPG) values (mmol/l) were taken from patients profiles and mean was calculated. A total of 166 patients were included in final analysis. A total mean knowledge score of 166 patients was 10.01±3.63 and total mean FPG value was 5.50±1.13. Knowledge had a significant negative association with FPG (r=- 0.306, Pdiet/food values domain and lowest for management of GDM. Educational level seems to be the most significant predictor of GDM knowledge and glycaemic control. Highest mean knowledge score and lowest mean glycaemic levels were recorded for patients aged 25-29 years, Malay ethnicity, working women and family history of DM. Higher Knowledge about GDM is related to better glycaemic control. New educational strategies should be developed to improve the lower health literacy. Copyright © 2014 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impaired vascular function during short-term poor glycaemic control in Type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, V.R.; Mathiassen, E.R.; Clausen, P.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of short-term poor glycaemic control on vascular function in Type 1 diabetic patients. METHODS: Ten Type 1 diabetic patients, with diabetes duration of less than 10 years and normal urinary albumin excretion and ophthalmoscopy, were studied. All patients were examined af...

  15. Effects of Level of Glycaemic Control in Reduction of Maternal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diabetes in pregnancy is associated with increased risk of morbidity for mother and fetus during pregnancy and at birth as well as later in life. The objective of this study was to determine the association between level of glycaemic control and maternal and perinantal complications in pregnant diabetic women. Institution ...

  16. Glycaemic threshold for diabetes-specific retinopathy among individuals from Saudi Arabia, Algeria and Portugal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, Thomas Peter; Handlos, Line Neerup; Vistisen, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    We studied the glycaemic threshold and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in screen-detected diabetes in Saudi Arabia, Algeria and Portugal. The prevalence of diabetes-specific retinopathy started to increase at an HbA1c level of 6-6.4% and in individuals with HbA1c >7.0% the prevalence was 6.0%....

  17. Moderate intensity sports and exercise is associated with glycaemic control in women with gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, S F; Hedderson, M M; Brown, S D; Sternfeld, B; Chasan-Taber, L; Feng, J; Adams, J; Ching, J; Crites, Y; Quesenberry, C P; Ferrara, A

    2017-10-01

    To assess the association of regular, unsupervised sports and exercise during pregnancy, by intensity level, with glycaemic control in women with gestational diabetes (GDM). Prospective cohort study of 971 women who, shortly after being diagnosed with GDM, completed a Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire assessing moderate and vigorous intensity sports and exercise in the past 3 months. Self-monitored capillary glucose values were obtained for the 6-week period following the questionnaire, with optimal glycaemic control defined≥80% values meeting the targetssports and exercise ([MET×hours]/week), the highest quartile, compared to the lowest, had significantly increased odds of optimal control (OR=1.82 [95% CI: 1.06-3.14] P=0.03). There were significant trends for decreasing mean 1-hour post breakfast, lunch and dinner glycaemia with increasing quartile of moderate activity (all Psports and exercise was associated with decreased mean 1-hour post breakfast and lunch glycaemia (both Psports and exercise, reported shortly after GDM diagnosis, were significantly associated with increased odds of achieving glycaemic control. Clinicians should be aware that unsupervised moderate intensity sports and exercise performed in mid-pregnancy aids in subsequent glycaemic control among women with GDM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Association between symptoms of depression and glycaemic control may be unstable across gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Snoek, Frank J

    2001-01-01

    AIMS: Lloyd and colleagues (Diabetic Med 2000; 17, 198-202) have described an association between poor glycaemic control and moderate to severe depression in male but not in female diabetes patients. However, the validity of this study may be limited by its small sample size and the influence of ...... across gender. Diabet. Med. 18, 595-598 (2001)...

  19. The Value of Fecal Markers in Predicting Relapse in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca J. Galgut

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs are lifelong chronic illnesses that place an immense burden on patients. The primary aim of therapy is to reduce disease burden and prevent relapse. However, the occurrence of relapses is often unpredictable. Current disease monitoring is primarily by way of clinical indices, with relapses often only recognized once the inflammatory episode is established with subsequent symptoms and gut damage. The window between initial upregulation of the inflammatory response and the recognition of symptoms may provide an opportunity to prevent the relapse and associated morbidity. This review will describe the existing literature surrounding predictive indicators of relapse of IBD with a specific focus on fecal biomarkers. Fecal biomarkers offer promise as a convenient, non-invasive, low cost option for disease monitoring that is predictive of subsequent relapse. To exploit the potential of fecal biomarkers in this role, further research is now required. This research needs to assess multiple fecal markers in context with demographics, disease phenotype, genetics, and intestinal microbiome composition, to build disease behavior models that can provide the clinician with sufficient confidence to intervene and change the long-term disease course.

  20. The Anterior Insular Cortex→Central Amygdala Glutamatergic Pathway Is Critical to Relapse after Contingency Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venniro, Marco; Caprioli, Daniele; Zhang, Michelle; Whitaker, Leslie R; Zhang, Shiliang; Warren, Brandon L; Cifani, Carlo; Marchant, Nathan J; Yizhar, Ofer; Bossert, Jennifer M; Chiamulera, Cristiano; Morales, Marisela; Shaham, Yavin

    2017-10-11

    Despite decades of research on neurobiological mechanisms of psychostimulant addiction, the only effective treatment for many addicts is contingency management, a behavioral treatment that uses alternative non-drug reward to maintain abstinence. However, when contingency management is discontinued, most addicts relapse to drug use. The brain mechanisms underlying relapse after cessation of contingency management are largely unknown, and, until recently, an animal model of this human condition did not exist. Here we used a novel rat model, in which the availability of a mutually exclusive palatable food maintains prolonged voluntary abstinence from intravenous methamphetamine self-administration, to demonstrate that the activation of monosynaptic glutamatergic projections from anterior insular cortex to central amygdala is critical to relapse after the cessation of contingency management. We identified the anterior insular cortex-to-central amygdala projection as a new addiction- and motivation-related projection and a potential target for relapse prevention. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Pemphigus erythematosus relapse associated with atorvastatin intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Schiavo A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ada Lo Schiavo,1 Rosa Valentina Puca,1 Francesca Romano,1 Roberto Cozzi2 1Department of Dermatology, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Dermatology, AORN "A Cardarelli", Naples, Italy Abstract: Statins, also known as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaril-CoA reductase inhibitors, are well-tolerated drugs used for prevention of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Although they are generally considered safe, some serious adverse effects, such as myositis, myopathy, and rhabdomyolysis can rarely occur. Furthermore, recent data from long-term follow-up on patients who have been taking statins for a long period of time suggest that prolonged exposure to statins may trigger autoimmune reactions. The exact mechanism of statin-induced autoimmune reactions is unclear. Statins, as proapoptotic agents, release nuclear antigen into the circulation and may induce the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Herein we report the case of a 70 year-old man who developed a relapse of pemphigus erythematosus, a syndrome with features of both lupus erythematosus and pemphigus, after atorvastatin intake. Keywords: pemphigus erythematosus, autoimmune disease, treatment, pathogenesis, statins

  2. Glycaemic control and quality of life among ethnically diverse Malaysian diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Aqil Mohammad; AlMashoor, Syed Ahmad H; Winn, Than

    2015-04-01

    To assess the relationship between glycaemic control and quality of life (QoL) among a sample of Malaysians with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study is a cross-sectional hospital-based study involving 256 patients from three major ethnic groups in Malaysia. Data about QoL were collected with the 18-item Audit of Diabetes Dependent QoL questionnaire. Other data about putative predictors of QoL including personal characteristics and disease-related factors were also collected. Hierarchical multiple linear regression was used to determine factors associated with QoL and to control for confounding variables. The mean age of participants was 56.79 years. Participants were mostly women, employed and married and had attained secondary education. More than a third of the patients had a disease duration of more than 10 years, and about two-thirds had HbA1c ≥ 6.5 %. Those with desired glycaemic control had poorer QoL than those with less than desired glycaemic control moderated by the use of insulin. Hierarchical multiple linear regression showed that desired glycaemic control (HbA1c), diabetes worry, use of insulin, more than 10 years' duration of diabetes, neuropathy and retinopathy were associated with poor QoL, whereas being satisfied with waiting time for consultation was associated with better QoL. The results of this study show that diabetes was associated with negative impact on quality of life. The use of insulin to achieve desired glycaemic control was particularly associated with negative impact on QoL.

  3. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Technology Recreation Travel Emergencies & Disasters d Relationships Disclosure Family Matters Parenting Intimacy Self Advocacy in the Family Preventing Abuse Testing for Living well d Research ...

  4. Prognosis and treatment after relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: 1985. A report from the Childrens Cancer Study Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleyer, W.A.; Sather, H.; Hammond, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma constitute 42% to 45% of the cancers in infants, children, and adolescents: In 1985, an estimated 2025 children were newly diagnosed with these two cancers and 900 (43%) of the pediatric cancer deaths in the United States have been projected to be due to these diseases. The single most important obstacle to preventing these deaths is relapse, and prevention of relapse or salvage of the patient who has had a relapse continues to be a major therapeutic challenge. The most important initial step in the treatment of the child whose disease has relapsed is to determine, to the extent possible, the prognosis. In a child with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a relapse confers an extremely poor prognosis, regardless of site of relapse, tumor histology, or other original prognostic factors, prior therapy, or time to relapse. In the child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in relapse, the prognosis depends on multiple factors. The primary therapy is chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy with marrow grafting. Other options exist, including no therapy, or investigational therapy. The therapy selected should be predicated on the prognosis. In the child with an isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse off therapy, minimum therapy should be administered, particularly if the relapse occurred without prior cranial irradiation. In the child whose relapse is more than 6 months off therapy, conventional therapy should be considered. Also, a patient with an isolated CNS relapse on therapy after prior cranial irradiation should be given moderate therapy. Bone marrow transplantation or high-dose chemoradiotherapy with autologous marrow rescue should be reserved in children with a second or subsequent extramedullary relapse, and possibly for those with a first isolated overt testicular relapse on therapy

  5. Clinical factors related to schizophrenia relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcelli, Stefano; Bianchini, Oriana; De Girolamo, Giovanni; Aguglia, Eugenio; Crea, Luciana; Serretti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Relapses represent one of the main problems of schizophrenia management. This article reviews the clinical factors associated with schizophrenia relapse. A research of the last 22 years of literature data was performed. Two-hundred nineteen studies have been included. Three main groups of factors are related to relapse: factors associated with pharmacological treatment, add-on psychotherapeutic treatments and general risk factors. Overall, the absence of a maintenance therapy and treatment with first generation antipsychotics has been associated with higher risk of relapse. Further, psychotherapy add-on, particularly with cognitive behaviour therapy and psycho-education for both patients and relatives, has shown a good efficacy for reducing the relapse rate. Among general risk factors, some could be modified, such as the duration of untreated psychosis or the substance misuse, while others could not be modified as male gender or low pre-morbid level of functioning. Several classes of risk factors have been proved to be relevant in the risk of relapse. Thus, a careful assessment of the risk factors here identified should be performed in daily clinical practice in order to individualise the relapse risk for each patient and to provide a targeted treatment in high-risk subjects.

  6. The modified Puestow procedure for chronic relapsing pancreatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombleholme, T M; deLorimier, A A; Way, L W; Adzick, N S; Longaker, M T; Harrison, M R

    1990-07-01

    Chronic relapsing pancreatitis in children is an unusual condition that often goes undiagnosed and untreated for years. In light of recent reports in adults that endocrine and exocrine function may be preserved by early pancreaticojejunostomy, we reviewed our experience with this procedure (one Duval, 10 Puestows) in 10 children between 1969 and 1989. The underlying etiology was familial pancreatitis in four patients, one case of unknown etiology, congenital ductal anomalies in four (one pancreas divisum, one annular pancreas, one choledochal cyst, and one ductal stenosis), and posttraumatic in one. All 10 had intractable recurrent abdominal pain. Preoperatively, only three patients evidenced exocrine insufficiency and none had endocrine insufficiency. There was complete resolution of pain in eight patients and improvement in two during a mean observation period of 4 years (range, 7 months to 19.75 years). Exocrine insufficiency resolved in two patients but has persisted in the third patient now on Viokase. Endocrine insufficiency has developed during follow-up in one patient. Pancreaticojejunostomy provides excellent relief of recurrent pain in chronic relapsing pancreatitis in children. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is indicated when the diagnosis of chronic relapsing pancreatitis is suspected to define the ductal anatomy. Pancreaticojejunostomy may prevent the progression of exocrine and endocrine insufficiency if performed early in the course of the disease.

  7. Metaplastic carcinoma. Breast. Relapse. Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, A.; Terrasa, J.; Garcia, J.M.; Rifa, J.

    1996-01-01

    Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor. The appearance of unexpected mesenchymal elements within the epithelial tumors is the squamous metaplasia. These tumors have a different clinical behaviour that classical breast carcinoma. We present a case of metaplastic mammary carcinoma with multiple relapses treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The use of chemotherapy after local treatment has enhanced the relapse-free survival. The combined treatment modality seems to produce some benefit in the management of the local relapses of this neoplasms

  8. The natural history of multiple sclerosis: a geographically based study 10: relapses and long-term disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfari, Antonio; Neuhaus, Anneke; Degenhardt, Alexandra; Rice, George P; Muraro, Paolo A; Daumer, Martin; Ebers, George C

    2010-07-01

    regulatory mechanism tied to neurodegeneration is suggested. Relapse frequency beyond Year 2 does not appear to predict the key outcome of secondary progression or times to Disability Status Scale 6, 8 or 10, highlighting two distinct disease phases related to late outcome. These appear to be separated by a watershed within the relapsing-remitting phase, just a few years after clinical onset. Higher early relapse frequencies and shorter first inter-attack intervals herald more rapid deterioration via interaction with the neurodegeneration characterizing secondary progression. They increase the probability of its occurrence, its latency and influence--to a lesser degree--its slope. The prevention or delay of the progressive phase of the disease is implicated as a key therapeutic target in relapsing-remitting patients.

  9. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Webinar Series Momentum Magazine Educational Videos Knowledge Is Power Live Fully, Live Well Everyday Matters Resilience: Addressing ... Parenting Intimacy Self Advocacy in the Family Preventing Abuse Testing for Living well d Research d Participate ...

  10. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Webinar Series Momentum Magazine Educational Videos Knowledge Is Power Live Fully, Live Well Everyday Matters Resilience: Addressing ... Parenting Intimacy Self Advocacy in the Family Preventing Abuse Testing for Living well d Research d Participate ...

  11. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to control the disease activity more effectively and help prevent worsening. If your RRMS is stable without evidence of MRI activity or worsening, you and your healthcare provider can feel confident that the current treatment regimen is ...

  12. Factors associated with relapse in schizophrenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    increases the economic burden on health care systems because of its associated morbidity .... Depression in schizophrenia has been associated with higher rates of relapse ... The researchers approached the psychiatric nursing staff of mental.

  13. The achievement of glycaemic, blood pressure and LDL cholesterol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C targets but there ... fasting, leading to anomalous lipid values and, in particular, ..... Developed countries ... The link between HbA1c and CVD still remains theoretical. .... federation task force on epidemiology and prevention; national heart,.

  14. Relapsing polychondritis and airway involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Armin; Rafeq, Samaan; Boiselle, Phillip; Sung, Arthur; Reddy, Chakravarthy; Michaud, Gaetane; Majid, Adnan; Herth, Felix J F; Trentham, David

    2009-04-01

    To assess the prevalence and characteristics of airway involvement in relapsing polychondritis (RP). Retrospective chart review and data analysis of RP patients seen in the Rheumatology Clinic and the Complex Airway Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center from January 2004 through February 2008. RP was diagnosed in 145 patients. Thirty-one patients had airway involvement, a prevalence of 21%. Twenty-two patients were women (70%), and they were between 11 and 61 years of age (median age, 42 years) at the time of first symptoms. Airway symptoms were the first manifestation of disease in 17 patients (54%). Dyspnea was the most common symptom in 20 patients (64%), followed by cough, stridor, and hoarseness. Airway problems included the following: subglottic stenosis (n = 8; 26%); focal and diffuse malacia (n = 15; 48%); and focal stenosis in different areas of the bronchial tree in the rest of the patients. Twelve patients (40%) required and underwent intervention including balloon dilatation, stent placement, tracheotomy, or a combination of the above with good success. The majority of patients experienced improvement in airway symptoms after intervention. One patient died during the follow-up period from the progression of airway disease. The rest of the patients continue to undergo periodic evaluation and intervention. In this largest cohort described in the English language literature, we found symptomatic airway involvement in RP to be common and at times severe. The nature of airway problems is diverse, with tracheomalacia being the most common. Airway intervention is frequently required and in experienced hands results in symptom improvement.

  15. [Central nervous system relapse in diffuse large B cell lymphoma: Risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2016-01-15

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by lymphoma is a complication associated, almost invariably, with a poor prognosis. The knowledge of the risk factors for CNS relapse is important to determine which patients could benefit from prophylaxis. Thus, patients with very aggressive lymphomas (such as lymphoblastic lymphoma or Burkitt's lymphoma) must systematically receive CNS prophylaxis due to a high CNS relapse rate (25-30%), while in patients with indolent lymphoma (such as follicular lymphoma or marginal lymphoma) prophylaxis is unnecessary. However, the question about CNS prophylaxis in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of lymphoma, remains controversial. The information available is extensive, mainly based on retrospective and heterogeneous studies. There seems that immunochemotherapy based on rituximab reduces the CNS relapse rate. On the other hand, patients with increased serum lactate dehydrogenase plus more than one extranodal involvement seem to have a higher risk of CNS relapse, but a prophylaxis strategy based only on the presence of these 2 factors does not prevent all CNS relapses. Patients with involvement of testes or breast have high risk of CNS relapse and prophylaxis is mandatory. Finally, CNS prophylaxis could be considered in patients with DLBCL and renal or epidural space involvement, as well as in those cases with MYC rearrangements, although additional studies are necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. The future of population registers: linking routine health datasets to assess a population's current glycaemic status for quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wing Cheuk; Jackson, Gary; Wright, Craig Shawe; Orr-Walker, Brandon; Drury, Paul L; Boswell, D Ross; Lee, Mildred Ai Wei; Papa, Dean; Jackson, Rod

    2014-04-28

    To determine the diabetes screening levels and known glycaemic status of all individuals by age, gender and ethnicity within a defined geographic location in a timely and consistent way to potentially facilitate systematic disease prevention and management. Retrospective observational study. Auckland region of New Zealand. 1 475 347 people who had utilised publicly funded health service in New Zealand and domicile in the Auckland region of New Zealand in 2010. The health service utilisation population was individually linked to a comprehensive regional laboratory repository dating back to 2004. The two outcomes measures were glycaemia-related blood testing coverage (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting and random glucose and glucose tolerance tests), and the proportions and number of people with known dysglycaemia in 2010 using modified American Diabetes Association (ADA) and WHO criteria. Within the health service utilisation population, 792 560 people had had at least one glucose or HbA1c blood test in the previous 5.5 years. Overall, 81% of males (n=198 086) and 87% of females (n=128 982) in the recommended age groups for diabetes screening had a blood test to assess their glycaemic status. The estimated age-standardised prevalence of dysglycaemia was highest in people of Pacific Island ethnicity at 11.4% (95% CI 11.2% to 11.5%) for males and 11.6% (11.4% to 11.8%) for females, followed closely by people of Indian ethnicity at 10.8% (10.6% to 11.1%) and 9.3% (9.1% to 9.6%), respectively. Among the indigenous Maori population, the prevalence was 8.2% (7.9% to 8.4%) and 7% (6.8% to 7.2%), while for 'Others' (mainly Europeans) it was 3% (3% to 3.1%) and 2.2% (2.1% to 2.2%), respectively. We have demonstrated that the data linkage between a laboratory repository and national administrative datasets has the potential to provide a systematic and consistent individual level clinical information that is relevant to medical auditing for a large geographically defined

  17. Are there clinically useful predictors and early warning signs for pending relapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebel, Wolfgang; Riesbeck, Mathias

    2014-02-01

    Despite the availability of effective long-term treatment strategies in schizophrenia, relapse is still common. Relapse prevention is one of the major treatment objectives, because relapse represents burden and costs for patients, their environment, and society and seems to increase illness progression at the biological level. Valid predictors for relapse are urgently needed to enable more individualized recommendations and treatment decisions to be made. Mainly recent evidence regarding predictors and early warning signs of relapse in schizophrenia was reviewed. In addition, data from the first-episode (long-term) study (FES; Gaebel et al., 2007, 2011) performed within the German Research Network on Schizophrenia were analyzed. On the basis of FES data, premorbid adjustment, residual symptoms and some side effects are significant predictors. Although a broad spectrum of potential parameters has been investigated in several other studies, only a few and rather general valid predictors were identified consistently. Data of the FES also indicated that predictive power could be enhanced by considering interacting conjunctions, as suggested by the Vulnerability-Stress-Coping model. Prospective studies, however, are rare. In addition, prodromal symptoms as course-related characteristics likewise investigated in the FES add substantially to early recognition of relapse and may serve as early warning signs, but prognosis nevertheless remains a challenge. Comprehensive and well-designed studies are needed to identify and confirm valid predictors for relapse in schizophrenia. In this respect, broadly accepted and specifically defined criteria for relapse would greatly facilitate comparison of results across studies. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Co-ingestion of essence of chicken to moderate glycaemic response of bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijuan; Wei Jie Tan, Kevin; Jeyakumar Henry, Christiani

    2015-01-01

    Essence of chicken (EOC) beverage is a chicken meat extract, widely consumed in Asian countries for health benefits. EOC is a rich source of peptides and amino acids. White bread has become a popular staple food in all regions of Southeast Asia. A randomized controlled, crossover, non-blind trial was performed to investigate the role of EOC on glycaemic response (GR) of white bread. Ten healthy young subjects returned on five separate days for three glucose and two bread sessions. Subjects consumed bread or bread with EOC. The 120 min incremental area under the curve was significantly lower after consuming two bottles of EOC with bread than white bread alone. The glycaemic index (GI) of white bread was 83 and white bread with EOC 57. The co-ingestion of EOC may be a practical and simple way to reduce the GR of bread and other starch-based staples.

  19. Green tea catechins reduced the glycaemic potential of bread: an in vitro digestibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Royston; Gao, Jing; Ananingsih, Victoria K; Ranawana, Viren; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar; Zhou, Weibiao

    2015-08-01

    Green tea catechins are potent inhibitors of enzymes for carbohydrate digestion. However, the potential of developing low glycaemic index bakery food using green tea extract has not been investigated. Results of this study showed that addition of green tea extract (GTE) at 0.45%, 1%, and 2% concentration levels significantly reduced the glycaemic potential of baked and steamed bread. The average retention levels of catechins in the baked and steamed bread were 75.3-89.5% and 81.4-99.3%, respectively. Bread fortified with 2% GTE showed a significantly lower level of glucose release during the first 90 min of pancreatic digestion as well as a lower content of rapidly digested starch (RDS) content. A significantly negative correlation was found between the catechin retention level and the RDS content of bread. The potential of transforming bread into a low GI food using GTE fortification was proven to be promising. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Insulin analogues: have they changed insulin treatment and improved glycaemic control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, Sten

    2002-01-01

    To improve insulin therapy, new insulin analogues have been developed. Two fast-acting analogues with a more rapid onset of effect and a shorter duration of action combined with a low day-to-day variation in absorption rate are now available. Despite this favourable time-action profile most studies....... This is probably the main explanation for the absence of improvement in overall glycaemic control when compared with regular human insulin. A tendency to a reduction in hypoglycaemic events during treatment with fast-acting analogues has been observed in most studies. Recent studies have indicated that NPH insulin...... administered several times daily at mealtimes can improve glycaemic control without increasing the risk of hypoglycaemia. The fast-acting analogues are now also available as insulin mixed with NPH. Insulin glargine is a new long-acting insulin which is soluble and precipitates after injection, resulting...

  1. Methodology for adding and amending glycaemic index values to a nutrition analysis package.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Levis, Sharon P

    2011-04-01

    Since its introduction in 1981, the glycaemic index (GI) has been a useful tool for classifying the glycaemic effects of carbohydrate foods. Consumption of a low-GI diet has been associated with a reduced risk of developing CVD, diabetes mellitus and certain cancers. WISP (Tinuviel Software, Llanfechell, Anglesey, UK) is a nutrition software package used for the analysis of food intake records and 24 h recalls. Within its database, WISP contains the GI values of foods based on the International Tables 2002. The aim of the present study is to describe in detail a methodology for adding and amending GI values to the WISP database in a clinical or research setting, using data from the updated International Tables 2008.

  2. Ethnic differences in glycaemic control in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus living in Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Negandhi, Preeti H; Ghouri, Nazim; Colhoun, Helen M; Fischbacher, Colin M; Lindsay, Robert S; McKnight, John A; Petrie, John; Philip, Sam; Sattar, Naveed; Wild, Sarah H; Scottish Diabetes Research Network Epidemiology Group

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims:\\ud \\ud Previous studies have investigated the association between ethnicity and processes of care and intermediate outcomes of diabetes, but there are limited population-based studies available. The aim of this study was to use population-based data to investigate the relationships between ethnicity and glycaemic control in men and women with diabetes mellitus living in Scotland.\\ud \\ud Methods:\\ud \\ud We used a 2008 extract from the population-based national electronic d...

  3. Postprandial lipid responses to standard carbohydrates used to determine glycaemic index values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-López, Sonia; Ausman, Lynne M; Matthan, Nirupa R; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2013-11-01

    Prior studies assessing the metabolic effects of different types of carbohydrates have focused on their glycaemic response. However, the response of postprandial cardiometabolic risk indicators has not been considered in these studies. The present study assessed postprandial lipid responses to two forms of carbohydrates used as reference foods for glycaemic index determinations, white bread (50 g available carbohydrate) and glucose (50 g), under controlled conditions and with intra-individual replicate determinations. A total of twenty adults (20–70 years) underwent two cycles of challenges with each pair of reference foods (four challenges/person), administered in a random order on separate days under standard conditions. Serum lipids (total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, TAG and NEFA), glucose and insulin were monitored for 5 h post-ingestion. Oral glucose resulted in greater glycaemic and insulinaemic responses than white bread for the first 90 min and a greater subsequent decline after 120 min (P =0·0001). The initial decline in serum NEFA concentrations was greater after the oral glucose than after the white bread challenge, as was the rebound after 150 min (P = 0·001). Nevertheless, the type of carbohydrate had no significant effect on postprandial total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol concentrations. Following an initial modest rise in TAG concentrations in response to both challenges, the values dropped below the fasting values for oral glucose but not for the white bread challenge. These data suggest that the type of carbohydrate used to determine the glycaemic index, bread or glucose, has little or modest effects on postprandial plasma cholesterol concentrations. Differences in TAG and NEFA concentrations over the 5 h time period were modest, and their clinical relevance is unclear.

  4. Glycaemic indices of three Sri Lankan wheat bread varieties and a bread-lentil meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettiaratchi, U P K; Ekanayake, S; Welihinda, J

    2009-01-01

    The glycaemic index (GI) concept ranks individual foods and mixed meals according to the blood glucose response. Low-GI foods with a slow and prolonged glycaemic response are beneficial for diabetic people, and several advantages have been suggested also for non-diabetic individuals. The recent investigations imply an increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Sri Lanka. Thus, the present study was designed primarily to determine the glycaemic indices of some bread varieties in Sri Lanka as bread has become a staple diet among most of the urban people. A second objective was to observe the effects of macronutrients and physicochemical properties of starch on GI. Glycaemic responses were estimated according to FAO/WHO guidelines and both glucose and white bread were used as standards. Non-diabetic individuals aged 22-30 years (n=10) participated in the study. The test meals included white sliced bread, wholemeal bread, ordinary white bread and a mixed meal of wholemeal bread with lentil curry. The GI values (+/-standard error of the mean) of the meals were 77+/-6, 77+/-6, 80+/-4, 61+/-6, respectively (with glucose as the standard). The GI values of the bread varieties or the meal did not differ significantly (P >0.05). However, the meal can be categorized as a medium-GI food while the other bread varieties belong to the high-GI food group. A significant negative correlation was obtained with protein (P=0.042) and fat (P=0.039) contents of the food items and GI. Although the GI values of the foods are not significantly different, the inclusion of lentils caused the GI to decrease from a high-GI category to a medium-GI category. According to the present study, a ratio of 1.36 can be used to interconvert the GI values obtained with the two standards.

  5. Exercise improves glycaemic control in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Anne L; Shields, Nora; Taylor, Nicholas F; Frawley, Helena C

    2016-10-01

    Does exercise improve postprandial glycaemic control in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus? A systematic review of randomised trials. Pregnant women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus. Exercise, performed more than once a week, sufficient to achieve an aerobic effect or changes in muscle metabolism. Postprandial blood glucose, fasting blood glucose, glycated haemoglobin, requirement for insulin, adverse events and adherence. This systematic review identified eight randomised, controlled trials involving 588 participants; seven trials (544 participants) had data that were suitable for meta-analysis. Five trials scored ≥ 6 on the PEDro scale, indicating a relatively low risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed that exercise, as an adjunct to standard care, significantly improved postprandial glycaemic control (MD -0.33mmol/L, 95% CI -0.49 to -0.17) and lowered fasting blood glucose (MD -0.31 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.56 to -0.05) when compared with standard care alone, with no increase in adverse events. Effects of similar magnitude were found for aerobic and resistance exercise programs, if performed at a moderate intensity or greater, for 20 to 30minutes, three to four times per week. Meta-analysis did not show that exercise significantly reduced the requirement for insulin. All studies reported that complications or other adverse events were either similar or reduced with exercise. Aerobic or resistance exercise, performed at a moderate intensity at least three times per week, safely helps to control postprandial blood glucose levels and other measures of glycaemic control in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus. PROSPERO CRD42015019106. [Harrison AL, Shields N, Taylor NF, Frawley HC (2016) Exercise improves glycaemic control in women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.Journal of Physiotherapy62: 188-196]. Copyright © 2016 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  6. The glycaemic potency of breakfast and cognitive function in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micha, R; Rogers, P J; Nelson, M

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess how the glycaemic potency (blood glucose (BG)-raising potential) of breakfast is associated with cognitive function (CF) in school children, taking into account important confounders, including iron status, underlying physiological adaptations and socio-economic status. Sixty children aged 11-14 years were selected on the basis of having breakfast habitually. Their breakfast and any snacks eaten on the morning of the study were recorded. They were categorized into four groups according to the glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) of the breakfast: low-GI, high-GL; high-GI, high-GL; low-GI, low-GL and high-GI, low-GL above or below the median for GI=61 and GL=27. BG levels were measured in finger-prick blood samples immediately before and immediately after the CF tests. A low-GI, high-GL breakfast was associated with better performance on a speed of information processing (Pbreakfast with better performance on an immediate word recall task (Pbreakfast with better performance on a Matrices task (Pperformance on the majority of the CF tests (4 of 7) used. This study describes the macronutrient composition of breakfast that could have a positive influence on the cognition of school children, proposes the use of both GI and GL to estimate exposure, and discusses future directions in this area of research.

  7. The impact of freezing and toasting on the glycaemic response of white bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, P; Lightowler, H J

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the impact of freezing and toasting on the glycaemic response of white bread. Ten healthy subjects (three male, seven female), aged 22-59 years, recruited from Oxford Brookes University and the local community. A homemade white bread and a commercial white bread were administered following four different storage and preparation conditions: (1) fresh; (2) frozen and defrosted; (3) toasted; (4) toasted following freezing and defrosting. They were administered randomized repeated measures design. Incremental blood glucose, peak glucose response, 2 h incremental area under the glucose response curve (IAUC). The different storage and preparation conditions resulted in lower blood glucose IAUC values compared to both types of fresh white bread. In particular, compared to the fresh homemade bread (IAUC 259 mmol min/l), IAUC was significantly lower when the bread was frozen and defrosted (179 mmol min/l, Pbread (253 mmol min/l), IAUC was significantly lower when the bread was toasted (183 mmol min/l, Pbreads. This is the first study known to the authors to show reductions in glycaemic response as a result of changes in storage conditions and the preparation of white bread before consumption. In addition, the study highlights a need to define and maintain storage conditions of white bread if used as a reference food in the determination of the glycaemic index of foods.

  8. The influence of the glycaemic load of breakfast on the behaviour of children in school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, David; Maconie, Alys; Williams, Claire

    2007-11-23

    The impact of breakfasts of different glycaemic loads on the performance of nineteen children, aged six to seven years, was explored. Over a four week period, children attended a school breakfast club each day and ate one of three meals. Each meal offered a similar amount of energy but differed in their glycaemic load. When working individually, the behaviour of a child was rated in the classroom every ten seconds for 30 min to produce a measure of time spent on task. Memory was assessed by asking for the recall of a series of objects. The ability to sustain attention was measured by asking for a response after various delays. The incidence of negative behaviour was recorded when playing a video game that was too difficult to allow success. Two to three hours after a low glycaemic load breakfast had been consumed, performance on the tests of memory and the ability to sustain attention were better, fewer signs of frustration were displayed and initially more time was spent on task when working individually in class. The importance of the results was discussed in the context of the wide range of factors that influence behaviour in school.

  9. Acute glycaemic load breakfast manipulations do not attenuate cognitive impairments in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamport, Daniel Joseph; Dye, Louise; Mansfield, Michael W; Lawton, Clare L

    2013-04-01

    Research on young healthy samples suggests that low glycaemic load foods can confer benefits for cognitive performance. The aim was to examine the effects of type 2 diabetes on cognitive function, and to investigate whether consumption of low glycaemic load breakfasts affects cognitive function in adults with type 2 diabetes. Memory, psychomotor skill and executive function were examined at two morning test sessions in 24 adults with type 2 diabetes and 10 adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) aged 45-77 years without dementia after water, low, and high glycaemic load breakfasts were consumed in accordance with a crossover, counterbalanced design. The type 2 diabetes and NGT groups were matched for education, depression, and IQ. Type 2 diabetes was associated with impairments in verbal memory, spatial memory, psychomotor skill, and executive function compared to adults with NGT. Consumption of the three breakfast conditions did not impact on cognitive performance in the type 2 diabetes or NGT participants. Abnormalities in glucose tolerance such as type 2 diabetes can have demonstrable negative effects on a range of cognitive functions. However, there was no evidence that low GL breakfasts administered acutely could confer benefits for cognitive function (ClincalTrials.gov identifier, NCT01047813). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  10. The influence of maternal glycaemia and dietary glycaemic index on pregnancy outcome in healthy mothers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGowan, Ciara A

    2010-07-01

    Infant birth weight has increased in Ireland in recent years along with levels of childhood overweight and obesity. The present article reviews the current literature on maternal glycaemia and the role of the dietary glycaemic index (GI) and its impact on pregnancy outcomes. It is known that maternal weight and weight gain significantly influence infant birth weight. Fetal macrosomia (birth weight >4000 g) is associated with an increased risk of perinatal trauma to both mother and infant. Furthermore, macrosomic infants have greater risk of being obese in childhood, adolescence and adulthood compared to normal-sized infants. There is evidence that there is a direct relationship between maternal blood glucose levels during pregnancy and fetal growth and size at birth, even when maternal blood glucose levels are within their normal range. Thus, maintaining blood glucose concentrations within normal parameters during pregnancy may reduce the incidence of fetal macrosomia. Maternal diet, and particularly its carbohydrate (CHO) type and content, influences maternal blood glucose concentrations. However, different CHO foods produce different glycaemic responses. The GI was conceived by Jenkins in 1981 as a method for assessing the glycaemic responses of different CHO. Data from clinical studies in healthy pregnant women have documented that consuming a low-GI diet during pregnancy reduces peaks in postprandial glucose levels and normalises infant birth weight. Pregnancy is a physiological condition where the GI may be of particular relevance as glucose is the primary fuel for fetal growth.

  11. Glycaemic responses to liquid food supplements among three Asian ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Siew Ling; Van Helvoort, Ardy; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2016-12-01

    A limited number of studies have compared the glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic responses (GR) to solid foods between Caucasians and Asians. These studies have demonstrated that Asians have greater GI and GR values for solid foods than Caucasians. However, no study has compared the GI and GR to liquids among various Asian ethnic groups. A total of forty-eight males and females (16 Chinese, 16 Indians, and 16 Malay) took part in this randomised, crossover study. Glycaemic response to the reference food (glucose beverage) was measured on three occasions, and GR to three liquids were measured on one occasion each. Liquids with different macronutrient ratio's and carbohydrate types were chosen to be able to evaluate the response to products with different GIs. Blood glucose concentrations were measured in duplicate at baseline (-5 and 0 min) and once at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after the commencement of beverage consumption. There were statistically significant differences in GI and GR between the three liquids (P Chinese vs. Indian vs. Malay). The GR for three different types of liquid nutritional supplements did not differ between the three main ethnic groups in Asia. It appears that the GI of liquid food derived from one Asian ethnicity can be applicable to other Asian populations.

  12. Risk factors for alcohol relapse following orthotopic liver transplantation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, James K; Stern, Theodore A; Prabhakar, Maithri; Musselman, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    more than double the prevalence of steatohepatitis or rejection on biopsy and graft failure and more frequent mortality resulting from recurrent alcoholic liver disease than late-onset (i.e., peak of heaviest drinking at 6y posttransplantation) alcohol users do. Fortunately, pretransplantation screening combined with a structured pretransplantation management program and a 12-step program attendance reduced recidivism. No randomized clinical trials have been performed that target pretransplantation risk factors in individuals with alcoholic liver disease before or after OLT to improve post-OLT outcomes. Recent research findings suggest that screening can reveal individuals who are vulnerable to alcohol relapse and targeted intervention can prevent their relapse to alcohol. Based on existing addiction treatments (e.g., relapse prevention plan construction), randomized clinical trials tailored to post-OLT patients should be conducted to improve their survival and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prognostic importance of glycaemic variability on hospital mortality in patients hospitalised in Internal Medicine Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáenz-Abad, D; Gimeno-Orna, J A; Pérez-Calvo, J I

    2015-12-01

    The objective was to assess the prognostic importance of various glycaemic control measures on hospital mortality. Retrospective, analytical cohort study that included patients hospitalised in internal medicine departments with a diagnosis related to diabetes mellitus (DM), excluding acute decompensations. The clinical endpoint was hospital mortality. We recorded clinical, analytical and glycaemic control-related variables (scheduled insulin administration, plasma glycaemia at admission, HbA1c, mean glycaemia (MG) and in-hospital glycaemic variability and hypoglycaemia). The measurement of hospital mortality predictors was performed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. A total of 384 patients (50.3% men) were included. The mean age was 78.5 (SD, 10.3) years. The DM-related diagnoses were type 2 diabetes (83.6%) and stress hyperglycaemia (6.8%). Thirty-one (8.1%) patients died while in hospital. In the multivariate analysis, the best model for predicting mortality (R(2)=0.326; P<.0001) consisted, in order of importance, of age (χ(2)=8.19; OR=1.094; 95% CI 1.020-1.174; P=.004), Charlson index (χ(2)=7.28; OR=1.48; 95% CI 1.11-1.99; P=.007), initial glycaemia (χ(2)=6.05; OR=1.007; 95% CI 1.001-1.014; P=.014), HbA1c (χ(2)=5.76; OR=0.59; 95% CI 0.33-1; P=.016), glycaemic variability (χ(2)=4.41; OR=1.031; 95% CI 1-1.062; P=.036), need for corticosteroid treatment (χ(2)=4.03; OR=3.1; 95% CI 1-9.64; P=.045), administration of scheduled insulin (χ(2)=3.98; OR=0.26; 95% CI 0.066-1; P=.046) and systolic blood pressure (χ(2)=2.92; OR=0.985; 95% CI 0.97-1.003; P=.088). An increase in initial glycaemia and in-hospital glycaemic variability predict the risk of mortality for hospitalised patients with DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  14. Association of glycaemic variability evaluated by continuous glucose monitoring with diabetic peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu-Ming; Zhao, Li-Hua; Zhang, Xiu-Lin; Cai, Hong-Li; Huang, Hai-Yan; Xu, Feng; Chen, Tong; Wang, Xue-Qin; Guo, Ai-Song; Li, Jian-An; Su, Jian-Bin

    2018-05-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), a common microvascular complication of diabetes, is linked to glycaemic derangements. Glycaemic variability, as a pattern of glycaemic derangements, is a key risk factor for diabetic complications. We investigated the association of glycaemic variability with DPN in a large-scale sample of type 2 diabetic patients. In this cross-sectional study, we enrolled 982 type 2 diabetic patients who were screened for DPN and monitored by a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system between February 2011 and January 2017. Multiple glycaemic variability parameters, including the mean amplitude of glycaemic excursions (MAGE), mean of daily differences (MODD), standard deviation of glucose (SD), and 24-h mean glucose (24-h MG), were calculated from glucose profiles obtained from CGM. Other possible risks for DPN were also examined. Of the recruited type 2 diabetic patients, 20.1% (n = 197) presented with DPN, and these patients also had a higher MAGE, MODD, SD, and 24-h MG than patients without DPN (p diabetic duration, HOMA-IR, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were found to be independent contributors to DPN, and the corresponding odds ratios (95% confidence interval) were 4.57 (3.48-6.01), 1.10 (1.03-1.17), 1.24 (1.09-1.41), and 1.33 (1.15-1.53), respectively. Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated that the optimal MAGE cutoff value for predicting DPN was 4.60 mmol/L; the corresponding sensitivity was 64.47%, and the specificity was 75.54%. In addition to conventional risks including diabetic duration, HOMA-IR and HbA1c, increased glycaemic variability assessed by MAGE is a significant independent contributor to DPN in type 2 diabetic patients.

  15. Association between the extent of urinary albumin excretion and glycaemic variability indices measured by continuous glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S-M; Kim, T-H; Oh, S; Baek, J; Joung, J Y; Park, S-M; Cho, Y Y; Sohn, S Y; Hur, K Y; Lee, M-S; Lee, M-K; Kim, J H

    2015-02-01

    The contribution of glycaemic variability to the microvascular complication of diabetes has not been established. We examined whether there is an independent association between indices of glycaemic variability in continuous glucose monitoring and extent of albuminuria. A total of 173 patients with Type 2 diabetes (without insulin therapy, n = 96; with insulin therapy, n = 77) who had unexplained large fluctuations in blood glucose values underwent three-day continuous glucose monitoring. We used a multinomial logistic regression model to determine whether the indices of glycaemic variability independently affected the odds of having a spot urine albumin/creatinine ratio of 30-299 mg/g and ≥ 300 mg/g. Higher standard deviation (P = 0.002), mean of daily differences (P = 0.023) and mean amplitude of glycaemic excursion (P = 0.043) significantly increased the odds of having a urine albumin/creatinine ratio of ≥ 300 mg/g. In multivariable analysis, only higher standard deviation, but not mean amplitude of glycaemic excursion and mean of daily differences, independently increased the odds of having a urine albumin/creatinine ratio of ≥ 300 mg/g (P = 0.025). Coefficient of variation (sd/mean) was not associated with the odds of having a urine albumin/creatinine ratio of 30-299 or ≥ 300 mg/g. The independent association between standard deviation and the extent of albuminuria was lost when the measures were normalized by mean glucose level. At least in terms of relative measures of glycaemic variability, we failed to demonstrate an independent association between glycaemic variability and albuminuria extent in patients with inadequately controlled Type 2 diabetes. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  16. Daily corticosteroids reduce infection-associated relapses in frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Ashima; Sinha, Aditi; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Math, Aparna; Hari, Pankaj; Bagga, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Relapses of nephrotic syndrome often follow minor infections, commonly of the upper respiratory tract. Daily administration of maintenance prednisolone during intercurrent infections was examined to determine whether the treatment reduces relapse rates in children with frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome. In a randomized controlled trial (nonblind, parallel group, tertiary-care hospital), 100 patients with idiopathic, frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome eligible for therapy with prolonged low-dose, alternate-day prednisolone with or without levamisole were randomized to either receive their usual dose of alternate-day prednisolone daily for 7 days during intercurrent infections (intervention group) or continue alternate-day prednisolone (controls). Primary outcome was assessed by comparing the rates of infection-associated relapses at 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes were the frequency of infections and the cumulative amount of prednisolone received in both groups. Patients in the intervention group showed significantly lower infection-associated (rate difference, 0.7 episodes/patient per year; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.3, 1.1) and lower total relapse rates (0.9 episodes/patient per year, 95% CI 0.4, 1.4) without increase in steroid toxicity. Poisson regression, adjusted for occurrence of infections, showed that daily administration of prednisolone during infections independently resulted in 59% reduction in frequency of relapses (rate ratio, 0.41; 95% CI 0.3, 0.6). For every six patients receiving this intervention, one showed a reduction of relapse frequency to less than three per year. Daily administration of maintenance doses of prednisolone, during intercurrent infections, significantly reduces relapse rates and the proportion of children with frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome.

  17. Glycaemic changes in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo De’Marziani

    2016-03-01

    OGTT is suggested for all CKD patients since it is able to detect the full range of unknown dysglycaemias, which avoids underdiagnoses and favours performing treatments to prevent progression in DM risk groups (IFG and/or IGT. It also aids in the selection of the most appropriate medication for transplantation or treatment initiation in new cases of undiagnosed DM to decrease morbidity and mortality.

  18. Chronic administration of ethanol leaf extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) may compromise glycaemic efficacy of Sitagliptin with no significant effect in retinopathy in a diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olurishe, Comfort; Kwanashie, Helen; Zezi, Abdulkadiri; Danjuma, Nuhu; Mohammed, Bisalla

    2016-12-24

    Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) has gained awareness for its antidiabetic effect, and is used as alternative therapy or concurrently with orthodox medicines such as sitagliptin in diabetes mellitus. This is without ascertaining the possibility of drug-herb interactions, which could either lead to enhanced antidiabetic efficacy, increased toxicity, or compromised glycaemic control with negative consequence in diabetic retinopathy. To investigate the effect, of sitagliptin (50mg/kg), Moringa oleifera (300mg/kg) leaf extract, and a combination of both on glycaemic control parameters, lenticular opacity and changes in retinal microvasculature in alloxan (150mg/kg i.p) induced diabetic rat model. Seven groups of eight rats per group were used, with groups I, II and VII as normal (NC), diabetic (DC) and post-prandial controls (PPC). Groups III to VI were diabetic rats on sitagliptin (III), M. oleifera (IV), sitagliptin and M. oleifera (SM) (V), for 42 days with 2 weeks delayed treatment in a post-prandial hyperglycaemic group (PPSM) (VI). Glycaemic control parameters, insulin levels, body weights, and effects of retinal microvasculature on lenticular opacity/morphology were investigated. A significant decrease in fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels was displayed in SM group from day 14(60%) (p<0.01) to day 28 (38%) (p<0.01) of treatment, compared to day 1. Thereafter, a steady increase of up to 57% on day 42 compared to day 28 was observed. A significant decrease in random blood glucose (RBG) levels, were demonstrated on day 42 (24%) (p<0.001), compared to day 1. No significant difference was seen in mean serum levels of insulin across groups. No significant changes in body weights. Evidence of mild lenticular opacity was observed, with no significant effect in pathologic lesions in the retina. The chronic co-administration of sitagliptin and M. oleifera showed a progressive decrease in anti-hyperglycaemic effect of sitagliptin, and although it delayed the onset of

  19. Gender differences in alcohol and substance use relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitzer, Kimberly S; Dearing, Ronda L

    2006-03-01

    This review explores gender differences in relapse and characteristics of relapse events in alcohol and substance use. For alcohol, relapse rates were similar across gender. Although negative mood, childhood sexual abuse, alcohol-related self-efficacy, and poorer coping strategies predicted alcohol relapse, gender did not moderate these effects. Gender did moderate the association between marriage and alcohol relapse. For women, marriage and marital stress were risk factors for alcohol relapse; among men, marriage lowered relapse risk. This gender difference in the role of marriage in relapse may be a result of partner differences in problem drinking. Alcoholic women are more likely to be married to heavy drinking partners than are alcoholic men; thus, alcoholic women may be put at risk of relapse by marriage and alcoholic men may be protected by marriage. There are fewer studies documenting gender differences in substance abuse relapse so conclusions are limited and tentative. In contrast to the lack of gender differences in alcohol relapse rates, women appear less likely to experience relapse to substance use, relative to men. Women relapsing to substance use appear to be more sensitive to negative affect and interpersonal problems. Men, in contrast, may be more likely to have positive experiences prior to relapse.

  20. Relapses in Multiple Sclerosis: Definition, Pathophysiology, Features, Imitators, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhan Sevim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Relapse in multiple sclerosis (MS is defined as a neurologic deficit associated with an acute inflammatory demyelinating event that lasts at least 24 hours in the absence of fever and infection. Myelinoclasis and axonal transection occur in relapses. Diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and many other features of the disease are directly related to the relapses. MS starts as the relapsing-remitting (RRMS form in 85% of patients. A large number of relapses in the first years, polysymptomatic relapses, and pyramidal system, brain stem, and spinal cord involvement are signs of a poor outcome. The average frequency of relapses is approximately one per year during the first years of RRMS. The frequency of relapses increases during systemic infections, psychological stress, and in the postpartum first 3 months. Seventy-five percent of relapses are monosymptomatic. Pseudo-relapses and paroxysmal symptoms are distinguished from relapses by their sudden onset, sudden termination, and shorter duration. Contrast enhancement is valuable in imaging, but undetectable in most relapses. The regression in the first few weeks of relapses is explained by reduction of the edema, and by remyelination in the following months. Relapses and their features are also among the main determinants of treatment. High-dose methylprednisolone and early treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone reduce post-relapse disability and shorten the duration of relapses. Plasmapheresis is a good option for patients who do not respond to steroid treatment. Identification of relapses by patients and physicians, distinguishing them from imitators, proper evaluation, treatment when necessary, and monitoring the results are of great importance for patients with MS. The educational levels of patients and physicians regarding these parameters should be increased. Well-designed studies that evaluate the long-term effect of relapse treatment on disability are needed.

  1. PARATHYROID CANCER OCCURRING IN RELAPSING SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kotova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a clinical case of parathyroid cancer in a patient with relapsing secondary hyperparathyroidism at 4 years after subtotal parathyroidectomy. Its unique character is related to the combination of relapsing secondary hyperparathyroidism, parathyromatosis, ectopic of an adenomatous hyperplastic parathyroid gland into the thyroid gland, and parathyroid cancer. Several most complicated aspects of parathyroid surgery are disclosed, such as the choice of strategy for surgical intervention in secondary hyperparathyroidism, complexity of morphological and cytological diagnostics of this disorder.

  2. Characteristics of Escherichia coli causing persistence or relapse of urinary tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, Karen; Stegger, Marc; Reisner, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs) pose a major problem but little is known about characteristics of Escherichia coli associated with RUTI. This study includes E. coli from 155 women with community-acquired lower urinary tract infections (UTIs) randomized to one of three dosing regiments...... of persistence or relapse of UTI compared with three days. In vitro biofilm formation was not higher among E. coli causing persistence or relapse. The presence of agn43a(CFT073) or agn43b(CFT073) was associated with biofilm forming capacity. In conclusion, our results show potential targets for prevention...... and treatment of persistence/relapse of UTI and potential markers for selecting treatment lengths and warrant studies of these and new VFGs....

  3. Psychotic relapse and associated factors among patients attending health services in Southwest Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikreyesus, Mahlet; Soboka, Matiwos; Feyissa, Garumma Tolu

    2016-10-20

    Psychotic relapse leads to repeated hospitalization and negatively affects the clinical prognosis of the patients. Information on prevalence of relapse among patients with psychotic disorders in Ethiopian setting is scarce. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of relapse among patients with psychotic disorders attending services in Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH). Data were collected using interviewer administered questionnaire. We used medication adherence rating scale (MARS) to assess compliance to medication and abnormal involuntary movement scale (AIMS) to detect medication side effects. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors of psychotic relapse. All variables with P-value value higher when compared to those who have never experienced medication side effects (aOR = 1.83, 95 % CI = 1.01, 3.31). The high prevalence of relapse among patients with psychotic disorder needs special attention. Clinicians need to pay attention to medication side effects the patient faces. Intervening noncompliance to medication and appropriately managing medication side effects may help in preventing psychotic relapse that may result because of non-compliance. The provision of counseling, psycho education, psycho social support may help patients in improving compliance to medication and reducing psychotic relapse. Developing and strengthening community based rehabilitation services should be emphasized as part of mental healthcare services.

  4. Potential risk factors associated with risk for drop-out and relapse during and following withdrawal of opioid prescription medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiwe, Susanne; Lönnquist, Ingeborg; Källmén, Håkan

    2011-10-01

    Withdrawal of opioid medication in patients with chronic pain has a drop-out and relapse problem. To evaluate if depressive symptoms, anxiety and pain intensity are potential risk factors for drop-out or relapse during the withdrawal process. Further, to assess internal consistency of scales for assessment of these potential risk factors. Twenty-nine patients were included. After 2 years 28 of these were followed-up. Those with depressive symptoms at baseline had a significant risk for drop-out from the withdrawal program (odds ratio 1.37) and relapse into use of opioids at follow-up (odds ratio 1.44). Drop-outs rated depressive symptoms significantly higher before detoxification. Those who relapsed rated significantly higher for pain intensity, depressive symptoms and abstinence prior to withdrawal. All scales had high reliability. To avoid drop-out and relapse clinical practice need to screen for depressive symptoms, pain intensity, and abstinence. This article presents significant reliability of scales useful within dependency centers. They can be used to identify these risk factors for drop-out and relapse, respectively, when initiating the withdrawal process. Taking these risk factors into consideration could improve the outcome of the withdrawal process by preventing drop-out and relapse. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychosocial factors related to gambling abstinence and relapse in members of gamblers anonymous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, Tian P S; Gordon, Leon M

    2008-03-01

    Problem gamblers account for almost one-third of the industry's total revenue with the adverse effects of problem gambling including significant financial loss, legal and occupational difficulties, family problems, psychological distress and suicide. As such, it is important to understand the influential factors in gambling abstinence and relapse, which will assist in the development of relapse prevention methods in therapeutic treatment regimes. This paper reported the role of a set of seven predictors in distinguishing between abstinent and relapsed gamblers among 75 Gambling Anonymous (GA) members (55 males; 20 females; Mean age 45 years) in Southeast Queensland. The measures taken were meeting Attendance and Participation, Social Support, God Belief, Belief in a Higher Power, Working the 12-steps of Recovery, Gambling Urges and Erroneous Cognitions. Discriminant analysis revealed that the variables separating the two groups were significant, suggesting that GA members achieving abstinence could be distinguished from those who relapsed, with Attendance and Participation, and Social Support contributing the greatest influence on member's ability to abstain from gambling. The findings suggested that GA member's involvement in meetings, and support from family and friends had significant impact on their gambling abstinence. In contrast, increased gambling urges and erroneous cognitions increased the chance of relapse.

  6. Effect of a group-based rehabilitation programme on glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes patients: The Copenhagen Type 2 Diabetes Rehabilitation Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadstrup, Eva Soelberg; Frølich, Anne; Perrild, Hans Jørgen Duckert

    2011-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of a group-based rehabilitation programme with an individual counselling programme at improving glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factors among patients with type 2 diabetes.......To compare the effectiveness of a group-based rehabilitation programme with an individual counselling programme at improving glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factors among patients with type 2 diabetes....

  7. Investigating the Effect of Emotional Intelligence on the Addiction Relapse after Quitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Raisjouyan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Addiction is multi-dimensional medical problem and psychologic defects have a major role on its establishment. This study was designed to determine the effect of emotional quotient (EQ on the rate of addiction relapse after quitting. Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study on 22 to 51 year old subjects who were being treated at chemical dependency rehabilitation centers in Mashhad, Iran, during December 2012 to May 2013. For assessment of EQ, the Persian version of Bar-On EQ questionnaire was employed at first visit of each patient. During the rehabilitation therapy, the subjects were visited monthly. The data of patients were collected during the first 6 months post-quitting. Results: One-hundred sixty subjects were studied which 87% of them were men. Mean (SD score of patients' EQ was 11.9 (2.8. The mean number of addiction relapses was 2.1 (2.8. Data analysis showed that there was a significant inverse correlation between EQ score and the number of relapses (r = -0.82, P = 0.05. In addition, it was found that the EQ score had a direct significant relationship with age (r = 0.33, P = 0.05. No significant correlation between type of abused substance and the number of relapses was found. Conclusion: EQ has a positive impact on preventing addiction relapse. Increasing EQ through educational programs can be used as a preventive measure for treating addict persons.   How to cite this article: Raisjouyan Z, Talebi M, Ghasimi Shahgaldi F, Abdollahian E. Investigating the Effect of Emotional Intelligence on the Addiction Relapse after Quitting. Asia Pac J Med Toxicol 2014;3:27-30.

  8. Relapse to cocaine seeking in an invertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaning-Kwarteng, Akua O; Asif-Malik, Aman; Pei, Yue; Canales, Juan J

    2017-06-01

    Addiction is characterised by cycles of compulsive drug taking, periods of abstinence and episodes of relapse. The extinction/reinstatement paradigm has been extensively used in rodents to model human relapse and explore underlying mechanisms and therapeutics. However, relapse to drug seeking behaviour has not been previously demonstrated in invertebrates. Here, we used a cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm in the flatworm, planarian, followed by extinction and reinstatement of drug seeking. Once baseline preference was established for one of two distinctly textured environments (i.e. compartments with a coarse or smooth surface), planarian received pairings of cocaine (5μM) in the non-preferred, and vehicle in the most preferred, environment, and were tested for conditioning thereafter. Cocaine produced robust CPP, measured as a significant increase in the time spent in the cocaine-paired compartment. Subsequently, planarian underwent extinction training, reverting back to their original preference within three sessions. Brief exposure to cocaine (5μM) or methamphetamine (5μM) reinstated cocaine-seeking behaviour. By contrast, the high affinity dopamine transporter inhibitor, (N-(n-butyl)-3α-[bis (4-fluorophenyl) methoxy]-tropane) (JHW007), which in rodents exhibits a neurochemical and behavioural profile distinct from cocaine, was ineffective. The present findings demonstrate for the first time reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking in an invertebrate model and suggest that the long-term adaptations underlying drug conditioning and relapse are highly conserved through evolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Relapsing/remitting type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Megen, Kayleigh M.; Spindler, Matthew P.; Keij, Fleur M.; Bosch, Ineke; Sprangers, Fleur; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Nikolic, Tatjana; Roep, Bart O.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Type 1 diabetes is believed to be an autoimmune disease associated with irreversible loss of insulin secretory function that follows a chronic progressive course. However, it has been speculated that relapsing/remitting disease progression may occur in type 1 diabetes. Methods: We

  10. Resistance to Change and Relapse of Observing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Eric A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Four experiments examined relapse of extinguished observing behavior of pigeons using a two-component multiple schedule of observing-response procedures. In both components, unsignaled periods of variable-interval (VI) food reinforcement alternated with extinction and observing responses produced stimuli associated with the availability of the VI…

  11. Effect of different milling methods on glycaemic response of foods made with finger millet (Eucenea coracana) flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, M A; Ekanayake, S; Nugegoda, D B

    2013-12-01

    Compare glycaemic response of foods prepared with finger millet flour, using traditional stone grinding and industrial milling. Crossover study. Healthy volunteers (n=11) consisting of five males and six females), aged between 20 and 30 years, with a body mass index of 18.5-23.5 Kgm-2. Blood glucose concentration was measured at fasting and 30, 45, 60, 90, 120 minutes after ingestion of roti and pittu made with stone ground or industrially milled finger millet flour, containing 50 g of available carbohydrates. Glycaemic Index (GI) values were expressed as the average value of the 11 subjects. Significant differences (p0.05) in proximate compositions of the different foods or raw flours. Foods prepared with finger millet (kurakkan) flour with a larger particle size distribution resulted in a lower glycaemic response.

  12. Glycaemic control of diabetic patients in an urban primary health care setting in Sarawak: the Tanah Puteh Health Centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J S; Rahimah, N

    2004-08-01

    Achieving glycaemic goals in diabetics has always been a problem, especially in a developing country with inadequate facilities such as in Sarawak in Malaysia. There are no reported studies on the control of diabetes mellitus in a diabetic clinic in the primary health care setting in Sarawak. This paper describes the profile of 1031 patients treated in Klinik Kesihatan Tanah Puteh Health Centre. The mean age was 59 years, the mean BMI 27 kg/m2. There was a female preponderance and mainly type-2 diabetes. Mean HbA1c was 7.4%. Glycaemic control was optimal in 28% (HbA1c 7.5%). Reasonable glycaemic control can be achieved in the primary health care setting in Sarawak.

  13. Utilisation of preharvest dropped apple peels as a flour substitute for a lower glycaemic index and higher fibre cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yujin; Bae, In Young; Lee, Suyong; Lee, Hyeon Gyu

    2014-02-01

    Fibre-enriched materials (FEMs) obtained from preharvest dropped apple peels were utilised as a source of dietary fibre in baked cakes and their effects on the textural/nutritional qualities and starch digestibility (glucose release behaviour, starch digestion fraction, predicted glycaemic index) of the cakes were evaluated. When FEMs were incorporated into the cake formulation (3 g and 6 g of dietary fibre per serving (100 g)), the volume of the cakes seemed to be reduced and their texture become harder. However, 3 g of FEMs did not degrade the cake qualities. The use of FEMs in cakes significantly reduced the levels of rapidly digestible starch and slowly digestible starch, while the levels of resistant starch increased. Additionally, the cake samples prepared with FEMs exhibited a lower predicted glycaemic index. This study may give rise to multi-functional bakery products with acceptable quality and low glycaemic index.

  14. The effect of Ramadan fasting on glycaemic control in insulin dependent diabetic patients: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabbood, Majid H; Ho, Kenneth W; Simons, Mary R

    Ramadan fasting is one of the five pillars of Islam. People with diabetes are exempted from fasting according to Islamic rules. However, many people with diabetes wish to fast. Physicians are asked frequently by their patients about their ability to fast and the possible impact of fasting on their glycaemic control. Studies about the effect of Ramadan on people with insulin-treated diabetes are scarce. This review aims to provide clinicians with the best recommendations for their patients with insulin-treated diabetes who wish to fast. Four databases (Medline, EMBASE, Scopus and PubMed) were searched using the following MeSH terms and keywords: "insulin dependent diabetes mellitus", "type 1 diabetes mellitus", 'Ramadan' "and" "fasting". In addition, a hand search of key journals and reference lists was performed. Sixteen full text articles were selected for review and critical analysis. All of the included studies except one found improvement or no change in glycaemic control parameters during Ramadan fasting. The incidence of major complications were negligible. Minor hypoglycaemic events were reported in some studies but did not adversely affect fasting. Postprandial hyperglycaemia was a major concern in other studies. However, the incidence of severe hyperglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis were trivial. Ramadan fasting is feasible for insulin dependent diabetic patient who wish to fast. Clinicians should advise their patients about the importance of adequate glycaemic control before Ramadan and frequent glucose monitoring during fasting. Certain types of Insulin seem to be more beneficial than other. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of functional insulin therapy on glycaemic parameters in children with diabetes mellitus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štimjanin-Koldžo, Diana; Alajbegović, Salem; Štimjanin, Ena; Mehinagić, Jasmina

    2017-08-01

    Aim The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of a prospectively conducted interactive 5-day education programme based on Düsseldorf model on glycated haemoglobin (A1C), and total daily dose of insulin in type 1 diabetes patients. Methods A total of 67 type 1 diabetes patients was analysed; mean age of 11±0.68 years, 43 females and 24 males. The programme was led by a trained team of diabetes specialist doctors and nurses. All subjects and their parents completed a knowledge test about diabetes at beginning, and at the end of education, and after 12 months (30 questions). Subjects were evaluated for total daily insulin, and HbA1c at baseline, as well as 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the end of the education programme. Results Results of the knowledge test after the education have shown higher knowledge at baseline. At the end of the education programme an average of total daily insulin dose was significantly lower. There was a 3.17% reduction in HbA1c values over 9 months, and 1.8% over 12 months in the comparison to the baseline values (p1). Conclusions Structured education programme of functional insulin therapy was associated with improved glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes patients and their parents. It motivated patients and parents to improve glycaemic control. One year after the follow up, glycaemic control was worsening, due to lack of patients' motivation, therefore, there is a need for yearly re-education. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  16. External validity of randomized controlled trials of glycaemic control and vascular disease: how representative are participants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, C; Byrne, C D; Guthrie, B; Lindsay, R S; McKnight, J A; Philip, S; Sattar, N; Walker, J J; Wild, S H

    2013-03-01

    To describe the proportion of people with Type 2 diabetes living in Scotland who meet eligibility criteria for inclusion in several large randomized controlled trials of glycaemic control to inform physicians and guideline developers about the generalizibility of trial results. A literature review was performed to identify large trials assessing the impact of glycaemic control on risk of macrovascular disease. Inclusion and exclusion criteria from each trial were applied to data on the population of people with a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes living in Scotland in 2008 (n = 180,590) in a population-based cross-sectional study and the number and proportion of people eligible for each trial was determined. Seven trials were identified. The proportion of people with Type 2 diabetes who met the eligibility criteria for the trials ranged from 3.5 to 50.7%. Trial participants were younger at age of diagnosis of diabetes and at time of trial recruitment than in the Scottish study population. The application of upper age criteria excluded the largest proportion of patients, with up to 39% of people with Type 2 diabetes ineligible for a trial with the most stringent criteria based on age alone. We found that many of the large trials of glycaemic control among people with Type 2 diabetes have limited external validity when applied to a population-based cohort of people with Type 2 diabetes. In particular, the age distribution of trial participants often does not reflect that of people with Type 2 diabetes in a contemporary British population. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  17. Effect of Optimization of Glycaemic Control on Mannan-Binding Lectin in Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gry Høst Dørflinger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL concentration in plasma is increased in subjects with type 1 diabetes and associated with increased mortality and risk of diabetic nephropathy. Recent findings show that pancreas transplantation reduces MBL concentration. Whether the increased MBL concentration is reversed by improved glycaemic control remains unknown. We investigated the effects of improved glycaemic control on MBL concentration in patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods. We measured MBL, fructosamine, and HbA1cat baseline and after 6 weeks in 52 type 1 diabetic patients following the change from conventional insulin therapy to insulin pump therapy. Results. After initiation of insulin pump therapy, the total daily insulin dose was significantly reduced (from 51 ± 18 IE/day to 39 ± 13 IE/day, P<0.0001. There was a significant decrease in HbA1c from 8.6% to 7.7% (from 70 mmol/mol to 61 mmol/mol, P<0.0001 and in fructosamine levels (from 356 μmol/L to 311 μmol/L, P<0.0001. MBL levels decreased by 10% from 2165 μg/L (IQR 919–3389 μg/L at baseline to 1928 μ/L (IQR 811–2758 μg/L at follow-up (P=0.005, but MBL change was not significantly correlated with changes in insulin dose, HbA1c, or fructosamine. Conclusions. MBL concentration decreased following the initiation of insulin pump therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes and did not correlate with changes in glycaemic control.

  18. Family CHAOS is associated with glycaemic control in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, M; Taylor, B J; Lawrence, J; Healey, D; Reith, D M; Gray, A; Wheeler, B J

    2016-02-01

    Despite advances in the medical management of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), for many, glycaemic control remains substandard. Other factors are clearly important in determining success, or lack thereof, with diabetes management. With this in mind, we have investigated whether family CHAOS may provide a novel tool to identify when environmental confusion could impact on diabetes management and subsequent glycaemic control. A case-control study of children and adolescents with established T1DM and age-/sex-matched controls was conducted. Demographic information, both maternal and paternal CHAOS scores, and HbA1c were collected. Statistical analysis was undertaken to explore associations between T1DM and CHAOS and between CHAOS and HbA1c. Data on 65 children with T1DM and 60 age-/sex-matched controls were obtained. There was no evidence of group differences for maternal CHAOS (p = 0.227), but paternal CHAOS scores were higher for the T1DM group (p = 0.041). Greater maternal and paternal CHAOS scores were both associated with higher HbA1c (p ≤ 0.027). The maternal association remained after controlling for diabetes duration, SMBG frequency, and insulin therapy. In children with T1DM, there appears to be a negative association between increased environmental confusion, as rated by CHAOS, and glycaemic control. In addition, when compared to controls, fathers of children and adolescents with T1DM appear to experience CHAOS differently to mothers. These findings contribute to the growing body of literature exploring psychosocial factors in T1DM. Continuing efforts are required to fully understand how the family and psychosocial environment interact with diabetes to impact on long-term health outcomes.

  19. Influence of vitamin E supplementation on glycaemic control: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renfan Xu

    Full Text Available Observational studies have revealed that higher serum vitamin E concentrations and increased vitamin E intake and vitamin E supplementation are associated with beneficial effects on glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. However, whether vitamin E supplementation exerts a definitive effect on glycaemic control remains unclear. This article involves a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials of vitamin E to better characterise its impact on HbA1c, fasting glucose and fasting insulin. PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were electronically searched from the earliest possible date through April 2013 for all relevant studies. Weighted mean difference (WMD was calculated for net changes using fixed-effects or random-effects models. Standard methods for assessing statistical heterogeneity and publication bias were used. Fourteen randomised controlled trials involving individual data on 714 subjects were collected in this meta-analysis. Increased vitamin E supplementation did not result in significant benefits in glycaemic control as measured by reductions in HbA1c, fasting glucose and fasting insulin. Subgroup analyses revealed a significant reduction in HbA1c (-0.58%, 95% CI -0.83 to -0.34 and fasting insulin (-9.0 pmol/l, 95% CI -15.90 to -2.10 compared with controls in patients with low baseline vitamin E status. Subgroup analyses also demonstrated that the outcomes may have been influenced by the vitamin E dosage, study duration, ethnic group, serum HbA1c concentration, and fasting glucose control status. In conclusion, there is currently insufficient evidence to support a potential beneficial effect of vitamin E supplementation on improvements of HbA1c and fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in subjects with T2DM.

  20. Influence of vitamin E supplementation on glycaemic control: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Renfan; Zhang, Shasha; Tao, Anyu; Chen, Guangzhi; Zhang, Muxun

    2014-01-01

    Observational studies have revealed that higher serum vitamin E concentrations and increased vitamin E intake and vitamin E supplementation are associated with beneficial effects on glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, whether vitamin E supplementation exerts a definitive effect on glycaemic control remains unclear. This article involves a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials of vitamin E to better characterise its impact on HbA1c, fasting glucose and fasting insulin. PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were electronically searched from the earliest possible date through April 2013 for all relevant studies. Weighted mean difference (WMD) was calculated for net changes using fixed-effects or random-effects models. Standard methods for assessing statistical heterogeneity and publication bias were used. Fourteen randomised controlled trials involving individual data on 714 subjects were collected in this meta-analysis. Increased vitamin E supplementation did not result in significant benefits in glycaemic control as measured by reductions in HbA1c, fasting glucose and fasting insulin. Subgroup analyses revealed a significant reduction in HbA1c (-0.58%, 95% CI -0.83 to -0.34) and fasting insulin (-9.0 pmol/l, 95% CI -15.90 to -2.10) compared with controls in patients with low baseline vitamin E status. Subgroup analyses also demonstrated that the outcomes may have been influenced by the vitamin E dosage, study duration, ethnic group, serum HbA1c concentration, and fasting glucose control status. In conclusion, there is currently insufficient evidence to support a potential beneficial effect of vitamin E supplementation on improvements of HbA1c and fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in subjects with T2DM.

  1. A pilot study of factors associated with glycaemic control in adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus on insulin pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, W; Frampton, R; Wright, K; Fattore, S; Shadbolt, B; Perampalam, S

    2016-02-01

    To identify the knowledge and management factors associated with glycaemic control among adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus treated with insulin pump therapy. A cross-sectional study of adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus on insulin pump therapy for at least 12 months (n = 50, 18-70 years old) was undertaken between December 2013 and May 2014. A new questionnaire was developed to evaluate participants' knowledge and management related to insulin pump therapy, and were correlated with insulin pump data, HbA1c and frequency of hypoglycaemia. Participants who changed their insulin pump settings when indicated had significantly better glycaemic control than those who did not (P = 0.04). Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that better overall insulin pump therapy management was a significant predictor of better glycaemic control (odds ratio 4.45, 95% confidence interval 1.61-12.3; P = 0.004) after adjusting for potential confounders including age, gender, duration of diabetes and insulin pump therapy. However, overall insulin pump therapy knowledge was not a significant predictor of glycaemic control (P = 0.058). There was no significant association between frequency of hypoglycaemia and insulin pump therapy knowledge or management. We identified some key knowledge and management factors associated with glycaemic control in adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus on insulin pump therapy using a newly designed questionnaire. The pilot study assessed the clinical utility of this evaluation tool, which may facilitate provision of targeted education to insulin pump therapy users to achieve optimal glycaemic control. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  2. Glycaemic indices and non-traditional biochemical cardiovascular disease markers in a diabetic population in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okeoghene, O.A.; Azenabor, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of hyperfibrinogenaemia, elevated C-reactive protein, hyperuricaemia and elevated lipoprotein A in a clinic population of patients with type 2 Diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with healthy controls; and determine the interrelationship between fasting plasma glucose levels and indices of long-term glycaemic control (fructosamine and glycosylated haemoglobin) in DM. Study Design: Cross-sectional, analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Ikeja, from April to June 2009. Methodology: A total of 200 patients with type 2 DM and 100 age and gender matched healthy controls were recruited for the study. Glycaemic control was assessed using fasting blood glucose, fructosamine and glycosylated haemoglobin levels. The non-traditional risk factors studied included C-reactive protein (CRP), Lipoprotein a (Lpa), serum uric acid (SUA), microalbuminuria and fibrinogen. Mann-whitney, chi-square and Pearson's correlation tests were used for analysis as applicable. Results: Hyperfibrinoginaemia, elevated CRP, LPa, microalbuminuria and hyperuricaemia were present in 3.5%, 65%, 12%, 6% and 57% respectively in type 2 DM. The mean levels of these CV risk factors were significantly higher in subjects with type 2 DM than that of the control subject. There was a positive and significant correlation between HbA1c and FBS (r=0.46, p=0.0001) and HbA1c and fructosamine (r=0.49, p=0.0001). All studied CVS risk factors were related to indices of glycaemic control which were found to be interrelated. Fasting blood glucose significantly correlated with both HbA1c and fructosamine but HbA1c showed better correlation to FPG than fructosamine (r=0.51 vs. 0.32). Conclusion: Glycosylated haemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose but not fructosamine are significantly associated with microalbuminuria, fibrinogen SUA and CRP in type 2 DM. HbA1c was found to be better than fructosamine in

  3. Glycaemic Index Of Uwi, Gadung, And Talas Which Were Given On Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, Ika Puspita; Lukitaningsih, Endang; Rumiyati, Rumiyati; Setiawan, Irfan Muris

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was the determination of glycaemic index (GI) of local tubers such as Uwi (Dioscorea alata), Gadung (Dioscorea hispida), dan Talas (Colocasia esculenta). Tubers were prepared as raw flour which were administered orally to the rats. Blood were taken at 0; 0,5; 1 and 2 hour after tubers administration. The dose was 2,5 kg/kg body weight (BW) whereas glucose was administered as a standart treatment. Area Under Curve (AUC) was calculated after plotting the graph of time vers...

  4. Glycaemic control status among type 2 diabetic patients and the role of their diabetes coping behaviours: a clinic-based study in Tripoli, Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Taher Ashur

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achieving good glycaemic control is important in diabetes management. However, poor glycaemic control is widely reported. This article assessed the prevalence of uncontrolled and poor glycaemic control among Libyans with type 2 diabetes and examined the relative contribution of diabetes coping behaviours to their glycaemic control status. Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 2013 in a large diabetes centre in Tripoli. The study included 523 respondents. Diabetes coping behaviours were measured using the revised version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities measure (SDSCA and the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8©, while glycaemic control status was based on the HbA1c level. Results: Mean HbA1c was 8.9 (±2.1, and of the 523 patients, only 114 (21.8% attained the glycaemic control target of HbAc1 of less than 7.0%. Females (OR=1.74, 95% CI=1.03–2.91, patients on insulin and oral hypoglycaemic agents (OR=1.92, 95% CI=1.05–3.54, patients on insulin (OR=3.14, 95% CI=1.66–6.03, and low-medication adherents (OR=2.25, 95% CI=1.36–3.73 were more likely to have uncontrolled and poor glycaemic control, while exercise contributed to glycaemic control status as a protective factor (OR=0.85, 95% CI=0.77–0.94. Conclusion: The findings from this study showed the considerable burden of uncontrolled and poor glycaemic control in one of the largest diabetes care settings in Libya. Medication adherence as well as exercise promotion programs would help in reducing the magnitude of poor glycaemic control.

  5. Glycaemic control status among type 2 diabetic patients and the role of their diabetes coping behaviours: a clinic-based study in Tripoli, Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashur, Sana Taher; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Bosseri, Soad; Fah, Tong Seng; Shamsuddin, Khadijah

    2016-01-01

    Achieving good glycaemic control is important in diabetes management. However, poor glycaemic control is widely reported. This article assessed the prevalence of uncontrolled and poor glycaemic control among Libyans with type 2 diabetes and examined the relative contribution of diabetes coping behaviours to their glycaemic control status. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 2013 in a large diabetes centre in Tripoli. The study included 523 respondents. Diabetes coping behaviours were measured using the revised version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities measure (SDSCA) and the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8(©)), while glycaemic control status was based on the HbA1c level. Mean HbA1c was 8.9 (±2.1), and of the 523 patients, only 114 (21.8%) attained the glycaemic control target of HbAc1 of less than 7.0%. Females (OR=1.74, 95% CI=1.03-2.91), patients on insulin and oral hypoglycaemic agents (OR=1.92, 95% CI=1.05-3.54), patients on insulin (OR=3.14, 95% CI=1.66-6.03), and low-medication adherents (OR=2.25, 95% CI=1.36-3.73) were more likely to have uncontrolled and poor glycaemic control, while exercise contributed to glycaemic control status as a protective factor (OR=0.85, 95% CI=0.77-0.94). The findings from this study showed the considerable burden of uncontrolled and poor glycaemic control in one of the largest diabetes care settings in Libya. Medication adherence as well as exercise promotion programs would help in reducing the magnitude of poor glycaemic control.

  6. Are there better alternatives than haemoglobin A1c to estimate glycaemic control in the chronic kidney disease population?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speeckaert, Marijn; Van Biesen, Wim; Delanghe, Joris

    2014-01-01

    paper based on narrative literature review. RESULTS: As a different association between glycaemic control and morbidity/mortality might be observed in patients with and without renal insufficiency, the European Renal Best Practice, the official guideline body of the European Renal Association......-European Dialysis and Transplant Association, presents the current knowledge and evidence of the use of alternative glycaemic markers (glycated albumin, fructosamine, 1,5-anhydroglucitol and continuous glucose monitoring). CONCLUSION: Although reference values of HbA1C might be different in patients with chronic...

  7. Identification of those most likely to benefit from a low-glycaemic index dietary intervention in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer M

    2014-08-28

    The present study is a secondary analysis of the ROLO study, a randomised control trial of a low-glycaemic index (GI) diet in pregnancy to prevent the recurrence of fetal macrosomia. The objectives of the present study were to identify which women are most likely to respond to a low-GI dietary intervention in pregnancy with respect to three outcome measures: birth weight; maternal glucose intolerance; gestational weight gain (GWG). In early pregnancy, 372 women had their mid-upper arm circumference recorded and BMI calculated. Concentrations of glucose, insulin and leptin were measured in early pregnancy and at 28 weeks. At delivery, infant birth weight was recorded and fetal glucose, C-peptide and leptin concentrations were measured in the cord blood. Women who benefited in terms of infant birth weight were shorter, with a lower education level. Those who maintained weight gain within the GWG guidelines were less overweight in both their first and second pregnancies, with no difference being observed in maternal height. Women who at 28 weeks of gestation developed glucose intolerance, despite the low-GI diet, had a higher BMI and higher glucose concentrations in early pregnancy with more insulin resistance. They also had significantly higher-interval pregnancy weight gain. For each analysis, women who responded to the intervention had lower leptin concentrations in early pregnancy than those who did not. These findings suggest that the maternal metabolic environment in early pregnancy is important in determining later risks of excessive weight gain and metabolic disturbance, whereas birth weight is mediated more by genetic factors. It highlights key areas, which warrant further interrogation before future pregnancy intervention studies, in particular, maternal education level and inter-pregnancy weight gain.

  8. From Abstinence to Relapse: A Preliminary Qualitative Study of Drug Users in a Compulsory Drug Rehabilitation Center in Changsha, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yang

    Full Text Available Relapse among abstinent drug users is normal. Several factors are related to relapse, but it remains unclear what individuals' actual life circumstances are during periods of abstinence, and how these circumstances facilitate or prevent relapse.To illuminate drug users' experiences during abstinence periods and explore the real-life catalysts and inhibitors contributing to drug use relapse.Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 drug users recruited from a compulsory isolated drug rehabilitation center in Changsha. The interviews were guided by open-ended questions on individuals' experiences in drug use initiation, getting addicted, treatment history, social environment, abstinence, and relapse. Participants were also encouraged to share their own stories. Interviews were digitally recorded and fully transcribed. The data of 18 participants who reported abstinence experiences before admission were included in the analyses. The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis with inductive hand coding to derive themes.Most drug users were able to successfully abstain from drugs. During abstinence, their lives were congested with challenges, such as adverse socioeconomic conditions, poor family/social support, interpersonal conflicts, and stigma and discrimination, all of which kept them excluded from mainstream society. Furthermore, the police's system of ID card registration, which identifies individuals as drug users, worsened already grave situations. Relapse triggers reported by the participants focused mainly on negative feelings, interpersonal conflicts, and stressful events. Craving was experienced but not perceived as a relapse trigger by most participants.This study of in-depth interview with drug users found evidence of situations and environments they live during abstinence appear rather disadvantaged, making it extremely difficult for them to remain abstinent. Comprehensive programs on relapse prevention that acknowledge

  9. Glycaemic changes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De'Marziani, Guillermo; Soler Pujol, Gervasio; Obregón, Liliana Miriam; Morales, Elisa Mabel; Gonzalez, Claudio Daniel; Gonzalez Paganti, Luciana; Cacciagiú, Leonardo; Lopez, Graciela; Schreier, Laura; Elbert, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In Argentina, there have been no studies aimed at establishing the prevalence of dysglycaemia (impaired fasting glucose [IFG], impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] and diabetes mellitus [DM]) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our group decided to conduct an observational study to evaluate the frequency with oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in CKD patients with no previous data for dysglycaemia in their medical records. OGTT was performed in 254 patients (60.62% male) with stage 3, 4 and 5 CKD under conservative treatment, haemodialysis or transplantation. Results for DM were found in 10 patients according to fasting glucose alone (3.94%; 95% CI: 1.35-6.53%), 11 patients with exclusively the second hour criterion (4.33%; 95% CI: 1.63-7.03%), 15 with both criteria (5.91%; 95% CI: 2.81-9.00%) and 36 patients with at least one criteria (14.17%; 95% CI: 9.69-18.66%). In a multivariate analysis, DM was associated with waist circumference (OR=1.033 per cm; 95% CI, 1.005 to 1.062; P=.019) and with conservative treatment vs. replacement therapy (OR=0.41; 95% CI: 0.19-0.92; P=.028). IGT was evident in 24.6% and 20.3 on conservative vs. replacement therapy, with no statistically significant difference. IFG (ADA criteria) was 19.75 vs. 9.24% in conservative vs. replacement therapy, with a statistically significant difference. OGTT is suggested for all CKD patients since it is able to detect the full range of unknown dysglycaemias, which avoids underdiagnoses and favours performing treatments to prevent progression in DM risk groups (IFG and/or IGT). It also aids in the selection of the most appropriate medication for transplantation or treatment initiation in new cases of undiagnosed DM to decrease morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of low and high glycaemic index drink on sleep pattern in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalilolghadr, S.; Afaghi, A.; Connor, H.O.; Chow, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of high and low glycaemic index drinks on children's sleep pattern. Methods: Eight children underwent 3 nights of full polysomnography study, one familiarization and two test nights consecutively. On the test nights, 1 hour before bedtime, the children had a milk drink of either low or high GI in a random order. The glycaemic loads (GL) were 7.4 and 52.8 for low and high GI drink respectively. Results: The mean of total arousal index in the first half of night after the high GI was greater than that of low GI drink. (12.9 +- 4.6 vs. 9.9 +- 2.2, P=0.03). NREM arousal index in the first half of night after the high GI was also higher than that of low GI drink. (12.7+- 4.8 vs. 9.6 +- 2.3, P=0.05). Other sleep parameters did not show any significant difference in low GI and high GI diets. Conclusion: NREM and total arousal indices were higher in those who consumed high GI drinks compared with low GI, one hour before sleep. It seems that the high quantity consumption of carbohydrates close to the bedtime is accompanied by frequent arousals and may affect the sleep quality. (author)

  11. Ethnic differences in glycaemic control and complications: the adult diabetes control and management (ADCM), Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, B H; Mastura, I; Lee, P Y; Wahyu, T Sri; Cheong, A T; Zaiton, A

    2011-08-01

    Ethnicity is an important factor in diabetes care. The understanding of its effect in this country may help to improve diabetes care, glycaemic control and diabetic complication rates. This study was to determine the diabetes control profile in relation to complication rates between the three main ethnics group in Malaysia. This nested cross-sectional study was part of the Audit of Diabetes Control and Management (ADCM), an ongoing cohort patient registry focused on diabetes control and management in the primary care setting in Malaysia. This registry registers all diabetes patients aged 18 years old and above. Demographic data, diabetes duration, treatment modalities, as well as various risk factors and diabetes complications are reported. Data was handled by statisticians using STATA version 9. A total of 20330 patients from 54 health centers were registered at the time of this report. The majority were type 2 diabetics (99.1%) of whom 56.6% were female. The mean age was 57.9 years (SD 11.58). Malay accounted for 56.3%, Chinese 19.5% and Indian 22.5%. There were 30.3% who attained HbA1c profiles. The Chinese diabetics suffer as many diabetes-related complications despite better glycaemic control. Further studies will need to look into other socio-genetic factors in order to provide a more personalized effective diabetes care.

  12. Self-care practices of Malaysian adults with diabetes and sub-optimal glycaemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ming Yeong; Magarey, Judy

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the self-care practices of Malaysian adults with diabetes and sub-optimal glycaemic control. Using a one-to-one interviewing approach, data were collected from 126 diabetic adults from four settings. A 75-item questionnaire was used to assess diabetes-related knowledge and self-care practices regarding, diet, medication, physical activity and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). Most subjects had received advice on the importance of self-care in the management of their diabetes and recognised its importance. Sixty-seven subjects (53%) scored below 50% in their diabetes-related knowledge. Subjects who consumed more meals per day (80%), or who did not include their regular sweetened food intakes in their daily meal plan (80%), or who were inactive in daily life (54%), had higher mean fasting blood glucose levels (p=0.04). Subjects with medication non-adherence (46%) also tended to have higher fasting blood glucose levels. Only 15% of the subjects practiced SMBG. Predictors of knowledge deficit and poor self-care were low level of education (p = <0.01), older subjects (p=0.04) and Type 2 diabetes subjects on oral anti-hyperglycaemic medication (p = <0.01). There were diabetes-related knowledge deficits and inadequate self-care practices among the majority of diabetic patients with sub-optimal glycaemic control. This study should contribute to the development of effective education strategies to promote health for adults with sub-optimal diabetes control.

  13. Glycaemic responses after ingestion of some local foods by non-insulin dependent diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuo, P O; Ettyang, G A

    1996-12-01

    Fifteen non-insulin dependent diabetic volunteers, aged 51 +/- 3.9 years, were studied over a two month period to determine their glycaemic responses to various local foods. They were all on chlorpropamide and one subject was removed from analysis due to concurrent use of insulin. They received on separate occasions two servings of white bread, one serving of: brown bread, white lice, English potatoes, maize meal, millet and cassava each. Each meal contained 50 g of carbohydrate. A total of 107 glucose tolerance tests (GTTs) were performed and the glycaemic index (GI) for each food calculated. The mean blood sugars at 0,60 and 120 minutes were comparable for each food, and the peak rise occurred at 60 minutes. The highest rise (4.0 mmol/I) was seen with millet porridge. The highest GI was seen with white rice and the lowest with English potatoes (159.9 and 34.3 respectively). Overall, the cereals conferred higher GIs than the root vegetables. The GIs of English potatoes, maize meal, millet and cassava significantly differed from that of white bread. It is concluded that, using GIs, dietary guidelines comprising locally available and affordable foods can be made.

  14. Soups increase satiety through delayed gastric emptying yet increased glycaemic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, M E; Ranawana, V; Shafat, A; Henry, C J

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the satiating properties of soups compared with solids; however, the mechanisms controlling soup-induced satiety are unknown. This study aimed to understand the physiological mechanisms causing soup to be more satiating. A total of 12 volunteers were tested on three occasions after a solid meal, chunky soup or smooth soup test meal for gastric emptying (GE) using the sodium [1-¹³C] acetate breath test, satiety using visual analog scales (VAS) and glycaemic response (GR) using finger prick blood samples. There was a significant difference in GE half-time (P=0.022) and GE ascension time (P=0.018), with the longest GE times for the smooth soup and the shortest for the solid meal. The GR area under the curve was significantly different between meals (P=0.040). The smooth soup had the greatest GR (87.0 ± 49.5 mmol/l/min), followed by the chunky soup (65.4 ± 48.0 mmol/l/min), with the solid meal having the lowest GR (61.6 ± 36.8 mmol/l/min). Volunteers were fuller after the smooth soup compared with solid meal (P=0.034). The smooth soup induced greater fullness compared with the solid meal because of a combination of delayed GE leading to feelings of gastric distension and rapid accessibility of nutrients causing a greater glycaemic response.

  15. Received View of Addiction, Relapse and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndasauka, Yamikani; Wei, Zhengde; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2017-01-01

    It is important to highlight that attempts at understanding and explaining addiction have been made for centuries. It is, however, just five decades ago, with the growth of science and technology that more interest has been observed in this field. This chapter examines different views and theories that have been posited to understand and explain addiction. More attention will be given to prominent views that seem to draw consensus among researchers and medical practitioners. The first section of the chapter introduces the addiction debate, the different theories that have been provided to explain it from different perspectives and disciplines such as neurosciences, philosophy and psychology. Then, the chapter discusses different views on the role of relapse and what it entails in understanding addiction. The second section discusses different proposed and used forms of treating addiction. Thus, the chapter discusses the received view of addiction, the understanding of relapse as a critical element in addiction and treatments.

  16. Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Trausti; Söderhäll, Stefan; Arvidson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Relapse is the main reason for treatment failure in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Despite improvements in the up-front therapy, survival after relapse is still relatively poor, especially for high-risk relapses. The aims of this study were to assess outcomes following acute lymphoblastic...... leukemia relapse after common initial Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology protocol treatment; to validate currently used risk stratifications, and identify additional prognostic factors for overall survival. Altogether, 516 of 2735 patients (18.9%) relapsed between 1992 and 2011 and were...

  17. Economic costs associated with an MS relapse

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, K.

    2014-09-01

    This was an prospective audit composed of medical chart review and patient questionnaire. Relapses were stratified into 3 groups: low, moderate and high intensity. Age, gender, MS subtype, disease duration, expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score, disease modifying therapy (DMT) use and employment status were recorded. Direct costs included GP visits, investigations, clinic visit, consultations with medical staff, medication and admission costs. Indirect costs assessed loss of earnings, partner\\'s loss of earnings, childcare, meals and travel costs.

  18. Site of relapse after chemotherapy alone for stage I and II Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahidi, Mehdi; Kamangari, Nahid; Ashley, Sue; Cunningham, David; Horwich, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Background: Short course chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy is a standard treatment for early Hodgkin's disease. There is yet no consensus regarding the appropriate radiotherapy portal following chemotherapy. A good guide to the adjuvant radiotherapy field is the site of relapse in patients treated with chemotherapy alone. Patients and methods: From 1980 to 1996, 61 patients with stage I and II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin's disease were treated with chemotherapy alone at the Royal Marsden Hospital. We undertook a retrospective review and failure analysis to define the pattern of recurrence. Results: After a median follow-up of 6.5 years, 24 patients had relapsed giving a 5-year relapse rate of 40%. The 5 and 10-year actuarial survival rates were 94 and 89%, respectively with cause-sepecific survival being 94% at 5 and 10 years. Two-thirds of the relapses were nodal and supradiaphragmatic. Twenty patients (83%) relapsed in the initially involved sites of disease and this was the sole site of recurrence in 11 (45%) of patients. In retrospect, it appeared that at least 12 recurrences could have been prevented by involved field radiotherapy. Review of detailed imaging data (available in 9 out of 11 patients with recurrences in initial sites of disease) showed that the relapses were always in the initially involved nodes. Conclusion: After chemotherapy alone in early stage HD most initial recurrences are nodal. Loco-regional recurrences are in the originally involved nodes. Based on limited data it appears that involved nodal RT is equivalent to involved field radiotherapy and may halve the risk of recurrence

  19. Locally limited inhibition of bone resorption and orthodontic relapse by recombinant osteoprotegerin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D A; Smith, S M; Campbell, C; Hayami, T; Kapila, S; Hatch, N E

    2015-04-01

    To determine minimal dose levels required for local inhibition of orthodontic relapse by recombinant OPG protein (OPG-Fc), while also determining effects of injected OPG-Fc on alveolar bone and long bone. The Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Michigan. Eighteen male Sprague Dawley rats. Maxillary molars were moved with nickel-titanium springs and then allowed to relapse in Sprague Dawley rats. Upon appliance removal, animals were injected with a single dose of 1.0 mg/kg OPG-Fc, 0.1 mg/kg OPG-Fc, or phosphate-buffered saline (vehicle) just distal to the molar teeth. Tooth movement measurements were made from stone casts, which were scanned and digitally measured. Alveolar tissues were examined by histology. Micro-computed tomography was used to quantify changes in alveolar and femur bone. Local injection of OPG-Fc inhibited molar but not incisor relapse, when compared to vehicle-injected animals. No significant differences in alveolar or femur bone were seen between the three treatment groups after 24 days of relapse. Our results demonstrate that a single local injection of OPG-Fc effectively inhibits orthodontic relapse, with minimal systemic bone metabolic effects. Our results also show that a single injection of OPG-Fc will influence tooth movement only in teeth close to the injection site. These findings indicate that OPG-Fc has potential as a safe and effective pharmacological means to locally control osteoclasts, for uses such as maintaining anchorage during orthodontic tooth movement and preventing orthodontic relapse in humans. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. TBI parameters and relapse of acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Tadashi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Mori, Tomoyuki.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study, which involved 240 acute leukemia patients (ALL: 115, ANL: 125) who received an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with preconditioning by total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy, was to examine retrospectively the TBI factors that may have influenced a leukemic relapse. The patients were divided into two groups: 124 patients who had received their BMT within a diagnosis-transplantation period of 9 months or less (DTP9 group), and 116 patients who had received their BMT within a diagnosis-transplantation period of 10 months or more (DTP10 group). It was concluded that: (1) the higher the TBI dose, the fewer the relapse rates in DTP9 group; (2) the longer the TBI period, the greater the increase in the relapse rate in DTP10 group. It was thus speculated that an effective TBI regimen for acute leukemia patients may vary depending on the length of time that has elapsed from the diagnosis of leukemia to the BMT. (author)

  1. Efficacy and safety of liraglutide for overweight adult patients with type 1 diabetes and insufficient glycaemic control (Lira-1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Thomas Fremming; Frandsen, Christian Seerup; Hansen, Tanja Stenbæk

    2016-01-01

    to insulin for overweight adult patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods We did a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial at Steno Diabetes Center (Gentofte, Denmark). Patients aged 18 years or older with type 1 diabetes, insufficient glycaemic control (HbA1c >8% [64 mmol/mol]), and overweight (BMI...

  2. Impact of Education on Disease Knowledge and Glycaemic Control Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients in Family Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Herenda

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In patients with diabetes type 2, good knowledge about disease often doesn’t follow appropriate behavior in their life. Therefore, we wanted to find out basic level of disease knowledge and glycemic control among type 2 diabetic patients, and after that impact of passive and intensive education on knowledge and glycemic control. Starting with 130 participants, 91 patients with type 2 diabetes, from four family medicine services in Tuzla Canton, completed six months education about their disease. Disease Knowledge Test of Michigan Diabetes Training and Research Center was used to evaluate knowledge about diabetes and glycaemic control was assessed by HbAic. Participants were tested at the beginning of survey, after 3 months of passive education and additional 3 months of intensive one. Basic test showed good knowledge of participants (score 8,3 out of 15, improved knowledge after passive education (score 9,23 and intensive one (11,19 (P<0,0001. Demographic characteristics of patients (age, sex, living area, level of education, duration of disease and type of treatment had no influence on disease knowledge and glycaemic control during education. Generally, patient education improved significantly glycaemic control by HbA1c reduction 0,45% (P=0,011 without significant differences between passive and intensive one. Education of patients improves both disease knowledge and glycaemic control among type 2 diabetic patients.

  3. Iron Profile and Glycaemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Misra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron overload is increasingly being connected to insulin resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM patients. Free iron causes the assembly of reactive oxygen species that invariably steer the body’s homeostasis towards oxidative stress-mediated diabetic complications. This study aims to assess the serum iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC, and percentage transferrin saturation (Tsat of 150 subjects divided into three groups (I,II,III of 50. Healthy individuals (controls constituted Group I. Group II consisted of T2DM patients with optimal glycaemic control. T2DM patients with suboptimal glycaemic control formed group III. Mean serum free iron concentration was 105.34 ± 3.5, 107.33 ± 3.45, and 125.58 ± 3.45 μg/dL in Group I, Group II, and Group III, respectively. Mean serum TIBC concentration in Group I, Group II, and Group III was 311.39 ± 5.47, 309.63 ± 6.1, and 284.2 ± 3.18 μg/dL, respectively. Mean serum transferrin saturation (% in Group I, Group II, and Group III was 34.17 ± 1.21, 35.02 ± 1.2, and 44.39 ± 1.07, respectively. The difference between TIBC, mean serum free iron concentration, and transferrin saturation between Group I and Group III (for all, p values <0.001, as well as between Group II and Group III (p values 0.0012, 0.0015, and <0.0001, respectively was statistically significant. The fasting plasma glucose values of Groups II and III were significantly higher than those of Group I, (p < 0.0001. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c values were also shown to increase from Group I to II and then III, and the increase was highly significant (all p values <0.0001. Thus, decreased glycaemic control and an increase in the glycation of haemoglobin was the key to elevation in serum iron values and alterations in other parameters. However, a significant correlation was absent between serum iron and HbA1c (r = 0.05 and transferrin saturation (r = 0.0496 in Group III.

  4. New-onset ascites as a manifestation of virologic relapse in patients with hepatitis C cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chua DL

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deborah Lim Chua, Thomas Hahambis, Samuel H SigalDivision of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USABackground: Chronic hepatitis C is the most common cause of cirrhosis in industrialized countries. Successful treatment of chronic hepatitis C in patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis has significant benefits, including improvements in inflammation, fibrosis, and portal hypertension, with prevention of esophageal varices and clinical decompensation.Case: In this report, we present two patients with well-compensated hepatitis C cirrhosis who achieved an end-of-treatment response on a direct-acting antiviral therapy-based triple regimen for hepatitis C virus, but subsequently presented with new-onset ascites associated with virologic relapse.Conclusion: We propose that the development of ascites in this setting is due to the adverse impact of inflammation of the virologic relapse on portal hypertension. Our observation that ascites formation can be a manifestation of virologic relapse has potentially important clinical implications, as it highlights not only the importance of close monitoring of cirrhotic patients after achieving end-of-treatment response but also the impact of active inflammation on the severity of portal hypertension.Keywords: chronic hepatitis C, cirrhosis, virologic relapse, portal hypertension, ascites

  5. Effect of carbonated hydroxyapatite incorporated advanced platelet rich fibrin intrasulcular injection on the alkaline phosphatase level during orthodontic relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhasyimi, Ananto Ali; Pudyani, Pinandi Sri; Asmara, Widya; Ana, Ika Dewi

    2018-02-01

    Nowadays, relapse in orthodontic treatment is considered very important because of high incidence of relapse after the treatment. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as a biomarker of bone formation will decrease in compression sites during relapse after orthodontic tooth movement. In this situation, manipulating alveolar bone remodeling to increase ALP level is considered one of the new strategies to prevent relapse properly. In the field of tissue engineering, in this study, carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) is expected to have the ability to incorporate advanced platelet rich fibrin (aPRF). Next, CHA will retain the aPRF containing various growth factors (GF) until it reaches into a specific targeted area, gradually degraded, and deliver the GF in a controlled manner to prevent relapse. Here, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of 45 samples (n=45) were collected and levels of ALP were analyzed using UV-Vis 6300 Spectrophotometer at 405 nm wavelength. We found that there is a significant difference of ALP levels (p<0.05) in GCF between treatments and control groups. ALP level was elevated significantly in CHA and CHA-aPRF groups at days 7 and 14 after debonding compared with the control groups. The peak level of ALP was observed at days 14 after debonding in groups C (0.789 ± 0.039 U/mg). Therefore, it can be concluded that the application of hydrogel CHA with controlled release manner incorporated aPRF enhances bone regeneration by increasing ALP level.

  6. Effects of dietary protein and glycaemic index on biomarkers of bone turnover in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Müller, Martha; Ritz, Christian

    2014-01-01

    For decades, it has been debated whether high protein intake compromises bone mineralisation, but no long-term randomised trial has investigated this in children. In the family-based, randomised controlled trial DiOGenes (Diet, Obesity and Genes), we examined the effects of dietary protein...... and glycaemic index (GI) on biomarkers of bone turnover and height in children aged 5-18 years. In two study centres, families with overweight parents were randomly assigned to one of five ad libitum-energy, low-fat (25-30 % energy (E%)) diets for 6 months: low protein/low GI; low protein/high GI; high protein....../low GI; high protein/high GI; control. They received dietary instructions and were provided all foods for free. Children, who were eligible and willing to participate, were included in the study. In the present analyses, we included children with data on plasma osteocalcin or urinary N...

  7. Yellow mustard bran attenuates glycaemic response of a semi-solid food in young healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, Aron M; Thondre, Pariyarath S; Rosenthal, Andrew J

    2013-03-01

    In a randomized, repeated-measures design, the glycaemic response and satiety ratings of a potato and leek soup were compared with and without the addition of 5 g of yellow mustard bran. Ten healthy, non-smoking, moderately active male subjects (mean age of 21.1 years and mean body mass index 23.2 kg/m(2)) were recruited to the study. Capillary blood glucose and satiety were measured at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min, postprandial of each food. The incremental area under the blood glucose curve, blood glucose at each time point and satiety rating were calculated and compared via paired t-test. Mean blood glucose values at 15, 30 and 90 min (p soup.

  8. Remitting - Relapsing Polyneuropathy In Juvenile Metachromatic Leukodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taly AB

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A five-year-old girl manifested with acute relapsing polyradiculo-neuropathy. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid proteins, electro-physiological evidence of conduction block and remitting course suggested possible acquired demyelinating radiculoneuropathy. However, intellectual deterioration during follow up, evidence of extensive, symmetrical and periventricular demyelination on MRI of brain and metachromatic on sural nerve biopsy led to the diagnosis of metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD. Inherited neuropathies such as MLD may occasionally present atypically in the early stages. Recognition of this variation has considerable therapeutic and prognostic significance.

  9. Breast cancer relapse stage I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Braojos, Ines; Diaz Gestoso, Yadira; Franco Odio, Sonia; Samuel Gonzalez, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer has always been the most common malignancy in women and is the leading cause of death in women, study relapses Stages I and II therapeutic guidelines applied in the service Mastology the 1985 - 1989, was our first objective, the database used was Clinical history, which gave us all the material necessary, treatments were: In tumors up to 3 cm node-conserving surgery plus treatment N0 with ionizing radiation on the breast tangential C0G0 in tumors greater than 3 cm or less with N1 was modified radical mastectomy according to node status for the study of the part and the receiver adjuvant treatment conducted. (Author)

  10. Glycaemic Control among Patients with Diabetes in Primary Care Clinics in Jamaica, 1995 and 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Harris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the quality of care received by patients with diabetes in public primary care clinics in 2012 with that reported in 1995. Methods: Patient records were audited at six randomly selected Type III health centres in the South East Health Region of Jamaica. The 2012 audit data were compared with published data from a similar audit conducted in 1995. Quality of care measures included timely screening tests and counselling of the patients. Fasting and postprandial glucose tests were used to assess glycaemic control. Results: Two hundred and forty-two patient records were analysed in 2012, and 185 in 1995. In 2012, 88% of patients were weighed within the last year compared with 43% in 1995. Advice on physical activity increased from 1% to 60% and on dietary practices from 6% to 79%. No patient had done the HBA1C in 1995 compared to 38% in 2012. In 1995, 66% had blood glucose measured at a laboratory during the last year while in 2012, 60% had a laboratory test and 90% were tested at the clinic by glucometer. Blood pressure control increased from 19% in 1995 to 41% in 2012 (p < 0.001. Poor glucose control was recorded among 61% of patients in 1995 compared with 68% in 2012. Conclusions: There was no improvement in glycaemic control. Health providers and patients must work together to improve patient outcomes. This will involve closer patient monitoring, treatment intensification where indicated, and the adoption of lifestyle practices that can lead to better control.

  11. Night-shift work is associated with poorer glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manodpitipong, Areesa; Saetung, Sunee; Nimitphong, Hataikarn; Siwasaranond, Nantaporn; Wongphan, Thanawat; Sornsiriwong, Chotima; Luckanajantachote, Pranee; Mangjit, Prasitchai; Keesukphan, Prasit; Crowley, Stephanie J; Hood, Megan M; Reutrakul, Sirimon

    2017-12-01

    The circadian system plays a role in regulating metabolism. Night-shift work, a form of circadian misalignment, is associated with increased type 2 diabetes risk. This study aimed to determine if night-shift workers with type 2 diabetes experience poorer glycaemic control than non-shift workers. Patients with type 2 diabetes (104 unemployed, 85 day workers and 60 night-shift workers) participated. Sleep duration, sleep quality, morningness-eveningness preference, depressive symptoms and dietary intake were assessed using standardized questionnaires. Haemoglobin A1c levels were measured. Night-shift workers had significantly higher haemoglobin A1c levels compared with others, while there were no differences between day workers and unemployed participants (median 7.86% versus 7.24% versus 7.09%, respectively). Additionally, night-shift workers were younger, had a higher body mass index, and consumed more daily calories than others. Among night-shift workers, there were no significant differences in haemoglobin A1c levels between those performing rotating versus non-rotating shifts (P = 0.856), or those with clockwise versus counterclockwise shift rotation (P = 0.833). After adjusting for age, body mass index, insulin use, sleep duration, morningness-eveningness preference and percentage of daily intake from carbohydrates, night-shift work, compared with day work, was associated with significantly higher haemoglobin A1c (B = 0.059, P = 0.044), while there were no differences between unemployed participants and day workers (B = 0.016, P = 0.572). In summary, night-shift work is associated with poorer glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. © The Authors. Journal of Sleep Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Sleep Research Society.

  12. The application of simple metrics in the assessment of glycaemic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, L; Colette, C; Owens, D R

    2018-03-06

    The assessment of glycaemic variability (GV) remains a subject of debate with many indices proposed to represent either short- (acute glucose fluctuations) or long-term GV (variations of HbA 1c ). For the assessment of short-term within-day GV, the coefficient of variation for glucose (%CV) defined as the standard deviation adjusted on the 24-h mean glucose concentration is easy to perform and with a threshold of 36%, recently adopted by the international consensus on use of continuous glucose monitoring, separating stable from labile glycaemic states. More complex metrics such as the Low Blood Glucose Index (LBGI) or High Blood Glucose Index (HBGI) allow the risk of hypo or hyperglycaemic episodes, respectively to be assessed although in clinical practice its application is limited due to the need for more complex computation. This also applies to other indices of short-term intraday GV including the mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE), Shlichtkrull's M-value and CONGA. GV is important clinically as exaggerated glucose fluctuations are associated with an enhanced risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes due primarily to hypoglycaemia. In contrast, there is at present no compelling evidence that elevated short-term GV is an independent risk factor of microvascular complications of diabetes. Concerning long-term GV there are numerous studies supporting its association with an enhanced risk of cardiovascular events. However, this association raises the question as to whether the impact of long-term variability is not simply the consequence of repeated exposure to short-term GV or ambient chronic hyperglycaemia. The renewed emphasis on glucose monitoring with the introduction of continuous glucose monitoring technologies can benefit from the introduction and application of simple metrics for describing GV along with supporting recommendations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Green leafy porridges: how good are they in controlling glycaemic response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuruddhika Subhashinie Senadheera, Senadheera Pathirannehelage; Ekanayake, Sagarika

    2013-03-01

    Green leafy porridges made with leaf water extracts, rice and coconut milk are common Sri Lankan dietary remedies for diabetes. Though water and ethanolic extracts of most leaves elicit hypoglycaemic effects, data are not available on the efficacy when leaf extracts are incorporated into porridges. Thus, an effort was made to evaluate the proximate compositions and glycaemic index (GI) of some commonly consumed green leafy porridges. The GI of rice porridge and coconut milk porridge were measured to evaluate the effect of other ingredients other than the leaf extracts. Rice was the main contributor to carbohydrate (56-68% on dry weight) and water was the main component in porridges (89-93%). Fat and total dietary fibre contents ranged between 2.5-27% and 5-10%, respectively. The GI of all porridges was low (GI ≤ 55), except Cassia auriculata which had a high GI of 77 ± 12. The GIs of coconut milk, Aerva lanata, Hemidesmus indicus, Scoparia dulcis, Asparagus racemosus, Cephalandra indica, Cardiospermum halicacabum, Murraya koenigii and Aegle marmelos were 31 ± 5, 32 ± 5, 40 ± 8, 39 ± 8, 37 ± 4, 49 ± 8, 46 ± 8, 44 ± 8 and 50 ± 8, respectively. All porridges had a low or medium glycaemic loads ( ≤ 19). However, peak blood glucose reductions of ≥ 25% were observed in all leafy and coconut milk porridges, except in C. auriculata and Atlantia zeylanica, when compared with the glucose control. Therefore, green leafy porridges, except Cassia, can be recommended as breakfast meals for diabetics due to their low GI, peak blood glucose reduction and presence of other nutrients in green leaves.

  14. The glycaemic index values of foods containing fructose are affected by metabolic differences between subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolever, T M S; Jenkins, A L; Vuksan, V; Campbell, J

    2009-09-01

    Glycaemic responses are influenced by carbohydrate absorption rate, type of monosaccharide absorbed and the presence of fat; the effect of some of these factors may be modulated by metabolic differences between subjects. We hypothesized that glycaemic index (GI) values are affected by the metabolic differences between subjects for foods containing fructose or fat, but not for starchy foods. The GI values of white bread (WB), fruit leather (FL) and chocolate-chip cookies (CCC) (representing starch, fructose and fat, respectively) were determined in subjects (n=77) recruited to represent all 16 possible combinations of age (40 years), sex (male, female), ethnicity (Caucasian, non-Caucasian) and body mass index (BMI) (25 kg/m2) using glucose as the reference. At screening, fasting insulin, lipids, c-reactive protein (CRP), aspartate transaminase (AST) and waist circumference (WC) were measured. There were no significant main effects of age, sex, BMI or ethnicity on GI, but there were several food x subject-factor interactions. Different factors affected each food's area under the curve (AUC) and GI. The AUC after oral glucose was related to ethnicity, age and triglycerides (r 2=0.27); after WB to ethnicity, age, triglycerides, sex and CRP (r 2=0.43); after CCC to age and weight (r 2=0.18); and after FL to age and CRP (r 2=0.12). GI of WB was related to ethnicity (r 2=0.12) and of FL to AST, insulin and WC (r 2=0.23); but there were no significant correlations for CCC. The GI values of foods containing fructose might be influenced by metabolic differences between -subjects, whereas the GI of starchy foods might be affected by ethnicity. However, the proportion of variation explained by subject factors is small.

  15. Relationship between glycaemic levels and arterial stiffness in non-diabetic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavero-Redondo, Iván; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; Recio-Rodríguez, José Ignacio; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel Ángel; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2018-01-23

    To examine, in a non-diabetic population, whether the association between arterial stiffness and glycaemic levels depends on the test used as a glycaemic indicator, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). A cross-sectional analysis of a 220 non-diabetic subsample from the EVIDENT II study in which FPG, HbA1c and arterial stiffness-related parameters (pulse wave velocity, radial and central augmentation index, and central pulse pressure) were determined. Mean differences in arterial stiffness-related parameters by HbA1c and FPG tertiles were tested using analysis of covariance. All means of arterial stiffness-related parameters increased by HbA1c tertiles, although mean differences were only statistically significant in pulse wave velocity (p ≤.001), even after controlling for potential confounders (HbA1c <5.30% = 6.88 m/s; HbA1c 5.30%-5.59% = 7.06 m/s; and HbA1c ≥5.60% = 8.16 m/s, p =.004). Conversely, mean differences in pulse wave velocity by FPG tertiles did not reach statistically significant differences after controlling for potential confounders (FPG 4.44 mmol/l = 7.18 m/s; FPG 4.44 mmol/l-4.87 mmol/l = 7.26 m/s; and FPG ≥4.88 mmol/l = 7.93 m/s, p =.066). Glucose levels in a non-diabetic population were associated with arterial stiffness but better when levels were determined using HbA1c. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Second allogeneic hematopoietic SCT for relapsed ALL in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, M; Horikoshi, Y; Okamoto, Y; Takahashi, Y; Hasegawa, D; Koh, K; Takita, J; Inoue, M; Kigasawa, H; Ogawa, A; Sasahara, Y; Kawa, K; Yabe, H; Sakamaki, H; Suzuki, R; Kato, K

    2012-10-01

    A second SCT is generally accepted as the only potentially curative approach for ALL patients that relapse after SCT, but the role of second SCT for pediatric ALL is not fully understood. We performed a retrospective analysis of 171 pediatric patients who received a second allo-SCT for relapsed ALL after allo-SCT. OS at 2 years was 29.4 ± 3.7%, the cumulative incidence of relapse was 44.1 ± 4.0% and non-relapse mortality was 18.8 ± 3.5%. Relapse occurred faster after the second SCT than after the first SCT (117 days vs 164 days, P=0.04). Younger age (9 years or less), late relapse (180 days or more after first SCT), CR at the second SCT, and myeloablative conditioning were found to be related to longer survival. Neither acute GVHD nor the type of donor influenced the outcome of second SCT. Multivariate analysis showed that younger age and late relapse were associated with better outcomes. Our analysis suggests that second SCT for relapsed pediatric ALL is an appropriate treatment option for patients that have achieved CR, which is associated with late relapse after the first SCT.

  17. Effect of Aloe vera on glycaemic control in prediabetes and type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksomboon, N; Poolsup, N; Punthanitisarn, S

    2016-04-01

    Aloe vera (Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f., Xanthorrhoeaceae family) has long been used in folk or traditional medicine for diabetes. Several studies have been conducted on the effect of Aloe vera on glycaemic control, but the results appear inconsistent. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effect of Aloe vera on glycaemic control in prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. A comprehensive literature search was conducted through MEDLINE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Scopus, http://clinicaltrials.gov, Web of Science, Proquest, LILACS, HerbMed, NAPRALERT and CNKI to the end of January 2016 without language restriction. Historical search of relevant articles and personal contact with experts in the area were also undertaken. Studies were included if they were (1) randomized controlled trials of Aloe vera aimed at assessing glycaemic control in prediabetes or type 2 diabetes and (2) reporting fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c ). Treatment effect was estimated with mean difference in the final value of FPG and HbA1c between the treatment and the control groups. Eight trials involving 470 patients (235 each for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes) were included. In prediabetes, Aloe vera significantly improved FPG (mean difference -0·22 mmol/L, 95% CI -0·32 mmol/L to -0·12 mmol/L, P Aloe vera may improve glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes, with a marginal improvement in FPG (mean differences -1·17 mmol/L, 95% CI -2·35 mmol/L to 0·00 mmol/L, P = 0·05) and a significant improvement in HbA1c (mean difference -11 mmol/mol, 95% CI -19 mmol/mol to -2 mmol/mol, P = 0·01). The current evidence suggests some potential benefit of Aloe vera in improving glycaemic control in prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. However, given the limitations of the available evidence and the high heterogeneity in study results, high-quality, well-powered randomized controlled trials using standardized preparations are needed to quantify any beneficial effects of Aloe vera on

  18. Relationship between self-efficacy, self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Malaysian primary care setting.

    OpenAIRE

    Tharek, Zahirah; Ramli, Anis Safura; Whitford, David L; Ismail, Zaliha; Mohd Zulkifli, Maryam; Ahmad Sharoni, Siti Khuzaimah; Shafie, Asrul A; Jayaraman, Thevaraajan

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self-efficacy has been shown to be positively correlated with self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, such evidence is lacking in the Malaysian primary care setting. The objectives of this study were to i) determine the levels of self-efficacy, self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Malaysian primary care setting ii) determine the relationship between self-efficacy, self...

  19. Relapses in recurrent depression 1 year after maintenance cognitive-behavioral therapy: the role of therapist adherence, competence, and the therapeutic alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weck, Florian; Rudari, Visar; Hilling, Christine; Hautzinger, Martin; Heidenreich, Thomas; Schermelleh-Engel, Karin; Stangier, Ulrich

    2013-11-30

    The prevention of relapse in recurrent depression is considered a central aim in cognitive-behavioral therapy, given the high risk of relapse. In this study, patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (currently remitted) received 16 sessions of Maintenance Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (M-CBT) over a period of 8 months, in order to prevent relapse. Therapist adherence and competence, as well as the therapeutic alliance, were investigated as predictors for reducing the risk of recurrence in depression. Videotapes of 80 participants were analyzed in order to evaluate therapist adherence and competence. Additionally, the therapeutic alliance was assessed by questionnaire. No associations were found between therapist adherence or competence, and the risk of relapse 1 year after treatment. By contrast, the therapeutic alliance was a significant predictor of the time to relapse. Moreover, we found that the number of previous depressive episodes (≥ 5 vs. ≤ 4) was a significant moderator variable. This indicates that the alliance-outcome relationship was particularly important when patients with five or more previous depressive episodes were taken into account, in comparison to patients with four or fewer episodes. For the psychotherapeutic treatment of recurrent depression and the prevention of relapse, sufficient attention should be paid to the therapeutic alliance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthroscintigraphy in diagnosis of relapses after early synovectomy of the knee joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubovski, G.A.; Abasov, Eh.Sh.; Smirnov, Yu.N.

    1980-01-01

    The authors studied differential diagnostic possibilities of scintigraphy with the use of sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate to reveal relapses after early synovectomy of the knee joints in 40 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. High informativeness of the method was established. The authors succeded in diagnosing the subclinical variant of rheumatoid synovitis in the operated joints by means of scintigraphy. The computer-arthroscintigraphy method with sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate is recommended for a wide use in arthrological practice to ensure an objective assessment of the condition of the operated joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to conduct timely adequate therapy for the prevention of the relapses

  1. Type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance are associated with word memory source monitoring recollection deficits but not simple recognition familiarity deficits following water, low glycaemic load, and high glycaemic load breakfasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamport, Daniel J; Lawton, Clare L; Mansfield, Michael W; Moulin, Chris A J; Dye, Louise

    2014-01-30

    It has been established that type 2 diabetes, and to some extent, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), are associated with general neuropsychological impairments in episodic memory. However, the effect of abnormalities in glucose metabolism on specific retrieval processes such as source monitoring has not been investigated. The primary aim was to investigate the impact of type 2 diabetes and IGT on simple word recognition (familiarity) and complex source monitoring (recollection). A secondary aim was to examine the effect of acute breakfast glycaemic load manipulations on episodic memory. Data are presented from two separate studies; (i) 24 adults with type 2 diabetes and 12 controls aged 45-75years, (ii) 18 females with IGT and 47 female controls aged 30-50years. Controls were matched for age, IQ, BMI, waist circumference, and depression. Recognition of previously learned words and memory for specifically which list a previously learned word had appeared in (source monitoring) was examined at two test sessions during the morning after consumption of low glycaemic load, high glycaemic load and water breakfasts according to a counterbalanced, crossover design. Type 2 diabetes (pglucose metabolism are not detrimental for global episodic memory processes. This enhances our understanding of how metabolic disorders are associated with memory impairments. © 2013.

  2. Addition of mushroom powder to pasta enhances the antioxidant content and modulates the predictive glycaemic response of pasta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xikun; Brennan, Margaret A; Serventi, Luca; Liu, Jianfu; Guan, Wenqiang; Brennan, Charles S

    2018-10-30

    This study reports the effects of addition of mushroom powder on the nutritional properties, predictive in vitro glycaemic response and antioxidant potential of durum wheat pasta. Addition of the mushroom powder enriched the pasta as a source of protein, and soluble and insoluble dietary fibre compared with durum wheat semolina. Incorporation of mushroom powder significantly decreased the extent of starch degradation and the area under the curve (AUC) of reducing sugars released during digestion, while the total phenolic content and antioxidant capacities of samples increased. A mutual inhibition system between the degree of starch gelatinisation and antioxidant capacity of the pasta samples was observed. These results suggest that mushroom powder could be incorporated into fresh semolina pasta, conferring healthier characteristics, namely lowering the potential glycaemic response and improving antioxidant capacity of the pasta. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. The use of dry Jerusalem artichoke as a functional nutrient in developing extruded food with low glycaemic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanovic, Ana; Stojceska, Valentina; Plunkett, Andrew; Jankovic, Slobodan; Milovanovic, Dragan; Cupara, Snezana

    2015-06-15

    This study considers the use of dry Jerusalem artichoke (JA) as a functional nutrient in developing food products with enhanced nutritional characteristics and low glycaemic index (GI). Three different formulations based on buckwheat and JA were developed and processed using extrusion technology. Nutritional properties including the levels of total dietary fibre (TDF), protein, inulin, total carbohydrates and lipids were analysed. A clinical study was performed on ten healthy volunteers (aged between 21 and 56) to determine the level of GI and glycaemic load (GL). The results revealed that JA significantly (PJerusalem artichoke were considered as a low GI food whilst samples containing 30% and 60% of Jerusalem artichoke as a medium GI food. A similar trend was seen in terms of GL. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Effect of adjunct metformin treatment in patients with type-1 diabetes and persistent inadequate glycaemic control. A randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, S.S.; Tarnow, L.; Astrup, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite intensive insulin treatment, many patients with type-1 diabetes (T1DM) have longstanding inadequate glycaemic control. Metformin is an oral hypoglycaemic agent that improves insulin action in patients with type-2 diabetes. We investigated the effect of a one-year treatment...... with metformin versus placebo in patients with T1DM and persistent poor glycaemic control. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: One hundred patients with T1DM, preserved hypoglycaemic awareness and HaemoglobinA(1c) (HbA(1c)) > or = 8.5% during the year before enrolment entered a one-month run-in on placebo treatment....... Thereafter, patients were randomized (baseline) to treatment with either metformin (1 g twice daily) or placebo for 12 months (double-masked). Patients continued ongoing insulin therapy and their usual outpatient clinical care. The primary outcome measure was change in HbA(1c) after one year of treatment...

  5. The Role of Dietary Protein and Fat in Glycaemic Control in Type 1 Diabetes: Implications for Intensive Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Megan; Bell, Kirstine J; O'Connell, Susan M; Smart, Carmel E; Shafat, Amir; King, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    A primary focus of the management of type 1 diabetes has been on matching prandial insulin therapy with carbohydrate amount consumed. However, even with the introduction of more flexible intensive insulin regimes, people with type 1 diabetes still struggle to achieve optimal glycaemic control. More recently, dietary fat and protein have been recognised as having a significant impact on postprandial blood glucose levels. Fat and protein independently increase the postprandial glucose excursions and together their effect is additive. This article reviews how the fat and protein in a meal impact the postprandial glycaemic response and discusses practical approaches to managing this in clinical practice. These insights have significant implications for patient education, mealtime insulin dose calculations and dosing strategies.

  6. Influence of a high fibre diet on glycaemic control and quality of life in dogs with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, P A; Maskell, E; Rawlings, J M; Nash, A S; Markwell, P J

    2002-02-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate a high fibre diet used in the management of 10 dogs with naturally occurring insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Following baseline measurements of health and glycaemic control, the dogs were fed a canned diet containing a blend of insoluble and soluble dietary fibres and were monitored during the ensuing four months. Switching to the high fibre diet was associated with significantly lower mean 24-hour and postprandial plasma glucose concentrations, which were maintained over the study period. The high fibre diet was also associated with significant reductions in plasma concentrations of fructosamine, glycated haemoglobin, free glycerol and cholesterol, and there were significant improvements in dog activity and demeanour. Bodyweight declined during the fourth month of feeding the diet, which is likely to have resulted from underfeeding relative to increased activity. The results indicate that a high fibre diet can significantly improve glycaemic control and quality of life in dogs with diabetes mellitus.

  7. Central diabetes insipidus as a very late relapse limited to the pituitary stalk in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Shinkoda, Yuichi; Hazeki, Daisuke; Imamura, Mari; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and relapse are frequently seen in multifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). We present two females with multifocal LCH who developed CDI 9 and 5 years after the initial diagnosis, respectively, as a relapse limited to the pituitary stalk. Combination chemotherapy with cytarabine reduced the mass in the pituitary stalk. Although CDI did not improve, there has been no anterior pituitary hormone deficiency (APHD), neurodegenerative disease in the central nervous system (ND-CNS) or additional relapse for 2 years after therapy. It was difficult to predict the development of CDI in these cases. CDI might develop very late in patients with multifocal LCH, and therefore strict follow-up is necessary, especially with regard to symptoms of CDI such as polydipsia and polyuria. For new-onset CDI with LCH, chemotherapy with cytarabine might be useful for preventing APHD and ND-CNS.

  8. The effects of oat β-glucan incorporation on the quality, structure, consumer acceptance and glycaemic response of steamed bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Ye, Fayin; Feng, Liyuan; Wei, Fubin; Zhao, Guohua

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the incorporation of oat β-glucan (OβG) on the sensory and nutritional quality of steamed bread. Wheat flour was substituted with OβG at levels varying from 0 g/100 g to 5 g/100 g. The results showed that the products containing 1 g/100 g and 3 g/100 g OβG produced a comparable overall consumer acceptance while a significantly lower score was given to the product with 5 g/100 g. Nutritionally, the presence of OβG impeded in vitro starch hydrolysis by amylolytic enzymes. More importantly, the addition of OβG up to 5 g/100 g did bring about a lower in vitro predicted glycaemic index to steamed bread, but it generated insignificant effects on the in vivo glycaemic response. The current work first demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating OβG-enriched steamed bread and its nutritional superiority compared to the corresponding normal product. Modern methods of food elaboration and processing frequently reduce the content of dietary fiber (DF). Despite the well-known health benefits of DF consumption, average intake levels still fall far below recommended ones. Oat β-glucan (OβG) is a kind of indigestible polysaccharide with diverse bioactivity. This article evaluated the effects of OβG incorporation on quality, structure, consumer acceptance, and glycaemic response of steamed bread. The addition of less than 3 g/100 g of OβG had negligible effects on the consumer acceptance of steamed bread. The enrichment at 5 g/100 g indeed deteriorated the consumer acceptance. Moreover, OβG highly lowered the glycaemic response of steamed bread. The current work first demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating OβG-enriched steamed bread and its nutritional superiority compared to the corresponding normal product. OβG enriched steamed bread may offer an alternative to improve DF intake of residents. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mathematical Models of Tuberculosis Reactivation and Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Steven Wallis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The natural history of human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is highly variable, as is the response to treatment of active tuberculosis. There is presently no direct means to identify individuals in whom Mtb infection has been eradicated, whether by a bactericidal immune response or sterilizing antimicrobial chemotherapy. Mathematical models can assist in such circumstances by measuring or predicting events that cannot be directly observed. The 3 models discussed in this review illustrate instances in which mathematical models were used to identify individuals with innate resistance to Mtb infection, determine the etiology of tuberculosis in patients treated with tumor necrosis factor antagonists, and predict the risk of relapse in persons undergoing tuberculosis treatment. These examples illustrate the power of various types of mathematic models to increase knowledge and thereby inform interventions in the present global tuberculosis epidemic.

  10. Natalizumab plus interferon beta-1a for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudick, R.A.; Stuart, W.H.; Calabresi, P.A.; Confavreux, C.; Galetta, S.L.; Radue, E.W.; Lublin, F.D.; Weinstock-Guttman, B.; Wynn, D.R.; Lynn, F.; Panzara, M.A.; Sandrock, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interferon beta is used to modify the course of relapsing multiple sclerosis. Despite interferon beta therapy, many patients have relapses. Natalizumab, an alpha4 integrin antagonist, appeared to be safe and effective alone and when added to interferon beta-1a in preliminary studies.

  11. Prefrontal cortex plasticity mechanisms in drug seeking and relapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Oever, M.C.; Spijker, S.; Smit, A.B.; de Vries, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Development of pharmacotherapy to reduce relapse rates is one of the biggest challenges in drug addiction research. The enduring nature of relapse suggests that it is maintained by long-lasting molecular and cellular adaptations in the neuronal circuitry that mediates learning and processing of

  12. Frequency of relapse among Nigerian children with steroid‑sensitive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The clinical course of steroid‑sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) among Nigerian children has rarely been reported; this makes prognostication difficult. Objectives: The objective was to determine the frequency of relapses including frequent relapses (FR) and steroid‑dependence (SD) in a cohort of Nigerian ...

  13. Predictors of Exercise Relapse in a College Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullum, Julie; Clark, Matthew M.; King, Teresa K.

    2000-01-01

    Investigated factors that predicted exercise relapse among college students. Physically active undergraduates completed questionnaires measuring Prochaska's 10 processes for change of exercise, self-efficacy, and decisional balance. Exercise levels were assessed at baseline and 8 weeks later. At baseline, relapsers had significantly lower…

  14. Symptomatic relapse of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common cause of adult meningitis in southern Africa. Much of this disease burden is thought to be due to symptomatic relapse of previously treated infection. We studied the contribution of inadequate secondary fluconazole prophylaxis to symptomatic relapses of cryptococcal ...

  15. Power2: Relapse Management with Adolescents Who Stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Gordon W.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes a cognitive-behavioral treatment package for relapse management in adolescents who stutter. The package includes game-based training techniques in problem solving, communication skills, and assertiveness; coping responses for stuttering episodes; and realistic expectations for fluency and relapse. Follow-up results with…

  16. Relapse and craving in alcohol-dependent individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Mheen, H,; Snelleman, M.; Schoenmakers, T.M.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Negative affective states and alcohol-related stimuli increase risk of relapse in alcohol dependence. In research and in clinical practice, craving is often used as another important indicator of relapse, but this lacks a firm empirical foundation. Objectives: The goal of the present

  17. Lapse and relapse following inpatient treatment of opiate dependence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, B P

    2010-06-01

    We conducted a prospective follow-up study of consecutive opiate dependent patients admitted to a residential addiction treatment service for detoxification. We measured the rate of relapse following discharge, and sought to identify factors that were associated with early relapse (i.e., a return to daily opiate use). Follow-up interviews were conducted with 109 patients, of whom, 99 (91%) reported a relapse. The initial relapse occurred within one week in 64 (59%) cases. Multivariate survival analysis revealed that earlier relapse was significantly predicted by younger age, greater heroin use prior to treatment, history of injecting, and a failure to enter aftercare. Unexpectedly, those who were in a relationship with an opiate user had significantly delayed relapse. Those who completed the entire six-week inpatient treatment programme also had a significantly delayed relapse. In order to reduce relapse and the associated increased risk of fatal overdose, services providing residential opiate detoxification should prepare people for admission, strive to retain them in treatment for the full admission period and actively support their entry into planned aftercare in order to improve outcome.

  18. Bortezomib or high-dose dexamethasone for relapsed multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.G. Richardson (Paul Gerard); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); M.W. Schuster (Michael); D. Irwin (David); E.A. Stadtmauer (Edward); T. Facon (Thierry); J-L. Harousseau (Jean-Luc); D. Ben-Yehuda (Dina); S. Lonial (Sagar); H. Goldschmidt (Hartmut); D. Reece (Donna); J.F. San Miguel (Jesús Fernando); J. Bladé (Joan); M. Boccadoro (Mario); J. Cavenagh (Jamie); W. Dalton (William); A.L. Boral (Anthony); D.-L. Esseltine (Dixie-Lee); J.B. Porter (Jane); D. Schenkein (David); K.C. Anderson (Kenneth)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: This study compared bortezomib with high-dose dexamethasone in patients with relapsed multiple myeloma who had received one to three previous therapies. METHODS: We randomly assigned 669 patients with relapsed myeloma to receive either an intravenous bolus of bortezomib (1.3

  19. Effect of Oral Pre-Meal Administration of Betaglucans on Glycaemic Control and Variability in Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Anders; Tura, Andrea; Pacini, Giovanni; Ridderstråle, Martin

    2017-09-12

    We conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover pilot study to investigate the effect of oat betaglucans (β-glucan) on glycaemic control and variability in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D; n = 14). Stomacol ® tablets (1.53 g of β-glucan) or placebo (Plac) were administered three times daily before meals for two weeks. Glucose levels were monitored during the second week by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). There was an increase in basic measures of glycaemic control (maximal glucose value 341 ± 15 vs. 378 ± 13 mg/dL for Plac and β-glucan, p = 0.004), and average daily risk range (62 ± 5 vs. 79 ± 4 mg/dL for Plac and β-glucan, p = 0.003) favouring Plac over β-glucan, but no increase in the M-value (the weighted average of the glucose values) or other more complex measures. Basic measures of glucose variability were also slightly increased during β-glucan treatment, with no difference in more complex measures. However, glycaemic variability increased between the first and last two CGM days on Plac, but remained unchanged on β-glucan. In conclusion, in this pilot study we were unable to demonstrate a general positive effect of β-glucan before meals on glucose control or variability in T1D.

  20. Effect of Oral Pre-Meal Administration of Betaglucans on Glycaemic Control and Variability in Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frid, Anders; Tura, Andrea; Pacini, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover pilot study to investigate the effect of oat betaglucans (β-glucan) on glycaemic control and variability in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D; n = 14). Stomacol(®) tablets (1.53 g of β-glucan) or placebo (Plac) were administered three times...... daily before meals for two weeks. Glucose levels were monitored during the second week by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). There was an increase in basic measures of glycaemic control (maximal glucose value 341 ± 15 vs. 378 ± 13 mg/dL for Plac and β-glucan, p = 0.004), and average daily risk range......, with no difference in more complex measures. However, glycaemic variability increased between the first and last two CGM days on Plac, but remained unchanged on β-glucan. In conclusion, in this pilot study we were unable to demonstrate a general positive effect of β-glucan before meals on glucose control...

  1. Glucose-lowering effect and glycaemic variability of insulin glargine, insulin detemir and insulin lispro protamine in people with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derosa, G; Franzetti, I; Querci, F; Romano, D; D'Angelo, A; Maffioli, P

    2015-06-01

    To compare, using a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system, the effect on glycaemic variability of insulin glargine, detemir and lispro protamine. A total of 49 white people with type 1 diabetes, not well controlled by three times daily insulin lispro, taken for at least 2 months before study and on a stable dose, were enrolled. The study participants were randomized to add insulin glargine, detemir or lispro protamine, once daily, in the evening. We used a CGM system, the iPro Digital Recorder (Medtronic MiniMed, Northridge, CA, USA) for 1 week. Glycaemic control was assessed according to mean blood glucose values, the area under the glucose curve above 3.9 mmol/l (AUC(>3.9)) or above 10.0 mmol/l (AUC(>10.0)), and the percentage of time spent with glucose values >3.9 or >10.0 mmol/l. Intraday glycaemic variability was assessed using standard deviation (s.d.) values, the mean amplitude of glycaemic excursions and continuous overlapping of net glycaemic action. Day-to-day glycaemic variability was assessed using the mean of daily differences. The s.d. was found to be significantly lower with insulin lispro protamine and glargine compared with insulin detemir. AUC(>3.9) was higher and AUC(>10.0) was lower with insulin lispro protamine and glargine compared with detemir. The mean amplitude of glycaemic excursions and continuous overlapping net glycaemic action values were lower with insulin lispro protamine and glargine compared with detemir. In addition, the mean of daily differences was significantly lower with insulin lispro protamine and glargine compared with detemir. Fewer hypoglycaemic events were recorded during the night-time with insulin lispro protamine compared with glargine and detemir. The results suggest that insulin lispro protamine and glargine are more effective than detemir in reducing glycaemic variability and improving glycaemic control in people with type 1 diabetes. Insulin lispro protamine seems to lead to fewer hypoglycaemic

  2. Does the ingestion of a 24 hour low glycaemic index Asian mixed meal diet improve glycaemic response and promote fat oxidation? A controlled, randomized cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Stefan Gerardus; Kaur, Bhupinder; Quek, Rina Yu Chin; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2017-07-12

    The health benefits of consuming a low glycaemic index (GI) diet to reduce the risk of type 2 Diabetes are well recognized. In recent years the GI values of various foods have been determined. Their efficacy in constructing and consuming a low GI diet over 24 h in modulating glycaemic response has not been fully documented. The translation of using single-point GI values of foods to develop a 24 h mixed meal diet can provide valuable information to consumers, researchers and dietitians to optimize food choice for glycaemic control. By using GI values of foods to develop mixed meals, our study is the first to determine how both blood glucose and substrate oxidation may be modulated over 24 h. The study included 11 Asian men with a BMI between 17-24 kg/m 2 who followed both a 1-day low GI and 1-day high GI diet in a randomized, controlled cross-over design. Test meals included breakfast, lunch, snack and dinner. Glycaemic response was measured continuously for over 24 h and postprandial substrate oxidation for 10 h inside a whole body calorimeter. The low GI diet resulted in lower 24 h glucose iAUC (860 ± 440 vs 1329 ± 614 mmol/L.min; p = 0.014) with lower postprandial glucose iAUC after breakfast (p low GI vs high GI diet (1.44 ± 0.63 vs 2.33 ± 0.82 mmol/L; p fat oxidation was less during the low vs high GI diet (-0.033 ± 0.021 vs -0.050 ± 0.017 g/min; p low GI local foods to construct a 24 h low GI diet, is able to reduce glycaemic response and variability as recorded by continuous glucose monitoring. Our observations also confirm that a low GI diet promotes fat oxidation over carbohydrate oxidation when compared to a high GI diet. These observations provide public health support for the encouragement of healthier nutrition choices by consuming low GI foods. NCT 02631083 (Clinicaltrials.gov).

  3. Improved outcome after relapse in children with acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Jonas; Clausen, Niels; Gustafsson, Göran

    2007-01-01

    investigated. The study included all 146 children in the Nordic countries diagnosed with AML between 1988 and 2003, who relapsed. Data on disease characteristics and relapse treatment were related to outcome. Sixty-six percentage achieved remission with survival after relapse (5 years) 34 +/- 4%. Of 122......In the Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology paediatric study acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) 93, event-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 66%, indicating that many patients were cured following relapse. Factors influencing outcome in children with relapsed AML were...... patients who received re-induction therapy, 77% entered remission with 40 +/- 5% survival. Remission rates were similar for different re-induction regimens but fludarabine, cytarabine, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-based therapy had low treatment-related mortality. Prognostic factors for survival...

  4. Increased multiple sclerosis relapses related to lower prevalence of pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vinícius Martins da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective The study aims to investigate the presence of pain amongst multiple sclerosis (MS patients. Method One hundred MS patients responded to questionnaires evaluating neuropathic and nociceptive pain, depression and anxiety. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann–Whitney U, Chi-Square and two-tailed Fisher’s exact tests and multivariate logistic regression. Results Women had a statistically higher prevalence of pain (p = 0.037, and chances of having pain after the age of 50 reduced. Women with pain had a statistically significant lower number of relapses (p = 0.003, restricting analysis to those patients with more than one relapse. After the second relapse, each relapse reduced the chance of having pain by 46%. Presence of pain was independent of Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS anxiety, and depression. Conclusion Our findings suggest a strong inverse association between relapses and pain indicating a possible protective role of focal inflammation in the control of pain.

  5. Predictive factors for relapse in patients on buprenorphine maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Michael; Finlayson, Alistair J Reid; Wang, Li; Martin, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in the use of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence, clinical outcomes of this treatment approach continue to need evaluation. This study examines factors associated with relapse and retention during buprenorphine treatment in a sample of opioid dependent outpatients. In a retrospective chart review of 62 patients with opioid dependence, relapse was determined by self-report, urine toxicology screens, and by checking the state controlled substance monitoring database. Data was analyzed using two-way tests of association and logistic regression. Patients with comorbid anxiety disorders, active benzodiazepine use (contrary to clinic policy), or active alcohol abuse, were significantly more likely to relapse. Patients who relapsed were also more likely to be on a higher buprenorphine maintenance dose. This study identifies relapse risk factors during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence. Future research is needed to determine whether modifying these factors may lead to improved treatment outcomes. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  6. Daily energy expenditure, cardiorespiratory fitness and glycaemic control in people with type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Joseph Valletta

    Full Text Available Encouraging daily physical activity improves cardiorespiratory fitness and many cardiovascular risk factors. However, increasing physical activity often creates a challenge for people with type 1 diabetes, because of difficulties maintaining euglycemia in the face of altered food intake and adjustments to insulin doses. Our aim was to examine the triangular relationship between glucose control measured by continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS, objective measures of total daily energy expenditure (TEE recorded by a multi-sensory monitoring device, and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF, in free-living subjects with type 1 diabetes.Twenty-three individuals (12 women with type 1 diabetes who were free from micro- and macrovascular complications were recruited. TEE and glucose control were monitored simultaneously for up to 12 days, using a multi-sensory device and CGMS respectively. CRF was recorded as V02 max from a maximal treadmill test with the Bruce protocol.Subjects (mean±SD were aged 37±11 years, with BMI = 26.5±5.1 kg.m⁻², HbA1c = 7.7±1.3% (61±14 mmol/mol and V02 max (ml.min⁻¹.kg⁻¹  = 39.9±8.4 (range 22.4-58.6. TEE (36.3±5.5 kcal.kg⁻¹.day⁻¹ was strongly associated with CRF(39.9±8.4 ml.min⁻¹.kg⁻¹ independently of sex (r = 0.63, p<0.01. However, neither TEE (r = -0.20, p = 0.36 nor CRF (r = -0.20, p = 0.39; adjusted for sex, were significantly associated with mean glycaemia measured by CGMS.Higher levels of energy expenditure (due to a more active lifestyle are associated with increased cardiorespiratory fitness, but not necessarily better glycaemic control. Since increased levels of energy expenditure and good glycaemic control are both needed to protect against diabetes-related complications our data suggest they need to be achieved independently.

  7. Relationship between vitamin D levels and glycaemic control in Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anyanwu Anthony Chinedu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have reported a relationship between Vitamin D deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. There is no information on the Vitamin D status or relationship between Vitamin D and glycaemia in Nigerian patients with T2DM. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between serum Vitamin D levels and glycaemic control, as determined by glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c in adult patients with T2DM. Methods: This was a cross-sectional analytical study involving T2DM participants attending the Diabetes Clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. The study participants consisted of 114 T2DM and sixty healthy controls. Levels of serum Vitamin D, fasting glucose, insulin, HbA1c, calcium, albumin, phosphate, creatinine and alanine transaminase were determined. Insulin resistance and beta cell function were estimated with the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR and HOMA-B, respectively. Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences, Version 20. Results: The mean age of the study participants was 52 ± 7.6 years for T2DM patients and 50 ± 8.4 years for controls. The female to male ratio in both T2DM and healthy controls was 3:2. The mean HbA1c was 7.3 ± 1.8%. Poor glycaemic control (HbA1c >6.5% was present in 67 (58.8% T2DM controls; forty-five (39.5% subjects had both low Vitamin D levels and poor glycaemic control. There was a significant inverse correlation between serum Vitamin D concentration and HbA1c levels in T2DM patients (rs= −0.185; P < 0.05 A non-significant inverse association was seen between serum Vitamin D level and HOMA-IR. Conclusion: This study shows an inverse association between serum levels of Vitamin D and glycaemic control, as determined by HbA1c. T2DM patients with poor glycaemic control may need to be assessed for serum Vitamin D levels and possibly treated for Vitamin D deficiency.

  8. Assessing Diabetes Self-Management with the Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ Can Help Analyse Behavioural Problems Related to Reduced Glycaemic Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schmitt

    Full Text Available To appraise the Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ's measurement of diabetes self-management as a statistical predictor of glycaemic control relative to the widely used SDSCA.248 patients with type 1 diabetes and 182 patients with type 2 diabetes were cross-sectionally assessed using the two self-report measures of diabetes self-management DSMQ and SDSCA; the scales were used as competing predictors of HbA1c. We developed a structural equation model of self-management as measured by the DSMQ and analysed the amount of variation explained in HbA1c; an analogue model was developed for the SDSCA.The structural equation models of self-management and glycaemic control showed very good fit to the data. The DSMQ's measurement of self-management showed associations with HbA1c of -0.53 for type 1 and -0.46 for type 2 diabetes (both P < 0.001, explaining 21% and 28% of variation in glycaemic control, respectively. The SDSCA's measurement showed associations with HbA1c of -0.14 (P = 0.030 for type 1 and -0.31 (P = 0.003 for type 2 diabetes, explaining 2% and 10% of glycaemic variation. Predictive power for glycaemic control was significantly higher for the DSMQ (P < 0.001.This study supports the DSMQ as the preferred tool when analysing self-reported behavioural problems related to reduced glycaemic control. The scale may be useful for clinical assessments of patients with suboptimal diabetes outcomes or research on factors affecting associations between self-management behaviours and glycaemic control.

  9. The effects of duration of glucocorticoid therapy on relapse rate in anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael; Merkel, Peter A.; Mahr, Alfred; Jayne, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective Disease relapses are common for patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibody associated vasculitis (AAV). The role of low-dose glucocorticoids (GC) in relapse prevention is controversial. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine if GC target doses influence relapses of AAV. Methods Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for observational studies and randomized controlled trials of treatment of AAV that included a predefined GC treatment plan. The association of GC target dose with the proportion of relapses in studies was assessed using meta-regression and multi-level generalized linear modeling. Results Thirteen studies (983 patients) were identified for inclusion. There were no studies directly comparing GC regimens. We classified 288 patients as having a non-zero GC target dose by study end and 695 patients as having a zero GC target dose by study end. The pooled proportion of patients with a relapse was 36% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25 to 47%). GC regimen was the most significant variable explaining the variability between the proportions of patients with relapses. The proportion of patients with a relapse was 14% (95% CI 10 to 19%) in non-zero GC target dose and 43% (95% CI 33 to 52%) in zero GC target dose studies. Differences other than GC regimens exist between studies that complicate the comparability of trials and isolation of the variability in relapses due to GC target alone. Conclusions Studies with longer courses of GC in AAV are associated with fewer relapses. These results have implications for study design and outcome assessment in clinical trials of AAV. PMID:20235186

  10. A study of glycaemic effects following acute anthocyanin-rich blueberry supplementation in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L; Lamport, D J; Butler, L T; Williams, C M

    2017-09-20

    The postprandial response to ingested carbohydrate is recognised as a marker of metabolic health. Postprandial hyperglycaemia is observed in type 2 diabetes mellitus and is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Cognitive deficits are also associated with type 2 diabetes. Therefore interventions which moderate postprandial glucose profiles are desirable. Here we investigated the impact of anthocyanin-rich wild blueberries on postprandial glucose response. Seventeen healthy young adults consumed a range of doses of freeze-dried wild blueberry powder, in smoothie form, in both sugar-matched and no-added-sugar conditions. Plasma glucose was determined by a capillary sampling method at baseline and at regular intervals up to 2.5 hours postprandially. Blueberries were observed to significantly extend the postprandial glucose response beyond the period observed for a sugar-matched control, characteristic of a beneficial glycaemic response. Furthermore, blueberries were observed to reduce peak postprandial glucose levels, although statistical significance was not achieved. The findings suggest a tempering of the postprandial glucose response in the presence of anthocyanin-rich blueberry, and are discussed with reference to likely glucoregulatory mechanisms of action and their implications for cognitive and type 2 diabetes research.

  11. Adverse glycaemic effects of cancer therapy: indications for a rational approach to cancer patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Marco; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Felicetti, Francesco; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Trimarchi, Francesco; Arvat, Emanuela; Vigneri, Riccardo; Colao, Annamaria

    2018-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer are common, chronic, and potentially fatal diseases that frequently co-exist. Observational studies have reported an increased risk of cancer in patients with diabetes. Furthermore, many patients with cancer already have diabetes, or develop hyperglycaemia as a consequence of the tumor or of cancer therapies, and coexisting diabetes confers a greater risk of mortality for many malignancies. Managing oncologic patients with diabetes is often complicated, since the co-existence of diabetes and cancer poses several complex clinical questions: what level of glycaemic control to achieve, which therapy to use, how to deal with glucocorticoid therapies and artificial nutrition, how diabetes complications can affect cancer management, which drug-drug interactions should be taken into account, or even how to manage diabetes at the end of life. In the clinical setting, both at hospital and at home, there are little agreed, evidence-based guidelines on the best management and criteria upon which clinical decisions should be based. A practical solution lies in the implementation of care networks based on communication and ongoing collaboration between Oncologists, Endocrinologists, and the nursing staff, with the patient at the centre of the care process. This manuscript aims to review the current evidence on the effect of cancer therapies on glucose metabolism and to address some of the more common challenges of diabetes treatment in patients with cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating compliance to a low glycaemic index (GI diet in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiomo William

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A low Glycaemic Index (GI diet may decrease some long-term health risks in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS such as endometrial cancer. This study was performed to assess compliance to a low GI diet in women with PCOS. Food diaries prospectively collected over 6 months from women on a low GI diet or healthy eating diet were analysed retrospectively. The women were recruited for a pilot randomised control trial investigating whether a low GI diet decreased the risk of Endometrial Cancer. Nine women with PCOS completed 33 food diaries (17 from women on a low GI diet and 16 from women on a healthy eating diet recording 3023 food items (low GI group:n = 1457; healthy eating group:n = 1566. Data was analysed using Foster-Powell international values inserted into an SPSS database as no scientifically valid established nutrition software was found. The main outcome measures were mean item GI and Glyacemic Load (GL, mean meal GL, percentage high GI foods and mean weight loss. Findings Women allocated the low GI diet had a statistically significant lower GI of food items (33.67 vs 36.91, p Conclusion Women with PCOS on a low GI diet consumed food items with a significantly lower mean GI and GL compared to the healthy eating diet group. Longer term compliance needs evaluation in subsequent studies to ascertain that this translates to reduced long term health risks. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN86420258

  13. MRI diagnosis of bone marrow relapse in children with ALL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.H.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Connolly, Susan A.

    2008-01-01

    Diffuse marrow replacement in acute leukemia is well known, but there are few reports describing the MRI features of pediatric leukemic relapse. Our purpose was to describe the MRI appearance of pediatric leukemic relapse. A total of 53 consecutive children with a history of ALL were referred for musculoskeletal MRI from 1 January 1998 to 28 February 2007 at one center, and from 1 January 2000 to 2 May 2007 at a second center. From this group, 14 children seen at initial diagnosis of leukemia and 2 children who underwent MRI after therapy for relapse were excluded. The remaining 37 children, 8 with relapse and 29 in remission, were studied. Images of patients with relapse and in remission were reviewed for type and configuration of marrow infiltration; coexisting marrow alterations including osteonecrosis or stress reaction were also reviewed. All eight children with relapse demonstrated nodular lesions with well-defined margins. Coexisting osteonecrosis was present in three children (38%) and pathologic fracture in one. Among the 29 children in remission, 9 showed stress reaction/fracture, 14 showed osteonecrosis and 9 showed ill-defined nodules, and in 5 the marrow was completely normal. Well-defined nodules in all patients with leukemic relapse suggest that this appearance is characteristic and distinct from the published findings of diffuse marrow replacement in acute leukemia. (orig.)

  14. MRI diagnosis of bone marrow relapse in children with ALL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.H.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta [Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Frangoul, Haydar A. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Connolly, Susan A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Diffuse marrow replacement in acute leukemia is well known, but there are few reports describing the MRI features of pediatric leukemic relapse. Our purpose was to describe the MRI appearance of pediatric leukemic relapse. A total of 53 consecutive children with a history of ALL were referred for musculoskeletal MRI from 1 January 1998 to 28 February 2007 at one center, and from 1 January 2000 to 2 May 2007 at a second center. From this group, 14 children seen at initial diagnosis of leukemia and 2 children who underwent MRI after therapy for relapse were excluded. The remaining 37 children, 8 with relapse and 29 in remission, were studied. Images of patients with relapse and in remission were reviewed for type and configuration of marrow infiltration; coexisting marrow alterations including osteonecrosis or stress reaction were also reviewed. All eight children with relapse demonstrated nodular lesions with well-defined margins. Coexisting osteonecrosis was present in three children (38%) and pathologic fracture in one. Among the 29 children in remission, 9 showed stress reaction/fracture, 14 showed osteonecrosis and 9 showed ill-defined nodules, and in 5 the marrow was completely normal. Well-defined nodules in all patients with leukemic relapse suggest that this appearance is characteristic and distinct from the published findings of diffuse marrow replacement in acute leukemia. (orig.)

  15. Outcome following late marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chessells, J.; Leiper, A.; Rogers, D.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-four children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed bone marrow relapse after treatment was electively stopped, received reinduction, consolidation, continuing therapy, and intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX). Sixteen children who relapsed within six months of stopping treatment had a median second-remission duration of 26 weeks; all next relapses occurred in the bone marrow. In 18 children who relapsed later, the median duration of second remission was in excess of two years, but after a minimum of four years follow-up, 16 patients have so far relapsed again (six in the CNS). CNS relapse occurred as a next event in four of 17 children who received five IT MTX injections only and in two of 14 children who received additional regular IT MTX. Although children with late marrow relapses may achieve long second remissions, their long-term out-look is poor, and regular IT MTX does not afford adequate CNS prophylaxis. It remains to be seen whether more intensive chemotherapy, including high-dose chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, will improve the prognosis in this group of patients

  16. Switching to multiple daily injection therapy with glulisine improves glycaemic control, vascular damage and treatment satisfaction in basal insulin glargine-injected diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Katsuyuki; Ashihara, Junya; Obara, Shinji; Wada, Norio; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Nishino, Yuri; Maeda, Sayaka; Ishibashi, Yuji; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2014-11-01

    Basal and bolus insulin therapy is required for strict blood control in diabetic patients, which could lead to prevention of vascular complications in diabetes. However, the optimal combination regimen is not well established. Fifty-nine diabetic patients (49 type 1 and 10 type 2; 52.9 ± 13.3 years old) whose blood glucose levels were uncontrolled (HbA1c  > 6.2%) by combination treatment of basal insulin glargine with multiple daily pre-meal injections of bolus short-acting insulin [aspart (n = 19), lispro (n = 37) and regular human insulin (n = 3)] for at least 8 weeks were enrolled in this study. We examined whether glycaemic control and vascular injury were improved by replacement of short-acting insulin with glulisine. Patient satisfaction was assessed with Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire. Although bolus and basal insulin doses were almost unchanged before and after replacement therapy, switching to glulisine insulin for 24 weeks significantly decreased level of HbA1c , advanced glycation end products (AGEs), soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and urinary albumin excretion. In multiple stepwise regression analysis, change in MCP-1 values from baseline (ΔMCP-1) was a sole determinant of log urinary albumin excretion. ΔAGEs and ΔsRAGE were independently correlated with each other. The relationship between ΔMCP-1 and ΔsRAGE was marginally significant (p = 0.05). Replacement of short-acting insulin by glulisine significantly increased Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire scores. Our present study suggests that combination therapy of glargine with multiple daily pre-meal injections of glulisine might show superior efficacy in controlling blood glucose, preventing vascular damage and improving treatment satisfaction in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Graves’ Ophthalmopathy Misdiagnosed as Relapsing Conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irini P. Chatziralli

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old female patient presented at the outpatients’ Department of Ophthalmology with epiphora, eyelid swelling, and a foreign body feeling in the right eye. The symptoms were present for 4 months, and the patient was treated as suffering from relapsing conjunctivitis. The slit lamp examination revealed keratitis due to exposure, related with the deficient closure of the eyelids. There was a 2 mm difference in the readings with the Hertel exophthalmometry examination between the eyes. Her medical history was clear, and she was referred for computed tomography of the orbits and brain and biochemical examinations (FT3, FT4, and TSH to investigate the presence of an intraorbital mass. FT3 was significantly increased and TSH was accordingly low, indicating the diagnosis of Graves’ disease, which presented without other signs and symptoms apart from ophthalmopathy. Computed tomography scan excluded the diagnosis of an intraorbital mass. Therefore, it is important not to underestimate the ocular manifestations of systemic diseases.

  18. Cognitive impairment in relapsing remitting Multiple Sclerosis

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    Saška Roškar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify changes in cognitive abilities that affect patients with relapsing remitting form of multiple sclerosis (MS and to find out which instrument manifests them best. The performance of MS patients was compared to a matched group of healthy people using three neuropsychological tests: Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST, Stroop color and word test and Trail making test (TMT part B. Results on all three tests indicate general cognitive impairments in the group of patients. Compared to the group of healthy people patients with MS exhibited impaired ability of abstract reasoning (WCST, impaired cognitive flexibility and less resistance to irrelevant stimuli (Stroop color and word test, slowed information processing and impaired ability of shifting attention from one symbol to another (TMT. The largest differences between groups occured in Stroop color and word test as well as in TMT. The estimation of cognitive abilities of MS patients is of high importance and sistematicaly observing of changes in those abilities should be considered.

  19. Psychotic relapse and associated factors among patients attending health services in Southwest Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

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    Mahlet Fikreyesus

    2016-10-01

    psychotic relapse among participants who have experienced medication side effects was 1.83 times higher when compared to those who have never experienced medication side effects (aOR = 1.83, 95 % CI = 1.01, 3.31. Conclusions The high prevalence of relapse among patients with psychotic disorder needs special attention. Clinicians need to pay attention to medication side effects the patient faces. Intervening noncompliance to medication and appropriately managing medication side effects may help in preventing psychotic relapse that may result because of non-compliance. The provision of counseling, psycho education, psycho social support may help patients in improving compliance to medication and reducing psychotic relapse. Developing and strengthening community based rehabilitation services should be emphasized as part of mental healthcare services.

  20. Treating Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have not responded or relapsed after initial chemotherapy will be randomly assigned to receive rituximab combined with either pentostatin or bendamustine.

  1. Novel therapeutic options for relapsed hairy cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Preetesh; Polliack, Aaron; Ravandi, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL) achieve a response to therapy with cladribine or pentostatin with or without rituximab. However, late relapses can occur. Treatment of relapsed HCL can be difficult due to a poor tolerance to chemotherapy, increased risk of infections and decreased responsiveness to chemotherapy. The identification of BRAFV600E mutations and the role of aberrant MEK kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) pathways in the pathogenesis of HCL have helped to develop novel targeted therapies for these patients. Currently, the most promising therapeutic strategies for relapsed or refractory HCL include recombinant immunoconjugates targeting CD22 (e.g. moxetumomab pasudotox), BRAF inhibitors such as vemurafenib and B cell receptor signaling kinase inhibitors such as ibrutinib. Furthermore, the VH4-34 molecular variant of classic HCL has been identified to be less responsive to chemotherapy. Herein, we review the results of the ongoing clinical trials and potential future therapies for relapsed/refractory HCL.

  2. Relapse of Legionella longbeachae infection in an immunocompromised patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van't Hullenaar, N. G.; van Ketel, R. J.; Kuijper, E. J.; Bakker, P. J.; Dankert, J.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the first known case of Legionella longbeachae infection in the Netherlands in a patient with myasthenia gravis. Infection with L. longbeachae relapsed after prolonged therapy with erythromycin. No environmental source of L. longbeachae could be traced

  3. A Unique Case of Relapsing Polychondritis Presenting with Acute Pericarditis

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    John V. Higgins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Relapsing polychondritis (RP is an inflammatory disease of the cartilaginous tissue primarily affecting the cartilaginous structures of the ear, nose, joints, and the respiratory system. Cardiovascular complications of RP are associated with high morbidity and mortality and occur most commonly as valvular disease. Pericarditis is a less common complication, occurring in 4% of patients with RP and has not previously been described at presentation. We describe a case of relapsing polychondritis with acute pericarditis at presentation.

  4. The effect of food with different glycaemic index on the blood glucose level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Kouřimská

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Blood glucose levels are affected by many factors including the type of foods consumed, processing technology and cooking method. Hormone insulin lowers blood glucose to its constant level, while glucagon, growth hormone, adrenalin and glucocorticoids have the opposite effect. High steepness of the blood glucose level rise after meals may be unfavourable for the organism. Sugars are transferred into the blood at different speeds according to the type of food. Therefore the aim of this study was to confirm experimentally the effect of food on blood glucose levels in men and women of different ages. Two types of low, medium and high-glycaemic index (GI foods were given to 4 men and 4 women of different age (from 35 to 65 years. All volunteers were healthy, slightly overweight, and without any regular sporting activity. None of them had any idea about their daily carbohydrates consumption and what the term glycaemic index meant. The volunteers came to the GI determination fasted in the morning. Their rise in blood glucose level was monitored by glucometer before the meal and after 1 and 2 hours of the consumption of baked potatoes (GI 85, white bread bun (GI 70, boiled potatoes (GI 64, rye bread (GI 62, potato dumplings (GI 52 and white cooked spaghetti (GI 41. Fasting blood sugar levels of volunteers highly depended on their age (p <0.0001 and gender (p <0.0001. The blood glucose values increased with age and were higher in men than in women. Significant influence of food GI on blood glucose levels in both men and women in all the age categories was observed (p <0.0001. An interaction between age and gender was also statistically highly significant (p <0.0001. One hour after consuming food the blood glucose values were significantly different from the values of fasting (p = 0.0035. The differences of these values did not depend on the age (p = 0.0574 and sex (p = 0.8256 of volunteers, but there was a significant difference on the GI value of food

  5. Diabetes-specific emotional distress mediates the association between depressive symptoms and glycaemic control in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Bastelaar, Kim M P; Pouwer, F; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P H L M

    2010-01-01

    and diabetes-specific emotional distress respectively. Linear regression was performed to examine the mediating effect of diabetes-distress. RESULTS: Complete data were available for 627 outpatients with Type 1 (n = 280) and Type 2 (n = 347) diabetes. Analyses showed that diabetes-distress mediated......OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether diabetes-specific emotional distress mediates the relationship between depression and glycaemic control in patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data were derived from the baseline assessment of a depression in diabetes screening...... and glycaemic control, diabetes-specific emotional distress appears to be an important mediator. Addressing diabetes-specific emotional problems as part of depression treatment in diabetes patients may help improve glycaemic outcomes....

  6. Ischaemic heart disease and glycaemic control in type-2 diabetes mellitus by questionnaire method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yathish, T.R.; Annamalai, N.; Shankar, V.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Various tests like Echocardiogram, Nuclear scan, Electron-beam computed tomography, Coronary angiography, and magnetic resonance angiography are available for diagnosis of ischemic heart disease (IHD). But most of these are expensive, invasive and cannot be afforded in developing countries. An attempt was made to study sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of non-invasive technique like questionnaire method and compared with traditional clinical evaluation. This study compared diagnosis of angina made with the Rose uestionnaire to diagnosis by physician in type-2 diabetes mellitus and the effect of glycaemic control. Methods: A cross-sectional study was done from March 2005 to March 2006. Cases were collected from outpatients and inpatients visiting RL Jalappa hospital and SNR Hospital attached to Sri Devraj Urs Medical College Kolar, Karnataka, India. Glycosylated haemoglobin levels were estimated. Data on Rose questionnaire angina and physician diagnosed angina were collected and compared between groups of well controlled diabetics, poorly controlled diabetics and controls. The 12 lead Electrocardiogram was used to confirm the diagnosis. Results: The Rose questionnaire had 63.63% sensitivity, 97.5% specificity, 73% positive predictive value, and 96% negative predictive value. This study also showed the occurrence of IHD was higher in the poorly controlled diabetics (16.3%) as compared to well controlled diabetic patients (6%) and controls (5%) which were significant. Conclusions: The questionnaire diagnosis showed good sensitivity and high specificity as compared with diagnosis by physicians. The questionnaire method can be frequently used and incorporated in cardiovascular risk assessment and epidemiologic screening programs. (author)

  7. Glycaemic, uricaemic and blood pressure response to beverages with partial fructose replacement of sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Natasha; Peng, Mei; Oey, Indrawati; Venn, Bernard Joseph

    2018-03-20

    The European Food Safety Authority approved a health claim (ID558) relating to lowered postprandial glycaemia when fructose replaces 30% of sucrose in foods and beverages. We assessed the effects of partial replacement of sucrose with fructose on serum glucose, uric acid and blood pressure. A randomised, crossover, double blind trial of 12 normoglycaemic participants consuming beverages containing 50 g blends of fructose and sucrose in proportions; 67% sucrose/33% fructose (67%S:33%F); 50% each (50%S:50%F) and 33%S:67%F; a 100% sucrose reference beverage was tested twice. Serum glucose and uric acid concentrations were measured at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min and incremental area-under-the-curve (iAUC) calculated. The geometric mean (95% CI) glycaemic iAUC following the 100% sucrose, 67%S:33%F, 50%S:50%F and 33%S:67%F blended beverages were 96 (63,145), 71 (46,109), 60 (39, 93) and 39 (12, 86) mmol/L min, respectively. At 33% fructose replacement, the proportionally lower iAUC of -28.5% (95% CI: -62.1, 5.2) mmol/L min was not different to sucrose alone. The response was lowered by fructose replacement of 50 and 67% and overall there was an inverse association (p beverages were 1320 (393, 2248), 3062 (1553, 4570), 3646 (2446, 4847), 3623 (2020, 5226) µmol/L min. Uric acid concentration was raised by all fructose-containing beverages with 33% fructose replacement causing an increase of 1741 (95% CI: 655, 2829) µmol/L min compared with sucrose alone. Blood pressure was not different among beverages. Reduced postprandial glycaemia was achieved by the substitution of sucrose with fructose although elevated uricaemic responses should be cautioned.

  8. Glycaemic index of different coconut (Cocos nucifera)-flour products in normal and diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinidad, Trinidad P; Valdez, Divinagracia H; Loyola, Anacleta S; Mallillin, Aida C; Askali, Faridah C; Castillo, Joan C; Masa, Dina B

    2003-09-01

    The glycaemic index (GI) of commonly consumed bakery products supplemented with increasing levels of coconut (Cocos nucifera) flour was determined in ten normal and ten diabetic subjects. Using a randomized crossover design, the control and test foods were fed in random order on separate occasions after an overnight fast. Blood samples were collected through finger prick before and after feeding and were analysed for glucose levels using a clinical chemistry analyser. The significantly low-GI (cake (GI 51.8 (sem 3.3)), with 200-250 g coconut flour/kg (Pflour/kg had GI ranging from 61.3 to 71.4. Among the test foods, pan de sal (GI 87.2 (sem 5.5)) and multigrain loaf (GI 85.2 (sem 6.8)) gave significantly higher GI with 50 and 100 g coconut flour/kg respectively (Pflour/kg respectively gave a GI ranging from 62.7 to 71.6 and did not differ significantly from the test foods with 150 g coconut flour/kg (Pflour. In conclusion, the GI of coconut flour-supplemented foods decreased with increasing levels of coconut flour and this may be due to its high dietary fibre content. The results of the present study may form a scientific basis for the development of coconut flour as a functional food. However, the fat content of coconut flour-supplemented food should always be considered to optimize the functionality of coconut fibre in the proper control and management of diabetes mellitus.

  9. Clinical benefits of tight glycaemic control: focus on the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesotten, Dieter; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2009-12-01

    While stress hyperglycaemia has traditionally been regarded as an adaptive, beneficial response, it is clear that hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia are associated with increased risk of death in critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Recent studies on blood-glucose control failed to fully clarify whether this association is causal. Early proof-of-concept single-centre randomised controlled studies found that maintaining normoglycaemia by intensive insulin therapy, as compared with tolerating hyperglycaemia as an adaptive response, improved patient outcome. However, recent large multicentre studies VISEP, GLUCONTROL and NICE-SUGAR) could not confirm this survival benefit. Methodological disparity in the execution of the complex intervention of tight glycaemic control may have contributed significantly to the contradicting results. First, different target ranges for blood glucose were used in the control group of the GLUCONTROL and 'Normoglycemia in intensive care evaluation and survival using glucose algorithm' regulation' (NICE-SUGAR) studies. Second, problems to steer blood-glucose levels within target range in the intervention group resulted in a significant overlap of the treatment groups. Third, allowing inaccurate blood-glucose measurement devices, in combination with different blood sampling sites and types of infusion pumps, may have led to unnoticed swings in blood-glucose levels. Fourth, the level of expertise of the intensive care nurses with the therapy may have been variable due to low number of study patients per centre. Finally, the studies on tight blood-glucose control were done with vastly different nutritional and end-of-life strategies. The currently available studies do not allow to confidently recommend one optimal target for glucose in heterogeneous ICU patient groups and settings. Provided that adequate devices for blood-glucose measurement and insulin administration are available, together with an extensive experience of the

  10. Greater Glycaemic Response to an Oral Glucose Load in Healthy, Lean, Active and Young Chinese Adults Compared to Matched Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Simper

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available There are ethnic differences recorded in glycaemic response and rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM between Chinese and Caucasian populations. Whether these differences are evident in matched healthy, lean, active, young adults is unclear. This study compares the postprandial glycaemic response of a group of Chinese participants (n = 49 with a group of similar Caucasians, (n = 48 aged 23.8 (±4.35 years, body mass index (BMI 22.7 (±2.6 kg/m2, healthy (free from non-communicable disease, and lean (body fat % 23.28% (±5.04. Participants undertook an oral glucose tolerance test to identify any significant differences in postprandial blood glucose response. Body fat percentage, body mass, age, physical activity, baseline glucose and HbA1c did not significantly differ between groups. Data from food frequency questionnaires indicated that the Chinese participants consumed less starchy foods, candy and “other” sweets and sugary drinks, and more rice than the Caucasians (all p ≤ 0.001, but not a greater overall intake of carbohydrates or any other macronutrient (all p > 0.05. The two groups’ postprandial blood glucose responses and 2-h incremental area under the curve values (iAUC—156.67 (74.12 mmol/L 120 min for Caucasians versus 214.03 (77.49 mmol/L 120 min for Chinese—indicate significant differences (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001 respectively between groups. Findings suggest that the difference between the two groups’ iAUC values do not relate to obvious lifestyle factors. The Chinese group were eating the least sugary and starchy food but had the highest iAUC. It is argued that the Chinese group in this investigation have the most favourable BMI, body fat percentage, and body mass, yet “poorest” glycaemic response.

  11. Inadequate Vitamin C Status in Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Associations with Glycaemic Control, Obesity, and Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Renée; Willis, Jinny; Gearry, Richard; Skidmore, Paula; Fleming, Elizabeth; Frampton, Chris; Carr, Anitra

    2017-09-09

    Vitamin C (ascorbate) is an essential micronutrient in humans, being required for a number of important biological functions via acting as an enzymatic cofactor and reducing agent. There is some evidence to suggest that people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have lower plasma vitamin C concentrations compared to those with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). The aim of this study was to investigate plasma vitamin C concentrations across the glycaemic spectrum and to explore correlations with indices of metabolic health. This is a cross-sectional observational pilot study in adults across the glycaemic spectrum from NGT to T2DM. Demographic and anthropometric data along with information on physical activity were collected and participants were asked to complete a four-day weighed food diary. Venous blood samples were collected and glycaemic indices, plasma vitamin C concentrations, hormone tests, lipid profiles, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were analysed. A total of 89 participants completed the study, including individuals with NGT ( n = 35), prediabetes ( n = 25), and T2DM managed by diet alone or on a regimen of Metformin only ( n = 29). Plasma vitamin C concentrations were significantly lower in individuals with T2DM compared to those with NGT (41.2 µmol/L versus 57.4 µmol/L, p prediabetes and T2DM groups. The results showed fasting glucose ( p = 0.001), BMI ( p = 0.001), smoking history ( p = 0.003), and dietary vitamin C intake ( p = 0.032) to be significant independent predictors of plasma vitamin C concentrations. In conclusion, these results suggest that adults with a history of smoking, prediabetes or T2DM, and/or obesity, have greater vitamin C requirements. Future research is required to investigate whether eating more vitamin C rich foods and/or taking vitamin C supplements may reduce the risk of progression to, and/or complications associated with, T2DM.

  12. Disease related knowledge, medication adherence and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Saeed Ur Rashid; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Saleem, Fahad; Bashir, Sajid; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of diabetes-related knowledge and treatment adherence with glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Pakistan. The study was designed as a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional analysis. T2DM patients attending a public outpatient clinic in Sargodha, Pakistan, were targeted for the study. In addition to the demographic information, the Urdu version of Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test and Morisky Medication Adherence Scale was used for data collection. Patients' medical records were reviewed for glycated haemoglobin levels (HbA1c). Descriptive statistics were used to elaborate sociodemographic characteristics. The Spearman's Rho correlation was used to measure association of disease-related knowledge and treatment adherence with glycaemic control. SPSS V 20.0 was used for data analysis and ppatients were included in the study. The mean age (SD) of these patients was 50.77±9.671 years, 56.6% were males and 90% (n=353) of respondents were married. The mean (SD) duration of disease was 5.58 (4.09) years with median HbA1c of 9.00 (IQR=8.20-10.40). The median knowledge score was 8.0 (IQR=6.0-10.0), while the median adherence score was 4.7 (IQR=3.0-6.0). HbA1c had non-significant and weak negative association with diabetes-related knowledge (r=-0.036, p=0.404) and treatment adherence (r=-0.071, p=0.238). There was negative association reported between HbA1c, treatment adherence and diabetes-related knowledge. Greater efforts are clearly required to investigate other factors affecting glycaemic control among T2DM patients in Pakistan. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Attenuating Nicotine Reinforcement and Relapse by Enhancing Endogenous Brain Levels of Kynurenic Acid in Rats and Squirrel Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secci, Maria E; Auber, Alessia; Panlilio, Leigh V; Redhi, Godfrey H; Thorndike, Eric B; Schindler, Charles W; Schwarcz, Robert; Goldberg, Steven R; Justinova, Zuzana

    2017-07-01

    The currently available antismoking medications have limited efficacy and often fail to prevent relapse. Thus, there is a pressing need for newer, more effective treatment strategies. Recently, we demonstrated that enhancing endogenous levels of kynurenic acid (KYNA, a neuroinhibitory product of tryptophan metabolism) counteracts the rewarding effects of cannabinoids by acting as a negative allosteric modulator of α7 nicotinic receptors (α7nAChRs). As the effects of KYNA on cannabinoid reward involve nicotinic receptors, in the present study we used rat and squirrel monkey models of reward and relapse to examine the possibility that enhancing KYNA can counteract the effects of nicotine. To assess specificity, we also examined models of cocaine reward and relapse in monkeys. KYNA levels were enhanced by administering the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) inhibitor, Ro 61-8048. Treatment with Ro 61-8048 decreased nicotine self-administration in rats and monkeys, but did not affect cocaine self-administration. In rats, Ro 61-8048 reduced the ability of nicotine to induce dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens shell, a brain area believed to underlie nicotine reward. Perhaps most importantly, Ro 61-8048 prevented relapse-like behavior when abstinent rats or monkeys were reexposed to nicotine and/or cues that had previously been associated with nicotine. Ro 61-8048 was also effective in monkey models of cocaine relapse. All of these effects of Ro 61-8048 in monkeys, but not in rats, were reversed by pretreatment with a positive allosteric modulator of α7nAChRs. These findings suggest that KMO inhibition may be a promising new approach for the treatment of nicotine addiction.

  14. Burden of a multiple sclerosis relapse: the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleen-Burkey, Merrikay; Castelli-Haley, Jane; Lage, Maureen J; Johnson, Kenneth P

    2012-01-01

    Relapses are a common feature of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and increasing severity has been shown to be associated with higher healthcare costs, and to result in transient increases in disability. Increasing disability likely impacts work and leisure productivity, and lowers quality of life. The objective of this study was to characterize from the patient's perspective the impact of a multiple sclerosis (MS) relapse in terms of the economic cost, work and leisure productivity, functional ability, and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL), for a sample of patients with RRMS in the US treated with immunomodulatory agents. A cross-sectional, web-based, self-report survey was conducted among members of MSWatch.com, a patient support website now known as Copaxone.com. Qualified respondents in the US had been diagnosed with RRMS and were using an immunomodulatory agent. The survey captured costs of RRMS with questions about healthcare resource utilization, use of community services, and purchased alterations and assistive items related to MS. The Work and Leisure Impairment instrument and the EQ-5D were used to measure productivity losses and HR-QOL (health utility), respectively. The Goodin MS neurological impairment questionnaire was used to measure functional disability; questions were added about relapses in the past year. Of 711 qualified respondents, 67% reported having at least one relapse during the last year, with a mean of 2.2 ± 2.3 relapses/year. Respondents who experienced at least one relapse had significantly higher mean annual direct and indirect costs compared with those who did not experience a relapse ($US38 458 vs $US28 669; p = 0.0004) [year 2009 values]. Direct health-related costs accounted for the majority of the increased cost ($US5201; 53%) and were mainly due to increases in hospitalizations, medications, and ambulatory care. Indirect costs, including informal care and productivity loss, accounted for the

  15. Glucocorticoids and relapse of major depression (dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing hormone test in relation to relapse of major depression)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelhof, Bente C.; Huyser, Jochanan; Verweij, Mijke; Brouwer, Jantien P.; van Dyck, Richard; Fliers, Eric; Hoogendijk, Witte J. G.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Schene, Aart H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms and predictors of relapse in major depressive disorder is still limited. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis dysregulation is thought to be related to the development and course of depression. METHODS: We investigated whether

  16. Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural therapy on glycaemic control and psychological outcomes in adults with diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchendu, C; Blake, H

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes is a chronic progressive condition presenting physical, social and psychological challenges that increase the risk of comorbid mental health problems. Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective in treating a variety of psychological disorders, and may potentially improve glycaemic control and psychological outcomes in diabetes. This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to establish the effectiveness of CBT on glycaemic control and comorbid diabetes-related distress, depression, anxiety and quality of life in the short, medium and longer term among adults with diabetes. An electronic search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and references in reviews. Twelve randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified that evaluated the effectiveness of CBT on at least one of: glycaemic control, diabetes-related distress, anxiety, depression or quality of life in adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool and Review Manager version 5.3 were used for risk of bias assessment and meta-analysis, respectively. CBT is effective in reducing short-term and medium-term glycaemic control, although no significant effect was found for long-term glycaemic control. CBT improved short- and medium-term anxiety and depression, and long-term depression. Mixed results were found for diabetes-related distress and quality of life. CBT is beneficial in improving depression for adults with diabetes. It may have benefits for improving glycaemic control and other aspects of psychological health, although the findings are inconclusive. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  17. Relationship between self-efficacy, self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Malaysian primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharek, Zahirah; Ramli, Anis Safura; Whitford, David Leonard; Ismail, Zaliha; Mohd Zulkifli, Maryam; Ahmad Sharoni, Siti Khuzaimah; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Jayaraman, Thevaraajan

    2018-03-09

    Self-efficacy has been shown to be positively correlated with self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, such evidence is lacking in the Malaysian primary care setting. The objectives of this study were to i) determine the levels of self-efficacy, self-care behaviour and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the Malaysian primary care setting ii) determine the relationship between self-efficacy, self-care behaviour and glycaemic control iii) determine the factors associated with glycaemic control. This was a cross-sectional study involving patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from two public primary care clinics in Malaysia. Self-efficacy and self-care behaviour levels were measured using previously translated and validated DMSES and SDSCA questionnaires in Malay versions, respectively. Glycaemic control was measured using HbA 1c. RESULTS: A total of 340 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were recruited. The total mean (±SD) of self-efficacy and self-care behaviour scores were 7.33 (±2.25) and 3.76 (±1.87), respectively. A positive relationship was found between self-efficacy and self-care behaviour (r 0.538, P self-efficacy score was shown to be correlated with lower HbA 1c (r - 0.41, P self-efficacy scores (b - 0.398; 95% CI: -0.024, - 0.014; P diabetes (b 0.177; 95% CI: 0.002, 0.007; P self-efficacy was correlated with improved self-care behaviour and better glycaemic control. Findings of this study suggest the importance of including routine use of self-efficacy measures in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care.

  18. Glycaemic index of parboiled rice depends on the severity of processing: study in type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, H. N.; Rasmussen, O. W.; Rasmussen, Peter Have

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of parboiling and the severity of the process on glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to rice in type 2 diabetes. Moreover, to examine changes in starch structure related to parboiling, which may affect the metabolic responses and digestibility. Design: Nine type 2...... that to white bread (P type 2 diabetic...... diabetic subjects ingested four test meals: white bread (WB) and three meals of cooked polished rice of the same variety being non-parboiled (NP), mildly traditionally parboiled (TP) and severely pressure parboiled (PP). The participants ingested the test meals (50 g available carbohydrates) on separate...

  19. EFFECT OF AEROBIC EXERCISE, RESISTANCE TRAINING OR COMBINED TRAINING ON GLYCAEMIC CONTROL AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Mobasseri

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity has been proven as a useful intervention for prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. The purpose of this article was to compare the effects of aerobic exercise alone and resistance training alone as well as the combination of aerobic plus resistance training on glycaemic control, cardiovascular risk factors, and body composition in patients with T2DM. Eighty T2DM participants (37 men, 43 women, aged 33-69 years, were randomly divided in equal numbers (n=20 into one of four groups (aerobic, resistance, combined training, and control. Exercise training was performed three times per week for 52 weeks. After one year, 60 subjects (15 subjects in each group were entered into the statistical analysis. Seventeen parameters were evaluated. Mean HbA1c showed statistically significant reductions in the three training groups. All subjects of training groups experienced improvement in postprandial glucose, blood pressure, VO2max, and muscular percentage. Furthermore, the reduced concentration of plasma triglycerides was significant in both aerobic exercise and combined training groups. Also, a significant reduction was observed in body fat percentage in resistance and combined groups. Combination of two forms of exercise training led to an additional improvement in some of the parameters such as A1c and triglycerides compared with aerobic alone or resistance training alone. In general, the reported results in previous studies were not obtained for whole lipid profile and BMI. Both aerobic and resistance training are effective interventions for the management of T2DM complications, but combined training is associated with greater positive changes.

  20. The neuropharmacology of relapse to food seeking: methodology, main findings, and comparison with relapse to drug seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sunila G; Adams-Deutsch, Tristan; Epstein, David H; Shaham, Yavin

    2009-09-01

    Relapse to old, unhealthy eating habits is a major problem in human dietary treatments. The mechanisms underlying this relapse are unknown. Surprisingly, until recently this clinical problem has not been systematically studied in animal models. Here, we review results from recent studies in which a reinstatement model (commonly used to study relapse to abused drugs) was employed to characterize the effect of pharmacological agents on relapse to food seeking induced by either food priming (non-contingent exposure to small amounts of food), cues previously associated with food, or injections of the pharmacological stressor yohimbine. We also address methodological issues related to the use of the reinstatement model to study relapse to food seeking, similarities and differences in mechanisms underlying reinstatement of food seeking versus drug seeking, and the degree to which the reinstatement procedure provides a suitable model for studying relapse in humans. We conclude by discussing implications for medication development and future research. We offer three tentative conclusions: (1)The neuronal mechanisms of food-priming- and cue-induced reinstatement are likely different from those of reinstatement induced by the pharmacological stressor yohimbine. (2)The neuronal mechanisms of reinstatement of food seeking are possibly different from those of ongoing food-reinforced operant responding. (3)The neuronal mechanisms underlying reinstatement of food seeking overlap to some degree with those of reinstatement of drug seeking.

  1. "I Was a Full Time Proper Smoker": A Qualitative Exploration of Smoking in the Home after Childbirth among Women Who Relapse Postpartum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Orton

    Full Text Available Many women stop smoking during pregnancy but relapse shortly afterwards, potentially putting their infants at risk of secondhand smoke (SHS exposure. Women who were able to stop during pregnancy may be a motivated group, receptive to making behaviour changes postpartum to protect their infant from SHS exposure. Understanding more about their experiences of relapse, and if this influences home smoking behaviours and children's exposure to SHS in the home may help to inform intervention development to prevent infant SHS exposure.Guided by interpretative phenomenological methodology we conducted and analysed nine semi-structured interviews with women who quit smoking during pregnancy, but relapsed ≤3 months postpartum.Central to mothers' accounts of their smoking behaviours during pregnancy and postpartum was their desire to be a 'responsible mother'. Mothers described using strategies to protect their infant from SHS exposure, and held strong negative attitudes towards other smoking parents. After relapsing, mothers appeared to reposition themselves as 'social' or 'occasional' smokers rather than 'regular' smokers.Findings suggest that interventions to prevent/reduce infants' home SHS exposure should build on mothers' intentions to be responsible parents. As mothers who relapse principally view themselves as 'social' or 'occasional' smokers, interventions that are highlighted as relevant for women with these types of smoking patterns may be more likely to be responded to, and, ultimately, be effective.

  2. “I Was a Full Time Proper Smoker”: A Qualitative Exploration of Smoking in the Home after Childbirth among Women Who Relapse Postpartum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Tim; Lewis, Sarah; Cooper, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Background Many women stop smoking during pregnancy but relapse shortly afterwards, potentially putting their infants at risk of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure. Women who were able to stop during pregnancy may be a motivated group, receptive to making behaviour changes postpartum to protect their infant from SHS exposure. Understanding more about their experiences of relapse, and if this influences home smoking behaviours and children’s exposure to SHS in the home may help to inform intervention development to prevent infant SHS exposure. Methods Guided by interpretative phenomenological methodology we conducted and analysed nine semi-structured interviews with women who quit smoking during pregnancy, but relapsed ≤3 months postpartum. Findings Central to mothers’ accounts of their smoking behaviours during pregnancy and postpartum was their desire to be a ‘responsible mother’. Mothers described using strategies to protect their infant from SHS exposure, and held strong negative attitudes towards other smoking parents. After relapsing, mothers appeared to reposition themselves as ‘social’ or ‘occasional’ smokers rather than ‘regular’ smokers. Conclusions Findings suggest that interventions to prevent/reduce infants' home SHS exposure should build on mothers' intentions to be responsible parents. As mothers who relapse principally view themselves as ‘social’ or ‘occasional’ smokers, interventions that are highlighted as relevant for women with these types of smoking patterns may be more likely to be responded to, and, ultimately, be effective. PMID:27308829

  3. "I Was a Full Time Proper Smoker": A Qualitative Exploration of Smoking in the Home after Childbirth among Women Who Relapse Postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Sophie; Coleman, Tim; Lewis, Sarah; Cooper, Sue; Jones, Laura L

    2016-01-01

    Many women stop smoking during pregnancy but relapse shortly afterwards, potentially putting their infants at risk of secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure. Women who were able to stop during pregnancy may be a motivated group, receptive to making behaviour changes postpartum to protect their infant from SHS exposure. Understanding more about their experiences of relapse, and if this influences home smoking behaviours and children's exposure to SHS in the home may help to inform intervention development to prevent infant SHS exposure. Guided by interpretative phenomenological methodology we conducted and analysed nine semi-structured interviews with women who quit smoking during pregnancy, but relapsed ≤3 months postpartum. Central to mothers' accounts of their smoking behaviours during pregnancy and postpartum was their desire to be a 'responsible mother'. Mothers described using strategies to protect their infant from SHS exposure, and held strong negative attitudes towards other smoking parents. After relapsing, mothers appeared to reposition themselves as 'social' or 'occasional' smokers rather than 'regular' smokers. Findings suggest that interventions to prevent/reduce infants' home SHS exposure should build on mothers' intentions to be responsible parents. As mothers who relapse principally view themselves as 'social' or 'occasional' smokers, interventions that are highlighted as relevant for women with these types of smoking patterns may be more likely to be responded to, and, ultimately, be effective.

  4. Paliperidone palmitate once-monthly reduces risk of relapse of psychotic, depressive, and manic symptoms and maintains functioning in a double-blind, randomized study of schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dong-Jing; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Simonson, R Bruce; Walling, David P; Schooler, Nina R; Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre; Canuso, Carla M; Alphs, Larry

    2015-03-01

    Schizoaffective disorder is a complex illness for which optimal treatment is not well established. Results of the first controlled, relapse-prevention study of paliperidone palmitate once-monthly injectable (paliperidone monthly) in schizoaffective disorder are presented. The study was conducted between September 20, 2010, and October 22, 2013. Patients with schizoaffective disorder (confirmed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders) experiencing acute exacerbation of psychotic and depressive/manic symptoms were stabilized with paliperidone monthly as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy to mood stabilizers or antidepressants and randomly assigned (1:1) to paliperidone monthly or placebo in a 15-month, double-blind, relapse-prevention phase. Randomization was stratified by administration as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy and by study center. The primary endpoint was time to relapse. 334 patients were evaluated. Paliperidone monthly significantly delayed time to relapse for psychotic, depressive, and manic symptoms compared with placebo (P schizoaffective disorder (5.9%, 3.0%), headache (3.5%, 5.5%), and nasopharyngitis (3.5%, 5.5%). Incidence of any extrapyramidal-related adverse event was 7.1% for placebo and 8.5% for paliperidone monthly. Paliperidone monthly as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy significantly delayed psychotic, depressive, and/or manic relapses; reduced their risk; and better maintained functioning in patients with schizoaffective disorder. Results support the value of maintenance treatment with paliperidone monthly in schizoaffective disorder. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01193153. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  5. Regional homogeneity changes between heroin relapse and non-relapse patients under methadone maintenance treatment: a resting-state fMRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Haifeng; Li, Wei; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jiajie; Zhu, Jia; Ye, Jianjun; Liu, Jierong; Li, Zhe; Li, Yongbin; Shi, Ming; Wang, Yarong; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is recognized as one of the most effective treatments for heroin addiction but its effect is dimmed by the high incidence of heroin relapse. However, underlying neurobiology mechanism of heroin relapse under MMT is still largely unknown. Here, we took advantage of a resting-state fMRI technique by analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo), and tried to explore the difference of brain function between heroin relapsers and non-relapsers in MMT. Met...

  6. A randomized clinical trial indicates that levamisole increases the time to relapse in children with steroid-sensitive idiopathic nephrotic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruppen, Mariken P.; Bouts, Antonia H.; Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C.; Merkus, Maruschka P.; Zurowska, Aleksandra; Maternik, Michal; Massella, Laura; Emma, Francesco; Niaudet, Patrick; Cornelissen, Elisabeth A. M.; Schurmans, Thierry; Raes, Ann; van de Walle, Johan; van Dyck, Mieke; Gulati, Ashima; Bagga, Arvind; Davin, Jean-Claude

    2018-01-01

    Levamisole has been considered the least toxic and least expensive steroid-sparing drug for preventing relapses of steroid-sensitive idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (SSINS). However, evidence for this is limited as previous randomized clinical trials were found to have methodological limitations.

  7. Effect of coffee and tea on the glycaemic index of foods: no effect on mean but reduced variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldughpassi, Ahmed; Wolever, Thomas M S

    2009-05-01

    Coffee and tea may influence glycaemic responses but it is not clear whether they affect the glycaemic index (GI) value of foods. Therefore, to see if coffee and tea affected the mean and SEM of GI values, the GI of fruit leather (FL) and cheese puffs (CP) were determined twice in ten subjects using the FAO/WHO protocol with white bread as the reference food. In one series subjects chose to drink 250 ml of either coffee or tea with all test meals, while in the other series they drank 250 ml water. The tests for both series were conducted as a single experiment with the order of all tests being randomised. Coffee and tea increased the overall mean peak blood glucose increment compared with water by 0.25 (SEM 0.09) mmol/l (P=0.02), but did not significantly affect the incremental area under the glucose response curve. Mean GI values were not affected by coffee or tea but the SEM was reduced by about 30% (FL: 31 (SEM 4) v. 35 (SEM 7) and CP: 76 (SEM 6) v. 75 (SEM 8) for coffee or tea v. water, respectively). The error mean square term from the ANOVA of the GI values was significantly smaller for coffee or tea v. water (F(18, 18) = 2.31; P=0.04). We conclude that drinking coffee or tea with test meals does not affect the mean GI value obtained, but may reduce variability and, hence, improve precision.

  8. Diabetes-specific emotional distress mediates the association between depressive symptoms and glycaemic control in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastelaar, K.M. van; Pouwer, F.; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P.H.; Tack, C.J.J.; Bazelmans, E.; Beekman, A.T.; Heine, R.J.; Snoek, F.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether diabetes-specific emotional distress mediates the relationship between depression and glycaemic control in patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data were derived from the baseline assessment of a depression in diabetes screening

  9. Insulin monotherapy compared with the addition of oral glucose-lowering agents to insulin for people with type 2 diabetes already on insulin therapy and inadequate glycaemic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Rimke C; van Avendonk, Mariëlle JP; Jansen, Hanneke; Goudswaard, Alexander N; van den Donk, Maureen; Gorter, Kees; Kerssen, Anneloes; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether people with type 2 diabetes mellitus on insulin monotherapy who do not achieve adequate glycaemic control should continue insulin as monotherapy or can benefit from adding oral glucose-lowering agents to the insulin therapy. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of

  10. Self-knowledge of HbA1c in people with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and its association with glycaemic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trivedi, Hina; Gray, Laura J.; Seidu, Samuel; Davies, Melanie J.; Charpentier, Guillaume; Lindblad, Ulf; Kellner, Christiane; Nolan, John J.; Pazderska, Agnieszka; Rutten, Guy; Trento, Marina; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of accurate self-knowledge of a patient's own HbA1c level (HbA1cSK), as a component of structural education (University Hospital's of Leicester (UHL), 2013) and its association with glycaemic control. Methods Data from the GUIDANCE

  11. Clinical, behavioural and social indicators for poor glycaemic control around the time of transfer to adult care: a longitudinal study of 126 young people with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castensøe-Seidenfaden, P.; Jensen, A. K.; Smedegaard, H.

    2017-01-01

    participants aged 14–22 years from 2 years before to 2 years after transfer from paediatric to adult care. Changes in glycaemic control were calculated using repeated measurements. We adjusted for gender, age at diabetes onset, age at transfer, duration of diabetes at transfer, gap (amount of time) between...... levels and thereby reduce hospitalization rates....

  12. Allogeneic transplantation for multiple myeloma: late relapse may occur as localised lytic lesion/plasmacytoma despite ongoing molecular remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J L; Fairbairn, J; Davy, B; Carter, I G; Bessell, E M; Russell, N H

    2003-02-01

    Allogeneic SCT for myeloma may be curative for young patients, but its role remains controversial because of a reported high TRM in some series. Since 1991, we have performed 25 allografts for myeloma using fully matched sibling donors. Of the 18 evaluable patients, 13 achieved CR at a median time of 2.5 months post-transplant. The five patients who were not in CR when assessed at 3 months received a short course of alpha-interferon and four subsequently achieved CR with this approach at a median of 82 days. One patient who failed to respond to IFN went on to achieve CR after four doses of DLI therapy, thus giving an overall CR rate of 72%. Seven patients have relapsed at a median of 4.7 years post-transplant (range 1.38-7.7 years) including two patients who had received IFN therapy. In five of these cases, relapse has been as a localised area of bone disease or isolated plasmacytoma with no evidence of marrow involvement by trephine biopsy or molecular analysis. All patients with localised relapse were treated with local radiotherapy +/-DLI and four are currently disease free despite two patients having had further treatment for a second localised lesion. Six patients died of TRM (24%) and the OS at 8 years is currently 69% with an EFS of 26%. These results suggest that allogeneic SCT for myeloma can be carried out with an acceptable TRM and a high CR rate. However, late relapses as localised disease may be a frequent finding and may represent foci of myeloma not eradicated by the conditioning. The use of pretransplant MRI scanning and top-up radiotherapy to involved areas may be useful in preventing this type of relapse.

  13. The Effect of a Condylar Repositioning Plate on Condylar Position and Relapse in Two-Jaw Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyu Sik Jung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNumerous condylar repositioning methods have been reported. However, most of them are 2-dimensional or are complex procedures that require a longer operation time and a highly trained surgeon. This study aims to introduce a new technique using a condylar repositioning plate and a centric relation splint to achieve a centric relationship.MethodsWe evaluated 387 patients who had undergone surgery for skeletal jaw deformities. During the operation, a centric relation splint, intermediate splint, final centric occlusion splint, and condylar repositioning plate along with an L-type mini-plate for LeFort I osteotomy or a bicortical screw for bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy were utilized for rigid fixation. The evaluation included: a physical examination to detect preoperative and postoperative temporomandibular joint dysfunction, 3-dimensional computed tomography and oblique transcranial temporomandibular joint radiography to measure 3-dimensional condylar head movement, and posteroanterior and lateral cephalometric radiography to measure the preoperative and postoperative movement of the bony segment and relapse rate.ResultsA 0.3% relapse rate was observed in the coronal plane, and a 2.8% relapse rate in the sagittal plane, which is indistinguishable from the dental relapse rate in orthodontic treatment. The condylar repositioning plate could not fully prevent movement of the condylar head, but the relapse rate was minimal, implying that the movement of the condylar head was within tolerable limits.ConclusionsOur condylar repositioning method using a centric relation splint and mini-plate in orthognathic surgery was found to be simple and effective for patients suffering from skeletal jaw deformities.

  14. Antidepressant monotherapy vs sequential pharmacotherapy and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, or placebo, for relapse prophylaxis in recurrent depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Zindel V; Bieling, Peter; Young, Trevor; MacQueen, Glenda; Cooke, Robert; Martin, Lawrence; Bloch, Richard; Levitan, Robert D

    2010-12-01

    Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a group-based psychosocial intervention designed to enhance self-management of prodromal symptoms associated with depressive relapse. To compare rates of relapse in depressed patients in remission receiving MBCT against maintenance antidepressant pharmacotherapy, the current standard of care. Patients who met remission criteria after 8 months of algorithm-informed antidepressant treatment were randomized to receive maintenance antidepressant medication, MBCT, or placebo and were followed up for 18 months. Outpatient clinics at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and St Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario. One hundred sixty patients aged 18 to 65 years meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder with a minimum of 2 past episodes. Of these, 84 achieved remission (52.5%) and were assigned to 1 of the 3 study conditions. Patients in remission discontinued their antidepressants and attended 8 weekly group sessions of MBCT, continued taking their therapeutic dose of antidepressant medication, or discontinued active medication and were switched to placebo. Relapse was defined as a return, for at least 2 weeks, of symptoms sufficient to meet the criteria for major depression on module A of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Intention-to-treat analyses showed a significant interaction between the quality of acute-phase remission and subsequent prevention of relapse in randomized patients (P = .03). Among unstable remitters (1 or more Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score >7 during remission), patients in both MBCT and maintenance treatment showed a 73% decrease in hazard compared with placebo (P = .03), whereas for stable remitters (all Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores ≤7 during remission) there were no group differences in survival. For depressed patients achieving stable or unstable clinical remission, MBCT offers protection against relapse

  15. Cladribine tablets for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rammohan, Kottil; Giovannoni, Gavin; Comi, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the phase III CLARITY study, treatment with cladribine tablets at cumulative doses of 3.5 or 5.25mg/kg over 96 weeks led to significant reductions in annualized relapse rates (ARR) versus placebo in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Further post hoc analyses...... of CLARITY study data were conducted to determine the efficacy of cladribine tablets across patient subgroups stratified by baseline characteristics. METHODS: Relapse rates over the 96-week CLARITY study were analyzed in cohorts stratified by demographics; disease duration; treatment history and disease...... activity at baseline. RESULTS: In the intent-to-treat population (n=437, 433 and 456 in the placebo, cladribine 3.5 and 5.25mg/kg groups, respectively), treatment with cladribine tablets 3.5 and 5.25mg/kg led to consistent improvements in ARR versus placebo in patients stratified by gender; age (≤40...

  16. Cross-sectional study of area-level disadvantage and glycaemic-related risk in community health service users in the Southern.IML Research (SIMLR) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Roger; Bonney, Andrew; Mayne, Darren J; Weston, Kathryn M

    2017-09-19

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine the association between area-level socioeconomic disadvantage and glycaemic-related risk in health service users in the Illawarra-Shoalhaven region of New South Wales, Australia. Methods HbA1c values recorded between 2010 and 2012 for non-pregnant individuals aged ≥18 years were extracted from the Southern.IML Research (SIMLR) database. Individuals were assigned quintiles of the Socioeconomic Indices for Australia (SEIFA) Index of Relative Socioeconomic Disadvantage (IRSD) according to their Statistical Area 1 of residence. Glycaemic risk categories were defined as HbA1c 5.0-5.99% (lowest risk), 6.0-7.49% (intermediate risk) and ≥7.5% (highest risk). Logistic regression models were fit with glycaemic risk category as the outcome variable and IRSD as the study variable, adjusting for age and sex. Results Data from 29064 individuals were analysed. Higher disadvantage was associated with belonging to a higher glycaemic risk category in the fully adjusted model (most disadvantaged vs least disadvantaged quintile; odds ratio 1.74, 95% confidence interval 1.58, 1.93; Pdisadvantage was a significant correlate of increased glycaemic-related risk. Geocoded clinical data can inform more targeted use of health service resources, with the potential for improved health care equity and cost-effectiveness. What is known about the topic? The rapid increase in the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes (T2D), both globally and nationally within Australia, is a major concern for the community and public health agencies. Individual socioeconomic disadvantage is a known risk factor for abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM), including T2D. Although small-area-level socioeconomic disadvantage is a known correlate of AGM in Australia, less is known of the association of area-level disadvantage and glycaemic-related risk in individuals with AGM. What does this paper add? This study demonstrates a robust association between small

  17. Do non-glycaemic markers add value to plasma glucose and hemoglobin a1c in predicting diabetes? Yuport health checkup center study.

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    Saori Kashima

    Full Text Available Many markers have been indicated as predictors of type 2 diabetes. However, the question of whether or not non-glycaemic (blood biomarkers and non-blood biomarkers have a predictive additive utility when combined with glycaemic (blood biomarkers is unknown. The study aim is to assess this additive utility in a large Japanese population.We used data from a retrospective cohort study conducted from 1998 to 2002 for the baseline and 2002 to 2006 for follow-up, inclusive of 5,142 men (mean age of 51.9 years and 4,847 women (54.1 years at baseline. The cumulative incidence of diabetes [defined either as a fasting plasma glucose (FPG ≥7.00 mmol/l or as clinically diagnosed diabetes] was measured. In addition to glycaemic biomarkers [FPG and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c], we examined the clinical usefulness of adding non-glycaemic biomarkers and non-blood biomarkers, using sensitivity and specificity, and the area under the curve (AUC of the receiver operating characteristics.The AUCs to predict diabetes were 0.874 and 0.924 for FPG, 0.793 and 0.822 for HbA1c, in men and women, respectively. Glycaemic biomarkers were the best and second-best for diabetes prediction among the markers. All non-glycaemic markers (except uric acid in men and creatinine in both sexes predicted diabetes. Among these biomarkers, the highest AUC in the single-marker analysis was 0.656 for alanine aminotransferase (ALT in men and 0.740 for body mass index in women. The AUC of the combined markers of FPG and HbA1c was 0.895 in men and 0.938 in women, which were marginally increased to 0.904 and 0.940 when adding ALT, respectively.AUC increments were marginal when adding non-glycaemic biomarkers and non-blood biomarkers to the classic model based on FPG and HbA1c. For the prediction of diabetes, FPG and HbA1c are sufficient and the other markers may not be needed in clinical practice.

  18. Topotecan in the treatment of relapsed small cell lung cancer

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    Elisabeth Quoix

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Elisabeth QuoixService de Pneumologie, Hôpitaux Universitaires, Strasbourg, FranceAbstract: Small cell lung cancer (SCLC represents about 15% to 20% of all lung cancers. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of the treatment, cisplatin–etoposide combination being the most used combination as first-line therapy. Despite high initial chemosensitivity, most SCLC patients will experience relapse sooner or later. Unfortunately, second-line chemotherapy does not result in a high response rate like first-line therapy, most patients having developed wide chemoresistance. This chemoresistance is far more important in refractory patients, ie, those who never responded to first-line therapy or who relapsed within 3 months after the end of chemotherapy, than in sensitive patients, ie, those who relapse more than 3 months after the end of chemotherapy. Topotecan, a topoisomerase I inhibitor, is the most studied drug in this second-line setting and has proved its efficacy as a single agent and in combination. A phase III trial comparing oral topotecan to best supportive care (BSC in relapsed SCLC demonstrated a significant survival benefit as well as a better quality of life. Although the usual schedule is 1.5 mg/m2, days 1–5 intravenously, it is not convenient for patients with relapsed SCLC, especially those who are refractory because of their short survival expectation. Oral topotecan is of similar efficacy and much more convenient with limited stay in a treatment unit and has a comparable toxicity profile for these patients with short expected survival. Combination of topotecan with platinum salts or taxanes does not seem to improve further the outcome of the patients and thus single-agent therapy with topotecan is the standard treatment for relapsed SCLC.Keywords: topotecan, small cell lung cancer, chemoresistance

  19. Differences in depression severity and frequency of relapses in opiate addicts treated with methadone or opiate blocker after detoxification

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    Jovanović Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    . Conclusion. The opioid relapse behavior is associated with a marked depression in post-detoxification period. The tested group M had a more expressed depression which is consistent with the literature data. In both tested groups the frequency of relapses was positively correlated with individual addiction variables associated with latent suicidal behavior. Diagnosing and monitoring depression of opiate addicts as well as timely remediation of post-detoxification depression symtoms, could help in prevention of opiate relapse.

  20. [Differences in depression severity and frequency of relapses in opiate addicts treated with methadone or opiate blocker after detoxification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Tatjana; Lazarević, Dusan; Nikolić, Gordana

    2012-04-01

    marked depression in post-detoxification period. The tested group M had a more expressed depression which is consistent with the literature data. In both tested groups the frequency of relapses was positively correlated with individual addiction variables associated with latent suicidal behavior. Diagnosing and monitoring depression of opiate addicts as well as timely remediation of post-detoxification depression symtoms, could help in prevention of opiate relapse.

  1. Confocal microscopy as an early relapse marker for acanthamoeba keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daas, Loay; Viestenz, Arne; Schnabel, Philipp Albert; Fries, Fabian N; Hager, Tobias; SzentmÁry, Nora; Seitz, Berthold

    2018-01-01

    Acanthameoba keratitis is a serious ophthalmological condition with a potentially vision-threatening prognosis. Early diagnosis and recognition of relapse, and the detection of persistent Acanthamoeba cysts, are essential for informing the prognosis and managing the condition. We suggest the use of in vivo confocal microscopy not only to identify the early signs of relapse after keratoplasty in patients with Acanthamoeba keratitis, but also as an additional follow-up tool after antimicrobial crosslinking. This study shows that in vivo confocal microscopy is, in experienced hands, a quick and reliable diagnostic tool. Clin. Anat. 31:60-63, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A simple technique for correction of relapsed overjet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkirala, Neelima; Saxena, Ruchi

    2014-01-01

    Class III malocclusions are usually growth related discrepancies, which often become more severe when growth is completed Orthognathic surgery can be a part of the treatment plan, although a good number of cases can be treated non-surgically by camouflage treatment. The purpose of this report is to review the relapse tendency in patients treated non-surgically. A simple technique is described to combat one such post-treatment relapse condition in an adult patient who had undergone orthodontic treatment by extraction of a single lower incisor.

  3. Relapse of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder Associated with Intravenous Lidocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyuki Uzawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine unmasks silent symptoms and eases neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis patients; however, the effects of lidocaine in neuromyelitis optica have never been reported. We describe the case of a 59-year-old Japanese woman with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder who developed optic neuritis 1 day after intravenous lidocaine injection for treating allodynia. Her symptom seemed to result from a relapse of neuromyelitis optica induced by lidocaine administration, and not because of the transient effects of intravenous lidocaine administration. The possibility that lidocaine administration results in relapse of neuromyelitis optica due to its immunomodulating effects cannot be ruled out.

  4. Late Relapses in Stage I Testicular Cancer Patients on Surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Mette Saksø; Lauritsen, Jakob; Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard

    2016-01-01

    Cancer (DaTeCa) database. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: We estimated survival and relapse probabilities and compared the results using log-rank tests and Cox regression analyses. We compared differences in patient characteristics by using χ(2), Fisher exact, and Mann-Whitney tests...... no significant differences in patient characteristics at orchiectomy or relapse. Limitations include retrospective design and exclusion of patients who had been offered adjuvant therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of VLR is minimal, and the patients carry a good prognosis. Patient characteristics of CS-1 surveillance...

  5. Vascular Endothelial-Targeted Therapy Combined with Cytotoxic Chemotherapy Induces Inflammatory Intratumoral Infiltrates and Inhibits Tumor Relapses after Surgery

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    Brendan F. Judy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is the most effective therapy for cancer in the United States, but disease still recurs in more than 40% of patients within 5 years after resection. Chemotherapy is given postoperatively to prevent relapses; however, this approach has had marginal success. After surgery, recurrent tumors depend on rapid neovascular proliferation to deliver nutrients and oxygen. Phosphatidylserine (PS is exposed on the vascular endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment but is notably absent on blood vessels in normal tissues. Thus, PS is an attractive target for cancer therapy after surgery. Syngeneic mice bearing TC1 lung cancer tumors were treated with mch1N11 (a novel mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets PS, cisplatin (cis, or combination after surgery. Tumor relapses and disease progression were decreased 90% by combination therapy compared with a 50% response rate for cis alone (P = .02. Mice receiving postoperative mch1N11 had no wound-related complications or added systemic toxicity in comparison to control animals. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the effects of mch1N11 were associated with a dense infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly granulocytes. This strategy was independent of the adaptive immune system. Together, these data suggest that vascular-targeted strategies directed against exposed PS may be a powerful adjunct to postoperative chemotherapy in preventing relapses after cancer surgery.

  6. Vascular endothelial-targeted therapy combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy induces inflammatory intratumoral infiltrates and inhibits tumor relapses after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Brendan F; Aliperti, Louis A; Predina, Jarrod D; Levine, Daniel; Kapoor, Veena; Thorpe, Philip E; Albelda, Steven M; Singhal, Sunil

    2012-04-01

    Surgery is the most effective therapy for cancer in the United States, but disease still recurs in more than 40% of patients within 5 years after resection. Chemotherapy is given postoperatively to prevent relapses; however, this approach has had marginal success. After surgery, recurrent tumors depend on rapid neovascular proliferation to deliver nutrients and oxygen. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is exposed on the vascular endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment but is notably absent on blood vessels in normal tissues. Thus, PS is an attractive target for cancer therapy after surgery. Syngeneic mice bearing TC1 lung cancer tumors were treated with mch1N11 (a novel mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets PS), cisplatin (cis), or combination after surgery. Tumor relapses and disease progression were decreased 90% by combination therapy compared with a 50% response rate for cis alone (P = .02). Mice receiving postoperative mch1N11 had no wound-related complications or added systemic toxicity in comparison to control animals. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the effects of mch1N11 were associated with a dense infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly granulocytes. This strategy was independent of the adaptive immune system. Together, these data suggest that vascular-targeted strategies directed against exposed PS may be a powerful adjunct to postoperative chemotherapy in preventing relapses after cancer surgery.

  7. The effect of tight glycaemic control, during and after cardiac surgery, on patient mortality and morbidity: A systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Carter Gordon H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycaemia is a common occurrence during cardiac surgery, however, there remains some uncertainty surrounding the role of tight glycaemic control (blood glucose Method The literature was systematically reviewed, based on pre-determined search criteria, for clinical trials evaluating the effect of tight versus normal glycaemic control during and/or after cardiac surgery. Each paper was reviewed by two, independent reviewers and data extracted for statistical analysis. Data from identified studies was combined using meta-analysis (RevMan5®. The results are presented either as odds ratios (OR or mean differences (MD with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results A total of seven randomised controlled trials (RCTs were identified in the literature, although not all trials could be used in each analysis. Tight glycaemic control reduced the incidence of early mortality (death in ICU (OR 0.52 [95% CI 0.30, 0.91]; of post-surgical atrial fibrillation (odds ratio (OR 0.76 [95%CI 0.58, 0.99]; the use of epicardial pacing (OR 0.28 [95%CI 0.15, 0.54]; the duration of mechanical ventilation (mean difference (MD -3.69 [95% CI -3.85, -3.54] and length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU (MD -0.57 [95%CI -0.60, -0.55] days. Measures of the time spent on mechanical ventilation (I2 94% and time spent in ICU (I2 99% both had high degrees of heterogeneity in the data. Conclusion The results from this study suggest that there may be some benefit to tight glycaemic control during and after cardiac surgery. However, due to the limited number of studies available and the significant variability in glucose levels; period of control; and the reporting of outcome measures, further research needs to be done to provide a definitive answer on the benefits of tight glycaemic control for cardiac surgery patients.

  8. The impact of a low glycaemic index (GI) diet on simultaneous measurements of blood glucose and fat oxidation: A whole body calorimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Bhupinder; Quek Yu Chin, Rina; Camps, Stefan; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2016-06-01

    Low glycaemic index (GI) foods are known to minimize large fluctuations in blood glucose levels and have been suggested to increase fat oxidation. The objective of this study was to simultaneously investigate glucose excursion and substrate oxidation in a whole body calorimetre when Chinese male subjects were provided a low or high GI meal. In a randomized, controlled crossover non blind design, 12 healthy Chinese male adults (BMI 21.8 ± 1.3 kgm -2 ) attended two sessions consisting of either four low or high glycaemic meals (LGI vs HGI). Breakfast, lunch and snack were consumed in a whole body calorimetre while dinner was consumed at home. Daily changes in glycaemic response (GR) and postprandial GR responses were measured using a continuous glucose monitoring system. The GR was further calculated to obtain the incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for glucose concentrations. Glycaemic variability was calculated as mean amplitude of glycaemic excursion (MAGE). Substrate oxidation was calculated by measuring respiratory quotient and urine nitrogen excretion. After LGI meals in the whole body calorimetre, iAUC for glucose (P = 0.008) was lower compared to the HGI session. The HGI treatment produced a significantly greater MAGE than the LGI treatment over the 24 hour period (P fat oxidation and lower carbohydrate oxidation were observed following breakfast and lunch when comparing LGI to HGI (P fat oxidation over carbohydrate oxidation when compared to HGI mixed meals. The consumption of low GI meals may be a strategic approach in improving overall glycaemia and increasing fat oxidation in Asians consuming a high carbohydrate diet.

  9. Triggers of Substance Abuse Slip and Relapse During Outpatient Treatment in Methadone/Buprenorphine Maintenance Therapy Clinics: A Predictive Model with Emphasis on Treatment-Related Factors

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    Saeid Komasi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Most addicts relapse in the first year of treatment especially in the first 3 - 6 months, which is the most vulnerable period. Objectives The present study aimed to assess the predictors of substance abuse slip and relapse among addicts in the first 6 months of treatment with an emphasis on treatment related factors. Methods The data of this cross-sectional study collected through assessment of 148 patients who were referred to the Methadone/Buprenorphine maintenance therapy clinics of Kermanshah city during April to September of 2015. Demographic, history, treatment checklist, comorbidity index, and medical records were used for collecting data. Data was analyzed through chi-square, t-test, and Binary logistic regression analysis. Results The mean age of total participants was 42.4 ± 11.3 years and 98% of them were male. 27% and 35.1% of the patients, respectively, had a slip and relapse during the first 6 months of treatment. After adjustment for all demographic data, it was indicated that self-employment (P = 0.037, more treatment costs (P = 0.049, previous treatment history (P = 0.027, not satisfied dose of medication (P = 0.012, and lack of medical therapy history under physicians supervision (P = 0.046 can increase the possibility of a slip significantly. Conclusions Despite the fact that prevention of re-abuse and relapse of disease includes multi-factorial approach, it seems that the treatment-related factors are as the most major factors in relapse and slip during the first 6 months of treatment. Health practitioners’ special attention to treatment related factors in addiction, especially previous treatment history as the most important predictor of relapse, are probably effective in the control and decrease of a slip and relapse.

  10. Plasma Riboflavin Level is Associated with Risk, Relapse, and Survival of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan-Shan; Xu, Yi-Wei; Wu, Jian-Yi; Tan, Hua-Zhen; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Xue, Yu-Jie; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Riboflavin is an essential micronutrient for normal cellular activity, and deficiency may result in disease, such as cancer. We performed a case-control study to explore the association of riboflavin levels with risk and prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Plasma riboflavin levels, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in ESCC patients were significantly lower than in those of healthy controls (7.04 ± 6.34 ng/ml vs. 9.32 ± 12.40 ng/ml; P riboflavin level and risk of ESCC (odds ratio (OR) = 0.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.95-0.99, P =  0.02). The 5-year relapse-free and overall survival rates were significantly lower when riboflavin levels were ≤0.8 ng/ml than >0.8 ng/ml (relapse-free survival rate: 29.4% vs. 54.8%; overall survival rate: 28.6% vs. 55.6%). Plasma riboflavin level was an independent protective factor for both relapse-free (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.325, 95% CI = 0.161-0.657, P = 0.002) and overall survival of ESCC patients (HR = 0.382, 95% CI = 0.190-0.768, P = 0.007). In conclusion, plasma riboflavin levels are significantly related to risk and prognosis of ESCC patients, suggesting that moderate supplementation of riboflavin will decrease risk and prevent recurrence of ESCC and also improve prognosis of ESCC patients.

  11. Differences in diabetes prevalence and inequalities in disease management and glycaemic control by immigrant status: a population-based study (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballotari, Paola; Caroli, Stefania; Ferrari, Francesca; Romani, Gabriele; Marina, Greci; Chiarenza, Antonio; Manicardi, Valeria; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo

    2015-02-06

    The diabetes prevalence increases at an alarming rate around the world and understanding disparities in occurrence, care management, and health outcomes may be a starting point towards achieving more effective strategies to prevent and manage it. The aims of this study are to compare immigrants and Italians in terms of the differences in diabetes prevalence and to evaluate inequalities in disease management and glycaemic control by using information included in Reggio Emilia diabetes register. We retrieved from the diabetes register subjects aged 20-74 on December 31(st), 2009. Using citizenship, we created three main groups: Italy, High Developed Countries (HDC), and High Migration Pressure Countries (HMPC). These were split into sub-regions of origin. We calculated age-adjusted prevalence by gender and sub-region. Using logistic regression model, we analyzed the association between area of origin and following indicators: 1) not being in care of diabetes clinics; 2) not having glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) test in 2010; 3) among those tested, having a HbA1c value > = 9% (75 mmol/mol). We found 15,889 Italian and 1,295 HMPC citizens with diabetes. HMPC citizens had higher age-adjusted prevalence of diabetes than Italians (females 5.0% vs 3.6%; males 6.5% vs 5.5%). The excess was mostly due to a strong excess in immigrants from Southern Asia (females 9.7%, males 10.2%) and Northern Africa (females 9.3%, males 5.9%). HMPC citizens were cared for by diabetes clinics in a similar proportion than Italians (OR: 1.08; 95% CI: 0.93-1.25), but had a greater odds of not being tested for HbA1c (OR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.34-1.71), as well as of having HbA1c values equal to or over 9% (OR: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.80-3.14). The outcomes were poorer in HMPC females for the first two outcomes, while there was no difference for the HbA1c values (Wald test for heterogeneity p = 0.0850; p = 0.0156; p = 0.6635, respectively). Our findings highlight the need for gender-oriented actions for

  12. Lowering dietary glycaemic index through nutrition education among Malaysian women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha-Shyam; Fatimah, A; Rohana, A G; Norasyikin, A W; Karuthan, C; Nik, Shanita S; Mohd, Yusof B N; Nor, Azmi K

    2013-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increases risks for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Low glycaemic index (GI) diets improve cardio-metabolic outcomes in insulin-resistant individuals. We examined the feasibility of lowering GI through GI-based-education among Asian post-GDM women. A 3-month investigation was carried out on 60 Malaysian women with a mean age of 31.0 +/- 4.5 years and a history of GDM. Subjects were randomised into two groups: LGIE and CHDR. The CHDR group received conventional healthy dietary recommendations only. The LGIE group received GI based-education in addition to conventional healthy dietary recommendations. At baseline and after 3-months, dietary intake of energy and macronutrient intakes including GI diet and glycaemic load was assessed using 3-day food records. Diabetes-Diet and GI-concept scores and physical activity levels were assessed using a questionnaire. Adherence to dietary instructions was measured at the end of 3 months. At the end of 3 months, the LGIE group had significant reductions in energy intake (241.7 +/- 522.4Kcal, P = 0.037, ES=0.463), total carbohydrate (48.7 +/- 83.5g, P = 0.010, ES = 0.583), GI (3.9 +/- 7.1, P = 0.017, ES = 0.549) and GL (39.0 +/- 55.3, P = 0.003, ES = 0.705) and significant increases in protein (3.7 +/- 5.4g, 0.003, ES = 0.685) and diet fibre (4.6 +/- 7.3g, P = 0.06). The CHDR group had a significant reduction in fat only (5.7 +/- 9.4g, P = 0.006, ES = 0.606). There was a 30% increase in GI-concept scores in the LGIE group (p < 0.001). Changes in GI-concept scores correlated significantly to the reduction in dietary GI (r = -0.642, P = 0.045). Dietary adherence was comparable in both groups. GI-education improves GI-concept knowledge and helps lower dietary glycaemic index among women with a history of GDM.

  13. High Intensity Interval Training Improves Glycaemic Control and Pancreatic β Cell Function of Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Søren Møller; Thorup, Anne Cathrine; Overgaard, Kristian; Jeppesen, Per Bendix

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity improves the regulation of glucose homeostasis in both type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients and healthy individuals, but the effect on pancreatic β cell function is unknown. We investigated glycaemic control, pancreatic function and total fat mass before and after 8 weeks of low volume high intensity interval training (HIIT) on cycle ergometer in T2D patients and matched healthy control individuals. Study design/method: Elderly (56 yrs±2), non-active T2D patients (n = 10) and matched (52 yrs±2) healthy controls (CON) (n = 13) exercised 3 times (10×60 sec. HIIT) a week over an 8 week period on a cycle ergometer. Participants underwent a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). On a separate day, resting blood pressure measurement was conducted followed by an incremental maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) cycle ergometer test. Finally, a whole body dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed. After 8 weeks of training, the same measurements were performed. Results: in the T2D-group, glycaemic control as determined by average fasting venous glucose concentration (p = 0.01), end point 2-hour OGTT (p = 0.04) and glycosylated haemoglobin (p = 0.04) were significantly reduced. Pancreatic homeostasis as determined by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and HOMA β cell function (HOMA-%β) were both significantly ameliorated (p = 0.03 and p = 0.03, respectively). Whole body insulin sensitivity as determined by the disposition index (DI) was significantly increased (p = 0.03). During OGTT, the glucose continuum was significantly reduced at -15 (p = 0.03), 30 (p = 0.03) and 120 min (p = 0.03) and at -10 (p = 0.003) and 0 min (p = 0.003) with an additional improvement (p = 0.03) of its 1st phase (30 min) area under curve (AUC). Significant abdominal fat mass losses were seen in both groups (T2D: p = 0.004 and CON: p = 0.02) corresponding to a percentage change of -17.84%±5.02 and -9.66%±3.07, respectively. Conclusion: these results

  14. High Intensity Interval Training Improves Glycaemic Control and Pancreatic β Cell Function of Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Møller Madsen

    Full Text Available Physical activity improves the regulation of glucose homeostasis in both type 2 diabetes (T2D patients and healthy individuals, but the effect on pancreatic β cell function is unknown. We investigated glycaemic control, pancreatic function and total fat mass before and after 8 weeks of low volume high intensity interval training (HIIT on cycle ergometer in T2D patients and matched healthy control individuals. Study design/method: Elderly (56 yrs±2, non-active T2D patients (n = 10 and matched (52 yrs±2 healthy controls (CON (n = 13 exercised 3 times (10×60 sec. HIIT a week over an 8 week period on a cycle ergometer. Participants underwent a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. On a separate day, resting blood pressure measurement was conducted followed by an incremental maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max cycle ergometer test. Finally, a whole body dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA was performed. After 8 weeks of training, the same measurements were performed. Results: in the T2D-group, glycaemic control as determined by average fasting venous glucose concentration (p = 0.01, end point 2-hour OGTT (p = 0.04 and glycosylated haemoglobin (p = 0.04 were significantly reduced. Pancreatic homeostasis as determined by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and HOMA β cell function (HOMA-%β were both significantly ameliorated (p = 0.03 and p = 0.03, respectively. Whole body insulin sensitivity as determined by the disposition index (DI was significantly increased (p = 0.03. During OGTT, the glucose continuum was significantly reduced at -15 (p = 0.03, 30 (p = 0.03 and 120 min (p = 0.03 and at -10 (p = 0.003 and 0 min (p = 0.003 with an additional improvement (p = 0.03 of its 1st phase (30 min area under curve (AUC. Significant abdominal fat mass losses were seen in both groups (T2D: p = 0.004 and CON: p = 0.02 corresponding to a percentage change of -17.84%±5.02 and -9.66%±3.07, respectively. Conclusion: these results

  15. Medical chart validation of an algorithm for identifying multiple sclerosis relapse in healthcare claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastek, Benjamin J; Oleen-Burkey, Merrikay; Lopez-Bresnahan, Maria V

    2010-01-01

    Relapse is a common measure of disease activity in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this study was to test the content validity of an operational algorithm for detecting relapse in claims data. A claims-based relapse detection algorithm was tested by comparing its detection rate over a 1-year period with relapses identified based on medical chart review. According to the algorithm, MS patients in a US healthcare claims database who had either (1) a primary claim for MS during hospitalization or (2) a corticosteroid claim following a MS-related outpatient visit were designated as having a relapse. Patient charts were examined for explicit indication of relapse or care suggestive of relapse. Positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Medical charts were reviewed for 300 MS patients, half of whom had a relapse according to the algorithm. The claims-based criteria correctly classified 67.3% of patients with relapses (positive predictive value) and 70.0% of patients without relapses (negative predictive value; kappa 0.373: p value of the operational algorithm. Limitations of the algorithm include lack of differentiation between relapsing-remitting MS and other types, and that it does not incorporate measures of function and disability. The claims-based algorithm appeared to successfully detect moderate-to-severe MS relapse. This validated definition can be applied to future claims-based MS studies.

  16. [Motivations for cannabis cessation, coping and adaptation strategies, and perceived benefits: impact on cannabis use relapse and abstinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauchard, E; Septfons, A; Chabrol, H

    2013-12-01

    energetic (reported by 68%) and more active during the day (62%), being able to control their life (67%), proving themselves they could quit (60%), saving money (60%), as well being less worried about their health (57%) were also reported as motivations to quit cannabis use. Different coping and adaptation strategies were also reported. First, environmental strategies such as disposing of both cannabis (71%) and equipment to smoke (71%), no longer going to places where cannabis is smoked (33%) or lifestyle changes (68%) were used to cope with cannabis cessation. Then cognitive strategies such as motivation, willingness (71%), self-control and having a positive perception of the situation (68%) were also reported. Regarding coping strategies, participants accepted and learned how to live with the new situation (68%), and social support from family (32%) and friends (30%) were reported. Perceived benefits were linked with motivations for cannabis cessation. Thus, participants reported having more energy (75%), being more active (73%), less tired (70%) and recovering memory (57%) after cannabis cessation. Fifty-two percent of participants relapsed after the quit attempt. Abstainers had significantly higher scores on two subscales: the "negative impact of cannabis use on one's health and on self and social image" (t(61)=-3.84; Pchange, relapse, and abstinence. Social and family support, as well as social network appears to be of prime importance in relapses and prevention programs for cannabis use. New perspectives for research on cannabis cessation self-change and relapses are thus highlighted, notably regarding factors that could predict relapse or success in cessation of smoking cannabis. Research on cannabis self-change and relapse are warranted for both prevention and therapeutic programs. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment-related mortality in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Trausti; Söderhäll, Stefan; Arvidson, Johan

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is particularly challenging due to the high treatment intensity needed to induce and sustain a second remission. To improve results, it is important to understand how treatment-related toxicity impacts survival...

  18. Irinotecan for relapsed Wilms tumor in pediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hol, Janna A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Graf, Norbert

    2018-01-01

    While irinotecan has been studied in various pediatric solid tumors, its potential role in Wilms tumor (WT) is less clear. We evaluated response and outcome of irinotecan-containing regimens in relapsed WT and compared our results to the available literature. Among 14 evaluable patients, one...

  19. A Qualitative Exploration of Drug Abuse Relapse Following Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Manirul; Hashizume, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Taro; Alam, Faruq; Rabbani, Golam

    2012-01-01

    Drug use is an alarming issue in Bangladesh. Most drug users return to drugs after treatment, in what becomes a vicious cycle of treatment and relapse. This study explored why they return and what pathways they follow. We carried out 5 key informant interviews, 10 in-depth interviews, 2 focus group discussions, 3 case studies, 8 observations, and…

  20. Functional symptoms in clinically definite MS--pseudo-relapse syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Merwick, A

    2012-02-03

    Although the diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS) have become more formalized and sensitive in the era of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, the assessment of individual relapses may not always be straightforward or easily linked to a particular lesion seen on imaging. In addition, acute episodes often have to be assessed outside of normal working hours or when the individual patients usual medical team is not available. Often the emergency department physicians have little formal neurological training and are under time pressure to get patients through the system as quickly as possible. It is therefore possible to mislabel functional symptoms as being true relapses. To illustrate scenarios of possible pseudo-relapse, three clinical vignettes are described. Misclassification of functional symptoms as relapse carries a number of inherent risks. Functional symptoms can be multifactorial and may cause a burden of disease. A multidisciplinary approach may be useful in minimizing unnecessary harm and identify if there is more than meets the eye to an episode of clinical deterioration.

  1. Social Resource Characteristics and Adolescent Substance Abuse Relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vik, Peter W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined social resource network characteristics of adolescent substance abusers (n=19). Perceived similarity to one's social network emerged as important moderator of whether social network provided support to remain abstinent or elevated risk for relapse. Increased perceived support predicted continued posttreatment abstinence when recovering…

  2. Modifiable factors influencing relapses and disability in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'hooghe, M. B.; Nagels, G.; Bissay, V.; De Keyser, J.

    A growing body of literature indicates that the natural course of multiple sclerosis can be influenced by a number of factors. Strong evidence suggests that relapses can be triggered by infections, the postpartum period and stressful life events. Vaccinations against influenza, hepatitis B and

  3. Atypical relapse of hemolytic uremic syndrome after transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olie, Karolien H.; Florquin, Sandrine; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Verlaak, René; Strain, Lisa; Goodship, Timothy H. J.; Weening, Jan J.; Davin, Jean-Claude

    2004-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) frequently leads to end-stage renal failure and can relapse after transplantation. A 12-year-old girl presenting with familial atypical HUS with a factor H mutation was successfully transplanted 6 years after a first transplant that had failed because of

  4. [A case of relapsing iridocyclitis in tropical malaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchinina, V V; Dushin, N V; Beliaev, V S; Barashkov, V I; Gonchar, P A; Frolov, M A

    1997-01-01

    An African student developed bilateral relapsing iridocyclitis with increased intraocular pressure. General examinations and parasitological studies revealed tropical malaria. Etiotropic and local therapy normalized intraocular pressure and improved vision acuity of both eyes. This case should be borne in mind by general practitioners as a possibility of transportation of various tropical diseases.

  5. Relapse and Mortality Risk of Stage I Testicular Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Florvall, Cecilia; Frederiksen, Peder; Lauritsen, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: - To assess the medical insurance risk for patients with stage I testicular cancer (TC), by calculating the overall mortality risk with and without relapse, and compare it to men from the Danish population. BACKGROUND: - Testicular cancer is the most common malignancy in young males...

  6. A novel UCS memory retrieval-extinction procedure to inhibit relapse to drug seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yi-xiao; Xue, Yan-xue; Liu, Jian-feng; Shi, Hai-shui; Jian, Min; Han, Ying; Zhu, Wei-li; Bao, Yan-ping; Wu, Ping; Ding, Zeng-bo; Shen, Hao-wei; Shi, Jie; Shaham, Yavin; Lu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that a conditioned stimulus (CS) memory retrieval-extinction procedure decreases reinstatement of cocaine and heroin seeking in rats and heroin craving in humans. Here we show that non-contingent cocaine or methylphenidate injections (UCS retrieval) 1 h before the extinction sessions decreases cocaine-priming-induced reinstatement, spontaneous recovery, and renewal of cocaine seeking in rats. Unlike the CS-based memory retrieval-extinction procedure, the UCS memory retrieval manipulation decreases renewal and reinstatement of cocaine seeking in the presence of cocaine cues that were not present during extinction training and also decreases cocaine seeking when the procedure commences after 28 days of abstinence. The inhibitory effect of the UCS retrieval manipulation on cocaine-priming-induced reinstatement is mediated by regulation of AMPA-receptor endocytosis in the basolateral amygdala. The UCS memory retrieval-extinction procedure has superior relapse prevention characteristics than the CS memory retrieval-extinction procedure and could be a promising method for decreasing relapse in human addicts. PMID:26169171

  7. Recurrent tuberculosis in an urban area in China: relapse or exogenous reinfection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xin; Yang, Chongguang; Wu, Jie; Lin, Senlin; Gao, Xu; Wu, Zheyuan; Tian, Jiyun; Gan, Mingyu; Luo, Tao; Wang, Lili; Yu, Chenlei; Mei, Jian; Pan, Qichao; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Yuan, ZhengAn; Gao, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent tuberculosis is an important indicator of the effectiveness of tuberculosis control and can occur by relapse or exogenous reinfection. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on all bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis cases that were successfully treated between 2000 and 2012 in Shanghai, an urban area with a high number but a low prevalence rate of tuberculosis cases and a low prevalence of HIV infection. Genotyping the Mycobacterium tuberculosis from clinical isolates was used to distinguish between relapse and reinfection. In total, 5.3% (710/13,417) of successfully treated cases had a recurrence, a rate of 7.55 (95% CI 7.01–8.13) episodes per 1000 person-years, more than 18 times the rate of tuberculosis in the general population. Patients who were male, age 30–59, retreatment cases, had cavitation, diabetes, drug-resistant or multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in their initial episode of tuberculosis, were at high risk for a recurrence. Among 141 recurrent cases that had paired isolates, 59 (41.8%) had different genotypes, indicating reinfection with a different strain. Patients who completed treatment were still at high risk of another episode of tuberculosis and exogenous reinfection contributed a significant proportion of the recurrent tuberculosis cases. Targeted control strategies are needed to prevent new tuberculosis infections in this setting. PMID:28237039

  8. A novel UCS memory retrieval-extinction procedure to inhibit relapse to drug seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yi-xiao; Xue, Yan-xue; Liu, Jian-feng; Shi, Hai-shui; Jian, Min; Han, Ying; Zhu, Wei-li; Bao, Yan-ping; Wu, Ping; Ding, Zeng-bo; Shen, Hao-wei; Shi, Jie; Shaham, Yavin; Lu, Lin

    2015-07-14

    We recently reported that a conditioned stimulus (CS) memory retrieval-extinction procedure decreases reinstatement of cocaine and heroin seeking in rats and heroin craving in humans. Here we show that non-contingent cocaine or methylphenidate injections (UCS retrieval) 1 h before the extinction sessions decreases cocaine-priming-induced reinstatement, spontaneous recovery, and renewal of cocaine seeking in rats. Unlike the CS-based memory retrieval-extinction procedure, the UCS memory retrieval manipulation decreases renewal and reinstatement of cocaine seeking in the presence of cocaine cues that were not present during extinction training and also decreases cocaine seeking when the procedure commences after 28 days of abstinence. The inhibitory effect of the UCS retrieval manipulation on cocaine-priming-induced reinstatement is mediated by regulation of AMPA-receptor endocytosis in the basolateral amygdala. The UCS memory retrieval-extinction procedure has superior relapse prevention characteristics than the CS memory retrieval-extinction procedure and could be a promising method for decreasing relapse in human addicts.

  9. Compulsory drug detention and injection drug use cessation and relapse in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbairn, Nadia; Hayashi, Kanna; Ti, Lianping; Kaplan, Karyn; Suwannawong, Paisan; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Strategies to promote the reduction and cessation of injection drug use are central to human immunodeficiency virus prevention and treatment efforts globally. Though drug use cessation is a major focus of drug policy in Thailand, little is known about factors associated with injection cessation and relapse in this setting. A cross-sectional study was conducted between July and October 2011 of a community-recruited sample of people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand. Using multivariate logistic regression, we examined the prevalence and correlates of injection drug use cessation with subsequent relapse. Among 422 participants, 209 (49.5%) reported a period of injection drug use cessation of at least one year. In multivariate analyses, incarceration (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 13.07), voluntary drug treatment (AOR 2.75), midazolam injection (AOR 2.48) and number of years since first injection (AOR 1.07) were positively associated with injection cessation of duration greater than a year (all P Thailand. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  10. Periodontal treatment to improve glycaemic control in diabetic patients: study protocol of the randomized, controlled DIAPERIO trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnes, Jean-Noel; Arrivé, Elise; Gourdy, Pierre; Hanaire, Hélène; Rigalleau, Vincent; Gin, Henri; Sédarat, Cyril; Dorignac, Georges; Bou, Christophe; Sixou, Michel; Nabet, Cathy

    2009-08-02

    Periodontitis is a common, chronic inflammatory disease caused by gram-negative bacteria leading to destruction of tissues supporting the teeth. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown increased frequency, extent and severity of periodontitis among diabetic adults. More recently, some controlled clinical trials have also suggested that periodontal treatment could improve glycaemic control in diabetic patients. However current evidence does not provide sufficient information on which to confidently base any clinical recommendations. The main objective of this clinical trial is to assess whether periodontal treatment could lead to a decrease in glycated haemoglobin levels in metabolically unbalanced diabetic patients suffering from chronic periodontitis. The DIAPERIO trial is an open-label, 13-week follow-up, randomized, controlled trial. The total target sample size is planned at 150 participants, with a balanced (1:1) treatment allocation (immediate treatment vs delayed treatment). Periodontal treatment will include full mouth non-surgical scaling and root planing, systemic antibiotherapy, local antiseptics (chlorhexidine 0.12%) and oral health instructions. The primary outcome will be the difference in change of HbA1c between the two groups after the 13-weeks' follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be the difference in change of fructosamine levels and quality of life between the two groups. The DIAPERIO trial will provide insight into the question of whether periodontal treatment could lead to an improvement in glycaemic control in metabolically unbalanced diabetic patients suffering from periodontitis. The results of this trial will help to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians and a draft framework for designing national health policies. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN15334496.

  11. The Health Economic Value of Changes in Glycaemic Control, Weight and Rates of Hypoglycaemia in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil McEwan

    Full Text Available Therapy-related consequences of treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, such as weight gain and hypoglycaemia, act as a barrier to attaining optimal glycaemic control, indirectly influencing the incidence of vascular complications and associated morbidity and mortality. This study quantifies the individual and combined contribution of changes in hypoglycaemia frequency, weight and HbA1c to predicted quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs within a T1DM population.We describe the Cardiff Type 1 Diabetes (CT1DM Model, originally informed by the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT and updated with the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC study and Swedish National Diabetes Registry for microvascular and cardiovascular complications respectively. We report model validation results and the QALY impact of HbA1c, weight and hypoglycaemia changes.Validation results demonstrated coefficients of determination for clinical endpoints of R2 = 0.863 (internal R2 = 0.999; external R2 = 0.823, costs R2 = 0.980 and QALYs R2 = 0.951. Achieving and maintaining a 1% HbA1c reduction was estimated to provide 0.61 additional discounted QALYs. Weight changes of ±1kg, ±2kg or ±3kg led to discounted QALY changes of ±0.03, ±0.07 and ±0.10 respectively, while modifying hypoglycaemia frequency by -10%, -20% or -30% resulted in changes of -0.05, -0.11 and -0.17. The differences in discounted costs, life-years and QALYs associated with HbA1c 6% versus 10% were -£19,037, 2.49 and 2.35 respectively.Using a model updated with contemporary epidemiological data, this study presents an outcome-focused perspective to assessing the health economic consequences of differing levels of glycaemic control in T1DM with and without weight and hypoglycaemia effects.

  12. The effects of intermittent compared to continuous energy restriction on glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes; a pragmatic pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, S; Clifton, P M; Keogh, J B

    2016-12-01

    Weight loss improves glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, as achieving and maintaining weight loss is difficult, alternative strategies are needed. Our primary aim was to investigate the effects of intermittent energy restriction (IER) compared to continuous energy restriction (CER) on glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Secondary aims were to assess effects on weight loss, body composition, medication changes and subjective measures of appetite. Using a 2-day IER method, we expected equal improvements to HbA1c and weight in both groups. Sixty-three overweight or obese participants (BMI 35.2±5kg/m 2 ) with T2DM (HbA1c 7.4±1.3%) (57mmol/mol) were randomised to a 2-day severe energy restriction (1670-2500kJ/day) with 5days of habitual eating, compared to a moderate CER diet (5000-6500kJ/day) for 12weeks. At 12weeks HbA1c (-0.7±0.9% P<0.001) and percent body weight reduction (-5.9±4% P<0.001) was similar in both groups with no group by time interaction. Similar reductions were also seen for medication dosages, all measures of body composition and subjective reports of appetite. In this pilot trial, 2days of IER compared with CER resulted in similar improvements in glycaemic control and weight reduction offering a suitable alternative treatment strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Novel Multidisciplinary Intervention for Long-Term Weight Loss and Glycaemic Control in Obese Patients with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lih

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Obesity and diabetes are difficult to treat in public clinics. We sought to determine the effectiveness of the Metabolic Rehabilitation Program (MRP in achieving long-term weight loss and improving glycaemic control versus “best practice” diabetes clinic (DC in obese patients using a retrospective cohort study. Methods. Patients with diabetes and BMI > 30 kg/m2 who attended the MRP, which consisted of supervised exercise and intense allied health integration, or the DC were selected. Primary outcomes were improvements in weight and glycaemia with secondary outcomes of improvements in blood pressure and lipid profile at 12 and 30 months. Results. Baseline characteristics of both cohorts (40 MRP and 40 DC patients were similar at baseline other than age (63 in MRP versus 68 years in DC, P=0.002. At 12 months, MRP patients lost 7.65 ± 1.74 kg versus 1.76 ± 2.60 kg in the DC group (P<0.0001 and 9.70 ± 2.13 kg versus 0.98 ± 2.65 kg at 30 months (P<0.0001. Similarly, MRP patients had significant absolute reductions in %HbA1c at 30 months versus the DC group (−0.86 ± 0.31% versus 0.12% ± 0.33%, P<0.038, with nonsignificant improvements in lipids and blood pressure in MRP patients. Conclusion. Further research is needed to establish the MRP as an effective strategy for achieving sustained weight loss and improving glycaemic control in obese patients with type 2 diabetes.

  14. Discovery and Fine-Mapping of Glycaemic and Obesity-Related Trait Loci Using High-Density Imputation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoko Horikoshi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Reference panels from the 1000 Genomes (1000G Project Consortium provide near complete coverage of common and low-frequency genetic variation with minor allele frequency ≥0.5% across European ancestry populations. Within the European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE Consortium, we have undertaken the first large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS, supplemented by 1000G imputation, for four quantitative glycaemic and obesity-related traits, in up to 87,048 individuals of European ancestry. We identified two loci for body mass index (BMI at genome-wide significance, and two for fasting glucose (FG, none of which has been previously reported in larger meta-analysis efforts to combine GWAS of European ancestry. Through conditional analysis, we also detected multiple distinct signals of association mapping to established loci for waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (RSPO3 and FG (GCK and G6PC2. The index variant for one association signal at the G6PC2 locus is a low-frequency coding allele, H177Y, which has recently been demonstrated to have a functional role in glucose regulation. Fine-mapping analyses revealed that the non-coding variants most likely to drive association signals at established and novel loci were enriched for overlap with enhancer elements, which for FG mapped to promoter and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic islets, in particular. Our study demonstrates that 1000G imputation and genetic fine-mapping of common and low-frequency variant association signals at GWAS loci, integrated with genomic annotation in relevant tissues, can provide insight into the functional and regulatory mechanisms through which their effects on glycaemic and obesity-related traits are mediated.

  15. Discovery and Fine-Mapping of Glycaemic and Obesity-Related Trait Loci Using High-Density Imputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Momoko; Mӓgi, Reedik; van de Bunt, Martijn; Surakka, Ida; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Mahajan, Anubha; Marullo, Letizia; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hӓgg, Sara; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ladenvall, Claes; Ried, Janina S; Winkler, Thomas W; Willems, Sara M; Pervjakova, Natalia; Esko, Tõnu; Beekman, Marian; Nelson, Christopher P; Willenborg, Christina; Wiltshire, Steven; Ferreira, Teresa; Fernandez, Juan; Gaulton, Kyle J; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Hamsten, Anders; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Willemsen, Gonneke; Milaneschi, Yuri; Robertson, Neil R; Groves, Christopher J; Bennett, Amanda J; Lehtimӓki, Terho; Viikari, Jorma S; Rung, Johan; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Perola, Markus; Heid, Iris M; Herder, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Roden, Michael; Hypponen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Karssen, Lennart C; Mihailov, Evelin; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; de Craen, Anton J M; Deelen, Joris; Havulinna, Aki S; Blades, Matthew; Hengstenberg, Christian; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Kaprio, Jaakko; Tobin, Martin D; Samani, Nilesh J; Lind, Lars; Salomaa, Veikko; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Slagboom, P Eline; Metspalu, Andres; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Jula, Antti; Groop, Leif; Raitakari, Olli T; Power, Chris; Penninx, Brenda W J H; de Geus, Eco; Smit, Johannes H; Boomsma, Dorret I; Pedersen, Nancy L; Ingelsson, Erik; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari; Ripatti, Samuli; Prokopenko, Inga; McCarthy, Mark I; Morris, Andrew P

    2015-07-01

    Reference panels from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project Consortium provide near complete coverage of common and low-frequency genetic variation with minor allele frequency ≥0.5% across European ancestry populations. Within the European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE) Consortium, we have undertaken the first large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), supplemented by 1000G imputation, for four quantitative glycaemic and obesity-related traits, in up to 87,048 individuals of European ancestry. We identified two loci for body mass index (BMI) at genome-wide significance, and two for fasting glucose (FG), none of which has been previously reported in larger meta-analysis efforts to combine GWAS of European ancestry. Through conditional analysis, we also detected multiple distinct signals of association mapping to established loci for waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (RSPO3) and FG (GCK and G6PC2). The index variant for one association signal at the G6PC2 locus is a low-frequency coding allele, H177Y, which has recently been demonstrated to have a functional role in glucose regulation. Fine-mapping analyses revealed that the non-coding variants most likely to drive association signals at established and novel loci were enriched for overlap with enhancer elements, which for FG mapped to promoter and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic islets, in particular. Our study demonstrates that 1000G imputation and genetic fine-mapping of common and low-frequency variant association signals at GWAS loci, integrated with genomic annotation in relevant tissues, can provide insight into the functional and regulatory mechanisms through which their effects on glycaemic and obesity-related traits are mediated.

  16. Effects of diabetes self-management education on glycaemic control in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, A.A.; Lone, S.W.; Ibrahim, M.N.; Raza, J.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of diabetes self-management education (DSME) on glycaemic control (HbA1c) in Pakistani children suffering from type-1 diabetes mellitus. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted at the Diabetic OPD of National Institute of Child Health, Karachi, from April to September 2009. Methodology: Sixty children with a mean age of 9.94 years with type-1 Diabetes mellitus (T1DM) were selected conveniently from the diabetic OPD. The patients along with their parents/caregivers attended a modular series of diabetes self-management education program consisting of 2 sessions. Customized program was designed to educate children regarding general information about the disease, basic insulin therapy, planning for hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia, activity, traveling and basic nutritional management. It was conducted by a multidisciplinary paediatric diabetes team including an endocrinologist, general paediatrician, nutritionist and diabetic nurse. The educational sessions were followed by monthly revision exercises. HbA1c levels were measured at baseline and after 3 months and compared using paired sample t-test. Results: Out of a total of 60 patients, 50 completed the trial. There was a significant decrease in the HbA1c levels after the DSME program. The mean pre- and post intervention HbA1c levels were 9.67 +- 0.65 and 8.49 +- 0.53 respectively with a p-value < 0.001. Conclusion: In the studied group, DSME programs helped to improve glycaemic control. It should be an integral part of patient treatment in diabetic care setups. (author)

  17. Relapse after treatment of MAM: Should we be concerned? Are we using our resources well?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manary, Mark

    2014-01-01

    determine whether offering a sequence of health and nutrition support measures to children after they recover from MAM will reduce the number of poor outcomes in the months following their recovery. These interventions could help to prevent relapse and help to maintain a durable long-term recovery for children who have recovered from MAM. (author)

  18. Regional homogeneity changes between heroin relapse and non-relapse patients under methadone maintenance treatment: a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Haifeng; Li, Wei; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jiajie; Zhu, Jia; Ye, Jianjun; Liu, Jierong; Li, Zhe; Li, Yongbin; Shi, Ming; Wang, Yarong; Wang, Wei

    2016-08-18

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is recognized as one of the most effective treatments for heroin addiction but its effect is dimmed by the high incidence of heroin relapse. However, underlying neurobiology mechanism of heroin relapse under MMT is still largely unknown. Here, we took advantage of a resting-state fMRI technique by analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo), and tried to explore the difference of brain function between heroin relapsers and non-relapsers in MMT. Forty MMT patients were included and received a 12-month follow-up. All patients were given baseline resting-state fMRI scans by using a 3.0 T GE Signa Excite HD whole-body MRI system. Monthly self-report and urine test were used to assess heroin relapse or non-relapse. Subjective craving was measured with visual analog scale. The correlation between ReHo and the degree of heroin relapse was analyzed. Compared with the non-relapsers, ReHo values were increased in the bilateral medial orbitofrontal cortex, right caudate, and right cerebellum of the heroin relapsers while those in the left parahippocampal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, right lingual gyrus, and precuneus were decreased in heroin relapsers. Importantly, altered ReHo in the right caudate were positively correlated with heroin relapse rates or subjective craving response. Using the resting-state fMRI technique by analysis of ReHo, we provided the first resting-state fMRI evidence that right caudate may serve as a potential biomarker for heroin relapse prediction and also as a promising target for reducing relapse risk.

  19. Motives to quit smoking and reasons to relapse differ by socioeconomic status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pisinger, Charlotta; Aadahl, Mette; Toft, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    To investigate motives, strategies and experiences to quit smoking and reasons to relapse as a function of socioeconomic status.......To investigate motives, strategies and experiences to quit smoking and reasons to relapse as a function of socioeconomic status....

  20. Berberine blocks the relapse of Clostridium difficile infection in C57BL/6 mice after standard vancomycin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhi; Peng, Guoli; Liu, Weihua; Xu, Hufeng; Su, JianRong

    2015-07-01

    Vancomycin is a preferred antibiotic for treating Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and has been associated with a rate of recurrence of CDI of as high as 20% in treated patients. Recent studies have suggested that berberine, an alternative medical therapy for gastroenteritis and diarrhea, exhibits several beneficial effects, including induction of anti-inflammatory responses and restoration of the intestinal barrier function. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of berberine on preventing CDI relapse and restoring the gut microbiota in a mouse model. Berberine was administered through gavage to C57BL/6 mice with established CDI-induced intestinal injury and colitis. The disease activity index (DAI), mean relative weight, histopathology scores, and levels of toxins A and B in fecal samples were measured. An Illumina sequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA genes was used to determine the overall structural change in the microbiota in the mouse ileocecum. Berberine administration significantly promoted the restoration of the intestinal microbiota by inhibiting the expansion of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and counteracting the side effects of vancomycin treatment. Therapy consisting of vancomycin and berberine combined prevented weight loss, improved the DAI and the histopathology scores, and effectively decreased the mortality rate. Berberine prevented CDIs from relapsing and significantly improved survival in the mouse model of CDI. Our data indicate that a combination of berberine and vancomycin is more effective than vancomycin alone for treating CDI. One of the possible mechanisms by which berberine prevents a CDI relapse is through modulation of the gut microbiota. Although this conclusion was generated in the case of the mouse model, use of the combination of vancomycin and berberine and represent a novel therapeutic approach targeting CDI. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Enablers and barriers for women with gestational diabetes mellitus to achieve optimal glycaemic control - a qualitative study using the theoretical domains framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martis, Ruth; Brown, Julie; McAra-Couper, Judith; Crowther, Caroline A

    2018-04-11

    Glycaemic target recommendations vary widely between international professional organisations for women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Some studies have reported women's experiences of having GDM, but little is known how this relates to their glycaemic targets. The aim of this study was to identify enablers and barriers for women with GDM to achieve optimal glycaemic control. Women with GDM were recruited from two large, geographically different, hospitals in New Zealand to participate in a semi-structured interview to explore their views and experiences focusing on enablers and barriers to achieving optimal glycaemic control. Final thematic analysis was performed using the Theoretical Domains Framework. Sixty women participated in the study. Women reported a shift from their initial negative response to accepting their diagnosis but disliked the constant focus on numbers. Enablers and barriers were categorised into ten domains across the three study questions. Enablers included: the ability to attend group teaching sessions with family and hear from women who have had GDM; easy access to a diabetes dietitian with diet recommendations tailored to a woman's context including ethnic food and financial considerations; free capillary blood glucose (CBG) monitoring equipment, health shuttles to take women to appointments; child care when attending clinic appointments; and being taught CBG testing by a community pharmacist. Barriers included: lack of health information, teaching sessions, consultations, and food diaries in a woman's first language; long waiting times at clinic appointments; seeing a different health professional every clinic visit; inconsistent advice; no tailored physical activities assessments; not knowing where to access appropriate information on the internet; unsupportive partners, families, and workplaces; and unavailability of social media or support groups for women with GDM. Perceived judgement by others led some women only to share

  2. Use of iowa spaces for the orthodontic management of mandibular postsurgical skeletal relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Justus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been documented that there is a tendency for skeletal relapse after orthognathic surgery. This relapse occurs more often following mandibular bilateral sagittal split osteotomy setbacks. The possible causes for lack of postsurgical stability as well as the clinical recommendations to manage the relapse are presented. Among these recommendations is the creation of Iowa Spaces.

  3. Evaluation of post-surgical relapse after mandibular setback surgery with minimal orthodontic preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Ki; Kim, Young-Kyun; Yun, Pil-Young; Kim, Jong-Wan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate of the patterns of post-surgical relapse after mandibular setback surgery with minimal orthodontic preparation (MS-MO). The subjects consisted of 15 patients with minimal pre-surgical orthodontic preparation (1.37 ± 1.69 months). Lateral cephalograms were taken in pre-surgical (T0), post-surgical 1 month (T1) and immediately after debonding (T2) stages. To evaluate the surgical changes (T1-T0) and the relapse (T2-T1), the linear and angular measurements were analyzed using paired t-test. Pearson's correlation coefficients of the horizontal and vertical relapses of Pog and Me to other measurements were calculated. Pog or Me in T1 were displaced rotationally on Ar-Pog or Ar-Me lines in T2 to evaluate the remaining surgical relapse except the rotational relapse from total relapse. The mandible relapsed anteriorly 3.53 mm (Pog) and 4.00 mm (Me) and superiorly 2.72 mm (Pog) and 2.44 mm (Me). FH to Ar-Pog and FH to Ar-Me decreased by about 2°. Pure surgical relapses at Pog and Me, except rotational relapses, were about 0.5 mm anteriorly and inferiorly 0.8 mm. The vertical relapse might induce mandibular rotation with the horizontal relapse. For an accurate prediction after MS-MO, the rotational relapse might be considered. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. How do ex-offenders in the CWP contribute to violence prevention in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-08-03

    Aug 3, 2016 ... ... and reintegration have minimized their chances of relapsing into a life of crime. ... implementation of crime and violence prevention initiatives in the two communities. ... Using psychology to reduce violence in South Africa.

  5. [Pharmacotherapy for preventing calcium containing stone formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Masao; Takayama, Tatsuya; Mugiya, Souichi; Ohzono, Seiichiro

    2011-10-01

    Many urinary tract stones consist of calcium, and has high relapse rate. Accordingly, it is very important to prevent calcium-containing stone formation. This paper describes about effects and mechanisms for Xanthine oxidase inhibitor, citrate formulation, magnesium formulation, thiazides, vitamin B(6), extract of Quercus salicina Blume and chorei-to (medical herb) . Recent new drugs and the elucidation of new metabolic pathways may lead to the development of prevention of urolithiasis.

  6. Alkaline phosphatase expression during relapse after orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinandi Sri Pudyani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increasing of osteoblast activities during bone formation will be accompanied with the increasing expression of alkaline phosphatase enzyme (ALP. ALP can be obtained from clear fluid excreted by gingival crevicular fluid (GCF. Bone turnover, especially bone formation process, can be monitored through the expression of ALP secreted by GCF during orthodontic treatment. Thus, retention period is an important period that can be monitored through the level of bone metabolism around teeth. Purpose: This research were aimed to determine the relation of distance change caused by tooth relapse and ALP activities in gingival crevicular fluid after orthodontic; and to determine ALP as a potential biomarker of bone formation during retention period. Methods: Lower incisors of 25 guinea pigs were moved 3 mm to the distally by using open coil spring. Those relapse distance were measured and the gingival crevicular fluid was taken by using paper points to evaluate ALP levels on days 0, 3, 7, 14 and 21 respectivelly by using a spectrophotometer (405 nm. t-test and ANOVA test were conducted to determine the difference of ALP activities among the time intervals. The correlation regression analysis was conducted to determine the relation of distance change caused by the relapse tooth movement and ALP activities. Results: The greatest relapse movement was occurred on day 3 after open coil spring was removed. There was significant difference of the average of distance decrease among groups A1-A5 (p<0.05. It was also known that ALP level was increased on day 3, but there was no significant difference of the average level of ALP among groups A1-A5 (p>0.05. Finally, based on the results of correlation analysis between the ALP level decreasing and the relapse distance on both right and left of mesial and distal sides, it is known that there was no relation between those two variables (p>0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that relapse after orthodontic

  7. Therapeutic education among adults with type 2 diabetes: effects of a three-day intervention on perceived competence, self-management behaviours and glycaemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouilloud, David; Regnier, Jennifer

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a three-day therapeutic education programme on perceived competence, self-management behaviours (i.e. physical activity, diet and medication) and glycaemic control among adults with type 2 diabetes. A total of 120 participants were included in this randomized, wait list control group trial. The results confirm that therapeutic education may be a powerful healthcare intervention to improve lifestyle and health status of people with type 2 diabetes. We observed that the education programme used in this study generated positive changes in glycaemic control and adherence to physical activity and diet after three months follow-up. Furthermore, the intervention positively impacted participants' perceived competence towards physical activity and diet. The latter finding is of particular importance, given that perceived competence has been found to be involved in long-term adherence to self-management behaviours.

  8. Liraglutide as adjunct to insulin treatment in type 1 diabetes does not interfere with glycaemic recovery or gastric emptying rate during hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Christian S.; Dejgaard, Thomas F.; Andersen, Henrik U.

    2017-01-01

    significantly between groups (P =.96), with no significant changes from baseline, whether evaluated from AUCs or time to peak. The secondary endpoints, glycaemic recovery, counter-regulatory hormone responses, systolic blood pressure and GLP-1 and PP responses, were also similar. Heart rate increased...... 1.2 mg once daily or placebo as add-on to insulin treatment. Before and at end of treatment a hypoglycaemic clamp (plasma glucose target 2.5 mmol/L) was carried out, followed by a liquid meal. Primary endpoint was change in GE rate (evaluated by area under the paracetamol curve and time to peak......). Secondary endpoints included changes in glycaemic recovery, counter-regulatory hormones, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), GLP-1, blood pressure and heart rate. Results: During the period June 2013 to October 2014, 20 patients were enrolled. After 12 weeks of treatment, changes in GE rates did not differ...

  9. Liraglutide as adjunct to insulin treatment in type 1 diabetes does not interfere with glycaemic recovery or gastric emptying rate during hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Christian Seerup; Dejgaard, Thomas Fremming; Andersen, Henrik Ullits

    2017-01-01

    groups (p = 0.96), with no significant changes from baseline whether evaluated from AUCs or time to peak. The secondary endpoints: glycaemic recovery, counterregulatory hormone responses, systolic blood pressure and GLP-1 and PP responses were also similar. Heart rate increased with liraglutide from 69.......2 mg once daily or placebo as add-on to insulin treatment. Before and at end of treatment a hypoglycaemic clamp (plasma glucose target 2.5 mmol/l) was carried out followed by a liquid meal. Primary endpoint was change in GE rate (evaluated by area under the paracetamol curve and time to peak......). Secondary endpoints included changes in glycaemic recovery, counterregulatory hormones, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), GLP-1, blood pressure, and heart rate. RESULTS: During June 2013-October 2014, 20 patients were enrolled. After 12 weeks' treatment, changes in GE rates did not differ significantly between...

  10. Random blood glucose may be used to assess long-term glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a rural African clinical setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jon B; Nordin, Lovisa S; Rasmussen, Niclas S

    2014-01-01

    clinical review only. Other information obtained was age, sex, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, urine albumin-creatinine ratio, duration since diagnosis and medication. RESULTS: One hundred and one patients with DM (type 1 DM = 23, type 2 DM = 78) were included. Spearman's rank......OBJECTIVES: To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of random blood glucose (RBG) on good glycaemic control among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) in a rural African setting. METHODS: Cross-sectional study at St. Francis' Hospital in eastern Zambia. RBG and HbA1c were measured during one.......24-0.32, P AUC = 0.80, SE = 0.05), RBG ≤7.5 mmol/l was determined as the optimal cut-off value for good glycaemic control (HbA1c

  11. Intralesional rituximab in primary conjunctival follicular lymphoma relapsed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Villa, S; Ruiz Rodríguez, M J; Vargas Pabón, M

    2017-07-01

    A 49-year-old woman experienced a local relapse of a primary follicular lymphoma (FL) of the conjunctiva. She received 4 weekly intra-lesional injections followed by 6 monthly injections of rituximab (6mg/ml). A clinical response was achieved after first injection. No adverse ocular event or signs of lymphoma relapse were seen after 10 months of follow-up. Intralesional administration of rituximab for treating primary FL of the conjunctiva was an effective and safe therapeutic option; therefore it could be an alternative to other conventional treatments, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolving concepts in the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comi, Giancarlo; Radaelli, Marta; Soelberg Sørensen, Per

    2017-01-01

    In the past 20 years the treatment scenario of multiple sclerosis has radically changed. The increasing availability of effective disease-modifying therapies has shifted the aim of therapeutic interventions from a reduction in relapses and disability accrual, to the absence of any sign of clinical...... or MRI activity. The choice for therapy is increasingly complex and should be driven by an appropriate knowledge of the mechanisms of action of the different drugs and of their risk-benefit profile. Because the relapsing phase of the disease is characterised by inflammation, treatment should be started...... as early as possible and aim to re-establish the normal complex interactions in the immune system. Before starting a treatment, neurologists should carefully consider the state of the disease, its prognostic factors and comorbidities, the patient's response to previous treatments, and whether the patient...

  13. Pyrexia-associated Relapse in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Jun; Yoshimura, Hajime; Kohara, Nobuo

    2018-04-27

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy is a relapsing-remitting or chronic progressive demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. We report the case of a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy who experienced relapses on four occasions after experiencing pyrexia and flu-like symptoms. Our patient showed characteristic features, such as relapse after pyrexia and flu-like symptoms, remission after pyretolysis without treatment, and the absence of remarkable improvement in a nerve conduction study in the remission phase. The serum level of tumor necrosis factor-α was elevated in the relapse phase and reduced in the remission phase; thus, the induction of cytokine release by viral infection might have caused the relapses.

  14. Early life adversity influences stress response association with smoking relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al'Absi, Mustafa; Lemieux, Andrine; Westra, Ruth; Allen, Sharon

    2017-11-01

    We examined the hypothesis that stress-related blunting of cortisol in smokers is particularly pronounced in those with a history of severe life adversity. The two aims of this study were first to examine hormonal, craving, and withdrawal symptoms during ad libitum smoking and after the first 24 h of abstinence in smokers who experienced high or low levels of adversity. Second, we sought to examine the relationship between adversity and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) hormones to predict relapse during the first month of a smoking cessation attempt. Hormonal and self-report measures were collected from 103 smokers (49 women) during ad libitum smoking and after the first 24 h of abstinence. HPA hormones were measured during baseline rest and in response to acute stress in both conditions. All smokers were interested in smoking cessation, and we prospectively used stress response measures to predict relapse during the first 4 weeks of the smoking cessation attempt. The results showed that high adversity was associated with higher distress and smoking withdrawal symptoms. High level of early life adversity was associated with elevated HPA activity, which was found in both salivary and plasma cortisol. Enhanced adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stress response was evident in high-adversity but not in low-adversity relapsers. This study demonstrated that early life adversity is associated with stress-related HPA responses. The study also demonstrated that, among smokers who experienced a high level of life adversity, heightened ACTH and cortisol responses were linked with increased risk for smoking relapse.

  15. Carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone for relapsed multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, A Keith; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Masszi, Tamás; Špička, Ivan; Oriol, Albert; Hájek, Roman; Rosiñol, Laura; Siegel, David S; Mihaylov, Georgi G; Goranova-Marinova, Vesselina; Rajnics, Péter; Suvorov, Aleksandr; Niesvizky, Ruben; Jakubowiak, Andrzej J; San-Miguel, Jesus F; Ludwig, Heinz; Wang, Michael; Maisnar, Vladimír; Minarik, Jiri; Bensinger, William I; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Kukreti, Vishal; Zojwalla, Naseem; Tonda, Margaret E; Yang, Xinqun; Xing, Biao; Moreau, Philippe; Palumbo, Antonio

    2015-01-08

    Lenalidomide plus dexamethasone is a reference treatment for relapsed multiple myeloma. The combination of the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib with lenalidomide and dexamethasone has shown efficacy in a phase 1 and 2 study in relapsed multiple myeloma. We randomly assigned 792 patients with relapsed multiple myeloma to carfilzomib with lenalidomide and dexamethasone (carfilzomib group) or lenalidomide and dexamethasone alone (control group). The primary end point was progression-free survival. Progression-free survival was significantly improved with carfilzomib (median, 26.3 months, vs. 17.6 months in the control group; hazard ratio for progression or death, 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57 to 0.83; P=0.0001). The median overall survival was not reached in either group at the interim analysis. The Kaplan-Meier 24-month overall survival rates were 73.3% and 65.0% in the carfilzomib and control groups, respectively (hazard ratio for death, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.99; P=0.04). The rates of overall response (partial response or better) were 87.1% and 66.7% in the carfilzomib and control groups, respectively (P<0.001; 31.8% and 9.3% of patients in the respective groups had a complete response or better; 14.1% and 4.3% had a stringent complete response). Adverse events of grade 3 or higher were reported in 83.7% and 80.7% of patients in the carfilzomib and control groups, respectively; 15.3% and 17.7% of patients discontinued treatment owing to adverse events. Patients in the carfilzomib group reported superior health-related quality of life. In patients with relapsed multiple myeloma, the addition of carfilzomib to lenalidomide and dexamethasone resulted in significantly improved progression-free survival at the interim analysis and had a favorable risk-benefit profile. (Funded by Onyx Pharmaceuticals; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01080391.).

  16. Disentangling the roles of point-of-sale ban, tobacco retailer density and proximity on cessation and relapse among a cohort of smokers: findings from ITC Canada Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Nancy L; Lozano, Paula; Wu, Yun-Hsuan; Hardin, James W; Meng, Gang; Liese, Angela D; Fong, Geoffrey T; Thrasher, James F

    2018-03-08

    To examine how point-of-sale (POS) display bans, tobacco retailer density and tobacco retailer proximity were associated with smoking cessation and relapse in a cohort of smokers in Canada, where provincial POS bans were implemented differentially over time from 2004 to 2010. Data from the 2005 to 2011 administrations of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Canada Survey, a nationally representative cohort of adult smokers, were linked via residential geocoding with tobacco retailer data to derive for each smoker a measure of retailer density and proximity. An indicator variable identified whether the smoker's province banned POS displays at the time of the interview. Outcomes included cessation for at least 1 month at follow-up among smokers from the previous wave and relapse at follow-up among smokers who had quit at the previous wave. Logistic generalised estimating equation models were used to determine the relationship between living in a province with a POS display ban, tobacco retailer density and tobacco retailer proximity with cessation (n=4388) and relapse (n=866). Provincial POS display bans were not associated with cessation. In adjusted models, POS display bans were associated with lower odds of relapse which strengthened after adjusting for retailer density and proximity, although results were not statistically significant (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.41 to 1.07, p=0.089). Neither tobacco retailer density nor proximity was associated with cessation or relapse. Banning POS retail displays shows promise as an additional tool to prevent relapse, although these results need to be confirmed in larger longitudinal studies. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. The Effectiveness of Pharmacological and Non-Pharmacological Interventions for Improving Glycaemic Control in Adults with Severe Mental Illness: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Johanna; Stubbs, Brendon; Hewitt, Catherine; Ajjan, Ramzi A.; Alderson, Sarah L.; Gilbody, Simon; Holt, Richard I. G.; Hosali, Prakash; Hughes, Tom; Kayalackakom, Tarron; Kellar, Ian; Lewis, Helen; Mahmoodi, Neda; McDermid, Kirstine; Smith, Robert D.

    2017-01-01

    People with severe mental illness (SMI) have reduced life expectancy compared with the general population, which can be explained partly by their increased risk of diabetes. We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the clinical effectiveness of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for improving glycaemic control in people with SMI (PROSPERO registration: CRD42015015558). A systematic literature search was performed on 30/10/2015 to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs...

  18. Postprandial glycaemic and insulinaemic responses in adults after consumption of dairy desserts and pound cakes containing short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides used to replace sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecerf, J M; Clerc, E; Jaruga, A; Wagner, A; Respondek, F

    2015-01-01

    The present studies aimed to evaluate the glycaemic and insulinaemic responses, in healthy adults, to short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS) from sucrose used to replace sugars in foods. Two study populations aged 18-50 years were recruited and they consumed dairy desserts or pound cakes containing either standard sugar content or scFOS to replace 30 % of the sugar content. For each study, the two products were tested once under a double-blind and cross-over design with at least 7 d between the two tests. Glucose and insulin were measured using standard methods in blood samples collected with a venous catheter for 120 min during a kinetic test. For the dairy desserts, replacing 30 % of the sugars with scFOS significantly reduced postprandial glycaemic (AUC0-120 min; P = 0·020) and insulinaemic (AUC0-120 min; P = 0·003) responses. For the pound cakes, the glycaemic response was not altered (AUC0-120 min; P =  0·322) while the insulinaemic response tended to be lower (AUC0-120 min; P = 0·067). This study showed that scFOS can be used to replace sugars with the benefit of lowering the postprandial glycaemic response without increasing the insulinaemic response. The effect might be modulated by other parameters (e.g. fat content) of the food matrices.

  19. Digestive tolerance and postprandial glycaemic and insulinaemic responses after consumption of dairy desserts containing maltitol and fru