WorldWideScience

Sample records for preventing fuel vapor

  1. Fuel conditioning facility electrorefiner cadmium vapor trap operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    Processing sodium-bonded spent nuclear fuel at the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West involves an electrometallurgical process employing a molten LiCl-KCl salt covering a pool of molten cadmium. Previous research has shown that the cadmium dissolves in the salt as a gas, diffuses through the salt layer and vaporizes at the salt surface. This cadmium vapor condenses on cool surfaces, causing equipment operation and handling problems. Using a cadmium vapor trap to condense the cadmium vapors and reflux them back to the electrorefiner has mitigated equipment problems and improved electrorefiner operations

  2. 14 CFR 23.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents... Powerplant Fuel System § 23.975 Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. (a) Each fuel tank must be vented... vapor elimination connections and each fuel injection engine employing vapor return provisions must have...

  3. A Flash Vaporization System for Detonation of Hydrocarbon Fuels in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tucker, Kelly C

    2005-01-01

    ...) with low vapor pressure, kerosene based jet fuels. These fuels have a low vapor pressure and the performance of a liquid hydrocarbon fueled PDE is significantly hindered by the presence of fuel droplets...

  4. Vapor-fed bio-hybrid fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamin, Marcus S; Jahnke, Justin P; Mackie, David M

    2017-01-01

    Concentration and purification of ethanol and other biofuels from fermentations are energy-intensive processes, with amplified costs at smaller scales. To circumvent the need for these processes, and to potentially reduce transportation costs as well, we have previously investigated bio-hybrid fuel cells (FCs), in which a fermentation and FC are closely coupled. However, long-term operation requires strictly preventing the fermentation and FC from harming each other. We introduce here the concept of the vapor-fed bio-hybrid FC as a means of continuously extracting power from ongoing fermentations at ambient conditions. By bubbling a carrier gas (N 2 ) through a yeast fermentation and then through a direct ethanol FC, we protect the FC anode from the catalyst poisons in the fermentation (which are non-volatile), and also protect the yeast from harmful FC products (notably acetic acid) and from build-up of ethanol. Since vapor-fed direct ethanol FCs at ambient conditions have never been systematically characterized (in contrast to vapor-fed direct methanol FCs), we first assess the effects on output power and conversion efficiency of ethanol concentration, vapor flow rate, and FC voltage. The results fit a continuous stirred-tank reactor model. Over a wide range of ethanol partial pressures (2-8 mmHg), power densities are comparable to those for liquid-fed direct ethanol FCs at the same temperature, with power densities >2 mW/cm 2 obtained. We then demonstrate the continuous operation of a vapor-fed bio-hybrid FC with fermentation for 5 months, with no indication of performance degradation due to poisoning (of either the FC or the fermentation). It is further shown that the system is stable, recovering quickly from disturbances or from interruptions in maintenance. The vapor-fed bio-hybrid FC enables extraction of power from dilute bio-ethanol streams without costly concentration and purification steps. The concept should be scalable to both large and small

  5. Measurement and analysis of transient vaporization in oxide fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, D.A.; Bergeron, E.G.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes a series of experiments in which samples are heated to produce high vapor pressure states in times of 10 -6 to 10 -3 seconds. Experimental measurements of vapor pressures over fresh UO 2 from the pulsed electron beam and pulsed reactor heating tests are presented and compared with other high temperature data. The interpretation of the vapor pressure measured in the tests is discussed in detail. Effects of original sample stoichiometry, chemical interactions with the container and non-equilibrium evaporation due to induced temperature gradients are discussed. Special attention is given to dynamic behavior in rapid heating and vaporization of the oxide due to chemical non-equilibrium. Finally, similar projected reactor experiments on irradiated fuel are described and vapor pressure predictions made using available equilibrium models. A discussion of information accessible from such future tests and its importance is presented. (orig.) [de

  6. 14 CFR 25.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents... Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. (a) Fuel tank vents. Each fuel tank must be vented from the... hazard; or (ii) From which fumes could enter personnel compartments. (b) Carburetor vapor vents. Each...

  7. 14 CFR 29.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents... Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. (a) Fuel tank vents. Each fuel tank must be vented from the... during landing, ground operations, or a survivable impact. (b) Carburetor vapor vents. Each carburetor...

  8. PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF DIMETHYLAMINE VAPORS EMISSION: HERBICIDE PRODUCTION PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorana Arsenijević

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The widely used herbicide, dimethylamine salt of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D-DMA, is usually prepared by mixing a dimethylamine (DMA aqueous solution with a solid 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D. The vapors of the both, reactants and products, are potentially hazardous for the environment. The contribution of DMA vapors in overall pollution from this process is most significant, concerning vapor pressures data of these pollutants. Therefore, the control of the air pollution in the manufacture and handling of methylamines is very important. Within this paper, the optimal air pollution control system in preparation of 2,4-D-DMA was developed for the pesticides manufacturing industry. This study employed the simple pollution prevention concept to reduce the emission of DMA vapors at the source. The investigations were performed on the pilot plant scale. To reduce the emission of DMA vapors, the effluent gases from the herbicide preparation zone were passed through the packed bed scrubber (water - scrubbing medium, and the catalytic reactor in sequence. The end result is a substantially improved air quality in the working area, as well as in the urbanized areas located near the chemical plant.

  9. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: immunotoxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kimber L; Peachee, Vanessa L; Armstrong, Sarah R; Twerdok, Lorraine E; Clark, Charles R; Schreiner, Ceinwen A

    2014-11-01

    Female Sprague Dawley rats were exposed via inhalation to vapor condensates of either gasoline or gasoline combined with various fuel oxygenates to assess potential immunotoxicity of evaporative emissions. Test articles included vapor condensates prepared from "baseline gasoline" (BGVC), or gasoline combined with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA). Target concentrations were 0, 2000, 10,000 or 20,000mg/mg(3) administered for 6h/day, 5days/week for 4weeks. The antibody-forming cell (AFC) response to the T-dependent antigen, sheep erythrocyte (sRBC), was used to determine the effects of the gasoline vapor condensates on the humoral components of the immune system. Exposure to BGVC, G/MTBE, G/TAME, and G/TBA did not result in significant changes in the IgM AFC response to sRBC, when evaluated as either specific activity (AFC/10(6) spleen cells) or as total spleen activity (AFC/spleen). Exposure to G/EtOH and G/DIPE resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the AFC response, reaching the level of statistical significance only at the high 20,000mg/m(3) level. Exposure to G/ETBE resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the AFC response at the middle (10,000mg/m(3)) and high (20,000mg/m(3)) exposure concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: neurotoxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, James P; Daughtrey, Wayne C; Clark, Charles R; Schreiner, Ceinwen A; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed via inhalation to vapor condensates of either gasoline or gasoline combined with various fuel oxygenates to assess potential neurotoxicity of evaporative emissions. Test articles included vapor condensates prepared from "baseline gasoline" (BGVC), or gasoline combined with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA). Target concentrations were 0, 2000, 10,000 or 20,000mg/mg(3) and exposures were for 6h/day, 5days/week for 13weeks. The functional observation battery (FOB) with the addition of motor activity (MA) testing, hematoxylin and eosin staining of brain tissue sections, and brain regional analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were used to assess behavioral changes, traditional neuropathology and astrogliosis, respectively. FOB and MA data for all agents, except G/TBA, were negative. G/TBA behavioral effects resolved during recovery. Neuropathology was negative for all groups. Analyses of GFAP revealed increases in multiplebrain regions largely limited to males of the G/EtOH group, findings indicative of minor gliosis, most significantly in the cerebellum. Small changes (both increases and decreases) in GFAP were observed for other test agents but effects were not consistent across sex, brain region or exposure concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Analysis of Fuel Vaporization, Fuel-Air Mixing, and Combustion in Integrated Mixer-Flame Holders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deur, J. M.; Cline, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    Requirements to limit pollutant emissions from the gas turbine engines for the future High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) have led to consideration of various low-emission combustor concepts. One such concept is the Integrated Mixer-Flame Holder (IMFH). This report describes a series of IMFH analyses performed with KIVA-II, a multi-dimensional CFD code for problems involving sprays, turbulence, and combustion. To meet the needs of this study, KIVA-II's boundary condition and chemistry treatments are modified. The study itself examines the relationships between fuel vaporization, fuel-air mixing, and combustion. Parameters being considered include: mixer tube diameter, mixer tube length, mixer tube geometry (converging-diverging versus straight walls), air inlet velocity, air inlet swirl angle, secondary air injection (dilution holes), fuel injection velocity, fuel injection angle, number of fuel injection ports, fuel spray cone angle, and fuel droplet size. Cases are run with and without combustion to examine the variations in fuel-air mixing and potential for flashback due to the above parameters. The degree of fuel-air mixing is judged by comparing average, minimum, and maximum fuel/air ratios at the exit of the mixer tube, while flame stability is monitored by following the location of the flame front as the solution progresses from ignition to steady state. Results indicate that fuel-air mixing can be enhanced by a variety of means, the best being a combination of air inlet swirl and a converging-diverging mixer tube geometry. With the IMFH configuration utilized in the present study, flashback becomes more common as the mixer tube diameter is increased and is instigated by disturbances associated with the dilution hole flow.

  12. Experimental investigation of fuel evaporation in the vaporizing elements of combustion chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezhba, I.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of the experimental apparatus and the methods used in the investigation of the degree of fuel (kerosene) evaporation in two types of vaporizing elements in combustion chambers. The results are presented as dependences of the degree of fuel evaporation on the factors which characterize the functioning of the vaporizing elements: the air surplus coefficient, the velocity of flow and temperature of the air at the entrance to the vaporizing element and the temperature of the wall of the vaporizing element.

  13. VOC composition of current motor vehicle fuels and vapors, and collinearity analyses for receptor modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jo-Yu; Batterman, Stuart A

    2012-03-01

    The formulation of motor vehicle fuels can alter the magnitude and composition of evaporative and exhaust emissions occurring throughout the fuel cycle. Information regarding the volatile organic compound (VOC) composition of motor fuels other than gasoline is scarce, especially for bioethanol and biodiesel blends. This study examines the liquid and vapor (headspace) composition of four contemporary and commercially available fuels: gasoline (gasoline), ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), and B20 (20% soy-biodiesel and 80% ULSD). The composition of gasoline and E85 in both neat fuel and headspace vapor was dominated by aromatics and n-heptane. Despite its low gasoline content, E85 vapor contained higher concentrations of several VOCs than those in gasoline vapor, likely due to adjustments in its formulation. Temperature changes produced greater changes in the partial pressures of 17 VOCs in E85 than in gasoline, and large shifts in the VOC composition. B20 and ULSD were dominated by C(9) to C(16)n-alkanes and low levels of the aromatics, and the two fuels had similar headspace vapor composition and concentrations. While the headspace composition predicted using vapor-liquid equilibrium theory was closely correlated to measurements, E85 vapor concentrations were underpredicted. Based on variance decomposition analyses, gasoline and diesel fuels and their vapors VOC were distinct, but B20 and ULSD fuels and vapors were highly collinear. These results can be used to estimate fuel related emissions and exposures, particularly in receptor models that apportion emission sources, and the collinearity analysis suggests that gasoline- and diesel-related emissions can be distinguished. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Scoping studies of vapor behavior during a severe accident in a metal-fueled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.W.; Marchaterre, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Scoping calculations have been performed examining the consequences of fuel melting and pin failures for a reactivity-insertion type accident in a sodium-cooled, pool-type reactor fueled with a metal alloy fuel. The principal gas and vapor species released are shown to be Xe, Cs,and bond sodium contained within the fuel porosity. Fuel vapor pressure is insignificant, and there is no energetic fuel-coolant interaction for the conditions considered. Condensation of sodium vapor as it expands into the upper sodium pool in a jet mixing regime may occur as rapidly as the vapor emerges from the disrupted core (although reactor-material experiments are needed to confirm these high condensation rates). If the predictions of rapid direct-contact condensation can be verified experimentally for the sodium system, the implication is that the ability of vapor expansion to perform appreciable work on the system is largely eliminated. Furthermore, the ability of an expanding vapor bubble to transport fuel and fission product species to the cover gas region where they may be released to the containment is also largely eliminated. The radionuclide species except for fission gas are largely retained within the core and sodium pool

  15. Fossil Fuel Combustion Fingerprint in High-Resolution Urban Water Vapor Isotope Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, G.; Good, S. P.; Bowen, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing energy consumption and rapid urbanization have many important and poorly understood consequences for the hydrologic cycle in urban and suburban areas. Wide use of fossil fuels for transportation and heating releases isotopically distinctive water vapor that contributes to the overall water vapor budget in varying, usually unknown, concentrations. The use of long term, high resolution isotopic measurements can help determine different sources and proportions of water vapor at various time scales. We present two months of high-resolution water vapor isotope measurements coupled with CO2 concentrations and co-located meteorological observations from December 2013 - January 2014 in Salt Lake City, UT. Periods of atmospheric stagnation (cold-air inversions) show a buildup of CO2 from baseline values of 420 ppm to as high as 600 ppm and an associated decrease in water vapor deuterium-excess values from a baseline of approx. 10‰ to values as low as -10‰ (where d = δ2H - 8*δ18O, in per mil units). We suggest that the strong relationship between CO2and d during inversion periods is driven by the build-up of fossil fuel combustion-derived water vapor with very low d values (≤ -150‰). Based on our measurements of its isotopic composition, combustion-derived water vapor could contribute as much as 15% to the total water vapor budget during inversion periods. We present evidence of this effect at both the multi-day scale and the diurnal scale, where periods of increased automobile use and home heating can be identified. This study provides the first isotopic evidence that accumulation of water of combustion can be identified in boundary layer water vapor, suggests that an appreciable fraction of boundary layer vapor can be derived from combustion under certain atmospheric conditions, and indicates that the distinctive d values of combustion-derived vapor may be a useful tracer for this component of the atmospheric water budget in other urban regions.

  16. Physical and mathematical modeling of diesel fuel liquid and vapor movement in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.E.; Kreamer, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional physical modeling of diesel fuel leaks was conducted in sand tanks to determine liquid and vapor migration characteristics. Mathematical modeling provided estimation of vapor concentrations at discrete times and distances from the vapor source and was compared to the physical experiment. The mathematical gaseous diffusion model was analogous to the Theis equation for ground-water flow, accounted for sorptive effects of the media, and was calibrated using measured concentrations from the sand tank. Mathematically different positions of the vapor source were tested to better relate observed liquid flow rates and media configuration to gaseous concentrations. The calculated diffusion parameters were then used to estimate theoretical, three-dimensional vapor transport from a hypothetical liquid leak of 2.0 1/hr for 30 days. The associated three-dimensional vapor plume, which would be reasonably detectable by commercially available vadose zone monitors, was estimated to have a diameter of 8 m with a vapor concentration of 50 ppm at the outside edge of the vapor plume. A careful application of the method and values can be used to give a first approximation to the number of vapor monitors required at a field site as well as the optimal locations for the monitors

  17. Formulation and analyses of vaporization and diffusion-controlled combustion of fuel sprays

    OpenAIRE

    Arrieta Sanagustín, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the modelling of vaporization and combustion of sprays. A general two-continua formulation is given for the numerical computation of spray flows, including the treatment of the droplets as homogenized sources. Group combustion is considered, with the reaction between the fuel coming from the vaporizing droplets and the oxygen of the air modeled in the Burke-Schumann limit of infinitely fast chemical reaction, with nonunity Lewis numbers allowed for the different r...

  18. Quantifying liquid boundary and vapor distributions in a fuel spray by rainbow schlieren deflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber Wanstall, C; Agrawal, Ajay K; Bittle, Joshua A

    2017-10-20

    The rainbow schlieren deflectometry (RSD) technique is used to determine the liquid boundary and the fuel volume fraction distributions in the vapor region of a high-pressure fuel spray. Experiments were conducted in a constant pressure flow vessel, whereby a customized single-hole common-rail diesel injector is used to introduce n-heptane fuel into a coflow of low-speed ambient air at two different test conditions. Only the quasi-steady period of the fuel spray is considered, and multiple injections are performed to acquire statistically significant data at an image acquisition rate of 20 kHz. An algorithm to identify the liquid boundary using intensity recorded by the RSD images is presented. The results are compared against measurements obtained by the Mie scattering technique. Results demonstrate that the RSD can be a powerful optical diagnostics technique to simultaneously quantify both the vapor and liquid regions in the high-pressure fuel sprays.

  19. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: generation and characterization of test materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Michael; Letinski, Daniel J; Carr, John; Caro, Mario L; Daughtrey, Wayne; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    In compliance with the Clean Air Act regulations for fuel and fuel additive registration, the petroleum industry, additive manufacturers, and oxygenate manufacturers have conducted comparative toxicology testing on evaporative emissions of gasoline alone and gasoline containing fuel oxygenates. To mimic real world exposures, a generation method was developed that produced test material similar in composition to the re-fueling vapor from an automotive fuel tank at near maximum in-use temperatures. Gasoline vapor was generated by a single-step distillation from a 1000-gallon glass-lined kettle wherein approximately 15-23% of the starting material was slowly vaporized, separated, condensed and recovered as test article. This fraction was termed vapor condensate (VC) and was prepared for each of the seven test materials, namely: baseline gasoline alone (BGVC), or gasoline plus an ether (G/MTBE, G/ETBE, G/TAME, or G/DIPE), or gasoline plus an alcohol (G/EtOH or G/TBA). The VC test articles were used for the inhalation toxicology studies described in the accompanying series of papers in this journal. These studies included evaluations of subchronic toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Results of these studies will be used for comparative risk assessments of gasoline and gasoline/oxygenate blends by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Hydrocarbon Fuel Flash Vaporization System for a Pulsed Detonation Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    and octane number were tested: n-heptane, isooctane , aviation gasoline, and JP-8. Results showed the FVS quickly provides a detonable mixture for all...fuel temperatures between 393 K and 533 K. The products from these reactions cause carbon particulates7 and carbonaceous deposits on metal surfaces in...tested. Table 1. Fuel vapor pressures (kPa) at various temperatures: from Refs. 12 and 13. Temperature (°C) isooctane n-heptane

  1. Determination of Vaporization Properties and Volatile Hazardous Components Relevant to Kukersite Oil Shale Derived Fuel Oil Handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada TRAUMANN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate vaporization properties of shale fuel oil in relation to inhalation exposure. The shale fuel oil was obtained from kukersite oil shale. The shale oil and its light fraction (5 % of the total fuel oil were characterized by vapor pressure curve, molecular weight distribution, elemental composition and functional groups based on FTIR spectra. The rate of vaporization from the total fuel oil at different temperatures was monitored as a function of time using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. It is shown that despite its relatively low vapor pressure at room temperature a remarkable amount of oil vaporizes influencing air quality significantly. From the TGA data the changes in the vapor pressure during vaporization process were estimated. Although the shale fuel oil has a strong, unpleasant smell, the main hazards to workplace air quality depend on the vaporization rate of different toxic compounds, such as benzene, toluene, xylene or phenolic compounds. The presence of these hazardous substances in the vapor phase of shale fuel oil was monitored using headspace analysis coupled with selective ion monitoring (SIM and confirmed by the NIST Mass Spectral library and retention times of standards. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4549

  2. Evaluation of FIDC system. [fuel vapor injector/ogniter and lean limit controller for automobile engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R. A.; Dowdy, M. W.; Price, T. W.

    1978-01-01

    A fuel vapor injector/igniter system was evaluated for its effect on automobile engine performance, fuel economy, and exhaust emissions. Improved fuel economy and emissions, found during the single cylinder tests were not realized with a multicylinder engine. Multicylinder engine tests were conducted to compare the system with both a stock and modified stock configuration. A comparison of cylinder-to-cylinder equivalence ratio distribution was also obtained from the multicylinder engine tests. The multicylinder engine was installed in a vehicle was tested on a chassis dynamometer to compare the system with stock and modified stock configurations. The fuel vapor injector/igniter system (FIDC) configuration demonstrated approximately five percent improved fuel economy over the stock configuration, but the modified stock configuration demonstrated approximately twelve percent improved fuel economy. The hydrocarbon emissions were approximately two-hundred-thirty percent higher with the FIDC system than with the stock configuration. Both the FIDC system and the modified stock configuration adversely affected driveability. The FIDC system demonstrated a modest fuel savings, but with the penalty of increased emissions, and loss of driveability.

  3. Fuel Evaporation in an Atmospheric Premixed Burner: Sensitivity Analysis and Spray Vaporization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dávid Csemány

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Calculation of evaporation requires accurate thermophysical properties of the liquid. Such data are well-known for conventional fossil fuels. In contrast, e.g., thermal conductivity or dynamic viscosity of the fuel vapor are rarely available for modern liquid fuels. To overcome this problem, molecular models can be used. Currently, the measurement-based properties of n-heptane and diesel oil are compared with estimated values, using the state-of-the-art molecular models to derive the temperature-dependent material properties. Then their effect on droplet evaporation was evaluated. The critical parameters were liquid density, latent heat of vaporization, boiling temperature, and vapor thermal conductivity where the estimation affected the evaporation time notably. Besides a general sensitivity analysis, evaporation modeling in a practical burner ended up with similar results. By calculating droplet motion, the evaporation number, the evaporation-to-residence time ratio can be derived. An empirical cumulative distribution function is used for the spray of the analyzed burner to evaluate evaporation in the mixing tube. Evaporation number did not exceed 0.4, meaning a full evaporation prior to reaching the burner lip in all cases. As droplet inertia depends upon its size, the residence time has a minimum value due to the phenomenon of overshooting.

  4. Vapor feed direct methanol fuel cells with passive thermal-fluids management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen; Faghri, Amir

    The present paper describes a novel technology that can be used to manage methanol and water in miniature direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) without the need for a complex micro-fluidics subsystem. At the core of this new technology is a unique passive fuel delivery system that allows for fuel delivery at an adjustable rate from a reservoir to the anode. Furthermore, the fuel cell is designed for both passive water management and effective carbon dioxide removal. The innovative thermal management mechanism is the key for effective operation of the fuel cell system. The vapor feed DMFC reached a power density of 16.5 mW cm -2 at current density of 60 mA cm -2. A series of fuel cell prototypes in the 0.5 W range have been successfully developed. The prototypes have demonstrated long-term stable operation, easy fuel delivery control and are scalable to larger power systems. A two-cell stack has successfully operated for 6 months with negligible degradation.

  5. Preconditioning of the YSZ-NiO Fuel Cell Anode in Hydrogenous Atmospheres Containing Water Vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyliv, Bogdan; Podhurska, Viktoriya; Ostash, Orest

    2017-12-01

    The YSZ-NiO ceramics for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) anode have been investigated. A series of specimens were singly reduced in a hydrogenous atmosphere (Ar-5 vol% H 2 mixture) at 600 °C under the pressure of 0.15 MPa or subjected to 'reduction in the mixture-oxidation in air' (redox) cycling at 600 °C. The YSZ-Ni cermets formed in both treatment conditions were then aged in 'water vapor in Ar-5 vol% H 2 mixture' atmosphere at 600 °C under the pressure of 0.15 MPa. Additionally, the behaviour of the as-received material in this atmosphere was studied. It was revealed that small amount of water vapor in Ar-5 vol% H 2 mixture (water vapor pressure below 0.03 MPa) does not affect the reduction of the nickel phase in the YSZ-NiO ceramics, but causes some changes in the YSZ-Ni cermet structure. In particular, nanopore growth in tiny Ni particles takes place. At higher concentration of water vapor in the mixture (water vapor pressure above 0.03-0.05 MPa), converse changes in the kinetics of reduction occur. The best physical and mechanical properties were revealed for the material treated by redox cycling after holding at 600 °C in water depleted gas mixture. The dual effect of water vapor on nickel-zirconia anode behaviour is discussed basing on scanning electron microscopy analysis data, material electrical conductivity, and strength.

  6. Modeling of fuel vapor jet eruption induced by local droplet heating

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2014-01-10

    The evaporation of a droplet by non-uniform heating is numerically investigated in order to understand the mechanism of the fuel-vapor jet eruption observed in the flame spread of a droplet array under microgravity condition. The phenomenon was believed to be mainly responsible for the enhanced flame spread rate through a droplet cloud at microgravity conditions. A modified Eulerian-Lagrangian method with a local phase change model is utilized to describe the interfacial dynamics between liquid droplet and surrounding air. It is found that the localized heating creates a temperature gradient along the droplet surface, induces the corresponding surface tension gradient, and thus develops an inner flow circulation commonly referred to as the Marangoni convection. Furthermore, the effect also produces a strong shear flow around the droplet surface, thereby pushing the fuel vapor toward the wake region of the droplet to form a vapor jet eruption. A parametric study clearly demonstrated that at realistic droplet combustion conditions the Marangoni effect is indeed responsible for the observed phenomena, in contrast to the results based on constant surface tension approximation

  7. Vapor pressures of oxide reactor fuels above 3000 K: Review and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitung, W.

    1982-03-01

    Vapor pressures of liquid oxide reactor fuels are among the most important material data required for theoretical analyses of Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents in Fast Breeder Reactors. This report is an attempt to completely summarize and critically review the numerous theoretical and experimental results published for the pressure-temperature and pressure-energy relation of unirradiated UO 2 and (U,Pu)O 2 . First - to define the research goal - the precision in the saturation vapor pressure is quantified which is required for the purpose of HCDA calculations. Then the various theoretical and experimental methods used for the determination of p-T and p-U data are reviewed with respect to their principles, results and uncertainties. The achievements of the individual methods are discussed in the light of the research goal and - in view of the widely scattered data - recommendations are made concerning the p-T and p-U relation of UO 2 . Finally, the most important future research areas are identified, including some specific research proposals which aim at reducing the still large uncertainties in fuel vapor pressures down to the desired level. (orig.) [de

  8. Fuel cell membranes and crossover prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I [Champaign, IL; York, Cynthia A [Newington, CT; Waszczuk, Piotr [White Bear Lake, MN; Wieckowski, Andrzej [Champaign, IL

    2009-08-04

    A membrane electrode assembly for use with a direct organic fuel cell containing a formic acid fuel includes a solid polymer electrolyte having first and second surfaces, an anode on the first surface and a cathode on the second surface and electrically linked to the anode. The solid polymer electrolyte has a thickness t:.gtoreq..times..times..times..times. ##EQU00001## where C.sub.f is the formic acid fuel concentration over the anode, D.sub.f is the effective diffusivity of the fuel in the solid polymer electrolyte, K.sub.f is the equilibrium constant for partition coefficient for the fuel into the solid polymer electrolyte membrane, I is Faraday's constant n.sub.f is the number of electrons released when 1 molecule of the fuel is oxidized, and j.sub.f.sup.c is an empirically determined crossover rate of fuel above which the fuel cell does not operate.

  9. Development and application of capacitor discharge vaporization technique for fuel aerosol studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, M.J.; Kress, T.S.; Parker, G.W.; Rochelle, J.M.; Fontana, M.H.

    1976-01-01

    Investigations into the behavior of LMFBR fuel as it responds to the levels of energy deposition projected for prompt-critical excursions have been limited because of the difficulty of experimentally achieving the resultant high thermodynamic states in a laboratory. In order to conduct ''source-term'' assessment and fuel aerosol behavioral experiments, the Aerosol Release and Transport program at ORNL has been developing a Capacitor Discharge Vaporization (CDV) technique for using electrical energy, via the discharge from capacitors, to achieve HCDA-like energy state in UO 2 . The paper reports the details of the technique, the developmental test results that have demonstrated feasibility, and a brief description of the proposed experiments that will use the CDV system for safety related studies

  10. Partitioning of fission products from irradiated nitride fuel using inductive vaporization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbina, N.; Kulik, D.A.; Kivel, N.; Potthast, H.D.; Guenther-Leopold, I. [Paul Scherrer Institut - PSI, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01

    Irradiated nitride fuel (Pu{sub 0.3}Zr{sub 0.7})N fabricated at PSI in frame of the CONFIRM project and having a burn-up of 10.4 % FIMA (Fission per Initial Metal Atom) has been investigated by means of inductive vaporization. The study of thermal stability and release behavior of Pu, Am, Zr and fission products (FPs) was performed in a wide temperature range (up to 2300 C. degrees) and on different redox conditions. On-line monitoring by ICP-MS detected low nitride stability and significant loss of Pu and Am at T>1900 C. degrees during annealing under inert atmosphere (Ar). The oxidative pre-treatment of nitride fuel on air at 1000 C. degrees resulted in strong retention of Pu and Am in the solid, as well as of most FPs. Thermodynamic modelling of elemental speciation using GEM-Selektor v.3 code (Gibbs Energy Minimization Selektor), supported by a comprehensive literature review on thermodynamics of actinides and FPs, revealed a number of binary compounds of Cs, Mo, Te, Sr and Ba to occur in the solid. Speciation of some FPs in the fuel is discussed and compared to earlier results of electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Predominant vapor species predicted by GEM-Selektor calculations were Pu(g), Am(g) and N{sub 2}. Nitrogen can be completely released from the fuel after complete oxidation at 1000 C. degrees. With regard to the irradiated nitride reprocessing technology, this result can have an important practical application as an alternative way for {sup 15}N recovery. (authors)

  11. A Characterization Of Alcohol Fuel Vapor For Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy Applied To Microgravity Flame Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Perry, David S.; Miller, Fletcher; Piltch, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    A diode laser diagnostic is being developed for use in an ongoing investigation of flame spread in microgravity at NASA Glenn Research Center. Flame spread rates through non-homogenous gas mixtures are significantly different in a microgravity environment because of buoyancy and possibly hydrostatic pressure effects. These effects contribute to the fuel vapor concentration ahead of the flame being altered so that flame spread is more rapid in microgravity. This paper describes spectral transmission measurements made through mixtures of alcohol, water vapor, and nitrogen in a gas cell that was designed and built to allow measurements at temperatures up to 500 C. The alcohols considered are methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol. The basic technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy for gas species measurements in microgravity was developed by Silver et al. For this technique to be applicable, one must carefully choose the spectral features over which the diode laser is modulated to provide good sensitivity and minimize interference from other molecular lines such as those in water. Because the methanol spectrum was not known with sufficient resolution in the wavelength region of interest, our first task was to perform high-resolution transmission measurements with an FTIR spectrometer for methanol vapor in nitrogen, followed recently by ethanol and n-propanol. A computer program was written to generate synthesized data to mimic that expected from the experiment using the laser diode, and results from that simulation are also presented.

  12. A computational study of droplet evaporation with fuel vapor jet ejection induced by localized heat sources

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-05-12

    Droplet evaporation by a localized heat source under microgravity conditions was numerically investigated in an attempt to understand the mechanism of the fuel vapor jet ejection, which was observed experimentally during the flame spread through a droplet array. An Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a local phase change model in order to effectively capture the interfacial dynamics between liquid droplet and surrounding air. It was found that the surface tension gradient caused by the temperature variation within the droplet creates a thermo-capillary effect, known as the Marangoni effect, creating an internal flow circulation and outer shear flow which drives the fuel vapor into a tail jet. A parametric study demonstrated that the Marangoni effect is indeed significant at realistic droplet combustion conditions, resulting in a higher evaporation constant. A modified Marangoni number was derived in order to represent the surface force characteristics. The results at different pressure conditions indicated that the nonmonotonic response of the evaporation rate to pressure may also be attributed to the Marangoni effect.

  13. Analysis of effect of flameholder characteristics on lean, premixed, partially vaporized fuel-air mixtures quality and nitrogen oxides emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis was conducted of the effect of flameholding devices on the precombustion fuel-air characteristics and on oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for combustion of premixed partially vaporized mixtures. The analysis includes the interrelationships of flameholder droplet collection efficiency, reatomization efficiency and blockage, and the initial droplet size distribution and accounts for the contribution of droplet combustion in partially vaporized mixtures to NOx emissions. Application of the analytical procedures is illustrated and parametric predictions of NOx emissions are presented.

  14. Vapor Delivery Systems for the Study of the Effects of Reformate Gas Impurities in HT-PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2011-01-01

    on a pump and electrically heated evaporator was found to be more suitable for the typical flow rates involved in the anode feed of an H3PO4/PBI based HT-PEMFC unit cell assembly. Test stations composed of vapor delivery systems and mass flow controllers for testing the effects of methanol slip, water vapor......, impurities in the reformate gas produced from methanol steam reforming can affect the performance and durability of fuel cells. In this paper different vapor delivery systems, intended to assist in the study of the effects of some of the impurities, are described and compared with each other. A system based...

  15. Prevention of nuclear fuel cladding materials corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, K.R.; Yang, J.C.; Lee, I.C.; Kang, H.D.; Cho, S.W.; Whang, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    The only way which could be performed by the operator of nuclear power plant to minimizing the degradation of nuclear fuel cladding material is to control the water quality of primary coolant as specified standard conditions which dose not attack the cladding material. If the water quality of reactor coolant does not meet far from the specification, the failure will occure not only cladding material itself but construction material of primary system which contact with the coolant. The corrosion product of system material are circulate through the whole primary system with the coolant and activated by the neutron near the reactor core. The activated corrosion products and fission products which released from fuel rod to the coolant, so called crud, will repeate deposition and redeposition continuously on the fuel rod and construction material surface. As a result we should consider heat transfer problem. In this study following activities were performed; 1. The crud sample was taken from the spent fuel rod surface of Kori unit one and analized for radioactive element and non radioactive chemical species. 2. The failure mode of nuclear fuel cladding material was estimated by the investigation of releasing type of fission products from the fuel rod to the reactor coolant using the iodine isotopes concentration of reactor coolants. 3. A study was carried out on the sipping test results of spent fuel and a discussion was made on the water quality control records through the past three cycle operation period of Kori unit one plant. (Author)

  16. Fuel-Cell Structure Prevents Membrane Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, J.

    1986-01-01

    Embossed plates direct flows of reactants and coolant. Membrane-type fuel-cell battery has improved reactant flow and heat removal. Compact, lightweight battery produces high current and power without drying of membranes.

  17. On the interpretation of vapor pressure measurements on oxide fuel at very-high temperatures for fast reactor safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bober, M.; Breitung, W.; Karow, H.U.; Schretzmann, K.

    1976-01-01

    Safety analysis of fast reactors requires knowledge of the evaporation behavior and the total vapor pressure of oxide fuel materials in the temperature region from 3000 K upwards. Dynamic vapor pressure measurements on liquid oxide fuels performed in open-evaporation experiments with laser heating techniques imply strong alterations in the composition of the incongruently evaporating fuel surface, since, during evaporation, the depletion in the preferentially evaporating components cannot be resupplied by diffusion from the bulk material. After a short transient evaporation period stationary surface-evaporation is reached with a surface composition which differs greatly from the given fuel composition and depends on the actual evaporation temperature. When this stationary forced-congruent evaporation mode is reached, the gross vapor composition is well-defined and is identical to the bulk composition of the fuel but is quite different from the actual surface composition. In consequence, the total vapor pressure developing in open surface-evaporation of a liquid oxide fuel can substantially deviate from its thermodynamic equation-of-state, in the case of (Usub(0.80)Pusub(0.20)) mixed oxide by a factor of 2 to 7 depending on the O/M-ratio. Following these thermodynamic calculations direct measurement of the equation-of-state in open-evaporation experiments is practically impossible. Theoretically fitted expressions applicable in reactor safety analysis are presented for the equations-of-state and the vapor pressure equations for open surface-evaporation and also for the heats of evaporation of liquid (Usub(0.80)Pusub(0.20)) 0sub(1.95...2.00) mixed oxides. (Auth.)

  18. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: subchronic inhalation toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charles R; Schreiner, Ceinwen A; Parker, Craig M; Gray, Thomas M; Hoffman, Gary M

    2014-11-01

    Sprague Dawley rats were exposed via inhalation to vapor condensates of either gasoline or gasoline combined with various fuel oxygenates to assess whether their use in gasoline influences the hazard of evaporative emissions. Test substances included vapor condensates prepared from an EPA described "baseline gasoline" (BGVC), or gasoline combined with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA). Target concentrations were 0, 2000, 10,000 or 20,000mg/m(3) and exposures were for 6h/day, 5days/week for 13weeks. A portion of the animals were maintained for a four week recovery period to determine the reversibility of potential adverse effects. Increased kidney weight and light hydrocarbon nephropathy (LHN) were observed in treated male rats in all studies which were reversible or nearly reversible after 4weeks recovery. LHN is unique to male rats and is not relevant to human toxicity. The no observed effect level (NOAEL) in all studies was 10,000mg/m(3), except for G/MTBE (gasoline alone. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigating the effects of methanol-water vapor mixture on a PBI-based high temperature PEM fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Nielsen, Heidi Venstrup

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of methanol and water vapor on the performance of a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC). A H3PO4-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane electrode assembly (MEA), Celtec P2100 of 45 cm2 of active surface area from BASF was employed...

  20. Impedance characterization of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack under the influence of carbon monoxide and methanol vapor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Christian; Polverino, Pierpaolo; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a comprehensive mapping of electrochemical impedance measurements under the influence of CO and methanol vapor contamination of the anode gas in a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell, at varying load current. Electrical equivalent circuit model parameters based ...

  1. Prevention of criticality accidents. Fuel elements storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canavese, S.I.; Capadona, N.M.

    1990-01-01

    Before the need to store fuel elements of the plate type MTR (Materials Testing Reactors), produced with enriched uranium at 20% in U235 for research reactors, it requires the design of a deposit for this purpose, which will give intrinsic security at a great extent and no complaints regarding its construction, is required. (Author) [es

  2. Study of SI engine fueled with methanol vapor and dissociation gas based on exhaust heat dissociating methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Jianqin; Deng, Banglin; Liu, Jingping; Wang, Linjun; Xu, Zhengxin; Yang, Jing; Shu, Gequn

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The full load power decreases successively from gasoline engine, methanol vapor engine to dissociated methanol engine. • Both power and thermal efficiency of dissociated methanol engine can be improved by boosting pressure. • The conversion efficiency of recovered exhaust gas energy is largely influenced by the BMEP. • At the same BMEP, dissociated methanol engine has higher thermal efficiency than methanol vapor engine and gasoline engine. - Abstract: To improve the fuel efficiency of internal combustion (IC) engine and also achieve the goal of direct usage of methanol fuel on IC engine, an approach of exhaust heat dissociating methanol was investigated, which is a kind of method for IC engine exhaust heat recovery (EHR). A bottom cycle system is coupled with the IC engine exhaust system, which uses the exhaust heat to evaporate and dissociate methanol in its catalytic cracker. The methanol dissociation gas (including methanol vapor) is used as the fuel for IC engine. This approach was applied to both naturally aspirated (NA) engine and turbocharged engine, and the engine performance parameters were predicted by the software GT-power under various kinds of operating conditions. The improvement to IC engine performance and the conversion efficiency of recovered exhaust gas energy can be evaluated by comparing the performances of IC engine fueled with various kinds of fuels (or their compositions). Results show that, from gasoline engine, methanol vapor engine to dissociated methanol engine, the full load power decreases successively in the entire speed area due to the declining of volumetric efficiency, while it is contrary in the thermal efficiency at the same brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) level because of the improving of fuel heating value. With the increase of BMEP, the conversion efficiency of recovered exhaust gas energy is promoted. All those results indicate that the approach of exhaust heat dissociating methanol has large

  3. Petroleum Vapor Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    One type of vapor intrusion is PVI, in which vapors from petroleum hydrocarbons such as gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel enter a building. Intrusion of contaminant vapors into indoor spaces is of concern.

  4. Effect of pervaporation plate thickness on the rate of methanol evaporation in a passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi, N. F. I.; Hasran, U. A.; Kamarudin, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    In a passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), methanol vapor is typically obtained using a pervaporation plate in a process by which liquid methanol contained in the fuel reservoir undergoes a phase change to vapor in the anodic vapor chamber. This work investigates the effect of pervaporation plate thickness on the rate of methanol evaporation using a three-dimensional simulation model developed by varying the plate thickness. A. The rate of methanol evaporation was measured using Darcy's law. The rate of methanol evaporation was found to be inversely proportional to the plate thickness, where the decrease in thickness inevitably lowers the resistance along the plate and consequently increases the methanol transport through the plate. This shows that the plate thickness has a significant influence on the rate of methanol evaporation and thereby plays an important role in improving the performance of the passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell.

  5. Effect of pervaporation plate thickness on the rate of methanol evaporation in a passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauzi, N F I; Hasran, U A; Kamarudin, S K

    2015-01-01

    In a passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), methanol vapor is typically obtained using a pervaporation plate in a process by which liquid methanol contained in the fuel reservoir undergoes a phase change to vapor in the anodic vapor chamber. This work investigates the effect of pervaporation plate thickness on the rate of methanol evaporation using a three-dimensional simulation model developed by varying the plate thickness. A. The rate of methanol evaporation was measured using Darcy's law. The rate of methanol evaporation was found to be inversely proportional to the plate thickness, where the decrease in thickness inevitably lowers the resistance along the plate and consequently increases the methanol transport through the plate. This shows that the plate thickness has a significant influence on the rate of methanol evaporation and thereby plays an important role in improving the performance of the passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell. (paper)

  6. Investigation of air cleaning processes for removing tributyl phosphate vapors from fuel reprocessing off-gas streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, G.B.; Schwendiman, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    Tributyl phosphate (TBP) is used as an extractant in combination with the solvent dodecane in the dissolution process in a conventional nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. When recycled acid is used in the process, the dissolver off-gas (DOG) may contain small amounts of TBP and dodecane vapor. The vessel off-gas (VOG) will also contain TBP vapors in even higher fractions. Under some conditions, TBP vapor in these gas streams adversely affects the performance of silver-loaded solid sorbent beds used in the treatment of these streams to remove iodine and organic iodide compounds. An investigation is reported of the use of inorganic solid sorbent beds located upstream of the silver-loaded sorbent beds to remove TBP and extend the useful life of the silver beds. Laboratory scale experiments have been conducted using selected inorganic solid sorbent materials which have specific properties indicating their effectiveness for removing TBP or similar organic compounds. Results indicated 4 inorganic materials would retain greater than 95% of inlet TBP over a 3-hour run time. These four materials are being tested in a small packed glass column arrangement using variations in TBP concentration, face velocity and column temperature. As a part of this work, a sensitive quantitative analysis technique was developed enabling continous real time analysis of TBP vapor concentrations, as low as 1 x 10 -7 g/l, so that breakthrough progression can be measured

  7. Numerical Simulations of High Reactivity Gasoline Fuel Sprays under Vaporizing and Reactive Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Mohan, Balaji

    2018-04-03

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines are becoming more popular alternative for conventional spark engines to harvest the advantage of high volatility. Recent experimental study demonstrated that high reactivity gasoline fuel can be operated in a conventional mixing controlled combustion mode producing lower soot emissions than that of diesel fuel under similar efficiency and NOx level [1]. Therefore, there is much interest in using gasoline-like fuels in compression ignition engines. In order to improve the fidelity of simulation-based GCI combustion system development, it is mandatory to enhance the prediction of spray combustion of gasoline-like fuels. The purpose of this study is to model the spray characteristics of high reactivity gasoline fuels and validate the models with experimental results obtained through an optically accessible constant volume vessel under vaporizing [2] and reactive conditions [3]. For reacting cases, a comparison of PRF and KAUST multi-component surrogate (KMCS) mechanism was done to obtain good agreement with the experimental ignition delay. From this study, some recommendations were proposed for GCI combustion modelling framework using gasoline like fuels.

  8. Locomotive fuel vapor reclamation system field evaluation and cost-benefit analysis : draft final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-21

    This report summarizes the results of the work performed to install a diesel vapor reclamation unit (DVRU) on an SD70 MAC : locomotive of BNSF Railways and its performance evaluation during freight railroad service. One complete DVRU with several : s...

  9. Film breakers prevent migration of aqueous potassium hydroxide in fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, P. D.

    1970-01-01

    Electrolyte film breakers made from polytetrafluoroethylene are installed in the reactant and water vapor removal outlets of each cell and sealed by elastomers. Use of these devices in the water vapor removal cavity outlets prevents loss of KOH solution through film migration during water removal.

  10. Design of a Helium Vapor Shroud for Liquid Hydrogen Fueling of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, K.; Evans, C.; Haney, J.; Leachman, J.

    2017-12-01

    Filling a vehicular liquid hydrogen fuel tank presents the potential for flammable mixtures due to oxygen concentration from liquid air condensation. Current liquid hydrogen tank designs utilize insulating paradigms such as aerogel/fiberglass materials, vacuum jackets, or inert gas purge systems to keep the outer surface from reaching the condensation temperature of air. This work examines the heat transfer at the refuelling connection of the tank to identify potential areas of condensation, as well as the surface temperature gradient. A shrouded inert gas purge was designed to minimize vehicle weight and refuelling time. The design of a shrouded inert gas purge system is presented to displace air preventing air condensation. The design investigates 3D printed materials for an inert gas shroud, as well as low-temperature sealing designs. Shroud designs and temperature profiles were measured and tested by running liquid nitrogen through the filling manifold. Materials for the inert gas shroud are discussed and experimental results are compared to analytical model predictions. Suggestions for future design improvements are made.

  11. Prevention of criticality accidents in a fuel cycle plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatti, A.M.; Canavese, S.I.; Capadona, N.M.

    1990-01-01

    This work reports the basic considerations on criticality accidents applied to an uranium dioxide fuel cycle production plant. The different fabrication stages are briefly described, with the identification of the neutronically isolated areas. Once the areas have been defined, an evaluation is made, setting up the control parameters to be used in each of them and their variation ranges; normal operation limitations based on experimental data or validating calculations, applied specifically to 5% enriched uranium, are established. Afterwards, defined parameters deviations are analyzed due to incidental conditions in order to prevent criticality accidents under normal conditions and maintenance operations. (Author) [es

  12. 14 CFR 23.954 - Fuel system lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system lightning protection. 23.954... Fuel System § 23.954 Fuel system lightning protection. The fuel system must be designed and arranged to prevent the ignition of fuel vapor within the system by— (a) Direct lightning strikes to areas having a...

  13. Development of a measuring system for vapor-jet forms of small-sized fuel injectors; Kogata injector funmu keijo sokutei system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibino, H.; Komatsubara, H.; Kawashima, O.; Fujita, A. [Aisan Industry Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    In the small-sized fuel injectors adapted to the United States` exhaust-gas regulation or the like, the vapor jet is extremely atomized and the jet form as one of the performances of the product has become more important than before. Accordingly, we have developed a measuring system in which the vapor jet of the small-sized fuel injector is irradiated with a flat laser light, the sectional form of the jet that is shining due to diffusion is sampled, and the distribution and the form of the sampled sections are determined by the image processing. 2 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: developmental toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Linda G; Gray, Thomas M; Trimmer, Gary W; Parker, Robert M; Murray, F Jay; Schreiner, Ceinwen A; Clark, Charles R

    2014-11-01

    Gasoline-vapor condensate (BGVC) or condensed vapors from gasoline blended with methyl t-butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME) diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA) were evaluated for developmental toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed via inhalation on gestation days (GD) 5-20 for 6h/day at levels of 0 (control filtered air), 2000, 10,000, and 20,000mg/m(3). These exposure durations and levels substantially exceed typical consumer exposure during refueling (gasoline and gasoline blended with the ether or alcohol oxygenates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Measured and Predicted Vapor Liquid Equilibrium of Ethanol-Gasoline Fuels with Insight on the Influence of Azeotrope Interactions on Aromatic Species Enrichment and Particulate Matter Formation in Spark Ignition Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratcliff, Matthew A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McCormick, Robert L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burke, Stephen [Colorado State University; Rhoads, Robert [University of Colorado; Windom, Bret [Colorado State University

    2018-04-03

    A relationship has been observed between increasing ethanol content in gasoline and increased particulate matter (PM) emissions from direct injection spark ignition (DISI) vehicles. The fundamental cause of this observation is not well understood. One potential explanation is that increased evaporative cooling as a result of ethanol's high HOV may slow evaporation and prevent sufficient reactant mixing resulting in the combustion of localized fuel rich regions within the cylinder. In addition, it is well known that ethanol when blended in gasoline forms positive azeotropes which can alter the liquid/vapor composition during the vaporization process. In fact, it was shown recently through a numerical study that these interactions can retain the aromatic species within the liquid phase impeding the in-cylinder mixing of these compounds, which would accentuate PM formation upon combustion. To better understand the role of the azeotrope interactions on the vapor/liquid composition evolution of the fuel, distillations were performed using the Advanced Distillation Curve apparatus on carefully selected samples consisting of gasoline blended with ethanol and heavy aromatic and oxygenated compounds with varying vapor pressures, including cumene, p-cymene, 4-tertbutyl toluene, anisole, and 4-methyl anisole. Samples collected during the distillation indicate an enrichment of the heavy aromatic or oxygenated additive with an increase in initial ethanol concentration from E0 to E30. A recently developed distillation and droplet evaporation model is used to explore the influence of dilution effects versus azeotrope interactions on the aromatic species enrichment. The results suggest that HOV-cooling effects as well as aromatic species enrichment behaviors should be considered in future development of predictive indices to forecast the PM potential of fuels containing oxygenated compounds with comparatively high HOV.

  16. In-situ vapor small angle neutron scattering of sulfonated polyarylenethioethersulfone random copolymer (SPTES 70) fuel cells membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoonessi, Mitra; Bai, Zongwu; Wheeler, Robert; Dang, Thuy D

    2014-01-01

    Highly sulfonated polyarylenethioethersulfone copolymer (SPTES 70) with excellent thermal stability, high proton conductivity and good mechanical properties is an excellent candidate as high temperature fuel cells membrane. The morphology of the SPTES 70 was examined with in situ vapor small angle neutron scattering (iVSANS), and transmission electron microscopy. An experimental neutron contrast match point was obtained with swelling SPTES 70 in a series of D 2 O/H 2 O ratios and compared with the calculated scattering contrast. The calculated scattering length density of SPTES 70 was in excellent agreement with the experiment scattering length density. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) data of the magnesium, calcium, and silver exchanged hydrated SPTES 70 membranes exhibited nanostructured morphology which was compared with the reported nanostructure of D 2 O hydrated SPTES 70. SANS data showed that the average ionic domain size changes with the size and valence of the counter ion. (paper)

  17. Integration of the AVLIS [atomic vapor laser isotopic separation] process into the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrove, R.S.; Knighton, J.B.; Eby, R.S.; Pashley, J.H.; Norman, R.E.

    1986-08-01

    AVLIS RD and D efforts are currently proceeding toward full-scale integrated enrichment demonstrations in the late 1980's and potential plant deployment in the mid 1990's. Since AVLIS requires a uranium metal feed and produces an enriched uranium metal product, some change in current uranium processing practices are necessitated. AVLIS could operate with a UF 6 -in UF 6 -out interface with little effect to the remainder of the fuel cycle. This path, however, does not allow electric utility customers to realize the full potential of low cost AVLIS enrichment. Several alternative processing methods have been identified and evaluated which appear to provide opportunities to make substantial cost savings in the overall fuel cycle. These alternatives involve varying levels of RD and D resources, calendar time, and technical risk to implement and provide these cost reduction opportunities. Both feed conversion contracts and fuel fabricator contracts are long-term entities. Because of these factors, it is not too early to start planning and making decisions on the most advantageous options so that AVLIS can be integrated cost effectively into the fuel cycle. This should offer economic opportunity to all parties involved including DOE, utilities, feed converters, and fuel fabricators. 10 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Multi-component vapor-liquid equilibrium model for LES of high-pressure fuel injection and application to ECN Spray A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matheis, Jan; Hickel, S.

    2018-01-01

    We present and evaluate a two-phase model for Eulerian large-eddy simulations (LES) of liquid-fuel injection and mixing at high pressure. The model is based on cubic equations of state and vapor-liquid equilibrium calculations and can represent the coexistence of supercritical states and

  19. Pore-Network Modeling of Water and Vapor Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; van Oosterhout, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the cathode side of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC), a micro porous layer (MPL) added between the catalyst layer (CL) and the gas diffusion layer (GDL) plays an important role in water management. In this work, by using both quasi-static and dynamic pore-network models, water and vapor

  20. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: developmental toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, L G; Gray, T M; Marr, M C; Tyl, R W; Trimmer, G W; Hoffman, G M; Murray, F J; Clark, C R; Schreiner, C A

    2014-11-01

    CD-1 mice were exposed to baseline gasoline vapor condensate (BGVC) alone or to vapors of gasoline blended with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE). Inhalation exposures were 6h/d on GD 5-17 at levels of 0, 2000, 10,000, and 20,000mg/m(3). Dams were evaluated for evidence of maternal toxicity, and fetuses were weighed, sexed, and evaluated for external, visceral, and skeletal anomalies. Exposure to 20,000mg/m(3) of BGVC produced slight reductions in maternal body weight/gain and decreased fetal body weight. G/MTBE exposure did not produce statistically significant maternal or developmental effects; however, two uncommon ventral wall closure defects occurred: gastroschisis (1 fetus at 10,000mg/m(3)) and ectopia cordis (1 fetus at 2000mg/m(3); 2 fetuses/1 litter at 10,000mg/m(3)). A second study (G/MTBE-2) evaluated similar exposure levels on GD 5-16 and an additional group exposed to 30,000mg/m(3) from GD 5-10. An increased incidence of cleft palate was observed at 30,000mg/m(3) G/MTBE. No ectopia cordis occurred in the replicate study, but a single observation of gastroschisis was observed at 30,000mg/m(3). The no observed adverse effect levels for maternal/developmental toxicity in the BGVC study were 10,000/2000mg/m(3), 20,000/20,000 for the G/MTBE study, and 10,000/20,000 for the G/MTBE-2 study. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: reproductive toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Thomas M; Steup, David; Roberts, Linda G; O'Callaghan, James P; Hoffman, Gary; Schreiner, Ceinwen A; Clark, Charles R

    2014-11-01

    Vapor condensates of baseline gasoline (BGVC), or gasoline-blended with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA) were evaluated for reproductive toxicity in rats at target concentrations of 2000, 10,000, or 20,000mg/m(3), 6h/day, 7days/week. BGVC and G/MTBE were assessed over two generations, the others for one generation. BGVC and G/MTBE F1 offspring were evaluated for neuropathology and changes in regional brain glial fibrillary acidic protein content. No neurotoxicity was observed. Male kidney weight was increased consistent with light hydrocarbon nephropathy. In adult rats, decreased body weight gain and increased liver weight were seen. Spleen weight decreased in adults and pups exposed to G/TBA. No pathological changes to reproductive organs occurred in any study. Decreased food consumption was seen in G/TAME lactating females. Transient decreases in G/TAME offspring weights were observed during lactation. Except for a minor increase in time to mating in G/TBA which did not affect other reproductive parameters, there were no adverse reproductive findings. The NOAEL for reproductive and offspring parameters was 20,000mg/m(3) for all vapor condensates except for lower offspring NOAELs of 10,000mg/m(3) for G/TBA and 2000mg/m(3) for G/TAME. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: micronucleus and sister chromatid exchange evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Ceinwen A; Hoffman, Gary M; Gudi, Ramadevi; Clark, Charles R

    2014-11-01

    Micronucleus and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) tests were performed for vapor condensate of baseline gasoline (BGVC), or gasoline with oxygenates, methyl tert-butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl tert butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), t-butyl alcohol (TBA), or ethanol (G/EtOH). Sprague Dawley rats (the same 5/sex/group for both endpoints) were exposed to 0, 2000, 10,000, or 20,000mg/m(3) of each condensate, 6h/day, 5days/week over 4weeks. Positive controls (5/sex/test) were given cyclophosphamide IP, 24h prior to sacrifice at 5mg/kg (SCE test) and 40mg/kg (micronucleus test). Blood was collected from the abdominal aorta for the SCE test and femurs removed for the micronucleus test. Blood cell cultures were treated with 5μg/ml bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) for SCE evaluation. No significant increases in micronucleated immature erythrocytes were observed for any test material. Statistically significant increases in SCE were observed in rats given BGVC alone or in female rats given G/MTBE. G/TAME induced increased SCE in both sexes at the highest dose only. Although DNA perturbation was observed for several samples, DNA damage was not expressed as increased micronuclei in bone marrow cells. Inclusion of oxygenates in gasoline did not increase the effects of gasoline alone or produce a cytogenetic hazard. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Supply Chain Based Solution to Prevent Fuel Tax Evasion: Proof of Concept Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Earl, Dennis Duncan [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL; McIntyre, Timothy J [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL; Connatser, Raynella M [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Moore, Sheila A [ORNL

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this research was to provide a proof-of-concept (POC) system for preventing non-taxable (non-highway diesel use) or low-taxable (jet fuel) petrochemical products from being blended with taxable fuel products and preventing taxable fuel products from cross-jurisdiction evasion. The research worked to fill the need to validate the legitimacy of individual loads, offloads, and movements by integrating and validating, on a near-real-time basis, information from global positioning system (GPS), valve sensors, level sensors, and fuel-marker sensors.

  4. Prevent the risk of climate change by taxing fossil fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Of all the greenhouse gases, it is emissions of CO 2 which most urgently require reduction. On the one hand, given the very long lifetime of this gas, its emissions are almost irreversible in character. On the other hand, the measures to be taken concern technological choices, and choices in matters of planning and land use, which are not easily reversible either. It would be very costly, later on, to go back on decisions we make in the coming years without taking into account the risk of climate change. We will only be able to stabilize the concentration of CO 2 in the atmosphere if we are able to reduce present emissions by 60 per cent. The challenge to humanity is considerable, since this reduction in emissions has to be achieved despite the forecast doubling of the world's population. We must organize ourselves both to stabilize the world's forests (reforestation in certain regions compensating for the inevitable deforestation elsewhere), and to reduce by 25 per cent the average consumption of fossil fuel per inhabitant. Such a radical reorientation of our habits in the consumption of fossil energy does not seem to me technically unreachable, and it will not cause widespread ruin if we manage to optimize its organization. Preventive work will only be effective if it is made on a planetary scale. It will only be undertaken if we are able to share the burden fairly between the various countries; and it will not be ruinous if we manage to decentralize necessary initiatives, so that the least costly methods are undertaken everywhere from the outset. (author)

  5. Impedance of vapor feed direct methanol fuel cells--polarization dependence of elementary processes at the anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunaga, Hiroshi; Ishida, Tomohiro; Teranishi, Nozomu; Arai, Chikao; Yamada, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    Membrane electrode assemblies of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) with different catalyst and ionomer loading were prepared. Anode performance and impedance spectra were measured to clarify the characteristics of vapor feed DMFCs (VF-DMFCs). The impedance spectra were deconvolved into three semi-circles with different time constants, each showing a different dependence on the anodic polarization. The middle-frequency range arc decreased as the anodic polarization increased, indicating that this process represents the oxidation reaction of methanol. The high-frequency range arc showed little dependence on the anodic polarization, but increased with the thickness of the electrode, indicating that this process might be related to proton conduction through the electrode. The low-frequency range arc was observed only when the methanol concentration was low, in contrast to liquid feed DMFCs (LF-DMFCs), for which the removal of the product gas presents a large resistance. A simpler design can therefore be used for a VF-DMFC, giving it an advantage over an LF-DMFC. A decreasing ionomer to catalyst ratio (I/C) caused the interfacial conductivity (σ E ) to increase, but it intensively decreased when I/C was below 0.25. Thus, the connection of the catalysts is important for the anode's performance

  6. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of environmental barrier coatings for the inhibition of solid deposit formation from heated jet fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Arun Ram

    Solid deposit formation from jet fuel compromises the fuel handling system of an aviation turbine engine and increases the maintenance downtime of an aircraft. The deposit formation process depends upon the composition of the fuel, the nature of metal surfaces that come in contact with the heated fuel and the operating conditions of the engine. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of substrate surfaces on the amount and nature of solid deposits in the intermediate regime where both autoxidation and pyrolysis play an important role in deposit formation. A particular focus has been directed to examining the effectiveness of barrier coatings produced by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on metal surfaces for inhibiting the solid deposit formation from jet fuel degradation. In the first part of the experimental study, a commercial Jet-A sample was stressed in a flow reactor on seven different metal surfaces: AISI316, AISI 321, AISI 304, AISI 347, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Inconel 750X and FecrAlloy. Examination of deposits by thermal and microscopic analysis shows that the solid deposit formation is influenced by the interaction of organosulfur compounds and autoxidation products with the metal surfaces. The nature of metal sulfides was predicted by Fe-Ni-S ternary phase diagram. Thermal stressing on uncoated surfaces produced coke deposits with varying degree of structural order. They are hydrogen-rich and structurally disordered deposits, spherulitic deposits, small carbon particles with relatively ordered structures and large platelets of ordered carbon structures formed by metal catalysis. In the second part of the study, environmental barrier coatings were deposited on tube surfaces to inhibit solid deposit formation from the heated fuel. A new CVD system was configured by the proper choice of components for mass flow, pressure and temperature control in the reactor. A bubbler was designed to deliver the precursor into the reactor

  7. Membranes produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique for low temperature fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennajdaoui, Aboubakr; Roualdes, Stéphanie; Brault, Pascal; Durand, Jean

    A plasma polymerization process using a continuous glow discharge has been implemented for preparing proton conducting membranes from trifluoromethane sulfonic acid and styrene. The chemical and physical structure of plasma membranes has been investigated using FTIR and SEM. The films are homogeneous with a good adhesion on commercial gas diffusion layer (E-Tek ®). Their deposition rate can be increased with increasing flow rate and input power. The thermogravimetric analysis under air of plasma polymers has showed a thermal stability up to 140 °C. Compared to the pulsed glow discharge studied in a previous paper, the continuous glow discharge has enabled to enhance the proton conductivity of membranes by a factor 3 (up to 1.7 mS cm -1). Moreover, the low methanol permeability (methanol diffusion coefficient down to 5 × 10 -13 m 2 s -1) of membranes has been confirmed by this study. In an industrial context, a reactor prototype has been developed to manufacture by plasma processes all active layers of fuel cell cores to be integrated in original compact PEMFC or DMFC.

  8. Modified Fabrication Method of Metal Fuel Slug for Preventing Evaporation of Volatile Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Jong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Jung-Won; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2014-01-01

    In order to develop innovative fabrication method of metal fuel slugs for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am, modified casting under inert atmosphere has been applied for metal fuel slugs for SFR. Alternative fabrication method of fuel slugs has been introduced to develop an improved fabrication process of metal fuel for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements. In this study, U-10wt.%Zr-Mn fuel slugs for SFR have been fabricated by modified casting method and characterized to evaluate the feasibility of the alternative fabrication method. Alternative casting such as modified casting has been applied to develop fabrication method of fuel slugs for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am. U-10wt.%Zr-Mn containing a volatile surrogate Mn fuel slug was soundly fabricated under inert atmosphere with dimensions of L250mm. Mass fraction of fuel loss was so low, upto 0.2%. Mn element was most recovered with prevention in evaporation of Mn. It was seen that the losses of volatile Am can be effectively controlled to below detectable levels using modest pressure

  9. Determination of As, Se, and Hg in fuel samples by in-chamber chemical vapor generation ICP OES using a Flow Blurring® multinebulizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Miriam; Aguirre, Miguel Ángel; Canals, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a new and simple analytical methodology based on in-chamber chemical vapor generation has been developed for the spectrochemical analysis of commercial fuel samples. A multiple nebulizer with three nebulization units has been employed for this purpose: One unit was used for sample introduction, while the other two were used for the necessary reagent introduction. In this way, the aerosols were mixed inside the spray chamber. Through this method, analyte transport and, therefore, sensitivity are improved in inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. The factors (i.e., variables), influencing chemical vapor generation, have been optimized using a multivariate approach. Under optimum chemical vapor generation conditions ([NaBH 4 ] = 1.39%, [HCl] = 2.97 M, total liquid flow = 936 μL min -1 ), the proposed sample introduction system allowed the determination of arsenic, selenium, and mercury up to 5 μg g -1 with a limit of detection of 25, 140, and 13 μg kg -1 , respectively. Analyzing spiked commercial fuel samples, recovery values obtained were between 96 and 113%, and expanded uncertainty values ranged from 4 to 16%. The most striking practical conclusion of this investigation is that no carbon deposit appears on the plasma torch after extended periods of working. Graphical abstract A new and simple analytical methodology based on in-chamber chemical vapor generation has been developed for the spectrochemical analysis of commercial fuel samples in ICP OES.

  10. Supply Chain-based Solution to Prevent Fuel Tax Evasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Daugherty, Michael [United States Department of Transportation (USDOT), Federal Highway Administration (FHWA); Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Barker, Alan M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    The primary source of funding for the United States transportation system is derived from motor fuel and other highway use taxes. Loss of revenue attributed to fuel-tax evasion has been assessed to be somewhere between $1 billion per year, or approximately 25% of the total tax collected. Any solution that addresses this problem needs to include not only the tax-collection agencies and auditors, but also the carriers transporting oil products and the carriers customers. This paper presents a system developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Federal Highway Administration which has the potential to reduce or eliminate many fuel-tax evasion schemes. The solution balances the needs of tax-auditors and those of the fuel-hauling companies and their customers. The technology was deployed and successfully tested during an eight-month period on a real-world fuel-hauling fleet. Day-to-day operations of the fleet were minimally affected by their interaction with this system. The results of that test are discussed in this paper.

  11. Vapor intrusion risk of fuel ether oxygenates methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE): A modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Xiong, Desen; Li, Haiyan; Ding, Yi; Xia, Xiangcheng; Yang, Yongqi

    2017-06-15

    Vapor intrusion of synthetic fuel additives represents a critical yet still neglected problem at sites contaminated by petroleum fuel releases. This study used an advanced numerical model to investigate the vapor intrusion potential of fuel ether oxygenates methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME), and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE). Simulated indoor air concentration of these compounds can exceed USEPA indoor air screening level for MTBE (110μg/m 3 ). Our results also reveal that MTBE has much higher chance to cause vapor intrusion problems than TAME and ETBE. This study supports the statements made by USEPA in the Petroleum Vapor Intrusion (PVI) Guidance that the vertical screening criteria for petroleum hydrocarbons may not provide sufficient protectiveness for fuel additives, and ether oxygenates in particular. In addition to adverse impacts on human health, ether oxygenate vapor intrusion may also cause aesthetic problems (i.e., odour and flavour). Overall, this study points out that ether oxygenates can cause vapor intrusion problems. We recommend that USEPA consider including the field measurement data of synthetic fuel additives in the existing PVI database and possibly revising the PVI Guidance as necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 14 CFR 29.954 - Fuel system lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system lightning protection. 29.954... lightning protection. The fuel system must be designed and arranged to prevent the ignition of fuel vapor within the system by— (a) Direct lightning strikes to areas having a high probability of stroke...

  13. 14 CFR 27.954 - Fuel system lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system lightning protection. 27.954... lightning protection. The fuel system must be designed and arranged to prevent the ignition of fuel vapor within the system by— (a) Direct lightning strikes to areas having a high probability of stroke...

  14. 14 CFR 25.954 - Fuel system lightning protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system lightning protection. 25.954... lightning protection. The fuel system must be designed and arranged to prevent the ignition of fuel vapor within the system by— (a) Direct lightning strikes to areas having a high probability of stroke...

  15. Pretreatment with human serum butyrylcholinesterase alone prevents cardiac abnormalities, seizures, and death in Göttingen minipigs exposed to sarin vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Ashima; Sun, Wei; Dabisch, Paul A; Hulet, Stanley W; Hastings, Nicholas B; Jakubowski, Edward M; Mioduszewski, Robert J; Doctor, Bhupendra P

    2011-12-15

    Human serum butyrylcholinesterase (Hu BChE) is a stoichiometric bioscavenger that is being developed as a prophylactic countermeasure against organophosphorus nerve agents. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of Hu BChE against whole-body inhalation exposure to a lethal dose of sarin (GB) vapor. Male Göttingen minipigs were subjected to: air exposure, GB vapor exposure, or pretreatment with Hu BChE followed by GB vapor exposure. Hu BChE was administered by i.m. injection 24 h prior to exposure to 4.1 mg/m(3) of GB vapor for 60 min. Electrocardiograms (ECG), electroencephalograms (EEG), and pupil size were recorded throughout exposure. Blood drawn before and throughout exposure was analyzed for blood gases, electrolytes, metabolites, acetylcholinesterase and BChE activities, and amount of GB present. Untreated animals exposed to GB vapor exhibited cardiac abnormalities and generalized seizures, ultimately succumbing to respiratory failure. Pretreatment with 3.0 or 6.5 mg/kg of Hu BChE delayed blood gas and acid-base disturbances and the onset of cardiac and neural toxic signs, but failed to increase survivability. Pretreatment with 7.5 mg/kg of Hu BChE, however, completely prevented toxic signs, with blood chemistry and ECG and EEG parameters indistinguishable from control during and after GB exposure. GB bound in plasma was 200-fold higher than plasma from pigs that did not receive Hu BChE, suggesting that Hu BChE scavenged GB in blood and prevented it from reaching other tissues. Thus, prophylaxis with Hu BChE alone not only increased survivability, but also prevented cardiac abnormalities and neural toxicity in minipigs exposed to a lethal dose of GB vapor. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Flame spread over electrical wire with AC electric fields: Internal circulation, fuel vapor-jet, spread rate acceleration, and molten insulator dripping

    KAUST Repository

    Lim, Seungjae

    2015-04-01

    The effect of electric field on the characteristics of flame spread along a polyethylene (PE) insulated electrical wire was investigated experimentally by varying the AC frequency and voltage applied to the wire. The results showed that the flame spread rate was accelerated due to the convergence of electric flux near the end of wire, having three distinct regimes depending on applied voltage. In each regime, several subregimes could be identified depending on AC frequency. Flame shape (height and width) and slanted direction of the spreading flame were influenced differently. Fuel-vapor jets were ejected from the molten PE surface even for the baseline case without the application of an electric field; this could be attributed to the bursting of fuel vapor bubbles generated from internal boiling at the molten PE surface. An internal circulation of molten-PE was also observed as a result of non-uniform heating by the spreading flame. In the high voltage regime with a high AC frequency, excessive dripping of molten PE led to flame extinction.

  17. Collapsing criteria for vapor film around solid spheres as a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freud, Roy; Harari, Ronen; Sher, Eran

    2009-01-01

    Following a partial fuel-melting accident, a Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) can result with the fragmentation of the melt into tiny droplets. A vapor film is then formed between the melt fragments and the coolant, while preventing a contact between them. Triggering, propagation and expansion typically follow the premixing stage. In the triggering stage, vapor film collapse around one or several of the fragments occurs. This collapse can be the result of fragments cooling, a sort of mechanical force, or by any other means. When the vapor film collapses and the coolant re-establishes contact with the dry surface of the hot melt, it may lead to a very rapid and rather violent boiling. In the propagation stage the shock wave front leads to stripping of the films surrounding adjacent droplets which enhance the fragmentation and the process escalates. During this process a large quantity of liquid vaporizes and its expansion can result in destructive mechanical damage to the surrounding structures. This multiphase thermal detonation in which high pressure shock wave is formed is regarded as 'vapor explosion'. The film boiling and its possible collapse is a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion. If the interaction of the melt and the coolant does not result in a film boiling, no explosion occurs. Many studies have been devoted to determine the minimum temperature and heat flux that is required to maintain a film boiling. The present experimental study examines the minimum temperature that is required to maintain a film boiling around metal spheres immersed into a liquid (subcooled distilled water) reservoir. In order to simulate fuel fragments that are small in dimension and has mirror-like surface, small spheres coated with anti-oxidation layer were used. The heat flux from the spheres was calculated from the sphere's temperature profiles and the sphere's properties. The vapor film collapse was associated with a sharp rise of the heat flux during the cooling

  18. ENERGY PRODUCTION AND POLLUTION PREVENTION AT SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS USING FUEL CELL POWER PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses energy production and pollution prevention at sewage treatment plants using fuel cell power plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at waste water treatment plants during the anaerobic treatment of sewage to reduce solids. The major constituents are...

  19. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  20. Wear mechanism and wear prevention in coal-fueled diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwalb, J.A.; Ryan, T.W.

    1991-10-01

    Coal fueled diesel engines present unique wear problems in the piston ring/cylinder liner area because of their tendency to contaminate the lube-oil with high concentrations of highly abrasive particles. This program involved a series of bench-scale wear tests and engine tests designed to investigate various aspects of the ring/liner wear problem and to make specific recommendations to engine manufacturers as to how to alleviate these problems. The program was organized into tasks, designed to accomplish the following objectives: (1) define the predominant wear mechanisms causing accelerated wear in the ring/liner area; (2) investigate the effectiveness of traditional approaches to wear prevention to prevent wear in coal-fueled engines; (3) further refine information on the most promising approaches to wear prevention; (4) present detailed information and recommendations to engine manufacturers on the most promising approach to wear prevention; (5) present a final report covering the entire program; (6)complete engine tests with a coal-derived liquid fuel, and investigate the effects of the fuel on engine wear and emissions.

  1. Calculation of vapor pressures of oxide fuels up to 5,000 K for equilibrium and nonequilibrium evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitung, W.

    1975-06-01

    In the first part of this work the evaporation kinetics of multicomponent systems is studied with UO 2 as the example. The evaporation, which is generally incongruent, implies that two opposing types of steady-state evaporation must be distinguished: equilibrium evaporation and 'forced congruent' evaporation. The two types of evaporation indicated entail different vapor pressures. In some prompt critical reactor incidents forced congruent evaporation must be anticipated. The second part of this work contains the calculation of the vapor pressures of UOsub(2+-x) and (U,Pu)Osub(2+-x) for both types of evaporation up to temperature of 5,000 K. The calculating procedures are based on the method of Rand and Markin (1967) incorporating the recent thermodynamic data. The agreement between the measured and calculated total pressures is good for the ranges of temperature and stoichiometry for which experimental results are available. This supports the results calculated for higher temperature ranges. (orig./UA) [de

  2. Apparatus and method for preventing the rotation of rods used in nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilgrim, L.G. Jr.; Jackson, L.F.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method for preventing the rotation of one or more elongated rods used in nuclear fuel assemblies include an end plug secured to one longitudinal end of such an elongated rod and having an out-of-cavity, non-round structure affixed thereto and configured to mate with a complementary shaped structure in a lower tie plate of a nuclear fuel assembly in such a manner as to prevent the rotation of the rod about its longitudinal axis. In one embodiment, the end plug includes a pair of flats formed on a portion of the end plug and configured to abut against a pair of flats formed on the outer surface of a cylindrical boss or sleeve of the lower tie plate, thereby to prevent the rotation of the rod. In another embodiment, four grooves, disposed 90 0 apart about the periphery of an end plug of a rod form a spline. The grooves are configured to receive four, radially inwardly protruding, key members disposed 90 0 apart about the periphery of a sleeve secured to the lower tie plate, thereby to prevent the rotation of the rod. In a further embodiment, a sleeve is secured to an end plug of a rod and includes four elongated slots disposed 90 0 apart about the periphery of the sleeve and configured in width, depth and spacing to receive and mate with four web portions of the lower tie plate of the nuclear fuel assembly, thereby to secure the rod against rotation about its longitudinal axis

  3. Nuclear fuel pellet manufacturing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tetsushi.

    1995-01-01

    An uranium oxide powder is compression-molded to form a compressed powder product, and the compressed powder product is sintered to form a ceramic nuclear fuel pellet. In this case, the uranium oxide powder to be supplied to a press hole for compression molding is exposed to an atmosphere of one of vapors of benzene, hexane, acetone, acetic acid, ethanol or water, or an atmosphere of a vapor mixture of several kinds of them. Thereafter, uranium oxide powder is compression molded in the same vapor atmosphere. Since the vapor atmosphere is used as an aid for a molding adjuvant or a substitute thereof, lowering of pellet density due to residual molding adjuvant can be prevented. In addition, the vapor atmosphere is penetrated uniformly between the uranium oxide powder to suppress density fluctuation of the compressed powder material thereby enabling to unify the shrinking rate. (I.N.)

  4. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels. Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, A.; Sahir, A.; Tan, E.; Humbird, D.; Snowden-Swan, L. J.; Meyer, P.; Ross, J.; Sexton, D.; Yap, R.; Lukas, J.

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructurecompatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis.

  5. Fabrication of Zircaloy-4 Fuel Cladding Pipe with Nanostructured Oxide Layer for Prevention of Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y. J.; Park, J. W.; Kim, H. J.; Cho, S. O. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    There has been an attempt to protect zircaloy fuel cladding by coating SiC. Research on producing oxide layer that can block fuel cladding from water on the surface of zircaloy fuel cladding by means of anodizing to reduce the rate of oxidation of fuel cladding at Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) is an significant ongoing study subject. Applying nanostructured oxide layer to the prevention of thermal deformation of oxide layer was already suggested in our research group, the reasons of which is nanoporous structure is better than nanotube structure in terms of corrosion-resistant structure because nanotube structure can be easily peeled off. In this study, methods which are able to control morphology between nanoporous and nanotube structure were conducted by changing the anodizing conditions. Hence, Using glycerol and ammonium fluoride, Zircaloy-4 was anodized by varying water contents and applied voltage. Zircaloy-4 pipe with nanostructured surface was fabricated by anodization technique. The produced nanostructure is quite even but the thickness of the oxide layer is not even. The nanostructured surface can increase the thermal characteristics of the zircaloy-4 fuel cladding.

  6. FUEL Your Life: A Translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program to Worksites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark G; DeJoy, David M; Vandenberg, Robert; Padilla, Heather; Davis, Marsha

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of FUEL Your Life, a translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program for worksites. A randomized control group design was conducted in five worksites of a large transportation company. Measures were collected pretest, posttest (6 months), and follow-up (12 months). Railroad maintenance facilities of Union Pacific Railroad. Participants consisted of 362 workers (227 treatment, 135 control). FUEL Your Life was translated from the Diabetes Prevention Program to better fit within the context of the worksite. The primary difference was the use of peer health coaches to provide social support and reinforcement and an occupational nurse to provide lesson content (six sessions of 10 minutes) to participants instead of the lifestyle coaches employed by the Diabetes Prevention Program, resulting in a less structured meeting schedule. The primary outcomes were weight and body mass index (BMI), with secondary outcomes including eating behaviors, physical activity, and social support. Latent growth modeling was used to measure changes in the outcomes over time. Participants in the intervention group maintained weight/BMI (-.1 pounds/-.1 BMI), whereas the control participants gained weight/BMI (+2.6 pounds/+.3 BMI), resulting in a statistically significant difference between groups. Fifty-five percent of intervention participants lost some weight, whereas only 35% of the control group lost weight. FUEL Your Life, a low intensity intervention, was not effective for promoting weight loss, but was effective for helping workers maintain weight over a 12-month period.

  7. Vapor Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapor intrusion occurs when there is a migration of volatile chemicals from contaminated groundwater or soil into an overlying building. Volatile chemicals can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and into indoor air spaces.

  8. USE OF DISC SPRINGS IN A PELLET FUEL MACHINE FOR PRESSURE REGULATION AND PREVENTION OF DAMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmet Çelik

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of biomass fuel pellets is becoming widespread as a renewable and environment-friendly energy. Pellet fuels are produced in various pellet machine types. Pellet machines encounter problems such as pressure irregularities and choke at the initial start for different kinds of biomass feedstock. In this study, disc springs are integrated into a vertical axis pellet machine for a pressure regulation and design optimization. Force-deformation and stress-deformation relations of disc springs are investigated using analytical and finite element methods. Pelletizing pressures were calculated based on disc spring force values using the Hertzian stress formula. Utilized disc springs ensured the pressure regulation, production efficiency increase and damage prevention on the die-roller mechanism.

  9. The effect of chemical vapor deposition temperature on the performance of binder-free sewage sludge-derived anodes in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huajun; Jia, Yufeng; Shen, Dongsheng; Zhou, Yuyang; Chen, Ting; Chen, Wei; Ge, Zhipeng; Zheng, Shuting; Wang, Meizhen

    2018-04-13

    Conversion of sewage sludge (SS) into value-added material has garnered increasing attention due to its potential applications. In this study, we propose a new application of the sewage sludge-derived carbon (SSC) as an electrode without binder in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). SS was firstly converted into SSC monoliths by methane chemical vapor method at different temperature (600, 800, 1000 or 1200°C). Scanning electron microscopy images showed that carbon micro-wires were present on the surfaces of the samples prepared at 1000 and 1200°C. The results showed that it was beneficial for converting sludge into a highly conductive electrode and increasing carbon content of the electrode at higher temperatures, thereby improving the current generation. The conductivity results show that a higher temperature favors the conversion of sludge into a highly conductive electrode. The MFC using an SSC anode processed at 1200°C generated the maximum power density of 2228mWm -2 and the maximum current density of 14.2Am -2 . This value was 5 times greater than that generated by an MFC equipped with a graphite anode. These results present a promising means of converting SS into electrode materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevention of significant deterioration permit application for the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    This New Source Review'' has been submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (PO Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352), pursuant to WAC 173-403-050 and in compliance with the Department of Ecology Guide to Processing A Prevention Of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Permit'' for three new sources of radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS), the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF), and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA), will be located in one facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post-irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were cancelled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies for use in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building, stack, and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, these systems will be dealt with separately to the extent possible. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex.

  11. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbon Fuels: Thermochemical Research Pathways with In Situ and Ex Situ Upgrading of Fast Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sahir, A. H. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Humbird, David [DWH Process Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Pimphan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ross, Jeff [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Sexton, Danielle [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Yap, Raymond [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Lukas, John [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Specifically, this report details two conceptual designs based on projected product yields and quality improvements via catalyst development and process integration. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. The two conversion pathways detailed are (1) in situ and (2) ex situ upgrading of vapors produced from the fast pyrolysis of biomass. While the base case conceptual designs and underlying assumptions outline performance metrics for feasibility, it should be noted that these are only two of many other possibilities in this area of research. Other promising process design options emerging from the research will be considered for future techno-economic analysis. Both the in situ and ex situ conceptual designs, using the underlying assumptions, project MFSPs of approximately $3.5/gallon gasoline equivalent (GGE). The performance assumptions for the ex situ process were more aggressive with higher distillate (diesel-range) products. This was based on an assumption that more favorable reaction chemistry (such as coupling) can be made possible in a separate reactor where, unlike in an in situ upgrading reactor, one does not have to deal with catalyst mixing with biomass char and ash, which pose challenges to catalyst performance and maintenance. Natural gas was used for hydrogen production, but only when off gases from the process was not sufficient to meet the needs; natural gas consumption is insignificant in both the in situ and ex situ base cases. Heat produced from the burning of char, coke, and off-gases allows for the production of surplus electricity which is sold to the grid allowing a reduction of approximately 5¢/GGE in the MFSP.

  12. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Hideyuki

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent bending of fuel rods caused by the difference of irradiation growth between coupling fuel rods and standards fuel rods thereby maintain the fuel rod integrity. Constitution: The f value for a fuel can (the ratio of pole of zirconium crystals in the entire crystals along the axial direction of the fuel can) of a coupling fuel rod secured by upper and lower tie plates is made smaller than the f value for the fuel can of a standard fuel rod not secured by the upper and the lower tie plates. This can make the irradiation growth of the fuel can of the coupling fuel rod greater than the irradiation growth of the fuel can of the standard fuel rod and, accordingly, since the elongation of the standard fuel rod can always by made greater, bending of the standard fuel rod can be prevented. (Yoshihara, M.)

  13. Collapsing criteria for vapor film around solid spheres as a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freud, Roy [Nuclear Research Center - Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel)], E-mail: freud@bgu.ac.il; Harari, Ronen [Nuclear Research Center - Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Sher, Eran [Pearlstone Center for Aeronautical Studies, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2009-04-15

    Following a partial fuel-melting accident, a Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) can result with the fragmentation of the melt into tiny droplets. A vapor film is then formed between the melt fragments and the coolant, while preventing a contact between them. Triggering, propagation and expansion typically follow the premixing stage. In the triggering stage, vapor film collapse around one or several of the fragments occurs. This collapse can be the result of fragments cooling, a sort of mechanical force, or by any other means. When the vapor film collapses and the coolant re-establishes contact with the dry surface of the hot melt, it may lead to a very rapid and rather violent boiling. In the propagation stage the shock wave front leads to stripping of the films surrounding adjacent droplets which enhance the fragmentation and the process escalates. During this process a large quantity of liquid vaporizes and its expansion can result in destructive mechanical damage to the surrounding structures. This multiphase thermal detonation in which high pressure shock wave is formed is regarded as 'vapor explosion'. The film boiling and its possible collapse is a fundamental stage leading to vapor explosion. If the interaction of the melt and the coolant does not result in a film boiling, no explosion occurs. Many studies have been devoted to determine the minimum temperature and heat flux that is required to maintain a film boiling. The present experimental study examines the minimum temperature that is required to maintain a film boiling around metal spheres immersed into a liquid (subcooled distilled water) reservoir. In order to simulate fuel fragments that are small in dimension and has mirror-like surface, small spheres coated with anti-oxidation layer were used. The heat flux from the spheres was calculated from the sphere's temperature profiles and the sphere's properties. The vapor film collapse was associated with a sharp rise of the heat flux

  14. ''Risk safety of high frequency fatigue rupture for the vapor generators tubes''; ''Prevention du risque de rupture par fatigue vibratoire des tubes de generateurs de vapeur''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solgadi, E.; Le Duff, J.A. [FRAMATOME, 92 - Paris-La-Defense (France); Bussy, B. [Electricite de France, 75 - Paris (France). Service Etudes et Projets Thermiques et Nucleaires

    2001-07-01

    Among the different rupture ways identified since 1975 for the steam generators tubes, the fatigue damage occurred on four cases. Two of them are analyzed in this paper: the NORTH ANNA 1 and the MIHAMA 2. From these analysis, it appears that the fatigue crack happens with aggravating factors as the tube embedding, the anti-vibration bars or fretting corrosion. As a preventive, the number of anti-vibration bars has been increase for the vapor generators 1300 and a new system of damper has been developed and implemented on the vapor generator 900. (A.L.B.)

  15. Vapor Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, H. M.; Garrard, G. C.; Houston, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Detector eliminates need for removing covers to take samples. Detector is canister consisting of screw-in base and clear plastic tube that contains two colors of silica gel. Monoethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide vapors are visually monitored with canister containing color-changing gels.

  16. Modified Injection Casting for Preventing the Evaporation of Volatile Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong Hwan; Ko, Young Mo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Lee, Chan Bock

    2013-01-01

    Am addition to the metal fuel hampers conventional fuel fabrication processes because of the high vapor pressure of Am at melting temperature of uranium alloys. An advanced fuel casting system to control transport of volatile elements during melting of a fuel alloy with minor actinides (MA) has been developed. It is necessary to minimize the vaporization of Am and volume of radioactive wastes. In this study, advanced fuel slug fabrication methods have been introduced to develop an innovative fabrication process of metal fuel of SFR for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am. Metal fuel slugs were fabricated by improved injection casting method in KAERI. Fuel slugs for SFR were characterized to evaluate the feasibility of the alternative fabrication method. In order to prevent the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am, alternative fabrication method of metal fuel slugs has been applied and evaluated by improved injection casting method, melted fuel material under inert atmosphere, instead of vacuum injection casting method in KAERI. Surrogate fuel slugs were generally soundly cast with the adjustment of casting process parameters by the modified injection casting method

  17. Fuel Cell Cathode Contamination: Comparison of Prevention Strategies and their Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejaswi, Arjun

    Fuel cells are a major area of research in ongoing efforts to find alternate sources of energy. Today these efforts have become ever the more necessary in the face of spiraling costs of conventional sources of energy and concerns about global warming. Most fuel cells consume hydrogen to produce, for the most part, only water in their exhaust. They are also capable of achieving significantly higher efficiencies than conventional automobile internal combustion engines. Since cost still remains one of the most intractable challenges to the advent of fuel cells, it is imperative that every effort be made to lower the costs of fuel cell production, operation and maintenance as well as improving overall efficiency. The air circulation system of a fuel cell is designed to provide oxygen to the cathode of the fuel cell. Air taken from the surroundings, however, often contains pollutants including dust, SO2, NO 2 and various other gases. These gases may severely degrade various components of system, especially for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) type fuel cells, including the catalyst, membrane electrode assembly and other components. Moreover, these pollutants may lead to specific behavior based on ambient air composition at the test site thereby confusing researchers. In order to address these issues, this study seeks to identify these pollutants and examine the mitigation strategies to mitigate them. Also discussed is whether these pollutants have an effect debilitating enough to justify the extra cost and potential parasitic losses associated with these mitigation strategies. Adsorptive filtration is identified as the most appropriate cathode side air quality system for fuel cells. Performance of cathode side fuel cell filters are examined under varying relative humidity, temperature, air flow rate and pollutant concentration conditions. An estimated filter survival time under realistic conditions is also suggested.

  18. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons vapors: Comparison of laboratory studies and field investigations in the vadose zone at the emplaced fuel source experiment, Airbase Værløse, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhener, Patrick; Dakhel, Nathalie; Christophersen, Mette; Broholm, Mette; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2006-12-01

    The natural attenuation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the unsaturated zone can only be predicted when information about microbial biodegradation rates and kinetics are known. This study aimed at determining first-order rate coefficients for the aerobic biodegradation of 13 volatile petroleum hydrocarbons which were artificially emplaced as a liquid mixture during a field experiment in an unsaturated sandy soil. Apparent first-order biodegradation rate coefficients were estimated by comparing the spatial evolution of the resulting vapor plumes to an analytical reactive transport model. Two independent reactive numerical model approaches have been used to simulate the diffusive migration of VOC vapors and to estimate degradation rate coefficients. Supplementary laboratory column and microcosm experiments were performed with the sandy soil at room temperature under aerobic conditions. First-order kinetics adequately matched the lab column profiles for most of the compounds. Consistent compound-specific apparent first-order rate coefficients were obtained by the three models and the lab column experiment, except for benzene. Laboratory microcosm experiments lacked of sensitivity for slowly degrading compounds and underestimated degradation rates by up to a factor of 5. Addition of NH 3 vapor was shown to increase the degradation rates for some VOCs in the laboratory microcosms. All field models suggested a significantly higher degradation rate for benzene than the rates measured in the lab, suggesting that the field microbial community was superior in developing benzene degrading activity.

  19. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons vapors: Comparison of laboratory studies and field investigations in the vadose zone at the emplaced fuel source experiment, Airbase Vaerløse, Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhener, Patrick; Dakhel, Nathalie; Christophersen, Mette; Broholm, Mette; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2006-12-15

    The natural attenuation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the unsaturated zone can only be predicted when information about microbial biodegradation rates and kinetics are known. This study aimed at determining first-order rate coefficients for the aerobic biodegradation of 13 volatile petroleum hydrocarbons which were artificially emplaced as a liquid mixture during a field experiment in an unsaturated sandy soil. Apparent first-order biodegradation rate coefficients were estimated by comparing the spatial evolution of the resulting vapor plumes to an analytical reactive transport model. Two independent reactive numerical model approaches have been used to simulate the diffusive migration of VOC vapors and to estimate degradation rate coefficients. Supplementary laboratory column and microcosm experiments were performed with the sandy soil at room temperature under aerobic conditions. First-order kinetics adequately matched the lab column profiles for most of the compounds. Consistent compound-specific apparent first-order rate coefficients were obtained by the three models and the lab column experiment, except for benzene. Laboratory microcosm experiments lacked of sensitivity for slowly degrading compounds and underestimated degradation rates by up to a factor of 5. Addition of NH3 vapor was shown to increase the degradation rates for some VOCs in the laboratory microcosms. All field models suggested a significantly higher degradation rate for benzene than the rates measured in the lab, suggesting that the field microbial community was superior in developing benzene degrading activity.

  20. Environmental Value of Draught Animals: Saving of Fossil-fuel and Prevention of Greenhouse Gas Emission

    OpenAIRE

    Dikshit, A.K.; Birthal, Pratap Singh

    2010-01-01

    Animal energy is a renewable and sustainable source of energy. It is renewable because the animals can be reproduced by breeding and rearing the required number of animals. It is sustainable because the animals derive their energy for work largely from agricultural by-products. In addition, there are other environmental contributions of the working animal stock — consider replacing it by agricultural machinery run on fossil-fuel. Animal energy saves natural resources, fossil fuel and preven...

  1. Passive vapor extraction feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-01-01

    Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft 3 /min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft 3 /min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm

  2. The Testing of Fuel Rod Models with Zr1Nb Alloy Cladding in Water Vapor at Temperature of Hypothetical Accident Situation in WWER-1000 Type Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnorutsky, V.S.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Gritsina, V.M.; Rodak, A.G.; Belash, N.N.; Yakovlev, V.K.

    2006-01-01

    In the article happen to results of testing the fuel rod models, their welded joints, changing the mechanical characteristics of shells of models from experimental parties of pipes from Zr1Nb alloy (Zr+1 mass%Nb) at heating of models, pervaded helium before pressures, using in earned one's living fuel rods (2,2 MPa), before the temperature 770 degree C and above occurs an overblown fuels, but at temperature 820...830 degree C shells can be broken at the expense of pressure of warming gas. Swept away reduction plasticity and embrittlement shells after the heating under temperature of 900...1200 degree C and cooling before room temperature pipes-shells from Zr1Nb alloy and from the staff alloy E110

  3. Supply Chain-Based Solution to Prevent Fuel Tax Evasion: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capps, Gary J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Engineering and Transportation Sciences Division; Franzese, Oscar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Engineering and Transportation Sciences Division; Lascurain, Mary Beth [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Engineering and Transportation Sciences Division; Siekmann, Adam [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Engineering and Transportation Sciences Division; Barker, Alan M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Electrical and Electronics Systems Research Division

    2016-07-28

    The primary source of funding for the United States transportation system is derived from motor fuel and other highway use taxes. Loss of revenue attributed to fuel-tax evasion has been assessed to be somewhere between 1 billion and 3 billion per year. Any solution that addresses this problem needs to include not only the tax-collection agencies and auditors, but also the carriers transporting oil products and the carriers customers. This report presents a system developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Federal Highway Administration which has the potential to reduce or eliminate many fuel-tax evasion schemes. The solution balances the needs of tax-auditors and those of the fuel-hauling companies and their customers. The system has three main components. The on-board subsystem combined sensors, tracking and communication devices, and software (the on-board Evidential Reasoning System, or obERS) to detect, monitor, and geo-locate the transfer of fuel among different locations. The back office sub-system (boERS) used self-learning algorithms to determine the legitimacy of the fuel loading and offloading (important for tax auditors) and detect potential illicit operations such as fuel theft (important for carriers and their customers, and may justify the deployment costs). The third sub-system, the Fuel Distribution and Auditing System or FDAS, is a centralized database, which together with a user interface allows tax auditors to query the data submitted by the fuel-hauling companies and correlate different parameters to quickly identify any anomalies. Industry partners included Barger Transport of Weber City, Virginia (fleet); Air-Weigh, of Eugene, Oregon (and their wires and harnesses); Liquid Bulk Tank (LBT) of Omaha, Nebraska (three five-compartment trailers); and Innovative Software Engineering (ISE) of Coralville, Iowa(on-board telematics device and back-office system). ORNL conducted a pilot test with the three instrumented vehicles

  4. Fuel processor for fuel cell power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E.; Springer, Thomas E.; Huff, James R.

    1987-01-01

    A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

  5. Fuel Conservation by the Application of Spill Prevention and Failsafe Engineering (A Guideline Manual)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodier, J. Leslie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Water and Land Resources Department, Office of Marine and Environmental Engineering; Siclari, Robert J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Water and Land Resources Department, Office of Marine and Environmental Engineering; Garrity, Phyllis A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Water and Land Resources Department, Office of Marine and Environmental Engineering

    1980-10-30

    From a series of nationwide plant surveys dedicated to spill prevention, containment and countermeasure evaluation, coupled with spill response action activities, a need was determined for a spill prevention guideline manual. From Federally accumulated statistics for oil and hazardous substance spills, the authors culled information on spills of hydrocarbon products. In 1978, a total of 1456 oil spills were reported compared to 1451 in 1979. The 1978 spills were more severe, however, since 7,289,163 gallons of oil were accidentally discharged. In 1979, the gallons spilled was reduced to 3,663,473. These figures are derived from reported spills; it is highly possible that an equal amount was spilled and not reported. Spills effectively contained within a plant property that do not enter a navigational waterway need not be reported. Needless to say, there is a tremendous annual loss of oil products due to accidental spillage during transportation, cargo transfer, bulk storage and processing. As an aid to plant engineers and managers, Federal workers, fire marshalls and fire and casualty insurance inspectors, the document is offered as a spill prevention guide. The manual defines state-of-the-art spill prevention practices and automation techniques that can reduce spills caused by human error. Whenever practical, the cost of implementation is provided to aid equipment acquisition and installation budgeting. To emphasize the need for spill prevention activities, historic spills are briefly described after which remedial action is defined in an appropriate section of the manual. The section on plant security goes into considerable depth since to date no Federal agency or trade association has provided industry with guidelines on this important phase of plant operation. The intent of the document is to provide finger-tip reference material that can be used by interested parties in a nationwide effort to reduce loss of oil from preventable spills.

  6. Oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Yan, Jinyue

    2016-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized fuels (PF), as a promising technology for CO2 capture from power plants, has gained a lot of concerns and also advanced considerable research, development and demonstration in the last past years worldwide. The use of CO2 or the mixture of CO2 and H2O vapor as th...

  7. Flammability characteristics of combustible gases and vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabetakis, M. G. [Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1964-05-01

    This is a summary of the available limit of flammability, autoignition and burning-rate data for more than 200 combustible gases and vapors in air and other oxidants, as well as of empirical rules and graphs that can be used to predict similar data for thousands of other combustibles under a variety of environmental conditions. Spec$c data are presented on the paraffinic, unsaturated, aromatic, and alicyclic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, and sulfur compounds, and an assortment of fuels, fuel blends, hydraulic fluids, engine oils, and miscellaneous combustible gases and vapors.

  8. Method and apparatus for preventing inadvertent criticality in a nuclear fueled electric power generating unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuley, C.R.; Bauman, D.A.; Neuner, J.A.; Feilchenfeld, M.M.; Greenberg, L.

    1984-01-01

    An inadvertent approach to criticality in a nuclear fueled electric power generating unit is detected and an alarm is generated through on-line monitoring of the neutron flux. The difficulties of accurately measuring the low levels of neutron flux in a subcritical reactor are overcome by the use of a microcomputer which continuously generates average flux count rate signals for incremental time periods from thousands of samples taken during each such period and which serially stores the average flux count rate signals for a preselected time interval. At the end of each incremental time period, the microcomputer compares the latest average flux count rate signal with the oldest, and preferably each of the intervening stored values, and if it exceeds any of them by at least a preselected multiplication factor, an alarm is generated. (author)

  9. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  10. Starting of the steam generator of a fossil fuel power plant, using predictive control based in a neuronal model; Arranque del generador de vapor de una central termoelectrica, usando control predictivo basado en un modelo neuronal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo Dominguez, Tonatiuh

    2004-09-15

    In this thesis work it is presented the design and implementation of a simulator of total scope of a predictive controller based in the neuronal model of the temperature in two stages of the heating of the steam generator of a fossil fuel power plant. An implemented control scheme is detailed, as well as the methodology for the identification of a neuronal model utilized for the control. Finally the results of the implementation in the simulator located at the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) are shown to be satisfactory. This control structure is not applied directly in closed circuit, but provides the value of the control actions to a human operator. [Spanish] En este trabajo de tesis se presenta el diseno e implementacion, en un simulador de alcance total, de un controlador predictivo basado en un modelo neuronal para el control de la temperatura en dos etapas del calentamiento del generador de vapor de una central termoelectrica. Se detalla el esquema de control implementado, asi como la metodologia de identificacion de un modelo neuronal utilizado para la sintesis del control. Finalmente se muestran los resultados de la implementacion en el simulador que se encuentra en el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE); dichos resultados fueron satisfactorios. Esta estructura de control no se aplica directamente en lazo cerrado, sino que provee el valor de las acciones de control a un operador humano.

  11. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    fuel, Anticipated evolution of fuel in dry storage, Anticipated evolution of fuel in deep geological disposal); Boiling-water reactor fuel (Similarities, and differences with PWR fuel, Axial and radial zoning, Rod and channel box sizes, Poisoning and reactivity control, Cladding specific characteristics, Trends in fuel evolution); 3 - Liquid-metal-cooled fast reactor fuel: Fast-neutron irradiation damage in structural materials (Fast-neutron-induced damage in metals, What materials should be used?); Fuels and targets for fast-reactor transmutation (Fast reactors: reactors affording the ability to carry out effective actinide transmutation, Recycling: homogeneous, or heterogeneous?); 4 - gas-cooled reactor fuel: Particle fuel (From the initial concept to the advanced TRISO particle concept, Kernel fabrication processes, Particle coating by chemical vapor deposition, Fuel element fabrication: particle compaction, Characterization of fuel particles, and elements, From HTR fuel to VHTR and GFR fuels: the GAIA facility at CEA/Cadarache); Irradiation behavior of particle fuels (Particle fuel: a variety of failure modes for a high-strength object, The amoeba effect, Fission product behavior, and diffusion in particle fuels); Mechanical modeling of particle fuel; Very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR) fuel; Gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) fuel (The specifications for GFR fuel, GFR fissile material, First containment baffler materials, GFR fuel element concepts); 5 - Research reactor fuels (A considerable feedback from experience, Conversion of French reactors to low-enriched (≤20% U-235)U 3 Si 2 fuel, Conversion of all reactors: R and D requirements for high-performance reactors, An 'advanced' research reactor fuel: UMo, The startup fuel for the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) will still be U 3 Si 2 -Al; 6 - An instrument for future fuel research: the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR): Fuel irradiation experiments in JHR, JHR: a flexible instrument; 7 - Glossary-Index

  12. Study of the stress corrosion cracking of zirconium alloys in iodine vapor and its relation with nuclear fuel element failures for pellet-cladding interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojorge, Claudia D.

    2003-01-01

    Fission product induced Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) susceptibility of Zirconium alloy cladding is a relevant attribute to be considered when evaluating nuclear fuel performance in power reactors. It is normally introduced in the codes through a typical parameter, namely the threshold stress needed to start a brittle fissure in normal reactor operating conditions. Iodine induced SCC of Zircaloy-4 cladding was measured at 350 and 400 C degrees by the pressurised-tube technique, method which permits an accurate control of the tensile hoop stress applied on the material. Materials with two different thermo-mechanical treatments were used, essentially differing in the number of roll steps used to arrive to tube finale dimensions. Threshold stress values of about 180-200 MPa were obtained in both cases at 400 C degrees, whereas the results at 350 C degrees have been strongly affected by the different fabrication routes. From the microscopic failure analysis carried out using optical and electronic microscopy, it was concluded that improper treatment may produce surface defects which can act as SCC initiators, giving way to failure at much lower applied stresses than in the case of well finished tubes [es

  13. Compact Vapor Chamber Cools Critical Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in the production of proton exchange membrane fuel cells have NASA considering their use as a power source for spacecraft and robots in future space missions. With SBIR funding from Glenn Research Center, Lancaster, Pennsylvania-based Thermacore Inc. developed strong, lightweight titanium vapor chambers to keep the fuel cells operating at optimum temperatures. The company is now selling the technology for cooling electronic components.

  14. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadaoka, Noriyuki.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain a satisfactory integrity by preventing the increase of corrosion at the outer surface of a fuel can near the point of contact between the fuel can and the spacer due to the use of fuel pellets incorporated with burnable poisons. Constitution: Since reactor coolants are at high temperature and high pressure, zirconium and water are brought into reaction to proceed oxidation at the outer surface of a fuel can to form uniform oxidation layers. However, abrasion corrosion is additionally formed at the contact portion between the spacer and the fuel can, by which the corrosion is increased by about 25 %. For preventing such nodular corrosion, fuel pellets not incorporated with burnable poisons are charged at a portion of the fuel rod where the spacer is supported and fuel pellets incorporated with burnable poisons are charged at the positions other than about to thereby suppress the amount of the corrosion at the portion where the corrosion of the fuel can is most liable to be increased to thereby improve the fuel integrity. That is, radiolysis of coolants due to gamma-rays produced from gadolinium is lowered to reduce the oxygen concentration near the outer surface thereby preventing the corrosion. (Kawakami, Y.)

  15. Prevention of Dietary-Fat-Fueled Ketogenesis Attenuates BRAF V600E Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Siyuan; Lin, Ruiting; Jin, Lingtao; Zhao, Liang; Kang, Hee-Bum; Pan, Yaozhu; Liu, Shuangping; Qian, Guoqing; Qian, Zhiyu; Konstantakou, Evmorfia; Zhang, Baotong; Dong, Jin-Tang; Chung, Young Rock; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Merghoub, Taha; Zhou, Lu; Kudchadkar, Ragini R; Lawson, David H; Khoury, Hanna J; Khuri, Fadlo R; Boise, Lawrence H; Lonial, Sagar; Lee, Benjamin H; Pollack, Brian P; Arbiser, Jack L; Fan, Jun; Lei, Qun-Ying; Chen, Jing

    2017-02-07

    Lifestyle factors, including diet, play an important role in the survival of cancer patients. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenic links between diet and particular oncogenic mutations in human cancers remain unclear. We recently reported that the ketone body acetoacetate selectively enhances BRAF V600E mutant-dependent MEK1 activation in human cancers. Here we show that a high-fat ketogenic diet increased serum levels of acetoacetate, leading to enhanced tumor growth potential of BRAF V600E-expressing human melanoma cells in xenograft mice. Treatment with hypolipidemic agents to lower circulating acetoacetate levels or an inhibitory homolog of acetoacetate, dehydroacetic acid, to antagonize acetoacetate-BRAF V600E binding attenuated BRAF V600E tumor growth. These findings reveal a signaling basis underlying a pathogenic role of dietary fat in BRAF V600E-expressing melanoma, providing insights into the design of conceptualized "precision diets" that may prevent or delay tumor progression based on an individual's specific oncogenic mutation profile. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  17. To prevent the occurrence of black water agglomerate through delaying decomposition of cyanobacterial bloom biomass by sediment microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan-Li; Jiang, He-Long; Cai, Hai-Yuan

    2015-04-28

    Settlement of cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB) into sediments in eutrophic lakes often induced the occurrence of black water agglomerate and then water quality deterioration. This study investigated the effect of sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC) on CBB removal in sediments and related water pollution. Sediment bulking and subsequent black water from decomposition of settled CBB happened without SMFC, but were not observed over 100-day experiments with SMFC employment. While CBB in sediments improved power production from SMFC, the removal efficiency of organic matters in CBB-amended sediments with SMFC was significantly lower than that without SMFC. Pyrosequencing analysis showed higher abundances of the fermentative Clostridium and acetoclastic methanogen in CBB-amended bulk sediments without SMFC than with SMFC at the end of experiments. Obviously, SMFC operation changed the microbial community in CBB-amended sediments, and delayed the CBB degradation against sediment bulking. Thus, SMFC could be potentially applied as pollution prevention in CBB-settled and sensitive zones in shallow lakes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  19. Dual Tank Fuel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  20. Vapor pumps and gas-driven machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, R.

    1991-01-01

    The vapor pump, patented in 1979 by Gaz de France, is an additional mass and heat exchanger which uses the combustion air of fuel-burning machines as an additional cold source. This cold source is preheated and, above all, humidified before reaching the burner, by means of the residual sensible and latent heat in the combustion products of the fuel-burning process. This final exchanger thus makes it possible, in many cases, to recover all the gross calorific value of natural gas, even when the combustion products leave the process at a wet temperature greater than 60 0 C, the maximum dew point of the products of normal combustion. Another significant advantage of the vapor pump being worth highlighting is the selective recycling of water vapor by the vapor pump which reduces the adiabatic combustion temperature and the oxygen concentration in the combustion air, two factors which lead to considerable reductions in nitrogen oxides formation, hence limiting atmospheric pollution. Alongside a wide range of configurations which make advantageous use of the vapor pump in association with gas-driven machines and processes, including gas turbines, a number of boiler plant installations are also presented [fr

  1. Nuclear weapon relevant materials and preventive arms control. Uranium-free fuels for plutonium elimination and spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebert, Wolfgang; Englert, Matthias; Pistner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    technological challenges of nuclear non-proliferation, which are directly connected with the central role of weapon-relevant materials, and it is trying to present practical solutions on a technical basis: - Discover paths for the disposal of existing amounts of nuclear weapon-relevant materials elaborating on the example of technically-based plutonium disposal options: central technical questions of the possible use of uranium-free inert matrix fuel (IMF) in currently used light water reactors will be addressed in order to clarify which advantages or disadvantages do exist in comparison to other disposal options. The investigation is limited on the comparison with one other reactor-based option, the use of uranium-plutonium mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels. - Analysis of proliferation relevant potentials of new nuclear technologies (accessibility of weapon materials): Exemplary investigation of spallation neutron sources in order to improve this technology by a more proliferation resistant shaping. Although they are obviously capable to breed nuclear weapon-relevant materials like plutonium, uranium-233 or tritium, there is no comprehensive analysis of nonproliferation aspects of spallation neutron sources up to now. Both project parts provide not only contributions to the concept of preventive arms control but also to the shaping of technologies, which is oriented towards the criteria of proliferation resistance.

  2. Metal Fuel Development and Verification for Prototype Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Bock Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR to be built by 2028. U–Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U–transuranics (TRU–Zr fuel will gradually replace U–Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U–Zr fuel, work on U–Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U–TRU–Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochemical processing of spent PWR (pressurized water reactor fuels, which contains highly radioactive minor actinides and chemically active lanthanide or rare earth elements as carryover impurities. An advanced fuel slug casting system, which can prevent vaporization of volatile elements through a control of the atmospheric pressure of the casting chamber and also deal with chemically active lanthanide elements using protective coatings in the casting crucible, was developed. Fuel cladding of the ferritic–martensitic steel FC92, which has higher mechanical strength at a high temperature than conventional HT9 cladding, was developed and fabricated, and is being irradiated in the fast reactor.

  3. Metal fuel development and verification for prototype generation- IV Sodium- Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Cheon, Jin Sik; Kim, Sung Ho; Park, Jeong Yong; Joo, Hyung Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) to be built by 2028. U-Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U -transuranics (TRU)-Zr fuel will gradually replace U-Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U-Zr fuel, work on U-Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U-TRU-Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochemical processing of spent PWR (pressurized water reactor) fuels, which contains highly radioactive minor actinides and chemically active lanthanide or rare earth elements as carryover impurities. An advanced fuel slug casting system, which can prevent vaporization of volatile elements through a control of the atmospheric pressure of the casting chamber and also deal with chemically active lanthanide elements using protective coatings in the casting crucible, was developed. Fuel cladding of the ferritic-martensitic steel FC92, which has higher mechanical strength at a high temperature than conventional HT9 cladding, was developed and fabricated, and is being irradiated in the fast reactor.

  4. Influence of absorption by environmental water vapor on radiation transfer in wildland fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Frankman; B. W. Webb; B. W. Butler

    2008-01-01

    The attenuation of radiation transfer from wildland flames to fuel by environmental water vapor is investigated. Emission is tracked from points on an idealized flame to locations along the fuel bed while accounting for absorption by environmental water vapor in the intervening medium. The Spectral Line Weighted-sum-of-gray-gases approach was employed for treating the...

  5. Clean/alternative fueled fleet programs - 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act, the Colorado Air Pollution Prevention and Control Act, and Denver City and County regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowles, S.L.; Manderino, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite substantial regulations for nearly two decades, attainment of this ambient standards for ozone and carbon monoxide (CO) remain difficult goals to achieve, Even with of ozone precursors and CO. The 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA90) prescribe further reductions of mobile source emissions. One such reduction strategy is using clean fuels, such as methanol, ethanol, or other alcohols (in blends of 85 percent or more alcohol with gasoline or other fuel), reformulated gasoline or diesel, natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, hydrogen, or electricity. There are regulatory measures involving special fuels which will be required in areas heavily polluted with ozone and CO. The state of Colorado recently passed the 1992 Air Pollution Prevention and Control Act which included provisions for the use of alternative fuels which will be implemented in 1994. In addition to adhering to the Colorado state regulations, the city and county of Denver also have regulations pertaining to the use of alternative fuels in fleets of 10 or more vehicles. Denver's program began in 1992. This paper will address the issue of fleet conversion and its impact on industry in Colorado, and Denver in particular

  6. Neurobehavioral evaluations of rats gestationally exposed to gasoline vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the US fuel supply is moving towards blends with higher ethanol levels, there are questions regarding effects of these fuel vapors in the developing fetus. As part of a project evaluating gasoline-ethanol blends of different proportions. we included an evaluation of inhaled pu...

  7. Integrated fuel processor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Pereira, C.; Lee, S. H. D.; Krumpelt, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies has been supporting the development of fuel-flexible fuel processors at Argonne National Laboratory. These fuel processors will enable fuel cell vehicles to operate on fuels available through the existing infrastructure. The constraints of on-board space and weight require that these fuel processors be designed to be compact and lightweight, while meeting the performance targets for efficiency and gas quality needed for the fuel cell. This paper discusses the performance of a prototype fuel processor that has been designed and fabricated to operate with liquid fuels, such as gasoline, ethanol, methanol, etc. Rated for a capacity of 10 kWe (one-fifth of that needed for a car), the prototype fuel processor integrates the unit operations (vaporization, heat exchange, etc.) and processes (reforming, water-gas shift, preferential oxidation reactions, etc.) necessary to produce the hydrogen-rich gas (reformate) that will fuel the polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. The fuel processor work is being complemented by analytical and fundamental research. With the ultimate objective of meeting on-board fuel processor goals, these studies include: modeling fuel cell systems to identify design and operating features; evaluating alternative fuel processing options; and developing appropriate catalysts and materials. Issues and outstanding challenges that need to be overcome in order to develop practical, on-board devices are discussed

  8. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Matsuzuka, Ryuji.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a fuel assembly which can decrease pressure loss of coolant to uniform temperature. Structure: A sectional area of a flow passage in the vicinity of an inner peripheral surface of a wrapper tube is limited over the entire length to prevent the temperature of a fuel element in the outermost peripheral portion from being excessively decreased to thereby flatten temperature distribution. To this end, a plurality of pincture-frame-like sheet metals constituting a spacer for supporting a fuel assembly, which has a plurality of fuel elements planted lengthwise and in given spaced relation within the wrapper tube, is disposed in longitudinal grooves and in stacked fashion to form a substantially honeycomb-like space in cross section. The fuel elements are inserted and supported in the space to form a fuel assembly. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Fluidized bed combustion of refuse-derived fuel in presence of protective coal ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer, Eduardo [CIRCE, Universidad de Zaragoza, Maria de Luna, 3, Zaragoza (Spain); Aho, Martti [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1603, 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Silvennoinen, Jaani; Nurminen, Riku-Ville [Kvaerner Power, P.O.Box 109, FIN-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2005-12-15

    Combustion of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) alone or together with other biomass leads to superheater fouling and corrosion in efficient power plants (with high steam values) due to vaporization and condensation of alkali chlorides. In this study, means were found to raise the portion of RDF to 40% enb without risk to boilers. This was done by co-firing RDF with coal and optimizing coal quality. Free aluminum silicate in coal captured alkalies from vaporized alkali chlorides preventing Cl condensation to superheaters. Strong fouling and corrosion were simultaneously averted. Results from 100 kW and 4 MW CFB reactors are reported. (author)

  10. Engines, fuels and pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvi, G.

    1992-01-01

    The article points out the close relationship among engines, fuels and polluting emissions, and outlines an overall picture of future trends. The technical trade literature shows that diesel engines may undergo strong future development, due to their more favourable energy converting and less polluting characteristics. With regard to petrol injection engines, their improved construction under extremely close tolerances will result in a severe tightening-up of fuel specifications (with or without lead), so as to prevent the deposition of residues at the inlet (manifolds, injectors, valves, and combustion chamber), and their ensuing adverse effects on vehicle handling especially during the 'warm-up' stage. Recent checkups and tests run in the USA have evidenced that automotive engine-derived pollution in towns is in fact considerably more severe than that derived from mathematical models based on 'average emission factors' determined on a laboratory scale (roller bench tests, vaporization tests etc.). The entire body of regulations issued so far becomes questionable, and supplementary studies based on road-tests have been proposed. The paper's discussion is concluded with statistical data showing traffic pollution caused by VOCs (volatile organic compounds)

  11. Cold start characteristics of ethanol as an automobile fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Leonard

    1982-01-01

    An alcohol fuel burner and decomposer in which one stream of fuel is preheated by passing it through an electrically heated conduit to vaporize the fuel, the fuel vapor is mixed with air, the air-fuel mixture is ignited and combusted, and the combustion gases are passed in heat exchange relationship with a conduit carrying a stream of fuel to decompose the fuel forming a fuel stream containing hydrogen gas for starting internal combustion engines, the mass flow of the combustion gas being increased as it flows in heat exchange relationship with the fuel carrying conduit, is disclosed.

  12. The development of CVR coatings for PBR fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, R. E.; Vanier, P. E.; Dowell, M. B.; Lennartz, J. A.

    Particle bed reactors (PBR's) are being developed for both space power and propulsion applications. These reactors operate with exhaust gas temperatures of 2500 to 3000 K and fuel temperatures hundreds of degrees higher. One fuel design for these reactors consists of uranium carbide encapsulated in either carbon or graphite. This fuel kernel must be protected from the coolant gas, usually H2, both to prevent attack of the kernel and to limit fission product release. Refractory carbide coatings have been proposed for this purpose. The typical coating process used for this is a chemical vapor deposition. Testing of other components have indicated the superiority of refractory carbide coatings applied using a chemical vapor reaction (CVR) process, however technology to apply these coatings to large numbers of fuel particles with diameters on the order of 500 pm were not readily available. A process to deposit these CVR coatings on surrogate fuel consisting of graphite particles is described. Several types of coatings have been applied to the graphite substrate: NbC in various thicknesses and a bilayer coating consisting of NbC and TaC with a intermediate layer of pyrolytic graphite. These coated particles have been characterized prior to test; results are presented.

  13. Method for Determining Vaporization Parameters

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An accurate method of measuring vaporization coefficients will be very useful to each of these disciplines: Cosmochemistry,Evaporative Vapor Deposition, Durability...

  14. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-11-08

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements.

  15. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, R.C.; Paisner, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985 the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for the internationally competitive production of uranium separative work. The economic basis for this decision is considered, with an indicated of the constraints placed on the process figures of merit and the process laser system. We then trace an atom through a generic AVLIS separator and give examples of the physical steps encountered, the models used to describe the process physics, the fundamental parameters involved, and the role of diagnostic laser measurements

  16. Removal of hydrogen sulfide as ammonium sulfate from hydropyrolysis product vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marker, Terry L.; Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Roberts, Michael J.

    2017-03-14

    A system and method for processing biomass into hydrocarbon fuels that includes processing a biomass in a hydropyrolysis reactor resulting in hydrocarbon fuels and a process vapor stream and cooling the process vapor stream to a condensation temperature resulting in an aqueous stream. The aqueous stream is sent to a catalytic reactor where it is oxidized to obtain a product stream containing ammonia and ammonium sulfate. A resulting cooled product vapor stream includes non-condensable process vapors comprising H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO, CO.sub.2, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide.

  17. Removal of hydrogen sulfide as ammonium sulfate from hydropyrolysis product vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Terry L; Felix, Larry G; Linck, Martin B; Roberts, Michael J

    2014-10-14

    A system and method for processing biomass into hydrocarbon fuels that includes processing a biomass in a hydropyrolysis reactor resulting in hydrocarbon fuels and a process vapor stream and cooling the process vapor stream to a condensation temperature resulting in an aqueous stream. The aqueous stream is sent to a catalytic reactor where it is oxidized to obtain a product stream containing ammonia and ammonium sulfate. A resulting cooled product vapor stream includes non-condensable process vapors comprising H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO, CO.sub.2, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide.

  18. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  19. Reduction of solvent emissions from vapor degreasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buresh, P.

    1989-12-31

    Hutchinson Tehnology, Inc. (HTI) implemented a number of low cost, low technology procedures to reduce emissions and prevent solvent loss from two open-top freon (CFC-113) vapor degreasers (Branson No. 1 and No. 2). HTI is a computer components manufacturer that uses freon vapor degreasing systems to remove fluxes and other residues remaining on the flexible printed circuits from the soldering process. With relatively minor changes in operation, solvent emissions were reduced by an average of 2.8 gallons per day (GDP) for both degreasers combined. It is anticipated that HTI will follow through with installation of an automatic cover, which can result in further solvent emissions reduction.

  20. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  1. Directed vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, James Frederick

    This dissertation describes the invention, design, construction, experimental evaluation and modeling of a new physical vapor deposition technique (U.S. Patent #5,534,314) for high rate, efficient deposition of refractory elements, alloys, and compounds onto flat or curved surfaces. The new Directed Vapor Deposition (DVD) technique examined in this dissertation was distinct from previous physical vapor deposition techniques because it used low vacuum electron beam (e-beam) evaporation in combination with a carrier gas stream to transport and vapor spray deposit metals, ceramics, and semiconducting materials. Because of the system's unique approach to vapor phase materials processing, detailed analyses of critical concepts (e.g. the e-beam accelerating voltage and power required for evaporation, the vacuum pumping capacity necessary to generate specific gas flow velocities exiting a nozzle) were used to reduce to practice a functioning materials synthesis tool. After construction, the ability to create low contamination films of pure metals, semi-conducting materials, and compounds via this new method was demonstrated, and oxide deposition using an oxygen-doped gas stream in combination with a pure metal evaporant source was shown to be feasible. DVD vapor transport characteristics were experimentally investigated with deposition chamber pressure, carrier gas type, and e-beam power being identified as major processing parameters which affected vapor atom trajectories. The low vacuum carrier gas streams employed in DVD showed a dramatic ability to focus the vapor stream during transport to the substrate and thereby enhance material deposition rates and efficiencies significantly under certain process conditions. Conditions for maximum deposition efficiency onto flat substrates and continuous fibers were experimentally identified by varying chamber pressure, carrier gas velocity (Mach number), and e-beam power. Deposition efficiencies peaked at about 0.5 Torr when

  2. Thermal ionization and plasma state of high temperature vapor of UO2, Cs, and Na: Effect on the heat and radiation transport properties of the vapor phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karow, H.U.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with the question how far the thermophysical state and the convective and radiative heat transport properties of vaporized reactor core materials are affected by the thermal ionization existing in the actual vapor state. The materials under consideration here are: nuclear oxide fuel (UO 2 ), Na (as the LMFBR coolant material), and Cs (alkaline fission product, partly retained in the fuel of the core zone). (orig./RW) [de

  3. Vapor concentration monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayly, John G.; Booth, Ronald J.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

  4. Heat transfer enhancement for spent nuclear fuel assembly disposal packages using metallic void fillers: A prevention technique for solidification shrinkage-induced interfacial gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongsoo; McKrell, Thomas J.; Driscoll, Michael J.

    2017-06-01

    This study considers replacing the externally accessible void spaces inside a disposal package containing a spent nuclear fuel assembly (SNFA) with high heat conducting metal to increase the effective thermal conductivity of the package and simplify the heat transfer mechanism inside the package by reducing it to a conduction dominant problem. The focus of the study is on preventing the gaps adjacent to the walls of the package components, produced by solidification shrinkage of poured liquid metal. We approached the problem by providing a temporary coating layer on the components to avoid direct build-up of thick metal oxides on their surface to promote metallic bonding at the interfaces under a non-inert environment. Laboratory scale experiments without SNFA were performed with Zn coated low carbon steel canisters and Zamak-3 void filler under two different filling temperature conditions - below and above the melting point of Zn (designated BMP and AMP respectively). Gap formation was successfully prevented in both cases while we confirmed an open gap in a control experiment, which used an uncoated canister. Minor growth of Al-Fe intermetallic phases was observed at the canister/filler interface of the sample produced under the BMP condition while their growth was significant and showed irregularly distributed morphology in the sample produced under the AMP condition, which has a potential to mitigate excessive residual stresses caused by shrinkage prevention. A procedure for the full-scale application was specified based on the results.

  5. Vaporization order and burning efficiency of crude oils during in-situ burning on water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gelderen, Laurens; Malmquist, Linus M.V.; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve the understanding of the burning efficiency and its observed size dependency of in-situ burning of crude oil on water, the vaporization order of the components in crude oils was studied. The vaporization order of such multicomponent fuels was assessed by studying the surface...... temperature, flame height, burning rate and burn residues of three alkanes (n-octane, dodecane and hexadecane), a mixture of these alkanes (1:1:1 volumetric ratio) and two crude oils (light and medium-light crudes). The experimental results were compared to four models for the vaporization order...... of multicomponent fuels. The alkanes were tested as benchmark fuels with a uniform vaporization order, for which all components evaporate simultaneously. As expected, these pure fuels showed a steady state burning with a near-constant surface temperature, flame height and burning rate. The alkane mixture showed...

  6. The toxicity of inhaled methanol vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavet, R; Nauss, K M

    1990-01-01

    Methanol could become a major automotive fuel in the U.S., and its use may result in increased exposure of the public to methanol vapor. Nearly all of the available information on methanol toxicity in humans relates to the consequences of acute, rather than chronic, exposures. Acute methanol toxicity evolves in a well-understood pattern and consists of an uncompensated metabolic acidosis with superimposed toxicity to the visual system. The toxic properties of methanol are rooted in the factors that govern both the conversion of methanol to formic acid and the subsequent metabolism of formate to carbon dioxide in the folate pathway. In short, the toxic syndrome sets in if formate generation continues at a rate that exceeds its rate of metabolism. Current evidence indicates that formate accumulation will not challenge the metabolic capacity of the folate pathway at the anticipated levels of exposure to automotive methanol vapor.

  7. 76 FR 61062 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Arizona; Update to Stage II Gasoline Vapor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... Stage II Gasoline Vapor Recovery Program; Change in the Definition of ``Gasoline'' To Exclude ``E85... emissions from the transfer of gasoline from storage tanks to motor vehicle fuel tanks at gasoline dispensing sites, i.e., stage II vapor recovery. The revisions would also amend the definition of ``gasoline...

  8. Enthalpy of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures: An Inexpensive Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battino, Rubin; Dolson, David A.; Hall, Michael A.; Letcher, Trevor M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method to determine the enthalpy of vaporization of liquids by measuring vapor pressure as a function of temperature is described. The vapor pressures measured with the stopcock cell were higher than the literature values and those measured with the sidearm rubber septum cell were both higher and lower than literature…

  9. Vaporization of irradiated droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.L.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Zardecki, A.

    1986-01-01

    The vaporization of a spherically symmetric liquid droplet subject to a high-intensity laser flux is investigated on the basis of a hydrodynamic description of the system composed of the vapor and ambient gas. In the limit of the convective vaporization, the boundary conditions at the fluid--gas interface are formulated by using the notion of a Knudsen layer in which translational equilibrium is established. This leads to approximate jump conditions at the interface. For homogeneous energy deposition, the hydrodynamic equations are solved numerically with the aid of the CON1D computer code (''CON1D: A computer program for calculating spherically symmetric droplet combustion,'' Los Alamos National Laboratory Report No. LA-10269-MS, December, 1984), based on the implict continuous--fluid Eulerian (ICE) [J. Comput. Phys. 8, 197 (1971)] and arbitrary Lagrangian--Eulerian (ALE) [J. Comput. Phys. 14, 1227 (1974)] numerical mehtods. The solutions exhibit the existence of two shock waves propagating in opposite directions with respect to the contact discontinuity surface that separates the ambient gas and vapor

  10. Vapor liquid fraction determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This invention describes a method of measuring liquid and vapor fractions in a non-homogeneous fluid flowing through an elongate conduit, such as may be required with boiling water, non-boiling turbulent flows, fluidized bed experiments, water-gas mixing analysis, and nuclear plant cooling. (UK)

  11. Heat of vaporization spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, D. Jr.

    1979-03-01

    Multilayer desorption measurements of various substances adsorbed on a stainless-steel substrate are found to exhibit desorption profiles consistent with a zeroth-order desorption model. The singleness of the desorption transients together with their narrow peak widths makes the technique ideally suited for a heat of vaporization spectrometer for either substance analysis or identification.

  12. Heat of vaporization spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, D. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Multilayer desorption measurements of various substances adsorbed on a stainless steel substrate are found to exhibit desorption profiles consistent with a zeroth order desorption model. The singleness of the desorption transients together with their narrow peak widths makes the technique ideally suited for a heat of vaporization spectrometer for either substance analysis or identification.

  13. Study on the metal vapor generator for the production of improved gadolinia burnable poison material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, O. C.; Noh, S. P.; Ko, K. H.; Kim, T. S.; Lim, C. H.; Kim, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    A longer cycle operation of a nuclear fuel is one of the ways to promote the economy of a nuclear power plant. For this purpose, high burn up fuel which has initial higher enrichment is required with higher loading of fuel. As a result, adequate burnable poison material must be used to control peak fuel pin power. Devices to manufacture the improved gadolinia burnable poison are developed. The improved gadolinia contains higher abundance of the preferred thermal neutron absorbers. Devices are composed of metal vapor generator, lasers and ion extractor. In this paper, a metal vapor generator by using electron beam gun is reported

  14. Análise termodinâmica de um ciclo de potência com célula a combustível sofc e turbina a vapor = Thermodynamic analysis of a power cycle such as SOFC fuel cell and steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Sordi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo foi realizar a análise termodinâmica de um sistema híbrido, SOFC / ST (célula a combustível tipo SOFC e turbina a vapor ST. O combustível considerado para a análise foi o gás metano (biogás produzido por meio da digestão anaeróbica de resíduos orgânicos. A metodologia utilizada foi o balanço de energia dosistema SOFC / ST, considerando a reforma interna do metano na célula a combustível, de forma a obter a sua eficiência elétrica. O resultado foi comparado a um ciclo combinado convencional de turbina a gás e turbina a vapor (GT / ST para potências entre 10 MW e 30MW. A eficiência do sistema híbrido SOFC / ST variou de 61% a 66% em relação ao poder calorífico do metano; e a eficiência do ciclo combinado GT / ST variou de 41% a 55% para o mesmo intervalo de potência. Para geração distribuída a célula a combustível SOFC é atecnologia mais eficiente.The objective of this article was to analyze the thermodynamic of ahybrid system, SOFC / ST (SOFC fuel cell and ST steam turbine. The fuel for the analysis was the gas methane (biogas produced through the anaerobic digestion of the organic residues. The utilized methodology was the energy balance of the system SOFC / ST,considering the internal reforming of methane in the fuel cell, in a way to obtain its electric effectiveness. The result was compared to a conventional combined cycle of gas turbine and steam turbine (GT / ST for powers between 10 MW and 30 MW. The efficiency of the hybrid system SOFC / ST varied from 61 to 66% in relation to the lower heating value of methane; and the efficiency of the combined cycle GT / ST varied from 41 to 55% within the same power interval. For distributed generation, the SOFC fuel cell is the most efficienttechnology.

  15. DETERMINING HOW VAPOR PHASE MTBE REACHES GROUND WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Region 2 and ORD have funded a RARE project for FY 2005/2006 to evaluate the prospects that MTBE (and other fuel components) in vapors that escape from an underground storage tank (UST) can find its way to ground water produced by monitoring wells at a gasoline filling statio...

  16. Apparatus of vaporizing and condensing liquid radioactive wastes and its operation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Hiromitsu; Tajima, Fumio.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent corrosion of material for a vapor-condenser and a vapor heater and to prevent radioactive contamination of heated vapor. Structure: Liquid waste is fed from a liquid feeding tank to a vapor-condenser to vaporize and condense the waste. Uncondensed liquid waste, which is not in a level of a given density, is temporally stored in a batch tank through a switching valve and a pipe. Prior to successive feeding from the liquid feeding tank, the uncondensed liquid waste within the batch tank is returned by a return pump to the condenser, after which a new liquid is fed from the liquid feeding tank for re-vaporization and condensation in the vapor-condenser. Then, similar operation is repeated until the uncondensed liquid waste assumes a given density, and when the uncondensed liquid waste reaches a given density, the condensed liquid waste is discharged into the storage tank through the switching valve. (Ohara, T.)

  17. Vaporization of a heated liquid into a saturated stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahluwalia, K.K.; Im, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    Convective vaporization of a liquid from a heated surface into a non-reactive stream is encountered in some industrial applications and naturally occuring phenomena. The vaporization flux may normally be estimated from analogy with heat transfer except when the free stream is much colder than the surface. In that case, the vapor diffusing from the surface may become supersaturated enough to homogeneously nucleate within the thermal boundary layer. The effect of vapor nucleation is to modify the concentration profile. It constitutes a sink term in the vapor conservation equation and, therefore, for given mass fraction at surface, it should increase the concentration gradient at the surface and hence the vaporization flux. The formulation developed in this paper attempts to quantify the enhancement. A most common manifestation of boundary layer nucleation during vaporization is the appearance of fumes over the surface of hot water. It is to be distinguished from fog formation (cold ground, superheated gas) which occurs when a mass of unsaturated air descends upon a cold ground and which can be analyzed. An industrial problem of recent interest to which the theory developed in this paper might be applied is in the area of light water reactor safety. It pertains to the potential revaporization of volatile fission products released from breached fuel pins and subsequently deposited on the reactor internal surfaces. The revaporization possibility arises because of the decay heat in fission products raising the deposit temperature above that of the gas

  18. Fuel injector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Bertrand D.; Leonard, Gary L.

    1988-01-01

    A fuel injection system particularly adapted for injecting coal slurry fuels at high pressures includes an accumulator-type fuel injector which utilizes high-pressure pilot fuel as a purging fluid to prevent hard particles in the fuel from impeding the opening and closing movement of a needle valve, and as a hydraulic medium to hold the needle valve in its closed position. A fluid passage in the injector delivers an appropriately small amount of the ignition-aiding pilot fuel to an appropriate region of a chamber in the injector's nozzle so that at the beginning of each injection interval the first stratum of fuel to be discharged consists essentially of pilot fuel and thereafter mostly slurry fuel is injected.

  19. Water-vapor pressure control in a volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The variation with time of the partial pressure of water in a volume that has openings to the outside environment and includes vapor sources was evaluated as a function of the purging flow and its vapor content. Experimental tests to estimate the diffusion of ambient humidity through openings and to validate calculated results were included. The purging flows required to produce and maintain a certain humidity in shipping containers, storage rooms, and clean rooms can be estimated with the relationship developed here. These purging flows are necessary to prevent the contamination, degradation, and other effects of water vapor on the systems inside these volumes.

  20. Nuclear fuel storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Isaka, Shinji.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the spent fuel storage capacity and reduce the installation cost in a nuclear fuel storage facility. Constitution: Fuels handled in the nuclear fuel storage device of the present invention include the following four types: (1) fresh fuels, (2) 100 % reactor core charged fuels, (3) spent fuels just after taking out and (4) fuels after a certain period (for example one half-year) from taking out of the reactor. Reactivity is high for the fuels (1), and some of fuels (2), while low in the fuels (3) (4), Source intensity is strong for the fuels (3) and some of the fuels (2), while it is low for the fuels (1) and (4). Taking notice of the fact that the reactivity, radioactive source intensity and generated after heat are different in the respective fuels, the size of the pool and the storage capacity are increased by the divided storage control. While on the other hand, since the division is made in one identical pool, the control method becomes important, and the working range is restricted by means of a template, interlock, etc., the operation mode of the handling machine is divided into four, etc. for preventing errors. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Shripad; Plawsky, Joel; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Zheng, Ling; Wang, Ying-Xi

    2002-11-01

    Microgravity experiments on the Constrained Vapor Bubble Heat Exchanger, CVB, are being developed for the International Space Station. In particular, we present results of a precursory experimental and theoretical study of the vertical Constrained Vapor Bubble in the Earth's environment. A novel non-isothermal experimental setup was designed and built to study the transport processes in an ethanol/quartz vertical CVB system. Temperature profiles were measured using an in situ PC (personal computer)-based LabView data acquisition system via thermocouples. Film thickness profiles were measured using interferometry. A theoretical model was developed to predict the curvature profile of the stable film in the evaporator. The concept of the total amount of evaporation, which can be obtained directly by integrating the experimental temperature profile, was introduced. Experimentally measured curvature profiles are in good agreement with modeling results. For microgravity conditions, an analytical expression, which reveals an inherent relation between temperature and curvature profiles, was derived.

  2. Stratified vapor generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathan, Desikan [Lakewood, CO; Hassani, Vahab [Golden, CO

    2008-05-20

    A stratified vapor generator (110) comprises a first heating section (H.sub.1) and a second heating section (H.sub.2). The first and second heating sections (H.sub.1, H.sub.2) are arranged so that the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2) is operatively associated with the outlet of the first heating section (H.sub.1). A moisture separator (126) having a vapor outlet (164) and a liquid outlet (144) is operatively associated with the outlet (124) of the second heating section (H.sub.2). A cooling section (C.sub.1) is operatively associated with the liquid outlet (144) of the moisture separator (126) and includes an outlet that is operatively associated with the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2).

  3. A Planar-Fluorescence Imaging Technique for Studying Droplet-Turbulence Interactions in Vaporizing Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavicca, Dom A.; Coy, E.

    1990-01-01

    Droplet turbulence interactions directly affect the vaporization and dispersion of droplets in liquid sprays and therefore play a major role in fuel oxidizer mixing in liquid fueled combustion systems. Proper characterization of droplet turbulence interactions in vaporizing sprays require measurement of droplet size velocity and size temperature correlations. A planar, fluorescence imaging technique is described which is being developed for simultaneously measuring the size, velocity, and temperature of individual droplets in vaporizing sprays. Preliminary droplet size velocity correlation measurements made with this technique are presented. These measurements are also compared to and show very good agreement with measurements made in the same spray using a phase Doppler particle analyzer.

  4. The vapor pressures of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  5. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  6. Nuclear fuel assembly and process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grubb, W.T.

    1978-01-01

    Rupture of boiling water reactor nuclear fuel cladding resulting from embrittlement caused by fission product cadmium is prevented by adding the stoichiometrically equivalent amount of gold, silver or palladium to the fuel

  7. Fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Shinji; Kajiwara, Koichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure the safety for the fuel rod failures by adapting plenum springs to function when small forces such as during transportation of fuel rods is exerted and not to function the resilient force when a relatively great force is exerted. Constitution: Between an upper end plug and a plenum spring in a fuel rod, is disposed an insertion member to the lower portion of which is mounted a pin. This pin is kept upright and causes the plenum spring to function resiliently to the pellets against the loads due to accelerations and mechanical vibrations exerted during transportation of the fuel rods. While on the other hand, if a compression force of a relatively high level is exerted to the plenum spring during reactor operation, the pin of the insertion member is buckled and the insertion member is inserted to the inside of the plenum spring, whereby the pellets are allowed to expand freely and the failures in the fuel elements can be prevented. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. TRACER-II: a complete computational model for mixing and propagation of vapor explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K.H. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Maritime Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Park, I.G.; Park, G.C.

    1998-01-01

    A vapor explosion is a physical process in which very rapid energy transfer occurs between a hot liquid and a volatile, colder liquid when the two liquids come into a sudden contact. For the analyses of potential impacts from such explosive events, a computer program, TRACER-II, has been developed, which contains a complete description of mixing and propagation phases of vapor explosions. The model consists of fuel, fragmented fuel (debris), coolant liquid, and coolant vapor in two-dimensional Eulerian coordinates. The set of governing equations are solved numerically using finite difference method. The results of this numerical simulation of vapor explosions are discussed in comparison with the recent experimental data of FARO and KROTOS tests. When compared to some selected FARO and KROTOS data, the fuel-coolant mixing and explosion propagation behavior agree reasonably with the data, although the results are yet sensitive primarily to the melt breakup and fragmentation modeling. (author)

  9. Fuel processor for fuel cell power system. [Conversion of methanol into hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderborgh, N.E.; Springer, T.E.; Huff, J.R.

    1986-01-28

    A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

  10. Influence of radiation absorption by environmental water vapor on radiation transfer in wildland fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Frankman; Brent W. Webb; Bret W. Butler

    2007-01-01

    Thermal radiation emission from a simulated black flame surface to a fuel bed is analyzed by a ray-tracing technique, tracking emission from points along the flame to locations along the fuel bed while accounting for absorption by environmental water vapor in the intervening medium. The Spectral Line Weighted-sum-of-gray-gases approach was adopted for treating the...

  11. Warm Vapor Atom Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant; Wheeler, David; Jau, Yuan-Yu; McGuinness, Hayden

    2014-05-01

    We present a light pulse atom interferometer using room temperature rubidium vapor. Doppler sensitive stimulated Raman transitions forming the atom optical elements inherently select a cold velocity group for the interferometer. The interferometer is configured to be sensitive to accelerations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Fuel Exhaling Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Varhade, Swapnil; Gautam, Manu; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-01-18

    State-of-the-art proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) anodically inhale H 2 fuel and cathodically expel water molecules. We show an unprecedented fuel cell concept exhibiting cathodic fuel exhalation capability of anodically inhaled fuel, driven by the neutralization energy on decoupling the direct acid-base chemistry. The fuel exhaling fuel cell delivered a peak power density of 70 mW/cm 2 at a peak current density of 160 mA/cm 2 with a cathodic H 2 output of ∼80 mL in 1 h. We illustrate that the energy benefits from the same fuel stream can at least be doubled by directing it through proposed neutralization electrochemical cell prior to PEMFC in a tandem configuration.

  13. Hydrogen production through allothermal ethanol reforming for fuel cells application: first generation prototype; Producao de hidrogenio atraves da reforma-vapor do etanol para aplicacoes em celulas a combustivel: prototipo de primeira geracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin Neto, Antonio Jose; Silva, Ennio Peres da; Camargo, Joao Carlos; Neves Junior, Newton Pimenta; Pinto, Cristiano da Silva [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Hidrogenio; Pinto, Cristiano da Silva [Centro Nacional de Referencia em Energia do Hidrogenio, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes preliminary results obtained with the allothermal ethanol reforming system for synthesis gas (syn-gas) production and hydrogen upgrading and purification for fuel cell applications. The system was designed to supply hydrogen to a 500 W PEM (Proton Exchange Membrane) fuel cell, with an electrical efficiency of 45%, which requires approximately 0.45 m3.h-1 of hydrogen, with a maximum carbon monoxide concentration of 20 {mu}mol.mol-1 (ppm). The study was performed changing the operation temperature and analyzing the resulting syn-gas through gas chromatography for a specific catalyst. This catalyst was tested up to 700 deg C, 1 bar and fixed stoichiometric steam to carbon ratio. The syn-gas, before carbon monoxide shift reactor implementation, was submitted to a two-bed-three-segments purification step composed of chemical and physical molecular sieves for hydrogen purification. The carbon monoxide shift reactor (water gas shift reactor) is under development to improve the efficiency-to-hydrogen and maximize the life of the purification bed. The final results also include a discussion about possible reactions involved in ethanol steam-reforming for such catalyst. (author)

  14. Fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Kimichika.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the size of the reactor core upper mechanisms and the reactor container, as well as decrease the nuclear power plant construction costs in reactors using liquid metals as the coolants. Constitution: Isotope capturing devices comprising a plurality of pipes are disposed to the gas plenum portion of a nuclear fuel rod main body at the most downstream end in the flowing direction of the coolants. Each of the capturing devices is made of nickel, nickel alloys, stainless steel applied with nickel plating on the surface, nickel alloys applied with nickel plating on the surface or the like. Thus, radioactive nuclides incorporated in the coolants are surely captured by the capturing devices disposed at the most downstream end of the nuclear fuel main body as the coolants flow along the nuclear fuel main body. Accordingly, since discharging of radioactive nuclides to the intermediate fuel exchange system can be prevented, the maintenance or reparing work for the system can be facilitated. (Moriyama, K.)

  15. Transient two-dimensional fuel-concentration measurement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Tadashi; Naka, Syuji; Ito, Akihiko; Saito, Kozo

    1997-11-01

    We propose a nonintrusive experimental technique, the transient fuel-concentration measurement technique (TFMT), that is capable of being used to measure two-dimensional profiles of transient fuel concentrations over an open liquid fuel surface. The TFMT is based on single-wavelength holographic interferometry; its response time is less than 1 s and spatial resolution is 0.1 mol. % /0.1 mm. It was applied to measure both methanol vapor and n-propanol vapor concentrations. To assess the accuracy of the technique, our results were compared with steady-state methanol and n-propanol fuel-vapor concentrations measured by other researchers with a microsampling technique combined with gas chromatography. We found the TFMT to be accurate for on-line monitoring of two-dimensional profiles of fuel-vapor concentrations.

  16. A Solvent-Vapor Approach toward the Control of Block Ionomer Morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineart, Kenneth P.; Lee, Byeongdu; Spontak, Richard J.

    2016-04-26

    Sulfonated block ionomers possess advantageous properties for a wide range of diverse applications such as desalination membranes, fuel cells, electroactive media, and photovoltaic devices. Unfortunately, their inherently high incompatibilities and glass transition temperatures e ff ectively prevent the use of thermal annealing, routinely employed to re fi ne the morphologies of nonionic block copolymers. An alternative approach is therefore required to promote morphological equilibration in block ionomers. The present study explores the morphological characteristics of midblock- sulfonated pentablock ionomers (SBIs) di ff ering in their degree of sulfonation (DOS) and cast from solution followed by solvent-vapor annealing (SVA). Transmission electron microscopy con fi rms that fi lms deposited from di ff erent solvent systems form nonequilibrium morphologies due to solvent-regulated self-assembly and drying. A series of SVA tests performed with solvents varying in polarity reveals that exposing cast fi lms to tetrahydrofuran (THF) vapor for at least 2 h constitutes the most e ff ective SVA protocol, yielding the anticipated equilibrium morphology. That is, three SBI grades subjected to THF-SVA self-assemble into well-ordered lamellae wherein the increase in DOS is accompanied by an increase in lamellar periodicity, as measured by small-angle X-ray scattering.

  17. An experimental study on the dynamics of melt-water micro-interactions in a Vapor explosion

    OpenAIRE

    Hansson, Roberta Concilio

    2007-01-01

    Vapor explosion as a result of Molten Fuel-Coolant Interactions (MFCI) postulated to occur in certain severe accident scenarios in a nuclear power plant presents a credible challenge on the plant containment integrity. Over the past several decades, a large body of literature has been accumulated on vapor explosion phenomenology and methods for assessment of the related risk. Vapor explosion is driven by a rapid fragmentation of high-temperature melt droplets, leading to a substantial increas...

  18. Reviews of experimental studies on various geometrical contact modes of vapor explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun-sun; Yamano, Norihiro; Maruyama, Yu; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Kudo, Tamotsu; Sugimoto, Jun

    1996-11-01

    The review aims to collect the available experimental information mainly on the stratified and injection modes of vapor explosions and identify areas requiring additional research. A substantial number of works have been performed on the pouring mode of vapor explosions since the pouring mode of vapor explosions is considered to be the most predominant geometric conditions in hypothetical severe accidents in nuclear power plants. However, other types of mode of vapor explosions are relatively less focused. Because of their different sequential progresses and mechanisms of vapor explosions especially at the initial stage of the event, it is essential to identify their mechanisms to make more clear understanding and eventually to provide a methodology for prevention in these types of vapor explosions. It has been recognized that the development of scaling methodologies in the experimental view points to bridge the experiment to prototypic conditions is of great importance under the circumstances of no relevant theoretical models in vapor explosion phenomena. In the sense, it will be useful to perform vapor explosion experiments in an experimental facility which can not only well control the initial and boundary experimental conditions, but also directly measure the energetics of vapor explosions. In particular, it is recommended to study the vapor explosion phenomena in such a facility which has additional capability of providing various contact modes to identify their mechanisms and to scale the energetics of vapor explosions in various contact modes in terms of a precisely measured conversion ratio. (J.P.N.). 51 refs

  19. Robust NdBa0.5Sr0.5Co1.5Fe0.5O5+δ cathode material and its degradation prevention operating logic for intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Hee; Park, Ka-Young; Kim, Nam-In; Song, Sun-Ju; Hong, Ki-Ha; Ahn, Docheon; Azad, Abul K.; Hwang, Junyeon; Bhattacharjee, Satadeep; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lim, Hyung-Tae; Park, Jun-Young

    2016-11-01

    We report solutions (durable material and degradation prevention method) to minimize the performance degradation of cell components occurring in the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operation. Reliability testing is carried out with the Nisbnd Nd0.1Ce0.9O2-δ (NDC) anode-supported intermediate temperature-SOFCs. For the cathode materials, single perovskite structured Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF) and double perovskite structured NdBa0.5Sr0.5Co1.5Fe0.5O5+δ (NBSCF) are prepared and evaluated under harsh SOFC operating conditions. The double perovskite NBSCF cathode shows excellent stability in harsh SOFC environments of high humidity and low flow rate of air. Furthermore, we propose the concurrent fuel and air starvation mode, in which the cell potential is temporarily reduced due to the formation of both fuel-starvation (in the anode) and air-depletion (in the cathode) concurrently under a constant load. This is carried out in order to minimize the performance decay of the stable NBSCF-cell through the periodic and extra reduction of aH2 O (and aO2) in the anode. The operating-induced degradation of SOFCs, which are ordinarily assumed to be unrecoverable, can be completely circumvented by the proposed periodical operation logic to prevent performance degradation (concurrent fuel-starvation and air-depletion mode).

  20. 33 CFR 154.828 - Vapor recovery and vapor destruction units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vapor recovery and vapor... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.828 Vapor recovery and vapor destruction units. (a) The inlet to a vapor recovery unit which...

  1. A Citizen's Guide to Vapor Intrusion Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guide describes how vapor intrusion is the movement of chemical vapors from contaminated soil and groundwater into nearby buildings.Vapors primarily enter through openings in the building foundation or basement walls.

  2. CuMn1.8O4 protective coatings on metallic interconnects for prevention of Cr-poisoning in solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhihao; Wang, Ruofan; Nikiforov, Alexey Y.; Gopalan, Srikanth; Pal, Uday B.; Basu, Soumendra N.

    2018-02-01

    Cr-poisoning of the cathodes due to the presence of metallic interconnects is detrimental to the performance of intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell stacks. Applying a protective coating on the interconnect is an effective solution to preventing Cr-poisoning. In this study, the application of a protective CuMn1.8O4 spinel coating is explored. Dense coatings are deposited on both metallic flat plates and meshes by electrophoretic deposition followed by thermal densification steps. The coating is found to be a mixture of Mn3O4 and cubic spinel phases at room temperature but is a pure cubic spinel phase between 750 °C and 850 °C. A reaction layer between the Cr2O3 scale at the coating/interconnect interface and CuMn1.8O4 coating is found to be a mixture of (Cu,Mn,Cr)3-xO4 cubic spinel phases with Cr-rich precipitates believed to be Cr2O3, indicating that the coating layer acts as a Cr getter. Solubility experiments show that 1 mol of the CuMn1.8O4 phase can getter at least 1.83 mol of Cr2O3 at 800 °C. Electrochemical testing of cells in the presence of coated interconnects show that the CuMn1.8O4 coating getters Cr effectively for 12 days at 800 °C, leading to no performance loss of the cell due to Cr-poisoning.

  3. DuPont Chemical Vapor Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOORE, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    DuPont Safety Resources was tasked with reviewing the current chemical vapor control practices and providing preventive recommendations on best commercial techniques to control worker exposures. The increased focus of the tank closure project to meet the 2024 Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones has surfaced concerns among some CH2MHill employees and other interested parties. CH2MHill is committed to providing a safe working environment for employees and desires to safely manage the tank farm operations using appropriate control measures. To address worker concerns, CH2MHill has chartered a ''Chemical Vapors Project'' to integrate the activities of multiple CH2MHill project teams, and solicit the expertise of external resources, including an independent Industrial Hygiene expert panel, a communications consultant, and DuPont Safety Resources. Over a three-month time period, DuPont worked with CH2MHill ESH and Q, Industrial Hygiene, Engineering, and the independent expert panel to perform the assessment. The process included overview presentations, formal interviews, informal discussions, documentation review, and literature review. DuPont Safety Resources concluded that it is highly unlikely that workers in the tank farms are exposed to chemicals above established standards. Additionally, the conventional and radiological chemistry is understood, the inherent chemical hazards are known, and the risk associated with chemical vapor exposure is properly managed. The assessment highlighted management's commitment to addressing chemical vapor hazards and controlling the associated risks. Additionally, we found the Industrial Hygiene staff to be technically competent and well motivated. The tank characterization data resides in a comprehensive database containing the tank chemical compositions and relevant airborne concentrations

  4. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  5. Fuel assembly in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shozo; Kawahara, Akira.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide a fuel assembly in a reactor which can effectively prevent damage of the clad tube caused by mutual interference between pellets and the clad tube. Structure: A clad tube for a fuel element, which is located in the outer peripheral portion, among the fuel elements constituting fuel assemblies arranged in assembled and lattice fashion within a channel box, is increased in thickness by reducing the inside diameter thereof to be smaller than that of fuel elements internally located, thereby preventing damage of the clad tube resulting from rapid rise in output produced when control rods are removed. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Metal vapor laser and medicine: laser systems, methods, and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtushenko, V. A.; Soldatov, Anatoly N.; Vusik, M. V.; Cheremisina, O. V.; Kucherova, T. Y.; Voronov, V. I.; Kirilov, Anatoly E.; Polunin, Yu. P.

    2002-03-01

    A copper-vapor laser 'Malakhit' was used to prevent and or treat complications caused by antitumor therapy. Results obtained for 19 adult patients with cancer of the lung, 59 adult patients with cancer of the stomach, and 640 children with malignant and benign tumors are discussed.

  7. Generation of Comprehensive Surrogate Kinetic Models and Validation Databases for Simulating Large Molecular Weight Hydrocarbon Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-25

    counterflow burner, a vaporization system, flow controllers, an online Fourier transform infrared ( FTIR ) spectrometer, and a laser induced fluorescence...plane Laser sheet for LIF Air Heater Heater N2 Fuel Atomization & evaporation Temperature measurements 59 vaporizing temperature, an FTIR ...amounts of indene being formed. The model simulates the fuel decay and formation of most of the intermediates accurately for all the experimental data

  8. Dimers in nucleating vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, A. A.; Kulmala, M.

    1998-09-01

    The dimer stage of nucleation may affect considerably the rate of the nucleation process at high supersaturation of the nucleating vapor. Assuming that the dimer formation limits the nucleation rate, the kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is studied starting with the definition of dimers as bound states of two associating molecules. The partition function of dimer states is calculated by summing the Boltzmann factor over all classical bound states, and the equilibrium population of dimers is found for two types of intermolecular forces: the Lennard-Jones (LJ) and rectangular well+hard core (RW) potentials. The principle of detailed balance is used for calculating the evaporation rate of dimers. The kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is then investigated under the assumption that the trimers are stable with respect to evaporation and that the condensation rate is a power function of the particle mass. If the power exponent λ=n/(n+1) (n is a non-negative integer), the kinetics of the process is described by a finite set of moments of particle mass distribution. When the characteristic time of the particle formation by nucleation is much shorter than that of the condensational growth, n+2 universal functions of a nondimensional time define the kinetic process. These functions are calculated for λ=2/3 (gas-to-particle conversion in the free molecular regime) and λ=1/2 (formation of islands on surfaces).

  9. Soil Vapor Extraction Implementation Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    This issue paper identifies issues and summarizes experiences with soil vapor extraction (SVE) as a remedy for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soils. The issues presented here reflect discussions with over 30 Remedial Project Managers (RPMs)...

  10. Risk-Based Evaluation of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Vapor Intrusion Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Brewer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a quantitative method for the risk-based evaluation of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH in vapor intrusion investigations. Vapors from petroleum fuels are characterized by a complex mixture of aliphatic and, to a lesser extent, aromatic compounds. These compounds can be measured and described in terms of TPH carbon ranges. Toxicity factors published by USEPA and other parties allow development of risk-based, air and soil vapor screening levels for each carbon range in the same manner as done for individual compounds such as benzene. The relative, carbon range makeup of petroleum vapors can be used to develop weighted, site-specific or generic screening levels for TPH. At some critical ratio of TPH to a targeted, individual compound, the overwhelming proportion of TPH will drive vapor intrusion risk over the individual compound. This is particularly true for vapors associated with diesel and other middle distillate fuels, but can also be the case for low-benzene gasolines or even for high-benzene gasolines if an adequately conservative, target risk is not applied to individually targeted chemicals. This necessitates a re-evaluation of the reliance on benzene and other individual compounds as a stand-alone tool to evaluate vapor intrusion risk associated with petroleum.

  11. Chemical vapor deposition reactor. [providing uniform film thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, S. S.; Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition reactor is characterized by a vapor deposition chamber configured to substantially eliminate non-uniformities in films deposited on substrates by control of gas flow and removing gas phase reaction materials from the chamber. Uniformity in the thickness of films is produced by having reactive gases injected through multiple jets which are placed at uniformally distributed locations. Gas phase reaction materials are removed through an exhaust chimney which is positioned above the centrally located, heated pad or platform on which substrates are placed. A baffle is situated above the heated platform below the mouth of the chimney to prevent downdraft dispersion and scattering of gas phase reactant materials.

  12. Fuel rod and fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takekawa, Tetsuya.

    1993-01-01

    Burnable poisons are contained in a portion of a pellet constituting a fuel rod. A distribution density of the burnable poison-containing pellets and a concentration of the burnable poisons in the pellet are varied depending on the axial position of the fuel rod. That is, the distribution density of the burnable poison containing-pellets is increased at the central portion of the fuel rod and it is decreased at both ends thereof, and a concentration of the burnable poisons of the burnable poison containing-pellet disposed at the end portions thereof is decreased to less than a concentration of the burnable poison-containing pellet at the central portion. With such a constitution, a central peaking at an early stage of the combustion cycle is decreased. Accordingly, power at the central portion is increased than that in the end portions at the latter half of the cycle, to flatten the power distribution. Further, a burnable poison concentration of the pellets at the end portions is decreased to promote burning of burnable poisons at the end portions which are less burnable relatively, thereby enabling to prevent worsening of neutron economy. (T.M.)

  13. Rare earth vapor laser studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupke, W.F.; Jacobs, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    The fluorescence decay rates of vapor phase neodymium aluminum chloride complex (Nd-Al-Cl) and neodymium-thd-chelate have been measured as functions of temperature, partial pressure and optical excitation intensity. Fluorescence quenching due to both ground and excited state collisions was observed in Nd-Al-Cl vapor. In constrast, quenching in the Nd-thd vapor was found to be dominated by multiquantum excitation of molecular vibrations. The fluorescence kinetics of Tb-Al-Cl vapor have also been examined under conditions of intense excitation of terbium 5d levels by a KrF laser source. Both prompt and delayed fluorescence of the 4f 8 ( 5 D 4 ) metastable level were observed together with evidence of excited-state collisional quenching. In laser amplifier experiments, a transient (greater than or equal to 10 μsec) population inversion was produced in Nd-Al-Cl vapor with a small signal gain coefficient greater than or equal to 0.25%/cm and a stored energy density approximately equal to 35 J/liter. Available data for the rare earth vapors are related to scaling requirements of large amplifiers for laser fusion application

  14. Fuel and Fuel Additive Registration Testing of Ethanol-Diesel Blend for O2Diesel, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanick, E. R.

    2004-02-01

    O2 Diesel Inc. (formerly AAE Technologies Inc.) tested a heavy duty engine with O2Diesel (diesel fuel with 7.7% ethanol and additives) for regulated emissions and speciation of vapor-phase and semi-volatile hydrocarbon compounds. This testing was performed in support of EPA requirements for registering designated fuels and fuel additives as stipulated by sections 211(b) and 211(e) of the Clean Air Act.

  15. Effect of pressure for direct fuel cells using DME-based fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Ji-Young; Kim, Bum-Soo; Choi, Hoo-Gon; Cho, Sung Min

    The performance of direct fuel cells using dimethyl ether(DME)-based fuels is presented at a relatively low temperature of 80 °C. DME is supplied to the fuel cells either by gas phase or aqueous phase for the operation of direct fuel cells. In order to keep DME in liquid phase during operation, fuel cells were operated at higher pressure up to 5 bar. For further increase of the power density from direct DME fuel cells, DME was mixed with methanol solution and fed into the fuel cells by the vapor pressure of DME itself without a liquid pump. In this study, we have obtained the highest power density of 210 mW cm -2 at a temperature of 80 °C when the fuel cell is operated with the mixed fuel with 2 M methanol solution under 4 bar.

  16. Improved drying rate diagnostics for saturated fuel debris at the INEEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, K.; Christensen, A.

    1999-01-01

    A fuel canning station (FCS) has been operated for ∼2 yr to prepare for the dry storage of a variety of spent reactor fuels stored in pools at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The FCS dewaters the fuel and then passivates possibly pyrophoric components in the fuel. Fuel-loaded canisters are placed into a heated insert, the canister is connected to a vacuum system, and the fuel is heated under a vacuum to remove the water. The dewatering system must also verify that the water was removed. The dryness criteria state that the canister pressure shall not exceed a defined pressure for a specified isolation time. Dewatering did not work well for defected TRIGA elements that had corroded in pool storage, leaving the intact fuel meat mixed with a bed of fines from metal oxides and from sludge that continuously accumulated within the pool. Dewatering these cans proved to be very time consuming. Fueled canisters were heated to 60 C and evacuated between 5 and 10 torr. At these conditions, intact fuels were rapidly dried (<10 h). TRIGA drying periods extended to 9 days. Dryness was qualitatively monitored using the canister pressure-control valve position. The valve closes as the gas flow rate declines, providing an indication that drying is complete. However, the valve remained open when drying TRIGA fuel, leaving no indication of dryness. In addition, dryness could not be verified because the canister pressure exceeded the defined pressure during isolation. Air leakage into the evacuated canister prevented the dryness from being verified. Air in-leakage and water vapor cannot easily be discriminated by the aforementioned procedures. Because the canister design does not seal above atmospheric pressure, a drying temperature that yielded a vapor pressure less than atmospheric pressure was chosen. A sufficiently long isolation test could then determine if air was accumulating in the canister; however, the low temperature reduced the drying

  17. THE STABILITY OF VAPOR CONDENSATION EQUILIBRIUM

    OpenAIRE

    SHIMIN ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    The system must get across an energy peak of unstable equilibrium during the condensation of pure vapor; as the supersaturated extent of vapor increases and the temperature decreases, the energy peak shortens and vapor condensation becomes easier. The system must get across an energy peak of unstable equilibrium first, and then get into an energy valley of stable equilibrium during the condensation of impure vapor; as the partial pressure of vapor decreases, the energy peak becomes taller, th...

  18. Studies report: methods for the evaluation and the prevention of accidental risks (DRA 35 - report {omega} 11). Knowledge of solid fuels self-heating; Rapport d'etude: methodes pour l'evaluation et la prevention des risques accidentels (DRA 35 - rapport {omega} 11). Connaissance des phenomenes d'autoechauffement des solides combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this document is to present a synthesis of the knowledge on risks bond to auto-heating phenomena which occur in solid fuels storage. It analyzes the role of some factors on the heating, and more specially the mass, temperature, oxygen content of the atmosphere and humidity. It presents a general methodology of risks evaluation and measures on the risks detection and prevention. (A.L.B.)

  19. Modeling the fine fragmentation following the triggering stage of a vapor explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbord, I.

    1997-01-01

    In the frame of PWR severe accidents, where the core melt, this thesis studies one of the stages of an FCI (fuel coolant interaction) or vapor explosion. An FCI is a rapid evaporation of a coolant when it comes into contact with a hot liquid. More precisely, the subject of this study is the triggering stage of the FCI, when a fuel drop of diameter around one centimeter breaks up into many fragments, diameter of which is around a hundred micrometers. The model describes the cyclic collapse and growth of a vapor bubble around the fuel droplet and its fragmentation. The main features of the model are: - the destabilization of the film or the vapor bubble due to the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (those form coolant jets that contact the fuel surface); - The mechanisms of fragmentation, following the contacts (in the case of entrapment of a certain amount of coolant in the fuel, the entrapped coolant evaporates violently after it has been heated to the homogeneous nucleation temperature); - the transient heat transfer from the fragments to the coolant and the elevated vapor production, which leads to an important expansion of the bubble (about this point, the cooling of the fragments has been described by a transient heat transfer coefficient linked to nucleate boiling). The results of the model show good agreement with experimental data. (Author)

  20. Design of an automated rapid vapor concentrator and its application in nitroaromatic vapor sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Mark; Kapila, Shubhender; Hambacker, Kurt L.; Flanigan, Virgil I.

    2000-08-01

    An automated, rapid-cycling vapor concentrator and sample introduction device was designed and evaluated. The device consists of an inert deactivated fused silica capillary sampling loop. The temperature of the loop was manipulated through contact with a cold plate or a hot plate, maintained at pre-selected temperatures with a thermoelectric cooler and heating cartridge, respectively. The position of the loop was controlled with a stepper motor under microprocessor control. The low mass of the loop permit its rapid cooling and heating. This permits efficient trapping of adsorptive vapors such as the nitroaromatics from the air stream and also allows rapid and quantitative transfer of the trapped analytes to the detection system. The use of at thermoelectric cooler permits variable trapping temperatures and increased sampling selectivity without the use of cumbersome cryogenic fluids. Chemically inert sampling train surfaces prevent analyte loss due to irreversible adsorption and cross contamination between samples. The device was evaluated for rapid analysis of nitroaromatic and chlorinated aromatic vapors from air stream at trace concentrations with a selective electron capture detection system. Trapping efficiencies of > 95 percent can be readily obtained with the device for nitroaromatics at ppb and sub ppb concentrations.

  1. Alternative Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  2. Estimating pure component vapor pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrdal, P.B.; Yalkowsky, S.H. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1994-12-31

    The hazard of exposure to volatile organic compounds is an increasing concern all chemical industries. Recent EPA and FDA guidelines require the environmental assessment of new chemical entities, which includes the determination or estimation of vapor pressure. This work presents a means for the reliable estimation of pure component vapor pressures. The method presented is an extension of the work proposed by Mishra and Yalkowsky. New equations are presented for the heat capacity change upon boiling and the entropy of boiling. The final vapor pressure equation requires only the knowledge of transition temperatures and molecular structure. The equation developed has been successfully applied to 296 organic compounds, giving an overall average absolute error of 0.12 log units (in atm. at 25 C). In addition, the equation is shown to be very accurate in predicting vapor pressure as a function of temperature. However, for many compounds of environmental interest, the boiling point is not known or cannot be determined due to decomposition. In light of this, a new technique has been developed which can be used to estimate ``hypothetical`` boiling points. This enables the estimation of vapor pressure from as little as one transition temperature and molecular structure.

  3. Fuel assembly reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, Mario M.; Oliveira, Monica G.N.; Ferreira Junior, Decio B.M.; Santos, Barbara O. dos; Santos, Jorge E. dos

    2009-01-01

    Fuel failures have been happened in Nuclear Power Plants worldwide, without lost of integrity and safety, mainly for the public, environment and power plants workers. The most common causes of these events are corrosion (CRUD), fretting and pellet cladding interaction. These failures are identified by increasing the activity of fission products, verified by chemical analyses of reactor coolant. Through these analyses, during the fourth operation cycle of Angra 2 Nuclear Power Plant, was possible to observe fuel failure indication. This indication was confirmed in the end of the cycle during the unloading of reactor core through leakage tests of fuel assembly, using the equipment called 'In Mast Sipping' and 'Box Sipping'. After confirmed, the fuel assembly reconstitution was scheduled, and happened in April, 2007, where was identified the cause and the fuel rod failure, which was substitute by dummy rods (zircaloy). The cause was fretting by 'debris'. The actions to avoid and prevent fuel assemblies failures are important. The goals of this work are to describe the methodology of fuel assembly reconstitution using the FARE (Fuel Assembly Reconstitution Equipment) system, to describe the results of this task in economic and security factors of the company and show how the fuel assembly failures are identified during operation and during the outage. (author)

  4. Fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooie, D. T.; Harrington, B. C., III; Mayfield, M. J.; Parsons, E. L.

    1992-07-01

    The primary objective of DOE's Fossil Energy Fuel Cell program is to fund the development of key fuel cell technologies in a manner that maximizes private sector participation and in a way that will give contractors the opportunity for a competitive posture, early market entry, and long-term market growth. This summary includes an overview of the Fuel Cell program, an elementary explanation of how fuel cells operate, and a synopsis of the three major fuel cell technologies sponsored by the DOE/Fossil Energy Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell program, the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell program, and the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell program.

  5. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao; Nishida, Koji; Karasawa, Hidetoshi; Kanazawa, Toru; Orii, Akihito; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Kashiwai, Shin-ichi; Masuhara, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly, for a BWR type nuclear reactor, comprising fuel rods in 9 x 9 matrix. The inner width of the channel box is about 132mm and the length of the fuel rods which are not short fuel rods is about 4m. Two water rods having a circular cross section are arranged on a diagonal line in a portion of 3 x 3 matrix at the center of the fuel assembly, and two fuel rods are disposed at vacant spaces, and the number of fuel rods is 74. Eight fuel rods are determined as short fuel rods among 74 fuel rods. Assuming the fuel inventory in the short fuel rod as X(kg), and the fuel inventory in the fuel rods other than the short fuel rods as Y(kg), X and Y satisfy the relation: X + Y ≥ 173m, Y ≤ - 9.7X + 292, Y ≤ - 0.3X + 203 and X > 0. Then, even when the short fuel rods are used, the fuel inventory is increased and fuel economy can be improved. (I.N.)

  6. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hajime.

    1995-01-01

    In a fuel assembly having fuel rods of different length, fuel pellets of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium are loaded to a short fuel rod. The volume ratio of a pellet-loaded portion to a plenum portion of the short fuel rod is made greater than the volume ratio of a fuel rod to which uranium fuel pellets are loaded. In addition, the volume of the plenum portion of the short fuel rod is set greater depending on the plutonium content in the loaded fuel pellets. MOX fuel pellets are loaded on the short fuel rods having a greater degree of freedom relevant to the setting for the volume of the plenum portion compared with that of a long rod fuel, and the volume of the plenum portion is ensured greater depending on the plutonium content. Even if a large amount of FP gas and He gas are discharged from the MOX fuels compared with that from the uranium fuels, the internal pressure of the MOX fuel rod during operation is maintained substantially identical with that of the uranium fuel rod, so that a risk of generating excess stresses applied to the fuel cladding tubes and rupture of fuels are greatly reduced. (N.H.)

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domoto, Noboru; Masuda, Hiroyuki

    1989-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel assembly loaded with a plurality of fuel rods, the inside of a fuel rod disposed at a high neutron flux region is divided into an inner region and an outer region, and more burnable poisons are mixed in the inner region than in the outer region. Alternatively, the central portion of a pellet disposed in a high neutron flux region is made hollow, in which burnable poisons are charged. This can prevent neutron infinite multiplication factor from decreasing extremely at the initial burning stage. Further, the burnable poisons are not rapidly burnt completely and local peaking coefficient can be controlled. Accordingly, in a case of suppressing a predetermined excess reactivity by using a fuel rod incorporated with the burnable poison, the fuel economy can be improved more and the reactor core controllability can also be improved as compared with the usual case. (T.M.)

  8. Fuels and fluoroelastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streit, G. [Parker Hannifin GmbH, Bietigheim-Bissingen (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    Modern fuels for combustion engines have an enormous spread in their composition. Fuels contain different amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons, are blended with oxygen containing components, especially alcohols and ethers and have some additive packages preventing deposits in the fuel circuit. This great variability in composition of fuels for combustion engines requires extremely resistant elastomers. The temperature range in the fuel circuit is determined by extreme low temperatures in countries of the Northern Hemisphere like Sweden and Canada of about -40 up to 150 C in small, high powered cars with encapsulated engines. A solution for sealing systems are special fluoroelastomers with high fluorine content and in some cases also with low temperature flexibility. It will be shown that a fluorine content of more than 68% in the polymer is necessary and in case of required low temperature flexibility a PMVE-perfluoromethyl-vinylether-modified type of fluoroelastomer, when a special seal design is not possible, might be the problem solving polymer. (orig.)

  9. Fuels and fluoroelastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streit, G. (Parker Hannifin GmbH, Bietigheim-Bissingen (Germany))

    1999-01-01

    Modern fuels for combustion engines have an enormous spread in their composition. Fuels contain different amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons, are blended with oxygen containing components, especially alcohols and ethers and have some additive packages preventing deposits in the fuel circuit. This great variability in composition of fuels for combustion engines requires extremely resistant elastomers. The temperature range in the fuel circuit is determined by extreme low temperatures in countries of the Northern Hemisphere like Sweden and Canada of about -40 up to 150 C in small, high powered cars with encapsulated engines. A solution for sealing systems are special fluoroelastomers with high fluorine content and in some cases also with low temperature flexibility. It will be shown that a fluorine content of more than 68% in the polymer is necessary and in case of required low temperature flexibility a PMVE-perfluoromethyl-vinylether-modified type of fluoroelastomer, when a special seal design is not possible, might be the problem solving polymer. (orig.)

  10. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    A bimetallic spacer means is cooperatively associated with a nuclear fuel assembly and operative to resist the occurrence of in-reactor bowing of the nuclear fuel assembly. The bimetallic spacer means in one embodiment of the invention includes a space grid formed, at least principally, of zircaloy to the external surface of which are attached a plurality of stainless steel strips. In another embodiment the strips are attached to fuel pins. In each of the embodiments, the stainless steel strips during power production expand outwardly to a greater extent than do the members to which the stainless steel strips are attached, thereby forming stiff springs which abut against like bimetallic spacer means with which the other nuclear fuel assemblies are provided in a given nuclear reactor core to thus prevent the occurrence of in-reactor bowing of the nuclear fuel assemblies. (author)

  11. Indirect heating of natural gas using vapor chambers; Aquecimento indireto de gas natural com uso de camaras de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milanez, Fernando H.; Mantellil, Marcia H.B.; Borges, Thomaz P.F. [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Landa, Henrique G. de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    2005-07-01

    Operation safety and reliability are major guidelines in the design of city-gate units. Conventional natural gas heaters operate by a indirect mechanism, where liquid water is used to transfer heat by natural convection between the combustion chamber and the natural gas coil. In this work, the concept of vapor chamber is evaluated as an indirect gas heater. In a vapor chamber, liquid water is in contact with the heat source, and vaporizes. The vapor condenses in contact with the heat sink. A reduced scale model was built and tested in order to compare these two heating concepts where the combustion chamber was replaced by electrical cartridge heaters. This engineering model can operate either as a conventional heater or as a vapor chamber. The comparison between the concepts was done by inducing a controlled power to the cartridges and by measuring the resulting temperature distributions. In the novel design, the heat exchanger efficiency increases, and the thermal inertia decreases, compared to the conventional system. The new sealed concept of the chamber prevents water evaporation losses. (author)

  12. FUEL PROCESSING FOR FUEL CELLS: EFFECTS ON CATALYST DURABILITY AND CARBON FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. BORUP; M. INBODY; B. MORTON; L. BROWN

    2001-05-01

    On-board production of hydrogen for fuel cells for automotive applications is a challenging developmental task. The fuel processor must show long term durability and under challenging conditions. Fuel processor catalysts in automotive fuel processors will be exposed to large thermal variations, vibrations, exposure to uncontrolled ambient conditions, and various impurities from ambient air and from fuel. For the commercialization of fuel processors, the delineation of effects on catalyst activity and durability are required. We are studying fuels and fuel constituent effects on the fuel processor system as part of the DOE Fuel Cells for Transportation program. Pure fuel components are tested to delineate the fuel component effect on the fuel processor and fuel processor catalysts. Component blends are used to simulate ''real fuels'', with various fuel mixtures being examined such as reformulated gasoline and naptha. The aliphatic, napthenic, olefin and aromatic content are simulated to represent the chemical kinetics of possible detrimental reactions, such as carbon formation, during fuel testing. Testing has examined the fuel processing performance of different fuel components to help elucidate the fuel constituent effects on fuel processing performance and upon catalyst durability. Testing has been conducted with vapor fuels, including natural gas and pure methane. The testing of pure methane and comparable testing with natural gas (97% methane) have shown some measurable differences in performance in the fuel processor. Major gasoline fuel constituents, such as aliphatic compounds, napthanes, and aromatics have been compared for their effect on the fuel processing performance. Experiments have been conducted using high-purity compounds to observe the fuel processing properties of the individual components and to document individual fuel component performance. The relative carbon formation of different fuel constituents have been measured by

  13. Fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enomoto, Hirofumi.

    1989-05-22

    This invention aims to maintain a long-term operation with stable cell output characteristics by uniformly supplying an electrolyte from the reserver to the matrix layer over the entire matrix layer, and further to prevent the excessive wetting of the catalyst layer by smoothly absorbing the volume change of the electrolyte, caused by the repeated stop/start-up of the fuel cell, within the reserver system. For this purpose, in this invention, an electrolyte transport layer, which connects with an electrolyte reservor formed at the electrode end, is partly formed between the electrode material and the catalyst layer; a catalyst layer, which faces the electrolyte transport layer, has through-holes, which connect to the matrix, dispersely distributed. The electrolyte-transport layer is a thin sheet of a hydrophilic fibers which are non-wovens of such fibers as carbon, silicon carbide, silicon nitride or inorganic oxides. 11 figs.

  14. Alternative Fuels in Cement Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Boberg

    The substitution of alternative for fossil fuels in cement production has increased significantly in the last decade. Of these new alternative fuels, solid state fuels presently account for the largest part, and in particular, meat and bone meal, plastics and tyre derived fuels (TDF) accounted...... for the most significant alternative fuel energy contributors in the German cement industry. Solid alternative fuels are typically high in volatile content and they may differ significantly in physical and chemical properties compared to traditional solid fossil fuels. From the process point of view......, considering a modern kiln system for cement production, the use of alternative fuels mainly influences 1) kiln process stability (may accelerate build up of blockages preventing gas and/or solids flow), 2) cement clinker quality, 3) emissions, and 4) decreased production capacity. Kiln process stability...

  15. Chemical vapor deposited boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Smith, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed analytical electron microscope (AEM) studies of yellow whiskers produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) show that two basic types of whiskers are produced at low temperatures (between 1200 0 C and 1400 0 C) and low boron to carbon gas ratios. Both whisker types show planar microstructures such as twin planes and stacking faults oriented parallel to, or at a rhombohedral angle to, the growth direction. For both whisker types, the presence of droplet-like terminations containing both Si and Ni indicate that the growth process during CVD is via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanisms

  16. Accident tolerant composite nuclear fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szpunar Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigated accident tolerant nuclear fuels are fuels with enhanced thermal conductivity, which can withstand the loss of coolant for a longer time by allowing faster dissipation of heat, thus lowering the centerline temperature and preventing the melting of the fuel. Traditional nuclear fuels have a very low thermal conductivity and can be significantly enhanced if transformed into a composite with a very high thermal conductivity components. In this study, we analyze the thermal properties of various composites of mixed oxides and thoria fuels to improve thermal conductivity for the next generation safer nuclear reactors.

  17. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangwani, Saloni; Chakrabortty, Sumita

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fuel is a material that can be consumed to derive nuclear energy, by analogy to chemical fuel that is burned for energy. Nuclear fuels are the most dense sources of energy available. Nuclear fuel in a nuclear fuel cycle can refer to the fuel itself, or to physical objects (for example bundles composed of fuel rods) composed of the fuel material, mixed with structural, neutron moderating, or neutron reflecting materials. Long-lived radioactive waste from the back end of the fuel cycle is especially relevant when designing a complete waste management plan for SNF. When looking at long-term radioactive decay, the actinides in the SNF have a significant influence due to their characteristically long half-lives. Depending on what a nuclear reactor is fueled with, the actinide composition in the SNF will be different. The following paper will also include the uses. advancements, advantages, disadvantages, various processes and behavior of nuclear fuels

  18. Fuel and nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunier, C.

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear fuel is studied in detail, the best choice and why in relation with the type of reactor, the properties of the fuel cans, the choice of fuel materials. An important part is granted to the fuel assembly of PWR type reactor and the performances of nuclear fuels are tackled. The different subjects for research and development are discussed and this article ends with the particular situation of mixed oxide fuels ( materials, behavior, efficiency). (N.C.)

  19. Method and system for low-NO.sub.x dual-fuel combustion of liquid and/or gaseous fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Vincent; Chojnacki, Dennis A; Rabovitser, Ioseph K

    2014-12-02

    A method and apparatus for combustion in which a pressurized preheated liquid fuel is atomized and a portion thereof flash vaporized, creating a mixture of fuel vapor and liquid droplets. The mixture is mixed with primary combustion oxidant, producing a fuel/primary oxidant mixture which is then injected into a primary combustion chamber in which the fuel/primary oxidant mixture is partially combusted, producing a secondary gaseous fuel containing hydrogen and carbon oxides. The secondary gaseous fuel is mixed with a secondary combustion oxidant and injected into the second combustion chamber wherein complete combustion of the secondary gaseous fuel is carried out. The resulting second stage flue gas containing very low amounts of NO.sub.x is then vented from the second combustion chamber.

  20. Concept and operational experience of the Areva DMT process for preventive maintenance of steam generators; Concepto y experiencia operacional del proceso DMT de Areva para el mantenimiento preventivo de generadores de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, S.; Gaspar, J. D.; Potier, P.; Jones, D.

    2015-07-01

    The AREVAs DMT process is a preventive chemical cleaning of the steam generators (SG) that provides the required features to keep the SG in good operative conditions. -Very low carbon steel corrosion -Innocuous towards stainless steel and nickel base alloys -Inherently safe process -Efficient magnetite dissolution -No use of CMR (i.e Carcinogenic, Mutagenic and toxic to Reproduction) Chemicals (e. g. Hydrazine) -No ammonia emissions -Easy decomposition of waste Several applications have been performed world-wide over the last 5 years. The results were fully satisfying in all the above stated points. The removal of up to 800 kg of dry deposits per SG was realized. A positive effect on fouling factor was observed, showing that AREVAs DMT process is a safe, easy and successful way to maintain the steam generators in excellent operative conditions. (Author)

  1. Waste Tank Vapor Project: Tank vapor database development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seesing, P.R.; Birn, M.B.; Manke, K.L.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the Tank Vapor Database (TVD) Development task in FY 1994 was to create a database to store, retrieve, and analyze data collected from the vapor phase of Hanford waste tanks. The data needed to be accessible over the Hanford Local Area Network to users at both Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The data were restricted to results published in cleared reports from the laboratories analyzing vapor samples. Emphasis was placed on ease of access and flexibility of data formatting and reporting mechanisms. Because of time and budget constraints, a Rapid Application Development strategy was adopted by the database development team. An extensive data modeling exercise was conducted to determine the scope of information contained in the database. a A SUN Sparcstation 1000 was procured as the database file server. A multi-user relational database management system, Sybase reg-sign, was chosen to provide the basic data storage and retrieval capabilities. Two packages were chosen for the user interface to the database: DataPrism reg-sign and Business Objects trademark. A prototype database was constructed to provide the Waste Tank Vapor Project's Toxicology task with summarized and detailed information presented at Vapor Conference 4 by WHC, PNL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Oregon Graduate Institute. The prototype was used to develop a list of reported compounds, and the range of values for compounds reported by the analytical laboratories using different sample containers and analysis methodologies. The prototype allowed a panel of toxicology experts to identify carcinogens and compounds whose concentrations were within the reach of regulatory limits. The database and user documentation was made available for general access in September 1994

  2. Experimental Investigations Of The Influence Of Pressure On Critical Extinction Conditions Of Laminar Nonpremixed Flames Burning Condensed Hydrocarbon Fuels, Jet Fuels, And Surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-25

    and the advancement of next-generation engines and power plants . However, due to the hundreds of chemical species found in practical fuels and the...the experimental testing of fuels with high boiling points for which it is difficult to avoid pyrolysis reactions during fuel vaporization [22]. Figure

  3. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  4. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  5. NUMERICAL STUDY ON COOLING EFFECT POTENTIAL FROM VAPORIZER DEVICE OF LPG VEHICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUJI SETIYO

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Over fuel consumption and increased exhaust gas due to the A/C system have become a serious problem. On the other hand, the LPG-fueled vehicle provides potential cooling from LPG phase changes in the vaporizer. Therefore, this article presents the potential cooling effect calculation from 1998 cm3 spark ignition (SI engine. A numerical study is used to calculate the potential heat absorption of latent and sensible heat transfer during LPG is expanded in the vaporizer. Various LPG compositions are also simulated through the engine speed range from 1000 to 6000 rpm. The result shows that the 1998 cm3 engine capable of generating the potential cooling effect of about 1.0 kW at 1000 rpm and a maximum of up to 1.8 kW at 5600 rpm. The potential cooling effects from the LPG vaporizer contributes about 26% to the A/C system works on eco-driving condition.

  6. Analysis of Petrol and Diesel Vapor Using Selective Ion Flow Tube/Mass Spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ping, CH.; Weijun, Z.; Yaman, CH.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 5, - (2003), s. 548-551 ISSN 0253-3820 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : selected ion flow tube/mass spectrometry * fuel vapor Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.224, year: 2003

  7. Prenatal exposure to vapors of gasoline-ethanol blends causes few cognitive deficits in adult rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental exposure to inhaled ethanol-gasoline fuel blends is a potential public health concern. Here we assessed cognitive functions in adult offspring of pregnant rats that were exposed to vapors of gasoline blended with a range of ethanol concentrations, including gasoli...

  8. Polybenzimidazole-based mixed membranes with exceptional high water vapor permeability and selectivity

    KAUST Repository

    Akhtar, Faheem Hassan

    2017-09-13

    Polybenzimidazole (PBI), a thermal and chemically stable polymer, is commonly used to fabricate membranes for applications like hydrogen recovery at temperatures of more than 300 °C, fuel cells working in a highly acidic environment, and nanofiltration in aggressive solvents. This report shows for the first time use of PBI dense membranes for water vapor/gas separation applications. They showed an excellent selectivity and high water vapor permeability. Incorporation of inorganic hydrophilic titanium-based nano-fillers into the PBI matrix further increased the water vapor permeability and water vapor/N2 selectivity. The most selective mixed matrix membrane with 0.5 wt% loading of TiO2 nanotubes yielded a water vapor permeability of 6.8×104 Barrer and a H2O/N2 selectivity of 3.9×106. The most permeable membrane with 1 wt% loading of carboxylated TiO2 nanoparticles had a 7.1×104 Barrer water vapor permeability and a H2O/N2 selectivity of 3.1×106. The performance of these membranes in terms of water vapor transport and selectivity is among the highest reported ones. The remarkable ability of PBI to efficiently permeate water versus other gases opens the possibility to fabricate membranes for dehumidification of streams in harsh environments. This includes the removal of water from high temperature reaction mixtures to shift the equilibrium towards products.

  9. Spill-Resistant Alkali-Metal-Vapor Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, William

    2005-01-01

    A spill-resistant vessel has been developed for dispensing an alkali-metal vapor. Vapors of alkali metals (most commonly, cesium or rubidium, both of which melt at temperatures slightly above room temperature) are needed for atomic frequency standards, experiments in spectroscopy, and experiments in laser cooling. Although the present spill-resistant alkali-metal dispenser was originally intended for use in the low-gravity environment of outer space, it can also be used in normal Earth gravitation: indeed, its utility as a vapor source was confirmed by use of cesium in a ground apparatus. The vessel is made of copper. It consists of an assembly of cylinders and flanges, shown in the figure. The uppermost cylinder is a fill tube. Initially, the vessel is evacuated, the alkali metal charge is distilled into the bottom of the vessel, and then the fill tube is pinched closed to form a vacuum seal. The innermost cylinder serves as the outlet for the vapor, yet prevents spilling by protruding above the surface of the alkali metal, no matter which way or how far the vessel is tilted. In the event (unlikely in normal Earth gravitation) that any drops of molten alkali metal have been shaken loose by vibration and are floating freely, a mesh cap on top of the inner cylinder prevents the drops from drifting out with the vapor. Liquid containment of the equivalent of 1.2 grams of cesium was confirmed for all orientations with rubbing alcohol in one of the prototypes later used with cesium.

  10. Vapor Pressure Data Analysis and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    SUBJECT TERMS Vapor pressure Antoine equation Statistical analysis Clausius–Clapeyron equation Standard deviation Volatility Enthalpy of volatilization...11 5. Antoine Constants (Equation 3), Standard Deviations , and S for 1-Tetradecanol .............12 6. Vapor...13 7. Antoine Constants (Equation 3), Standard Deviations , and S for DEM ............................13 8. Vapor Pressures

  11. High density fuels using dispersion and monolithic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel S.; Silva, Antonio T.; Abe, Alfredo Y.; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br, E-mail: alfredo@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, E-mail: rafael.orm@gmail.com, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Naval e Oceânica

    2017-07-01

    Fuel plates used in high-performance research reactors need to be converted to low-enrichment uranium fuel; the fuel option based on a monolithic formulation requires alloys to contain 6 - 10 wt% Mo. In this case, the fuel plates are composed of the metallic alloy U-10Mo surrounded by a thin zirconium layer encapsulated in aluminum cladding. This study reviewed the physical properties of monolithic forms. The constraints produced during the manufacturing process were analyzed and compared to those of dispersed fuel. The bonding process used for dispersion fuels differs from the techniques applied to foil bonding used for pure alloys. The quality of monolithic plates depends on the fabrication method, which usually involves hot isostatic pressing and the thermal annealing effect of residual stress, which degrades the uranium cubic phase. The preservation of the metastable phase has considerable influence on fuel performance. The physical properties of the foil fuel under irradiation are superior to those of aluminum-dispersed fuels. The fuel meat, using zirconium as the diffusion barrier, prevents the interaction layer from becoming excessively thick. The problem with dispersed fuel is breakaway swelling with a medium fission rate. It has been observed that the fuel dispersed in aluminum was minimized in monolithic forms. The pure alloys exhibited a suitable response from a rate at least twice as much as the fission rate of dispersions. The foils can support fissile material concentration combined with a reduced swelling rate. (author)

  12. A copper vapor laser by using a copper-vapor-complex reaction at a low temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Kano, Toshiyuki; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    A copper vapor laser performance by using ametal-vapor-complex reaction (Cu+AlBr3) is reported. The laser operation is obtained at a low temperature without externalheating because of the AlBr3 vapors evaporating at a room temperature. The copper vapor laser using this metal-vapor-complex reaction has an advantage of deposition-free of a metallic copper to the laser tube wall, which is different from the copper halide and the organometallic copper lasers.

  13. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the mixing of fuel oil with air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, A.; Bombach, R.; Hubschmid, W.; Kaeppeli, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    We report on measurements of the mixing of fuel oil with air at atmospheric pressure in an industrial premixed gas turbine burner. The concentration of the vaporized fuel oil was measured with laser induced fluorescence. We reason that the fuel oil concentration can be considered with good accuracy as proportional to the fluorescence intensity. (author) 6 fig., 3 refs.

  14. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  15. Vapor deposition of tantalum and tantalum compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkula, M.

    1996-01-01

    Tantalum, and many of its compounds, can be deposited as coatings with techniques ranging from pure, thermal chemical vapor deposition to pure physical vapor deposition. This review concentrates on chemical vapor deposition techniques. The paper takes a historical approach. The authors review classical, metal halide-based techniques and current techniques for tantalum chemical vapor deposition. The advantages and limitations of the techniques will be compared. The need for new lower temperature processes and hence new precursor chemicals will be examined and explained. In the last section, they add some speculation as to possible new, low-temperature precursors for tantalum chemical vapor deposition

  16. Recent advances in vapor intrusion site investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Thomas; Loll, Per; Eklund, Bart

    2017-12-15

    Our understanding of vapor intrusion has evolved rapidly since the discovery of the first high profile vapor intrusion sites in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Research efforts and field investigations have improved our understanding of vapor intrusion processes including the role of preferential pathways and natural barriers to vapor intrusion. This review paper addresses recent developments in the regulatory framework and conceptual model for vapor intrusion. In addition, a number of innovative investigation methods are discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. High temperature vapors science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hastie, John

    2012-01-01

    High Temperature Vapors: Science and Technology focuses on the relationship of the basic science of high-temperature vapors to some areas of discernible practical importance in modern science and technology. The major high-temperature problem areas selected for discussion include chemical vapor transport and deposition; the vapor phase aspects of corrosion, combustion, and energy systems; and extraterrestrial high-temperature species. This book is comprised of seven chapters and begins with an introduction to the nature of the high-temperature vapor state, the scope and literature of high-temp

  18. Importance Profiles for Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Brian; Chandra, Arunchandra S.; Kuang, Zhiming; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by the scientific desire to align observations with quantities of physical interest, we survey how scalar importance functions depend on vertically resolved water vapor. Definitions of importance begin from familiar examples of water mass I m and TOA clear-sky outgoing longwave flux I OLR, in order to establish notation and illustrate graphically how the sensitivity profile or "kernel" depends on whether specific humidity S, relative humidity R, or ln( R) are used as measures of vapor. Then, new results on the sensitivity of convective activity I con to vapor (with implied knock-on effects such as weather prediction skill) are presented. In radiative-convective equilibrium, organized (line-like) convection is much more sensitive to moisture than scattered isotropic convection, but it exists in a drier mean state. The lesson for natural convection may be that organized convection is less susceptible to dryness and can survive and propagate into regions unfavorable for disorganized convection. This counterintuitive interpretive conclusion, with respect to the narrow numerical result behind it, highlights the importance of clarity about what is held constant at what values in sensitivity or susceptibility kernels. Finally, the sensitivities of observable radiance signals I sig for passive remote sensing are considered. While the accuracy of R in the lower free troposphere is crucial for the physical importance scalars, this layer is unfortunately the most difficult to isolate with passive remote sensing: In high emissivity channels, water vapor signals come from too high in the atmosphere (for satellites) or too low (for surface radiometers), while low emissivity channels have poor altitude discrimination and (in the case of satellites) are contaminated by surface emissions. For these reasons, active ranging (LiDAR) is the preferred observing strategy.

  19. Sodium vapor charge exchange cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiddleston, H.R.; Fasolo, J.A.; Minette, D.C.; Chrien, R.E.; Frederick, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational sequential charge-exchange ion source yielding a 50 MeV H - current of approximately 8 mA is planned for use with the Argonne 500 MeV booster synchrotron. Progress is reported on the development of a sodium vapor charge-exchange cell as part of that planned effort. Design, fabrication, and operating results to date are presented and discussed

  20. Sodium vapor charge exchange cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiddleston, H.R.; Fasolo, J.A.; Minette, D.C.; Chrien, R.E.; Frederick, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational sequential charge-exchange ion source yielding a 50 MeV H - current of approximately 8 mA is planned for use with the Argonne 500 MeV booster synchrotron. We report on the progress for development of a sodium vapor charge-exchange cell as part of that planned effort. Design, fabrication, and operating results to date are presented and discussed. (author)

  1. Vapor Growth of III Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dang; Zheng, Lili; Zhang, Hui

    Good understanding of transport phenomena in vapor deposition systems is critical to fast and effective crystal growth system design. Transport phenomena are complicated and are related to operating conditions, such as temperature, velocity, pressure, and species concentration, and geometrical conditions, such as reactor geometry and source-substrate distance. Due to the limited in situ experimental monitoring, design and optimization of growth is mainly performed through semi-empirical and trial-and-error methods. Such an approach is only able to achieve improvement in the deposition sequence and cannot fulfill the increasingly stringent specifications required in industry. Numerical simulation has become a powerful alternative, as it is fast and easy to obtain critical information for the design and optimization of the growth system. The key challenge in vapor deposition modeling lies in developing an accurate simulation model of gas-phase and surface reactions, since very limited kinetic information is available in the literature. In this chapter, GaN thin-film growth by iodine vapor-phase epitaxy (IVPE) is used as an example to present important steps for system design and optimization by the numerical modeling approach. The advanced deposition model will be presented for multicomponent fluid flow, homogeneous gas-phase reaction inside the reactor, heterogeneous surface reaction on the substrate surface, heat transfer, and species transport. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis will be presented for gas-phase and surface reactions, together with a proposal for the reaction mechanism based on experiments. The prediction of deposition rates is presented. Finally, the surface evolution of film growth from vapor is analyzed for the case in which surface diffusion determines crystal grain size and morphology. Key control parameters for film instability are identified for quality improvement.

  2. Fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, E.R.

    1975-01-01

    Description of the operation of power plants and the respective procurement of fuel to fulfil the needs of the grid. The operation of the plants shall be optimised with respect to the fuel cost. (orig./RW) [de

  3. Fuel gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives a brief presentation of the context, perspectives of production, specificities, and the conditions required for the development of NGV (Natural Gas for Vehicle) and LPG-f (Liquefied Petroleum Gas fuel) alternative fuels. After an historical presentation of 80 years of LPG evolution in vehicle fuels, a first part describes the economical and environmental advantages of gaseous alternative fuels (cleaner combustion, longer engines life, reduced noise pollution, greater natural gas reserves, lower political-economical petroleum dependence..). The second part gives a comparative cost and environmental evaluation between the available alternative fuels: bio-fuels, electric power and fuel gases, taking into account the processes and constraints involved in the production of these fuels. (J.S.)

  4. Process for humidifying a gaseous fuel stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sederquist, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    A fuel gas stream for a fuel cell is humidified by a recirculating hot liquid water stream using the heat of condensation from the humidified stream as the heat to vaporize the liquid water. Humidification is accomplished by directly contacting the liquid water with the dry gas stream in a saturator to evaporate a small portion of water. The recirculating liquid water is reheated by direct contact with the humidified gas stream in a condenser, wherein water is condensed into the liquid stream. Between the steps of humidifying and condensing water from the gas stream it passes through the fuel cell and additional water, in the form of steam, is added thereto

  5. The Science of Emissions from Alternative Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    conditions, was varied between 3 – 5 ms by changing the fuel and air flow rates. Combustion products exhaust through a ceramic stack located on top of...premixed, phi=6 and phi=2. The fuel flow rate was varied to keep a constant carbon flow for all flames. The nitrogen flow to the vaporizer was 0.2... flow of natural gas is decreased gradually and that of liquid fuel is increased. The natural gas is finally cut off completely to achieve a stable flame

  6. Fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel pellet for insertion into a cladding tube in order to form a fuel element or a fuel rod. The fuel pellet has got a belt-like projection around its essentially cylindrical lateral circumferential surface. The upper and lower edges in vertical direction of this belt-like projection are wave-shaped. The projection is made of the same material as the bulk pellet. Both are made in one piece. (orig.) [de

  7. A Burst Mode, Ultrahigh Temperature UF4 Vapor Core Reactor Rankine Cycle Space Power System Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, E. T.; Kahook, S. D.; Diaz, N. J.

    1996-01-01

    Static and dynamic neutronic analyses have been performed on an innovative burst mode (100's of MW output for a few thousand seconds) Ulvahigh Temperature Vapor Core Reactor (UTVR) space nuclear power system. The NVTR employs multiple, neutronically-coupled fissioning cores and operates on a direct, closed Rankine cycle using a disk Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generater for energy conversion. The UTVR includes two types of fissioning core regions: (1) the central Ultrahigh Temperature Vapor Core (UTVC) which contains a vapor mixture of highly enriched UF4 fuel and a metal fluoride working fluid and (2) the UF4 boiler column cores located in the BeO moderator/reflector region. The gaseous nature of the fuel the fact that the fuel is circulating, the multiple coupled fissioning cores, and the use of a two phase fissioning fuel lead to unique static and dynamic neutronic characteristics. Static neutronic analysis was conducted using two-dimensional S sub n, transport theory calculations and three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport theory calculations. Circulating-fuel, coupled-core point reactor kinetics equations were used for analyzing the dynamic behavior of the UTVR. In addition to including reactivity feedback phenomena associated with the individual fissioning cores, the effects of core-to-core neutronic and mass flow coupling between the UTVC and the surrounding boiler cores were also included in the dynamic model The dynamic analysis of the UTVR reveals the existence of some very effectlve inherent reactivity feedback effects that are capable of quickly stabilizing this system, within a few seconds, even when large positive reactivity insertions are imposed. If the UTVC vapor fuel density feedback is suppressed, the UTVR is still inherently stable because of the boiler core liquid-fuel volume feedback; in contrast, suppression of the vapor fuel density feedback in 'conventional" gas core cavity reactors causes them to become inherently unstable. Due to the

  8. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Vapors In Unsaturated Alluvial Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhener, P.; Duwig, C.; Pasteris, G.; Dakhel, N.; Kaufmann, K.; Werner, D.

    Biodegradation rates are critical parameters in models aimed at predicting the nat- ural attenuation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the unsaturated zone. In this study the kinetic rate laws for the aerobic biodegradation of selected petroleum hydrocarbons and MTBE were investigated in unsaturated alluvial sand exposed to the vapors from a fuel mixture. Laboratory column and batch experiments were per- formed at room temperature under aerobic conditions. An analytical reactive transport model for VOC vapors in soil based on Monod kinetics is used for data interpretation. In the column experiment, steady-state diffusive vapor transport was reached after 23 days. Monod kinetic parameters were derived from the column profiles for toluene, m-xylene, octane and hexane. The degradation of cyclic alkanes, isooctane, and 1,2,4- trimethylbenzene was best described by first-order kinetics. MTBE, pentane and chlo- rofluorocarbons were recalcitrant. Batch experiments suggested first-order disappear- ance rate laws for all VOCs except octane, which followed zero-order kinetics. For some compounds including MTBE, disappearance rates in abiotic batch experiments were as high as in live batches. Abiotic disappearance is explained by slow intraparti- cle diffusion and sorption. It is concluded that the column approach is preferable for determining biodegradation rate parameters to be used in risk assessment models.

  9. Framework for simulating droplet vaporization in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    A framework for performing direct numerical simulations of droplet vaporization is presented. The work is motivated by spray combustion in engines wherein fuel droplets vaporize in a turbulent gas flow. The framework is built into a conservative finite volume code for simulating low Mach number turbulent multiphase flows. Phase tracking is performed using a discretely conservative geometric volume of fluid method, while the transport of mass fraction and temperature is performed using the BQUICK scheme. Special attention is given to the implementation of transport equations near the interface to ensure the consistency between fluxes of mass, momentum, and scalars. The effect of evaporation on the flow appears as a system of coupled source terms which depend on the local thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases. The sources are implemented implicitly using an unconditionally stable, monotone scheme. Two methodologies for resolving the system's thermodynamic equilibrium are compared for their accuracy, robustness, and computational expense. Verification is performed by comparing results to known solutions in one and three dimensions. Finally, simulations of droplets vaporizing in turbulence are demonstrated, and trends for mass fraction and temperature fields are discussed.

  10. Measurement of droplet vaporization rate enhancement caused by acoustic disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T. J.; Winter, M.

    1992-10-01

    Advanced laser diagnostics are being applied to quantify droplet vaporization enhancement in the presence of acoustic fields which can lead to instability in liquid-fueled rockets. While models have been developed to describe the interactions between subcritical droplet vaporization and acoustic fields in the surrounding gases, they have not been verified experimentally. In the super critical environment of a rocket engine combustor, little is understood about how the injected fluid is distributed. Experiments in these areas have been limited because of the lack of diagnostic techniques capable of providing quantitative results. Recently, however, extremely accurate vaporization rate measurements have been performed on droplets in a subcritical environment using morphology-dependent resonances (MDR's) in which fluorescence from an individual droplet provides information about its diameter. Initial measurements on methanol droplets behind a pressure pulse with a pressure ratio of 1.2 indicated that the evaporation rate in the first few microsec after wave passage was extremely high. Subsequent measurements have been made to validate these results using MDR's acquired from similarly-sized droplets using a pulse with a 1.1 pressure ratio. A baseline measurement was also made using a non evaporative fluid under similar Weber and Reynolds number conditions. The MDR technique employed for these measurements is explained and the facilities are described. The evaporation measurement results are shown and the rates observed from different droplet materials and different wave strengths are compared.

  11. Aviation-fuel property effects on combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosfjord, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    The fuel chemical property influence on a gas turbine combustor was studied using 25 test fuels. Fuel physical properties were de-emphasized by using fuel injectors which produce highly-atomized, and hence rapidly vaporizing sprays. A substantial fuel spray characterization effort was conducted to allow selection of nozzles which assured that such sprays were achieved for all fuels. The fuels were specified to cover the following wide ranges of chemical properties: hydrogen, 9.1 to 15 (wt) pct; total aromatics, 0 to 100 (vol) pct; and naphthalene, 0 to 30 (vol) pct. standard fuels (e.g., Jet A, JP4), speciality products (e.g., decalin, xylene tower bottoms) and special fuel blends were included. The latter group included six, 4-component blends prepared to achieve parametric variations in fuel hydrogen, total aromatics and naphthalene contents. The principle influences of fuel chemical properties on the combustor behavior were reflected by the radiation, liner temperature, and exhaust smoke number (or equivalently, soot number density) data. Test results indicated that naphthalene content strongly influenced the radiative heat load while parametric variations in total aromatics did not.

  12. Fossil Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

  13. Fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A new fuel can with a loose bottom and head is described. The fuel bar is attached to the loose bottom and head with two grid poles keeping the distance between bottom and head. A bow-shaped handle is attached to the head so that the fuel bar can be lifted from the can

  14. Experiments on Induction Times of Diesel-Fuels and its Surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenbrod, Christian; Reimert, Manfredo; Marks, Guenther; Rickmers, Peter; Klinkov, Konstantin; Moriue, Osamu

    Aiming for as low polluting combustion control as possible in Diesel-engines or gas-turbines, pre-vaporized and pre-mixed combustion at low mean temperature levels marks the goal. Low-est emissions of nitric-oxides are achievable at combustion temperatures associated to mixture ratios close to the lean flammability limit. In order to prevent local mixture ratios to be below the flammability limit (resulting in flame extinction or generation of unburned hydrocarbons and carbon-monoxide) or to be richer than required (resulting in more nitric-oxide than possi-ble), well-stirred conditioning is required. The time needed for spray generation, vaporization and turbulent mixing is limited through the induction time to self-ignition in a hot high-pressure ambiance. Therefore, detailed knowledge about the autoignition of fuels is a pre-requisit. Experiments were performed at the Bremen drop tower to investigate the self-ignition behavior of single droplets of fossil-Diesel oil, rapeseed-oil, Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) synthetic Diesel-oil and the fossil Diesel surrogates n-heptane, n-tetradecane, 50 n-tetradecane/ 50 1-methylnaphthalene as well as on the GTL-surrogates n-tetradecane / bicyclohexyl and n-tetradecane / 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). The rules for selection of the above fuels and the experimental results are presented and dis-cussed.

  15. Analysis of supercritical vapor explosions using thermal detonation wave theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamoun, B.I.; Corradini, M.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The interaction of certain materials such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with water results in vapor explosions with very high (supercritical) pressures and propagation velocities. A quasi-steady state analysis of supercritical detonation in one-dimensional multiphase flow was applied to analyze experimental data of the KROTOS (26-30) set of experiments conducted at the Joint Research Center at Ispra, Italy. In this work we have applied a new method of solution which allows for partial fragmentation of the fuel in the shock adiabatic thermodynamic model. This method uses known experiment values of the shock pressure and propagation velocity to estimate the initial mixing conditions of the experiment. The fuel and coolant were both considered compressible in this analysis. In KROTOS 26, 28, 29, and 30 the measured values of the shock pressure by the experiment were found to be higher than 25, 50, 100, and 100 Mpa respectively. Using the above data for the wave velocity and our best estimate for the values of the pressure, the predicted minimum values of the fragmented mass of the fuel were found to be 0.026. 0.04, 0.057, and 0.068 kg respectively. The predicted values of the work output corresponding to the above fragmented masses of the fuel were found to be 40, 84, 126, and 150 kJ respectively, with predicted initial void fractions of 112%, 12.5%, 8%, and 6% respectively.

  16. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Mitsuya; Yamashita, Jun-ichi; Mochida, Takaaki.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the fuel economy by increasing the reactivity at the latter burning stage of fuel assemblies and thereby increasing the burn-up degree. Constitution: At the later stage of the burning where the infinite multiplication factor of a fuel assembly is lowered, fuel rods are partially discharged to increase the fuel-moderator volume ratio in the fuel assembly. Then, plutonium is positively burnt by bringing the ratio near to an optimum point where the infinite multiplication factor becomes maximum and the reactivity of the fuel assembly is increased by utilizing the spectral shift effect. The number of the fuel rods to be removed is selected so as to approach the fuel-moderator atom number ratio where the infinite multiplication factor is maximum. Further, the positions where the thermal neutron fluxes are low are most effective for removing the rods and those positions between which no fuel rods are present and which are adjacent with neither the channel box nor the water rods are preferred. The rods should be removed at the time when the burning is proceeded at lest for one cycle. The reactivity is thus increased and the burn-up degree of fuels upon taking-out can be improved. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Review of Rover fuel element protective coating development at Los Alamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Terry C.

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) entered the nuclear propulsion field in 1955 and began work on all aspects of a nuclear propulsion program with a target exhaust temperature of about 2750 K. A very extensive chemical vapor deposition coating technology for preventing catastrophic corrosion of reactor core components by the high temperature, high pressure hydrogen propellant gas was developed. Over the 17-year term of the program, more than 50,000 fuel elements were coated and evaluated. Advances in performance were achieved only through closely coupled interaction between the developing fuel element fabrication and protective coating technologies. The endurance of fuel elements in high temperature, high pressure hydrogen environment increased from several minutes at 2000 K exit gas temperature to 2 hours at 2440 K exit gas temperature in a reactor test and 10 hours at 2350 K exit gas temperature in a hot gas test. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the rationale for selection of coating materials used (NbC and ZrC), identify critical fuel element-coat interactions that had to be modified to increase system performance, and review the evolution of protective coating technology.

  18. Method for Hot Real-Time Sampling of Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomeroy, Marc D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-29

    Biomass Pyrolysis has been an increasing topic of research, in particular as a replacement for crude oil. This process utilizes moderate temperatures to thermally deconstruct the biomass which is then condensed into a mixture of liquid oxygenates to be used as fuel precursors. Pyrolysis oils contain more than 400 compounds, up to 60 percent of which do not re-volatilize for subsequent chemical analysis. Vapor chemical composition is also complicated as additional condensation reactions occur during the condensation and collection of the product. Due to the complexity of the pyrolysis oil, and a desire to catalytically upgrade the vapor composition before condensation, online real-time analytical techniques such as Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) are of great use. However, in order to properly sample hot pyrolysis vapors, many challenges must be overcome. Sampling must occur within a narrow range of temperatures to reduce product composition changes from overheating or partial condensation or plugging of lines from condensed products. Residence times must be kept at a minimum to reduce further reaction chemistries. Pyrolysis vapors also form aerosols that are carried far downstream and can pass through filters resulting in build-up in downstream locations. The co-produced bio-char and ash from the pyrolysis process can lead to plugging of the sample lines, and must be filtered out at temperature, even with the use of cyclonic separators. A practical approach for considerations and sampling system design, as well as lessons learned are integrated into the hot analytical sampling system of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) to provide industrially relevant demonstrations of thermochemical transformations of biomass feedstocks at the pilot scale.

  19. Thermogravimetric measurements of liquid vapor pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Yunhong; Gregson, Christopher M.; Parker, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Rapid determination of vapor pressure by TGA. ► Demonstration of limitations of currently available approaches in literature. ► New model for vapor pressure assessment of small size samples in TGA. ► New model accounts for vapor diffusion and sample geometry and measures vapor pressure normally within 10%. - Abstract: A method was developed using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the vapor pressure of volatile liquids. This is achieved by measuring the rate of evaporation (mass loss) of a pure liquid contained within a cylindrical pan. The influence of factors like sample geometry and vapor diffusion on evaporation rate are discussed. The measurement can be performed across a wide range of temperature yielding reasonable results up to 10 kPa. This approach may be useful as a rapid and automatable method for measuring the volatility of flavor and fragrance raw materials.

  20. A Lithium Vapor Box Divertor Similarity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert A.; Emdee, Eric D.; Goldston, Robert J.; Jaworski, Michael A.; Schwartz, Jacob A.

    2017-10-01

    A lithium vapor box divertor offers an alternate means of managing the extreme power density of divertor plasmas by leveraging gaseous lithium to volumetrically extract power. The vapor box divertor is a baffled slot with liquid lithium coated walls held at temperatures which increase toward the divertor floor. The resulting vapor pressure differential drives gaseous lithium from hotter chambers into cooler ones, where the lithium condenses and returns. A similarity experiment was devised to investigate the advantages offered by a vapor box divertor design. We discuss the design, construction, and early findings of the vapor box divertor experiment including vapor can construction, power transfer calculations, joint integrity tests, and thermocouple data logging. Heat redistribution of an incident plasma-based heat flux from a typical linear plasma device is also presented. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 and The Princeton Environmental Institute.

  1. Fuel or irradiation subassembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seim, O.S.; Hutter, E.

    1975-01-01

    A subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which incorporates a loose bundle of fuel or irradiation pins enclosed within an inner tube which in turn is enclosed within an outer coolant tube and includes a locking comb consisting of a head extending through one side of the inner sleeve and a plurality of teeth which extend through the other side of the inner sleeve while engaging annular undercut portions in the bottom portion of the fuel or irradiation pins to prevent movement of the pins

  2. Nuclear fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.T.; Williamson, H.E.

    1977-01-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of Zr or Zr alloy getters in the fuel cans of a fuel element, the formation of Zr oxide layers must be prevented. Therefore, a compound body acting as a bimetal is to be inserted which consists of a metallic substrate (Ni, Ni alloys, ferro-alloys, steel, Ti, Ti alloys) and a coating (Zr, Zr alloys). The substrate has a much higher thermal expansion coefficient than the coating, so that the surface of the coating layer formed is constantly torn apart at normal operating temperatures of the reactor. The invention is described in great detail. (HP) [de

  3. SPOUTED BED DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR COATED NUCLEAR FUEL PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Douglas W.

    2017-07-01

    High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are fueled with tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated nuclear fuel particles embedded in a carbon-graphite fuel body. TRISO coatings consist of four layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide that are deposited on uranium ceramic fuel kernels (350µm – 500µm diameters) in a concatenated series of batch depositions. Each layer has dedicated functions such that the finished fuel particle has its own integral containment to minimize and control the release of fission products into the fuel body and reactor core. The TRISO coatings are the primary containment structure in the HTGR reactor and must have very high uniformity and integrity. To ensure high quality TRISO coatings, the four layers are deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using high purity precursors and are applied in a concatenated succession of batch operations before the finished product is unloaded from the coating furnace. These depositions take place at temperatures ranging from 1230°C to 1550°C and use three different gas compositions, while the fuel particle diameters double, their density drops from 11.1 g/cm3 to 3.0 g/cm3, and the bed volume increases more than 8-fold. All this is accomplished without the aid of sight ports or internal instrumentation that could cause chemical contamination within the layers or mechanical damage to thin layers in the early stages of each layer deposition. The converging section of the furnace retort was specifically designed to prevent bed stagnation that would lead to unacceptably high defect fractions and facilitate bed circulation to avoid large variability in coating layer dimensions and properties. The gas injection nozzle was designed to protect precursor gases from becoming overheated prior to injection, to induce bed spouting and preclude bed stagnation in the bottom of the retort. Furthermore, the retort and injection nozzle designs minimize buildup of pyrocarbon and silicon carbide on the

  4. The so-called 'Castor-Crisis': Transport of spent nuclear fuel elements and German 'Angst'. How to prevent the public relations catastrophe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suess, Werner

    1999-01-01

    Full text: 1. 'Castor-Crisis' - The Real Facts. - the background: radioactive contamination on the surface of transport containers for spent nuclear fuel elements; - legal aspects: transport limit values and notification obligations; - health aspects: radioactive contamination and ionising radiation; - the news media: divergence between technical facts and public perception. 2. 'Castor-Crisis' - The Reactions. 2.1 Technical measures: - 'action plan' of the Federal Ministry for Environment Protection and Reactor Safety; - IT-based European Information and Report System for the transport of nuclear combustibles => 'Transparent Transport Procedures'; - optimisation of decontamination procedures and transport organisation; - simplification of logistics, clearer responsibilities. 2.2 Communications measures: - defense strategy: 'we made a mistake...'; - information campaign: 'we owe you some answers...'; - regaining credibility: public testimonials of employees in newspaper ads, brochures etc.; - regaining credibility: neutral investigation of all relevant circumstances by KPMG. 3. 'Castor-Crisis' - The Lessons: - internal crisis management: improved co-ordination at company and branch level; - pro-active strategy: 'The benefits of nuclear energy' (avoidance Of CO 2 -emissions); - limits of communications; - communications efforts for nuclear energy - the European context. (author)

  5. Monofilament Vaporization Propulsion (MVP) System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Monofilament Vaporization Propulsion (MVP) is a new propulsion technology targeted at secondary payload applications. It does not compromise on performance while...

  6. Monofilament Vaporization Propulsion (MVP) System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Monofilament Vaporization Propulsion (MVP) is an innovative new propulsion technology targeted at secondary payload applications. The approach with MVP, rather than...

  7. Experiences of marijuana-vaporizer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouff, John M; Rooke, Sally E; Copeland, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Using a marijuana vaporizer may have potential harm-reduction advantages on smoking marijuana, in that the user does not inhale smoke. Little research has been published on use of vaporizers. In the first study of individuals using a vaporizer on their own initiative, 96 adults anonymously answered questions about their experiences with a vaporizer and their use of marijuana with tobacco. Users identified 4 advantages to using a vaporizer over smoking marijuana: perceived health benefits, better taste, no smoke smell, and more effect from the same amount of marijuana. Users identified 2 disadvantages: inconvenience of setup and cleaning and the time it takes to get the device operating for each use. Only 2 individuals combined tobacco in the vaporizer mix, whereas 15 combined tobacco with marijuana when they smoked marijuana. Almost all participants intended to continue using a vaporizer. Vaporizers seem to have appeal to marijuana users, who perceive them as having harm-reduction and other benefits. Vaporizers are worthy of experimental research evaluating health-related effects of using them.

  8. Mars water vapor, near-surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. A.; Sharman, R. D.; Lucich, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous paper we concluded that the temperature sensors aboard the Viking landers (VL-1 and VL-2) were detecting the water vapor frost point. Analysis of one Mars year of data at both lander sites substantiates this conclusion. At VL-1 it is found that the water vapor mixing ratio is constant with height through the bulk of the atmosphere, most of the time. Exceptions are during the onset phases of the two major dust storms when temporary enhancement of near-surface vapor occurs (the same phenomenon is observed at VL-2), and some depletion of near-surface vapor during the decay phase of the first storm, possibly the second storm as well. The former suggests near-surface, northward transport of water vapor with the storms. The latter suggests adsorption of vapor on dust particles followed by surface deposition. At VL-2, severe near-surface depletion of water vapor occurs during northern autumn and winter. The residual vapor is in equilibrium with the surface condensate observed at the site during this period, indicating that the source region for the condensate must be aloft with downward transport by dust fall-out. Since the near-surface water vapor mixing ratio and concentration at VL-1 generally parallels the column abundance over VL-1 obtained by the orbiters, this suggests that VL-1 can be used to give a measure of column abundance for as long as the temperature sensors remain operational.

  9. Calculational and experimental approaches to the equation of state of irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bober, M.; Breitung, W.; Karow, H.U.; Schumacher, G.

    1977-07-01

    The oxygen potential is an important parameter for the estimation of the vapor pressure of mixed oxide fuel and fission products. Dissolved fission products can have great influence on this potential in hypostoichiometric fuel. Therefore an attempt was made to calculate oxygen potentials of uranium-plutonium mixed oxides which contain fission products using models based on the equilibrium of oxygen defects. Vapor pressures have been calculated applying these data. The results of the calculation with various models differ especially at high temperatures above 4,000 K. Experimental work has been done to determine the vapor pressure of oxide fuel material at temperatures between 3,000 K and 5,000 K using laser beam heating. A measuring technique and a detailed evaluation model of laser evaporation measurements have been developed. The evaluation model describes the complex phenomena occurring during surface evaporation of liquid oxide fuel. Vapor pressure measurements with UO 2 have been carried out in the temperature region up to 4,500 K. With thermodynamic calculations the required equilibrium vapor pressures (EOS) can be derived from the vapor pressures measured. The caloric equation-of-state of the liquid-vapor equilibrium of the fuel up to temperatures of 5,000 K has been considered theoretically. (orig.) [de

  10. Vapor pressures and thermophysical properties of selected hexenols and recommended vapor pressure for hexan-1-ol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štejfa, V.; Fulem, Michal; Růžička, K.; Matějka, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 402, Sep (2015), 18-29 ISSN 0378-3812 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : alcohols * vapor pressure * heat capacity * ideal - gas thermodynamic properties * vaporization enthalpy Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.846, year: 2015

  11. Boiling crisis as inhibition of bubble detachment by the vapor recoil force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolayev, V.S.; Beysens, D.; Garrabos, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Boiling crisis is a transition between nucleate and film boiling. In this communication we present a physical model of the boiling crisis based on the vapor recoil effect. Our numerical simulations of the thermally controlled bubble growth at high heat fluxes show how the bubble begins to spread over the heater thus forming a germ for the vapor film. The vapor recoil force not only causes the vapor spreading, it also creates a strong adhesion to the heater that prevents the bubble departure, thus favoring the further bubble spreading. Near the liquid-gas critical point, the bubble growth is very slow and allows the kinetics of the bubble spreading to be observed. Since the surface tension is very small in this regime, only microgravity conditions can preserve a convex bubble shape. Under such conditions, we observed an increase of the apparent contact angle and spreading of the dry spot under the bubble, thus confirming our model of the boiling crisis. (authors)

  12. Exposures to jet fuel and benzene during aircraft fuel tank repair in the U.S. Air Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, G N; Smith, L B

    2000-06-01

    Jet fuel and benzene vapor exposures were measured during aircraft fuel tank entry and repair at twelve U.S. Air Force bases. Breathing zone samples were collected on the fuel workers who performed the repair. In addition, instantaneous samples were taken at various points during the procedures with SUMMA canisters and subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry. The highest eight-hour time-weighted average (TWA) fuel exposure found was 1304 mg/m3; the highest 15-minute short-term exposure was 10,295 mg/m3. The results indicate workers who repair fuel tanks containing explosion suppression foam have a significantly higher exposure to jet fuel as compared to workers who repair tanks without foam (p fuel, absorbed by the foam, to volatilize during the foam removal process. Fuel tanks that allow flow-through ventilation during repair resulted in lower exposures compared to those tanks that have only one access port and, as a result, cannot be ventilated efficiently. The instantaneous sampling results confirm that benzene exposures occur during fuel tank repair; levels up to 49.1 mg/m3 were found inside the tanks during the repairs. As with jet fuel, these elevated benzene concentrations were more likely to occur in foamed tanks. The high temperatures associated with fuel tank repair, along with the requirement to wear vapor-permeable cotton coveralls for fire reasons, could result in an increase in the benzene body burden of tank entrants.

  13. Summary and evaluation of transient test data on extended fuel motion resulting from unprotected loss of flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerman, C E

    1977-06-01

    Experimental data on fuel failure and its consequences are used to provide predictions of the extended fuel motion that would occur after a hypothetical core-disruptive loss-of-flow accident without scram in the Fast Test Reactor. These data indicate the existence of fuel-dispersal mechanisms, slow collapse of fresh fuel, resistance to collapse of irradiated fuel, the absence of accelerated collapse mechanisms (such as cladding-coolant vapor ''explosions''), and the fact that real LMFBR conditions inhibit rapid sodium-vaporization events. These data indicate that severely damaged subassemblies will not be coolable in situ by returning sodium after the accident, because of steel and fuel blockages, and suggest that the severely damaged, melted fuel will eventually disperse upward under the influence of vapor generated by decay heating.

  14. Fuel spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Koji; Yokomizo, Osamu; Kanazawa, Toru; Kashiwai, Shin-ichi; Orii, Akihito.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel spacer for a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor and a PTR type reactor. Springs each having a vane are disposed on the side surface of a circular cell which supports a fuel rods. A vortex streams having a vertical component are formed by the vanes in the flowing direction of a flowing channel between adjacent cylindrical cells. Liquid droplets carried by streams are deposited on liquid membrane streams flowing along the fuel rod at the downstream of the spacer by the vortex streams. In view of the above, the liquid droplets can be deposited to the fuel rod without increasing the amount of metal of the spacer. Accordingly, the thermal margin of the fuel assembly can be improved without losing neutron economy. (I.N.)

  15. 40 CFR 86.1246-96 - Fuel dispensing spitback procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1246-96 Fuel dispensing spitback procedure. (a) The... or methanol. The bag shall be designed and used so that liquid fuel does not spit back onto the... shall be folded as quickly as possible to prevent evaporation of collected emissions. (l) Within 5...

  16. Diesel fuel containing polyalkylene amine and Mannich base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harle, O.L.

    1979-09-04

    Disclosed is a fuel additive and fuel composition. The additive comprises a mixture of a polyalkylene amine and the reaction product of an alkylphenol, an aldehyde and an amine. The additive provides surprising stability in preventing thermal degradation of fuels, particularly fuels for compression ignition engines.

  17. Fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahm, W.

    1989-01-01

    The situation of the nuclear fuel cycle for LWR type reactors in France and in the Federal Republic of Germany was presented in 14 lectures with the aim to compare the state-of-the-art in both countries. In addition to the momentarily changing fuilds of fuel element development and fueling strategies, the situation of reprocessing, made interesting by some recent developmnts, was portrayed and differences in ultimate waste disposal elucidated. (orig.) [de

  18. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, J.B.L. de.

    1980-01-01

    All stages of nuclear fuel cycle are analysed with respect to the present situation and future perspectives of supply and demand of services; the prices and the unitary cost estimation of these stages for the international fuel market are also mentioned. From the world resources and projections of uranium consumption, medium-and long term analyses are made of fuel availability for several strategies of use of different reactor types. Finally, the cost of nuclear fuel in the generation of electric energy is calculated to be used in the energetic planning of the electric sector. (M.A.) [pt

  19. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1993-01-01

    Among fuel pellets to be loaded to fuel cans of a fuel assembly, fuel pellets having a small thermal power are charged in a region from the end of each of spacers up to about 50mm on the upstream of coolants that flow vertically at the periphery of fuel rods. Coolants at the periphery of fuel rods are heated by the heat generation, to result in voids. However, since cooling effect on the upstream of the spacers is low due to influences of the spacers. Further, since the fuel pellets disposed in the upstream region have small thermal power, a void coefficient is not increased. Even if a thermal power exceeding cooling performance should be generated, there is no worry of causing burnout in the upstream region. Even if burnout should be caused, safety margin and reliability relative to burnout are improved, to increase an allowable thermal power, thereby enabling to improve integrity and reliability of fuel rods and fuel assemblies. (N.H.)

  20. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tadashi; Sato, Kenji; Goto, Masakazu.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate identification of a fuel assembly upon fuel exchange in BWR type reactors. Constitution: Fluorescent material is coated or metal plating is applied to the impressed portion of a upper tie plate handle of a fuel assembly, and the fluorescent material or the metal plating surface is covered with a protective membrane made of transparent material. This enables to distinguish the impressed surface from a distant place and chemical reaction between the impressed surface and the reactor water can be prevented. Furthermore, since the protective membrane is formed such that it protrudes toward the upper side relative to the impressed surface, there is no risk of depositions of claddings thereover. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. CANDU fuel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Cheadle, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    The service life of CANDU fuel channels is determined by the component that has to withstand the most severe conditions, the Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube. The latest fuel channels are expected to have a lifetime of over 30 years. The properties that control service life are fracture and deformation. For fracture, a defence-in-depth approach is used - preventing crack initiation and invoking leak-before-break. Confidence in the serviceability of fuel channels is based on current knowledge of the state of health of the components evaluated by surveillance. Degradation of properties with service is slow, allowing sufficient time to judge and act when end-of-life is reached. Methods for improving the properties of components are outlined. (author)

  2. The fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this brochure the fuel cycle is presented. The following fuel cycle steps are described: (1) Front of the fuel cycle (Mining and milling; Treatment; Refining, conversion and enrichment; Fuel fabrication); (2) Use of fuel in nuclear reactors; (3) Back end of the fuel cycle (Interim storage of spent fuel; spent fuel reprocessing; Final disposal of spent fuel)

  3. Safety assessment of in-vessel vapor explosion loads in next generation reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Kwang Hyun; Cho, Jong Rae; Choi, Byung Uk; Kim, Ki Yong; Lee, Kyung Jung [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea); Park, Ik Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    A safety assessment of the reactor vessel lower head integrity under in-vessel vapor explosion loads has been performed. The premixing and explosion calculations were performed using TRACER-II code. Using the calculated explosion pressures imposed on the lower head inner wall, strain calculations were performed using ANSYS code. The explosion analyses show that the explosion impulses are not altered significantly by the uncertain parameters of triggering location and time, fuel and vapor volume fractions in uniform premixture bounding calculations within the conservative ranges. Strain analyses using the calculated pressure loads on the lower head inner wall show that the vapor explosion-induced lower head failure is physically unreasonable. The static analysis using the conservative explosion-end pressure of 7,246 psia shows that the maximum equivalent strain is 4.3% at the bottom of lower head, which is less than the allowable threshold value of 11%. (author). 24 refs., 40 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Nuclear fuel reliability in NPP KRSKO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolovic, A.; Kurincic, B.

    2001-01-01

    The importance of achieving and maintaining high fuel integrity comes from negative consequences of operation with failed fuel. Failed fuel has a significant effect on operating cost and performance, and increases the radiological consequences to environment. Fuel failures represent a breach in the first barrier (cladding) preventing the release of fission products. Historically NPP Krsko experienced some degradation of fuel cladding integrity. To resolve this problem and to ensure the safe, reliable and cost effective operation of nuclear fuel, NPP Krsko established 'Fuel Integrity Program'. The key elements of the Program are: continuous monitoring and trending of the fuel behaviour through operating cycle, evaluation of key performance indicators (RCS isotopes, operational parameters) to determine whether the fuel defects exist, implementation of appropriate actions to reduce and mitigate the consequences of fuel defects (four action levels), 100% examination of fuel to remove the defective fuel from operation (Ultrasonic (UT), In Mast Sipping (IMS) and visual inspection), evaluating the worldwide experience and fuel performance and, integrating the experience and knowledge into new fuel design (ZIRLO TM cladding, debris filter bottom nozzle, removable top nozzle). Since start of commercial operation fuel integrity has been evaluated considering certain aspects like operation and fuel handling, fuel rod burnup and cycle length, cladding material properties, etc. As a result of successful Fuel Integrity Program NPP Krsko has achieved high performance level in terms of fuel integrity in past four cycles. Also, NPP Krsko calculations show good matching between analytical prediction of number of failed fuel rods from primary coolant activity analysis and inspection results with the Nondestructive Testing (NDT) methods.(author)

  5. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  6. Vapor Pressures of Several Commercially Used Alkanolamines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepacova, Katarina; Huttenhuis, Patrick J. G.; Derks, Peter W. J.; Versteeg, Geert F.; Klepáčová, Katarína

    For the design of acid gas treating processes, vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data must be available of the solvents to be applied. In this study the vapor pressures of seven frequently industrially used alkanolamines (diethanolamine, N-methylethanolamine, N,N-dimethylethanolamine,

  7. Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guastad, Krista; Riihimaki, Laura; none,

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio (TWRMR) value-added product (VAP) is to calculate water-vapor mixing ratio at the 25-meter and 60-meter levels of the meteorological tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility.

  8. 75 FR 65151 - Marine Vapor Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... 35 and 39 Marine Vapor Control Systems; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 203... Control Systems AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... vapor control systems (VCSs). The proposed changes would make VCS requirements more compatible with new...

  9. SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY: REFERENCE HANDBOOK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) systems are being used in Increasing numbers because of the many advantages these systems hold over other soil treatment technologies. SVE systems appear to be simple in design and operation, yet the fundamentals governing subsurface vapor transport ar...

  10. LNG fire and vapor control system technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Yasutake, K.M.; Franklin, A.L.

    1982-06-01

    This report provides a review of fire and vapor control practices used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry. Specific objectives of this effort were to summarize the state-of-the-art of LNG fire and vapor control; define representative LNG facilities and their associated fire and vapor control systems; and develop an approach for a quantitative effectiveness evaluation of LNG fire and vapor control systems. In this report a brief summary of LNG physical properties is given. This is followed by a discussion of basic fire and vapor control design philosophy and detailed reviews of fire and vapor control practices. The operating characteristics and typical applications and application limitations of leak detectors, fire detectors, dikes, coatings, closed circuit television, communication systems, dry chemicals, water, high expansion foam, carbon dioxide and halogenated hydrocarbons are described. Summary descriptions of a representative LNG peakshaving facility and import terminal are included in this report together with typical fire and vapor control systems and their locations in these types of facilities. This state-of-the-art review identifies large differences in the application of fire and vapor control systems throughout the LNG industry.

  11. On the dissolution of vapors and gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüstneck, N; Wüstneck, R; Pison, U; Möhwald, H

    2007-02-13

    The captive bubble technique in combination with axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA-CB) and with micro gas chromatography is used to study the dynamics of dissolution of different gases and vapors in water in situ. The technique yields the changes in the interfacial tension and bubble volume and surface. As examples, the dissolution of methanol and hexane vapors, inhaled anesthetic vapors, and gases, that is, diethyl ether, chloroform, isoflurane, enflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, N2O, and xenon, and as nonimmobilizers perfluoropentane and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoro-ethane (R113) were investigated. The examination of interfacial tension-time and bubble volume-time functions permits us to distinguish between water-soluble and -insoluble substances, gases, and vapors. Vapors and gases generally differ in terms of the strength of their intermolecular interactions. The main difference between dissolution processes of gases and vapors is that, during the entire process of gas dissolution, no surface tension change occurs. In contrast, during vapor dissolution the surface tension drops immediately and decreases continuously until it reaches the equilibrium surface tension of water at the end of dissolution. The results of this study show that it is possible to discriminate anesthetic vapors from anesthetic gases and nonimmobilizers by comparing their dissolution dynamics. The nonimmobilizers have extremely low or no solubility in water and change the surface tension only negligibly. By use of newly defined molecular dissolution/diffusion coefficients, a simple model for the determination of partition coefficients is developed.

  12. Mechanics of gas-vapor bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, Yue; Zhang, Yuhang; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Most bubbles contain a mixture of vapor and incondensible gases. While the limit cases of pure vapor and pure gas bubbles are well studied, much less is known about the more realistic case of a mixture. The bubble contents continuously change due to the combined effects of evaporation and

  13. Effect of granosan vapors on mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lishenko, N.P.; Lishenko, I.D.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of granosan on the germination of vetch seeds. Vetch seeds were stored from 4-6 days in ethyl mercuric chloride vapors. Results indicated that the vapors caused a sharp decrease in germination and caused chromosomal aberrations during the anaphase.

  14. Transient heating and evaporation of moving fuel droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2014-01-01

    In combustion devices involving direct injection of low-volatility liquid fuel (e.g., bio-oils from pyrolysis process) into the combustor, transient heating and vaporization is an important controlling factor in ignition and combustion of the fuel vapor/air mixture. As a result, quite many...... experimental and numerical efforts have been made on this topic. In this paper, a comprehensive 3D model that addresses the internal circulation, heat and mass transfer within a moving droplet has been successfully developed. The model is calibrated by analytical solutions for simplified cases and validated...

  15. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  16. Fuel cell with internal reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maru, H.C.; Patel, P.S.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel cell system provided with a first passage means in communication with and adjacent to a cell diffusion electrode and with a second passage means having a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbons and communicating with the first passage means through a gas porous member. Differential pressure means is further provided to establish a pressure differential between the passage means for promoting reformed gas flow from the second passage means to the first passage means and retarding electrolyte vapor passage from the first passage means to the second passage means

  17. Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cells have been the subject of intense research and development efforts for the past decades. Even so, the technology has not had its commercial breakthrough yet. This entry gives an overview of the technological challenges and status of fuel cells and discusses the most promising applications...

  18. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitosi.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel pellets containing burnable poison and fuel pellets not containing burnable poison are used together in burnable poison-incorporated fuel rods which is disposed at the outermost layer of a cluster. Since the burnable poison-incorporated fuel rods are disposed at the outermost layer of the cluster where a neutron flux level is high and, accordingly, the power is high originally, local power peaking can be suppressed and, simultaneously, fuels can be burnt effectively without increasing the fuel concentration in the inner and the intermediate layers than that of the outermost layer. In addition, a problem of lacking a reactor core reactivity at an initial stage is solved by disposing both of the fuel pellets together, even if burnable poisons of high concentration are used. This is because the extent of the lowering of the reactivity due to the burnable poison-incorporated fuels is mainly determined by the surface area thereof and the remaining period of the burnable poison is mainly determined by the concentration thereof. As a result, the burnup degree can be improved without lowering the reactor reactivity so much. (N.H.)

  19. Fuel cells:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2013-01-01

    A brief overview of the progress in fuel cell applications and basic technology development is presented, as a backdrop for discussing readiness for penetration into the marketplace as a solution to problems of depletion, safety, climate or environmental impact from currently used fossil...... and nuclear fuel-based energy technologies....

  20. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Akiyoshi; Bessho, Yasunori; Aoyama, Motoo; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Hirakawa, Hiromasa; Yamashita, Jun-ichi; Hayashi, Tatsuo

    1998-01-01

    In a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor in which a water rod of a large diameter is disposed at the central portion, the cross sectional area perpendicular to the axial direction comprises a region a of a fuel rod group facing to a wide gap water region to which a control rod is inserted, a region b of a fuel rod group disposed on the side of the wide gap water region other than the region a, a region d of a fuel rod group facing to a narrow gap water region and a region c of a fuel rod group disposed on the side of the narrow gap water region other than the region d. When comparing an amount of fission products contained in the four regions relative to that in the entire regions and average enrichment degrees of fuel rods for the four regions, the relative amount and the average enrichment degree of the fuel rod group of the region a is minimized, and the relative amount and the average enrichment degree of the fuel rod group in the region b is maximized. Then, reactor shut down margin during cold operation can be improved while flattening the power in the cross section perpendicular to the axial direction. (N.H.)

  1. Vapor-barrier Vacuum Isolation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor); Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system includes a collimated beam source within a vacuum chamber, a condensable barrier gas, cooling material, a pump, and isolation chambers cooled by the cooling material to condense the barrier gas. Pressure levels of each isolation chamber are substantially greater than in the vacuum chamber. Coaxially-aligned orifices connect a working chamber, the isolation chambers, and the vacuum chamber. The pump evacuates uncondensed barrier gas. The barrier gas blocks entry of atmospheric vapor from the working chamber into the isolation chambers, and undergoes supersonic flow expansion upon entering each isolation chamber. A method includes connecting the isolation chambers to the vacuum chamber, directing vapor to a boundary with the working chamber, and supersonically expanding the vapor as it enters the isolation chambers via the orifices. The vapor condenses in each isolation chamber using the cooling material, and uncondensed vapor is pumped out of the isolation chambers via the pump.

  2. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinauk, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1985, Fragema has been marketing and selling the Advanced Fuel Assemby AFA whose main features are its zircaloy grids and removable top and bottom nozzles. It is this product, which exists for several different fuel assembly arrays and heights, that will be employed in the reactors at Daya Bay. Fragema employs gadolinium as the consumable poison to enable highperformance fuel management. More recently, the company has supplied fuel assemblies of the mixed-oxide(MOX) and enriched reprocessed uranium type. The reliability level of the fuel sold by Fragema is one of the highest in the world, thanks in particular to the excellence of the quality assurance and quality control programs that have been implemented at all stages of its design and manufacture

  3. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echigoya, Hironori; Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To render the axial distribution relatively flat. Constitution: First nuclear element comprises a fuel can made of zircalloy i.e., the metal with less neutron absorption, which is filled with a plurality of UO 2 pellets and sealed by using a lower end plug, a plenum spring and an upper end plug by means of welding. Second fuel element is formed by substituting a part of the UO 2 pellets with a water tube which is sealed with water and has a space for allowing the heat expansion. The nuclear fuel assembly is constituted by using the first and second fuel elements together. In such a structure, since water reflects neutrons and decrease their leakage to increase the temperature, reactivity is added at the upper portion of the fuel assembly to thereby flatten the axial power distribution. Accordingly, stable operation is possible only by means of deep control rods while requiring no shallow control rods. (Sekiya, K.)

  4. Aircraft-Fuel-Tank Design for Liquid Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, T W

    1955-01-01

    Some of the considerations involved in the design of aircraft fuel tanks for liquid hydrogen are discussed herein. Several of the physical properties of metals and thermal insulators in the temperature range from ambient to liquid-hydrogen temperatures are assembled. Calculations based on these properties indicate that it is possible to build a large-size liquid-hydrogen fuel tank which (1) will weigh less then 15 percent of the fuel weight, (2) will have a hydrogen vaporization rate less than 30 percent of the cruise fuel-flow rate, and (3) can be held in a stand-by condition and readied for flight in a short time.

  5. HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON, T.J.

    2006-12-20

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

  6. Microbial growth with vapor-phase substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzel, Joanna; Thullner, Martin; Harms, Hauke [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Wick, Lukas Y., E-mail: lukas.wick@ufz.de [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Limited information exists on influences of the diffusive transport of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) on bacterial activity in the unsaturated zone of the terrestrial subsurface. Diffusion of VOC in the vapor-phase is much more efficient than in water and results in effective VOC transport and high bioavailability despite restricted mobility of bacteria in the vadose zone. Since many bacteria tend to accumulate at solid-water, solid-air and air-water interfaces, such phase boundaries are of a special interest for VOC-biodegradation. In an attempt to evaluate microbial activity toward air-borne substrates, this study investigated the spatio-temporal interplay between growth of Pseudomonas putida (NAH7) on vapor-phase naphthalene (NAPH) and its repercussion on vapor-phase NAPH concentrations. Our data demonstrate that growth rates of strain PpG7 were inversely correlated to the distance from the source of vapor-phase NAPH. Despite the high gas phase diffusivity of NAPH, microbial growth was absent at distances above 5 cm from the source when sufficient biomass was located in between. This indicates a high efficiency of suspended bacteria to acquire vapor-phase compounds and influence headspace concentration gradients at the centimeter-scale. It further suggests a crucial role of microorganisms as biofilters for gas-phase VOC emanating from contaminated groundwater or soil. - Research highlights: > Suspended bacteria have a high efficiency to degrade vapor-phase naphthalene. > Bacteria influence NAPH vapor-phase concentration gradients at centimeter-scale. > Microbial growth on vapor-phase naphthalene is inversely correlated to its source. > Bacteria are good biofilters for gas-phase NAPH emanating from contaminated sites. - Suspended bacteria have a high efficiency to degrade vapor-phase naphthalene and effectively influence vapor-phase naphthalene concentration gradients at the centimeter scale.

  7. Building blocks for ionic liquids: Vapor pressures and vaporization enthalpies of 1-(n-alkyl)-imidazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emel'yanenko, Vladimir N.; Portnova, Svetlana V.; Verevkin, Sergey P.; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Schubert, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We measured vapor pressures of the 1-(n-alkyl)-imidazoles by transpiration method. → Variations on the alkyl chain length n were C 3 , C 5 -C 7 , and C 9 -C 10 . → Enthalpies of vaporization were derived from (p, T) dependencies. → Enthalpies of vaporization at 298.15 K were linear dependent on the chain length. - Abstract: Vapor pressures of the linear 1-(n-alkyl)-imidazoles with the alkyl chain C 3 , C 5 -C 7 , and C 9 -C 10 have been measured by the transpiration method. The molar enthalpies of vaporization Δ l g H m of these compounds were derived from the temperature dependencies of vapor pressures. A linear correlation of enthalpies of vaporization Δ l g H m (298.15 K) of the 1-(n-alkyl)-imidazoles with the chain length has been found.

  8. Assessment of bio-fuel options for solid oxide fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiefeng

    diesel engine and truck idling with fuel cell auxiliary power unit system. The customized nozzle used for fuel vaporization and mixing achieved homogenous atomization of input hydrocarbon fuels (e.g., diesel, biodiesel, diesel-biodiesel blend, and biodiesel-ethanol-diesel), and improved the performance of fuel catalytic reformation. Given the same operating condition (reforming temperature, total oxygen content, water input flow, and gas hourly space velocity), the hydrocarbon reforming performance follows the trend of diesel > biodiesel-ethanol-diesel > diesel-biodiesel blend > biodiesel (i.e., diesel catalytic reformation has the highest hydrogen production, lowest risk of carbon formation, and least possibility of hot spot occurrence). These results provide important new insight into the use of bio-fuels and bio-fuel blends as a primary fuel source for solid oxide fuel cell applications.

  9. Fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel assembly in a nuclear reactor comprises a locking mechanism that is capable of locking the fuel assembly to the core plate of a nuclear reactor to prevent inadvertent movement of the fuel assembly. The locking mechanism comprises a ratchet mechanism 108 that allows the fuel assembly to be easily locked to the core plate but prevents unlocking except when the ratchet is disengaged. The ratchet mechanism is coupled to the locking mechanism by a rotatable guide tube for a control rod or water displacer rod. (author)

  10. Microwave Treatment of Oxidizer Vapor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cha, Chang

    2002-01-01

    .... The Air Force Research Laboratory, Weapon Systems Logistics Branch (AFRL/MLQL) has developed a systematic assessment of needs for pollution prevention research within the space segment of Air Force activities...

  11. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  12. Investigation of a piezoelectric droplet delivery method for fuel injection and physical property evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Menon, Shyam

    2017-11-01

    A piezoelectric droplet generator is investigated to deliver liquid hydrocarbon fuels to a micro-combustor application. Besides fuel delivery, the setup is intended to measure fuel physical properties such as viscosity and surface tension. These properties are highly relevant to spray generation in internal combustion engines. Accordingly, a drop-on-demand piezoelectric dispenser is used to generate fuel droplet trains, which are studied using imaging and Phase Doppler Particle Anemometry (PDPA). The diagnostics provide information regarding droplet size and velocity and their evolution over time. The measurements are correlated with results from one-dimensional (1D) models that incorporate sub-models for piezo-electric actuation and droplet vaporization. By validating the 1D models for fuels with known physical properties, a technique is developed that has the capability to meter low-vapor pressure liquid fuels to the microcombustor and use information from the droplet train to calculate physical properties of novel fuels.

  13. Hardened over-coating fuel particle and manufacture of nuclear fuel using its fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimuda, Hideharu.

    1990-01-01

    Coated-fuel particles comprise a coating layer formed by coating ceramics such as silicon carbide or zirconium carbide and carbons, etc. to a fuel core made of nuclear fuel materials. The fuel core generally includes oxide particles such as uranium, thorium and plutonium, having 400 to 600 μm of average grain size. The average grain size of the coated-fuel particle is usually from 800 to 900 μm. The thickness of the coating layer is usually from 150 to 250 μm. Matrix material comprising a powdery graphite and a thermosetting resin such as phenol resin, etc. is overcoated to the surface of the coated-fuel particle and hardened under heating to form a hardened overcoating layer to the coated-fuel particle. If such coated-fuel particles are used, cracks, etc. are less caused to the coating layer of the coated-fuel particles upon production, thereby enabling to prevent the damages to the coating layer. (T.M.)

  14. Direct methanol fuel cell and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2004-10-26

    A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

  15. Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R; Bowen, Gabriel J

    2015-03-17

    Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. We show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration of water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. Our findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry.

  16. Vapor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes reflect water of combustion in the urban atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Galen; Strong, Courtenay; Good, Stephen P.; Bares, Ryan; Ehleringer, James R.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic modification of the water cycle involves a diversity of processes, many of which have been studied intensively using models and observations. Effective tools for measuring the contribution and fate of combustion-derived water vapor in the atmosphere are lacking, however, and this flux has received relatively little attention. We provide theoretical estimates and a first set of measurements demonstrating that water of combustion is characterized by a distinctive combination of H and O isotope ratios. We show that during periods of relatively low humidity and/or atmospheric stagnation, this isotopic signature can be used to quantify the concentration of water of combustion in the atmospheric boundary layer over Salt Lake City. Combustion-derived vapor concentrations vary between periods of atmospheric stratification and mixing, both on multiday and diurnal timescales, and respond over periods of hours to variations in surface emissions. Our estimates suggest that up to 13% of the boundary layer vapor during the period of study was derived from combustion sources, and both the temporal pattern and magnitude of this contribution were closely reproduced by an independent atmospheric model forced with a fossil fuel emissions data product. Our findings suggest potential for water vapor isotope ratio measurements to be used in conjunction with other tracers to refine the apportionment of urban emissions, and imply that water vapor emissions associated with combustion may be a significant component of the water budget of the urban boundary layer, with potential implications for urban climate, ecohydrology, and photochemistry. PMID:25733906

  17. High-temperature thermodynamics by laser-vaporization mass spectrometry: An approach based on statistical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloni, Fabio; Manara, Dario; Pflieger, Rachel; Colle, Jean-Yves; Rondinella, Vincenzo V.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of correlation between the temperature of the target surface and the mass-spectrometer signal in laser-vaporization mass spectrometry has been analyzed theoretically. An approach based on statistical mechanics has been applied in order to describe the transient vaporization into vacuum of molecules effused from the area of the target surface struck by a laser pulse of moderate power density and time duration of some tens of ms (Langmuir vaporization). In particular, an expression for the intensity of the output signal of the mass spectrometer, I(l,t), has been derived as a function of the detection time, t, and of the distance, l, of the ionizing chamber of the spectrometer from the target. A simple numerical method for the calculation of I(l,t) according to the time profile of the target temperature is also provided. By fitting experimental I(t) values with the theoretical expression one can retrieve thermodynamic quantities involved in the sublimation/evaporation process of the molecular species analyzed, such as enthalpy and equilibrium vapor pressure (or, alternatively, vaporization coefficient). As an illustration, this fitting was performed on experimental measurements of pyrolytic graphite sublimation in the temperature range 3200-3700 K. The analysis developed will be useful for the interpretation of experimental datasets in order to retrieve high-temperature thermodynamic data, especially on high-melting materials. Research in this domain is being launched for nuclear materials, particularly for Generation IV advanced fuels

  18. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, Masaomi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Hirai, Mutsumi; Tanabe, Isami; Yuda, Ryoichi.

    1989-01-01

    In a method of manufacturing nuclear fuel pellets by compression molding an oxide powder of nuclear fuel material followed by sintering, a metal nuclear material is mixed with an oxide powder of the nuclear fuel material. As the metal nuclear fuel material, whisker or wire-like fine wire or granules of metal uranium can be used effectively. As a result, a fuel pellet in which the metal nuclear fuel is disposed in a network-like manner can be obtained. The pellet shows a great effect of preventing thermal stress destruction of pellets upon increase of fuel rod power as compared with conventional pellets. Further, the metal nuclear fuel material acts as an oxygen getter to suppress the increase of O/M ratio of the pellets. Further, it is possible to reduce the swelling of pellet at high burn-up degree. (T.M.)

  19. Effects of Heat of Vaporization and Octane Sensitivity on Knock-Limited Spark Ignition Engine Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratcliff, Matthew A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burton, Jonathan L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sindler, Petr [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McCormick, Robert L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, Earl D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Fouts, Lisa A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-03

    Knock-limited loads for a set of surrogate gasolines all having nominal 100 research octane number (RON), approximately 11 octane sensitivity (S), and a heat of vaporization (HOV) range of 390 to 595 kJ/kg at 25 degrees C were investigated. A single-cylinder spark-ignition engine derived from a General Motors Ecotec direct injection (DI) engine was used to perform load sweeps at a fixed intake air temperature (IAT) of 50 degrees C, as well as knock-limited load measurements across a range of IATs up to 90 degrees C. Both DI and pre-vaporized fuel (supplied by a fuel injector mounted far upstream of the intake valves and heated intake runner walls) experiments were performed to separate the chemical and thermal effects of the fuels' knock resistance. The DI load sweeps at 50 degrees C intake air temperature showed no effect of HOV on the knock-limited performance. The data suggest that HOV acts as a thermal contributor to S under the conditions studied. Measurement of knock-limited loads from the IAT sweeps for DI at late combustion phasing showed that a 40 vol% ethanol (E40) blend provided additional knock resistance at the highest temperatures, compared to a 20 vol% ethanol blend and hydrocarbon fuel with similar RON and S. Using the pre-vaporized fuel system, all the high S fuels produced nearly identical knock-limited loads at each temperature across the range of IATs studied. For these fuels RON ranged from 99.2 to 101.1 and S ranged from 9.4 to 12.2, with E40 having the lowest RON and highest S. The higher knock-limited loads for E40 at the highest IATs examined were consistent with the slightly higher S for this fuel, and the lower engine operating condition K values arising from use of this fuel. The study highlights how fuel HOV can affect the temperature at intake valve closing, and consequently the pressure-temperature history of the end gas leading to more negative values of K, thereby enhancing the effect of S on knock resistance.

  20. FUEL ELEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  1. Evaporation studies of liquid oxide fuel at very high temperatures using laser beam heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bober, M.; Breitung, W.; Karow, H.U.; Schretzmann, K.

    1976-11-01

    Evaporation experiments with oxide fuel are carried out based laser beam heating of the fuel specimen surface. The measuring quantities are the recoil momentum of the target, the evaporation area, the evaporation time and the mass and momentum of the supersonic vapor jet expanding into vacuum, and the thermal radiation density of the evaporating surface. From the mechanical measuring quantities we derive the vapor pressure of the target material and, in a first approach, also the evaporation temperature by applying a gas dynamic evaluation model. In a second approach, after having measured the spectral emissivity of liquid UO 2 at 633 nm, we determine the evaporation temperature at the liquid surface also from its thermal radiation. For the determination of the vapor pressure from the measured quantities a gas dynamic evaluation model has been developed. An application limit of the measuring technique is given by onset of plasma interaction of the vapor plume with the incident laser beam at temperatures above 4500 K. Experimental values for the saturated vapor pressure of UO 2 are presented, determined from three series of laser evaporation measurements obtained at temperatures around 3500 K, 3950 K, and 4200 K. The average vapor pressures found are 0.6 bar, 3 bar, and 7 bar, respectively. Laser vapor pressure measurements performed by other authors and theoretical extrapolations of the UO 2 vapor pressure curve known from literature show fairly good agreement within their confidence interval with the vapor pressure measurements reported here. (orig./HR) [de

  2. Water Vapor Permeation in Plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Paul E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Polyvinyl toluene (PVT) and polystyrene (PS) (referred to as “plastic scintillator”) are used for gamma ray detectors. A significant decrease in radiation detection performance has been observed in some PVT-based gamma-ray detectors in systems in outdoor environments as they age. Recent studies have revealed that plastic scintillator can undergo an environmentally related material degradation that adversely affects gamma ray detection performance under certain conditions and histories. A significant decrease in sensitivity has been seen in some gamma-ray detectors in some systems as they age. The degradation of sensitivity of plastic scintillator over time is due to a variety of factors, and the term “aging” is used to encompass all factors. Some plastic scintillator samples show no aging effects (no significant change in sensitivity over more than 10 years), while others show severe aging (significant change in sensitivity in less than 5 years). Aging effects arise from weather (variations in heat and humidity), chemical exposure, mechanical stress, light exposure, and loss of volatile components. The damage produced by these various causes can be cumulative, causing observable damage to increase over time. Damage may be reversible up to some point, but becomes permanent under some conditions. The objective of this report is to document the phenomenon of permeability of plastic scintillator to water vapor and to derive the relationship between time, temperature, humidity and degree of water penetration in plastic. Several conclusions are documented about the properties of water permeability of plastic scintillator.

  3. Fuel production for LWRs - MOX fuel aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deramaix, P.

    2005-01-01

    Plutonium recycling in Light Water Reactors is today an industrial reality. It is recycled in the form of (U, Pu)O 2 fuel pellets (MOX), fabricated to a large extent according to UO 2 technology and pellet design. The similarity of physical, chemical, and neutron properties of both fuels also allows MOX fuel to be burnt in nuclear plants originally designed to burn UO 2 . The industrial processes presently in use or planned are all based on a mechanical blending of UO 2 and PuO 2 powders. To obtain finely dispersed plutonium and to prevent high local concentration of plutonium, the feed materials are micronised. In the BNFL process, the whole (UO 2 , PuO 2 ) blend is micronised by attrition milling. According to the MIMAS process, developed by BELGONUCLEAIRE, a primary blend made of UO 2 containing about 30% PuO 2 is micronised in a ball mill, afterwards this primary blend is mechanically diluted in UO 2 to obtain the specified Pu content. After mixing, the (U, Pu)O 2 powder is pressed and the pellets are sintered. The sintering cover gas contains moisture and 5 v/o H 2 . Moisture increases the sintering process and the U-Pu interdiffusion. After sintering and grinding, the pellets are submitted to severe controls to verify conformity with customer specifications (fissile content, Pu distribution, surface condition, chemical purity, density, microstructure). (author)

  4. Thermodynamics of the fuel fragmentation gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, R.B.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    In the context of nuclear reactor safety studies, a program is in progress at ORNL whereby fuel-fragmentation situations are mocked up by the application of high-current capacitor discharges through solid UO 2 samples. The goal of the present work is to predict such quantities as the number of gas and liquid fragments and their energy distributions. The point of view adopted is that upon fragmentation, a cloud of UO 2 vapor is formed containing ''primeval'' liquid fragments which act as condensation centers. In the evolution of time, fragment growth is controlled by nucleation, coagulation and evaporation processes. Eventually, the vapor-droplet system will reach a situation in which clusters (fragments) of various sizes and UO 2 vapor will coexist in an ''association-disassociation'' equilibrium. Thus, the physical model considered here consists of the identification of the fragmentation gas with an ''imperfect'' vapor, made up of interacting UO 2 vapor and liquid fragments. The results of the study are presented

  5. Review of oxidation rates of DOE spent nuclear fuel : Part 1 : nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    The long-term performance of Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a mined geologic disposal system depends highly on fuel oxidation and subsequent radionuclide release. The oxidation rates of nuclear fuels are reviewed in this two-volume report to provide a baseline for comparison with release rate data and technical rationale for predicting general corrosion behavior of DOE SNF. The oxidation rates of nuclear fuels in the DOE SNF inventory were organized according to metallic, Part 1, and non-metallic, Part 2, spent nuclear fuels. This Part 1 of the report reviews the oxidation behavior of three fuel types prototypic of metallic fuel in the DOE SNF inventory: uranium metal, uranium alloys and aluminum-based dispersion fuels. The oxidation rates of these fuels were evaluated in oxygen, water vapor, and water. The water data were limited to pure water corrosion as this represents baseline corrosion kinetics. Since the oxidation processes and kinetics discussed in this report are limited to pure water, they are not directly applicable to corrosion rates of SNF in water chemistry that is significantly different (such as may occur in the repository). Linear kinetics adequately described the oxidation rates of metallic fuels in long-term corrosion. Temperature dependent oxidation rates were determined by linear regression analysis of the literature data. As expected the reaction rates of metallic fuels dramatically increase with temperature. The uranium metal and metal alloys have stronger temperature dependence than the aluminum dispersion fuels. The uranium metal/water reaction exhibited the highest oxidation rate of the metallic fuel types and environments that were reviewed. Consequently, the corrosion properties of all DOE SNF may be conservatively modeled as uranium metal, which is representative of spent N-Reactor fuel. The reaction rate in anoxic, saturated water vapor was essentially the same as the water reaction rate. The long-term intrinsic

  6. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Sei; Ando, Ryohei; Mitsutake, Toru.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly suitable to a BWR-type reactor and improved especially with the nuclear characteristic, heat performance, hydraulic performance, dismantling or assembling performance and economical property. A part of poison rods are formed as a large-diameter/multi-region poison rods having a larger diameter than a fuel rod. A large number of fuel rods are disposed surrounding a large diameter water rod and a group of the large-diameter/multi-region poison rods in adjacent with the water rod. The large-diameter water rod has a burnable poison at the tube wall portion. At least a portion of the large-diameter poison rods has a coolant circulation portion allowing coolants to circulate therethrough. Since the large-diameter poison rods are disposed at a position of high neutron fluxes, a large neutron multiplication factor suppression effect can be provided, thereby enabling to reduce the number of burnable poison rods relative to fuels. As a result, power peaking in the fuel assembly is moderated and a greater amount of plutonium can be loaded. In addition the flow of cooling water which tends to gather around the large diameter water rod can be controlled to improve cooling performance of fuels. (N.H.)

  7. In-pile observations of fuel and clad relocation during LMFBR initiation phase accident experiments - the STAR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.; Schumacher, G.; Henkel, P.R.; Royl, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of seven in-pile experiments (the STAR experiments) were performed in which clad motion and fuel dispersal were observed in small pin bundles with high-speed cinematography. The experimental heating conditions reproduced a range of Loss of Flow (LOF) accident scenarios for the lead subassemblies in LMFBRs. The experiments show strong tendencies for limited clad motion in multiple pin bundles, early fuel disruption and dispersal (prior to fuel melting) in moderate power transients having simultaneous clad melting and fuel disruption. The more recent experiments indicate a possibility of steel vapor driven fuel dispersal after fuel breakup and intimate fuel/steel mixing. (author)

  8. Effect of supplementation of water vapor to the environmental characteristics of the combustion of propane-air mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionov, V. M.; Mitrofanov, G. A.; Iovleva, O. V.

    2014-11-01

    To improve the efficiency of combustion of fuel gas and air can be used additive steam. The article presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of water vapor on the combustion of propane-butane mixture with air. Combustion mixture produced in a modified Bunsen burner. Studies carried change of steam temperature of 180 to 260 degrees Celsius, and the change of the specific volume steam in the composition of the fuel mixture. Influence steam on combustion was estimated by the change of temperature of heating the quartz tube. It has been established that the increase of the steam temperature and increasing the specific volume of the heated vapor in the composition of the gaseous fuel increases the temperature of combustion.

  9. GOES WATER VAPOR TRANSPORT V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GOES Water Vapor Transport CD contains nineteen months of geostationary satellite-derived products spanning the 1987/1988 El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO)...

  10. Fundamentals of Friction and Vapor Phase Lubrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gellman, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This is the final report for the three year research program on "Fundamentals of Friction and Vapor Phase Lubrication" conducted at Carnegie Mellon with support from AFOSR grant number F49630-01-1-0069...

  11. DMSP SSMT/2 - Atmospheric Water Vapor Profiler

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SSM/T-2 sensor is a five channel, total power microwave radiometer with three channels situated symmetrically about the 183.31 GHz water vapor resonance line and...

  12. Vapor Species Over Te Precious Metal Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Sonia; Wildeman, Thomas; Yarar, Baki

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on two developments of interest to extractive metallurgists: how the knowledge of the vapors over tellurium minerals can be used to develop better processing methods and how graphite furnace atomic absorption, used at moderate temperatures, can be used to characterize the vapors over ore minerals. Elemental tellurium, Ag2Te, and AuTe2 were studied from 250°C through 1050°C. The vapors over these solids were analyzed in-situ by placing the solids directly into the graphite furnace of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer and adjusting the temperature accordingly. Atomic Ag, Au, and Te and molecular Te were analyzed in the vapor above the solids. Using absorbance versus temperature data, Clausius-Clapeyron plots were made to determine how the solids were changing.

  13. GOES WATER VAPOR TRANSPORT V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GOES Water Vapor Transport CD contains nineteen months of geostationary satellite-derived products from the GOES-8 satellite spanning the 1987-1988 El Nino...

  14. Static Water Vapor Feed Electrolyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a static vapor feed electrolyzer utilizing an advanced bipolar plate that produces sub-saturated H2 and O2 is proposed. This novel bipolar design can...

  15. Arctic Water Vapor Characteristics from Rawinsondes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A gridded climatological monthly-mean data base of Arctic water vapor characteristics has been assembled by combining fixed station data with data from soundings...

  16. Interfacial instability induced by lateral vapor pressure fluctuation in bounded thin liquid-vapor layers

    OpenAIRE

    Kanatani, Kentaro

    2008-01-01

    We study an instability of thin liquid-vapor layers bounded by rigid parallel walls from both below and above. In this system, the interfacial instability is induced by lateral vapor pressure fluctuation, which is in turn attributed to the effect of phase change: evaporation occurs at a hotter portion of the interface and condensation at a colder one. The high vapor pressure pushes the interface downward and the low one pulls it upward. A set of equations describing the temporal evolution of ...

  17. Control apparatus and method for efficiently heating a fuel processor in a fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2003-08-05

    A control apparatus and method for efficiently controlling the amount of heat generated by a fuel cell processor in a fuel cell system by determining a temperature error between actual and desired fuel processor temperatures. The temperature error is converted to a combustor fuel injector command signal or a heat dump valve position command signal depending upon the type of temperature error. Logic controls are responsive to the combustor fuel injector command signals and the heat dump valve position command signal to prevent the combustor fuel injector command signal from being generated if the heat dump valve is opened or, alternately, from preventing the heat dump valve position command signal from being generated if the combustor fuel injector is opened.

  18. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude.

  19. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarron, Daniel J.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L.

    2007-01-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D 2 transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude

  20. Coated fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Mitsunobu; Yoshimuta, Hideharu.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear fuels used for an HTGR type reactor or the like have to sufficiently keep mechanical integrity and nuclear fission products even at a high temperature above 1300degC. In coated fuel particles having a ceramic layer as an intermediate layer, the ceramics layer is divided into a ZrC layer and a SiC layer in order to compensate the drawbacks of SiC and ZrC with each other and, in addition, ZrC layer is disposed at a position nearer to the fuel core in the present invention. With such a constitution, the ZrC layer can prevent corrosion of the SiC layer caused by Sr and Pd. Further, since ZrC is not degradated by dissociation at a temperature lower than 2850degC, high temperature stability as the coating layer can be improved. In addition, since the SiC layer which is less oxidized compared with ZrC is disposed on the side outer to the ZrC layer, oxidative-degradation of the ZrC layer can be prevented even if the outermost high density thermal decomposition carbon layer should be injured accidentally. (T.M.)

  1. Optical monitor for water vapor concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebabian, P.

    1998-06-02

    A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma. 5 figs.

  2. Vapor Explosions with Subcooled Freon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.E.; Fauske, Hans K.; McUmber, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    Explosive vapor formation accompanied by destructive shock waves, can be produced when two liquids, at much different temperatures, are brought into intimate contact. A proposed analytical model states that the interface temperature upon contact between the two liquid systems, gust be greater than or equal to the spontaneous nucleation temperature of that liquid-liquid system and that the thermal boundary layer must be sufficiently developed to support a critical size cavity. For time scales greater than 10-12 sec, the interface temperature upon contact of two semi-infinite masses, with constant thermal properties, can be related to the initial liquid temperatures. The spontaneous nucleation behavior at the interface can either be heterogeneous or homogeneous in nature. In either case, the critical size cavities, which initiate the vaporization process, are produced by local density fluctuations within the cold liquid. For homogeneous conditions, the two liquids present a well-wetted system and the vapor embryos are produced entirely within the cold liquid. For heterogeneous conditions, which result from poor, or imperfect wetting, at the liquid-liquid interface, the critical sized cavities are created at the interface at somewhat lower temperatures. A sequence of experiments, using Freon-22 and water, Freon-22 and mineral oil, and Freon-12 and mineral oil have been performed to test this spontaneous nucleation premise. For Freon-22 at its normal boiling point, the interface temperature of the water must be at least 77 deg. C before the interface temperature equals or exceeds the minimum homogeneous nucleation value of 54 deg. C and 84 deg. C before the interface temperature equals 60 deg. C where the homogeneous nucleation rate becomes truly explosive. The Freon-water test demonstrated explosive interactions for water temperatures considerably lower than this value and this was attributed to the heterogeneous nucleation characteristics of that particular system

  3. Spent fuel counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drayer, D.D.

    1988-09-01

    In many cases the IAEA must inspect spent fuel shipping casks before they leave facilities. Similarly, inspections may be required at the location where a cask is received and unloaded. In order to reduce the number of inspections required, it would be desirable to develop a system to count spent fuel assemblies as they are loaded or removed from shipping casks. This report discusses several methods which potentially could be used for performing this function. A concept for a Spent Fuel Counter System is proposed which uses a Laser Surveillance System (LASSY), Cerenkov Viewing Device (CVD), and Modular Integrated Video System (MIVS), all coupled together. In the proposed system, LASSY would provide an indication that an object is being placed into or removed from the cask, the CVD would be used to determine if the object has the radiation characteristics of a spent fuel assembly, and the MIVS would record the information. The system may need to be designed so that the operator could determine that it was operating correctly during the loading operations. This would help prevent anomalies from occurring which could only be resolved through reverification measures. Before such a system could be implemented testing would be necessary to determine that the individual components would each work adequately in this application. The issues of reliability, intrusiveness, and cask sealing should also be addressed before a development program is undertaken. 12 refs., 1 fig

  4. 21 CFR 868.1975 - Water vapor analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water vapor analyzer. 868.1975 Section 868.1975...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1975 Water vapor analyzer. (a) Identification. A water vapor analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of water vapor in a...

  5. 33 CFR 154.808 - Vapor control system, general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vapor control system, general... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.808 Vapor control system, general. (a) A vapor control system design and installation must eliminate...

  6. 46 CFR 28.835 - Fuel systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... or other means to prevent oil draining into the bilge. (f) All nonmetallic filters and strainers must... flame screen. (c) Test cocks must not be fitted to fuel oil tanks. (d) Valves for removing water or impurities from diesel fuel oil systems are permitted in the machinery space provided they are away from any...

  7. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hideaki; Sakai, Takao; Ishida, Tomio; Yokota, Norikatsu.

    1992-01-01

    The lower ends of a plurality of plate-like shape memory alloys are secured at the periphery of the upper inside of the handling head of a fuel assembly. As the shape memory alloy, a Cu-Zn alloy, a Ti-Pd alloy or a Fe-Ni alloy is used. When high temperature coolants flow out to the handling head, the shape memory alloy deforms by warping to the outer side more greatly toward the upper portion thereof with the temperature increase of the coolants. As the result, the shape of the flow channel of the coolants is changed so as to enlarge at the exit of the upper end of the fuel assembly. Then, the pressure loss of the coolants in the fuel assembly is decreased by the enlargement. Accordingly, the flow rate of the coolants in the fuel assembly is increased to lower the temperature of the coolants. Further, high temperature coolants and low temperature coolants are mixed sufficiently just above the fuel assembly. This can suppress the temperature fluctuation of the mixed coolants in the upper portion of the reactor core, thereby enabling to decrease a fatigue and failures of the structural components in the upper portion of the reactor core. (I.N.)

  8. Canadian power reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, R.D.

    1976-03-01

    The following subjects are covered: the basic CANDU fuel design, the history of the bundle design, the significant differences between CANDU and LWR fuel, bundle manufacture, fissile and structural materials and coolants used in the CANDU fuel program, fuel and material behaviour, and performance under irradiation, fuel physics and management, booster rods and reactivity mechanisms, fuel procurement, organization and industry, and fuel costs. (author)

  9. Effect of Coal Contaminants on Solid Oxide Fuel System Performance and Service Life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Gopala N.; Jayaweera, Palitha; Perez, Jordi; Hornbostel, M.; Albritton, John R.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    2007-10-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s SECA program envisions the development of high-efficiency, low-emission, CO2 sequestration-ready, and fuel-flexible technology to produce electricity from fossil fuels. One such technology is the integrated gasification-solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) that produces electricity from the gas stream of a coal gasifier. SOFCs have high fuel-to-electricity conversion efficiency, environmental compatibility (low NOx production), and modularity. The primary objective of the Phase I study was to determine the sensitivity of the performance of solid oxide fuel cells to trace level contaminants present in a coal-derived gas stream in the temperature range 700° to 900°C. Laboratory-scale tests were performed with 1-inch diameter solid oxide fuel cells procured from InDec B.V., Netherlands. These cells produce 0.15, 0.27, and 0.35 W/cm2 at 700°, 750°, and 800°C, respectively, in a H2 anode feed and are expected to be stable within 10% of the original performance over a period of 2000 h. A simulated coal-derived gas containing 30.0% CO, 30.6% H2 11.8% CO2, 27.6% H2O was used at a rate of ~100 standard cm3/min to determine the effect of contaminants on the electrical performance of the cells. Alumina or zirconia components were used for the gas manifold to prevent loss of contaminants by reaction with the surfaces of the gas manifold Short-term accelerated tests were conducted with several contaminants including As, P, CH3Cl, HCl, Hg, Sb, and Zn vapors. In these tests, AsH3, PH3, Cd vapor and CH3Cl identified as the potential contaminants that can affect the electrical performance of SOFCs. The effect of some of these contaminants varied with the operating temperature. Cell failure due to contact break inside the anode chamber occurred when the cell was exposed to 10 ppm arsenic vapor at 800°C. The electrical performance of SOFC

  10. Influence of liquid water and water vapor on antimisting kerosene (AMK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavrouian, A. H.; Sarolouki, M.; Sarohia, V.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to evaluate the compatibility of liquid water and water vapor with antimisting kerosenes (AMK) containing polymer additive FM-9 developed by Imperial Chemical Industries. This effort consists of the determination of water solubility in AMK, influence of water on restoration (degradation) of AMK, and effect of water on standard AMK quality control methods. The principal conclusions of this investigation are: (1) the uptake of water in AMK critically depends upon the degree of agitation and can be as high as 1300 ppm at 20 C, (2) more than 250 to 300 ppm of water in AMK causes an insoluble second phase to form. The amount of this second phase depends on fuel temperature, agitation, degree of restoration (degradation) and the water content of the fuel, (3) laboratory scale experiments indicate precipitate formation when water vapor comes in contact with cold fuel surfaces at a much lower level of water (125 to 150 ppm), (4) precipitate formation is very pronounced in these experiments where humid air is percolated through a cold fuel (-20 C), (5) laboratory tests further indicate that water droplet settling time is markedly reduced in AMK as compared to jet A, (6) limited low temperature testing down to -30 C under laboratory conditions indicates the formation of stable, transparent gels.

  11. Performance of candu-6 fuel bundles manufactured in romania nuclear fuel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailescu, A.; Barbu, A.; Din, F.; Dinuta, G.; Dumitru, I.; Musetoiu, A.; Serban, G.; Tomescu, A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the performance of nuclear fuel produced by Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti during 1995 - 2012 and irradiated in units U1 and U2 from Nuclear Power Plant (N.P.P.) Cernavoda and also present the Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti concern for providing technology to prevent the failure causes of fuel bundles in the reactor. This article presents Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti experience on tracking performance of nuclear fuel in reactor and strategy investigation of fuel bundles notified as suspicious and / or defectives both as fuel element and fuel bundle, it analyzes the possible defects that can occur at fuel bundle or fuel element and can lead to their failure in the reactor. Implementation of modern technologies has enabled optimization of manufacturing processes and hence better quality stability of achieving components (end caps, chamfered sheath), better verification of end cap - sheath welding. These technologies were qualified by Nuclear Fuel Plant (N.F.P.) - Pitesti on automatic and Computer Numerical Control (C.N.C.) programming machines. A post-irradiation conclusive analysis which will take place later this year (2013) in Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (the action was initiated earlier this year by bringing a fuel bundle which has been reported defective by pool visual inspection) will provide additional information concerning potential damage causes of fuel bundles due to manufacturing processes. (authors)

  12. Fuel fragmentation model advances using TEXAS-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M.L.; El-Beshbeeshy, M.; Nilsuwankowsit, S.; Tang, J. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

    1998-01-01

    Because an energetic fuel-coolant interaction may be a safety hazard, experiments are being conducted to investigate the fuel-coolant mixing/quenching process (FARO) as well as the energetics of vapor explosion propagation for high temperature fuel melt simulants (KROTOS, WFCI, ZrEX). In both types of experiments, the dynamic breakup of the fuel is one of the key aspects that must be fundamentally understood to better estimate the magnitude of the mixing/quenching process or the explosion energetics. To aid our understanding the TEXAS fuel-coolant interaction computer model has been developed and is being used to analyze these experiments. Recently, the models for dynamic fuel fragmentation during the mixing and explosion phases of the FCI have been improved by further insights into these processes. The purpose of this paper is to describe these enhancements and to demonstrate their improvements by analysis of particular JRC FCI data. (author)

  13. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimble, Ralph E.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

  14. CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacEwan, J.R.; Notley, M.J.F.; Wood, J.C.; Gacesa, M.

    1982-09-01

    The direction of CANDU fuel development was set in 1957 with the decision to build pressure tube reactors. Short - 50 cm long - rodded bundles of natural UO 2 clad in Zircaloy were adopted to facilitate on-power fuelling to improve uranium utilization. Progressive improvements were made during 25 years of development, involving 650 man years and 180 million dollars. Today's CANDU bundle is based on the knowledge gained from extensive irradiation testing and experience in power reactors. The main thrust of future development is to demonstrate that the present bundle is suitable, with minor modifications, for thorium fuels

  15. Economic analysis of fuel treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Evan Mercer; Jeffrey P. Prestemon

    2012-01-01

    The economics of wildfire is complicated because wildfire behavior depends on the spatial and temporal scale at which management decisions made, and because of uncertainties surrounding the results of management actions. Like the wildfire processes they seek to manage, interventions through fire prevention programs, suppression, and fuels management are scale dependent...

  16. Pressurized water reactor fuel performance problems connected with fuel cladding corrosion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrevski, I.; Zaharieva, N.

    2008-01-01

    Generally, Pressurized Water Reactor (WWER, PWR) Fuel Element Performance is connected with fuel cladding corrosion and crud deposition processes. By transient to extended fuel cycles in nuclear power reactors, aiming to achieve higher burnup and better fuel utilization, the role of these processes increases significantly. This evolution modifies the chemical and electrochemical conditions in the reactor primary system, including change of fuel claddings' environment. The higher duty cores are always attended with increased boiling (sub-cooled nucleate boiling) mainly on the feed fuel assemblies. This boiling process on fuel cladding surfaces can cause different consequences on fuel element cladding's environment characteristics. In the case of boiling at the cladding surfaces without or with some cover of corrosion product deposition, the behavior of gases dissolved in water phase is strongly influenced by the vapor generation. The increase of vapor partial pressure will reduce the partial pressures of dissolved gases and will cause their stripping out. By these circumstances the concentrations of dissolved gases in cladding wall water layer can dramatically decrease, including also the case by which all dissolved gases to be stripped out. On the other hand it is known that the hydrogen is added to primary coolant in order to avoid the production of oxidants by radiolysis of water. It is clear that if boiling strips out dissolved hydrogen, the creation of oxidizing conditions at the cladding surfaces will be favored. In this case the local production of oxidants will be a result from local processes of water radiolysis, by which not only both oxygen (O 2 ) and hydrogen (H 2 ) but also hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) will be produced. While these hydrogen and oxygen will be stripped out preferentially by boiling, the bigger part of hydrogen peroxide will remain in wall water phase and will act as the most important factor for creation of oxidizing conditions in fuel

  17. Primer on Motor Fuel Excise Taxes and the Role of Alternative Fuels and Energy Efficient Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Alex [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-08-26

    Motor fuel taxes were established to finance our nation’s transportation infrastructure, yet evolving economic, political, and technological influences are constraining this ability. At the federal level, the Highway Trust Fund (HTF), which is primarily funded by motor fuel taxes, has become increasingly dependent on general fund contributions and short-term reauthorizations to prevent insolvency. As a result, there are discussions at both the federal and state levels in which stakeholders are examining the future of motor fuel excise taxes as well as the role of electric and alternative fuel vehicles in that future. On July 1, 2015, six states increased their motor fuel tax rates.

  18. Determination of Cannabinoid Vapor Pressures to Aid in Vapor Phase Detection of Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovestead, Tara M; Bruno, Thomas J

    2017-09-01

    The quest for a reliable means to detect cannabis intoxication with a breathalyzer is ongoing. To design such a device, it is important to understand the fundamental thermodynamics of the compounds of interest. The vapor pressures of two important cannabinoids, cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ 9 -THC), are presented, as well as the predicted normal boiling temperature (NBT) and the predicted critical constants (these predictions are dependent on the vapor pressure data). The critical constants are typically necessary to develop an equation of state (EOS). EOS-based models can provide estimations of thermophysical properties for compounds to aid in designing processes and devices. An ultra-sensitive, quantitative, trace dynamic headspace analysis sampling called porous layered open tubular-cryoadsorption (PLOT-cryo) was used to measure vapor pressures of these compounds. PLOT-cryo affords short experiment durations compared to more traditional techniques for vapor pressure determination (minutes versus days). Additionally, PLOT-cryo has the inherent ability to stabilize labile solutes because collection is done at reduced temperature. The measured vapor pressures are approximately 2 orders of magnitude lower than those measured for n-eicosane, which has a similar molecular mass. Thus, the difference in polarity of these molecules must be impacting the vapor pressure dramatically. The vapor pressure measurements are presented in the form of Clausius-Clapeyron (or van't Hoff) equation plots. The predicted vapor pressures that would be expected at near ambient conditions (25 °C) are also presented.

  19. Evidence of a sewer vapor transport pathway at the USEPA vapor intrusion research duplex

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of sewer lines as preferential pathways for vapor intrusion is poorly understood. Although the importance of sewer lines for volatile organic compound (VOC) transport has been documented at a small number of sites with vapor intrusion, sewer lines are not routinely sampl...

  20. Expansion of effective wet bulb globe temperature for vapor impermeable protective clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoi, Tomonori; Mochida, Tohru; Kurazumi, Yoshihito; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Horiba, Yosuke; Kuwabara, Kohei

    2018-01-01

    The wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) is an effective measure for risk screening to prevent heat dISOrders. However, a heat risk evaluation by WBGT requires adjustments depending on the clothing. In this study, we proposed a new effective WBGT (WBGT eff * ) for general vapor permeable clothing ensembles and vapor impermeable protective clothing that is applicable to occupants engaged in moderate intensity work with a metabolic heat production value of around 174W/m 2 . WBGT eff * enables the conversion of heat stress into the scale experienced by the occupant dressed in the basic clothing ensemble (work clothes) based on the heat balances for a human body. We confirmed that WBGT eff * was effective for expressing the critical thermal environments for the prescriptive zones for occupants wearing vapor impermeable protective clothing. Based on WBGT eff * , we succeeded in clarifying how the weights for natural wet bulb, globe, and air temperatures and the intercept changed depending on clothing properties and the surrounding environmental factors when heat stress is expressed by the weighted sum of natural wet bulb, globe, and air temperatures and the intercept. The weight of environmental temperatures (globe and air temperatures) for WBGT eff * for vapor impermeable protective clothing increased compared with that for general vapor permeable clothing, whereas that of the natural wet bulb temperature decreased. For WBGT eff * in outdoor conditions with a solar load, the weighting ratio of globe temperature increased and that of air temperature decreased with air velocity. Approximation equations of WBGT eff * were proposed for both general vapor permeable clothing ensembles and for vapor impermeable protective clothing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of Soil Moisture on Soil Gas Vapor Concentration for Vapor Intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2013-10-01

    Mathematical models have been widely used in analyzing the effects of various environmental factors in the vapor intrusion process. Soil moisture content is one of the key factors determining the subsurface vapor concentration profile. This manuscript considers the effects of soil moisture profiles on the soil gas vapor concentration away from any surface capping by buildings or pavement. The "open field" soil gas vapor concentration profile is observed to be sensitive to the soil moisture distribution. The van Genuchten relations can be used for describing the soil moisture retention curve, and give results consistent with the results from a previous experimental study. Other modeling methods that account for soil moisture are evaluated. These modeling results are also compared with the measured subsurface concentration profiles in the U.S. EPA vapor intrusion database.

  2. Fuels characterization studies. [jet fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, G. T.; Antoine, A. C.; Flores, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Current analytical techniques used in the characterization of broadened properties fuels are briefly described. Included are liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. High performance liquid chromatographic ground-type methods development is being approached from several directions, including aromatic fraction standards development and the elimination of standards through removal or partial removal of the alkene and aromatic fractions or through the use of whole fuel refractive index values. More sensitive methods for alkene determinations using an ultraviolet-visible detector are also being pursued. Some of the more successful gas chromatographic physical property determinations for petroleum derived fuels are the distillation curve (simulated distillation), heat of combustion, hydrogen content, API gravity, viscosity, flash point, and (to a lesser extent) freezing point.

  3. Alternative Fabrication of Recycling Fast Reactor Metal Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Jong Hwan; Song, Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Tae; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2015-01-01

    Metal fuels such as U-Zr/U-Pu-Zr alloys have been considered as a nuclear fuel for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) related to the closed fuel cycle for managing minor actinides and reducing a high radioactivity levels since the 1980s. In order to develop innovative fabrication method of metal fuel for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am, modified casting under inert atmosphere has been applied for metal fuel slugs for SFR. Alternative fabrication method of fuel slugs has been introduced to develop an improved fabrication process of metal fuel for preventing the evaporation of volatile elements. In this study, metal fuel slugs for SFR have been fabricated by modified casting method, and characterized to evaluate the feasibility of the alternative fabrication method. In order to prevent evaporation of volatile elements such as Am and improve quality of fuel slugs, alternative fabrication methods of metal fuel slugs have been studied in KAERI. U-10Zr-5Mn fuel slug containing volatile surrogate element Mn was soundly cast by modified injection casting under modest pressure. Evaporation of Mn during alternative casting could not be detected by chemical analysis. Mn element was most recovered with prevention of evaporation by alternative casting. Modified injection casting has been selected as an alternative fabrication method in KAERI, considering evaporation prevention, and proven benefits of high productivity, high yield, and good remote control

  4. Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the theories, construction, operation, types, and advantages of fuel cells developed by the American space programs. Indicates that the cell is an ideal small-scale power source characterized by its compactness, high efficiency, reliability, and freedom from polluting fumes. (CC)

  5. Transport fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronsse, Frederik; Jørgensen, Henning; Schüßler, Ingmar

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, the use of transport fuel derived from biomass increased four-fold between 2003 and 2012. Mainly based on food resources, these conventional biofuels did not achieve the expected emission savings and contributed to higher prices for food commod - ities, especially maize and oilseeds...

  6. Control of sodium vapor transport in annuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, G.E.; Bohringer, A.P.

    1983-11-01

    The method used to control sodium vapor transport in the annuli of various components at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a downward purge of the annuli with high purity argon. The purge rates for the FFTF were selected by calculating the gas velocity required to overcome thermal convection transport in the annuli. To evaluate the effectiveness of the gas purge, laboratory apparatus was fabricated which simulated selected annuli in the FFTF In-Vessel Handling Machine (IVHM) and the Instrument Tree (IT) annuli. Tests were conducted at temperatures similar to FFTF conditions. Gas purge rates ranged from zero to 130% of FFTF flow rates. Test results show the effectiveness of a high purity gas purge in decreasing the accumulation of sodium vapor deposits in an annulus. The presence of water vapor and oxygen in the purge gas increased the sodium deposition rate by a factor of three over other tests usig high purity argon. The presence of a vapor control collar used in the IT annulus was shown to be beneficial for controlling vapor transport into the upper region of the annulus

  7. Distribution of tropical tropospheric water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, De-Zheng; Lindzen, Richard S.

    1993-01-01

    Utilizing a conceptual model for tropical convection and observational data for water vapor, the maintenance of the vertical distribution of the tropical tropospheric water vapor is discussed. While deep convection induces large-scale subsidence that constrains the turbulent downgradient mixing to within the convective boundary layer and effectively dries the troposphere through downward advection, it also pumps hydrometeors into the upper troposphere, whose subsequent evaporation appears to be the major source of moisture for the large-scale subsiding motion. The development of upper-level clouds and precipitation from these clouds may also act to dry the outflow, thus explaining the low relative humidity near the tropopause. A one-dimensional model is developed to simulate the mean vertical structure of water vapor in the tropical troposphere. It is also shown that the horizontal variation of water vapor in the tropical troposphere above the trade-wind boundary layer can be explained by the variation of a moisture source that is proportional to the amount of upper-level clouds. Implications for the nature of water vapor feedback in global warming are discussed.

  8. A Review of Vapor Intrusion Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    A complete vapor intrusion (VI) model, describing vapor entry of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) into buildings located on contaminated sites, generally consists of two main parts-one describing vapor transport in the soil and the other its entry into the building. Modeling the soil vapor transport part involves either analytically or numerically solving the equations of vapor advection and diffusion in the subsurface. Contaminant biodegradation must often also be included in this simulation, and can increase the difficulty of obtaining a solution, especially when explicitly considering coupled oxygen transport and consumption. The models of contaminant building entry pathway are often coupled to calculations of indoor air contaminant concentration, and both are influenced by building construction and operational features. The description of entry pathway involves consideration of building foundation characteristics, while calculation of indoor air contaminant levels requires characterization of building enclosed space and air exchange within this. This review summarizes existing VI models, and discusses the limits of current screening tools commonly used in this field. PMID:23360069

  9. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Silicate Vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Costa, Gustavo C. C.

    2015-01-01

    Silicates are a common class of materials that are often exposed to high temperatures. The behavior of these materials needs to be understood for applications as high temperature coatings in material science as well as the constituents of lava for geological considerations. The vaporization behavior of these materials is an important aspect of their high temperature behavior and it also provides fundamental thermodynamic data. The application of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS) to silicates is discussed. There are several special considerations for silicates. The first is selection of an appropriate cell material, which is either nearly inert or has well-understood interactions with the silicate. The second consideration is proper measurement of the low vapor pressures. This can be circumvented by using a reducing agent to boost the vapor pressure without changing the solid composition or by working at very high temperatures. The third consideration deals with kinetic barriers to vaporization. The measurement of these barriers, as encompassed in a vaporization coefficient, is discussed. Current measured data of rare earth silicates for high temperature coating applications are discussed. In addition, data on magnesium-iron-silicates (olivine) are presented and discussed.

  10. A Direct DME High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vassiliev, Anton; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Li, Qingfeng

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl ether (DME) has been identified as an alternative to methanol for use in direct fuel cells. It combines the advantages of hydrogen in terms of pumpless fuel delivery and high energy density like methanol, but without the toxicity of the latter. The performance of a direct dimethyl ether...... fuel cell suffers greatly from the very low DME-water miscibility. To cope with the problem polybenzimidazole (PBI) based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) have been made and tested in a vapor fed system. PtRu on carbon has been used as anode catalyst and air at ambient pressure was used as oxidant...

  11. 30 CFR 56.4103 - Fueling internal combustion engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fueling internal combustion engines. 56.4103... Prevention and Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4103 Fueling internal combustion engines. Internal combustion engines shall be switched off before refueling if the fuel tanks are integral parts of...

  12. 30 CFR 57.4103 - Fueling internal combustion engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fueling internal combustion engines. 57.4103... Prevention and Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4103 Fueling internal combustion engines. Internal combustion engines shall be switched off before refueling if the fuel tanks are integral parts of...

  13. 14 CFR 25.993 - Fuel system lines and fittings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system lines and fittings. 25.993 Section 25.993 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Fuel system lines and fittings. (a) Each fuel line must be installed and supported to prevent excessive...

  14. 14 CFR 29.993 - Fuel system lines and fittings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system lines and fittings. 29.993 Section 29.993 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Fuel system lines and fittings. (a) Each fuel line must be installed and supported to prevent excessive...

  15. 14 CFR 27.993 - Fuel system lines and fittings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel system lines and fittings. 27.993 Section 27.993 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Fuel system lines and fittings. (a) Each fuel line must be installed and supported to prevent excessive...

  16. A Numerical Investigation of Vapor Intrusion — the Dynamic Response of Contaminant Vapors to Rainfall Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. government and various agencies have published guidelines for field investigation of vapor intrusion, most of which suggest soil gas sampling as an integral part of the investigation. Contaminant soil gas data are often relatively more stable than indoor air vapor concentration measurements, but meteorological conditions might influence soil gas values. Although a few field and numerical studies have considered some temporal effects on soil gas vapor transport, a full explanation of the contaminant vapor concentration response to rainfall events is not available. This manuscript seeks to demonstrate the effects on soil vapor transport during and after different rainfall events, by applying a coupled numerical model of fluid flow and vapor transport. Both a single rainfall event and seasonal rainfall events were modeled. For the single rainfall event models, the vapor response process could be divided into three steps: namely, infiltration, water redistribution, and establishment of a water lens atop the groundwater source. In the infiltration step, rainfall intensity was found to determine the speed of the wetting front and wash-out effect on the vapor. The passage of the wetting front led to an increase of the vapor concentration in both the infiltration and water redistribution steps and this effect is noted at soil probes located 1 m below the ground surface. When the mixing of groundwater with infiltrated water was not allowed, a clean water lens accumulated above the groundwater source and led to a capping effect which can reduce diffusion rates of contaminant from the source. Seasonal rainfall with short time intervals involved superposition of the individual rainfall events. This modeling results indicated that for relatively deeper soil that the infiltration wetting front could not flood, the effects were damped out in less than a month after rain; while in the long term (years), possible formation of a water lens played a larger role in

  17. Calculation and experimental estimation of the equation of state of irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bober, M.; Breitung, W.; Karow, H.U.; Schumacher, G.

    1977-01-01

    The gas pressure development in an irradiated mixed oxide fuel is mainly influenced by fission gases and volatile fission products in the temperature range below the melting point and by the fuel material itself and the less volatile fission products in the temperature region above 4000 K. Besides the temperature the important factors for the vapor pressure are the oxygen potential of the fuel and the concentration of fission products in the fuel. As demonstrated previously the oxygen potential influences strongly the pressure of vapor species above (U Pu)O 2 . The pressure of the species U, UO, UO 2 , Pu, PuO, PuO 2 varies over a range of more than five orders of magnitude by variation of the oxygen potential at 2000 K. Similar effects were observed with oxides of the fission products. Fission products dissolved in mixed oxide fuel on the other hand can influence significantly the oxygen potential of the irradiated mixed oxide. In the first paragraph of the paper an attempt is made to calculate oxygen potentials of mixed oxides containing dissolved fission products. The model used is based on the equilibrium of oxygen defects in the mixed oxide. The chemical state and distribution of fission products is a further behavior that should be considered in calculation of the local and overall pressures and behavior of the fuel. Fission products were transported during the irradiation time and collect at different positions within the fuel pin. This process can produce high local concentrations of fission products, thus enabling elements with low overall concentrations to reach their saturation pressure. The distribution of fission products and their behavior in irradiated mixed oxide fuel is described in the second paragraph. The third paragraph deals with the calculation of vapor pressures that has been conducted using a model described for uranium-plutonium mixed oxides. This model is based on the law of mass action and provides vapor pressures as a function of

  18. Choking Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & Prevention Safety and Prevention Immunizations At Home ...

  19. APEX nuclear fuel cycle for production of LWR fuel and elimination of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, M.; Powell, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    The development of a nuclear fission fuel cycle is proposed which eliminates all the radioactive fission product waste effluent and the need for geological-age high level waste storage and provides a long term supply of fissile fuel for an LWR power reactor economy. The fuel cycle consists of reprocessing LWR spent fuel (1 to 2 years old) to remove the stable nonradioactive (NRFP, e.g. lanthanides, etc.) and short-lived fission products SLFP e.g. half-lives of (1 to 2 years) and returning, in dilute form, the long-lived fission products, ((LLFPs, e.g. 30 y half-life Cs, Sr, and 10 y Kr, and 16 x 10 6 y I) and the transuranics (TUs, e.g. Pu, Am, Cm, and Np) to be refabricated into fresh fuel elements. Makeup fertile and fissile fuel are to be supplied through the use of a Spallator (linear accelerator spallation-target fuel-producer). The reprocessing of LWR fuel elements is to be performed by means of the Chelox process which consists of Airox treatment (air oxidation and hydrogen reduction) followed by chelation with an organic reagent (β-diketonate) and vapor distillation of the organometallic compounds for separation and partitioning of the fission products

  20. Vapor Pressures and Thermodynamics of Oxygen-Containing Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Measured Using Knudsen Effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Jillian L.

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their oxygenated derivatives (OPAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants resulting from the incomplete combustion of coal and fossil fuels. Their vapor pressures are key thermodynamic data essential for modeling fate and transport within the environment. The present study involved nine PAHs containing oxygen heteroatoms, including aldehyde, carboxyl and nitro groups, specifically: 2-nitrofluorene; 9-fluorenecarboxylic acid; 2-fluorenecarboxaldehyde; 2-anthracenecarboxylic acid; 9-anthracenecarboxylic acid; 9-anthraldehyde; 1-nitropyrene; 1-pyrenecarboxaldehyde and 1-bromo-2-naphthoic acid. The vapor pressures of these compounds, with molecular weights ranging from 194 to 251 grams per mole, were measured using the isothermal Knudsen effusion technique in the temperature range of 329 to 421. The corresponding enthalpies of sublimation, calculated via the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, are compared to parent, non-oxygenated PAH compound data to determine the effect of the addition of these oxygen-containing heteroatoms. As expected, the addition of –CHO,–COOH, and –NO2 groups onto these PAHs increases the enthalpy of sublimation and decreases the vapor pressure as compared to the parent PAH; the position of substitution also plays a significant role in determining the vapor pressure of these OPAHs. PMID:18220445

  1. Air blast effects on nuclear power plants from vapor cloud explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedermann, A.H.; Eichler, T.V.; Kot, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    To assess the hazards arising from the explosion of a large flammable vapor cloud a method was developed for estimating the air blast field assuming a detonation wave is established. The actual 'pancake' like geometry typical for negatively buoyant vapor clouds is taken into account. The cloud height and other characteristics are generated by a global cloud dynamics model for negatively buoyant clouds. This model provides the cloud height as a function of fuel vapor concentration and other pertinent variables. A two-dimensional Eulerian shock hydrodynamic computer code is utilized to compute the blast environment in the neighborhood of the end of the cloud. The initial field is taken to be a quasi-steady explosion field calculated by the method of characteristics for a thin Prandtl-Meyer expansion wave, and the upward driven air shock representing the combustion and pressure relief processes inherent in the pancake geometry. This initial fields is established in the 2-D hydrocode at a time corresponding to the arrival of the detonation front at the cloud edge. It is to be noted that the local blast environment scales with respect to the cloud height. The computational results indicate that it is essential to include the influence of cloud geometry for the realistic prediction of the air blast hazard arising from the explosion of a negatively buoyant vapor cloud. (orig./HP)

  2. Nuclear weapon relevant materials and preventive arms control. Uranium-free fuels for plutonium elimination and spallation neutron sources; Kernwaffenrelevante Materialien und Praeventive Ruestungskontrolle. Uranfreie Brennstoffe zur Plutoniumbeseitigung und Spallationsneutronenquellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebert, Wolfgang; Englert, Matthias [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Interdisziplinaere Arbeitsgruppe Naturwissenschaft, Technik und Sicherheit (IANUS); Pistner, Christoph [Oeko-Institut e.V. - Institut fuer Angewandte Oekologie, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Today, the most significant barrier against the access to nuclear weapons is to take hold on sufficient amounts of nuclear weapon-relevant nuclear materials. It is mainly a matter of fissionable materials (like highly enriched uranium and plutonium) but also of fusionable tritium. These can be used as reactor fuel in civil nuclear programmes but also in nuclear weapon programmes. To stop or to hinder nuclear proliferation, in consequence, there is not only a need to analyse open or covered political objectives and intentions. In the long term, it might be more decisive to analyse the intrinsic civil-military ambivalence of nuclear materials and technologies, which are suitable for sensitive material production. A farsighted strategy to avoid proliferation dangers should take much more account to technical capabilities as it is done in the political debate on nuclear non-proliferation so far. If a technical option is at a state's disposal, it is extremely difficult and lengthy to revert that again. The dangers, which one has to react to, are stemming from already existing stocks of nuclear weapon-relevant materials - in the military as well as in the civil realm - and from existing or future technologies, which are suitable for the production of such materials (cf. info 1 and 2). Therefore, the overall approach of this research project is to strive for a drastic reduction of the access to nuclear weapon-relevant material and its production capabilities. Thus, on one hand the nuclear proliferation by state actors could be answered more effectively, on the other hand by that approach a decisive barrier against the access on nuclear weapons by sub-national groups and terrorists could also be erected. For this purpose, safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and other measures of physical accountancy will remain indispensable elements of arms control. However, one has to consider that the goal of nuclear non-proliferation could not be achieved

  3. Thorium fuel cycle management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajac, R.; Darilek, P.; Breza, J.; Necas, V.

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with the thorium fuel cycle management. Description of the thorium fuels and thorium fuel cycle benefits and challenges as well as thorium fuel calculations performed by the computer code HELIOS are presented.

  4. Method for the determination of the equation of state of advanced fuels based on the properties of normal fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, M.J.; Catton, I.; Kastenberg, W.E.

    1976-12-01

    An equation of state based on the properties of normal fluids, the law of rectilinear averages, and the second law of thermodynamics can be derived for advanced LMFBR fuels on the basis of the vapor pressure, enthalpy of vaporization, change in heat capacity upon vaporization, and liquid density at the melting point. The method consists of estimating an equation of state by means of the law of rectilinear averages and the second law of thermodynamics, integrating by means of the second law until an instability is reached, and then extrapolating by means of a self-consistent estimation of the enthalpy of vaporization

  5. Repairing fuel for reinsertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krukshenk, A.

    1986-01-01

    Eqiupment for nuclear reactor fuel assembly repairing produced by Westinghouse and Brawn Bovery companies is described. Repair of failed fuel assemblies replacement of defect fuel elements gives a noticeable economical effect. Thus if the cost of a new fuel assembly is 450-500 thousand dollars, the replacement of one fuel element in it costs approximately 40-60 thousand dollars. In simple cases repairing includes either removal of failed fuel elements from a fuel assembly and its reinsertion with the rest of fuel elements into the reactor core (reactor refueling), or replacement of unfailed fuel elements from one fuel assembly to a new one (fuel assembly overhaul and reconditioning)

  6. Rover fuel element development activities: July-September 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, J.M.; Marrow, G.B.

    1971-11-30

    Experimental studies designed to fabricate NERVA graphite fuel elements capable of cyclic operations at exit gas temperatures of approximately 4400/degree/R were continued during this report period. Carbon precursor materials, manufacturing parameters, and deposition of carbide films are included in these studies. Accomplishments include the following: three commercial powders were extruded into elements having a desirable coefficient of thermal expansion; molded graphites using low-fired filler carbons and uncured short organic fibers produced graphites having an improved strain-to-failure value; thick-walled tubes of vapor-deposited zirconium carbide were produced, and the chemical composition was determined; vapor-deposited zirconium carbide coatings were applied to fuel-element bores; experimental graphite fuel elements were hot-gas tested; uranium-loaded ion exchange beads survived a heat treatment cycle of 2800/degree/C for three hours. Organic precursor carbon studies were oriented toward modification of the CAI polymers. 2 refs., 66 figs., 23 tabs.

  7. Characterization of polymer electrolytes for fuel cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Springer, T.E.; Uribe, F.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1992-01-01

    We review here our recent work on polymer electrolyte fuel cells emphasizing membrane transport issues. Transport parameters measured at 30 degrees C for several available perfluorosulfonic acid membranes are compared. The water sorption characteristics, diffusion coefficient of water, electroosmotic drag, and pretonic conductivity were determined for Nafion reg-sign 117, Membrane C, and Dow XUS 13204.10 Developmental Fuel Cell Membrane. The diffusion coefficient and conductivity of each of these membranes were determined as functions of membrane water content. Data on water sorption and conductivity are reported for an experimental membrane which is a modified form of Nafion. Contact angle measurements indicate that the surface of a perfluorosulfonic acid membrane exposed to water vapor is quite hydrophobic, even in the presence of saturated water vapor. Modeling of water distribution in PEFC's based on the uptake and transport data shows that membrane thickness contributes in a nonlinear fashion to performance in PEM fuel cells. Finally, some work currently underway is discussed

  8. Exploration of hydrogen odorants for fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Daichi; Akai, Motoaki; Watanabe, Shogo [Japan Automobile Research Institute, 2530 Karima, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0822 (Japan)

    2005-12-01

    The suitability of sulfur compounds (e.g., mercaptan and sulfide) and various sulfur-free smelling compounds for hydrogen odorants were evaluated. The influence of each smelling compound on fuel cell performance was evaluated through the measurement of I-V curves and voltage decline under constant current density, and their condensation properties under high-pressure condition were evaluated by measuring their vapor pressures. The results indicated that all the sulfur compounds evaluated in this study were not suitable as hydrogen odorants since their addition to the hydrogen caused serious degradation of fuel cell performance. Among the sulfur-free compounds, however, some oxygen-containing compounds (2,3-butanedione, ethyl isobutyrate and ethyl sugar lactone) and an unsaturated hydrocarbon (5-ethylidene-2-norbornene) proved to be promising candidates since their adverse effects on the fuel cell performance were minimal and their vapor pressures were adequate. (author)

  9. Exploration of hydrogen odorants for fuel cell vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Daichi; Akai, Motoaki; Watanabe, Shogo

    The suitability of sulfur compounds (e.g., mercaptan and sulfide) and various sulfur-free smelling compounds for hydrogen odorants were evaluated. The influence of each smelling compound on fuel cell performance was evaluated through the measurement of I- V curves and voltage decline under constant current density, and their condensation properties under high-pressure condition were evaluated by measuring their vapor pressures. The results indicated that all the sulfur compounds evaluated in this study were not suitable as hydrogen odorants since their addition to the hydrogen caused serious degradation of fuel cell performance. Among the sulfur-free compounds, however, some oxygen-containing compounds (2,3-butanedione, ethyl isobutyrate and ethyl sugar lactone) and an unsaturated hydrocarbon (5-ethylidene-2-norbornene) proved to be promising candidates since their adverse effects on the fuel cell performance were minimal and their vapor pressures were adequate.

  10. Hydriding failure in water reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, D.N.; Ramadasan, E.; Unnikrishnan, K.

    1980-01-01

    Hydriding of the zircaloy cladding has been one of the important causes of failure in water reactor fuel elements. This report reviews the causes, the mechanisms and the methods for prevention of hydriding failure in zircaloy clad water reactor fuel elements. The different types of hydriding of zircaloy cladding have been classified. Various factors influencing zircaloy hydriding from internal and external sources in an operating fuel element have been brought out. The findings of post-irradiation examination of fuel elements from Indian reactors, with respect to clad hydriding and features of hydriding failure are included. (author)

  11. Tolman's length and limiting supersaturation of vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseechkin, Nikolay V.

    2018-01-01

    The classical Kelvin formula for the equilibrium vapor pressure over a droplet of radius R is extended to small radii and vapor non-ideality, from where the limiting supersaturation condition is obtained by relating the point R = 0 to the value of limiting (spinodal) supersaturation of vapor. The analysis of different dependences of the Tolman length on radius, δ (R) , obeying this condition suggests that (i) the value of δ (0) is positive and the function δ (R) decreases with increasing radius; (ii) the curvature effect (the dependence of surface tension on radius) in the nucleation region is determined by the value of δ (0) . At the same time, this effect is weakly sensitive to the form of the function δ (R) and insensitive to its asymptotic value δ∞ .

  12. Numerical modeling of a vaporizing multicomponent droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megaridis, C. M.; Sirignano, W. A.

    The fundamental processes governing the energy, mass, and momentum exchange between the liquid and gas phases of vaporizing, multicomponent liquid droplets have been investigated. The axisymmetric configuration under consideration consists of an isolated multicomponent droplet vaporizing in a convective environment. The model considers different volatilities of the liquid components, variable liquid properties due to variation of the species concentrations, and non-Fickian multicomponent gaseous diffusion. The bicomponent droplet model was employed to examine the commonly used assumptions of unity Lewis number in the liquid phase and Fickian gaseous diffusion. It is found that the droplet drag coefficients, the vaporization rates, and the related transfer numbers are not influenced by the above assumptions in a significant way.

  13. Cesium chemistry in GCFR fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fee, D.C.; Johnson, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    The fuel rod design for the Gas Cooled Fast-Breeder Reactor (GCFR) is similar to that employed for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) with the exception of the unique features inherent to the use of helium as the coolant. These unique design features include the use of (1) vented and pressure-equalized fuel rods, and (2) ribbed cladding along 75% of the fuel section. The former design feature enables reduction in cladding thickness and prevention of possible creep collapse of the cladding due to the high coolant pressure (8.5 MPa). The latter design feature brings about improved heat transfer characteristics. Each GCFR fuel rod is vented to a manifold whereby gaseous fission products diffusing out of the fuel pin are retained on charcoal traps. As a result, the internal pressure of a GCFR fuel pin does not increase during irradiation. In addition, the venting system also maintains the pressure within the fuel pin slightly below (0.3 to 0.5 MPa) the coolant pressure outside the fuel pin. Consequently, should a breach occur in the cladding, helium flows into the breached fuel pin thereby minimizing fission product contamination of the coolant. These desirable aspects of a GCFR fuel pin can be maintained only as long as axial gas transport paths are available and operating within the fuel pin

  14. Secondhand Exposure to Vapors From Electronic Cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czogala, Jan; Fidelus, Bartlomiej; Zielinska-Danch, Wioleta; Travers, Mark J.; Sobczak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are designed to generate inhalable nicotine aerosol (vapor). When an e-cigarette user takes a puff, the nicotine solution is heated and the vapor is taken into lungs. Although no sidestream vapor is generated between puffs, some of the mainstream vapor is exhaled by e-cigarette user. The aim of this study was to evaluate the secondhand exposure to nicotine and other tobacco-related toxicants from e-cigarettes. Materials and Methods: We measured selected airborne markers of secondhand exposure: nicotine, aerosol particles (PM2.5), carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an exposure chamber. We generated e-cigarette vapor from 3 various brands of e-cigarette using a smoking machine and controlled exposure conditions. We also compared secondhand exposure with e-cigarette vapor and tobacco smoke generated by 5 dual users. Results: The study showed that e-cigarettes are a source of secondhand exposure to nicotine but not to combustion toxicants. The air concentrations of nicotine emitted by various brands of e-cigarettes ranged from 0.82 to 6.23 µg/m3. The average concentration of nicotine resulting from smoking tobacco cigarettes was 10 times higher than from e-cigarettes (31.60±6.91 vs. 3.32±2.49 µg/m3, respectively; p = .0081). Conclusions: Using an e-cigarette in indoor environments may involuntarily expose nonusers to nicotine but not to toxic tobacco-specific combustion products. More research is needed to evaluate health consequences of secondhand exposure to nicotine, especially among vulnerable populations, including children, pregnant women, and people with cardiovascular conditions. PMID:24336346

  15. Vapor characterization of Tank 241-C-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Story, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program has developed, in cooperation with Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory, the equipment and expertise to characterize gases and vapors in the high-level radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State. This capability has been demonstrated by the characterization of the tank 241-C-103 headspace. This tank headspace is the first, and for many reasons is expected to be the most problematic, that will be characterized (Osborne 1992). Results from the most recent and comprehensive sampling event, sample job 7B, are presented for the purpose of providing scientific bases for resolution of vapor issues associated with tank 241-C-103. This report is based on the work of Clauss et al. 1994, Jenkins et al. 1994, Ligotke et al. 1994, Mahon et al. 1994, and Rasmussen and Einfeld 1994. No attempt has been made in this report to evaluate the implications of the data presented, such as the potential impact of headspace gases and vapors to tank farm workers health. That and other issues will be addressed elsewhere. Key to the resolution of worker health issues is the quantitation of compounds of toxicological concern. The Toxicology Review Panel, a panel of Pacific Northwest Laboratory experts in various areas, of toxicology, has chosen 19 previously identified compounds as being of potential toxicological concern. During sample job 7B, the sampling and analytical methodology was validated for this preliminary list of compounds of toxicological concern. Validation was performed according to guidance provided by the Tank Vapor Conference Committee, a group of analytical chemists from academic institutions and national laboratories assembled and commissioned by the Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program

  16. Vapor characterization of Tank 241-C-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, J.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Story, M.S. [Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc. Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program has developed, in cooperation with Northwest Instrument Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory, the equipment and expertise to characterize gases and vapors in the high-level radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State. This capability has been demonstrated by the characterization of the tank 241-C-103 headspace. This tank headspace is the first, and for many reasons is expected to be the most problematic, that will be characterized (Osborne 1992). Results from the most recent and comprehensive sampling event, sample job 7B, are presented for the purpose of providing scientific bases for resolution of vapor issues associated with tank 241-C-103. This report is based on the work of Clauss et al. 1994, Jenkins et al. 1994, Ligotke et al. 1994, Mahon et al. 1994, and Rasmussen and Einfeld 1994. No attempt has been made in this report to evaluate the implications of the data presented, such as the potential impact of headspace gases and vapors to tank farm workers health. That and other issues will be addressed elsewhere. Key to the resolution of worker health issues is the quantitation of compounds of toxicological concern. The Toxicology Review Panel, a panel of Pacific Northwest Laboratory experts in various areas, of toxicology, has chosen 19 previously identified compounds as being of potential toxicological concern. During sample job 7B, the sampling and analytical methodology was validated for this preliminary list of compounds of toxicological concern. Validation was performed according to guidance provided by the Tank Vapor Conference Committee, a group of analytical chemists from academic institutions and national laboratories assembled and commissioned by the Tank Vapor Issue Resolution Program.

  17. Transport coefficients in copper vapor arc plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahal, A.M.; Rahhaoui, B.; Vacquie, S.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of copper vapors modifies the properties of arc discharges. The paper deals with a region not investigated earlier, where in the core of the positive column of very short or high current arcs there is a high copper concentration. At these values the relative losses take a greater part in the energy balance. Using the charged-charged collision integrals, the transport coefficients (axial temperature, thermal and electric conductivity, viscosity) of the plasma with higher copper vapor concentration are calculated as the function of the arc current intensity. (D.Gy.)

  18. Drag Reduction by Leidenfrost Vapor Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2011-05-23

    We demonstrate and quantify a highly effective drag reduction technique that exploits the Leidenfrost effect to create a continuous and robust lubricating vapor layer on the surface of a heated solid sphere moving in a liquid. Using high-speed video, we show that such vapor layers can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by over 85%. These results appear to approach the ultimate limit of drag reduction possible by different methods based on gas-layer lubrication and can stimulate the development of related energy saving technologies.

  19. Drag reduction by Leidenfrost vapor layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Marston, Jeremy O; Chan, Derek Y C; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2011-05-27

    We demonstrate and quantify a highly effective drag reduction technique that exploits the Leidenfrost effect to create a continuous and robust lubricating vapor layer on the surface of a heated solid sphere moving in a liquid. Using high-speed video, we show that such vapor layers can reduce the hydrodynamic drag by over 85%. These results appear to approach the ultimate limit of drag reduction possible by different methods based on gas-layer lubrication and can stimulate the development of related energy saving technologies. © 2011 American Physical Society

  20. The vertical distribution of Mars water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of observations made from the Viking 1 Orbiter indicates that the water vapor over the Viking 1 landing site is uniformly mixed with the atmosphere and not concentrated near the surface. The analysis incorporates the effects of atmospheric scattering and explains why previous earth-based observations showed a strong diurnal variation in water content. It also explains the lack of an early morning fog and removes the necessity of daily exchange of large amounts of water between the surface and the atmosphere. A water vapor volume mixing ratio of 1.5 x 10 to the -4th is inferred for the Viking 1 site in late summer.

  1. Low temperature vapor phase digestion of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-04-18

    A method for digestion and gasification of graphite for removal from an underlying surface is described. The method can be utilized to remove graphite remnants of a formation process from the formed metal piece in a cleaning process. The method can be particularly beneficial in cleaning castings formed with graphite molding materials. The method can utilize vaporous nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) or vaporous HNO.sub.3 with air/oxygen to digest the graphite at conditions that can avoid damage to the underlying surface.

  2. Vapor deposition in basaltic stalactites, Kilauea, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, A. K.; Mohrig, D. C.; Welday, E. E.

    Basaltic stalacties suspended from the ceiling of a large lava tube at Kilauea, Hawaii, have totally enclosed vesicles whose walls are covered with euhedral FeTi oxide and silicate crystals. The walls of the vesicles and the exterior surfaces of stalactites are Fe and Ti enriched and Si depleted compared to common basalt. Minerals in vesicles have surface ornamentations on crystal faces which include alkali-enriched, aluminosilicate glass(?) hemispheres. No sulfide-, chloride-, fluoride-, phosphate- or carbonate-bearing minerals are present. Minerals in the stalactites must have formed by deposition from an iron oxide-rich vapor phase produced by the partial melting and vaporization of wall rocks in the tube.

  3. Method and Apparatus for Concentrating Vapors for Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, Jay W.; Baldwin, David L.; Anheier, Jr., Norman C.

    2008-10-07

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for pre-concentrating gaseous vapors for analysis. The invention finds application in conjunction with, e.g., analytical instruments where low detection limits for gaseous vapors are desirable. Vapors sorbed and concentrated within the bed of the apparatus can be thermally desorbed achieving at least partial separation of vapor mixtures. The apparatus is suitable, e.g., for preconcentration and sample injection, and provides greater resolution of peaks for vapors within vapor mixtures, yielding detection levels that are 10-10,000 times better than for direct sampling and analysis systems. Features are particularly useful for continuous unattended monitoring applications.

  4. A ``NEW'' Solid-Core Reactor Fuel Form that Maximizes the Performance of Nuclear Thermal and Electric Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Frank E.; Finnegan, Patrick M.

    1994-07-01

    The ``NEW'' solid-core fuel form is the old Vapor Transport (VT) fuel pin investigated at NASA about 30 years ago. It is simply a tube sealed at both ends partially filled with UO2. During operation the UO2 forms an annular layer on the inside of the tube by vaporization and condensation. This form is an ideal structure for overall strength and retention of fission products. All of the structural material lies between the fuel (including fission products) and the reactor coolant. The isothermal inside fuel surface temperature that results from the vaporization and condensation of fuel during operation eliminates hotspots, significantly increasing the design fuel pin surface temperature. For NTP, W-UO2 fuel pins yield higher operating temperatures than for other fuel forms, because W has about a ten-fold lower vaporization rate compared to any other known material. The use of perigee propulsion using W-UO2 fuel pins can result in a more than ten-fold reduction in reactor power. Lower reactor power, together with zero fission product release potential, and the simplicity of fabrication of VT fuel pins should greatly simplify and reduce the cost of development of NTP. For NEP, VT fuel pins can increase fast neutron spectrum reactor life with no fission product release. Thermal spectrum NEP reactors using W184 or Mo VT fuel pins, with only small amounts of high neutron absorbing additives, offer benefits because of much lower fissionable fuel requirements. The VT fuel pin has application to commercial power reactors with similar benefits.

  5. Thermodynamic state, specific heat, and enthalpy function of saturated UO2 vapor between 3,000 K and 5,000 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karow, H.U.

    1977-02-01

    The properties have been determined by means of statistical mechanics. The discussion of the thermodynamic state includes the evaluation of the plasma state and its contribution to the caloric variables-of-state of saturated oxide fuel vapor. Because of the extremely high ion and electron density due to thermal ionization, the ionized component of the fuel vapor does no more represent a perfect kinetic plasma. At temperatures around 5,000 K, UO 2 vapor reaches the collective plasma state and becomes increasingly 'metallic'. - Moreover, the nonuniform molecular equilibrium composition of UO 2 vapor has been taken into account in calculating its caloric functions-of-state. The contribution to specific heat and enthalpy of thermally excited electronic states of the vapor molecules has been derived by means of a Rydberg orbital model of the UO 2 molecule. The resulting enthalpy functions and specific heats for saturated UO 2 vapor of equilibrium composition and that for pure UO 2 gas are compared with the enthalpy and specific heat data of gaseous UO 2 at lower temperatures known from literature. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Chemically vapor deposited coatings for multibarrier containment of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusin, J.M.; Shade, J.W.; Kidd, R.W.; Browning, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was selected as a feasible method to coat ceramic cores, since the technology has previously been demonstrated for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel particles. CVD coatings, including SiC, PyC (pyrolytic carbon), SiO 2 , and Al 2 O 3 were studied. This paper will discuss the development and characterization of PyC and Al 2 O 3 CVD coatings on supercalcine cores. Coatings were applied to 2 mm particles in either fluidized or vibrating beds. The PyC coating was deposited in a fluidized bed with ZrO 2 diluent from C 2 H 2 at temperatures between 1100 and 1200 0 C. The Al 2 O 3 coatings were deposited in a vibrated bed by a two-stage process to minimize loss of PyC during the overcoating operation. This process involved applying 10 μm of Al 2 O 3 using water vapor hydrolysis of AlCl 3 and then switching to the more surface-controlled hydrolysis via the H 2 + CO 2 reaction (3CO 2 + 3H 2 + 2AlCl 3 = Al 2 O 3 + 6HCl + 3CO). Typically, 50 to 80 μm Al 2 O 3 coatings were applied over 30 to 40 μm PyC coatings. The coatings were evaluated by metallographic examination, PyC oxidation tests, and leach resistance. After air oxidation for 100 hours at 750 0 C, the duplex PyC/Al 2 O 3 coated particles exhibited a weight loss of 0.01 percent. Leach resistance is being determined for temperatures from 50 to 150 0 C in various solutions. Typical results are given for selected ions. The leach resistance of supercalcine cores is significantly improved by the application of PyC and/or Al 2 O 3 coatings

  7. Fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Yasuo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the plenum space in a fuel element used for a liquid metal cooled reactor. Constitution: A fuel pellet is secured at one end with an end plug and at the other with a coil spring in a tubular container. A mechanism for fixing the coil spring composed of a tubular unit is mounted by friction with the inner surface of the tubular container. Accordingly, the recoiling force of the coil spring can be retained by fixing mechanism with a small volume, and since a large amount of plenum space can be obtained, the internal pressure rise in the cladding tube can be suppressed even if large quantities of fission products are discharged. (Kamimura, M.)

  8. Fuel trading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    A first part of this report proposes an overview of trends and predictions. After a synthesis on the sector changes and trends, it indicates and comments the most recent predictions for the consumption of refined oil products and for the turnover of the fuel wholesale market, reports the main highlights concerning the sector's life, and gives a dashboard of the sector activity. The second part proposes the annual report on trends and competition. It presents the main operator profiles and fuel categories, the main determining factors of the activity, the evolution of the sector context between 2005 and 2015 (consumptions, prices, temperature evolution). It analyses the evolution of the sector activity and indicators (sales, turnovers, prices, imports). Financial performances of enterprises are presented. The economic structure of the sector is described (evolution of the economic fabric, structural characteristics, French foreign trade). Actors are then presented and ranked in terms of turnover, of added value, and of result

  9. Methods of preventing fast breeder reactor shield plug from adhesion of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiguchi, Koh; Hara, Johji; Nei, Hiromichi; Daiku, Motoichi; Wagatsuma, Kenji

    1980-01-01

    The shield plug, which is located at the upper part of a reactor vessel of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor, is composed of a rotating and a stationary plug. Fuel exchange is performed easily by the rotation of the rotating plug. The vapor or mist of sodium evaporated from liquid sodium deposits on the gap surfaces of the rotating and stationary plugs and is solidified or changed into a solid reactant. If such condition continues for a long period, harmful effects are exerted on the fuel exchange operation. In order to develop methods of preventing the sodium deposition, investigation was made on the phenomenon of sodium deposition. By the use of the testing equipment simulating the shield plug, deposition tests and specimen measurements were made for different gap width test section size and condition. On the basis of the effects of these parameters clarified by experiments, the effectiveness of three kinds of mechanism for preventing sodium deposition were investigated experimentally. In addition, by using a thermo-siphon analogical model, analysis was performed to deduce experimental equations for sodium deposition. (author)

  10. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, R. James

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  11. Solid TRU fuels and fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Suzuki, Yasufumi

    1997-01-01

    Alloys and nitrides are candidate solid fuels for transmutation. However, the nitride fuels are preferred to the alloys because they have more favorable thermal properties which allows to apply a cold-fuel concept. The nitride fuel cycle technology is briefly presented

  12. Vapor recovery system in the gasolines commercialization; Sistema de recuperacion de vapores en la comercializacion de las gasolinas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casas Barba, R.; Molina Gallegos, J.R. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (IMP), Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1995-12-31

    In the last years the studies performed with respect to the environmental pollution show that the ozone is one of the most problematic contaminants in the Metropolitan Zone of Mexico City (MZMC) and that the hydrocarbons are the main forerunners of it. The main source of hydrocarbon vapor emissions originates from the handling and distribution operations. In this paper a description is made of the involved stages in the commercialization of gasolines in the MZMC and a description is also made of the systems employed to control the emissions in the three stages of the fuels storage and distribution cycle and explains the degree the hydrocarbon emissions to the atmosphere will be reduced, once the recovery systems are installed in all of the involved stages. [Espanol] En los ultimos anos los estudios realizados con respecto a contaminacion ambiental reflejan que el ozono es uno de los contaminantes mas problematicos de la zona metropolitana de la ciudad de Mexico (ZMCM), y los hidrocarburos son los principales precursores de este. La principal fuente de emision de vapores de hidrocarburos proviene de las operaciones de manejo y distribucion de combustibles. En este articulo se hace una descripcion de las etapas involucradas en la comercializacion de las gasolinas en la ZMCM, se describen tambien los sistemas utilizados para controlar las emisiones en las tres etapas del ciclo de almacenamiento y distribucion de combustibles y se explica en que grado se reduciran las emisiones de hidrocarburos a la atmosfera, una vez que se instalen los sistemas de recuperacion en todas las etapas involucradas.

  13. Hydrocarbon vapor diffusion in intact core sleeves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostendorf, D.W.; Moyer, E.E.; Yuefeng Xie; Rajan, R.V.

    1993-01-01

    The diffusion of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP) and 2,2,5-trimethylhexane (TMH) vapors out of residually contaminated sandy soil from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) field research site at Traverse City, Michigan, was measured and modeled. The headspace of an intact core sleeve sample was swept with nitrogen gas to simulate the diffusive release of hydrocarbon vapors from residual aviation gasoline in and immediately above the capillary fringe to a soil-venting air flow in the unsaturated zone. The resulting steady-state profile was modeled using existing diffusivity and air porosity estimates in a balance of diffusive flux and a first order source term. The source strength, which was calibrated with the observed flux of 2,2,4-TMP leaving the sleeve, varied with the residual gasoline remaining in the core, but was independent of the headspace sweep flow rate. This finding suggested that lower soil-venting air flow rates were in principle as effective as higher air flow rates in venting LNAPL vapors from contaminated soils. The saturated vapor concentration ratio of 2,2,4-TMP to 2,2,5-TMH decreased from 6.6 to 3.5 over the duration of the experiments in an expression of distillation effects. The vertical profile model was tested against sample port data in four separate experiments for both species, yielding mean errors ranging from 0 to -24% in magnitude

  14. Flowing Afterglow Vapor Deposition for Microelectric Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-28

    PACVD system it is worthwhile to review briefly the limitations of conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) systems, glow discharge deposition...regimes previously inaccessible to MOCVD. III. F. Status of Construction Project As shown in Fig. 8, a good portion of the basic PACVD machine has

  15. Vapor Pressure of 2-Chlorovinyl Dichloroarsine (Lewisite)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Woodward, and Owens investigated the vapor pressures of arsenic trichloride and Lewisite I in a study covering the range 50 to 150 °C.10 In 1944...Interaction with Benzene in the Presence of Aluminum Chloride. Production of 9:10-Di-methylanthracene. J. Chem. Soc. 1931,753. 9. Klosky, S.; Strieker

  16. Update on photoselective vaporization of the prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sountoulides, Petros; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.

    2008-01-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) with a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser may be the most promising new technology applied to the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The specific laser light characteristics and the ideal interactions between KTP lasers and

  17. Fractional condensation of biomass pyrolysis vapors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; Garcia Perez, M.; Wang, Zhouhong; Oudenhoven, Stijn; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the possibilities to steer the composition and, thus, the quality of pyrolysis liquids by the reactor temperature and the pyrolysis vapor condenser temperature. Pine wood was pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized-bed pyrolysis reactor operated at 330 or 480 °C. The

  18. A FGGE water vapor wind data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Tod R.; Hayden, Christopher M.

    1985-01-01

    It has been recognized for some time that water vapor structure visible in infrared imagery offers a potential for obtaining motion vectors when several images are considered in sequence (Fischer et al., 1981). A study evaluating water vapor winds obtained from the VISSR atmospheric sounder (Stewart et al., 1985) has confirmed the viability of the approach. More recently, 20 data sets have been produced from METEOSAT water vapor imagery for the FGGE period of 10-25 November 1979. Where possible, two data sets were prepared for each day at 0000 and 1200 GMT and compared with rawinsondes over Europe, Africa, and aircraft observations over the oceans. Procedures for obtaining winds were, in general, similar to the earlier study. Motions were detected both by a single pixel tracking and a cross correlation method by using three images individually separated by one hour. A height assignment was determined by matching the measured brightness temperature to the temperature structure represented by the FGGE-IIIB analyses. Results show that the METEOSAT water vapor winds provide uniform horizontal coverage of mid-level flow over the globe with good accuracy.

  19. Atomic-vapor-laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.I.

    1982-10-01

    This paper gives a brief history of the scientific considerations leading to the development of laser isotope separation (LIS) processes. The close relationship of LIS to the broader field of laser-induced chemical processes is evaluated in terms of physical criteria to achieve an efficient production process. Atomic-vapor LIS processes under development at Livermore are reviwed. 8 figures

  20. Covering sources of toxic vapors with foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aue, W. P.; Guidetti, F.

    2009-01-01

    In a case of chemical terrorism, first responders might well be confronted with a liquid source of toxic vapor which keeps spreading out its hazardous contents. With foam as an efficient and simple means, such a source could be covered up in seconds and the spread of vapors mitigated drastically. Once covered, the source could then wait for a longer time to be removed carefully and professionally by a decontamination team. In order to find foams useful for covering up toxic vapor sources, a large set of measurements has been performed in order to answer the following questions: - Which foams could be used for this purpose? - How thick should the foam cover be? - For how long would such a foam cover be effective? - Could the practical application of foam cause a spread of the toxic chemical? The toxic vapors sources included GB, GD and HD. Among the foams were 10 fire fighter foams (e.g. AFFF, protein) and the aqueous decontamination foam CASCAD. Small scale experiments showed that CASCAD is best suited for covering a toxic source; a 10 cm layer of it covers and decontaminates GB. The large scale experiments confirmed that any fire fighter foam is a suitable cover for a longer or shorter period.(author)

  1. 78 FR 42595 - Marine Vapor Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ...) Commenter 18 said we should add calorimeters as approved In general, a calorimeter is a device used to... wishing to use a calorimeter can submit an alternative or exemption request with information for review... vapor stream is lowered by 1% from could be the appropriate solution. In general, the more normal levels...

  2. Atomic lithium vapor laser isotope separation

    CERN Document Server

    Olivares, I E

    2002-01-01

    An atomic vapor laser isotope separation in lithium was performed using tunable diode lasers. The method permits also the separation of the isotopes between the sup 6 LiD sub 2 and the sup 7 LiD sub 1 lines using a self-made mass separator which includes a magnetic sector and an ion beam designed for lithium. (Author)

  3. Atomic lithium vapor laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares, I.E.; Rojas, C.

    2002-01-01

    An atomic vapor laser isotope separation in lithium was performed using tunable diode lasers. The method permits also the separation of the isotopes between the 6 LiD 2 and the 7 LiD 1 lines using a self-made mass separator which includes a magnetic sector and an ion beam designed for lithium. (Author)

  4. Terahertz radiation in alkali vapor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xuan; Zhang, X.-C.

    2014-01-01

    By taking advantage of low ionization potentials of alkali atoms, we demonstrate terahertz wave generation from cesium and rubidium vapor plasmas with an amplitude nearly one order of magnitude larger than that from nitrogen gas at low pressure (0.02–0.5 Torr). The observed phenomena are explained by the numerical modeling based upon electron tunneling ionization

  5. 40 CFR 796.1950 - Vapor pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... combined with water solubility data permit the calculation of Henry's law constant, a parameter essential...) “Pascal” (Pa) is the standard international unit of vapor pressure and is defined as newtons per square meter (N/m2). A newton is the force necessary to give acceleration of one meter per second squared to...

  6. Estimates of limits to fuel/coolant mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, G.C.; Corradini, M.L.

    1991-06-01

    The vapor explosion process can involve the mixing of fuel with coolant prior to the explosion. A number of analysts have suggested limits to the amount of fuel/coolant mixing that could occur within the reactor vessel following a core melt accident. Past models are reviewed and a simplified approach is suggested to estimate a limit on the amount of fuel/coolant mixing possible. The approach uses concepts first advanced by Fauske in a different way. The results indicate that fuel temperature, ambient pressure and in particular the mixing length scale D mix are important parameters. For large values of D mix the fuel mass mixed in-vessel is limited to the range of 1-12 metric tons (1-10% of the core mass). (orig.) [de

  7. Methods for making a porous nuclear fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L; Williams, Brian E; Benander, Robert E

    2014-12-30

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  8. Methods for making a porous nuclear fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youchison, Dennis L; Williams, Brian E; Benander, Robert E

    2014-12-30

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  9. Cyanoborohydride-based ionic liquids as green aerospace bipropellant fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Yin, Ping; Zhang, Jiaheng; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2014-06-02

    In propellant systems, the most common bipropellants are composed of two chemicals, a fuel (or reducer) and an oxidizer. Currently, the choices for propellant fuels rely mainly on hydrazine and its methylated derivatives, even though they are extremely toxic, highly volatile, sensitive to adiabatic compression (risk of detonation), and, therefore, difficult to handle. With this background, the search for alternative green propellant fuels has been an urgent goal of space science. In this study, a new family of cyanoborohydride-based ionic liquids (ILs) with properties and performances comparable to hydrazine derivatives were designed and synthesized. These new ILs as bipropellant fuels, have some unique advantages including negligible vapor pressure, ultra-short ignition delay (ID) time, and reduced synthetic and storage costs, thereby showing great application potential as environmentally friendly fuels in bipropellant formulations. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. 75 FR 71346 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Lightning Protection of Fuel Tank Structure To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Lightning... fuel vapor ignition caused by lightning strikes. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not... meet the requirements of that regulation for some areas of lightning protection for fuel tank structure...

  11. Influence of Promotor, H2O and H2S on the Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapor over MoS2 Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndal, Trine M. H.; Høj, Martin; Gaur, Abhijeet

    Catalytic hydropyrolysis combines fast pyrolysis with catalytic upgrading by hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) in a single step for the production of fuel oil from biomass in which reactive pyrolysis vapors are upgraded before condensation. Catalyst activity and lifetime is challenged by carbon deposition...

  12. Water vapor movement in freezing aggregate base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to 1) measure the extent to which water vapor movement results in : water accumulation in freezing base materials; 2) evaluate the effect of soil stabilization on water vapor movement : in freezing base materials;...

  13. Vapor Intrusion Characterization Report (Revision 1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapor Intrusion Characterization Report (Revision 1) - February 5, 2015: This report, which was approved by the EPA on February 18, 2015, documents the results from implementation of the Final Vapor Intrusion Characterization Work Plan.

  14. Vapor segregation and loss in basaltic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of volcanic gases at Pu'u'O??'o??, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, reveal distinct degassing regimes with respect to vapor segregation and loss during effusive activity in 2004-2005. Three styles of vapor loss are distinguished by the chemical character of the emitted volcanic gases, measured by open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: 1 persistent continuous gas emission, 2 gas piston events, and 3 lava spattering. Persistent continuous gas emission is associated with magma ascent and degassing beneath the crater vents, then eruption of the degassed magma from flank vents. Gas piston events are the result of static gas accumulation at depths of 400-900 m beneath Pu'u'O??'o??. A CO2-rich gas slug travels up the conduit at a few meters per second, displacing magma as it expands. Lava spattering occurs due to dynamic bubble coalescence in a column of relatively stagnant magma. The Large gas bubbles are H2O rich and are generated by open-system degassing at depths of gas accumulation and dynamic bubble coalescence are both manifestations of vapor segregation in basaltic melts, but their implications differ. Accumulation and segregation of CO2-rich vapor at depth does not deplete the melt of H2O (required to drive lava fountains near to the surface) and therefore gas piston events can occur interspersed with lava fountaining activity. Lava spattering, however, efficiently strips H2O-rich vapor from magma beneath the crater vents; the magma must then erupt effusively from vents on the flank of the cone. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  15. Vaporization of fault water during seismic slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianye; Niemeijer, André R.; Fokker, Peter A.

    2017-06-01

    Laboratory and numerical studies, as well as field observations, indicate that phase transitions of pore water might be an important process in large earthquakes. We present a model of the thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical processes, including a two-phase mixture model to incorporate the phase transitions of pore water, occurring during fast slip (i.e., a natural earthquake) in order to investigate the effects of vaporization on the coseismic slip. Using parameters from typical natural faults, our modeling shows that vaporization can indeed occur at the shallow depths of an earthquake, irrespective of the wide variability of the parameters involved (sliding velocity, friction coefficient, gouge permeability and porosity, and shear-induced dilatancy). Due to the fast kinetics, water vaporization can cause a rapid slip weakening even when the hydrological conditions of the fault zone are not favorable for thermal pressurization, e.g., when permeability is high. At the same time, the latent heat associated with the phase transition causes the temperature rise in the slip zone to be buffered. Our parametric analyses reveal that the amount of frictional work is the principal factor controlling the onset and activity of vaporization and that it can easily be achieved in earthquakes. Our study shows that coseismic pore fluid vaporization might have played important roles at shallow depths of large earthquakes by enhancing slip weakening and buffering the temperature rise. The combined effects may provide an alternative explanation for the fact that low-temperature anomalies were measured in the slip zones at shallow depths of large earthquakes.

  16. Diesel engine emissions and combustion predictions using advanced mixing models applicable to fuel sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abani, Neerav; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2010-09-01

    An advanced mixing model was applied to study engine emissions and combustion with different injection strategies ranging from multiple injections, early injection and grouped-hole nozzle injection in light and heavy duty diesel engines. The model was implemented in the KIVA-CHEMKIN engine combustion code and simulations were conducted at different mesh resolutions. The model was compared with the standard KIVA spray model that uses the Lagrangian-Drop and Eulerian-Fluid (LDEF) approach, and a Gas Jet spray model that improves predictions of liquid sprays. A Vapor Particle Method (VPM) is introduced that accounts for sub-grid scale mixing of fuel vapor and more accurately and predicts the mixing of fuel-vapor over a range of mesh resolutions. The fuel vapor is transported as particles until a certain distance from nozzle is reached where the local jet half-width is adequately resolved by the local mesh scale. Within this distance the vapor particle is transported while releasing fuel vapor locally, as determined by a weighting factor. The VPM model more accurately predicts fuel-vapor penetrations for early cycle injections and flame lift-off lengths for late cycle injections. Engine combustion computations show that as compared to the standard KIVA and Gas Jet spray models, the VPM spray model improves predictions of in-cylinder pressure, heat released rate and engine emissions of NOx, CO and soot with coarse mesh resolutions. The VPM spray model is thus a good tool for efficiently investigating diesel engine combustion with practical mesh resolutions, thereby saving computer time.

  17. Fuel element loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, S.P; s.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element loading system is described which conveys a plurality of fuel rods to longitudinal passages in fuel elements. Conveyor means successively position the fuel rods above the longitudinal passages in axial alignment therewith and adapter means guide the fuel rods from the conveyor means into the longitudinal passages. The fuel elements are vibrated to cause the fuel rods to fall into the longitudinal passages through the adapter means

  18. A GUIDE TO FUEL PERFORMANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITZKE,W.

    2004-08-01

    Heating oil, as its name implies, is intended for end use heating consumption as its primary application. But its identity in reference name and actual chemical properties may vary based on a number of factors. By name, heating oil is sometimes referred to as gas oil, diesel, No. 2 distillate (middle distillate), or light heating oil. Kerosene, also used as a burner fuel, is a No. 1 distillate. Due to the higher heat content and competitive price in most markets, No. 2 heating oil is primarily used in modern, pressure-atomized burners. Using No. 1 oil for heating has the advantages of better cold-flow properties, lower emissions, and better storage properties. Because it is not nearly as abundant in supply, it is often markedly more expensive than No. 2 heating oil. Given the advanced, low-firing rate burners in use today, the objective is for the fuel to be compatible and achieve combustion performance at the highest achievable efficiency of the heating systems--with minimal service requirements. Among the Oil heat industry's top priorities are improving reliability and reducing service costs associated with fuel performance. Poor fuel quality, fuel degradation, and contamination can cause burner shut-downs resulting in ''no-heat'' calls. Many of these unscheduled service calls are preventable with routine inspection of the fuel and the tank. This manual focuses on No. 2 heating oil--its performance, properties, sampling and testing. Its purpose is to provide the marketer, service manager and technician with the proper guidelines for inspecting the product, maintaining good fuel quality, and the best practices for proper storage. Up-to-date information is also provided on commercially available fuel additives, their appropriate use and limitations.

  19. Convective vaporization of particles in an electromagnetic radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, P. V.; Kurochkin, V. I.

    1987-03-01

    The heating and vaporization of spherical particles in the case of the arbitrary relative concentration of vapor and gas are studied on the basis of the exact equations of multicomponent gas dynamics with allowance for the temperature dependence of the transport coefficients. The proposed method makes possible an easy computation of the vaporization rate and temperature in a wide range of particle sizes and radiation flux densities. The results obtained can be used to calculate laser-induced breakdown in metal vapors.

  20. Analytical modeling of the subsurface volatile organic vapor concentration in vapor intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    The inhalation of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds that intrude from a subsurface contaminant source into indoor air has become the subject of health and safety concerns over the last twenty years. Building subslab and soil gas contaminant vapor concentration sampling have become integral parts of vapor intrusion field investigations. While numerical models can be of use in analyzing field data and in helping understand the subslab and soil gas vapor concentrations, they are not widely used due to the perceived effort in setting them up. In this manuscript, we present a new closed-form analytical expression describing subsurface contaminant vapor concentrations, including subslab vapor concentrations. The expression was derived using Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. Results from this analytical model match well the numerical modeling results. This manuscript also explores the relationship between subslab and exterior soil gas vapor concentrations, and offers insights on what parameters need to receive greater focus in field studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 40 CFR 52.787 - Gasoline transfer vapor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline transfer vapor control. 52.787... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.787 Gasoline transfer vapor control. (a) Gasoline means any petroleum distillate having a Reid vapor pressure of 4 pounds or greater...

  2. 40 CFR 52.255 - Gasoline transfer vapor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline transfer vapor control. 52.255... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.255 Gasoline transfer vapor control. (a) “Gasoline” means any petroleum distillate having a Reid vapor pressure of 4 pounds or greater...

  3. Recommended vapor pressures for thiophene, sulfolane, and dimethyl sulfoxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fulem, Michal; Růžička, K.; Růžička, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 303, č. 2 (2011), s. 205-216 ISSN 0378-3812 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : thiophene sulfolane * dimethyl sulfoxide * vapor pressure * heat capacity * vaporization enthalpy * recommended vapor pressure equation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.139, year: 2011

  4. 33 CFR 154.826 - Vapor compressors and blowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154... system acceptable to the Commandant (CG-522). (b) If a reciprocating or screw-type compressor handles...-type compressor handles vapor in the vapor collection system, it must be provided with indicators and...

  5. 21 CFR 888.4220 - Cement monomer vapor evacuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement monomer vapor evacuator. 888.4220 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4220 Cement monomer vapor evacuator. (a) Identification. A cement monomer vapor evacuator is a device intended for use during surgery to contain or remove...

  6. 46 CFR 153.465 - Flammable vapor detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable vapor detector. 153.465 Section 153.465... Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.465 Flammable vapor detector. (a) A tankship that carries a flammable cargo must have two vapor detectors that meet § 35.30-15(b) of this chapter. (b) At...

  7. 7 CFR 305.24 - Vapor heat treatment schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vapor heat treatment schedules. 305.24 Section 305.24... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PHYTOSANITARY TREATMENTS Heat Treatments § 305.24 Vapor heat treatment... increased using saturated water vapor at 112 °F until the approximate center of the fruit reaches 112 °F...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1828 - Spaces containing cargo vapor: Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spaces containing cargo vapor: Entry. 154.1828 Section... Spaces containing cargo vapor: Entry. (a) No person may enter a cargo handling space without the... toxic vapors and has an oxygen concentration of at least 19.5 percent oxygen by volume; or (2) Those...

  9. The separation of hydrocarbons from waste vapor streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behling, R.D.; Ohlrogge, K.; Peinemann, K.V.; Kyburz, E.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrocarbon vapors generated from industrial processes dispersed into air are contributing factors for the creation of photochemical smog. The separation of hydrocarbon vapor by means of membranes is in case of some applications a technically simple and economic process. A membrane vapor separation process with a following treatment of the retentate by catalytic incineration is introduced in this paper

  10. Membrane-assisted vapor stripping: energy efficient hybrid distillation-vapor permeation process for alcohol-water separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Energy efficient alternatives to distillation for alcohol recovery from dilute solution are needed to improve biofuel sustainability. A process integrating steam stripping with a vapor compression step and a vapor permeation membrane separation step is proposed. The...

  11. Self-catalytic growth of tin oxide nanowires by chemical vapor deposition process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thabethe, BS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available are commercially available for detecting fuel gas, carbon monoxide, combustible gases, ammonia, water vapour, and numerous other gases and vapors [11]. Due to the enhanced surface-to-volume ratio of 1D struc- tures, tin oxide nanowires have been shown to have... power consumption [15]. It has been reported by several authors that the performances of gas sensors can be enhanced by increasing the specific surface area by way of achieving nanoparticles [16, 17] and by incorporation of noble metals [18...

  12. EFECTOS DE LOS GASES PRODUCTO DE LA COMBUSTIÓN EN LOS GENERADORES DE VAPOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Plá Duporté

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available En el trabajo se presentan recopilados, los efectos de ensuciamiento y corrosión que provocan en ungenerador de vapor acuotubular los gases productos de la combustión de combustibles líquidos,explicándose los mecanismos mediante los cuales ocurren tanto en las zonas de alta temperaturacomo en las de baja temperatura  This paper presents gathering of the dirty and corrosion effects of flue gas from liquid fuels, also it’sexplained the process by means of which happen in high and low temperature surfaces in steam watergenerator

  13. Nuclear Fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakawa, Hiromasa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the stress gradient resulted in the fuel can in fuel rods adapted to control the axial power distribution by the combination of fuel pellets having different linear power densities. Constitution: In a fuel rod comprising a first fuel pellet of a relatively low linear power density and a second fuel pellet of a relatively high linear power density, the second fuel pellet is cut at its both end faces by an amount corresponding to the heat expansion of the pellet due to the difference in the linear power density to the adjacent first fuel pellet. Thus, the second fuel pellet takes a smaller space than the first fuel pellet in the fuel can. This can reduce the stress produced in the portion of the fuel can corresponding to the boundary between the adjacent fuel pellets. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. Alternative applications of atomic vapor laser isotope separation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report was commissioned by the Secretary of Energy. It summarizes the main features of atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) technology and subsystems; evaluates applications, beyond those of uranium enrichment, suggested by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and a wide range of US industries and individuals; recommends further work on several applications; recommends the provision of facilities for evaluating potential new applications; and recommends the full involvement of end users from the very beginning in the development of any application. Specifically excluded from this report is an evaluation of the main AVLIS missions, uranium enrichment and purification of plutonium for weapons. In evaluating many of the alternative applications, it became clear that industry should play a greater and earlier role in the definition and development of technologies with the Department of Energy (DOE) if the nation is to derive significant commercial benefit. Applications of AVLIS to the separation of alternate (nonuranium) isotopes were considered. The use of 157 Gd as burnable poison in the nuclear fuel cycle, the use 12 C for isotopically pure diamond, and the use of plutonium isotopes for several nonweapons applications are examples of commercially useful products that might be produced at a cost less than the product value. Separations of other isotopes such as the elemental constituents of semiconductors were suggested; it is recommended that proposed applications be tested by using existing supplies to establish their value before more efficient enrichment processes are developed. Some applications are clear, but their production costs are too high, the window of opportunity in the market has passed, or societal constraints (e.g., on reprocessing of reactor fuel) discourage implementation

  15. A numerical investigation of vapor intrusion--the dynamic response of contaminant vapors to rainfall events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2012-10-15

    The U.S. government and various agencies have published guidelines for field investigation of vapor intrusion, most of which suggest soil gas sampling as an integral part of the investigation. Contaminant soil gas data are often relatively more stable than indoor air vapor concentration measurements, but meteorological conditions might influence soil gas values. Although a few field and numerical studies have considered some temporal effects on soil gas vapor transport, a full explanation of the contaminant vapor concentration response to rainfall events is not available. This manuscript seeks to demonstrate the effects on soil vapor transport during and after different rainfall events, by applying a coupled numerical model of fluid flow and vapor transport. Both a single rainfall event and seasonal rainfall events were modeled. For the single rainfall event models, the vapor response process could be divided into three steps: namely, infiltration, water redistribution, and establishment of a water lens atop the groundwater source. In the infiltration step, rainfall intensity was found to determine the speed of the wetting front and wash-out effect on the vapor. The passage of the wetting front led to an increase of the vapor concentration in both the infiltration and water redistribution steps and this effect is noted at soil probes located 1m below the ground surface. When the mixing of groundwater with infiltrated water was not allowed, a clean water lens accumulated above the groundwater source and led to a capping effect which can reduce diffusion rates of contaminant from the source. Seasonal rainfall with short time intervals involved superposition of the individual rainfall events. This modeling results indicated that for relatively deeper soil that the infiltration wetting front could not flood, the effects were damped out in less than a month after rain; while in the long term (years), possible formation of a water lens played a larger role in determining

  16. Rape prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date rape - prevention; Sexual assault - prevention ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Sexual assault and abuse and STDs. In: 2015 sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines 2015. www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/sexual- ...

  17. Dengue Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir This photograph ... medications to treat a dengue infection. This makes prevention the most important step, and prevention means avoiding ...

  18. LEU fuel element produced by the Egyptian fuel manufacturing pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, W.I.

    2000-01-01

    The Egyptian Fuel Manufacturing Pilot Plant, FMPP, is a Material Testing Reactor type (MTR) fuel element facility, for producing the specified fuel elements required for the Egyptian Second Research Reactor, ETRR-2. The plant uses uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 , 19.75% U 235 by wt) as a raw material which is processed through a series of the manufacturing, inspection and test plan to produce the final specified fuel elements. Radiological safety aspects during design, construction, operation, and all reasonably accepted steps should be taken to prevent or reduce the chance of accidents occurrence. (author)

  19. Constant strength fuel-fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaseen, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical apparatus composed of both a nonconsumable anode and cathode; and electrolyte, fuel oxidant and controls. This invention guarantees the constant transfer of hydrogen atoms and their respective electrons, thus a constant flow of power by submergence of the negative electrode in a constant strength hydrogen furnishing fuel; when said fuel is an aqueous absorbed hydrocarbon, such as and similar to ethanol or methnol. The objective is accomplished by recirculation of the liquid fuel, as depleted in the cell through specific type membranes which pass water molecules and reject the fuel molecules; thus concentrating them for recycle use

  20. I. c. [internal combustion] engine fuel injection pumping apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, K.M.; Stead, M.A.

    1993-06-09

    A low pressure pump supplies fuel at a pressure depending upon the engine speed to a high pressure pump. The pump has a fuel control means which is responsive to the movement of a piston which is biased by a spring and is movable by the fuel pressure developed by the pump. When the cold engine is at rest the fuel control means allows an excess of fuel to be supplied to the engine for starting purposes but when the engine is started the piston is moved from the end of its cylinder to reduce the amount of fuel which can be supplied. In order to prevent the supply of excess fuel when the engine is hot, a stop element is movable by a temperature responsive memory spring into the path of the piston to prevent the return of the piston to the end of the cylinder when the engine is stopped. (author)

  1. On-site concrete cask storage system for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, P.A.; Haelsig, R.T.; Kent, J.D.; Schmoker, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    A method is described of storing spent nuclear fuel assemblies including the steps of: transferring the fuel assemblies from a spent-fuel pool to a moveable concrete storage cask located outside the spent-fuel pool; maintaining a barrier between the fuel and the concrete in the cask to prevent contamination of the concrete by the fuel; maintaining the concrete storage cask containing the spent-fuel on site at the reactor complex for some predetermined period; transferring the fuel assemblies from the concrete storage cask to a shipping container; and, recycling the concrete storage cask

  2. Evaluation of the Process of Solvent Vapor Annealing on Organic Thin Films

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Yi

    2011-07-01

    Solvent vapor annealing has recently emerged as an intriguing, room-temperature, and highly versatile alternative to thermal annealing. The chemically selective interaction between solvents and organic semiconductors opens new opportunities to selectively anneal certain components of the device, while leaving others intact. On the downside, these interactions are complex and rather unpredictable, requiring further investigation. We propose a novel methodology to investigate solvent-film interactions, based on use of an in situ quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) capability and in situ grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS). These methods make it possible to investigate both qualitatively and quantitatively the solvent vapor uptake, the resulting softening and changes (reversible and/or irreversible) in crystallinity. Using this strategy, we have investigated the solvent vapor annealing of traditional donor and acceptor materials, namely poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and [6,6]-Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). We find these materials retain their rigid structure during toluene vapor annealing and do not dewet. We also investigated the toluene vapor annealing of several newly proposed acceptor molecules (pentacene-based) modified with various silyl groups and electron withdrawing groups to tune the packing structure of the acceptor domains and energy levels at the donor-acceptor interface. We found a dramatic effect of the electron-withdrawing group on vapor uptake and whether the film remains rigid, softens, or dissolves completely. In the case of trifluoromethyl electron-withdrawing group, we found the film dissolves, resulting in complete and irreversible loss of long range order. By contrast, the cyano group prevented loss of long range order, instead promoting crystallization in some cases. The silyl groups had a secondary effect in comparison to these. In the last part of the thesis, we investigated the

  3. Plague Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthcare Professionals Clinicians Public Health Officials Veterinarians Prevention History of Plague Resources FAQ Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Reduce rodent habitat around your ...

  4. Cumulus convection and the terrestrial water-vapor distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Leo J.

    1988-01-01

    Cumulus convection plays a significant role in determining the structure of the terrestrial water vapor field. Cumulus convection acts directly on the moisture field by condensing and precipitating water vapor and by redistributing water vapor through cumulus induced eddy circulations. The mechanisms by which cumulus convection influences the terrestrial water vapor distribution is outlined. Calculations using a theory due to Kuo is used to illustrate the mechanisms by which cumulus convection works. Understanding of these processes greatly aids the ability of researchers to interpret the seasonal and spatial distribution of atmospheric water vapor by providing information on the nature of sources and sinks and the global circulation.

  5. Chemochromic Indicators for the Detection of Hypergolic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Maldonado, E.; Captian, J.; Devor, R.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicity and hazard level associated with the use of hypergolic fuels necessitates the development of technology capable of detecting the presence of such fuels in a variety of different environments and conditions. The most commonly used sensors for the detection of hypergolic fuels are electrochemical in nature, which have serious limitations when used as area monitoring devices. Recent collaborative work between Kennedy Space Center and ASRC Aerospace has led to the development of indicators which exhibit a color change upon exposure to hydrazine under different conditions. The indicators under investigation on this developmental effort are para-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde (PDAB), various formulations of universal pH indicators, and potassium tetrachloroaurate (KAuCl4). These chemochromic indicators have been tested for the detection of hydrazine under various conditions: pure liquid fuel, aqueous fuel solution, saline aqueous fuel solutions, vapor fuel, and 3-month shelf life study, which included UV protection, thermal extremes, and normal storage conditions. The hypergolic fuel indicator test was conducted with the indicator impregnated into a wipe material to test the applicability of the indicator to be used to capture (absorb) and indicate the presence of hypergolic fuels. Each of the indicators performed well, with the universal pH indicator being the best candidate because of the visible response color change and the indicator stability after the shelf life study.

  6. Liquid-liquid contact in vapor explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, A.

    1978-08-01

    The contact of two liquid materials, one of which is at a temperature substantially above the boiling point of the other, can lead to fast energy conversion and a subsequent shock wave. This phenomenon is called a vapor explosion. One method of producing intimate, liquid-liquid contact (which is known to be a necessary condition for vapor explosion) is a shock tube configuration. Such experiments in which water was impacted upon molten aluminum showed that very high pressures, even larger than the thermodynamic critical pressure, could occur. The mechanism by which such sharp pressure pulses are generated is not yet clear. The report describes experiments in which cold liquids (Freon-11, Freon-22, water, or butanol) were impacted upon various hot materials

  7. A predictive vapor-pressure equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco, S.; Roman, F.L.; White, J.A.; Mulero, A.

    2008-01-01

    A simple equation is presented for predicting the temperature dependence of the vapor-pressure of a pure substance along the entire (liquid + vapor) coexistence curve, from the triple point to the critical point. The proposed equation is based on the use of a dimensionless temperature reduced by using critical and triple point values, and of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation as a zeroth-order approximation. The pressure and temperature at the triple point, the normal boiling temperature, and the pressure and temperature at the critical point are required as input data. The proposed equation is verified for 53 fluids by using NIST data. These data are reproduced with an overall average deviation of 0.55%

  8. Transport properties of fission product vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1983-07-01

    Kinetic theory of gases is used to calculate the transport properties of fission product vapors in a steam and hydrogen environment. Provided in tabular form is diffusivity of steam and hydrogen, viscosity and thermal conductivity of the gaseous mixture, and diffusivity of cesium iodide, cesium hydroxide, diatomic tellurium and tellurium dioxide. These transport properties are required in determining the thermal-hydraulics of and fission product transport in light water reactors

  9. Ceramic composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinton, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Composites consisting of silicon carbide matrices reinforced with continuous ceramic fibers are being developed for high-temperature structural applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques are very effective in fabricating composites with high strengths and exceptional fracture toughness. Mechanical properties of infiltrated composites are controlled by the strength of the interfacial bond between the fibers and matrix. This paper describes two CVD techniques and reviews the models being developed to better understand and control the infiltration process

  10. Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about regulations, developed by EPA, in collaboration with refiners, renewable fuel producers, and many other stakeholders, that ensure that transportation fuel sold in the United States contains a minimum volume of renewable fuel.

  11. Fuel Property Blend Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mehl, Marco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wagnon, Scott J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhang, Kuiwen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kukkadapu, Goutham [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-12

    The object of this project is to develop chemical models and associated correlations to predict the blending behavior of bio-derived fuels when mixed with conventional fuels like gasoline and diesel fuels.

  12. Logistic Fuel Processor Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salavani, Reza

    2004-01-01

    The Air Base Technologies Division of the Air Force Research Laboratory has developed a logistic fuel processor that removes the sulfur content of the fuel and in the process converts logistic fuel...

  13. Fuel pellet loading apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus is described for loading a predetermined amount of nuclear fuel pellets into nuclear fuel elements and particularly for the automatic loading of fuel pellets from within a sealed compartment. (author)

  14. Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Hager, Charles A.

    1998-01-01

    An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier.

  15. Estimating evaporative vapor generation from automobiles based on parking activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Xinyi; Tschantz, Michael; Fu, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to quantify the evaporative vapor generation based on real parking activity data. As compared to the existing methods, two improvements are applied in this new approach to reduce the uncertainties: First, evaporative vapor generation from diurnal parking events is usually calculated based on estimated average parking duration for the whole fleet, while in this study, vapor generation rate is calculated based on parking activities distribution. Second, rather than using the daily temperature gradient, this study uses hourly temperature observations to derive the hourly incremental vapor generation rates. The parking distribution and hourly incremental vapor generation rates are then adopted with Wade–Reddy's equation to estimate the weighted average evaporative generation. We find that hourly incremental rates can better describe the temporal variations of vapor generation, and the weighted vapor generation rate is 5–8% less than calculation without considering parking activity. - Highlights: • We applied real parking distribution data to estimate evaporative vapor generation. • We applied real hourly temperature data to estimate hourly incremental vapor generation rate. • Evaporative emission for Florence is estimated based on parking distribution and hourly rate. - A new approach is proposed to quantify the weighted evaporative vapor generation based on parking distribution with an hourly incremental vapor generation rate

  16. Simultaneous fast pyrolysis and catalytic upgrading of lignin to obtain a marine diesel fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Guofeng

    The topic of this Ph.D. project is to convert lignin, a by-product from a 2nd generation bio-ethanol plant, into a marine diesel fuel by fast pyrolysis followed with catalytic upgrading of the pyrolysis vapor. Lignin, a major component of lignocellulosic biomass, is underutilized in the 2nd...... generation bio-ethanol plants. Shipping industry on the other hand is looking for clean alternative fuels in order to meet stricter fuel quality and emission standards. To convert lignin into a renewable marine diesel fuel will both accelerate the development of modern bio-refinery and transfer the marine...

  17. Status and prospects of safety research of fuel cycle facilities in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchere, H.; Mercier, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    The following themes of research are discussed: prolonged loss of cooling in concentrated fission product solution storage tanks; dewatering of a spent fuel storage pond; explosion risks in nuclear fuel cycle laboratories and plants; dissemination of radioactive materials in case of fire in fuel manufacturing plants and in spent fuel analysis laboratories; contamination transfer; phenomenology of liquid uranium hexafluoride vaporization into the atmosphere; ways and means of intervention in the event of liquid ClF{sub 3} leakage; offsite explosion; seismic research. (K.A.).

  18. Status and prospects of safety research of fuel cycle facilities in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchere, H.; Mercier, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The following themes of research are discussed: prolonged loss of cooling in concentrated fission product solution storage tanks; dewatering of a spent fuel storage pond; explosion risks in nuclear fuel cycle laboratories and plants; dissemination of radioactive materials in case of fire in fuel manufacturing plants and in spent fuel analysis laboratories; contamination transfer; phenomenology of liquid uranium hexafluoride vaporization into the atmosphere; ways and means of intervention in the event of liquid ClF 3 leakage; offsite explosion; seismic research. (K.A.)

  19. Liquid--liquid contact in vapor explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, A.

    1978-08-01

    The contact of two liquid materials, one of which is at a temperature substantially above the boiling point of the other, can lead to fast energy conversion and a subsequent shock wave. This well-known phenomenon is called a ''vapor explosion.'' One method of producing intimate, liquid--liquid contact (which is known to be a necessary condition for vapor explosion) is a shock tube configuration. Such experiments in which water was impacted upon molten aluminum showed that very high pressures, even larger than the thermodynamic critical pressure, could occur. The mechanism by which such sharp pressure pulses are generated is not yet clear. In this experiment cold liquids (Freon-11, Freon-22, water, or butanol) were impacted upon various hot materials (mineral oil, silicone oil, water, mercury, molten Wood's metal or molten salt mixture). The main conclusion from the experimental study is that hydrodynamic effects may be very significant in any shock tube analyses, especially when multiple interactions are observed. A theoretical study was performed to check the possibility of vapor film squeezing (between a drop in film boiling and a surface) as a controlling mechanism for making liquid--liquid contact. Using experimental data, the film thickness was calculated and it was found to be too thick for any conceivable film rupture mechanism. It was suggested that the coalescence is a two-stage process, in which the controlling stage depends mainly on temperature and surface properties and can be described as the ability of cold liquid to spread on a hot surface

  20. Marketing practices of vapor store owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Marshall; Gowin, Mary; Wann, Taylor Franklin

    2015-06-01

    We examined the marketing strategies for local vapor stores in a large metropolitan area in Oklahoma. Vapor store owners or managers (n = 33) participated in individual interviews regarding marketing practices in 2014. We asked owners about their marketing strategies and the groups they targeted. We transcribed the interviews and analyzed them for themes. Store owners used a variety of marketing strategies to bring new customers to their stores and keep current customers coming back. These marketing strategies showed many parallels to tobacco industry strategies. Most owners engaged in some form of traditional marketing practices (e.g., print media), but only a few used radio or television advertising because of budget constraints. Owners used social media and other forms of electronic communication, pricing discounts and specials, and loyalty programs. Owners also had booths at local events, sponsored community events, and hosted them in their stores. Owners attempted to target different groups of users, such as college students and long-term smokers. Local vapor store marketing practices closely resemble current and former tobacco industry marketing strategies. Surveillance of marketing practices should include local and Web-based strategies.

  1. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-02-03

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  2. Marketing Practices of Vapor Store Owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowin, Mary; Wann, Taylor Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the marketing strategies for local vapor stores in a large metropolitan area in Oklahoma. Methods. Vapor store owners or managers (n = 33) participated in individual interviews regarding marketing practices in 2014. We asked owners about their marketing strategies and the groups they targeted. We transcribed the interviews and analyzed them for themes. Results. Store owners used a variety of marketing strategies to bring new customers to their stores and keep current customers coming back. These marketing strategies showed many parallels to tobacco industry strategies. Most owners engaged in some form of traditional marketing practices (e.g., print media), but only a few used radio or television advertising because of budget constraints. Owners used social media and other forms of electronic communication, pricing discounts and specials, and loyalty programs. Owners also had booths at local events, sponsored community events, and hosted them in their stores. Owners attempted to target different groups of users, such as college students and long-term smokers. Conclusions. Local vapor store marketing practices closely resemble current and former tobacco industry marketing strategies. Surveillance of marketing practices should include local and Web-based strategies. PMID:25880960

  3. Selective Metal-vapor Deposition on Organic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujioka, Tsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Selective metal-vapor deposition signifies that metal-vapor atoms are deposited on a hard organic surface, but not on a soft (low glass transition temperature, low Tg ) surface. In this paper, we introduce the origin, extension, and applications of selective metal-vapor deposition. An amorphous photochromic diarylethene film shows light-controlled selective metal-vapor deposition, which is caused by a large Tg change based on photoisomerization, but various organic surfaces, including organic crystal and polymers, can be utilized for achieving selective metal-vapor deposition. Various applications of selective metal-vapor deposition, including cathode patterning of organic light-emitting devices, micro-thin-film fuses, multifunctional diffraction gratings, in-plane electrical bistability for memory devices, and metal-vapor integration, have been demonstrated. © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Estimating evaporative vapor generation from automobiles based on parking activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinyi; Tschantz, Michael; Fu, Joshua S

    2015-07-01

    A new approach is proposed to quantify the evaporative vapor generation based on real parking activity data. As compared to the existing methods, two improvements are applied in this new approach to reduce the uncertainties: First, evaporative vapor generation from diurnal parking events is usually calculated based on estimated average parking duration for the whole fleet, while in this study, vapor generation rate is calculated based on parking activities distribution. Second, rather than using the daily temperature gradient, this study uses hourly temperature observations to derive the hourly incremental vapor generation rates. The parking distribution and hourly incremental vapor generation rates are then adopted with Wade-Reddy's equation to estimate the weighted average evaporative generation. We find that hourly incremental rates can better describe the temporal variations of vapor generation, and the weighted vapor generation rate is 5-8% less than calculation without considering parking activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, C.; Alvarez-Miranda, A.

    2009-01-01

    ENSA is a well known manufacturer of multi-system primary components for the nuclear industry and is totally prepared to satisfy future market requirements in this industry. At the same time that ENSA has been gaining a reputation world wider for the supply of primary components, has been strengthening its commitment and experience in supplying spent fuel components, either pool racks or storage and transportation casks, and offers not only fabrication but also design capabilities for its products. ENSA has supplied Spent Fuel Pool Racks, in spain, Finland, Taiwan, Korea, China, and currently it is in the process of licensing its own rack design in the United States of America for the ESBWR along with Ge-Hitachi. ENSA has supplied racks for 20 pools and 22 different reactors and it has also manufactured racks under all available technologies and developed a design known as Interlock Cell Matrix whose main features are outlined in this article. Another ENSA achievement in rack technology is the use of remote control for re-racking activities instead of using divers, which improves the ALARA requirements. Regarding casks for storage and transportation, ENSA also has al leading worldwide position, with exports prevailing over the Spanish market where ENSA has supplied 16 storage and transportation casks to the Spanish nuclear power Trillo. In some cases, ENSA acts as subcontractor for other clients. Foreign markets are still a major challenge for ENSA. ENSA-is well known for its manufacturing capabilities in the nuclear industry, but has been always involved in design activities through its engineering division, which carries out different tasks: components Design; Tooling Design; Engineering and Documentation; Project Engineering; Calculations, Design and Development Engineering. (Author)

  6. Nuclear fuel replacement device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, W.C.; Robey, R.M.; Wett, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    A fuel handling arrangement for a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a single rotating plug eccentric to the fuel core and a fuel handling machine radially movable along a slot in the plug with a transfer station disposed outside the fuel core but covered by the eccentric plug and within range of movement of said fuel handling machine to permit transfer of fuel assemblies between the core and the transfer station. (author)

  7. CANDU fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanoff, N.V.; Bazeley, E.G.; Hastings, I.J.

    1982-01-01

    CANDU fuel has operated successfully in Ontario Hydro's power reactors since 1962. In the 19 years of experience, about 99.9% of all fuel bundles have performed as designed. Most defects occurred before 1979 and subsequent changes in fuel design, fuel management, reactor control, and manufacturing quality control have reduced the current defect rate to near zero. Loss of power production due to defective fuel has been negligible. The outstanding performance continues while maintaining a low unit energy cost for fuel

  8. Summary report : universal fuel processor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coker, Eric Nicholas; Rice, Steven F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.; Miller, James Edward; Cornelius, Christopher James; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Pickett, Lyle M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2008-01-01

    The United States produces only about 1/3 of the more than 20 million barrels of petroleum that it consumes daily. Oil imports into the country are roughly equivalent to the amount consumed in the transportation sector. Hence the nation in general, and the transportation sector in particular, is vulnerable to supply disruptions and price shocks. The situation is anticipated to worsen as the competition for limited global supplies increases and oil-rich nations become increasingly willing to manipulate the markets for this resource as a means to achieve political ends. The goal of this project was the development and improvement of technologies and the knowledge base necessary to produce and qualify a universal fuel from diverse feedstocks readily available in North America and elsewhere (e.g. petroleum, natural gas, coal, biomass) as a prudent and positive step towards mitigating this vulnerability. Three major focus areas, feedstock transformation, fuel formulation, and fuel characterization, were identified and each was addressed. The specific activities summarized herein were identified in consultation with industry to set the stage for collaboration. Two activities were undertaken in the area of feedstock transformation. The first activity focused on understanding the chemistry and operation of autothermal reforming, with an emphasis on understanding, and therefore preventing, soot formation. The second activity was focused on improving the economics of oxygen production, particularly for smaller operations, by integrating membrane separations with pressure swing adsorption. In the fuel formulation area, the chemistry of converting small molecules readily produced from syngas directly to fuels was examined. Consistent with the advice from industry, this activity avoided working on improving known approaches, giving it an exploratory flavor. Finally, the fuel characterization task focused on providing a direct and quantifiable comparison of diesel fuel and JP-8.

  9. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2001-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  10. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2000-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  11. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results. [fuel development for high-speed civil transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  12. Thermal performance of a meso-scale liquid-fuel combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, V.; Gupta, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Demonstrated successful combustion of liquid fuel-air mixtures in a novel meso-scale combustor. → Flame quenching was eliminated using heat recirculation in a swiss roll type combustor that also extended the flammability limits. → Liquid fuel was rapidly vaporized with the use of hot narrow channel walls that eliminated the need of a fuel atomizer. → Maximum power density of the combustor was estimated to be about 8.5 GW/m3 and heat load in the range of 50-280W. → Overall efficiency of the combustor was estimated in the range of 12 to 20%. - Abstract: Combustion in small scale devices poses significant challenges due to the quenching of reactions from wall heat losses as well as the significantly reduced time available for mixing and combustion. In the case of liquid fuels there are additional challenges related to atomization, vaporization and mixing with the oxidant in the very short time-scale liquid-fuel combustor. The liquid fuel employed here is methanol with air as the oxidizer. The combustor was designed based on the heat recirculating concept wherein the incoming reactants are preheated by the combustion products through heat exchange occurring via combustor walls. The combustor was fabricated from Zirconium phosphate, a ceramic with very low thermal conductivity (0.8 W m -1 K -1 ). The combustor had rectangular shaped double spiral geometry with combustion chamber in the center of the spiral formed by inlet and exhaust channels. Methanol and air were introduced immediately upstream at inlet of the combustor. The preheated walls of the inlet channel also act as a pre-vaporizer for liquid fuel which vaporizes the liquid fuel and then mixes with air prior to the fuel-air mixture reaching the combustion chamber. Rapid pre-vaporization of the liquid fuel by the hot narrow channel walls eliminated the necessity for a fuel atomizer. Self-sustained combustion of methanol-air was achieved in a chamber volume as small as 32.6 mm 3

  13. GSPEL - Fuel Cell Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fuel Cell Lab (FCL)Established to investigate, integrate, testand verifyperformance and technology readiness offuel cell systems and fuel reformers for use with...

  14. Fuel performance experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofer, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The history of LWR fuel supply has been characterized by a wide range of design developments and fuel cycle cost improvements. Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. has pursued an aggressive fuel research and development program aimed at improved fuel performance. Exxon Nuclear has introduced many design innovations which have improved fuel cycle economics and operating flexibility while fuel failures remain at very low levels. The removable upper tie plate feature of Exxon Nuclear assemblies has helped accelerate this development, enabling repeated inspections during successive plant outages. Also, this design feature has made it possible to repair damaged fuel assemblies during refueling outages, thereby minimizing the economic impact of fuel failure from all causes

  15. Catalytic Fuel Conversion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility enables unique catalysis research related to power and energy applications using military jet fuels and alternative fuels. It is equipped with research...

  16. Three-Dimensional Measurements of Fuel Distribution in High-Pressure, High- Temperature, Next-Generation Aviation Gas Turbine Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; Locke, Randy J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Zaller, Michelle M.

    1998-01-01

    In our world-class, optically accessible combustion facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center, we have developed the unique capability of making three-dimensional fuel distribution measurements of aviation gas turbine fuel injectors at actual operating conditions. These measurements are made in situ at the actual operating temperatures and pressures using the JP-grade fuels of candidate next-generation advanced aircraft engines for the High Speed Research (HSR) and Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) programs. The inlet temperature and pressure ranges used thus far are 300 to 1100 F and 80 to 250 psia. With these data, we can obtain the injector spray angles, the fuel mass distributions of liquid and vapor, the degree of fuel vaporization, and the degree to which fuel has been consumed. The data have been used to diagnose the performance of injectors designed both in-house and by major U.S. engine manufacturers and to design new fuel injectors with overall engine performance goals of increased efficiency and reduced environmental impact. Mie scattering is used to visualize the liquid fuel, and laser-induced fluorescence is used to visualize both liquid and fuel vapor.

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTOR AND FUEL ELEMENT THEREFOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilard, L.; Young, G.J.

    1958-03-01

    This patent relates to a reactor design of the type which employs solid fuel elements disposed in channels within the moderator through which channels and around the fuel elements is conveyed a coolant fiuid. The coolant channels are comprised of aluminum tubes extending through a solid moderator such as graphite and the fuel elements are comprised of an elongated solid body of natural uranium jacketed in an aluminum jacket with the ends thereof closed by aluminum caps of substantially greater thickness than the jacket was and in good thermal contact with the fuel material to facilitate the conduction of heat from the central portion of said ends to the coolant surrounding the fuel element to prevent overheating of said central portion.

  18. Reducing deuterium-tritium ice roughness by electrical heating of the saturated vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mapoles, E.R.; Sater, J.D.; Monsler, E.; Pipes, J.

    1996-01-01

    High gain targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) contain a layer of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice which surrounds a volume of DT gas in thermal equilibrium with the solid. The roughness of the cryogenic fuel layer inside of ICF targets is one of the sources of imperfections which cause implosions to deviate from perfect one dimensional performance. Experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have shown that applying a heat flux across the inner surface of a hydrogen layer such as that inside an ICF target reduces the intrinsic roughness of the surface. We have developed a technique to generate this heat flux by applying and electric field to the DT vapor in the center of these shells. This vapor has a small but significant conductivity due to ionization caused by beta decay of tritium in the vapor and the solid. We describe here experiments using a 1.15 GHz cavity to apply an electric field to frozen DT inside of a sapphire test cell. The cell and cavity geometry allows visual observation of the frozen layers

  19. Internal reforming fuel cell assembly with simplified fuel feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, Mohammad; Novacco, Lawrence J.; Allen, Jeffrey P.

    2001-01-01

    A fuel cell assembly in which fuel cells adapted to internally reform fuel and fuel reformers for reforming fuel are arranged in a fuel cell stack. The fuel inlet ports of the fuel cells and the fuel inlet ports and reformed fuel outlet ports of the fuel reformers are arranged on one face of the fuel cell stack. A manifold sealing encloses this face of the stack and a reformer fuel delivery system is arranged entirely within the region between the manifold and the one face of the stack. The fuel reformer has a foil wrapping and a cover member forming with the foil wrapping an enclosed structure.

  20. Convection in tropical cyclones associated with vapor volume reduction - a new concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardhekar, D.

    2010-09-01

    low pressure zone due to the condensation is instantaneous. The moment the condensation takes place, the low pressure zone and the consequent pressure gradient force is formed at that instant, hence this phenomenon enhances the fuel input process. Thus, the combination of the convection and the low pressure zone formation due to condensation and vapor volume reduction plays a combined role in the dynamics of a tropical cyclone. In case of tornadoes in the tornado alley, tornadoes are formed where warm vapor-rich air from the Gulf of Mexico meets the cold dry air from Canada. Here the same phenomena of vapor volume reduction and consequent formation of the low pressure zone as explained above is dominantly contributing in initiating and maintaining the flow of air forming a tornado. Since this phenomenon is taking place on land and vapour supply is limited, the tornadoes have a short life span.