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Sample records for prevent cardiac arrest

  1. Prediction of cardiac arrest recurrence using ensemble classifiers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nachiket Tapas

    Abstract. Inability of a heart to contract effectually or its failure to contract prevents blood from circulating efficiently, causing circulatory arrest or cardiac arrest or cardiopulmonary arrest. The unexpected cardiac arrest is medically referred to as sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Poor survival rate of patients with SCA is one of the.

  2. Parental Knowledge of Cardiovascular Screening and Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Youth Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Madison A; Diamond, Alex B; Karpinos, Ashley Rowatt

    2017-08-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the leading cause of death in youth athletes. Survival from out- of-hospital SCA depends on prompt initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use of an automated external defibrillator (AED). This study evaluated parental knowledge, experience, and attitudes related to cardiovascular screening, SCA, and CPR/AED use in youth athletes and made comparisons between parents who are employed in healthcare and parents who are not employed in healthcare. We conducted a cross-sectional survey to evaluate knowledge, experiences, and attitudes of 91 parents of youth athletes who attended a community-based cardiovascular screening event. Although cardiovascular screening can reduce the risk of SCA, we found that 36% of parents incorrectly thought cardiovascular screening could prevent SCA and there was no difference in knowledge between the two groups of parents. This initial evaluation of parental knowledge of cardiovascular screening issues in youth athletes should guide educational efforts to prevent and respond to SCA in youth athletes.

  3. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  4. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  5. Possibly preventable cardiac arrest in a morbidly obese patient - a comment on the 2015 ERC guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Felix Patricius; Hoeren, Claudia Johanna Maria; Kellmeyer, Phillipp; Hohloch, Lisa; Busch, Hans-Jörg; Bayer, Jörg

    2016-10-04

    The incidence of overweight and obesity has been steadily on the rise and has reached epidemic proportions in various countries and this represents a well-known major health problem. Nevertheless, current guidelines for resuscitation do not include special sequences of action in this subset of patients. The aim of this letter is to bring this controversy into focus and to suggest alterations of the known standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the obese. An obese patient weighing 272 kg fell to the floor, afterwards being unable to get up again. Thus, emergency services were called for assistance. There were no signs or symptoms signifying that the person had been harmed in consequence of the fall. Only when brought into a supine position the patient suffered an immediate cardiac arrest. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed but there was no return of a stable spontaneous circulation until the patient was brought into a full lateral position. In spite of immediate emergency care the patient ultimately suffered a lethal hypoxic brain damage. A full lateral position should be considered in obese patients having a cardiac arrest as it might help to re-establish stable circulatory conditions.

  6. Prevention of deterioration of ventricular fibrillation by basic life support during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalewijn, Reinier A.; Nijpels, Marië A.; Tijssen, Jan G.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2002-01-01

    Survival of cardiac arrest is improved by basic life support (BLS). This study investigated the relationship between ventricular fibrillation (VF) characteristics and survival. In a 2-year prospective study out-of-hospital witnessed non-traumatic cardiac arrests were observed. The probabilities of

  7. An airline cardiac arrest program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, M F; Donaldson, E; Geddes, J S

    1997-11-04

    As many as 1000 lives are lost annually from cardiac arrest in commercial aircraft. Ventricular fibrillation (VF), the most common mechanism, can be treated effectively only with prompt defibrillation, whereas the current policy of most airlines is to continue cardiopulmonary resuscitation pending aircraft diversion. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of making semiautomatic external defibrillators (AEDs) available for use on airline passengers with cardiac arrest. AEDs were installed on international Qantas aircraft and at major terminals, selected crew were trained in their use, and all crew members were trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Supervision was provided by medical volunteers or (remotely) by airline physicians. During a 64-month period, AEDs were used on 109 occasions: 63 times for monitoring an acutely ill passenger and 46 times for cardiac arrest. Twenty-seven episodes of cardiac arrest occurred in aircraft, often (11 of 27 [41%]) unwitnessed, and they were usually (21 of 27 [78%]) associated with asystole or pulseless idioventricular rhythm. All 19 arrests in terminals were witnessed; VF was present in 17 (89%). Overall, defibrillation was initially successful in 21 of 23 cases (91%). Long-term survival from VF was achieved in 26% (2 of 6 in aircraft and 4 of 17 in terminals). The ability to monitor cardiac rhythm aided decisions on diversion, which was avoided in most passengers with asystole or idioventricular rhythm. AEDs in aircraft and terminals, with appropriate crew training, are helpful in the management of cardiac emergencies. Survival from VF is practicable and is comparable with the most effective prehospital ambulance emergency services. Costly aircraft diversions can be avoided in clearly futile situations, enhancing the cost-effectiveness of the program.

  8. Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-21

    Neurological Outcome; Cardiac Arrest; Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest; Brain Anoxia Ischemia; Hypoxia, Brain; Hypoxia-Ischemia, Brain; Cardiac Arrest With Successful Resuscitation; Cardiac Arrest, Out-Of-Hospital; Brain Injuries

  9. Wearable cardioverter defibrillators for the prevention of sudden cardiac arrest: a health technology assessment and patient focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettinger S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sabine Ettinger,1 Michal Stanak,1 Piotr Szymański,2 Claudia Wild,1 Romana Tandara Haček,3 Darija Erčević,3 Renata Grenković,3 Mirjana Huić3 1Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Health Technology Assessment, Vienna, Austria; 2Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw, Poland; 3Department for Development, Research and Health Technology Assessment, Agency for Quality and Accreditation in Health Care and Social Welfare, Zagreb, Croatia Aim: To summarize the evidence on clinical effectiveness and safety of wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD therapy for primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac arrest in patients at risk. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search in databases including MEDLINE via OVID, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and CRD (DARE, NHS-EED, HTA. The evidence obtained was summarized according to GRADE methodology. A health technology assessment (HTA was conducted using the HTA Core Model® for rapid relative effectiveness assessment. Primary outcomes for the clinical effectiveness domain were all-cause and disease-specific mortality. Outcomes for the safety domain were adverse events (AEs and serious adverse events (SAEs. A focus group with cardiac disease patients was conducted to evaluate ethical, organizational, patient, social, and legal aspects of the WCD use. Results: No randomized- or non-randomized controlled trials were identified. Non-comparative studies (n=5 reported AEs including skin rash/itching (6%, false alarms (14%, and palpitations/light-headedness/fainting (9% and discontinuation due to comfort/lifestyle issues (16–22%, and SAEs including inappropriate shocks (0–2%, unsuccessful shocks (0–0.7%, and death (0–0.3%. The focus group results reported that experiencing a sense of security is crucial to patients and that the WCD is not considered an option for weeks or even months due to expected restrictions in living a “normal” life. Conclusion: The WCD appears to be relatively safe for short

  10. Sudden Cardiac Arrest during Participation in Competitive Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Cameron H; Allan, Katherine S; Connelly, Kim A; Cunningham, Kris; Morrison, Laurie J; Dorian, Paul

    2017-11-16

    The incidence of sudden cardiac arrest during participation in sports activities remains unknown. Preparticipation screening programs aimed at preventing sudden cardiac arrest during sports activities are thought to be able to identify at-risk athletes; however, the efficacy of these programs remains controversial. We sought to identify all sudden cardiac arrests that occurred during participation in sports activities within a specific region of Canada and to determine their causes. In this retrospective study, we used the Rescu Epistry cardiac arrest database (which contains records of every cardiac arrest attended by paramedics in the network region) to identify all out-of-hospital cardiac arrests that occurred from 2009 through 2014 in persons 12 to 45 years of age during participation in a sport. Cases were adjudicated as sudden cardiac arrest (i.e., having a cardiac cause) or as an event resulting from a noncardiac cause, on the basis of records from multiple sources, including ambulance call reports, autopsy reports, in-hospital data, and records of direct interviews with patients or family members. Over the course of 18.5 million person-years of observation, 74 sudden cardiac arrests occurred during participation in a sport; of these, 16 occurred during competitive sports and 58 occurred during noncompetitive sports. The incidence of sudden cardiac arrest during competitive sports was 0.76 cases per 100,000 athlete-years, with 43.8% of the athletes surviving until they were discharged from the hospital. Among the competitive athletes, two deaths were attributed to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and none to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Three cases of sudden cardiac arrest that occurred during participation in competitive sports were determined to have been potentially identifiable if the athletes had undergone preparticipation screening. In our study involving persons who had out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, the incidence of sudden cardiac

  11. Epidemiology and management of cardiac arrest: what registries are revealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Bossaert, Leo

    2013-09-01

    Major European institutions report cardiovascular disease (CVD) as the first cause of death in adults, with cardiac arrest and sudden death due to coronary ischaemia as the primary single cause. Global incidence of CVD is decreasing in most European countries, due to prevention, lifestyle and treatment. Mortality of acute coronary events inside the hospital decreases more rapidly than outside the hospital. To improve the mortality of cardiac arrest outside the hospital, reliable epidemiological and process figures are essential: "we can only manage what we can measure". Europe is a patchwork of 47 countries (total population of 830 million), with a 10-fold difference in incidence of coronary heart disease between North and South, East and West, and a 5-fold difference in number of EMS-treated cardiac arrest (range 17-53/1000,000/year). Epidemiology of cardiac arrest should not be calculated as a European average, but it is appropriate to describe the incidence of cardiac arrest, the resuscitation process, and the outcome in each of the European regions, for benchmarking and quality management. Epidemiological reports of cardiac arrest should specify definitions, nominator (number of cases) and denominator (study population). Recently some regional registries in North America, Japan and Europe fulfilled these conditions. The European Registry of Cardiac Arrest (EuReCa) has the potential to achieve these objectives on a pan-European scale. For operational applications, the Utstein definition of "Cardiac arrest" is used which includes the potential of survival. For application in community health, the WHO definition of "sudden death" is frequently used, describing the mode of death. There is considerable overlap between both definitions. But this explains that no single method can provide all information. Integrating data from multiple sources (local, national, multinational registries and surveys, death certificates, post-mortem reports, community statistics, medical

  12. Post-resuscitation care for survivors of cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvarya Mangla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest can occur following a myriad of clinical conditions. With advancement of medical science and improvements in Emergency Medical Services systems, the rate of return of spontaneous circulation for patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA continues to increase. Managing these patients is challenging and requires a structured approach including stabilization of cardiopulmonary status, early consideration of neuroprotective strategies, identifying and managing the etiology of arrest and initiating treatment to prevent recurrence. This requires a closely coordinated multidisciplinary team effort. In this article, we will review the initial management of survivors of OHCA, highlighting advances and ongoing controversies.

  13. Spatiotemporal Stability of Public Cardiac Arrests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirtas, Derya; Brooks, Steven C.; Morrison, Laurie J.; Chan, Timothy C.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Public access automated external defibrillator (AED) deployment and community cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) programs should target geographical areas with high risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Although these long-term, location-based interventions implicitly assume

  14. The ethics of cardiac arrest research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B L

    1993-01-01

    In cardiac arrest research, prior informed consent is not available to resolve the conflict between the rights and well-being of subjects and the possible benefit to future patients. The right to autonomy is the fundamental right that is protected by the legal doctrine of informed consent. As a fundamental right, it cannot be balanced against other goods. Rather, it is a constraint, or trump, on the balancing of goods and can be overridden only for a narrow range of reasons: its recognition in a given case conflicts with another basic right, infringing the right will prevent great harm to others, and excluding a particular case from its scope will recognize and advance the right in the long run. Proxy consent, deferred consent, and presumed consent to cardiac arrest research are examined to determine if they qualify as justified infringements of the right to autonomy. The conclusion is that only presumed consent can be used, provided that the researcher can honestly say that outside of the randomized clinical trial of two or more treatments, a physician would have no basis for choosing one over the others.

  15. Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different? Updated:Mar 15,2018 People often use these ... The heart attack symptoms in women can be different than men. What is cardiac arrest? Sudden cardiac ...

  16. Cardiac arrest leadership: in need of resuscitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Philip S; Shall, Emma; Rakhit, Roby

    2016-12-01

    Leadership skills directly correlate with the quality of technical performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and clinical outcomes. Despite an improved focus on non-technical skills in CPR training, the leadership of cardiac arrests is often variable. To assess the perceptions of leadership and team working among members of a cardiac arrest team and to evaluate future training needs. Cross-sectional survey of 102 members of a cardiac arrest team at an Acute Hospital Trust in the UK with 892 inpatient beds. Responses sought from doctors, nurses and healthcare assistants to 12 rated statements and 4 dichotomous questions. Of 102 responses, 81 (79%) were from doctors and 21 (21%) from nurses. Among specialist registrars 90% agreed or strongly agreed that there was clear leadership at all arrests compared with between 28% and 49% of nurses and junior doctors respectively. Routine omission of key leadership tasks was reported by as many as 80% of junior doctors and 50% of nurses. Almost half of respondents reported non-adherence with Advanced Life Support (ALS) guidelines. Among junior members of the team, 36% felt confident to lead an arrest and 75% would welcome further dedicated cardiac arrest leadership training. Leadership training is integrated into the ALS (Resus Council, UK) qualification. However, this paper found that in spite of this training; standards of leadership are variable. The findings suggest a pressing need for further dedicated cardiac arrest leadership training with a focus on improving key leadership tasks such as role assignment, team briefing and debriefing. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. [Extracorporeal life support for treating cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehot, Jean-Jacques; Long-Him-Nam, Nelly; Bastien, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Percutaneous extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is now widespread for treating acute cardiac failure. ECLS has been used for treating in-hospital and out of hospital cardiac arrests. A systematic review of literature was performed in order to assess the results. Nine studies of in-hospital cardiac arrests were published between 2003 and January 31, 2011. They included 724 patients, 208 of which survived without significant neurological sequelae (28.7 %). In the other patients, the initial disease and the consequences of low flow brought multiorgan failure, or ECLS resulted in haemorrhage and ischaemia. Low flow lasted between 42 and 105 min (mean 54min). ECLS was used after out of hospital cardiac arrests in 3 studies published between 2008 and January 31, 2011. They included 110 patients of which only 6 survived (4.4 %) despite strict inclusion criteria. Low flow lasted between 60 and 120 min (mean 98 min.) According to these results the use of ECLS should be encouraged after in-hospital cardiac arrest and training in cardiorespiratory resuscitation should be improved in global population and health professionals.

  18. Sudden cardiac arrest in sports - need for uniform registration: A Position Paper from the Sport Cardiology Section of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solberg, E.E.; Borjesson, M.; Sharma, S.; Papadakis, M.; Wilhelm, M.; Drezner, J.A.; Harmon, K.G.; Alonso, J.M.; Heidbuchel, H.; Dugmore, D.; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, N.M.; Mellwig, K.P.; Carre, F.; Rasmusen, H.; Niebauer, J.; Behr, E.R.; Thiene, G.; Sheppard, M.N.; Basso, C.; Corrado, D.

    2016-01-01

    There are large variations in the incidence, registration methods and reported causes of sudden cardiac arrest/sudden cardiac death (SCA/SCD) in competitive and recreational athletes. A crucial question is to which degree these variations are genuine or partly due to methodological incongruities.

  19. Cardiac Arrest After Submucosal Infiltration With Lignocaine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marinda

    excitation like perioral twitching or tinnitus, seizures in our case. The occurrence of cardiac arrest was within a ten minute period after submucosal infiltration of 6 ml lignocaine 2% (120 mg) and. 1:200,000 epinephrine (30 μg). Further, the rapid onset and offset of symptoms would likely correlate with epinephrine and not ...

  20. An Audit Of Perioperative Cardiac Arrest At Lagos University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Intraoperative cardiac arrests are not uncommon and are related to both surgical and anaesthetic factors. This study aimed to examine the factors which predispose to a periopeartive cardiac arrest, to assess the appropriateness of therapy and the outcome. Materials and Methods: All perioperative cardiac arrests ...

  1. Variations in Cardiac Arrest Regionalization in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary P. Mercer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The development of cardiac arrest centers and regionalization of systems of care may improve survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. This survey of the local EMS agencies (LEMSA in California was intended to determine current practices regarding the treatment and routing of OHCA patients and the extent to which EMS systems have regionalized OHCA care across California. Methods: We surveyed all of the 33 LEMSA in California regarding the treatment and routing of OHCA patients according to the current recommendations for OHCA management. Results: Two counties, representing 29% of the California population, have formally regionalized cardiac arrest care. Twenty of the remaining LEMSA have specific regionalization protocols to direct all OHCA patients with return of spontaneous circulation to designated percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI-capable hospitals, representing another 36% of the population. There is large variation in LEMSA ability to influence inhospital care. Only 14 agencies (36%, representing 44% of the population, have access to hospital outcome data, including survival to hospital discharge and cerebral performance category scores. Conclusion: Regionalized care of OHCA is established in two of 33 California LEMSA, providing access to approximately one-third of California residents. Many other LEMSA direct OHCA patients to PCI-capable hospitals for primary PCI and targeted temperature management, but there is limited regional coordination and system quality improvement. Only one-third of LEMSA have access to hospital data for patient outcomes.

  2. Pattern of Perioperative Cardiac Arrests at University of Maiduguri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    only 4 out of the 14 cardiac arrests. Only 2(14%) out of 14 cardiac arrests recovered to home discharge, one of them with significant neurological deficit. Majority of arrests were due to hypoxia from airway problems that were not detected early. There is need to improve on patient monitoring, knowledge of CPR and intensive ...

  3. Sublingual Microcirculation is Impaired in Post-cardiac Arrest Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Omar, Yasser; Massey, Michael; Wiuff Andersen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    the microcirculation flow index (MFI) at 6 and 24h in the cardiac arrest patients, and within 6h of emergency department admission in the sepsis and control patients. RESULTS: We evaluated 30 post-cardiac arrest patients, 16 severe sepsis/septic shock patients, and 9 healthy control patients. Sublingual...... markers in the post-cardiac arrest state. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated the sublingual microcirculation in post-cardiac arrest patients, severe sepsis/septic shock patients, and healthy control patients using Sidestream Darkfield microscopy. Microcirculatory flow was assessed using...

  4. A case of thyroid storm with cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakashima Y

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Yutaka Nakashima,1 Tsuneaki Kenzaka,2 Masanobu Okayama,3 Eiji Kajii31Department for Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, 2Division of General Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, Japan; 3Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Shimotsuke, JapanAbstract: A 23-year-old man became unconscious while jogging. He immediately received basic life support from a bystander and was transported to our hospital. On arrival, his spontaneous circulation had returned from a state of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity. Following admission, hyperthyroidism led to a suspicion of thyroid storm, which was then diagnosed as a possible cause of the cardiac arrest. Although hyperthyroidism-induced cardiac arrest including ventricular fibrillation is rare, it should be considered when diagnosing the cause of treatable cardiac arrest.Keywords: hyperthyroidism, ventricular fibrillation, treatable cardiac arrest, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary arrest

  5. Cardiac arrest caused by nafamostat mesilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Shik Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old man was transferred from the Department of Vascular Surgery to Nephrology because of cardiac arrest during hemodialysis. He underwent incision and drainage for treatment of a buttock abscess. Nafamostat mesilate was used as an anticoagulant for hemodialysis to address bleeding from the incision and drainage site. Sudden cardiac arrest occurred after 15 minutes of dialysis. The patient was treated in the intensive care unit for 5 days. Continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration was started without any anticoagulant in the intensive care unit. Conventional hemodialysis was reinitiated, and nafamostat mesilate was used again because of a small amount of continued bleeding. Ten minutes after hemodialysis, the patient complained of anaphylactic signs and symptoms such as dyspnea, hypotension, and facial swelling. Epinephrine, dexamethasone, and pheniramin were injected under the suspicion of anaphylactic shock, and the patient recovered. Total immunoglobulin E titer was high, and skin prick test revealed weak positivity for nafamostat mesilate. We first report a case of anaphylactic shock caused by nafamostat mesilate in Korea.

  6. Adverse drug reactions in therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcher, Robert; Dzierba, Amy L; Kim, Catherine; Smithburger, Pamela L; Kane-Gill, Sandra L

    2017-03-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves survival and neurologic function in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Many medications used to support TH have altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics during this treatment. It is unknown if or at what frequency the medications used during TH cause adverse drug reactions (ADRs). A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) after cardiac arrest and treated with TH from January 2009 to June 2012 at two urban, university-affiliated, tertiary-care medical centres. Medications commonly used during TH were screened for association with significant ADRs (grade 3 or greater per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) using three published ADR detection instruments. A total of 229 patients were included, the majority being males with median age of 62 presenting with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pulseless electrical activity or asystole. The most common comorbidities were hypertension, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. There were 670 possible ADRs and 69 probable ADRs identified. Of the 670 possible ADRs, propofol, fentanyl, and acetaminophen were the most common drugs associated with ADRs. Whereas fentanyl, insulin, and propofol were the most common drugs associated with a probable ADR. Patients were managed with TH for a median of 22 hours, with 38% of patients surviving to hospital discharge. Patients undergoing TH after cardiac arrest frequently experience possible adverse reactions associated with medications and the corresponding laboratory abnormalities are significant. There is a need for judicious use and close monitoring of drugs in the setting of TH until recommendations for dose adjustments are available to help prevent ADRs.

  7. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg Jørgensen, Mads

    challenges, due to the victim’s physical location, which brings an inherent risk of delay (or altogether absence) of recognition and treatment of cardiac arrest. A low frequency of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and low 30-day survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were identified nearly ten...

  8. Cardiac arrest during anesthesia at a University Hospital in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-07

    Mar 7, 2013 ... Background: We assessed the incidence and outcomes of cardiac arrest during anesthesia in the operating room at our university hospital. A previous study on intraoperative cardiac arrests covered a period from 1994-1998 and since then; anesthetic personnel, equipment, and workload have increased ...

  9. Cardiac arrest during anesthesia at a University Hospital in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: We assessed the incidence and outcomes of cardiac arrest during anesthesia in the operating room at our university hospital. A previous study on intraoperative cardiac arrests covered a period from 1994-1998 and since then; anesthetic personnel, equipment, and workload have increased remarkably.

  10. Recent developments in the management of patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentzer, Jacob C; Clements, Casey M; Murphy, Joseph G; Scott Wright, R

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in Europe and the United States. Many patients who are initially resuscitated die in the hospital, and hospital survivors often have substantial neurologic dysfunction. Most cardiac arrests are caused by coronary artery disease; patients with coronary artery disease likely benefit from early coronary angiography and intervention. After resuscitation, cardiac arrest patients remain critically ill and frequently suffer cardiogenic shock and multiorgan failure. Early cardiopulmonary stabilization is important to prevent worsening organ injury. To achieve best patient outcomes, comprehensive critical care management is needed, with primary goals of stabilizing hemodynamics and preventing progressive brain injury. Targeted temperature management is frequently recommended for comatose survivors of cardiac arrest to mitigate the neurologic injury that drives outcomes. Accurate neurologic assessment is central to managing care of cardiac arrest survivors and should combine physical examination with objective neurologic testing, with the caveat that delaying neurologic prognosis is essential to avoid premature withdrawal of supportive care. A combination of clinical findings and diagnostic results should be used to estimate the likelihood of functional recovery. This review focuses on recent advances in care and specific cardiac intensive care strategies that may improve morbidity and mortality for patients after cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ERC initiatives to reduce the burden of cardiac arrest: the European Cardiac Arrest Awareness Day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Marios; Lockey, Andrew S

    2013-09-01

    The rate of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Europe remains unacceptably low and could be increased by better bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rates. The European Resuscitation Council has announced that there will be a European Cardiac Arrest Awareness Day every year on the 16th of October. This is to coincide with the goals of the Written Declaration passed by the European Parliament in June 2012 that emphasised the importance of equal access to CPR and automated external defibrillator (AED) training. The topic of this year's Awareness Day is 'Children Saving Lives' and it is hoped that all national resuscitation councils will promote awareness of the benefits of training all children in CPR and AED use and lobby for legislative change to ensure that all children receive this training. Children are not just the adults of tomorrow - they are the lifesavers of today and tomorrow. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiac Arrest in Pediatric Patients Receiving Azithromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Santiago O; Kim, Jeffrey J; Niu, Mary C; de la Uz, Caridad M; Miyake, Christina Y; Moffett, Brady S

    2017-03-01

    To compare outcomes of pediatric patients treated with azithromycin compared with penicillin or cephalosporin. We hypothesized that azithromycin use would not be associated with increased cardiac mortality in the pediatric population. Retrospective cohort study from the Pediatric Health Information System database between 2008 and 2012. Patients Azithromycin was used in 5039 (6.1%); penicillin or cephalosporin was used in 77 943 (93.9%). Overall prevalence of antibiotic-associated CPR was 0.14%. Patients receiving a macrolide antibiotic had a lower prevalence of CPR compared with patients receiving a penicillin or cephalosporin (0.04% vs 0.14%, P = .04), and there was no difference in mortality. Multivariable analysis did not find an association between macrolide use and CPR. In contrast to recent adult studies, among children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia, azithromycin use was not associated with a greater prevalence of cardiac arrest compared with penicillin or cephalosporin use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Transfusion Associated Hyperkalemia and Cardiac Arrest in an Infant after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do Wan Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest associated with hyperkalemia during red blood cell transfusion is a rare but fatal complication. Herein, we report a case of transfusion-associated cardiac arrest following the initiation of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in a 9-month old infant. Her serum potassium level was increased to 9.0 mEq/L, soon after the newly primed circuit with pre-stored red blood cell (RBC was started and followed by sudden cardiac arrest. Eventually, circulation was restored and the potassium level decreased to 5.1 mEq/L after 5 min. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO priming is a relatively massive transfusion into a pediatric patient. Thus, to prevent cardiac arrest during blood-primed ECMO in neonates and infants, freshly irradiated and washed RBCs should be used when priming the ECMO circuit, to minimize the potassium concentration. Also, physicians should be aware of all possible complications associated with transfusions during ECMO.

  14. Sudden cardiac arrest in sports - need for uniform registration: A Position Paper from the Sport Cardiology Section of the European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, E E; Borjesson, M; Sharma, S; Papadakis, M; Wilhelm, M; Drezner, J A; Harmon, K G; Alonso, J M; Heidbuchel, H; Dugmore, D; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, N M; Mellwig, K-P; Carre, F; Rasmusen, H; Niebauer, J; Behr, E R; Thiene, G; Sheppard, M N; Basso, C; Corrado, D

    2016-04-01

    There are large variations in the incidence, registration methods and reported causes of sudden cardiac arrest/sudden cardiac death (SCA/SCD) in competitive and recreational athletes. A crucial question is to which degree these variations are genuine or partly due to methodological incongruities. This paper discusses the uncertainties about available data and provides comprehensive suggestions for standard definitions and a guide for uniform registration parameters of SCA/SCD. The parameters include a definition of what constitutes an 'athlete', incidence calculations, enrolment of cases, the importance of gender, ethnicity and age of the athlete, as well as the type and level of sporting activity. A precise instruction for autopsy practice in the case of a SCD of athletes is given, including the role of molecular samples and evaluation of possible doping. Rational decisions about cardiac preparticipation screening and cardiac safety at sport facilities requires increased data quality concerning incidence, aetiology and management of SCA/SCD in sports. Uniform standard registration of SCA/SCD in athletes and leisure sportsmen would be a first step towards this goal. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  15. Sudden cardiac arrest risk in young athletes | Gradidge | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Underlying cardiac abnormalities are the main cause of unexpected death in athletes on field. These abnormalities have been associated with a previous history of syncope, a family history of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), cardiac murmur, a history of over-exhaustion post exercise and ventricular tachyarrhythmia during ...

  16. Effects of viscosity on cerebral blood flow after cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschops, L.L.A.; Pop, G.A.M.; Teerenstra, S.; Struijk, P.C.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine blood viscosity in adult comatose patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and to assess the relation between blood viscosity, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral oxygen extraction. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Tertiary care university

  17. Endothelial Dysfunction in Resuscitated Cardiac Arrest (ENDO-RCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anna Sina P; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Kjærgaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Morbidity and mortality following initial survival of cardiac arrest remain high despite great efforts to improve resuscitation techniques and post-resuscitation care, in part due to the ischemia-reperfusion injury secondary to the restoration of the blood circulation. Patients...... resuscitated from cardiac arrest display evidence of endothelial injury and coagulopathy (hypocoagulability, hyperfibrinolysis), which in associated with poor outcome. Recent randomized controlled trials have revealed that treatment with infusion of prostacyclin reduces endothelial damage after major surgery...... and AMI. Thus, a study is pertinent to investigate if prostacyclin infusion as a therapeutic intervention reduces endothelial damage without compromising, or even improving, the hemostatic competence in resuscitated cardiac arrest patients. Post-cardiac arrest patients frequently have a need...

  18. Cardiac arrest due to lymphocytic colitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groth Kristian A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of cardiac arrest due to hypokalemia caused by lymphocytic colitis. Case presentation A 69-year-old Caucasian man presented four months prior to a cardiac arrest with watery diarrhea and was diagnosed with lymphocytic colitis. Our patient experienced a witnessed cardiac arrest at his general practitioner's surgery. Two physicians and the emergency medical services resuscitated our patient for one hour and four minutes before arriving at our university hospital. Our patient was defibrillated 16 times due to the recurrence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. An arterial blood sample revealed a potassium level of 2.0 mmol/L (reference range: 3.5 to 4.6 mmol/L and pH 6.86 (reference range: pH 7.37 to 7.45. As the potassium level was corrected, the propensity for ventricular tachyarrhythmias ceased. Our patient recovered from his cardiac arrest without any neurological deficit. Further tests and examinations revealed no other reason for the cardiac arrest. Conclusion Diarrhea can cause life-threatening situations due to the excretion of potassium, ultimately causing cardiac arrest due to hypokalemia. Physicians treating patients with severe diarrhea should consider monitoring their electrolyte levels.

  19. Multicenter Cohort Study of In-Hospital Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, Kathleen L.; Donaldson, Amy; Nadkarni, Vinay; Tieves, Kelly S.; Schleien, Charles L.; Brilli, Richard J.; Clark, Robert S. B.; Shaffner, D. H.; Levy, Fiona; Statler, Kimberly; Dalton, H.J.; van der Jagt, Elise W.; Hackbarth, Richard; Pretzlaff, Robert; Hernan, Lynn; Dean, J. Michael; Moler, Frank W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives (1) Describe the clinical characteristics, hospital courses and outcomes of a cohort of children cared for within the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) who experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest with sustained return of circulation between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2004, and (2) identify factors associated with hospital mortality in this population. These data are required to prepare a randomized trial of therapeutic hypothermia on neurobehavioral outcomes in children after in-hospital cardiac arrest. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Fifteen children’s hospitals associated with PECARN. Patients Patients between one day and 18 years of age who had cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and received chest compressions for >1 minute, and had a return of circulation for >20 minutes. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results A total of 353 patients met entry criteria; 172 (48.7%) survived to hospital discharge. Among survivors, 132 (76.7%) had good neurological outcome documented by Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category scores. After adjustment for age, gender and first documented cardiac arrest rhythm, variables available prior to and during the arrest that were independently associated with increased mortality included pre-existing hematologic, oncologic, or immunologic disorders, genetic or metabolic disorders, presence of an endotracheal tube prior to the arrest, and the use of sodium bicarbonate during the arrest. Variables associated with decreased mortality included post-operative CPR. Extending the time frame to include variables available prior to, during, and within 12 hours following arrest, variables independently associated with increased mortality included the use of calcium during the arrest. Variables associated with decreased mortality included higher minimum blood pH and pupillary responsiveness. Conclusions Many factors are associated with hospital mortality among children after in

  20. The optimal hemodynamics management of post-cardiac arrest shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Tommaso; Sanfilippo, Filippo; Ristagno, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest develop a pathophysiological state named "post-cardiac arrest syndrome." Post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction is a common feature of this syndrome, and many patients eventually die from cardiovascular failure. Cardiogenic shock accounts for most deaths in the first 3 days, when post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction peaks. Thus, identification and treatment of cardiovascular failure is one of the key therapeutic goals during hospitalization of post-cardiac arrest patients. Patients with hemodynamic instability may require advanced cardiac output monitoring. Inotropes and vasopressors should be considered if hemodynamic goals are not achieved despite optimized preload. If these measures fail to restore adequate organ perfusion, a mechanical circulatory assistance device may be considered. Adequate organ perfusion should be ensured in the absence of definitive data on the optimal target pressure goals. Hemodynamic goals should also take into account targeted temperature management and its effect on the cardiovascular function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Assessment of professional practices in treating cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazon, Clara; Kerrou, Yamina

    2017-12-01

    An assessment of professional practices was carried out in 2013-2014 with the aim of improving the treatment of cardiac arrest in hospitals. Two methods were used: an assessment by questionnaire to evaluate theoretical knowledge and a practical assessment of external cardiac massage. The results highlight the need for greater knowledge. The use of cardiac massage must be included in continuing professional development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Opiate Withdrawal Complicated by Tetany and Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfanali R. Kugasia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with symptoms of opiate withdrawal, after the administration of opiate antagonist by paramedics, are a common presentation in the emergency department of hospitals. Though most of opiate withdrawal symptoms are benign, rarely they can become life threatening. This case highlights how a benign opiate withdrawal symptom of hyperventilation led to severe respiratory alkalosis that degenerated into tetany and cardiac arrest. Though this patient was successfully resuscitated, it is imperative that severe withdrawal symptoms are timely identified and immediate steps are taken to prevent catastrophes. An easier way to reverse the severe opiate withdrawal symptom would be with either low dose methadone or partial opiate agonists like buprenorphine. However, if severe acid-base disorder is identified, it would be safer to electively intubate these patients for better control of their respiratory and acid-base status.

  3. Strategies for the prevention of sudden cardiac death during sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Domenico; Drezner, Jonathan; Basso, Cristina; Pelliccia, Antonio; Thiene, Gaetano

    2011-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death of a young athlete is the most tragic event in sports and devastates the family, the sports medicine team, and the local community. Such a fatality represents the first manifestation of cardiac disease in up to 80% of young athletes who remain asymptomatic before sudden cardiac arrest occurs; this explains the limited power of screening modalities based solely on history and physical examination. The long-running Italian experience showed that electrocardiogram (ECG) screening definitively improves the sensitivity of pre-participation evaluation for heart diseases and substantially reduces the risk of death in the athletic field (primary prevention). However, some cardiac conditions, such as coronary artery diseases, present no abnormalities on 12-lead ECG. Moreover, cardiac arrest due to non-penetrating chest injury (commotio cordis) cannot be prevented by screening. This justifies the efforts for implementing programmes of early external defibrillation of unpredictable arrhythmic cardiac arrest. This article reviews the epidemiology of sudden cardiac arrest in the athlete in terms of incidence, sport-related risk, underlying causes, and the currently available prevention programmes such as pre-participation screening and early external defibrillation by using automated external defibrillators. The best strategy is to combine synergistically primary prevention of sudden cardiac death by pre-participation identification of athletes affected by at-risk cardiomyopathies and secondary prevention with back-up defibrillation of unpredictable sudden cardiac arrest on the athletic field.

  4. Serum tau and neurological outcome in cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Nielsen, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test serum tau as a predictor of neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. METHODS: We measured the neuronal protein tau in serum at 24, 48, and 72 hours after cardiac arrest in 689 patients in the prospective international Target Temperature Management trial. The main outcome...... was poor neurological outcome, defined as Cerebral Performance Categories 3-5 at 6 months. RESULTS: Increased tau was associated with poor outcome at 6 months after cardiac arrest (median = 38.5, interquartile range [IQR] = 5.7-245ng/l in poor vs median = 1.5, IQR = 0.7-2.4ng/l in good outcome, for tau....... The accuracy in predicting outcome by serum tau was equally high for patients randomized to 33 °C and 36 °C targeted temperature after cardiac arrest. INTERPRETATION: Serum tau is a promising novel biomarker for prediction of neurological outcome in patients with cardiac arrest. It may be significantly better...

  5. Swedish ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Ricard; Engström, Åsa

    2013-04-01

    Effective pre-hospital treatment of a person suffering cardiac arrest is a challenging task for the ambulance nurses. The aim of this study was to describe ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest. Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2011 in Sweden with seven ambulance nurses with experience of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrests. The interview texts were analyzed using qualitative thematic content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme with six categories. Mutual preparation, regular training and education were important factors in the nursing of patients suffering cardiac arrest. Ambulance nurses are placed in ethically demanding situations regarding if and for how long they should continue cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to accord with pre-hospital cardiac guidelines and patients' wishes. When a cardiac arrest patient is nursed their relatives also need the attention of ambulance nurses. Reflection is one way for ambulance nurses to learn from, and talk about, their experiences. This study provides knowledge of ambulance nurses' experiences in the care of people with cardiac arrest. Better feedback about the care given by the ambulance nurses, and about the diagnosis and nursing care the patients received after they were admitted to the hospital are suggested as improvements that would allow ambulance nurses to learn more from their experience. Further development and research concerning the technical equipment might improve the situation for both the ambulance nurses and the patients. Ambulance nurses need regularly training and education to be prepared for saving people's lives and also to be able to make the right decisions. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Cardiac arrest following ventilator fire: A rare cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Nazeer Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Operating room fires are rare events, but when occur they result in serious and sometimes fatal consequences. Anaesthesia ventilator fire leading to cardiac arrest is a rare incident and has not been reported. We report a near catastrophic ventilator fire leading to cardiac arrest in a patient undergoing subtotal thyroidectomy. In the present case sparks due to friction or electrical short circuit within the ventilator might have acted as source of ignition leading to fire and explosion in the oxygen rich environment. The patient was successfully resuscitated and revived with uneventful recovery and no adverse sequelae. The cardiac arrest was possibly due to severe hypoxia resulting from inhalation of smoke containing high concentrations of carbon monoxide and other noxious gases.

  7. The Evolving Paradigm of Individualized Postresuscitation Care After Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seder, David B; Lord, Christine; Gagnon, David J

    2016-11-01

    The postresuscitation period after a cardiac arrest is characterized by a wide range of physiological derangements. Variations between patients include preexisting medical problems, the underlying cause of the cardiac arrest, presence or absence of hemodynamic and circulatory instability, severity of the ischemia-reperfusion injury, and resuscitation-related injuries such as pulmonary aspiration and rib or sternal fractures. Although protocols can be applied to many elements of postresuscitation care, the widely disparate clinical condition of cardiac arrest survivors requires an individualized approach that stratifies patients according to their clinical profile and targets specific treatments to patients most likely to benefit. This article describes such an individualized approach, provides a practical framework for evaluation and triage at the bedside, and reviews concerns specific to all members of the interprofessional postresuscitation care team. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. Complete maternal and fetal recovery after prolonged cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, B S; Burke, T J

    1988-04-01

    A case of complete maternal and fetal recovery after prolonged cardiac arrest from massive lidocaine overdose is presented. A 27-year-old woman at 15 weeks gestation had a complete neurologic recovery after 22 minutes of CPR, including 19 minutes of electromechanical dissociation and asystole, with normal fetal heart function and fetal motion confirmed by ultrasound immediately after resuscitation. The patient delivered a healthy and neurologically normal infant at 40 weeks gestation. This is the longest cardiac arrest in early pregnancy reported in the medical literature with normal maternal and fetal outcome.

  9. Interrater variability of EEG interpretation in comatose cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westhall, Erik; Rosén, Ingmar; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: EEG is widely used to predict outcome in comatose cardiac arrest patients, but its value has been limited by lack of a uniform classification. We used the EEG terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society (ACNS) to assess interrater variability in a cohort.......42) for malignant patterns. Substantial agreement was found for malignant periodic or rhythmic patterns (κ 0.72) while agreement for identifying an unreactive EEG was fair (κ 0.26). CONCLUSIONS: The ACNS EEG terminology can be used to identify highly malignant EEG-patterns in post cardiac arrest patients...

  10. Factors predicting quality of life and societal participation after survival of a cardiac arrest: A prognostic longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberne, Daan; Moulaert, Véronique; Verbunt, Jeanine; van Heugten, Caroline

    2018-02-01

    For those patients who suffer unfavourable outcome after survival of cardiac arrest, it is important to know whether this can be predicted at an early stage. Support can subsequently be provided. This study aimed to identify early prognostic factors of quality of life (QOL) and societal participation at one year post-cardiac arrest. The design was a prospective longitudinal cohort study following cardiac arrest survivors up to one year. Prognostic personal, injury-related, function-related and subjective outcome factors were selected and entered into a hierarchical regression model to assess whether they were predictive of QOL and societal participation at one year post-cardiac arrest. Hundred and ten cardiac arrest survivors were included. Not having a partner, more functional limitations (at two weeks) and cognitive complaints were significantly predictive of lower physical QOL, while higher levels of anxiety and depression symptoms (at three months) were significant predictors of mental QOL. A neurological history and higher levels of anxiety and depression symptoms were significantly predictive of lower brain injury-specific QOL. Societal participation was only predicted by premorbid functioning. This study identified prognostic factors of QOL and societal participation one year after survival of cardiac arrest. Screening of these factors in early stages can identify those survivors with possibly unfavourable QOL at one year post cardiac arrest. For those survivors, preventive and targeted interventions may be offered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Definitions and prevention of cardiorespiratory arrest in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo Alvarez, A; López-Herce Cid, J

    2006-08-01

    In cardiopulmonary resuscitation ages are divided in neonates (in the inmediate period after the birth), infant (from birth to 12 months) and child (from 12 months to puberty). Respiratory arrest is defined by the absence of spontaneous respiration (apnea) or a severe respiratory insufficiency (agonal gasping) that require respiratory assistance. Cardiac arrest is defined as the absence of central arterial pulse or signs of circulation (movement, cough or normal breathing) or the presence of a central pulse less than 60 lpm in a child who does not respond, not breath and with poor perfusion. After resuscitation the return of spontaneous circulation is defined as the recuperation of central arterial pulse or signs of circulation in a child with previous cardiorespiratory arrest. It is maintained when the duration is longer than 20 minutes. Injuries, sudden infant death syndrome, and respiratory diseases are the most frequent etiologies of cardiorrespiratory arrest in children. The prevention and the formation of citizens in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation are the most effective measures to reduce the mortality of cardiorespiratory arrest in children.

  12. Cardiac Arrest after Local Anaesthetic Toxicity in a Paediatric Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Maria Torres de Araújo Azi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a paediatric patient undergoing urological procedure in which a possible inadvertent intravascular or intraosseous injection of bupivacaine with adrenaline in usual doses caused subsequent cardiac arrest, completely reversed after administration of 20% intravenous lipid emulsion. Early diagnosis of local anaesthetics toxicity and adequate cardiovascular resuscitation manoeuvres contribute to the favourable outcome.

  13. Prediction of cardiac arrest recurrence using ensemble classifiers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana; Volume 42; Issue 7. Prediction of cardiac arrest recurrence using ensemble classifiers. NACHIKET TAPAS ... Poor survival rate of patients with SCA is one of themost ubiquitous health care problems today. Recent studies show that heart-rate-derived features can act as early predictors of SCA.

  14. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald

    2013-01-01

    intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations. He was discharged in good health after 14 days. This case report emphasises both the importance...

  15. [Refractory cardiac arrest patients in prehospital care, potential organ donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Jan, Arnaud; Dupin, Aurélie; Garrigue, Bruno; Sapir, David

    2016-09-01

    Under the authority of the French Biomedicine Agency, a new care pathway integrates refractory cardiac arrest patients into a process of organ donation. It is a medical, logistical and ethical challenge for the staff of the mobile emergency services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. CSI cardiac prevent 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ramakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The CSI Cardiac Prevent 2015 was held at Hotel Taj Palace, New Delhi, on September 25-27, 2015. The major challenge was to create interest among cardiologists and physicians on preventive cardiology, a neglected area. The theme of the conference was "Innovations in Heart Disease Prevention.′′ This conference included "CSI at WHF Roadmap Workshop, Inauguration Ceremony, scientific program, plenary sessions, Nursing/Dietician track, Industry Exhibition, Social Events," Great India blood pressure Survey, and CSI Smart Heart App. A total of 848 delegates/faculties attended this conference against a total of 1140 people registered for the meeting.

  17. Cardiac arrest related to anaesthesia in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena Delgado, J; Sanabria Carretero, P; Durán la Fuente, P; Gónzalez Rocafort, A; Castro Parga, L; Reinoso Barbero, F

    2017-12-12

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is the clinical manifestation of a congenital genetic disorder in the elastin gene, among others. There is a history of cardiac arrest refractory to resuscitation manoeuvres in anaesthesia. The incidence of myocardial ischaemia is high during anaesthetic induction, but there are patients who do not have this condition yet also have had very serious cardiac events, and issues that are still to be resolved. Case descriptions will enable the common pathophysiological factors to be defined, and decrease morbidity and mortality. We report the case of a 3-year-old boy with cardiac arrest at induction, rescued with circulatory assistance with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hypothermia induced for cerebral protection. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Poisson cluster analysis of cardiac arrest incidence in Columbus, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Craig; Cudnik, Michael T; Sasson, Comilla; Schwartz, Greg; Semple, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Scarce resources in disease prevention and emergency medical services (EMS) need to be focused on high-risk areas of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Cluster analysis using geographic information systems (GISs) was used to find these high-risk areas and test potential predictive variables. This was a retrospective cohort analysis of EMS-treated adults with OHCAs occurring in Columbus, Ohio, from April 1, 2004, through March 31, 2009. The OHCAs were aggregated to census tracts and incidence rates were calculated based on their adult populations. Poisson cluster analysis determined significant clusters of high-risk census tracts. Both census tract-level and case-level characteristics were tested for association with high-risk areas by multivariate logistic regression. A total of 2,037 eligible OHCAs occurred within the city limits during the study period. The mean incidence rate was 0.85 OHCAs/1,000 population/year. There were five significant geographic clusters with 76 high-risk census tracts out of the total of 245 census tracts. In the case-level analysis, being in a high-risk cluster was associated with a slightly younger age (-3 years, adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.99-1.00), not being white, non-Hispanic (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.45-0.64), cardiac arrest occurring at home (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.23-1.71), and not receiving bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.62-0.96), but with higher survival to hospital discharge (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.30-2.46). In the census tract-level analysis, high-risk census tracts were also associated with a slightly lower average age (-0.1 years, OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.06-1.22) and a lower proportion of white, non-Hispanic patients (-0.298, OR 0.04, 95% CI 0.01-0.19), but also a lower proportion of high-school graduates (-0.184, OR 0.00, 95% CI 0.00-0.00). This analysis identified high-risk census tracts and associated census tract-level and case-level characteristics that can be used to

  19. Cranial computed tomography in the resuscitated patient with cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naples, Robin; Ellison, Elizabeth; Brady, William J

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiorespiratory arrest from all causes in the United States occurs not infrequently. Postresuscitation care should include the identification of the inciting arrest event as well as therapy tailored to support the patient and treat the primary cause of the decompensation. The application of one particular testing modality, cranial computed tomography (CT) of the head, has not yet been determined. We undertook an evaluation of the use of head CT in patients who were resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Prehospital (emergency medical services), ED, and hospital records were reviewed for patients of all ages with cardiorespiratory arrest over a 4-year period (July 1996-June 2000). Information regarding diagnosis, management, and outcome was recorded. The results of cranial CT, if performed, and any apparent resulting therapeutic changes were recorded. Patients with a known traumatic mechanism for the cardiorespiratory arrest were excluded. A total of 454 patients (mean age 58.3 years with 60% male) with cardiorespiratory arrest were entered in the study with 98 (22%) individuals (mean age 58.5 years with 53% male) undergoing cranial CT. Arrest location was as follows: emergency medical services, 41 (42%); ED, 11 (11%); and hospital, 46 (47%). Seventy-eight (79%) patients demonstrated 111 CT abnormalities: edema, 35 (32%); atrophy, 24 (22%); extra-axial hemorrhage, 14 (13%); old infarct, 12 (11%); new infarct, 11 (10%); intraparenchymal hemorrhage, 6 (5%); skull fracture, 5 (4%); mass, 3 (2%); and foreign body, 1 (1%). Therapeutic and diagnostic alterations in care were made in 38 (39%) patients-35 abnormal and 3 normal CTs. The following alterations occurred: medication administration, 26; withdrawal of life support, 7; additional diagnostic study, 6; neurologic consultation, 6; and intracranial pressure monitoring. 4. No patient survived to discharge. In this subset of resuscitated patients with cardiac arrest

  20. Exercise-related cardiac arrest in cardiac rehabilitation - The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescribed physical activity plays a major role in the rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease, and as with any other form of treatment its benefits must be weighed against its possible risks. This study attempted to establish the safety of cardiac rehabilitation as a medical intervention at the Johannesburg Cardiac ...

  1. Location of cardiac arrest and impact of pre-arrest chronic disease and medication use on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granfeldt, Asger; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Steen Møller; Lippert, Freddy K; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo

    2017-05-01

    Cardiac arrest in a private location is associated with a higher mortality when compared to public location. Past studies have not accounted for pre-arrest factors such as chronic disease and medication. To investigate whether the association between cardiac arrest in a private location and a higher mortality can be explained by differences in chronic diseases and medication. We identified 27,771 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients ≥18 years old from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry (2001-2012). Using National Registries, we identified pre-arrest chronic disease and medication. To investigate the importance of cardiac arrest related factors and chronic disease and medication use we performed adjusted Cox regression analyses during day 0-7 and day 8-365 following cardiac arrest to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for death. Day 0-7: Un-adjusted HR for death day 0-7 was 1.21 (95%CI:1.18-1.25) in private compared to public location. When including cardiac arrest related factors HR for death was 1.09 (95%CI:1.06-1.12). Adding chronic disease and medication to the analysis changed HR for death to 1.08 (95%CI:1.05-1.12). 8-365 day: The un-adjusted HR for death day 8-365 was 1.70 (95% CI: 1.43-2.02) in private compared to public location. When including cardiac arrest related factors the HR decreased to 1.39 (95% CI: 1.14-1.68). Adding chronic disease and medication to the analysis changed HR for death to 1.27 (95% CI:1.04-1.54). The higher mortality following cardiac arrest in a private location is partly explained by a higher prevalence of chronic disease and medication use in patients surviving until day 8. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Unique Case of Cardiac Arrest following K2 Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD accounts for up to 450,000 deaths every year in the United States (Zipes et al. (2006. Most cases of sudden cardiac death occur in subjects with no prior history of heart disease (Myerburg et al. (1998. The incidence of sudden death in a general population has been shown to increase contemporaneously with substance abuse (Phillips et al. (1999. The causative association of sudden death with cocaine, methadone, and volatile agents is well established (Adgey et al. (1995 and Isner et al. (1986. We describe a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest temporally related to abuse of the synthetic cannabinoid street drug known as K2. To our knowledge, there are no previously documented cases of sudden cardiac death associated with synthetic cannabinoids although they have been linked to myocardial infarction in teenagers despite normal coronary angiography (Mir et al. (2011.

  3. Relationship between chest compression rates and outcomes from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Ahamed H; Guffey, Danielle; Aufderheide, Tom P; Brown, Siobhan; Morrison, Laurie J; Nichols, Patrick; Powell, Judy; Daya, Mohamud; Bigham, Blair L; Atkins, Dianne L; Berg, Robert; Davis, Dan; Stiell, Ian; Sopko, George; Nichol, Graham

    2012-06-19

    Guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend a chest compression rate of at least 100 compressions per minute. Animal and human studies have reported that blood flow is greatest with chest compression rates near 120/min, but few have reported rates used during out-of-hospital (OOH) cardiopulmonary resuscitation or the relationship between rate and outcome. The purpose of this study was to describe chest compression rates used by emergency medical services providers to resuscitate patients with OOH cardiac arrest and to determine the relationship between chest compression rate and outcome. Included were patients aged ≥ 20 years with OOH cardiac arrest treated by emergency medical services providers participating in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium. Data were abstracted from monitor-defibrillator recordings during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Multiple logistic regression analysis assessed the association between chest compression rate and outcome. From December 2005 to May 2007, 3098 patients with OOH cardiac arrest were included in this study. Mean age was 67 ± 16 years, and 8.6% survived to hospital discharge. Mean compression rate was 112 ± 19/min. A curvilinear association between chest compression rate and return of spontaneous circulation was found in cubic spline models after multivariable adjustment (P=0.012). Return of spontaneous circulation rates peaked at a compression rate of ≈ 125/min and then declined. Chest compression rate was not significantly associated with survival to hospital discharge in multivariable categorical or cubic spline models. Chest compression rate was associated with return of spontaneous circulation but not with survival to hospital discharge in OOH cardiac arrest.

  4. Cerebral vasoconstriction in comatose patients resuscitated from a cardiac arrest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buunk, G; van der Hoeven, J G; Frölich, M; Meinders, A E

    1996-11-01

    To determine the role of cerebral vasoconstriction in the delayed hypoperfusion phase in comatose patients after cardiac arrest. Prospective study. Medical intensive care unit in a university hospital. 10 comatose patients (Glasgow Coma Score +/- 6)successfully resuscitated from a cardiac arrest occurring outside the hospital. We measured the pulsatility index (PI) and mean blood flow velocity (MFV) of the middle cerebral artery, the cerebral oxygen extraction ratio and jugular bulb levels of endothelin, nitrate, and cGMP during the first 24 h after cardiac arrest. The PI decreased significantly from 1.86 +/- 1.02 to 1.05 +/- 0.22 (p = 0.03). The MFV increased significantly from 29 +/- 10 to 62 +/- 25 cm/s (p = 0.003). Cerebral oxygen extraction ratio decreased also from 0.39 +/- 0.13 to 0.24 +/- 0.11 (p = 0.015). Endothelin levels were high but did not change during the study period. Nitrate levels varied widely and showed a slight but significant decrease from 37.1 mumol/l (median; 25th-75th percentiles: 26.8-61.6) to 31.3 mumol/l (22.1-39.6) (p = 0.04). Cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels increased significantly from 2.95 mumol/l (median; 25th-75th percentiles: 2.48-5.43) to 7.5 mumol/l (6.20-14.0) (p = 0.02). We found evidence of increased cerebrovascular resistance during the first 24 h after cardiac arrest with persistent high endothelin levels, gradually decreasing nitrate levels, and gradually increasing cGMP levels, This suggests that active cerebral vasoconstriction due to an imbalance between local vasodilators and vasoconstrictors plays a role in the delayed hypoperfusion phase.

  5. Outcome from paediatric cardiac arrest associated with trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewdson, K; Lockey, D; Davies, G

    2007-10-01

    To examine survival rates for paediatric trauma patients requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the pre-hospital setting, and to identify characteristics that may be associated with survival. Ten-year retrospective trauma database review. An urban physician-led pre-hospital trauma service serving a population of approximately 7.5 million, in the United Kingdom. Eighty paediatric trauma patients (15 years or less) who received pre-hospital resuscitation following cardiorespiratory arrest between July 1994 and June 2004. Pre-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Survival to hospital discharge. Eighty children met inclusion criteria for the study. Nineteen (23.8%) were discharged alive from the emergency department and seven children (8.75%) survived to hospital discharge. Of the seven survivors, one had spinal cord injury. Two suffered asphyxial injury associated with blunt trauma and three sustained hypoxic insults following drowning or burns/smoke inhalation. In one patient with known congenital cardiac disease the cause of cardiac arrest was likely to have been medical. This study confirms the poor outcome for children requiring pre-hospital CPR following trauma. However, the results are better in this physician-attended group than in other studies where physicians were not present. They also suggest that cardiac arrest associated with trauma in children has a better outcome than in adults. In common with adults treated in this system, those patients with hypovolaemic cardiac arrest did not survive (Ann Emerg Med 2006;48:240-4). A large proportion of the survivors suffered hypoxic or asphyxial injuries. Targeted aggressive out-of-hospital resuscitation in certain patient groups can produce good outcomes.

  6. Brain Gray Matter MRI Morphometry for Neuroprognostication After Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Stein; Peran, Patrice; Kerhuel, Lionel; Malagurski, Briguita; Chauveau, Nicolas; Bataille, Benoit; Lotterie, Jean Albert; Celsis, Pierre; Aubry, Florent; Citerio, Giuseppe; Jean, Betty; Chabanne, Russel; Perlbarg, Vincent; Velly, Lionel; Galanaud, Damien; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Fourcade, Olivier; Laureys, Steven; Puybasset, Louis

    2017-08-01

    We hypothesize that the combined use of MRI cortical thickness measurement and subcortical gray matter volumetry could provide an early and accurate in vivo assessment of the structural impact of cardiac arrest and therefore could be used for long-term neuroprognostication in this setting. Prospective cohort study. Five Intensive Critical Care Units affiliated to the University in Toulouse (France), Paris (France), Clermont-Ferrand (France), Liège (Belgium), and Monza (Italy). High-resolution anatomical T1-weighted images were acquired in 126 anoxic coma patients ("learning" sample) 16 ± 8 days after cardiac arrest and 70 matched controls. An additional sample of 18 anoxic coma patients, recruited in Toulouse, was used to test predictive model generalization ("test" sample). All patients were followed up 1 year after cardiac arrest. None. Cortical thickness was computed on the whole cortical ribbon, and deep gray matter volumetry was performed after automatic segmentation. Brain morphometric data were employed to create multivariate predictive models using learning machine techniques. Patients displayed significantly extensive cortical and subcortical brain volumes atrophy compared with controls. The accuracy of a predictive classifier, encompassing cortical and subcortical components, has a significant discriminative power (learning area under the curve = 0.87; test area under the curve = 0.96). The anatomical regions which volume changes were significantly related to patient's outcome were frontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, thalamus, putamen, pallidum, caudate, hippocampus, and brain stem. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis of pathologic disruption of a striatopallidal-thalamo-cortical mesocircuit induced by cardiac arrest and pave the way for the use of combined brain quantitative morphometry in this setting.

  7. Anaphylaxis with Latrodectus Antivenin Resulting in Cardiac Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Christine M.; Hong, Jeannie J.; Beuhler, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Latrodectus mactans antivenin is a safe and effective therapy for severe black widow spider envenomations when given to most patients. We report a case of a 37-year-old male with a history of asthma that was given L. mactans antivenin for symptoms related to a black widow envenomation and developed a severe anaphylactic reaction resulting in cardiac arrest. When traditional therapies failed, the patient was given methylene blue for anaphylactic shock resulting in a 30-h period of hemodynamic ...

  8. Domains of nursing intervention after sudden cardiac arrest and automatic internal cardioverter defibrillator implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, C M; Benoliel, J Q; Bellin, C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore individual and family experiences after sudden cardiac arrest and automatic internal cardioverter defibrillator implantation during the first year of recovery. This report specifically addresses the domains of concern expressed and helpful strategies used by participants that are relevant to the development of future intervention programs. A grounded theory approach was used to gain an understanding of areas of concern of sudden cardiac arrest survivors and families that could be used when designing future nursing interventions. Semistructured interviews were conducted with both sudden cardiac arrest survivors and 1 family member each at 5 points during the first year of recovery (hospitalization; 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after hospitalization). Participants were asked to identify those specific areas that most concerned them and that they would like assistance with during the first year. A total of 150 interviews were conducted with 176 hours of data generated. The study focused on 10 northwest urban community medical centers and participants' homes within a 50-mile driving distance from the medical centers. The sample included 15 first-time sudden cardiac arrest survivors (13 men and 2 women) and 1 family member each between the ages of 31 and 72 years. Domains of concern identified by participants that can be used to design future nursing intervention programs included preventive care, dealing with automatic internal cardioverter defibrillator shocks, emotional challenges, physical changes, activities of daily living, partner relationships, and dealing with health care providers. Suggestions of helpful strategies used by participants during the first year are outlined. Domains of concern and helpful strategies identified by participants provide a framework for the development and testing of nursing intervention programs to enhance recovery following sudden cardiac arrest for survivors and their families.

  9. C.A.U.S.E.: Cardiac arrest ultra-sound exam--a better approach to managing patients in primary non-arrhythmogenic cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Caleb; Shuler, Klaus; Hannan, Hashibul; Sonyika, Chionesu; Likourezos, Antonios; Marshall, John

    2008-02-01

    Cardiac arrest is a condition frequently encountered by physicians in the hospital setting including the Emergency Department, Intensive Care Unit and medical/surgical wards. This paper reviews the current literature involving the use of ultrasound in resuscitation and proposes an algorithmic approach for the use of ultrasound during cardiac arrest. At present there is the need for a means of differentiating between various causes of cardiac arrest, which are not a direct result of a primary ventricular arrhythmia. Identifying the cause of pulseless electrical activity or asystole is important as the underlying cause is what guides management in such cases. This approach, incorporating ultrasound to manage cardiac arrest aids in the diagnosis of the most common and easily reversible causes of cardiac arrest not caused by primary ventricular arrhythmia, namely; severe hypovolemia, tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, and massive pulmonary embolus. These four conditions are addressed in this paper using four accepted emergency ultrasound applications to be performed during resuscitation of a cardiac arrest patient with the aim of determining the underlying cause of a cardiac arrest. Identifying the underlying cause of cardiac arrest represents the one of the greatest challenges of managing patients with asystole or PEA and accurate determination has the potential to improve management by guiding therapeutic decisions. We include several clinical images demonstrating examples of cardiac tamponade, massive pulmonary embolus, and severe hypovolemia secondary to abdominal aortic aneurysm. In conclusion, this protocol has the potential to reduce the time required to determine the etiology of a cardiac arrest and thus decrease the time between arrest and appropriate therapy.

  10. Use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a prospective follow-up study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Ratika; Tang, Anthony; Wells, George; Blackburn, Josée; Stiell, Ian; Simpson, Christopher; Dorian, Paul; Yee, Raymond; Cameron, Doug; Connolly, Stuart; Birnie, David; Nichol, Graham

    2004-01-01

    Background Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest are at high risk of recurrent arrests, many of which could be prevented with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). We sought to determine the ICD insertion rate among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and to determine factors associated with ICD implantation. Methods The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) study is a prospective, multiphase, before–after study assessing the effectiveness of prehospital interventions for people experiencing cardiac arrest, trauma or respiratory arrest in 19 Ontario communities. We linked OPALS data describing survivors of cardiac arrest with data from all defibrillator implantation centres in Ontario. Results From January 1997 to April 2002, 454 patients in the OPALS study survived to hospital discharge after experiencing an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The mean age was 65 (standard deviation 14) years, 122 (26.9%) were women, 398 (87.7%) had a witnessed arrest, 372 (81.9%) had an initial rhythm of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF), and 76 (16.7%) had asystole or another arrhythmia. The median cerebral performance category at discharge (range 1–5, 1 = normal) was 1. Only 58 (12.8%) of the 454 patients received an ICD. Patients with an initial rhythm of VT/VF were more likely than those with an initial rhythm of asystole or another rhythm to undergo device insertion (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 9.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–71.50). Similarly, patients with a normal cerebral performance score were more likely than those with abnormal scores to undergo ICD insertion (adjusted OR 12.52, 95% CI 1.74–92.12). Interpretation A minority of patients who survived cardiac arrest underwent ICD insertion. It is unclear whether this low usage rate reflects referral bias, selection bias by electrophysiologists, supply constraint or patient preference. PMID:15505267

  11. Sudden cardiac arrest and coexisting mitral valve prolapse: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aetiology of sudden cardiac arrest can often be identified to underlying cardiac pathology. Mitral valve prolapse is a relatively common valvular pathology with symptoms manifesting with increasing severity of mitral regurgitation (MR. It is unusual for severe MR to be present without symptoms, and there is growing evidence that this subset of patients may be at increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest or death. The difficulty lies in identifying those patients at risk and applying measures that are appropriate to halting progression to cardiac arrest. This article examines the association of mitral valve prolapse with cardiac arrests, the underlying pathophysiological process and the strategies for identifying those at risk.

  12. Is Ward Experience in Resuscitation Effort Related to the Prognosis of Unexpected Cardiac Arrest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-Kuang Hou

    2007-09-01

    Conclusion: Hospital wards with more than 5 cardiac arrests per year have a better patient survival rate than those with fewer arrests. This is despite all ward staff receiving the same level of training.

  13. Survival in patients without acute ST elevation after cardiac arrest and association with early coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dankiewicz, J; Nielsen, N; Annborn, M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether early coronary angiography (CAG) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of a presumed cardiac cause is associated with improved outcomes in patients without acute ST elevation. METHODS: The target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (TTM) tria...

  14. Determinants of occurrence and survival after sudden cardiac arrest-A European perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Empana, Jean-Philippe; Blom, Marieke T; Bӧttiger, Bernd W

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: The ESCAPE-NET project ("European Sudden Cardiac Arrest network- towards Prevention, Education and New Effective Treatments") aims to study: (1) risk factors and mechanisms for the occurrence of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in the population, and (2) risk factors and treatment strategies...... for survival after SCA on a European scale. METHODS: This is an Horizon2020 funded program of the European Union, performed by a European public-private consortium of 16 partners across 10 EU countries. There are 11 deep-phenotyped SCA cohorts for the study of risk factors and treatment strategies for survival...... after SCA, and 5 deep-phenotyped observational prospective population cohorts for the study of risk factors for occurrence of SCA. Personalized risk scores for predicting SCA onset and for predicting survival after SCA will be derived and validated. RESULTS: The 11 clinical studies with SCA cases...

  15. [Hypothermia after cardiac arrest--underused method that saves lives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornik, Ivan; Peklić, Marina; Gasparović, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory arrest causes ischemia and lesion of all organ systems, but the central nervous system is the most vulnerable. It is known that only few minutes of hypoperfusion and ischemia can cause irreversible damage to the brain which is the major frustration of reanimatology. Results of clinical trials suggest positive effects of hypothermia on survival and neurological recovery which led to including this method to Guidelines for resuscitation as a recommended standard method in post-resuscitation period for patients who have not regained consciousness. Methods for induction and maintenance of hypothermia are numerous and various, basically divided into invasive and non-invasive, each with its own advantages and disadvantages which are described in this paper. Despite recognised positive effects of mild therapeutic hypothermia after resuscitation from cardiac arrest, the method is not fully implemented as a standard method in post-resuscitation period.

  16. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for refractory cardiac arrest in children after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erek, Ersin; Aydın, Selim; Suzan, Dilek; Yıldız, Okan; Altın, Fırat; Kırat, Barış; Demir, Ibrahim Halil; Ödemiş, Ender

    2017-04-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is used to provide cardiorespiratory support during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation; ECPR) unresponsive to conventional methods. In this study, the results of ECPR in a cardiac arrest setting after cardiac surgery in children were analyzed. In this retrospective cohort study, between November 2010 and June 2014, 613 congenital heart operations were performed by the same surgical team. Medical records of all the patients who experienced cardiac arrest and ECPR in an early postoperative period (n=25; 4%) were analyzed. Their ages were between 2 days and 4.5 years (median: 3 months). Sixteen patients had palliative procedures. In 88% of the patients, cardiac arrest episodes occurred in the first 24 h after operation. Mechanical support was provided by cardiopulmonary bypass only (n=10) or by ECMO (n=15) during CPR. The CPR duration until commencing mechanical support was 40 min in 12 patients. Eleven patients (44%) were weaned successfully from ECMO and survived more than 7 days. Five of them (20%) could be discharged. The CPR duration before ECMO (p=0.01) and biventricular physiology (p=0.022) was the key factor affecting survival. The follow-up duration was a mean of 15±11.9 months. While four patients were observed to have normal neuromotor development, one patient died of cerebral bleeding 6 months after discharge. Postoperative cardiac arrest usually occurs in the first 24 h after operation. ECPR provides a second chance for survival in children who have had cardiac arrest. Shortening the duration of CPR before ECMO might increase survival rates.

  17. Cardiac arrest upon induction of anesthesia in children with cardiomyopathy: an analysis of incidence and risk factors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Johanne

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is thought that patients with cardiomyopathy have an increased risk of cardiac arrest on induction of anesthesia, but there is little available data. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and potential risk factors for cardiac arrest upon induction of anesthesia in children with cardiomyopathy in our institution. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed. Eligible patients included patients admitted between 1998 and 2008 with the International Statistical Classification of Disease code for cardiomyopathy (ICD-9 code 425) who underwent airway intervention for sedation or general anesthesia in the operating room, cardiac diagnostic and interventional unit (CDIU) or intensive care unit. Patients undergoing emergency airway intervention following cardiovascular collapse were excluded. For each patient, we recorded patient demographics, disease severity, anesthesia location, and anesthetic technique. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-nine patients with cardiomyopathy underwent a total of 236 anesthetic events, and four cardiac arrests were identified. One was related to bradycardia (HR<60), two were attributed to bradycardia in association with severe hypotension (systolic blood pressure<45), and the fourth arrest was related to isolated severe hypotension. Two occurred in the operating suite and two in the CDIU. There was no resulting mortality. One patient progressed to heart transplantation. Multiple combinations of anesthetic drugs were used for induction of anesthesia. CONCLUSION: We performed a review of the last 10 years of anesthesia events in children with cardiomyopathy. We report four cardiac arrests in two patients and 236 anesthetic events (1.7%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest review of these patients to date but is limited by its retrospective nature. The low cardiac arrest incidence prevents the identification of risk factors and the development of a cardiac arrest risk predictive clinical

  18. Electrophysiological Monitoring of Brain Injury and Recovery after Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxian Deng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Reliable prognostic methods for cerebral functional outcome of post cardiac-arrest (CA patients are necessary, especially since therapeutic hypothermia (TH as a standard treatment. Traditional neurophysiological prognostic indicators, such as clinical examination and chemical biomarkers, may result in indecisive outcome predictions and do not directly reflect neuronal activity, though they have remained the mainstay of clinical prognosis. The most recent advances in electrophysiological methods—electroencephalography (EEG pattern, evoked potential (EP and cellular electrophysiological measurement—were developed to complement these deficiencies, and will be examined in this review article. EEG pattern (reactivity and continuity provides real-time and accurate information for early-stage (particularly in the first 24 h hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injury patients with high sensitivity. However, the signal is easily affected by external stimuli, thus the measurements of EP should be combined with EEG background to validate the predicted neurologic functional result. Cellular electrophysiology, such as multi-unit activity (MUA and local field potentials (LFP, has strong potential for improving prognostication and therapy by offering additional neurophysiologic information to understand the underlying mechanisms of therapeutic methods. Electrophysiology provides reliable and precise prognostication on both global and cellular levels secondary to cerebral injury in cardiac arrest patients treated with TH.

  19. Variation in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Jones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate variation in airway management strategies in one suburban emergency medical services system treating patients experiencing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. Method. Retrospective chart review of all adult OHCA resuscitation during a 13-month period, specifically comparing airway management decisions. Results. Paramedics demonstrated considerable variation in their approaches to airway management. Approximately half of all OHCA patients received more than one airway management attempt (38/77 [49%], and one-quarter underwent three or more attempts (25/77 [25%]. One-third of patients arrived at the emergency department with a different airway device than initially selected (25/77 [32%]. Conclusion. This study confirmed our hypothesis that paramedics’ selection of ventilation strategies in cardiac arrest varies considerably. This observation raises concern because airway management diverts time and energy from interventions known to improve outcomes in OHCA management, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation. More research is needed to identify more focused airway management strategies for prehospital care providers.

  20. In-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros, Martha; Rodriguez, Roger; Callejas, Allison; Carranza, Douglas; Zeron, Hilda; Sánchez, Carlos; Del Castillo, Jimena; López-Herce, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the characteristic and the prognostic factors of in-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) in a public hospital Honduras. A prospective observational study was performed on pediatric in-hospital CA as a part of a multicenter international study. One hundred forty-six children were studied. The primary end point was survival at hospital discharge. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of each factor on mortality. Cardiac arrest occurred in the emergency department in 66.9%. Respiratory diseases and sepsis were predominant causes of CA. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 60% of patients, and 22.6% survived to hospital discharge. The factors related with mortality were nonrespiratory cause of CA (odds ratio [OR], 2.55; P = 0.045), adrenaline administration (OR, 4.96; P = 0.008), and a duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation more than 10 minutes (OR, 3.40; P = 0.012). In-hospital CA in children in a developing country has low survival. Patients with nonrespiratory causes and those who need adrenaline administration and prolonged resuscitation had worse prognosis.

  1. Postoperative cardiac arrest after heart surgery: does extracorporeal perfusion support a paradigm change in management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gologorsky, Edward; Macedo, Francisco Igor B; Carvalho, Enisa M; Gologorsky, Angela; Ricci, Marco; Salerno, Tomas A

    2010-01-01

    Early institution of extracorporeal perfusion support (ECPS) may improve survival after cardiac arrest. Two patients sustained unexpected cardiac arrest in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) following cardiac interventions. ECPS was initiated due to failure to restore hemodynamics after prolonged (over 60 minutes) advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) protocol-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Despite relatively late institution of ECPS, both patients survived with preserved neurological function. This communication focuses on the utility of ECPS in the ICU as a part of resuscitative efforts.

  2. Critical incidents, including cardiac arrest, associated with pediatric anesthesia at a tertiary teaching children's hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Song, In-Kyung; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Soo; Kim, Chong-Sung; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of critical incidents provides valuable information to improve the quality and safety of patient care. This study identified and analyzed pediatric anesthesia-related critical incidents including cardiac arrests in a tertiary teaching children's hospital. All pediatric anesthesia-related critical incidents reported in a voluntary departmental reporting system between January 2008 and August 2013 were included in the analysis. A critical incident was defined as (i) any incident that altered patients' vital signs and affected the management of patients while they were under the care of an anesthesiologist, and (ii) human factor: where patient injury or accidents were as a result of human error. Changes in vital signs that recovered spontaneously were excluded. During the 6-year study period, a total of 229 critical incidents were reported from 49,373 anesthetic procedures. The most frequently reported incidents were associated with the respiratory system (55%), with tracheal tube-related events accounting for 40.9% of respiratory incidents followed by laryngospasm (17.3% of respiratory incidents). Cardiac arrest occurred in 42 cases in this study (8.5 cases per 10,000 anesthetics). Cardiovascular problems were the major causes of cardiac arrest (66.7%), and incidents of cardiogenic shock and hemorrhage/hypotension contributed equally to the cardiac arrest induced by cardiovascular problems (each 16.7%). Human factor-related events accounted for 58.5% of all critical incidents of which 53.7% were respiratory events. Despite recent improvements in safety of pediatric anesthesia, many preventable factors still remain that can lead to critical incidents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Epidemiology and outcomes of cardiac arrest among children with Down Syndrome: a multicenter analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padiyath, Asif; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Gossett, Jeffrey M; Tadphale, Sachin D; Garcia, Xiomara; Seib, Paul M; Gupta, Punkaj

    2017-06-01

    With the increasing prevalence of Down Syndrome, it is unknown if children with Down Syndrome are associated with increased incidence of cardiac arrest and poor outcomes after cardiac arrest. The objective of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology of cardiac arrest and mortality after cardiac arrest among critically ill children with and without Down Syndrome. Patients ≤18 years admitted at a Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS) participating Intensive Care Unit were included (2004-2014). Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to evaluate association of Down Syndrome with study outcomes after adjusting for patient and center characteristics. A total of 849,250 patients from 44 centers were included. Of the 25,143 patients with Down Syndrome, cardiac arrest was noted among 568 (2.3%) patients with an associated mortality at hospital discharge of 248 (43.6%) patients. In contrast, of the 824,107 patients without Down Syndrome, cardiac arrest was noted among 15,822 (1.9%) patients with an associated mortality at hospital discharge of 7775 (49.1%) patients. In adjusted models, patients with Down Syndrome had a higher likelihood of having cardiac arrest as compared to patients without Down Syndrome (with vs. without Down, OR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.03-1.25, P=0.01). Despite having a higher likelihood of cardiac arrest, patients with Down Syndrome were associated with a lower mortality after cardiac arrest (OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.63-0.96, P=0.02). Both incidence of cardiac arrest, and mortality at hospital discharge in those with cardiac arrest vary substantially in children with and without Down Syndrome.

  4. Association between dental caries and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of cardiac origin in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Yasunori; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Zhang, Bo; Uehara, Yoshinari; Ogawa, Masahiro; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nonogi, Hiroshi; Nagao, Ken; Kimura, Takeshi; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-04-01

    Oral infection contributes to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. We hypothesized that dental caries may be associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) of cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin. We compared the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (785,591 cases of OHCA: 55.4% of cardiac origin and 44.6% of non-cardiac origin) to the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries between 2005 and 2011 in the 47 prefectures of Japan. In both the total population and males over 65 years, the number of cases of dental caries was significantly associated with the number of OHCA of total and cardiac origin from 2005 to 2011, but not those of non-cardiac origin. In the total population, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was not significantly associated with the age-adjusted incidence of OHCA (total OHCA: r correlation coefficient=0.22, p=0.14; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.25, p=0.09; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=-0.002, p=0.99). Among male patients over 65 years, the age-adjusted prevalence of dental caries was significantly associated with OHCA of total and cardiac origin, but not non-cardiac origin (total OHCA: r=0.47, p<0.001; OHCA of cardiac origin: r=0.37, p=0.01; OHCA of non-cardiac origin: r=0.28, p=0.054). While oral hygiene is important in all age groups, it may be particularly associated with OHCAs of cardiac origin in males over 65 years. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Cardiac arrest during gamete release in chum salmon regulated by the parasympathetic nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Makiguchi

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta at the moment of gamete release for 7.39+/-1.61 s in females and for 5.20+/-0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release.

  6. Cardiac arrest in pregnancy: Case report and review of the literature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiac arrest in pregnancy is a rare event, and resuscitation of the pregnant patient is complicated by the impact on resuscitative measures of the normal physiological changes of pregnancy. A case of successful resuscitation of a pregnant patient with a cardiac arrest and a normal neurocognitive outcome is reported.

  7. Out of hospital thoracotomy for cardiac arrest after penetrating thoracic trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. van Vledder (Mark); O.J.F. van Waes (Oscar); Kooij, F.O. (Fabian O.); Peters, J.H. (Joost H.); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Emergency department thoracotomy is an established procedure for cardiac arrest in patients suffering from penetrating thoracic trauma and yields relatively high survival rates (up to 21%) in patients with cardiac tamponade. To minimize the delay between arrest and

  8. Out of hospital thoracotomy for cardiac arrest after penetrating thoracic trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vledder, Mark G.; van Waes, Oscar J. F.; Kooij, Fabian O.; Peters, Joost H.; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; Verhofstad, Michael H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Emergency department thoracotomy is an established procedure for cardiac arrest in patients suffering from penetrating thoracic trauma and yields relatively high survival rates (up to 21%) in patients with cardiac tamponade. To minimize the delay between arrest and thoracotomy, some have advocated

  9. Automated external defibrillators inaccessible to more than half of nearby cardiac arrests in public locations during evening, nighttime, and weekends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carolina Malta; Wissenberg, Mads; Weeke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite wide dissemination, use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in community settings is limited. We assessed how AED accessibility affected coverage of cardiac arrests in public locations. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified cardiac arrests in public locations (1994...

  10. Current practice in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proclemer, Alessandro; Dobreanu, Dan; Pison, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: The purpose of this EP wire is to examine clinical practice in the field of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) management, with special focus on in-hospital diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. METHODS AND RESULTS: Fifty-three European centres, all members of the EHRA-EP Research network......, completed the questions of the survey. A dedicated strategy for OHCA management is active in 85% of the centres. Shockable tachyarrhythmias such as initial OHCA rhythm are reported in >70% of the patients in 64% of the centres. In-hospital therapeutic hypothermia was applied in >50% of the patients in 53...... management strategy, including coronary angiography/PCI and implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy, while therapeutic hypothermia appears to be underused....

  11. Anaphylaxis with Latrodectus antivenin resulting in cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Christine M; Hong, Jeannie J; Beuhler, Michael C

    2011-12-01

    Latrodectus mactans antivenin is a safe and effective therapy for severe black widow spider envenomations when given to most patients. We report a case of a 37-year-old male with a history of asthma that was given L. mactans antivenin for symptoms related to a black widow envenomation and developed a severe anaphylactic reaction resulting in cardiac arrest. When traditional therapies failed, the patient was given methylene blue for anaphylactic shock resulting in a 30-h period of hemodynamic stability. Despite initial resuscitation, the patient ultimately died 40 h after presentation. Under the right circumstances, L. mactans antivenin remains a safe and effective therapy for severe black widow envenomations. However, anaphylaxis is a risk for those receiving this therapy, even when the antivenin is diluted and given as an infusion. We report the first death related to diluted L. mactans antivenin given as an infusion.

  12. Partners in Crime in the Setting of Recurring Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lida P. Papavasileiou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available No previous reports are available about the potential dramatic effects resulting from the combination of acquired long QT interval not associated to bradycardia and myocardial ischemia. We report the case of a man that during acute necrotic pancreatitis presented QT interval prolongation without bradycardia, TdP, and two episodes of cardiac arrest. A coronary angiogram revealed a subocclusive stenosis of left anterior descending coronary artery, treated with a percutaneous coronary intervention. After myocardial revascularization, even in presence of long QT interval, no arrhythmic events occurred suggesting the key role of myocardial ischemia in triggering TdP in acquired long QT even without bradycardia. ECG performed six months later, after complete recovery from pancreatitis, showed a normal QT interval.

  13. Partners in crime in the setting of recurring cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavasileiou, Lida P; Forleo, Giovanni B; Santini, Luca; Martuscelli, Eugenio; Romeo, Francesco

    2011-03-03

    No previous reports are available about the potential dramatic effects resulting from the combination of acquired long QT interval not associated to bradycardia and myocardial ischemia. We report the case of a man that during acute necrotic pancreatitis presented QT interval prolongation without bradycardia, TdP, and two episodes of cardiac arrest. A coronary angiogram revealed a subocclusive stenosis of left anterior descending coronary artery, treated with a percutaneous coronary intervention. After myocardial revascularization, even in presence of long QT interval, no arrhythmic events occurred suggesting the key role of myocardial ischemia in triggering TdP in acquired long QT even without bradycardia. ECG performed six months later, after complete recovery from pancreatitis, showed a normal QT interval.

  14. Cardiac arrest in the toilet: clinical characteristics and resuscitation profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamasu, Joji; Miyatake, Satoru

    2013-03-01

    The great majority of non-traumatic cardiac arrests (CA) occur at home. The toilet is a closed and private room where CA occurs frequently. However, due to the feelings of privacy that are associated with this room, the circumstances and causes of CA in the toilet have rarely been investigated. A retrospective study was conducted to clarify clinical characteristics and resuscitation profiles of patients sustaining CA in the toilet. Among 907 CA patients treated during a 4-year period, 101 (11 %) sustained CA in the toilet. While the collapse was witnessed in only 10 % of these patients, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved in 41 %. However, the long-term survival rate was 1 %. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that a history of cardiac diseases was predictive of CA in the toilet (odds ratio 3.045; 95 % confidence interval 1.756-5.282) but that there was no correlation with advanced age. The frequency of CA in the toilet may be influenced moderately by seasonal/circadian variations. The 101 patients were classified into four subgroups according to mode of discovery of CA. The frequency of ROSC was highest in those who collapsed in the presence of caregivers and lowest in those whose collapse were discovered later by family members being worried that the patient stayed in the toilet "too long." Imaging studies revealed life-threatening extra-cardiac lesions responsible for CA, such as subarachnoid hemorrhage and aortic dissection, in 23 % of the patient cohort. The rarity of long-term survival among individuals sustaining CA in the toilet is mainly due to the delay in discovering the individual who collapsed. Although a history of cardiac diseases is a risk factor, predicting who may sustain CA in the toilet remains difficult due to etiological heterogeneity.

  15. Organisation of in-hospital cardiac arrest teams - a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Kasper Glerup; Schmidt, Anders Sjørslev; Adelborg, Kasper; Løfgren, Bo

    2015-04-01

    In-hospital cardiac arrests are treated by a team of health care providers. Improving team performance may increase survival. Currently, no international standards for cardiac arrest teams exist in terms of member composition and allocation of tasks. To describe the composition of in-hospital cardiac arrest teams and review pre-arrest allocation of tasks. A nationwide cross-sectional study was performed. Data on cardiac arrest teams and pre-arrest allocation of tasks were collected from protocols on resuscitation required for hospital accreditation in Denmark. Additional data were collected through telephone interviews and email correspondence. Psychiatric hospitals and hospitals serving outpatients only were excluded. Data on the cardiac arrest team were available from 44 of 47 hospitals. The median team size was 5 (25th percentile; 75th percentile: 4; 6) members. Teams included a nurse anaesthetist (100%), a medical house officer (82%), an orderly (73%), an anaesthesiology house officer (64%) and a medical assistant (20%). Less likely to participate was a cardiology house officer (23%) or a cardiology specialist registrar (5%). Overall, a specialist registrar was represented on 20% of teams and 20% of cardiac arrest teams had a different team composition during nights and weekends. In total, 41% of teams did not define a team leader pre-arrest, and the majority of the teams did not define the tasks of the remaining team members. In Denmark, there are major differences among cardiac arrest teams. This includes team size, profession of team members, medical specialty and seniority of the physicians. Nearly half of the hospitals do not define a cardiac arrest team leader and the majority do not define the tasks of the remaining team members. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Malignant Course of Anomalous Left Coronary Artery Causing Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Anantha Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac arrest has been reported to occur in patients with congenital anomalous coronary artery disease. About 80% of the anomalies are benign and incidental findings at the time of catheterization. We present a case of sudden cardiac arrest caused by anomalous left anterior descending artery. 61-year-old African American female was brought to the emergency department after sudden cardiac arrest. Initial EKG showed sinus rhythm with RBBB and LAFB with nonspecific ST-T wave changes. Coronary angiogram revealed no atherosclerotic disease. The left coronary artery was found to originate from the right coronary cusp. Cardiac CAT scan revealed similar findings with interarterial and intramural course. Patient received one-vessel arterial bypass graft to her anomalous coronary vessel along with a defibrillator for secondary prevention. Sudden cardiac arrest secondary to congenital anomalous coronary artery disease is characterized by insufficient coronary flow by the anomalous left coronary artery to meet elevated left ventricular (LV myocardial demand. High risk defects include those involved with the proximal coronary artery or coursing of the anomalous artery between the aorta and pulmonary trunk. Per guidelines, our patient received one vessel bypass graft to her anomalous vessel. It is important for clinicians to recognize such presentations of anomalous coronary artery.

  17. Induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest in trauma patients: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Mazin A; Stansbury, Lynn G; Stein, Deborah M; McQuillan, Karen A; Scalea, Thomas M

    2011-12-01

    Induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest is an accepted neuroprotective strategy. However, its role in cardiac arrest during acute trauma care is not yet defined. To characterize recent experience with this technique at our center, we undertook a detailed chart review of acute trauma patients managed with induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest. From Trauma Registry records, we identified all adult patients (older than 17 years) admitted to our Level I trauma center from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2010, who experienced cardiac arrest during acute trauma care and were managed via our induced hypothermia protocol. This requires maintenance of core body temperature between 32°C and 34°C for 24 hours after arrest. Patient clinical records were then reviewed for selected factors. Six acute trauma patients (3 male and 3 female; median age, 53 years) with cardiac arrest managed per protocol were identified. All injuries were due to blunt impact, and five of six injuries were motor-vehicle-associated. Median Injury Severity Score was 27; median prearrest Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score was 15. One patient arrested prehospital and the other 5 in-hospital. Median duration of arrest was 8 minutes. All were comatose after arrest. One death occurred, in the patient with a prehospital cardiac arrest. Two patients were discharged to chronic care facilities with GCS11-tracheostomy; three were discharged to active rehabilitation care facilities with GCS score of 14 to 15. There were no obvious complications related to cooling. Mild induced hypothermia can be beneficial in a selected group of trauma patients after cardiac arrest. Prospective trials are needed to explore the effects of targeted temperature management on coagulation in this patient group.

  18. Infectious complications after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest-A comparison between two target temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dankiewicz, Josef; Nielsen, Niklas; Linder, Adam

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that target temperature management (TTM) increases the probability of infectious complications after cardiac arrest. We aimed to compare the incidence of pneumonia, severe sepsis and septic shock after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in patients with two...... complications were recorded daily during the ICU-stay. Pneumonia, severe sepsis and septic shock were considered infectious complications. Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive-protein (CRP) levels were measured at 24h, 48h and 72h after cardiac arrest. RESULTS: There were 939 patients in the modified intention...

  19. Errors in the management of cardiac arrests: an observational study of patient safety incidents in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Ignatowicz, Agnieszka M; Donaldson, Liam J

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this qualitative study is to better understand the types of error occurring during the management of cardiac arrests that led to a death. All patient safety incidents involving management of cardiac arrests and resulting in death which were reported to a national patient safety database over a 17-month period were analysed. Structured data from each report were extracted and these together with the free text, were subjected to content analysis which was inductive, with the coding scheme emerged from continuous reading and re-reading of incidents. There were 30 patient safety incidents involving management of cardiac arrests and resulting in death. The reviewers identified a main shortfall in the management of each cardiac arrest and this resulted in 12 different factors being documented. These were grouped into four themes that highlighted systemic weaknesses: miscommunication involving crash number (4/30, 13%), shortfalls in staff attending the arrest (4/30, 13%), equipment deficits (11/30, 36%), and poor application of knowledge and skills (11/30, 37%). The factors identified represent serious shortfalls in the quality of response to cardiac arrests resulting in death in hospital. No firm conclusion can be drawn about how many deaths in the study population would have been averted if the emergency had been managed to a high standard. The effective management of cardiac arrests should be considered as one of the markers of safe care within a healthcare organisation.

  20. [Anesthesia-related cardiac arrest in children. Data from a tertiary referral hospital registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Carretero, P; Ochoa-Osorio, C; Martín-Vega, A; Lahoz-Ramón, A; Rodríguez-Pérez, E; Reinoso-Barbero, F; Goldman-Tarlovsky, L

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the cardiac arrests related to anesthesia in a tertiary children's hospital, in order to identify risk factors that would lead to opportunities for improvement. A 5-year retrospective study was conducted on anesthesia related cardiac arrest occurring in pediatric patients. All urgent and elective anesthetic procedures performed by anesthesiologists were included. Data collected included patient characteristics, the procedure, the probable cause, and outcome of the cardiac arrest. Odds ratio was calculated by univariate analysis to determine the clinical factors associated with cardiac arrest and mortality. There were a total of 15 cardiac arrests related to anesthesia in 43,391 anesthetic procedures (3.4 per 10,000), with an incidence in children with ASA I-II versus ASA≥III of 0.28 and 19.27 per 10,000, respectively. The main risk factors were children ASA≥III (P<.001), less than one month old (P<.001), less than one year old (P<.001), emergency procedures (P<.01), cardiac procedures (P<.001) and procedures performed in the catheterization laboratory (P<.05). The main causes of cardiac arrest were cardiovascular (53.3%), mainly due to hypovolemia, and cardiovascular depression associated with induction of anesthesia, followed by respiratory causes (20%), and medication causes (20%). The incidence of mortality and neurological injury within the first 24h after the cardiac arrest was 0.92 and 1.38 per 10,000, respectively. The mortality in the first 3 months was 1.6 per 10,000. The main causes of death were ASA≥III, age under one year, pulmonary arterial hypertension, cardiac arrest in areas remote from the surgery area, a duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation over 20min, and when hypothermia was not applied after cardiac arrest. The main risk factors for cardiac arrest were ASA≥III, age under one year, emergency procedures, cardiology procedures and procedures performed in the catheterization laboratory. The main

  1. Sudden Cardiac Arrest During Sports Activity in Middle Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijon, Eloi; Uy-Evanado, Audrey; Reinier, Kyndaron; Teodorescu, Carmen; Narayanan, Kumar; Jouven, Xavier; Gunson, Karen; Jui, Jonathan; Chugh, Sumeet S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sports-associated sudden cardiac arrests (SCAs) occur mostly during middle age. We sought to determine burden, characteristics, and outcomes of SCA during sports among middle aged residents of a large US community. Methods and Results SCA cases aged 35–65 years were identified in a large, prospective, population-based study (2002–2013), with systematic and comprehensive assessment of their lifetime medical history. Of the 1,247 SCA cases, 63 (5%) occurred during sports activities at a mean age of 51.1±8.8 years, yielding an incidence of 21.7 (95%CI 8.1–35.4) per million per year. The incidence varied significantly based on sex, with a higher incidence among men (RR 18.68 95%CI 2.50–139.56) for sports SCA, as compared to all other SCA (RR 2.58, 95%CI 2.12–3.13). Sports SCA was also more likely to be a witnessed event (87 vs. 53%, Psports-associated SCA (23.2 vs. 13.6%, P=0.04). Sports SCA cases presented with known pre-existing cardiac disease in 16%, ≥1 cardiovascular risk factor in 56%, and overall, 36% of cases had typical cardiovascular symptoms during the week preceding SCA. Conclusions Sports-associated SCA in middle age represents a relatively small proportion of the overall SCA burden, reinforcing the idea of the high benefit-low risk nature of sports activity. Especially in light of current population aging trends, our findings emphasize that targeted education could maximize both safety and acceptance of sports activity in the older athlete. PMID:25847988

  2. Excessive chest compression rate is associated with insufficient compression depth in prehospital cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; De Regge, Melissa; Vansteelandt, Kristof; De Smet, Jeroen; Annaert, Emmanuel; Lemoyne, Sabine; Kalmar, Alain F.; Calle, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and goal of study: The relationship between chest compression rate and compression depth is unknown. In order to characterise this relationship, we performed an observational study in prehospital cardiac arrest patients. We hypothesised that faster compressions are associated with

  3. Therapeutic Hypothermia and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in a Child with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Spurkeland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic outcomes following pediatric cardiac arrest are consistently poor. Early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to have positive effects on both survival to hospital discharge, and improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Additionally, the use of therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival in pediatric cardiac arrest patients admitted to the intensive care unit. We report a child with congenital hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, in whom the early initiation of effective prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent administration of therapeutic hypothermia contributed to a positive outcome with no gross neurologic sequelae. Continuing efforts should be made to promote and employ high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which likely contributed to the positive outcome of this case. Further research will be necessary to develop and solidify national guidelines for the implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in selected subpopulations of children with OHCA.

  4. Successful Management of Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning Resulting in Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimoğlu, Sedat; Dikey, İsmail; Sarı, Ali; Kekeç, Leyla; Tuzcu, Kasım; Karcıoğlu, Murat

    2015-08-01

    Aluminum phosphide has high toxicity when it is ingested, and in case of contact with moisture, phosphine gas is released. Aluminum phosphide poisoning causes metabolic acidosis, arrhythmia, acute respiratory distress syndrome and shock, and there is no specific antidote. A 17-year-old male patient was referred to our hospital because of aluminum phosphide poisoning with 1500 mg of aluminum phosphide tablets. The patient's consciousness was clear but he was somnolent. Vital parameters were as follows: blood pressure: 85/56 mmHg, pulse: 88 beats/min, SpO2: 94%, temperature: 36.4°C. Because of hypotension, noradrenaline and dopamine infusions were started. The patient was intubated because of respiratory distress and loss of consciousness. Severe metabolic acidosis was determined in the arterial blood gas, and metabolic acidosis was corrected by sodium bicarbonate treatment. In addition to supportive therapy of the poisoning, haemodialysis was performed. Cardiac arrest occurred during follow-ups in the intensive care unit, and sinus rhythm was achieved after 10 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The patient was discharged after three sessions of haemodialysis on the ninth day. As a result, haemodialysis contributed to symptomatic treatment of aluminum phosphide poisoning in this case report.

  5. The best timing for defibrillation in shockable cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scapigliati, A; Ristagno, G; Cavaliere, F

    2013-01-01

    High quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, i.e. chest compressions and ventilations) and prompt defibrillation when appropriate (i.e. in ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia, VF/VT) are currently the best early treatment for cardiac arrest (CA). In cases of prolonged CA due to shockable rhythms, it is reasonable to presume that a period of CPR before defibrillation could partially revert the metabolic and hemodynamic deteriorations imposed to the heart by the no flow state, thus increasing the chances of successful defibrillation. Despite supporting early evidences in CA cases in which Emergency Medical System response time was longer than 5 minutes, recent studies have failed to confirm a survival benefit of routine CPR before defibrillation. These data have imposed a change in guidelines from 2005 to 2010. To take in account all the variables encountered when treating CA (heart condition before CA, time elapsed, metabolic and hemodynamic changes, efficacy of CPR, responsiveness to defibrillation attempt), it would be very helpful to have a real-time and non invasive tool able to predict the chances of defibrillation success. Recent evidences have suggested that ECG waveform analysis of VF, such as the derived Amplitude Spectrum Area, can fit the purpose of monitoring the CPR effectiveness and predicting the responsiveness to defibrillation. While awaiting clinical studies confirming this promising approach, CPR performed according to high quality standard and with minimal interruptions together with early defibrillation are the best immediate way to achieve resuscitation in CA due to shochable rhythms..

  6. Increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest in obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam Jacoba; Blom, Marieke Tabo; Bardai, Abdennasser

    2013-01-01

    with electrocardiographic documentation of VT/VF were included. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between SCA and OPD. Pre-specified subgroup analyses were performed regarding age, sex, cardiovascular risk-profile, disease severity, and current use of respiratory drugs. RESULTS......BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine whether (1) patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (OPD) have an increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT/VF), and (2) the SCA risk is mediated by cardiovascular risk-profile and/or respiratory drug use......: A higher risk of SCA was observed in patients with OPD (n = 190 cases [15%], 622 controls [11%]) than in those without OPD (OR adjusted for cardiovascular risk-profile 1.4 [1.2-1.6]). In OPD patients with a high cardiovascular risk-profile (OR 3.5 [2.7-4.4]) a higher risk of SCA was observed than in those...

  7. Adrenaline in cardiac arrest: Prefilled syringes are faster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Claire; Gillett, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Standard ampoules and prefilled syringes of adrenaline are widely available in Australasian EDs for use in cardiac arrest. We hypothesise that prefilled syringes can be administered more rapidly and accurately when compared with the two available standard ampoules. This is a triple arm superiority study comparing the time to i.v. administration and accuracy of dosing of three currently available preparations of adrenaline. In their standard packaging, prefilled syringes were on average more than 12 s faster to administer than the 1 mL 1:1000 ampoules and more than 16 s faster than the 10 mL 1:10,000 ampoules (P adrenaline utilising a Minijet (CSL Limited, Parkville, Victoria, Australia) is faster than using adrenaline in glass ampoules presented in their plastic packaging. Removing the plastic packaging from the 1 mL (1 mg) ampoule might result in more rapid administration similar to the Minijet. Resuscitation personnel requiring rapid access to adrenaline should consider storing it as either Minijets or ampoules devoid of packaging. These results might be extrapolatable to other clinical scenarios, including pre-hospital and anaesthesia, where other drugs are required for rapid use. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  8. Postoperative Cardiac Arrest after Heart Surgery: Does Extracorporeal Perfusion Support a Paradigm Change in Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Gologorsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Early institution of extracorporeal perfusion support (ECPS may improve survival after cardiac arrest. Two patients sustained unexpected cardiac arrest in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU following cardiac interventions. ECPS was initiated due to failure to restore hemodynamics after prolonged (over 60 minutes advanced cardiac life support (ACLS protocol-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Despite relatively late institution of ECPS, both patients survived with preserved neurological function. This communication focuses on the utility of ECPS in the ICU as a part of resuscitative efforts.

  9. Indicators of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage as a Cause of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Zachariah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH may present with cardiac arrest (SAH-CA. We report a case of SAH-CA to assist providers in distinguishing SAH as an etiology of cardiac arrest despite electrocardiogram findings that may be suggestive of a cardiac etiology. SAH-CA is associated with high rates of return of spontaneous circulation, but overall poor outcome. An initially non-shockable cardiac rhythm and the absence of brain stem reflexes are important clues in indentifying SAH-CA.

  10. Automated external defibrillators and survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Paul S; Krumholz, Harlan M; Spertus, John A; Jones, Philip G; Cram, Peter; Berg, Robert A; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Nadkarni, Vinay; Mancini, Mary E; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K

    2010-11-17

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) improve survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, but data on their effectiveness in hospitalized patients are limited. To evaluate the association between AED use and survival for in-hospital cardiac arrest. Cohort study of 11,695 hospitalized patients with cardiac arrests between January 1, 2000, and August 26, 2008, at 204 US hospitals following the introduction of AEDs on general hospital wards. Survival to hospital discharge by AED use, using multivariable hierarchical regression analyses to adjust for patient factors and hospital site. Of 11,695 patients, 9616 (82.2%) had nonshockable rhythms (asystole and pulseless electrical activity) and 2079 (17.8%) had shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia). AEDs were used in 4515 patients (38.6%). Overall, 2117 patients (18.1%) survived to hospital discharge. Within the entire study population, AED use was associated with a lower rate of survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest compared with no AED use (16.3% vs 19.3%; adjusted rate ratio [RR], 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78-0.92; P < .001). Among cardiac arrests due to nonshockable rhythms, AED use was associated with lower survival (10.4% vs 15.4%; adjusted RR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.65-0.83; P < .001). In contrast, for cardiac arrests due to shockable rhythms, AED use was not associated with survival (38.4% vs 39.8%; adjusted RR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.88-1.13; P = .99). These patterns were consistently observed in both monitored and nonmonitored hospital units where AEDs were used, after matching patients to the individual units in each hospital where the cardiac arrest occurred, and with a propensity score analysis. Among hospitalized patients with cardiac arrest, use of AEDs was not associated with improved survival.

  11. Identifying non-technical skills and barriers for improvement of teamwork in cardiac arrest teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.O.; Jensen, Michael Kammer; Lippert, A.

    2010-01-01

    2006 to November 2006. Interviews were focussed on barriers and recommendations for teamwork in the cardiac arrest team, optimal policy for improvement of resuscitation training and clinical practice, use of cognitive aids and adoption of European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines 2005. Interviews...... management. Important barriers that were identified were inexperienced team leaders, task overload and hierarchic structure in the teams' inability to maintain focus on chest compressions. Conclusion: Interview participants pointed out that NTSs of teams could improve the treatment of cardiac arrest...

  12. Unanticipated cardiac arrest under spinal anesthesia: An unavoidable mystery with review of current literature

    OpenAIRE

    Kumari, Anita; Gupta, Ruchi; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Singh, Amrinder

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest during anesthesia and perioperative period is a matter of grave concern for any anesthesiologist. But such mishaps have been reported for one reason or the other in the literary sciences. We are reporting the occurrence of unanticipated delayed cardiac arrest following spinal anesthesia in two young and healthy patients. Fortunately, these patients were successfully resuscitated with timely and appropriate cardiopulmonary resuscitative measures. Occurrence of such cases needs t...

  13. Communication between members of the cardiac arrest team--a postal survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, J; Turner, B; Gabbott, D A

    2001-05-01

    Effective communication enhances team building and is perceived to improve the quality of team performance. A recent publication from the Resuscitation Council (UK) has highlighted this fact and recommended that cardiac arrest team members make contact daily. We wished to identify how often members of this team communicate prior to a cardiopulmonary arrest. A questionnaire on cardiac arrest team composition, leadership, communication and debriefing was distributed nationally to Resuscitation Training Officers (RTOs) and their responses analysed. One hundred and thirty (55%) RTOs replied. Physicians and anaesthetists were the most prominent members of the team. The Medical Senior House Officer is usually nominated as the team leader. Eighty-seven centres (67%) have no communication between team members prior to attending a cardiopulmonary arrest. In 33%, communication occurs but is either informal or fortuitous. The RTOs felt that communication is important to enhance team dynamics and optimise task allocation. Only 7% achieve a formal debrief following a cardiac arrest. Communication between members of the cardiac arrest team before and after a cardiac arrest is poor. Training and development of these skills may improve performance and should be prioritised. Team leadership does not necessarily reflect experience or training.

  14. Sudden Cardiac Arrest Risk Assessment: Population Science and the Individual Risk Mandate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerburg, Robert J; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2017-06-01

    High-resolution stratification of risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in individual patients is a tool that is necessary for achieving effective and efficient application of data generated by population-based research. This concept is at the core of initiatives for merging cost effectiveness with maximized clinical efficiency and individual patient treatment. For this review, we analyzed data on sudden cardiac death and SCA available from population studies that included large longitudinal and cross-sectional databases, observational cohort studies, and randomized clinical trials. In the context of population science, we treated clinical trials as small, scientifically rigid population studies that generate outcomes focused on defined segments of the population. Application of probabilistic outcomes from these available sources to individual patients generally and patients at risk for SCA and sudden cardiac death in particular is limited by the diversity of the study population based on inclusion criteria and/or the absence of uniformly large effect sizes. Limited information is available on the requirements for defining small high-risk density subgroups that would lead to identification of individuals at a sufficiently high probability of SCA to have a significant effect on clinical decision making. Synthesis of available population and clinical science data demonstrates the limitations for prediction and prevention of SCA and sudden cardiac death and provides justification for a research mandate for improving risk prediction at the level of individual patients. This leads to suggested approaches to new data generation and required research funding to address this large public health burden.

  15. Interdisciplinary ICU cardiac arrest debriefing improves survival outcomes*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Heather; Zebuhr, Carleen; Topjian, Alexis A; Nishisaki, Akira; Niles, Dana E; Meaney, Peter A; Boyle, Lori; Giordano, Rita T; Davis, Daniela; Priestley, Margaret; Apkon, Michael; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Sutton, Robert M

    2014-07-01

    In-hospital cardiac arrest is an important public health problem. High-quality resuscitation improves survival but is difficult to achieve. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel, interdisciplinary, postevent quantitative debriefing program to improve survival outcomes after in-hospital pediatric chest compression events. Single-center prospective interventional study of children who received chest compressions between December 2008 and June 2012 in the ICU. Structured, quantitative, audiovisual, interdisciplinary debriefing of chest compression events with front-line providers. Primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included survival of event (return of spontaneous circulation for ≥ 20 min) and favorable neurologic outcome. Primary resuscitation quality outcome was a composite variable, termed "excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation," prospectively defined as a chest compression depth ≥ 38 mm, rate ≥ 100/min, ≤ 10% of chest compressions with leaning, and a chest compression fraction > 90% during a given 30-second epoch. Quantitative data were available only for patients who are 8 years old or older. There were 119 chest compression events (60 control and 59 interventional). The intervention was associated with a trend toward improved survival to hospital discharge on both univariate analysis (52% vs 33%, p = 0.054) and after controlling for confounders (adjusted odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 0.91-6.8; p = 0.075), and it significantly increased survival with favorable neurologic outcome on both univariate (50% vs 29%, p = 0.036) and multivariable analyses (adjusted odds ratio, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.01-7.5; p = 0.047). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation epochs for patients who are 8 years old or older during the debriefing period were 5.6 times more likely to meet targets of excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (95% CI, 2.9-10.6; p < 0.01). Implementation of an interdisciplinary, postevent quantitative debriefing

  16. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury following in hospital cardiac arrest - lessons from autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinduja, Archana; Gupta, Harsh; Yang, Ju Dong; Onteddu, Sanjeeva

    2014-03-01

    Hypoxic ischemic brain injury (HIBI) is the most decisive factor in determining the outcome following a cardiac arrest. After an arrest, neuronal death may be early or delayed. The aim of our study is to determine the prevalence and predictors of HIBI on autopsy following an in hospital cardiac arrest. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who sustained an in hospital cardiorespiratory arrest and underwent autopsy following in hospital mortality at our tertiary care medical center from January 2004-June 2012. These patients were identified from the autopsy registry maintained by the Department of Pathology and were classified into two groups based on the presence or absence of HIBI on autopsy. We compared the baseline demographics, risk factors, total duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, number of resuscitative events and survival time between both groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of hypoxic ischemic injury following cardiac arrest. Out of 71 patients identified during this study period, 21% had evidence of HIBI on autopsy. On univariate analysis, predictors of HIBI were prolonged hospital stay, prolonged survival time following an arrest and a slight increased trend following multiple resuscitative events. On multivariate analysis, prolonged survival time was the only significant predictor of HIBI. Similar to other prognostication cardiac arrest studies, there were minimal predictors of early neuronal injury even on autopsy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Association of national initiatives to improve cardiac arrest management with rates of bystander intervention and patient survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Lippert, Freddy K.; Folke, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    temporal changes in bystander resuscitation attempts and survival during a 10-year period in which several national initiatives were taken to increase rates of bystander resuscitation and improve advanced care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for which...

  18. Optimizing Neurologically Intact Survival from Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Call to Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Goodloe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. national out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest survival rates, although improving recently, have remained suboptimal despite the collective efforts of individuals, communities, and professional societies. Only until very recently, and still with inconsistency, has focus been placed specifically on survival with pre-arrest neurologic function. The reality of current approaches to sudden cardiac arrest is that they are often lacking an integrative, multi-disciplinary approach, and without deserved funding and outcome analysis. In this manuscript, a multidisciplinary group of authors propose practice, process, technology, and policy initiatives to improve cardiac arrest survival with a focus on neurologic function. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  19. Management of cardiac arrest caused by coronary artery spasm: epinephrine/adrenaline versus nitrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Gabor; Corre, Olivier; Gueret, Gildas; Nguyen Ba, Vinh; Gilard, Martine; Boschat, Jaques; Arvieux, Charles Chistian

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines imply the use of epinephrine/adrenaline during cardiopulmonary arrest. However, in cardiac arrest situations resulting from coronary artery spasm (CAS), the use of epinephrine/adrenaline could be deleterious. A 49-year-old patient underwent an emergency coronarography with an attempt to stent the coronary arteries. Radiologic imaging revealed a positive methylergonovine maleate (Methergine, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ) test, with subocclusive CAS in several coronary vessels leading to electromechanical dissociation. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed, and intracoronary boluses of isosorbide dinitrate were given to treat CAS. Epinephrine/adrenaline was not administered during resuscitation. Spontaneous circulation was obtained after cardioversion for ventricular fibrillation, and the patient progressively regained consciousness. Resuscitation guidelines do not specify the use of trinitrate derivatives in cardiac arrest situations caused by CAS. The pros and cons of the use of nitrates and epinephrine/adrenaline during cardiac arrest caused by CAS are analyzed in this case report.

  20. Sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of Brugada syndrome unmasked by thyroid storm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, Anna K M; Derde, Lennie; van Wijk, Jeroen; Tjan, David H

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old man suffered a sudden cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation and was successfully resuscitated. He had neither a medical nor family history of cardiac disease/sudden death, but was known to have Graves' disease, for which he was treated with radioactive iodine. Recently,

  1. Characteristics and outcomes of young adults who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Michael Yih-Chong; Lu, Qing Shu; Rahman, Nik Hisamuddin; Doctor, Nausheen Edwin; Nishiuchi, Tatsuya; Leong, Benjamin Sieu-Hon; Tham, Lai Peng; Goh, E-Shaun; Tiah, Ling; Monsomboon, Apichaya; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2017-02-01

    There is paucity of data examining the incidence and outcomes of young OHCA adults. The aim of this study is to determine the outcomes and characteristics of young adults who suffered an OHCA and identify factors that are associated with favourable neurologic outcomes. All EMS-attended OHCA adults between the ages of 16 and 35 years in the Pan-Asian Resuscitation Outcomes Study (PAROS) registry were analysed. The primary outcome was favourable neurologic outcome (Cerebral Performance Category 1 or 2) at hospital discharge or at 30th day post OHCA if not discharged. Regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with favourable neurologic outcomes. 66,780 OHCAs were collected between January 2009 and December 2013; 3244 young OHCAs had resuscitation attempted by emergency medical services (EMS). 56.8% of patients had unwitnessed arrest; 47.9% were of traumatic etiology. 17.2% of patients (95% CI: 15.9-18.5%) had return of spontaneous circulation; 7.8% (95% CI: 6.9-8.8%) survived to one month; 4.6% (95% CI: 4.0-5.4%) survived with favourable neurologic outcomes. Factors associated with favourable neurologic outcomes include witnessed arrest (adjusted RR=2.42, p-valueyoung adults are not uncommon. Traumatic OHCA, occurring most frequently in young adults had dismal prognosis. First arrest rhythms of VF/VT/unknown shockable rhythm, cardiac etiology, bystander-witnessed arrest, and bystander CPR were associated with favourable neurological outcomes. The results of the study would be useful for planning preventive and interventional strategies, improving EMS, and guiding future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, Marie L.; Langendijk, Pim N. J.; Koopmans, Richard P.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Leufkens, Hubert G. M.; Hoes, Arno W.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: QTc interval-prolonging drugs have been linked to cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac arrest and sudden death. In this study we aimed to quantify the risk of cardiac arrest associated with the use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs in an academic hospital setting. METHODS: We performed a

  3. Genetic mutation in Korean patients of sudden cardiac arrest as a surrogating marker of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myoung Kyun; Ki, Chang-Seok; Park, Seung-Jung; Huh, June; Kim, June Soo; On, Young Keun

    2013-07-01

    Mutation or common intronic variants in cardiac ion channel genes have been suggested to be associated with sudden cardiac death caused by idiopathic ventricular tachyarrhythmia. This study aimed to find mutations in cardiac ion channel genes of Korean sudden cardiac arrest patients with structurally normal heart and to verify association between common genetic variation in cardiac ion channel and sudden cardiac arrest by idiopathic ventricular tachyarrhythmia in Koreans. Study participants were Korean survivors of sudden cardiac arrest caused by idiopathic ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. All coding exons of the SCN5A, KCNQ1, and KCNH2 genes were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. Fifteen survivors of sudden cardiac arrest were included. Three male patients had mutations in SCN5A gene and none in KCNQ1 and KCNH2 genes. Intronic variant (rs2283222) in KCNQ1 gene showed significant association with sudden cardiac arrest (OR 4.05). Four male sudden cardiac arrest survivors had intronic variant (rs11720524) in SCN5A gene. None of female survivors of sudden cardiac arrest had SCN5A gene mutations despite similar frequencies of intronic variants between males and females in 55 normal controls. Common intronic variant in KCNQ1 gene is associated with sudden cardiac arrest caused by idiopathic ventricular tachyarrhythmia in Koreans.

  4. Mutations in the Kv1.5 channel gene KCNA5 in cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nathalie H; Winkel, Bo G; Kanters, Jørgen K

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in one of the ion channels shaping the cardiac action potential can lead to action potential prolongation. However, only in a minority of cardiac arrest cases mutations in the known arrhythmia-related genes can be identified. In two patients with arrhythmia and cardiac arrest, we...... characteristics and drug sensitivity. Both patients also carried a D85N polymorphism in KCNE1, which was neither found to influence the Kv1.5 nor the Kv7.1 channel activity. We conclude that although the two N-terminal Kv1.5 mutations did not show any apparent electrophysiological phenotype, it is possible...

  5. Optimizing survival outcomes for adult patients with nontraumatic cardiac arrest [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julianna; Zaurova, Milana

    2016-10-22

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  6. Public-Access Defibrillation and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Sakai, Tomohiko; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Hatakeyama, Toshihiro; Shimamoto, Tomonari; Izawa, Junichi; Fujii, Tomoko; Nishiyama, Chika; Kawamura, Takashi; Iwami, Taku

    2016-10-27

    Early defibrillation plays a key role in improving survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrests due to ventricular fibrillation (ventricular-fibrillation cardiac arrests), and the use of publicly accessible automated external defibrillators (AEDs) can help to reduce the time to defibrillation for such patients. However, the effect of dissemination of public-access AEDs for ventricular-fibrillation cardiac arrest at the population level has not been extensively investigated. From a nationwide, prospective, population-based registry of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Japan, we identified patients from 2005 through 2013 with bystander-witnessed ventricular-fibrillation arrests of presumed cardiac origin in whom resuscitation was attempted. The primary outcome measure was survival at 1 month with a favorable neurologic outcome (Cerebral Performance Category of 1 or 2, on a scale from 1 [good cerebral performance] to 5 [death or brain death]). The number of patients in whom survival with a favorable neurologic outcome was attributable to public-access defibrillation was estimated. Of 43,762 patients with bystander-witnessed ventricular-fibrillation arrests of cardiac origin, 4499 (10.3%) received public-access defibrillation. The percentage of patients receiving public-access defibrillation increased from 1.1% in 2005 to 16.5% in 2013 (PThe percentage of patients who were alive at 1 month with a favorable neurologic outcome was significantly higher with public-access defibrillation than without public-access defibrillation (38.5% vs. 18.2%; adjusted odds ratio after propensity-score matching, 1.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.80 to 2.19). The estimated number of survivors in whom survival with a favorable neurologic outcome was attributed to public-access defibrillation increased from 6 in 2005 to 201 in 2013 (Pbystanders was associated with an increase in the number of survivors with a favorable neurologic outcome after out

  7. Distinctive Clinical Profile of Blacks Versus Whites Presenting With Sudden Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinier, Kyndaron; Nichols, Gregory A; Huertas-Vazquez, Adriana; Uy-Evanado, Audrey; Teodorescu, Carmen; Stecker, Eric C; Gunson, Karen; Jui, Jonathan; Chugh, Sumeet S

    2015-08-04

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a major contributor to mortality, but data are limited among nonwhites. Identification of differences in clinical profile based on race may provide opportunities for improved SCA prevention. In the ongoing Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study (SUDS), individuals experiencing SCA in the Portland, OR, metropolitan area were identified prospectively. Patient demographics, arrest circumstances, and pre-SCA clinical profile were compared by race among cases from 2002 to 2012 (for clinical history, n=126 blacks, n=1262 whites). Incidence rates were calculated for cases from the burden assessment phase (2002-2005; n=1077). Age-adjusted rates were 2-fold higher among black men and women (175 and 90 per 100 000, respectively) compared with white men and women (84 and 40 per 100 000, respectively). Compared with whites, blacks were >6 years younger at the time of SCA and had a higher prearrest prevalence of diabetes mellitus (52% versus 33%; Pblacks had more prevalent congestive heart failure (43% versus 34%; P=0.04) and left ventricular hypertrophy (77% versus 58%; P=0.02) and a longer QTc interval (466±36 versus 453±41 milliseconds; P=0.03). In this US community, the burden of SCA was significantly higher in blacks compared with whites. Blacks with SCA had a higher prearrest prevalence of risk factors beyond established coronary artery disease, providing potential targets for race-specific prevention. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. ECMO as an effective rescue therapeutic for fulminant myocarditis complicated with refractory cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Ting; Yang, Li-Fen; Chen, Zhuang-Gui; Pan, Li; Duan, Meng-Qi; Hu, Yan; Zhou, Cheng-Bin; Guo, Yu-Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Fulminant myocarditis (FM) is a life-threatening disease in children. With a rapid, progressive course of deterioration, it causes refractory cardiorespiratory failure even with optimal clinical intervention. We present the case of a 9-year-old girl with FM complicated by cardiogenic shock, malignant arrhythmia, and refractory cardiac arrest. She received effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation, therapeutic hypothermia, and other supportive treatments. However, the patient rapidly worsened into pulseless ventricular tachycardia and refractory cardiac arrest. Therefore, we performed extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to establish spontaneous circulation after the failure of standard resuscitation measures. The girl recovered with intact cardiac and neurocognitive functions after continued ECMO treatment for 221 hours. Therefore, ECMO is an effective rescue therapeutics for FM, especially when complicated with refractory cardiac arrest.

  9. Establishing a Rodent Model of Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest with Graded Histologic and Neurologic Damage with Different Cardiac Arrest Durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettl, Florian; Magnet, Ingrid A M; Weihs, Wolfgang; Warenits, Alexandra; Grassmann, Daniel; Wagner, Michael; Teubenbacher, Ursula; Högler, Sandra; Sterz, Fritz; Janata, Andreas

    2017-09-28

    To establish a ventricular fibrillation (VF) cardiac arrest (CA) resuscitation model with consistent neurologic and neuropathologic damage as potential therapeutic target. Prospectively randomized groups of experiments in 2 phases. In phase 1 four groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 5) were resuscitated after 6 min VFCA with 2 and 6 min basic life support durations (BLS) with and without adrenaline. In phase 2 the most promising group regarding return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival was compared to a group of 8 min CA. Resuscitability, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and overall performance category (OPC) were assessed daily; histolopathology of the hippocampal CA1 region [hematoxylin and eosin- (viable neurons), Fluoro-Jade- (dying neurons) and Iba-1 Immuno-staining (microglial activation - semiquantitative)] on day 14. Two minutes BLS and with adrenaline as most promising group of phase 1 compared to an 8 min group in phase 2 exhibited ROSC in 8 (80%) vs. 9 (82%) animals and survivors till day 14 in 7 (88%) (all OPC 1, NDS 0 ± 0) vs. 6 (67%) (5 OPC 1, 1 OPC 2, NDS 0.83 ± 2.4) animals. OPC and NDS were only significantly different at day 1 (OPC: p = 0.035 NDS: p = 0.003). Histopathologic results between groups were not significantly different, however a smaller variance of extent of lesions was found in the 8 min group. Both CA durations caused graded neurologic, overall, such as histopathologic damage. This dynamic global ischemia model offers the possibility to evaluate further cognitive and novel neuroprotective therapy testing after CA.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0.

  10. Hospital discharge diagnoses of ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrest were useful for epidemiologic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, M L; van Hemel, N M; Leufkens, H G M

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the validity of hospital discharge diagnosis regarding ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. METHODS: We identified patients whose record in the PHARMO record linkage system database showed a code for ventricular or unspecified cardiac arrhythmias according to cod...... according to ICD-9-CM as paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, ventricular flutter, ventricular premature beats, or cardiac arrest) have a high PPV and are useful for selecting events in epidemiological studies on drug-induced arrhythmias.......OBJECTIVE: We investigated the validity of hospital discharge diagnosis regarding ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. METHODS: We identified patients whose record in the PHARMO record linkage system database showed a code for ventricular or unspecified cardiac arrhythmias according to codes...... of the International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, clinical modification (ICD-9-CM). The validity of ICD codes for ventricular arrhythmias and cardiac arrest (427.1, 427.4, 427.41, 427.42, 427.5, 427.69) and ICD codes for unspecified cardiac arrhythmias (427.2, 427.60, 427.8, 427.89, 427.9) was ascertained...

  11. Clinical evaluation of unselected cardiac arrest survivors in a tertiary center over a 1-year period (the LAZARUZ study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, Peter; Corell, Pernille; Henriksen, Finn Lund

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: When the cause of an aborted cardiac arrest is unclear the initiation of therapy, counseling and family screening is challenging. METHODS: We included 43 unselected, prospectively identified cardiac arrest survivors with or without a diagnosis. Family history for cardiac disease...... and supplemental electrocardiograms were evaluated for additional diagnostic information. RESULTS: 43 cardiac arrest survivors were included, 34 (79%) were male and the average age was 48years (range 23-64, SD 13.0). The most common etiologies identified in cardiac arrest survivors were ischemic heart disease (33......%), cardiomyopathies (14%), miscellaneous (e.g. drug induced arrhythmias, coronary spasms) (12%) and channelopathies (5%). Family history of cardiac disease - even inheritable conditions - was not indicative of etiology in cardiac arrest survivors. Supplemental ECGs were abnormal in 10 of 43 patients; in the majority...

  12. [Chronobiology of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Galicia with semi-automatic external defibrillators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Araujo, L; Costa-Parcero, M; López-Campos, M; Sánchez-Santos, L; Iglesias-Vázquez, J A; Rodríguez-Núñez, A

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the chronobiological variations of out-hospital cardiac arrest in which an automated external defibrillator was used in Galicia. Descriptive retrospective study of the cardiac arrest attended by the Emergency Medical Service in which an automated external defibrillator was in use during a period of 5 years (2007-2011). An Utstein style database was used. The sex, age, date and hour of the event, location, cardiac arrest attended, beginning of resuscitation by the professional, first monitored rhythm, emergency team activation time and care, endotracheal intubation, and recovery of spontaneous circulation were studied as independent variables. A total of 2,005 cases (0.14/1,000 population-year) was recorded. Time slot with more frequency of cardiac arrest: between 09-11 hrs (18.4%). Months with more cases: January (10.4%) and December (9.8%). It was significantly more probable that the cardiac arrest occurred in the home between 00-08 hrs, and in the street between 08-16 hrs. Asystole was more frequent in the night period (00-08 hrs), whereas the shockable rhythm was in the evening (16-00 hrs). There is more probability of death after cardiac arrest between 00-08 hrs, with recovery of spontaneous circulation being more probable between 16-00 hrs. The time between the emergency team activation and time care was longer in night schedule. In Galicia, cardiac arrest is more frequent in the winter months and in morning schedule. There is a circadian distribution of the cardiac arrest and the rhythm detected at the time of the first assistance, with asystole being more common in night schedule and the shockable rhythm in the evening. The chronobiology of the cardiac arrest should be taken into account in order to organize the distribution and the schedule of the healthcare resources. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Main Complications of Mild Induced Hypothermia after Cardiac Arrest: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Soleimanpour

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to assess the complications of mild induced hypothermia (MIH in patients with cardiac arrest. Presently, based on the guidelines of the American heart Association, MIH following successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR in unconscious adult patients due to ventricular fibrillation (VF with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA is essential and required. However, MIH could be associated with complications in Patients with cardiac arrest. Studies conducted on the precautions and care following cardiac arrest and MIH were included. Valid scientific data bases were used for data collection. The obtained results from different studies revealed that mild MIH could be associated with numerous complications and the knowledge and awareness of the medical staff from the complications is required to guarantee successful therapeutic approaches in MIH following cardiac arrest which is a novel medical facility with different styles and complications. Overall, further future studies are required to improve the quality of MIH, to increase survival and to decrease complications rates.

  14. Apathy and Cognitive Deficits in Patients with Transient Global Ischemia After Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Stefan; Thiel, Friederike; Schroeter, Matthias L; Jentzsch, Regina Tina

    2017-12-01

    Despite the extensive literature on cognitive deficits in the course of transient global ischemia after cardiac arrest with delayed resuscitation, apathy has been studied less frequently and systematically. We aimed to evaluate the frequency of apathy, defined as changes in drive or lack of motivation, and its relation to cognition as well as depression in people with transient global ischemia after cardiac arrest. In a retrospective study using the clinical data of 38 cardiac arrest survivors, we analyzed the frequency and severity of deficits in four cognitive domains (attention, memory spans, long-term memory, and executive functions) as well as apathy. As in previous studies, long-term memory problems were predominant, but occurred rarely in isolation. Problems in drive were frequent and correlated with the severity of deficits in all cognitive domains except memory spans (and executive functions only as a trend). Influences of apathy were independent of the presence of a depressive syndrome. Transient global ischemia after cardiac arrest generally leads to a broad pattern of cognitive decline with predominating memory deficits. Apathy is a frequent sequela and is associated with cognitive deficits, independent of depression. Studies investigating the cognitive profile after cardiac arrest should account for modulating influences of apathy.

  15. Development of a data dictionary for the Strategies for Post Arrest Resuscitation Care (SPARC) network for post cardiac arrest research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steve; Morrison, Laurie J; Brooks, Steven C

    2011-04-01

    The widely accepted Utstein style has standardized data collection and analysis in resuscitation and post resuscitation research. However, collection of many of these variables poses significant practical challenges. In addition, several important variables in post resuscitation research are missing. Our aim was to develop a comprehensive data dictionary and web-based data collection tool as part of the Strategies for Post Arrest Resuscitation Care (SPARC) Network project, which implemented a knowledge translation program for post cardiac arrest therapeutic hypothermia in 37 Ontario hospitals. A list of data variables was generated based on the current Utstein style, previous studies and expert opinion within our group of investigators. We developed a data dictionary by creating clear definitions and establishing abstraction instructions for each variable. The data dictionary was integrated into a web-based collection form allowing for interactive data entry. Two blinded investigators piloted the data collection tool, by performing a retrospective chart review. A total of 454 variables were included of which 400 were Utstein, 2 were adapted from existing studies and 52 were added to address missing elements. Kappa statistics for two outcome variables, survival to discharge and induction of therapeutic hypothermia were 0.86 and 0.64, respectively. This is the first attempt in the literature to develop a data dictionary as part of a standardized, pragmatic data collection tool for post cardiac arrest research patients. In addition, our dataset defined important variables that were previously missing. This data collection tool can serve as a reference for future trials in post cardiac arrest care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Enterocyte Damage: A Piece in the Puzzle of Post-Cardiac Arrest Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piton, Gaël; Belin, Nicolas; Barrot, Loïc; Belon, François; Cypriani, Benoit; Navellou, Jean-Christophe; Capellier, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    Cardiac arrest is considered to be a cause of small bowel ischemia, but the consequences of cardiac arrest on the human small bowel have been rarely studied. Plasma citrulline concentration is a marker of functional enterocyte mass, and plasma intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) concentration is a marker of enterocyte damage. We aimed to measure enterocyte biomarkers after cardiac arrest and to study the prognostic value of biomarker abnormalities. This is a prospective, observational, single-center study of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for cardiac arrest, evaluating plasma citrulline and I-FABP concentrations at admission and after 24  h and variables according to the Utstein criteria. Variables according to 28-day Cerebral Performance Category score of 1 to 2 (good neurological outcome) versus 3 to 5 (poor neurological outcome) were compared. Sixty-nine patients with cardiac arrest of both cardiac and hypoxic origin were included. At ICU admission, plasma citrulline concentration was low in 65% and plasma I-FABP was elevated in 82% of the patients. After 24  h, plasma citrulline was low in 82% and I-FABP was normal in 60% of the patients. Patients with a poor neurological outcome had a lower plasma citrulline concentration and a higher I-FABP concentration at ICU admission. By multivariate analysis, plasma citrulline levels of 13.1  μmol L or less and I-FABP more than 260  pg mL were independently associated with a poor neurological outcome (odds ratio, 21.9 [2.2-215], and odds ratio, 13.6 [1.4-129], respectively). Cardiac arrest resuscitation is associated with evidence of small bowel mucosal damage in most patients, with a short and intense I-FABP elevation at admission and a decrease in citrulline concentration during the first day. In this study, low plasma citrulline and high I-FABP concentrations at ICU admission were predictive of a poor neurological outcome. This study confirms that cardiac arrest is a model of

  17. [Consideration of early rehabilitation in the treatment of post-cardiac arrest syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Masaki; Ogasawara, Sadanobu; Kadowaki, Aya; Onizuka, Shouzaburou; Samejima, Mituhiro

    2011-04-01

    Resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest is an unnatural pathophysiological state. In 2008, ILCOR has proposed "post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS)". Clinicians must focus on treating to reverse the pathophysiological manifestations of PCAS in bed. Immobility, deconditioning, and weakness are common problems in patients with critical illness. Therapeutic strategies have to be identified to give patients after ROSC the best chance for survival with good neurological function. Concerning the beneficial effects of early mobilization after stroke, and the efficacy of a strategy for whole-body rehabilitation in the earliest days of critical illness on functional outcomes, the intervention of early rehabilitation care by an interdisciplinary team seems to contribute to good long-time outcome of post-cardiac arrest patients.

  18. Can ambulance telephone triage using NHS Pathways accurately identify paediatric cardiac arrest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Charles D; England, Simon; Diffey, Debbie; Maconochie, Ian

    2017-07-01

    Most out-of-hospital paediatric cardiac arrests (CA) are not identified until a call is made to the emergency medical services. Accurate identification increases overall survival by enabling immediate ambulance dispatch and delivery of bystander CPR. European ambulance services use a variety of didactic telephone scripts to interrogate the caller and rapidly identify paediatric CA. The performance of these scripts has not been reported. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the NHS Pathways as a telephone triage tool to identify patients less than 16 years age in cardiac arrest. All emergency calls to South Central Ambulance Service (SCAS) over a 12-month period screened by 'NHS Pathways' v9.04 were identified. All actual or presumed paediatric CAs (telephone triage system for identifying CA. Further work is required to refine telephone triage pathways for paediatric cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiac Arrest Secondary to Lightning Strike: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotariu, Elena L; Manole, Mioara D

    2017-08-01

    Lightning strike injuries, although less common than electrical injuries, have a higher morbidity rate because of critical alterations of the circulatory system, respiratory system, and central nervous system. Most lightning-related deaths occur immediately after injury because of arrhythmia or respiratory failure. We describe the case of a pediatric patient who experienced cardiorespiratory arrest secondary to a lightning strike, where the Advanced Cardiac Life Support and Basic Life Support chain of survival was well executed, leading to return of spontaneous circulation and intact neurological survival. We review the pathophysiology of lightning injuries, prognostic factors of favorable outcome after cardiac arrest, including bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, shockable rhythm, and automatic external defibrillator use, and the importance of temperature management after cardiac arrest.

  20. Sudden Cardiac Arrest due to Brugada Syndrome: a Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Soleimanirad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Brugada Syndrome is a rare cause of sudden cardiac arrest and has a unique ECG pattern. In fact, with ST-segment elevation down sloping in the right precordial leads (v1-v3, RBBB pattern in lateral leads and J-point elevation is revealed. We must notice and avoid trigger factors of this syndrome during general anesthesia. Patient is a 39 old man who attended to emergency department with sudden cardiac arrest and resuscitate. He was transferred to ICU for management of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Complementary studies concluded the diagnosis of Brugada syndrome. We must consider Brugada syndrome within patients with family history of sudden cardiac arrest. Moreover, we must avoid trigger factors of this syndrome such as fever, bradicardia and electrolyte abnormality (specialy Na, Ca abnormalities during general anesthesia and if they appear, we should treat them.

  1. Survivors of cardiac arrest with good neurological outcome show considerable impairments of memory functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzgruber, Patrick; Kliegel, Andreas; Wandaller, Cosima; Uray, Thomas; Losert, Heidrun; Laggner, Anton N; Sterz, Fritz; Kliegel, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Deficits in cognitive function are a well-known dysfunction in survivors of cardiac arrest. However, data concerning memory function in this neurological vulnerable patient collective remain scarce and inconclusive. Therefore, we aimed to assess multiple aspects of retrospective and prospective memory performance in patients after cardiac arrest. We prospectively enrolled 33 survivors of cardiac arrest, with cerebral performance categories (CPC) 1 and 2 and a control-group (n=33) matched in sex, age and educational-level. To assess retrospective and prospective memory performance we administrated 4 weeks after cardiac arrest the "Rey Adult Learning Test" (RAVLT), the "Digit-Span-Backwards Test", the "Logic-Memory Test" and the "Red-Pencil Test". Results indicate an impairment in immediate and delayed free recall, but not in recognition. However, the overall impairment in immediate recall was qualified by analyzing RAVLT performance, showing that patients were only impaired in trials 4 and 5 of the learning sequence. Moreover, working and prospective memory as well as prose recall were worse in cardiac arrest survivors. Cranial computed tomography was available in 61% of all patients (n=20) but there was no specific neurological damage detectable that could be linked to this cognitive impairment. Episodic long-term memory functioning appears to be particularly impaired after cardiac arrest. In contrast, short-term memory storage, even tested via free-call, seems not to be affected. Based on cranial computed tomography we suggest that global brain ischemia rather than focal brain lesions appear to underlie these effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Temporal variation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in an equatorial climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus EH Ong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Marcus EH Ong1, Faith SP Ng2, Susan Yap1, Kok Leong Yong1, Mary A Peberdy3, Joseph P Ornato41Department of Emergency Medicine, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; 2Clinical Trials and Epidemiology Research Unit (now known as Singapore Clinical Research Institute, Singapore; 3Division of Cardiology, Virginia Commonwealth University – Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA, USA; 4Department of Emergency Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University – Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA, USAObjective: We aimed to determine whether there is a seasonal variation of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA in an equatorial climate, which does not experience seasonal environmental change.Methods: We conducted an observational prospective study looking at the occurrence of OHCA in Singapore. Included were all patients with OHCA presented to Emergency Departments across the country. We examined the monthly, daily, and hourly number of cases over a threeyear period. Data was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA.Results: From October, 1st 2001 to October, 14th 2004, 2428 patients were enrolled in the study. Mean age for cardiac arrests was 60.6 years with 68.0% male. Ethnic distribution was 69.5% Chinese, 15.0% Malay, 11.0% Indian, and 4.4% Others. There was no significant seasonal variation (spring/summer/fall/winter of events (ANOVA P = 0.71, monthly variation (P = 0.88 or yearly variation (P = 0.26. We did find weekly peaks on Mondays and a circadian pattern with daily peaks from 9–10 am.Conclusions: We did not find any discernable seasonal pattern of cardiac arrests. This contrasts with findings from temperate countries and suggests a climatic influence on cardiac arrest occurrence. We also found that sudden cardiac arrests follow a circadian pattern.Keywords: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, cardiac arrest, seasonal pattern, circadian pattern

  3. Unanticipated cardiac arrest under spinal anesthesia: An unavoidable mystery with review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anita; Gupta, Ruchi; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Singh, Amrinder

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest during anesthesia and perioperative period is a matter of grave concern for any anesthesiologist. But such mishaps have been reported for one reason or the other in the literary sciences. We are reporting the occurrence of unanticipated delayed cardiac arrest following spinal anesthesia in two young and healthy patients. Fortunately, these patients were successfully resuscitated with timely and appropriate cardiopulmonary resuscitative measures. Occurrence of such cases needs timely reporting and exploring all the possible causes of these unusual and possibly avoidable events. The present case reports are an important addition to a series of recently published mishaps that occurred during spinal anesthesia in young and healthy patients.

  4. Strategic Placement of Ambulance Drones for Delivering Defibrillators to Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Victims

    OpenAIRE

    Lennartsson, Josefin

    2015-01-01

    The number of out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCAs) that occur in Sweden every year is really high and there are very few survivors. When a cardiac arrest happens the heart loses its original rhythm and to find it again the heart needs to be shocked within minutes. There is on going research to see what can be done to improve the survival rate. Publicly accessible defibrillators are one thing that is being implemented. Another solution being considered right now is the possibility of deliver...

  5. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Potential Prognostic Implications After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Wanscher, Michael

    2015-01-01

    , interleukin-6 was independently associated with mortality, whereas both interleukin-6 levels (hazard ratio=1.23 [1.01-1.49]; p=0.04) and procalcitonin levels (hazard ratio=1.20 [1.03-1.39]; p=0.02) 24 hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were associated with 30-day mortality with no interactions between.......63, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Level of inflammation, assessed by interleukin-6 and procalcitonin, was independently associated with increased mortality with the highest discriminative value obtained 24 hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Interventions aiming at decreasing level of inflammation as a way...

  6. Management of severe hypercapnia post cardiac arrest with extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruvoipati, R; Gupta, S; Haji, K; Braun, G; Carney, I; Botha, J A

    2014-03-01

    Normocapnia is recommended in intensive care management of patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. While normocapnia is usually achievable, it may be therapeutically challenging, particularly in patients with airflow obstruction. Conventional mechanical ventilation may not be adequate to provide optimal ventilation in such patients. One of the recent advances in critical care management of hypercapnia is the advent of newer, low-flow extracorporeal carbon dioxide clearance devices. These are simpler and less invasive than conventional extracorporeal devices. We report the first case of using a novel, extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal device in Australia on a patient with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest where mechanical ventilation failed to achieve normocapnia.

  7. The heart of the matter: utility of ultrasound of cardiac activity during traumatic arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cureton, Elizabeth L; Yeung, Louise Y; Kwan, Rita O; Miraflor, Emily J; Sadjadi, Javid; Price, Daniel D; Victorino, Gregory P

    2012-07-01

    The clinical utility of determining cardiac motion on ultrasound has been reported for patients presenting in pulseless medical cardiac arrest. However, the relationship between ultrasound-documented cardiac activity and the probability of surviving pulseless electrical activity has not been examined in populations with trauma. We hypothesized that cardiac activity on ultrasound predicts survival for patients presenting in pulseless traumatic arrest. We conducted a retrospective analysis at our university-based urban trauma center of adult patients with trauma, who were pulseless on hospital arrival. Results of cardiac ultrasound performed during trauma resuscitations were compared with the electrocardiogram (EKG) rhythm and survival. Among 318 pulseless patients with trauma, 162 had both EKG tracings and a cardiac ultrasound, and 4.3% of these 162 patients survived to hospital admission. Survival was higher for those with cardiac motion than for those without it (23.5% vs. 1.9% for patients with EKG electrical activity, p = 0.002, and 66.7% vs. 0% for patients without EKG electrical activity, p cardiac motion to predict survival to hospital admission was 86% (specificity, 91%; positive predictive value, 30%; negative predictive value, 99%). When examined by mechanism, sensitivity was 100% for the 111 patients with penetrating trauma and 75% for the 50 patients with blunt trauma. Survival in pulseless traumatic arrest is very low, but survival for patients with no cardiac motion on ultrasound is also exceedingly rare. Cardiac ultrasound had a negative predictive value approaching 100% for survival to hospital admission. For patients with prolonged prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation, ultrasound evaluation of cardiac motion in pulseless patients with trauma may be a rapid way to help determine which patients have no chance of survival in the setting of lethal injuries, so that futile resuscitations can be stopped.

  8. ECMO as an effective rescue therapeutic for fulminant myocarditis complicated with refractory cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li YT

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ya-Ting Li,1,* Li-Fen Yang,1,* Zhuang-Gui Chen,1,* Li Pan,1 Meng-Qi Duan,1 Yan Hu,2 Cheng-bin Zhou,3 Yu-Xiong Guo2 1Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 2Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, 3Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Fulminant myocarditis (FM is a life-threatening disease in children. With a rapid, progressive course of deterioration, it causes refractory cardiorespiratory failure even with optimal clinical intervention. We present the case of a 9-year-old girl with FM complicated by cardiogenic shock, malignant arrhythmia, and refractory cardiac arrest. She received effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation, therapeutic hypothermia, and other supportive treatments. However, the patient rapidly worsened into pulseless ventricular tachycardia and refractory cardiac arrest. Therefore, we performed extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO to establish spontaneous circulation after the failure of standard resuscitation measures. The girl recovered with intact cardiac and neurocognitive functions after continued ECMO treatment for 221 hours. Therefore, ECMO is an effective rescue therapeutics for FM, especially when complicated with refractory cardiac arrest. Keywords: cardiac arrest, children, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, fulminant myocarditis

  9. Cardiorespiratory interactions and blood flow generation during cardiac arrest and other states of low blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Gardar; Yannopoulos, Demetris; McKnite, Scott H; Lurie, Keith G

    2003-06-01

    Recent advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation have shed light on the importance of cardiorespiratory interactions during shock and cardiac arrest. This review focuses on recently published studies that evaluate factors that determine preload during chest compression, methods that can augment preload, and the detrimental effects of hyperventilation and interrupting chest compressions. Refilling of the ventricles, so-called ventricular preload, is diminished during cardiovascular collapse and resuscitation from cardiac arrest. In light of the potential detrimental effects and challenges of large-volume fluid resuscitations, other methods have increasing importance. During cardiac arrest, active decompression of the chest and impedance of inspiratory airflow during the recoil of the chest work by increasing negative intrathoracic pressure and, hence, increase refilling of the ventricles and increase cardiac preload, with improvement in survival. Conversely, increased frequency of ventilation has detrimental effects on coronary perfusion pressure and survival rates in cardiac arrest and severe shock. Prolonged interruption of chest compressions for delivering single-rescuer ventilation or analyzing rhythm before shock delivery is associated with decreased survival rate. Cardiorespiratory interactions are of profound importance in states of cardiovascular collapse in which increased negative intrathoracic pressure during decompression of the chest has a favorable effect and increased intrathoracic pressure with ventilation has a detrimental effect on survival rate.

  10. Intestinal ischaemia during cardiac arrest and resuscitation: comparative analysis of extracellular metabolites by microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, Ulrike; Krieter, Heiner; Denz, Christof; Janke, Christoph; Ellinger, Klaus; Bertsch, Thomas; Henn, Claudia; Klein, Jochen

    2003-08-01

    Intestinal ischaemia is a major complication of shock syndromes causing translocation of bacteria and endotoxins and multiple organ failure in intensive care patients. The present study was designed to use microdialysis as a tool to monitor intestinal ischaemia after cardiac arrest and resuscitation in pigs. For this purpose, microdialysis probes were implanted in pig jejunal wall, peritoneum, skeletal muscle and brain, and interstitial fluid was obtained during circulatory arrest (induced by ventricular fibrillation) and after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Cardiac arrest for 4 min caused a prolonged (60 min) reduction of blood flow in jejunal wall, muscle and brain as determined by the ethanol technique. This was accompanied by cellular damage in heart muscle and brain as indicated by increased levels of troponin-I and protein S-100, respectively. Plasma levels of glucose, lactate and choline were increased at 15-60 min following cardiac arrest. In contrast, cardiac arrest induced a rapid but variable decrease of interstitial glucose levels in all monitored organs; this decrease was followed by an increase over baseline during reperfusion. In the intestine, lactate, glutamate and choline levels were increased during ischaemia and reperfusion for 60-120 min; intestinal and peritoneal samples yielded parallel changes of lactate levels. Brain and muscle samples showed similar changes as in intestinum and peritoneum except for glutamate, which was increased in brain but not in muscle. We conclude that intestinal ischaemia occurs as a consequence of cardiac arrest and resuscitation and can be monitored by in vivo microdialysis. Comparative analysis by multi-site microdialysis reveals that the intestine is equally or even more sensitive to ischaemia than brain or muscle.

  11. Cardiac arrest during treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with intravenous pentamidine isethionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, U; Berild, D; Nielsen, T L

    1992-01-01

    A 27-year-old man, HIV-positive for 4 years, developed ventricular fibrillation and cardiac arrest during treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with intravenous pentamidine isethionate. The dosage was 4 mg/kg/day for 18 days. Nephrotoxicity occurred and raised serum potassium. The plasma...... concentration of pentamidine was 580 nmol/l. Careful monitoring of renal and cardiac functions is recommended during intravenous therapy with pentamidine isethionate....

  12. Prehospital behaviour of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or witnessed cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Michael Mundt; Dixen, Ulrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2003-01-01

    -four per cent of the patients admitted with cardiac arrest expressed no prior symptoms. Two-thirds of patients with typical symptoms interpreted it as cardiac-still only half took action within 20 min. Fifty per cent of patients who called a physician were delayed by wrong advice or misinterpretation. One...... for medical assistance. Perceiving jeopardy had positive influence on the behaviour. Awareness of therapeutic options influences the decision-making process....

  13. Hemodynamic effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibition before and after cardiac arrest in infant piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleien, C L; Kuluz, J W; Gelman, B

    1998-04-01

    Using infant piglets, we studied the effects of nonspecific inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 3 mg/kg) on vascular pressures, regional blood flow, and cerebral metabolism before 8 min of cardiac arrest, during 6 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and at 10 and 60 min of reperfusion. We tested the hypotheses that nonspecific NO synthase inhibition 1) will attenuate early postreperfusion hyperemia while still allowing for successful resuscitation after cardiac arrest, 2) will allow for normalization of blood flow to the kidneys and intestines after cardiac arrest, and 3) will maintain cerebral metabolism in the face of altered cerebral blood flow after reperfusion. Before cardiac arrest, L-NAME increased vascular pressures and cardiac output and decreased blood flow to brain (by 18%), heart (by 36%), kidney (by 46%), and intestine (by 52%) compared with placebo. During CPR, myocardial flow was maintained in all groups to successfully resuscitate 24 of 28 animals [P value not significant (NS)]. Significantly, L-NAME attenuated postresuscitation hyperemia in cerebellum, diencephalon, anterior cerebral, and anterior-middle watershed cortical brain regions and to the heart. Likewise, cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRGluc) and of lactate production (CMRLac) were not elevated at 10 min of reperfusion. These cerebral blood flow and metabolic effects were reversed by L-arginine. Flows returned to baseline levels by 60 min of reperfusion. Kidney and intestinal flow, however, remained depressed throughout reperfusion in all three groups. Thus nonspecific inhibition of NO synthase did not adversely affect the rate of resuscitation from cardiac arrest while attenuating cerebral and myocardial hyperemia. Even though CMRGluc and CMRLac early after resuscitation were decreased, they were maintained at baseline levels. This may be clinically advantageous in protecting the brain and heart from the damaging effects of

  14. Therapeutic Hypothermia Reduces Oxidative Damage and Alters Antioxidant Defenses after Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenhaar, Fernanda S.; Medeiros, Tássia M.; Heemann, Fernanda M.; Behling, Camile S.; Putti, Jordana S.; Mahl, Camila D.; Verona, Cleber; da Silva, Ana Carolina A.; Guerra, Maria C.; Gonçalves, Carlos A. S.; Oliveira, Vanessa M.; Riveiro, Diego F. M.; Vieira, Silvia R. R.

    2017-01-01

    After cardiac arrest, organ damage consequent to ischemia-reperfusion has been attributed to oxidative stress. Mild therapeutic hypothermia has been applied to reduce this damage, and it may reduce oxidative damage as well. This study aimed to compare oxidative damage and antioxidant defenses in patients treated with controlled normothermia versus mild therapeutic hypothermia during postcardiac arrest syndrome. The sample consisted of 31 patients under controlled normothermia (36°C) and 11 patients treated with 24 h mild therapeutic hypothermia (33°C), victims of in- or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Parameters were assessed at 6, 12, 36, and 72 h after cardiac arrest in the central venous blood samples. Hypothermic and normothermic patients had similar S100B levels, a biomarker of brain injury. Xanthine oxidase activity is similar between hypothermic and normothermic patients; however, it decreases posthypothermia treatment. Xanthine oxidase activity is positively correlated with lactate and S100B and inversely correlated with pH, calcium, and sodium levels. Hypothermia reduces malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, markers of oxidative damage. Concomitantly, hypothermia increases the activity of erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferase while decreasing the activity of serum paraoxonase-1. These findings suggest that mild therapeutic hypothermia reduces oxidative damage and alters antioxidant defenses in postcardiac arrest patients. PMID:28553435

  15. The School Nurse Role in Preparing for Sudden Cardiac Arrest in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Warna K.; Ficca, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were introduced for first responders in 1992 to manage adult cardiac arrest and are now common in many public places. Today AEDs are capable of shocking children under 8 years of age, or less than 55 pounds. This presents a challenge for school nurses, particularly as the prevalence of chronic medical…

  16. Willingness to Perform Chest Compression Only in Witnessed Cardiac Arrest Victims versus Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesreen Yaghmour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performing immediate bystander Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR is the most important factor that determines survival from cardiac arrest. Recommended mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver during CPR has led to lower rate of CPR performance in the population. Objectives: The present survey aimed to evaluate the willingness of nurses at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for performing CPR versus chest-compression-only CPR. Patients and Methods: During a CPR course, we performed a survey on 25 nurses from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. This survey included age and gender of the participants. In the first question, they were asked about their willingness to perform CPR with mouth to mouth breathing for witnessed cardiac arrest victims. In the second question, they were asked about their willingness to perform chest compression only for cardiac arrest victims. Results: Among the participating nurses, 96% were female with a mean age of 31 years. Only 40% were willing to perform CPR that requires mouth to mouth ventilation. On the other hand, 92% were willing to perform chest compression only without mouth to mouth ventilation. The mean age of the nurses who would do CPR was lower compared to those who would not. Conclusions: In this survey, we demonstrated that eliminating mouth to mouth ventilation maneuver could lead to markedly higher willingness to perform CPR for witnessed cardiac arrest victims in CPR trained nursing personnel. Our study is in agreement with other studies advocating that chest-compression-only CPR could lead to higher bystander resuscitation efforts.

  17. EMuRgency: Addressing cardiac arrest with socio-technical innovation in a smart learning region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Klerkx, Joris; Parra, Gonzalo; Haberstroh, Max; Elsner, Jesko; Ternier, Stefaan; Schilberg, Daniel; Jeschke, Sabina; Duval, Erik; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Kalz, M., Klerx, J., Parra, G., Haberstroh, M., Elsner, J., Ternier, S., Schilberg, D., Jeschke, S., Duval, E., & Specht, M. (2013). EMuRgency: Addressing cardiac arrest with socio-technical innovation in a smart learning region. Interaction Design and Architectures Journal. Summer 2013 (17), 77-91.

  18. Platelet aggregation during targeted temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Anni Nørgaard; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Grejs, Anders Morten

    2017-01-01

    temperature management affected platelet aggregation. We randomised 82 comatose patients resuscitated after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to either 24 hours (standard group) or 48 hours (prolonged group) of targeted temperature management at 33±1°C. Blood samples were collected 22 hours, 46 hours and 70......® decreased by 14% (95% CI -8%;-20%), p management....

  19. Targeted Temperature Management at 33°C versus 36°C after Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; Cronberg, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Background Unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have a high risk of death or poor neurologic function. Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended by international guidelines, but the supporting evidence is limited, and the target temperature associated with the best outcome is unkn...

  20. Sudden Cardiac arrest Risk profile in a group of amateur level ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... males and females in this group of university basketball players showed varying signs of SCA risk, with the overall risk being reasonably low, albeit abnormalities were highlighted in some and Marfanoid characteristics were clearly evident in others. Key words: Sudden cardiac arrest; Basketball players, Marfan syndrome; ...

  1. Identifying non-technical skills and barriers for improvement of teamwork in cardiac arrest teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.O.; Jensen, Michael Kammer; Lippert, A.

    2010-01-01

    2006 to November 2006. Interviews were focussed on barriers and recommendations for teamwork in the cardiac arrest team, optimal policy for improvement of resuscitation training and clinical practice, use of cognitive aids and adoption of European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines 2005. Interviews...

  2. Increased prevalence of ECG markers for sudden cardiac arrest in refractory epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, R. J.; Blom, M. T.; Novy, J.; Belluzzo, M.; Seldenrijk, A.; Penninx, B. W.; Sander, J. W.; Tan, H. L.; Thijs, R. D.

    2015-01-01

    People with epilepsy are at increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ECG-confirmed ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation, as seen in a community-based study. We aimed to determine whether ECG-risk markers of SCA are more prevalent in people with epilepsy. In a cross-sectional,

  3. Increased prevalence of ECG markers for sudden cardiac arrest in refractory epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, R.; Blom, M.; Novy, J.; Belluzzo, M.; Seldenrijk, A.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Sander, J.; Tan, H.L.; Thijs, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: People with epilepsy are at increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ECG-confirmed ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation, as seen in a community-based study. We aimed to determine whether ECG-risk markers of SCA are more prevalent in people with epilepsy. Methods: In a

  4. Long-term prognosis after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsted, Tina I; Rasmussen, Lars S; Meyhoff, Christian S

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study we aimed to report survival beyond 6 months, including quality of life, for patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with a physician-based EMS in an urban area. METHODS: We collected data related to OHCA prospectively during a 2-year period. Long-term survival...

  5. extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patients with out-of-hospital refractory cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obling, Laust; Wiberg, Sebastian; Møller, Jacob Eifer

    2017-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Treatment options remain few in refractory cases, but extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR) is increasingly applied to improve the outcome. This article summarizes the use, experience and outcome of e...

  6. GLP-1 analogues for neuroprotection after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    Background: Attenuating the neurological damage occurring after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is an ongoing research effort. This dual-centre study investigates the neuroprotective effects of the glucagon-like-peptide-1 analogue Exenatide administered within 4 hours from the return of spontaneous...

  7. Long-term neuropsychological outcomes in children and adolescents after cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van Zellem (Lennart); C.M.P. Buysse (Corinne); M.J. Madderom (Marlous); F.K. Aarsen (Femke); J.S. Legerstee (Jeroen); D. Tibboel (Dick); E.M.W.J. Utens (Elisabeth)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Research into neuropsychological functioning of survivors of cardiac arrest (CA) in childhood is scarce. We sought to assess long-term neuropsychological functioning in children and adolescents surviving CA. Methods: Neuropsychological follow-up study involving all consecutive

  8. Evaluation of intensified prehospital treatment in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, F; Nielsen, J R; Gram, L

    1991-01-01

    of a test for dementia was assessed in long-term survivors (n = 30) together with 28 patients surviving acute myocardial infarction and 11 control persons. The results of the investigation demonstrate that the more intensive the prehospital treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, the more patients...

  9. Cardiac Arrest During Medically-Supervised Exercise Training: A Report of Fifteen Successful Defibrillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyfer, Howard R.; And Others

    The Cardio-Pulmonary Research Institute conducted an exercise program for men with a history of coronary heart disease. Over 7 years, there were 15 cases of cardiac arrest during exercise (one for every 6,000 man-hours of exercise). Trained medical personnel were present in all cases, and all were resuscitated by electrical defibrillation with no…

  10. Defibrillation probability and impedance change between shocks during resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, Robert G.; Koster, Rudolph W.; Sun, Charles; Moffat, George; Barger, Joseph; Dodson, Pamela P.; Chapman, Fred W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Technical data now gathered by automated external defibrillators (AEDs) allows closer evaluation of the behavior of defibrillation shocks administered during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed technical data from a large case series to evaluate the change in transthoracic

  11. Cardiac arrest from intravenous indigo carmine during laparoscopic surgery -A case report-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Indigo carmine (sodium indigotindisulfonate) is a safe, biologically inactive blue dye routinely administered intravascularly during urologic and gynecologic procedures to localize the ureteral orifices and to identify severed ureters and fistulous communications. We report a case of hypotension, cardiac arrest, and cerebral ischemia after the administration of indigo carmine in a patient under total laparoscopic hysterectomy. PMID:22323961

  12. Cardiac arrest during treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with intravenous pentamidine isethionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, U; Berild, D; Nielsen, T L

    1992-01-01

    A 27-year-old man, HIV-positive for 4 years, developed ventricular fibrillation and cardiac arrest during treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with intravenous pentamidine isethionate. The dosage was 4 mg/kg/day for 18 days. Nephrotoxicity occurred and raised serum potassium. The plasma...

  13. Seasonal variability and influence of outdoor temperature on body temperature of cardiac arrest victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratil, Peter; Wallmueller, Christian; Schober, Andreas; Stoeckl, Mathias; Hoerburger, David; Weiser, Christoph; Testori, Christoph; Krizanac, Danica; Spiel, Alexander; Uray, Thomas; Sterz, Fritz; Haugk, Moritz

    2013-05-01

    Mild therapeutic hypothermia is a major advance in post-resuscitation-care. Some questions remain unclear regarding the time to initiate cooling and the time to achieve target temperature below 34 °C. We examined whether seasonal variability of outside temperature influences the body temperature of cardiac arrest victims, and if this might have an effect on outcome. Patients with witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests were enrolled retrospectively. Temperature variables from 4 climatic stations in Vienna were provided from the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics. Depending on the outside temperature at the scene the study participants were assigned to a seasonal group. To compare the seasonal groups a Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U test was performed as appropriate. Of 134 patients, 61 suffered their cardiac arrest during winter, with an outside temperature below 10 °C; in 39 patients the event occurred during summer, with an outside temperature above 20 °C. Comparing the tympanic temperature recorded at hospital admission, the median of 36 °C (IQR 35.3-36.3) during summer differed significantly to winter with a median of 34.9 °C (IQR 34-35.6) (ptemperature had no impact on the time-to-target-temperature, survival rate or neurologic recovery. The seasonal variability of outside temperature influences body temperature of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Out-of-Hospital Perimortem Cesarean Section as Resuscitative Hysterotomy in Maternal Posttraumatic Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Gatti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimal treatment of a severe hemodynamic instability from shock to cardiac arrest in late term pregnant women is subject to ongoing studies. However, there is an increasing evidence that early “separation” between the mother and the foetus may increase the restoration of the hemodynamic status and, in the cardiac arrest setting, it may raise the likelihood of a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC in the mother. This treatment, called Perimortem Cesarean Section (PMCS, is now termed as Resuscitative Hysterotomy (RH to better address the issue of an early Cesarean section (C-section. This strategy is in contrast with the traditional treatment of cardiac arrest characterized by the maintenance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR maneuvers without any emergent surgical intervention. We report the case of a prehospital perimortem delivery by Caesarean (C section of a foetus at 36 weeks of gestation after the mother’s traumatic cardiac arrest. Despite the negative outcome of the mother, the choice of performing a RH seems to represent up to date the most appropriate intervention to improve the outcome in both mother and foetus.

  15. Epinephrine in cardiac arrest: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Cané, Ignacio; Valverde-León, María Del Rocío; Rodríguez-Borrego, María Aurora

    2016-12-08

    evaluate the effectiveness of epinephrine used during cardiac arrest and its effect on the survival rates and neurological condition. systematic review of scientific literature with meta-analysis, using a random effects model. The following databases were used to research clinical trials and observational studies: Medline, Embase and Cochrane, from 2005 to 2015. when the Return of Spontaneous Circulation (ROSC) with administration of epinephrine was compared with ROSC without administration, increased rates were found with administration (OR 2.02. 95% CI 1.49 to 2.75; I2 = 95%). Meta-analysis showed an increase in survival to discharge or 30 days after administration of epinephrine (OR 1.23; 95% IC 1.05-1.44; I2=83%). Stratification by shockable and non-shockable rhythms showed an increase in survival for non-shockable rhythm (OR 1.52; 95% IC 1.29-1.78; I2=42%). When compared with delayed administration, the administration of epinephrine within 10 minutes showed an increased survival rate (OR 2.03; 95% IC 1.77-2.32; I2=0%). administration of epinephrine appears to increase the rate of ROSC, but when compared with other therapies, no positive effect was found on survival rates of patients with favorable neurological status. avaliar a efetividade da adrenalina na parada cardíaca e seu efeito na sobrevivência e no estado neurológico. revisão sistemática da literatura científica com meta-análise utilizando um modelo de efeitos aleatórios. Revisão em Medline, Embase e Cochrane, desde 2005 até 2015 de ensaios clínicos e estudos observacionais. observou-se aumento nas taxas de retorno de circulação espontânea com a administração de adrenalina (OR 2,02; 95% IC 1,49-2,75; I2=95%) comparadas com a não administração de adrenalina. A meta-análise mostrou um aumento da sobrevivência na alta ou depois de 30 dias da administração de adrenalina (OR 1,23; 95% IC 1,05-1,44; I2=83%). Quando estratificados por ritmos desfibrilháveis e não desfibrilh

  16. Prediction and Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Daniel P; Homoud, Munther K; Estes, N A Mark

    2017-12-01

    Sudden death is a major problem, with significant impact on public health. Many conditions predispose to sudden cardiac death and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), foremost among them coronary artery disease, and an effective therapy exists in the form of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Risk stratification for SCA remains imperfect, especially for patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Ongoing trials may make it easier to identify those at high risk, and potentially those at very low risk, in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Detailed statistical analysis plan for the target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Winkel, Per; Cronberg, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Animal experimental studies and previous randomized trials suggest an improvement in mortality and neurological function with temperature regulation to hypothermia after cardiac arrest. According to a systematic review, previous trials were small, had a risk of bias, evaluated select populations......, and did not treat hyperthermia in the control groups. The optimal target temperature management (TTM) strategy is not known. To prevent outcome reporting bias, selective reporting and data-driven results, we present the a priori defined detailed statistical analysis plan as an update to the previously...

  18. Outcomes after in-hospital cardiac arrest in children with cardiac disease: a report from Get With the Guidelines--Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmann, Laura; Prodhan, Parthak; Gossett, Jeffrey; Schexnayder, Stephen; Berg, Robert; Nadkarni, Vinay; Bhutta, Adnan

    2011-11-22

    Small studies suggest that children experiencing a cardiac arrest after undergoing cardiac surgery have better outcomes than other groups of patients, but the survival outcomes and periarrest variables of cardiac and noncardiac pediatric patients have not been compared. All cardiac arrests in patients <18 years of age were identified from Get With the Guidelines-Resuscitation from 2000 to 2008. Cardiac arrests occurring in the neonatal intensive care unit were excluded. Of 3323 index cardiac arrests, 19% occurred in surgical-cardiac, 17% in medical-cardiac, and 64% in noncardiac (trauma, surgical-noncardiac, and medical-noncardiac) patients. Survival to hospital discharge was significantly higher in the surgical-cardiac group (37%) compared with the medical-cardiac group (28%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.5) and the noncardiac group (23%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-2.4). Those in the cardiac groups were younger and less likely to have preexisting noncardiac organ dysfunction, but were more likely to have ventricular arrhythmias as their first pulseless rhythm, to be monitored and hospitalized in the intensive care unit at the time of cardiac arrest, and to have extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation compared with those in the noncardiac group. There was no survival advantage for patients in the medical-cardiac group compared with those in the noncardiac group when adjusted for periarrest variables. Children with surgical-cardiac disease have significantly better survival to hospital discharge after an in-hospital cardiac arrest compared with children with medical-cardiac disease and noncardiac disease.

  19. Detoxification with hemabsorption after cardiac arrest does not improve neurologic recovery. Review and outcome study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterz, F; Safar, P; Diven, W; Leonov, Y; Radovsky, A; Oku, K

    1993-04-01

    We and others hypothesized that noxious substances released after prolonged cardiac arrest from malfunctioning liver, kidneys, or intestine (e.g. bacterial toxins, aromatic amino acids), might hamper recovery of the brain. The highly detoxifying effect of hemabsorption (i.e. hemoperfusion) with microencapsulated activated carbon has been demonstrated in other diseases. We used our dog model of ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest of 15 min (n = 2 x 4) or 12.5 min (n = 2 x 6), reversed by brief (high flow) cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). In half of the dogs in each insult group, a charcoal filter (HemoKart) was inserted into the circuit of CPB at low flow, from start of reperfusion to 4 h. Intermittent positive pressure ventilation was to 20 h and intensive care to 96 h after cardiac arrest. Bacterial blood cultures were positive in most of the dogs in both groups 30 min to 20 h after cardiac arrest (but not later) and were uninfluenced by hemabsorption. In the control groups to 4 h after cardiac arrest, serum levels of potentially injurious aromatic amino acids (e.g. phenylalanine, tyrosine) and of branched-chain/aromatic amino acid ratios, remained unchanged. From 12 to 48 h after cardiac arrest, aromatic amino acid levels increased (worsened). The branched-chain/aromatic amino acid ratios changed accordingly in the opposite direction. In the hemabsorption groups to 4 h after cardiac arrest, all amino acid levels were reduced, aromatic amino acids more so than branched-chain amino acids, thus increasing (improving) the ratio, compared with controls (P arrest, were not significantly different between groups. The lack of a beneficial outcome effect of hemabsorption to 4 h after cardiac arrest does not support the self-intoxication hypothesis. The amino acid levels later after cardiac arrest suggest that more prolonged hemabsorption and more encompassing detoxification treatments, such as plasma phoresis or total body blood washout, might be evaluated.

  20. Association between a quantitative CT scan measure of brain edema and outcome after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metter, Robert B; Rittenberger, Jon C; Guyette, Francis X; Callaway, Clifton W

    2011-09-01

    Cerebral edema is one physical change associated with brain injury and decreased survival after cardiac arrest. Edema appears on computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain as decreased X-ray attenuation by gray matter. This study tested whether the gray matter attenuation to white matter attenuation ratio (GWR) was associated with survival and functional recovery. Subjects were patients hospitalized after cardiac arrest at a single institution between 1/1/2005 and 7/30/2010. Subjects were included if they had non-traumatic cardiac arrest and a non-contrast CT scan within 24h after cardiac arrest. Attenuation (Hounsfield Units) was measured in gray matter (caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, and cortex) and in white matter (internal capsule, corpus callosum and centrum semiovale). The GWR was calculated for basal ganglia and cerebrum. Outcomes included survival and functional status at hospital discharge. For 680 patients, 258 CT scans were available, but 18 were excluded because of hemorrhage (10), intravenous contrast (3) or technical artifact (5), leaving 240 CT scans for analysis. Lower GWR values were associated with lower initial Glasgow Coma Scale motor score. Overall survival was 36%, but decreased with decreasing GWR. The average of basal ganglia and cerebrum GWR provided the best discrimination. Only 2/58 subjects with average GWR<1.20 survived and both were treated with hypothermia. The association of GWR with functional outcome was completely explained by mortality when GWR<1.20. Subjects with severe cerebral edema, defined by GWR<1.20, have very low survival with conventional care, including hypothermia. GWR estimates pre-treatment likelihood of survival after cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mobile-phone dispatch of laypersons for CPR in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringh, Mattias; Rosenqvist, Mårten; Hollenberg, Jacob; Jonsson, Martin; Fredman, David; Nordberg, Per; Järnbert-Pettersson, Hans; Hasselqvist-Ax, Ingela; Riva, Gabriel; Svensson, Leif

    2015-06-11

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed by bystanders is associated with increased survival rates among persons with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We investigated whether rates of bystander-initiated CPR could be increased with the use of a mobile-phone positioning system that could instantly locate mobile-phone users and dispatch lay volunteers who were trained in CPR to a patient nearby with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We conducted a blinded, randomized, controlled trial in Stockholm from April 2012 through December 2013. A mobile-phone positioning system that was activated when ambulance, fire, and police services were dispatched was used to locate trained volunteers who were within 500 m of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; volunteers were then dispatched to the patients (the intervention group) or not dispatched to them (the control group). The primary outcome was bystander-initiated CPR before the arrival of ambulance, fire, and police services. A total of 5989 lay volunteers who were trained in CPR were recruited initially, and overall 9828 were recruited during the study. The mobile-phone positioning system was activated in 667 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests: 46% (306 patients) in the intervention group and 54% (361 patients) in the control group. The rate of bystander-initiated CPR was 62% (188 of 305 patients) in the intervention group and 48% (172 of 360 patients) in the control group (absolute difference for intervention vs. control, 14 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, 6 to 21; Pmobile-phone positioning system to dispatch lay volunteers who were trained in CPR was associated with significantly increased rates of bystander-initiated CPR among persons with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. (Funded by the Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation and Stockholm County; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01789554.).

  2. Outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated by basic vs advanced life support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghavi, Prachi; Jena, Anupam B; Newhouse, Joseph P; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2015-02-01

    Most out-of-hospital cardiac arrests receiving emergency medical services in the United States are treated by ambulance service providers trained in advanced life support (ALS), but supporting evidence for the use of ALS over basic life support (BLS) is limited. To compare the effects of BLS and ALS on outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Observational cohort study of a nationally representative sample of traditional Medicare beneficiaries from nonrural counties who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 1, 2009, and October 2, 2011, and for whom ALS or BLS ambulance services were billed to Medicare (31,292 ALS cases and 1643 BLS cases). Propensity score methods were used to compare the effects of ALS and BLS on patient survival, neurological performance, and medical spending after cardiac arrest. Survival to hospital discharge, to 30 days, and to 90 days; neurological performance; and incremental medical spending per additional survivor to 1 year. Survival to hospital discharge was greater among patients receiving BLS (13.1% vs 9.2% for ALS; 4.0 [95% CI, 2.3-5.7] percentage point difference), as was survival to 90 days (8.0% vs 5.4% for ALS; 2.6 [95% CI, 1.2-4.0] percentage point difference). Basic life support was associated with better neurological functioning among hospitalized patients (21.8% vs 44.8% with poor neurological functioning for ALS; 23.0 [95% CI, 18.6-27.4] percentage point difference). Incremental medical spending per additional survivor to 1 year for BLS relative to ALS was $154,333. Patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who received BLS had higher survival at hospital discharge and at 90 days compared with those who received ALS and were less likely to experience poor neurological functioning.

  3. Management of simulated maternal cardiac arrest by residents: didactic teaching versus electronic learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hards, Andrea; Davies, Sharon; Salman, Aliya; Erik-Soussi, Magda; Balki, Mrinalini

    2012-09-01

    Successful resuscitation of a pregnant woman undergoing cardiac arrest and survival of the fetus require prompt, high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The objective of this observational study was to assess management of maternal cardiac arrest by anesthesia residents using high-fidelity simulation and compare subsequent performance following either didactic teaching or electronic learning (e-learning). Twenty anesthesia residents were randomized to receive either didactic teaching (Didactic group, n = 10) or e-learning (Electronic group, n = 10) on maternal cardiac arrest. Baseline management skills were tested using high-fidelity simulation, with repeat simulation testing one month after their teaching intervention. The time from cardiac arrest to start of perimortem Cesarean delivery (PMCD) was measured, and the technical and nontechnical skills scores between the two teaching groups were compared. The median [interquartile range] time to PMCD decreased after teaching, from 4.5 min [3.4 to 5.1 min] to 3.5 min [2.5 to 4.0 min] (P = 0.03), although the change within each group was not statistically significant (Didactic group 4.9 to 3.8 min, P = 0.2; Electronic group 3.9 to 2.5 min, P = 0.07; Didactic group vs Electronic group, P = 1.0). Even after teaching, only 65% of participants started PMCD within four minutes. Technical and nontechnical skills scores improved after teaching in both groups, and there were no differences between the groups. There are gaps in the knowledge and implementation of resuscitation protocols and the recommended modifications for pregnancy among residents. Teaching can improve performance during management of maternal cardiac arrest. Electronic learning and didactic teaching offer similar benefits.

  4. Paramedic Intubation Experience Is Associated With Successful Tube Placement but Not Cardiac Arrest Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Kylie; Bray, Janet E; Smith, Karen; Bernard, Stephen; Straney, Lahn; Nair, Resmi; Finn, Judith

    2017-09-01

    Paramedic experience with intubation may be an important factor in skill performance and patient outcomes. Our objective is to examine the association between previous intubation experience and successful intubation. In a subcohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases, we also measure the association between patient survival and previous paramedic intubation experience. We analyzed data from Ambulance Victoria electronic patient care records and the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry for January 1, 2008, to September 26, 2014. For each patient case, we defined intubation experience as the number of intubations attempted by each paramedic in the previous 3 years. Using logistic regression, we estimated the association between intubation experience and (1) successful intubation and (2) first-pass success. In the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cohort, we determined the association between previous intubation experience and patient survival. During the 6.7-year study period, 769 paramedics attempted intubation in 14,857 patients. Paramedics typically performed 3 intubations per year (interquartile range 1 to 6). Most intubations were successful (95%), including 80% on the first attempt. Previous intubation experience was associated with intubation success (odds ratio 1.04; 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.05) and intubation first-pass success (odds ratio 1.02; 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.03). In the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest subcohort (n=9,751), paramedic intubation experience was not associated with patient survival. Paramedics in this Australian cohort performed few intubations. Previous experience was associated with successful intubation. Among out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients for whom intubation was attempted, previous paramedic intubation experience was not associated with patient survival. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of Medical Priority Dispatch (MPD) and Criteria Based Dispatch (CBD) relating to cardiac arrest calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Camilla; Olasveengen, Theresa M; Lawrence, Rob; Garrison, Danny; Lorem, Tonje; Farstad, Gunnar; Wik, Lars

    2014-05-01

    Prompt emergency medical service (EMS) system activation with rapid delivery of pre-hospital treatment is essential for patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The two most commonly used dispatch tools are Medical Priority Dispatch (MPD) and Criteria Based Dispatch (CBD). We compared cardiac arrest call processing using these two dispatch tools in two different dispatch centres. Observational study of adult EMS confirmed (non-EMS witnessed) OHCA calls during one year in Richmond, USA (MPD) and Oslo, Norway (CBD). Patients receiving CPR prior to call, interrupted calls or calls where the caller did not have access to the patients were excluded from analysis. Dispatch logs, ambulance records and digitalized dispatcher and caller voice recordings were compared. The MPDS-site processed 182 cardiac arrest calls and the CBD-site 232, of which 100 and 140 calls met the inclusion criteria, respectively. The recognition of cardiac arrest was not different in the MPD and CBD systems; 82% vs. 77% (p=0.42), and pre-EMS arrival CPR instructions were offered to 81% vs. 74% (p=0.22) of callers, respectively. Time to ambulance dispatch was median (95% confidence interval) 15 (13, 17) vs. 33 (29, 36) seconds (pCBD systems, respectively (p=0.05). Pre-arrival CPR instructions were offered faster and more frequently in the CBD system, but in both systems chest compressions were delayed 3-4min. Earlier recognition of cardiac arrest and improved CPR instructions may facilitate earlier lay rescuer CPR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hospital Variation in Survival Trends for In‐hospital Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotra, Saket; Cram, Peter; Spertus, John A.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Li, Yan; Jones, Philip G.; Chan, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Background During the past decade, survival after in‐hospital cardiac arrest has improved markedly. It remains unknown whether the improvement in survival has occurred uniformly at all hospitals or was driven by large improvements at only a few hospitals. Methods and Results We identified 93 342 adults with an in‐hospital cardiac arrest at 231 hospitals in the Get With The Guidelines®‐Resuscitation registry during 2000–2010. Using hierarchical regression models, we evaluated hospital‐level trends in survival to discharge. Mean age was 66 years, 59% were men, and 21% were black. Between 2000 and 2010, there was a significant decrease in age, prevalence of heart failure and myocardial infarction, and cardiac arrests due to shockable rhythms (Phospital rates of in‐hospital cardiac arrest survival improved by 7% per year (odds ratio [OR] 1.07, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.08, Phospital quartile to 11% in the top hospital quartile. Compared with minor teaching hospitals (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.06), hospital rate of survival improvement was greater at major teaching (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.10) and nonteaching hospitals (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.09, P value for interaction=0.03). Conclusion Although in‐hospital cardiac arrest survival has improved during the past decade, the magnitude of improvement varied across hospitals. Future studies are needed to identify hospital processes that have led to the largest improvement in survival. PMID:24922627

  7. Sudden cardiac arrest in sports - need for uniform registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solberg, E E; Borjesson, M; Sharma, S

    2016-01-01

    preparticipation screening and cardiac safety at sport facilities requires increased data quality concerning incidence, aetiology and management of SCA/SCD in sports. Uniform standard registration of SCA/SCD in athletes and leisure sportsmen would be a first step towards this goal......., the importance of gender, ethnicity and age of the athlete, as well as the type and level of sporting activity. A precise instruction for autopsy practice in the case of a SCD of athletes is given, including the role of molecular samples and evaluation of possible doping. Rational decisions about cardiac...

  8. Recurrent syncope and cardiac arrest in a patient with systemic light chain amyloidosis treated with bortezomib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Jaipaul

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available About 10-15% of patients with multiple myeloma develop light chain (AL amyloidosis. AL amyloidosis is a systemic disease that may involve multiple organs, often including the heart. It may present clinically with bradyarrhythmia and syncope. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has been used with clinical efficacy in treating patients with AL amyloidosis but also implicated as a possible cause of cardiomyocyte injury. We report a case of a 48-year-old man with AL amyloidosis and increased frequency of syncope and cardiac arrest after starting bortezomib. The biologic and clinical plausibility of a heightened risk for cardiac arrest in patients with cardiac AL amyloidosis and history of syncope being treated with bortezomib is a possibility that is not well documented in the medical literature and warrants further investigation.

  9. Clinical Trials in Cardiac Arrest and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Lessons from the Past and Ideas for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Frontera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Elevated intracranial pressure that occurs at the time of cerebral aneurysm rupture can lead to inadequate cerebral blood flow, which may mimic the brain injury cascade that occurs after cardiac arrest. Insights from clinical trials in cardiac arrest may provide direction for future early brain injury research after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Methods. A search of PubMed from 1980 to 2012 and clinicaltrials.gov was conducted to identify published and ongoing randomized clinical trials in aneurysmal SAH and cardiac arrest patients. Only English, adult, human studies with primary or secondary mortality or neurological outcomes were included. Results. A total of 142 trials (82 SAH, 60 cardiac arrest met the review criteria (103 published, 39 ongoing. The majority of both published and ongoing SAH trials focus on delayed secondary insults after SAH (70%, while 100% of cardiac arrest trials tested interventions within the first few hours of ictus. No SAH trials addressing treatment of early brain injury were identified. Twenty-nine percent of SAH and 13% of cardiac arrest trials showed outcome benefit, though there is no overlap mechanistically. Conclusions. Clinical trials in SAH assessing acute brain injury are warranted and successful interventions identified by the cardiac arrest literature may be reasonable targets of the study.

  10. Trends in PICU Admission and Survival Rates in Children in Australia and New Zealand Following Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straney, Lahn D; Schlapbach, Luregn J; Yong, Glenn; Bray, Janet E; Millar, Johnny; Slater, Anthony; Alexander, Janet; Finn, Judith

    2015-09-01

    To describe the temporal trends in rates of PICU admissions and mortality for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and in-hospital cardiac arrests admitted to PICU over the last decade. Multicenter, retrospective analysis of prospectively collected binational data of the Australian and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care Registry. All nine specialist PICUs in Australia and New Zealand were included. All children admitted between 2003 and 2012 to PICU who were less than 16 years old at the time of admission. None. There were a total of 71,425 PICU admissions between 2003 and 2012. Overall, cardiac arrest accounted for 1.86% of all admissions (1,329 cases), including 677 cases of in-hospital cardiac arrest (51.0%) and 652 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (49.0%). Over the last decade, there has been a 29.6% increase in the odds of PICU survival for all pediatric admissions (odds ratio, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.09-1.54). By contrast, there was no significant improvement in the risk-adjusted odds of survival for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest admissions (odds ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.50-2.10; p = 0.94) or in-hospital cardiac arrest admissions (odds ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.54-1.98; p = 0.92). Despite improvements in overall outcomes in children admitted to Australian and New Zealand PICUs, survival of children admitted with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest or in-hospital cardiac arrest did not change significantly over the past decade.

  11. Amiodarone, Lidocaine, or Placebo in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudenchuk, Peter J; Brown, Siobhan P; Daya, Mohamud; Rea, Thomas; Nichol, Graham; Morrison, Laurie J; Leroux, Brian; Vaillancourt, Christian; Wittwer, Lynn; Callaway, Clifton W; Christenson, James; Egan, Debra; Ornato, Joseph P; Weisfeldt, Myron L; Stiell, Ian G; Idris, Ahamed H; Aufderheide, Tom P; Dunford, James V; Colella, M Riccardo; Vilke, Gary M; Brienza, Ashley M; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Gray, Pamela C; Gray, Randal; Seals, Norman; Straight, Ron; Dorian, Paul

    2016-05-05

    Antiarrhythmic drugs are used commonly in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for shock-refractory ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia, but without proven survival benefit. In this randomized, double-blind trial, we compared parenteral amiodarone, lidocaine, and saline placebo, along with standard care, in adults who had nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, shock-refractory ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia after at least one shock, and vascular access. Paramedics enrolled patients at 10 North American sites. The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge; the secondary outcome was favorable neurologic function at discharge. The per-protocol (primary analysis) population included all randomly assigned participants who met eligibility criteria and received any dose of a trial drug and whose initial cardiac-arrest rhythm of ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia was refractory to shock. In the per-protocol population, 3026 patients were randomly assigned to amiodarone (974), lidocaine (993), or placebo (1059); of those, 24.4%, 23.7%, and 21.0%, respectively, survived to hospital discharge. The difference in survival rate for amiodarone versus placebo was 3.2 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.4 to 7.0; P=0.08); for lidocaine versus placebo, 2.6 percentage points (95% CI, -1.0 to 6.3; P=0.16); and for amiodarone versus lidocaine, 0.7 percentage points (95% CI, -3.2 to 4.7; P=0.70). Neurologic outcome at discharge was similar in the three groups. There was heterogeneity of treatment effect with respect to whether the arrest was witnessed (P=0.05); active drugs were associated with a survival rate that was significantly higher than the rate with placebo among patients with bystander-witnessed arrest but not among those with unwitnessed arrest. More amiodarone recipients required temporary cardiac pacing than did recipients of lidocaine or placebo. Overall, neither

  12. Adrenaline, terlipressin, and corticoids versus adrenaline in the treatment of experimental pediatric asphyxial cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Rafael; Urbano, Javier; Botrán, Marta; López, Jorge; Solana, Maria J; García, Ana; Fernández, Sarah; López-Herce, Jesús

    2014-07-01

    To analyze if treatment with adrenaline (epinephrine) plus terlipressin plus corticoids achieves higher return of spontaneous circulation than adrenaline in an experimental infant animal model of asphyxial cardiac arrest. Prospective randomized animal study. Experimental department in a University Hospital. Forty-nine piglets were studied. Cardiac arrest was induced by at least 10 minutes of removal of mechanical ventilation and was followed by manual external chest compressions and mechanical ventilation. After 3 minutes of resuscitation, piglets that did not achieve return of spontaneous circulation were randomized to two groups: adrenaline 0.02 mg kg every 3 minutes (20 animals) and adrenaline 0.02 mg kg every 3 minutes plus terlipressin 20 μg kg every 6 minutes plus hydrocortisone 30 mg kg one dose (22 animals). Resuscitation was discontinued when return of spontaneous circulation was achieved or after 24 minutes. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 14 piglets (28.5%), 14.2% with only cardiac massage and ventilation. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 25% of piglets treated with adrenaline and in 9.1% of those treated with adrenaline plus terlipressin plus hydrocortisone (p = 0.167). Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 45.4% of animals with pulseless electric activity, 20% with asystole, and 0% with ventricular fibrillation (p = 0.037). Shorter duration of cardiac arrest, higher mean blood pressure and EtCO2 and lower PaCO2 before resuscitation, and higher mean blood pressure during resuscitation were associated with higher return of spontaneous circulation. Treatment with adrenaline plus terlipressin plus corticoids does not achieve higher return of spontaneous circulation than that with adrenaline in an infant animal model of asphyxial cardiac arrest.

  13. Locating AED Enabled Medical Drones to Enhance Cardiac Arrest Response Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulver, Aaron; Wei, Ran; Mann, Clay

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOHCA) is prevalent in the United States. Each year between 180,000 and 400,000 people die due to cardiac arrest. The automated external defibrillator (AED) has greatly enhanced survival rates for OOHCA. However, one of the important components of successful cardiac arrest treatment is emergency medical services (EMS) response time (i.e., the time from EMS "wheels rolling" until arrival at the OOHCA scene). Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have regularly been used for remote sensing and aerial imagery collection, but there are new opportunities to use drones for medical emergencies. The purpose of this study is to develop a geographic approach to the placement of a network of medical drones, equipped with an automated external defibrillator, designed to minimize travel time to victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Our goal was to have one drone on scene within one minute for at least 90% of demand for AED shock therapy, while minimizing implementation costs. In our study, the current estimated travel times were evaluated in Salt Lake County using geographical information systems (GIS) and compared to the estimated travel times of a network of AED enabled medical drones. We employed a location model, the Maximum Coverage Location Problem (MCLP), to determine the best configuration of drones to increase service coverage within one minute. We found that, using traditional vehicles, only 4.3% of the demand can be reached (travel time) within one minute utilizing current EMS agency locations, while 96.4% of demand can be reached within five minutes using current EMS vehicles and facility locations. Analyses show that using existing EMS stations to launch drones resulted in 80.1% of cardiac arrest demand being reached within one minute Allowing new sites to launch drones resulted in 90.3% of demand being reached within one minute. Finally, using existing EMS and new sites resulted in 90.3% of demand being reached while greatly reducing

  14. A Report of Brugada Syndrome Presenting with Cardiac Arrest Triggered by Verapamil Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahraman Yakut

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brugada syndrome is a disease characterized by a specific electrocardiographic pattern and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. We present this case with the updated literature to emphasise the need to consider the diagnosis of Brugada syndrome in patients admitted to the emergency ward with sudden cardiac arrest. Case Report: A 16-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency ward with complaints of weakness and abdominal pain, and she had four cardiac arrests during her evaluation period. She was referred to our clinic for permanent pacemaker implantation. She was on a temporary pace maker after having had C-reactive protein. Her physical exam was normal except for bilaterally decreased lung sounds. Lung x-ray and computed tomography, which were performed by another institution, revealed minimal pleural effusion and nothing else of significance. Blood and peritoneal fluid samples were sterile. Echocardiographic exam and cardiac enzymes were also in the normal ranges. Electrocardiographic showed incomplete right branch block in leads V1 and V2. An ajmaline test revealed specific electrocardiographic findings of the type I Brugada pattern. We proposed implanting an implantable cardioverter defibrillator to the patient as there were positive findings on the ajmaline test as well as a history of sudden cardiac arrest. After this treatment proposal, the patient’s family admitted that she had taken a high dose of verapamil and thus, the encountered bradycardia was associated with verapamil overuse. The ajmaline test was repeated as it was contemplated that the previous positive ajmaline test had been associated with verapamil overuse. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation was proposed again as there was a history of sudden cardiac arrest; however, the family did not consent to implantable cardioverter defibrillator, and the patient was discharged and followed up. Conclusion: Brugada syndrome should be

  15. Return to Work in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke Normark

    2015-01-01

    reported to the Danish Cardiac Arrest Register since 2001. During 2001-2011, we identified 4354 patients employed before arrest among 12 332 working-age patients (18-65 years), of whom 796 survived to day 30. Among 796 survivors (median age, 53 years [quartile 1-3, 46-59 years]; 81.5% men), 610 (76...... over time (66.1% in 2001-2005 versus 78.1% in 2006-2011; P=0.002). In multivariable Cox regression analysis, factors associated with return to work with ≥6 months of sustainable employment were as follows: (1) arrest during 2006-2011 versus 2001-2005, hazard ratio (HR), 1.38 (95% CI, 1.05-1.82); (2...

  16. Gender differences in 24-hour outcome following resuscitation after 9 minutes of cardiac arrest in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwemer, C F; O'Connor, E M; Whitesall, S E; D'Alecy, L G

    1997-02-01

    To examine possible gender-specific differences in 24-hr outcome following resuscitation from 9 mins of controlled cardiac arrest. Preclinical, prospective study comparing two similarly prepared, independent control groups (one female group, one male group) included in a larger series of studies. Physiology research laboratory at a major medical center. Male and female mongrel dogs (Canis familiaris), weighing 16 to 22 kg. Cardiopulmonary-cerebral resuscitation following 9 mins of normothermic cardiac arrest in male vs. female dogs. Mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, urine output, arterial blood oxygen, and PCO2 values, arterial pH, temperature, plasma glucose concentrations, and hematocrit were measured and recorded at the precardiac arrest and postcardiac arrest period, and at 30 mins, and 1, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hrs following resuscitation. Neurologic dysfunction was assessed using a well-standardized neurologic deficit score assigned at 6, 12, and 24 hrs after arrest. Plasma concentrations of malonaldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione were measured at the precardiac arrest period, and 6, 12, and 24 hrs following resuscitation. Additionally, serum concentrations of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, creatinine kinase, creatinine, albumin, and total protein were measured before arrest, and at 6, 12, and 24 hrs after resuscitation. Plasma concentrations of inorganic phosphorus, blood urea nitrogen, and electrolytes (sodium, chloride, calcium, and potassium) were measured. The estrous cycle phase in the female dogs enrolled in the study was determined by physical examination and vaginal cytology. No prearrest differences were detectable between males and females in basic physiologic variables. No differences in neurologic deficit were detectable between males and females across the 24-hr recovery period following resuscitation. No detectable

  17. European Resuscitation Council (ERC) - the Network to fight against cardiac arrest in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffay, Violetta

    2013-09-01

    The ideas of collaboration and formation of scientific societies and registries for cardiac arrest were developed in the 18th century. The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) was formed in 1990. Nowadays, the ERC network consists of 30 National Resuscitation Councils (NRCs), which have an obligation to ensure that effective resuscitation services are provided and to promote education, training, and research in all aspects of resuscitation science. The central role of NRCs in decreasing the incidence of cardiac arrest may be highlighted and enhanced by the incorporation and implementation of the following suggestions. NRCs should emphasize and actively participate in acute care training of healthcare professionals and of lay rescuers. Implementation of current resuscitation guidelines should be a priority of each NRC and identification of the weakest link in the chain of survival should be a priority. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Post-cardiac arrest level of free-plasma DNA and DNA-histone complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, A N; Hvas, A-M; Grejs, A M

    2017-01-01

    Background Plasma DNA-histone complexes and total free-plasma DNA have the potential to quantify the ischaemia-reperfusion damages occurring after cardiac arrest. Furthermore, DNA-histone complexes may have the potential of being a target for future treatment. The aim was to examine if plasma DNA-histone...... after 22, 46 and 70 h. Samples for DNA-histone complexes were quantified by Cell Death Detection ELISAplus. The total free-plasma DNA analyses were quantified with qPCR by analysing the Beta-2 microglobulin gene. The control group comprised 40 healthy individuals. Results We found no difference...... in the level of DNA-histone complexes between the 22-h sample and healthy individuals (P = 0.10). In the 46-h sample, there was an increased level of DNA-histone complexes in non-survivors compared with survivors 30 days after the cardiac arrest (P

  19. Cardiac Arrest Following Drug Abuse with Intravenous Tapentadol: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaja, Misbahuddin; Lominadze, George; Millerman, Konstantin

    2017-07-21

    BACKGROUND Tapentadol is a centrally acting opioid analgesic, with a dual mode of action, as a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor and an agonist of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Tapentadol is used for the management of musculoskeletal pain, and neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. CASE REPORT A 32-year-old woman attended hospital for evaluation of an intractable headache. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were negative. She was found unresponsive in the bathroom on the day following hospital admission, and despite resuscitative measures, the patient died following cardiac arrest. Autopsy toxicology revealed significantly elevated levels of tapentadol, and bedside evidence suggested that the patient had self-administered this medication intravenously before her death. CONCLUSIONS We report a rare adverse effect of tapentadol causing respiratory depression leading to cardiac arrest. Medical examiners and forensic toxicologists should be aware of the toxicity of this novel opiate drug.

  20. Intravascular versus surface cooling for targeted temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glover, Guy W; Thomas, Richard M; Vamvakas, George

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Targeted temperature management is recommended after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and may be achieved using a variety of cooling devices. This study was conducted to explore the performance and outcomes for intravascular versus surface devices for targeted temperature management after...... out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHOD: A retrospective analysis of data from the Targeted Temperature Management trial. N = 934. A total of 240 patients (26%) managed with intravascular versus 694 (74%) with surface devices. Devices were assessed for speed and precision during the induction......, maintenance and rewarming phases in addition to adverse events. All-cause mortality, as well as a composite of poor neurological function or death, as evaluated by the Cerebral Performance Category and modified Rankin scale were analysed. RESULTS: For patients managed at 33 °C there was no difference between...

  1. Survival after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Nursing Homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pape, Marianne; Rajan, Shahzleen; Hansen, Steen Møller

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival among nursing home residents who suffers out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is sparsely studied. Deployment of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in nursing home facilities in Denmark is unknown. We examined 30-day survival following OHCA in nursing and private home...... residents. METHODS: This register-based, nationwide, follow-up study identified OHCA-patients ≥18 years of age with a resuscitation attempt in nursing homes and private homes using Danish Cardiac Arrest Register data from June 1, 2001 to December 31, 2014. The primary outcome measure was 30-day survival....... Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess factors potentially associated with survival among nursing and private home residents separately. RESULTS: Of 26,999 OCHAs, 2516 (9.3%) occurred in nursing homes, and 24,483 (90.7%) in private homes. Nursing home residents were older (median 83 (Q1...

  2. Cardiac arrest after anesthetic management in a patient with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergül Yakup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV is a rare disorder with an autosomal recessive transmission and characterized by self-mutilation due to a lack in pain and heat sensation. Recurrent hyperpyrexia and anhydrosis are seen in patients as a result of a lack of sweat gland innervation. Self-mutilation and insensitivity to pain result in orthopedic complications and patients undergone recurrent surgical interventions with anesthesia. However, these patients are prone to perioperative complications such as hyperthermia, hypothermia, and cardiac complications like bradycardia and hypotension. We report a 5-year-old boy with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV, developing hyperpyrexia and cardiac arrest after anesthesia.

  3. Antipsychotics and Associated Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, Peter; Jensen, Aksel; Folke, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs have been associated with sudden cardiac death, but differences in the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) associated with different antipsychotic drug classes are not clear. We identified all OHCA in Denmark (2001-2010). Risk of OHCA associated with antipsychotic drug...... use was evaluated by conditional logistic regression analysis in case-time-control models. In total, 2,205 (7.6%) of 28,947 OHCA patients received treatment with an antipsychotic drug at the time of event. Overall treatment with any antipsychotic was associated with OHCA (odds ratio [OR]= 1.53, 95...

  4. Critical incidents related to cardiac arrests reported to the Danish Patient Safety Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Oluf; Maaløe, Rikke; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2010-01-01

    Background Critical incident reports can identify areas for improvement in resuscitation practice. The Danish Patient Safety Database is a mandatory reporting system and receives critical incident reports submitted by hospital personnel. The aim of this study is to identify, analyse and categorize...... critical incidents related to cardiac arrests reported to the Danish Patient Safety Database. Methods The search terms “cardiac arrest” and “resuscitation” were used to identify reports in the Danish Patient Safety Database. Identified critical incidents were then classified into categories. Results One...

  5. [Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. A cold intravenous fluid, a cooling helmet and a cooling blanket efficiently reduce body temperature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Cronberg, Tobias; Widner, Håkan; Englund, Elisabet; Ersson, Anders

    2004-07-22

    Two controlled randomized trials have shown that mild systemic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is beneficial for neurological outcome and one of the studies shows an improved survival rate. A pilot study was performed to evaluate a model of induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest, using cold intravenous fluids and surface cooling with a cold helmet and a coldwater blanket (Thermowrap). The main purpose was to evaluate our cooling method regarding efficacy, safety and usability. Five unconscious patients after cardiac arrest were treated with induced hypothermia of whom three survived with good recovery to six-month follow up. Two patients died in the ICU without regaining consciousness. There were no adverse events during treatment. We conclude that our method is reasonably fast compared to other published methods, it is easy to perform and it offers a good temperature control during cooling and rewarming. Routines for evaluating prognosis and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment need to be revised.

  6. Lay Bystanders' Perspectives on What Facilitates Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Use of Automated External Defibrillators in Real Cardiac Arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rosenkranz, Simone Mørk; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest will fail to receive bystander intervention (cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR] or defibrillation) despite widespread CPR training and the dissemination of automated external defibrillators (AEDs). We sought to investigate what...

  7. Detailed statistical analysis plan for the target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Winkel, Per; Cronberg, Tobias; Erlinge, David; Friberg, Hans; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Horn, Janneke; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wise, Matt P.; Aneman, Anders; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    Animal experimental studies and previous randomized trials suggest an improvement in mortality and neurological function with temperature regulation to hypothermia after cardiac arrest. According to a systematic review, previous trials were small, had a risk of bias, evaluated select populations,

  8. Antidepressant Use and Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, P; Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg; Folke, F

    2012-01-01

    being the most frequently used type of antidepressant (50.8%). Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs; odds ratio (OR) = 1.69, confidence interval (CI): 1.14-2.50) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; OR = 1.21, CI: 1.00-1.47) were both associated with comparable increases in risk of OHCA.......17-12.2). An association between cardiac arrest and antidepressant use could be documented in both the SSRI and TCA classes of drugs....

  9. Hemodynamic–directed cardiopulmonary resuscitation during in–hospital cardiac arrest*

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, Robert M.; Friess, Stuart H.; Maltese, Matthew R.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R.; Garuccio, Mia; Bhalala, Utpal; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines assume that cardiac arrest victims can be treated with a uniform chest compression (CC) depth and a standardized interval administration of vasopressor drugs. This non-personalized approach does not incorporate a patient’s individualized response into ongoing resuscitative efforts. In previously reported porcine models of hypoxic and normoxic ventricular fibrillation (VF), a hemodynamic-directed resuscitation improved short-term survival compared...

  10. Pulmonary emboli cardiac arrest with CPR complication: Liver laceration and massive abdominal bleed, a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Lundqvist, John; Jakobsson, Jan G.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Massive pulmonary emboli may cause right ventricular failure and backward stasis with parenchymal organ swelling thus increasing the risk for laceration, e.g. if CPR is needed. Presentation of case: A 28-year-old Colombian female with no medical history but taking contraceptive pills and having had a recent longer flight was admitted to Danderyds hospital Emergency Department because of respiratory failure. She developed cardiac arrest in the emergence department following th...

  11. Genetic, clinical and pharmacological determinants of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, M T; van Hoeijen, D A; Bardai, A

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major public health problem. Recognising the complexity of the underlying causes of OHCA in the community, we aimed to establish the clinical, pharmacological, environmental and genetic factors and their interactions that may cause OHCA...... victims since June 2005, we prospectively collect medical history (through hospital and general practitioner), and current and previous medication use (through community pharmacy). In addition, we include DNA samples from OHCA victims with documented ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation during...

  12. Enhanced pyruvate dehydrogenase activity improves cardiac outcomes in a murine model of cardiac arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Piao

    Full Text Available Post-ischemic changes in cellular metabolism alter myocardial and neurological function. Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH, the limiting step in mitochondrial glucose oxidation, is inhibited by increased expression of PDH kinase (PDK during ischemia/reperfusion injury. This results in decreased utilization of glucose to generate cellular ATP. Post-cardiac arrest (CA hypothermia improves outcomes and alters metabolism, but its influence on PDH and PDK activity following CA are unknown. We hypothesized that therapeutic hypothermia (TH following CA is associated with the inhibition of PDK activity and increased PDH activity. We further hypothesized that an inhibitor of PDK activity, dichloroacetate (DCA, would improve PDH activity and post-CA outcomes.Anesthetized and ventilated adult female C57BL/6 wild-type mice underwent a 12-minute KCl-induced CA followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Compared to normothermic (37°C CA controls, administering TH (30°C improved overall survival (72-hour survival rate: 62.5% vs. 28.6%, P<0.001, post-resuscitation myocardial function (ejection fraction: 50.9±3.1% vs. 27.2±2.0%, P<0.001; aorta systolic pressure: 132.7±7.3 vs. 72.3±3.0 mmHg, P<0.001, and neurological scores at 72-hour post CA (9.5±1.3 vs. 5.4±1.3, P<0.05. In both heart and brain, CA increased lactate concentrations (1.9-fold and 3.1-fold increase, respectively, P<0.01, decreased PDH enzyme activity (24% and 50% reduction, respectively, P<0.01, and increased PDK protein expressions (1.2-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively, P<0.01. In contrast, post-CA treatment with TH normalized lactate concentrations (P<0.01 and P<0.05 and PDK expressions (P<0.001 and P<0.05, while increasing PDH activity (P<0.01 and P<0.01 in both the heart and brain. Additionally, treatment with DCA (0.2 mg/g body weight 30 min prior to CA improved both myocardial hemodynamics 2 hours post-CA (aortic systolic pressure: 123±3 vs. 96±4 mmHg, P<0.001 and 72-hour survival rates

  13. Reliability of pulse oximetry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a piglet model of neonatal cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohammad Ahmad; Mendler, Marc; Maurer, Miriam; Waitz, Markus; Huang, Li; Hummler, Helmut D

    2015-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is widely used in intensive care and emergency conditions to monitor arterial oxygenation and to guide oxygen therapy. To study the reliability of pulse oximetry in comparison with CO-oximetry in newborn piglets during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In a prospective cohort study in 30 healthy newborn piglets, cardiac arrest was induced, and thereafter each piglet received CPR for 20 min. Arterial oxygen saturation was monitored continuously by pulse oximetry (SpO2). Arterial blood was analyzed for functional oxygenation (SaO2) every 2 min. SpO2 was compared with coinciding SaO2 values and bias considered whenever the difference (SpO2 - SaO2) was beyond ±5%. Bias values were decreased at the baseline measurements (mean: 2.5 ± 4.6%) with higher precision and accuracy compared with values across the experiment. Two minutes after cardiac arrest, there was a marked decrease in precision and accuracy as well as an increase in bias up to 13 ± 34%, reaching a maximum of 45.6 ± 28.3% after 10 min over a mean SaO2 range of 29-58%. Pulse oximetry showed increased bias and decreased accuracy and precision during CPR in a model of neonatal cardiac arrest. We recommend further studies to clarify the exact mechanisms of these false readings to improve reliability of pulse oximetry during the marked desaturation and hypoperfusion found during CPR. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality in trauma patients. A 14-yr survey from a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo T O Carlucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little information on the factors influencing intraoperative cardiac arrest and its outcomes in trauma patients is available. This survey evaluated the associated factors and outcomes of intraoperative cardiac arrest in trauma patients in a Brazilian teaching hospital between 1996 and 2009. METHODS: Cardiac arrest during anesthesia in trauma patients was identified from an anesthesia database. The data collected included patient demographics, ASA physical status classification, anesthesia provider information, type of surgery, surgical areas and outcome. All intraoperative cardiac arrests and deaths in trauma patients were reviewed and grouped by associated factors and also analyzed as totally anesthesia-related, partially anesthesia-related, totally surgery-related or totally trauma patient condition-related. FINDINGS: Fifty-one cardiac arrests and 42 deaths occurred during anesthesia in trauma patients. They were associated with male patients (P<0.001 and young adults (18-35 years (P=0.04 with ASA physical status IV or V (P<0.001 undergoing gastroenterological or multiclinical surgeries (P<0.001. Motor vehicle crashes and violence were the main causes of trauma (P<0.001. Uncontrolled hemorrhage or head injury were the most significant associated factors of intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality (P<0.001. All cardiac arrests and deaths reported were totally related to trauma patient condition. CONCLUSIONS: Intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality incidence was highest in male trauma patients at a younger age with poor clinical condition, mainly related to uncontrolled hemorrhage and head injury, resulted from motor vehicle accidents and violence.

  15. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial infarction in Denmark in the years 2001-2012, a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Lassen, Jens F; Køber, Lars; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Hansen, Steen M; Lippert, Freddy; Kragholm, Kristian; Christensen, Erika F; Hassager, Christian

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest caused by myocardial infarction in Denmark 2001-2012 and subsequent survival. The Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry was used to identify patients ⩾18 years surviving to discharge without prior implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Information on cardioverter defibrillator implantation was obtained from the National Patient Registry. We identified 974 myocardial infarction-out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients surviving to hospital discharge, 130 of these patients (13%) had a cardioverter defibrillator implanted early (⩽40 days post-out-of-hospital cardiac arrest), 58 patients (6%) had late implantable cardioverter defibrillator (41-365 days post-out-of-hospital cardiac arrest). Odds of implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation within one year were higher in patients receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (odds ratio (OR) CPR : 1.99, confidence interval (CI): 1.23-3.22, p=0.01), and Charlson Comorbidity Index level 1, (OR CCI1 : 2.10, CI:1.25-3.49, pdefibrillator was higher in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (OR PCI : 3.67, CI: 1.35-9.97, p=0. 01). An early, but not late implantable cardioverter defibrillator was associated with increased survival (event time ratio Early ICD : 1.45, CI: 1.11-1.90, p=0.01). Chronic heart failure, higher age groups, Charlson Comorbidity Index levels 1 to ⩾3 and male sex were associated with lower survival. Highest income was associated with higher survival. Cardioverter defibrillator implantation rates in patients surviving an myocardial infarction-out-of-hospital cardiac arrest increased from 14% to 19% over the period. Of the total patient population, 13% had implantation earlier than recommended by guidelines, presumably as primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Acute PCI and arrest later in the study period (increase one year) were predictors

  16. Non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia in out of hospital cardiac arrest survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, Raphael; Cho, Anna; Arfsten, Henrike; van Tulder, Raphael; Wallmüller, Christian; Steininger, Philipp; Sterz, Fritz; Tendl, Kristina; Balassy, Csilla; Distelmaier, Klaus; Hülsmann, Martin; Heinz, Gottfried; Adlbrecht, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Non-occlusive mesenteric ischaemia (NOMI) is characterised by hypoperfusion of the intestines without evidence of mechanical obstruction, potentially leading to extensive ischaemia and necrosis. Low cardiac output appears to be a major risk factor. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation aims at restoring blood flow after cardiac arrest. However, post restoration of spontaneous circulation, myocardial stunning limits immediate recovery of sufficient cardiac function. Since after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation patients are often ventilated and sedated, NOMI might be underdiagnosed and potentially life-saving treatment delayed. A prospectively maintained multi-purpose cohort of out of hospital cardiac arrest survivors, who had successful restoration of spontaneous circulation, was used for this retrospective database analysis. Patients' charts were screened for clinical, radiological or pathological evidence of NOMI and clinical data were collected. Between 2000 and 2014, 1780 patients who were successfully resuscitated after out of hospital cardiac arrest were screened for NOMI. Twelve patients (0.68 %) suffered from NOMI and six of those died (50 %). Patients suffering from NOMI tended to have a longer duration until restoration of spontaneous circulation (27 vs. 20 min, p=0.128) and had significantly higher lactate (14 mmol/l vs. 8 mmol/l, p=0.002) and base deficit levels at admission (-17 vs. -10, p=0.012). Median leukocyte counts in NOMI patients peaked at the day of diagnosis. NOMI is a rare but life-threatening and potentially curable complication following successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Lactate and base deficit at admission could help to identify patients at risk for developing NOMI who might benefit from increased clinical attention.

  17. Intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality in trauma patients. A 14-yr survey from a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Marcelo T O; Braz, José R C; do Nascimento, Paulo; de Carvalho, Lidia R; Castiglia, Yara M M; Braz, Leandro G

    2014-01-01

    Little information on the factors influencing intraoperative cardiac arrest and its outcomes in trauma patients is available. This survey evaluated the associated factors and outcomes of intraoperative cardiac arrest in trauma patients in a Brazilian teaching hospital between 1996 and 2009. Cardiac arrest during anesthesia in trauma patients was identified from an anesthesia database. The data collected included patient demographics, ASA physical status classification, anesthesia provider information, type of surgery, surgical areas and outcome. All intraoperative cardiac arrests and deaths in trauma patients were reviewed and grouped by associated factors and also analyzed as totally anesthesia-related, partially anesthesia-related, totally surgery-related or totally trauma patient condition-related. Fifty-one cardiac arrests and 42 deaths occurred during anesthesia in trauma patients. They were associated with male patients (Pundergoing gastroenterological or multiclinical surgeries (Ptrauma (Ptrauma patient condition. Intraoperative cardiac arrest and mortality incidence was highest in male trauma patients at a younger age with poor clinical condition, mainly related to uncontrolled hemorrhage and head injury, resulted from motor vehicle accidents and violence.

  18. Results of rapid-response extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children with refractory cardiac arrest following cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Awan, Abid; Manlhiot, Cedric; Guechef, Alexander; Al-Halees, Zohair; Al-Ahmadi, Mamdouh; McCrindle, Brian W; Kalloghlian, Avedis

    2014-02-01

    Survival of children having cardiac arrest refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is very poor. We sought to examine current era outcomes of extracorporeal CPR (ECPR) support for refractory arrest following surgical correction of congenital heart disease. Demographic, anatomical, clinical, surgical and support details of children requiring postoperative ECPR (2007-12) were included in multivariable logistic regression models to determine the factors associated with survival. Thirty-nine children, median age 44 days (4 days-10 years), required postoperative ECPR at a median interval of 1 day (up to 15 days) after surgery. Thirteen (33%) children had single-ventricle pathology; Risk Adjustment in Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS)-1 categories were 2, 3, 4 and 6 in 6, 15, 13 and 5 patients, respectively. Median CPR duration was 34 (8-125) min, while median support duration was 4 (1-17) days. Seven (18%) patients underwent cardiac re-operation, 28 (72%) survived >24 h after support discontinuation and 16 (41%) survived. Survival rates in neonates, infants and older children were 53, 39 and 17% (P=0.13). Survival rates for single- vs two-ventricle pathology patients were 54 and 35%, (P=0.25) and 50, 47, 23 and 60% in RACHS-1 2, 3, 4 and 6 patients, respectively (P=0.37). Survivors had shorter CPR duration (25 vs 34 min, P=0.05), lower pre-arrest lactate (2.6 vs 4.6 mmol/l, P=0.05) and postextracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) peak lactate (15.4 vs 20.0 mmol/l, P<0.001). On multivariable analysis, factors associated with death were higher immediate post-ECMO lactate (odds ratio, OR 1.34 per mmol/l, P=0.008) and renal failure requiring haemodialysis (OR 14.1, P=0.01). ECPR plays a valuable role in children having refractory postoperative cardiac arrest. Survival is unrelated to cardiac physiology or surgical complexity. Timely support prior to the emergence of end-organ injury and surgical correction of residual cardiac lesions might enhance

  19. Bystander Efforts and 1-Year Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke N; Hansen, Steen M; Malta Hansen, Carolina; Thorsteinsson, Kristinn; Rajan, Shahzleen; Lippert, Freddy; Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Fonager, Kirsten; Jensen, Svend E; Gerds, Thomas A; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Rasmussen, Bodil S

    2017-05-04

    The effect of bystander interventions on long-term functional outcomes among survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has not been extensively studied. We linked nationwide data on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Denmark to functional outcome data and reported the 1-year risks of anoxic brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause among patients who survived to day 30 after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed risks according to whether bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or defibrillation was performed and evaluated temporal changes in bystander interventions and outcomes. Among the 2855 patients who were 30-day survivors of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during the period from 2001 through 2012, a total of 10.5% had brain damage or were admitted to a nursing home and 9.7% died during the 1-year follow-up period. During the study period, among the 2084 patients who had cardiac arrests that were not witnessed by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, the rate of bystander CPR increased from 66.7% to 80.6% (Pthe rate of bystander defibrillation increased from 2.1% to 16.8% (Pthe rate of brain damage or nursing home admission decreased from 10.0% to 7.6% (Pbystander CPR was associated with a risk of brain damage or nursing home admission that was significantly lower than that associated with no bystander resuscitation (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47 to 0.82), as well as a lower risk of death from any cause (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.99) and a lower risk of the composite end point of brain damage, nursing home admission, or death (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.84). The risks of these outcomes were even lower among patients who received bystander defibrillation as compared with no bystander resuscitation. In our study, we found that bystander CPR and defibrillation were associated with risks of brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause that were

  20. Time to Epinephrine and Survival After Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars W; Berg, Katherine M; Saindon, Brian Z; Massaro, Joseph M; Raymond, Tia T; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Donnino, Michael W

    2015-08-25

    Delay in administration of the first epinephrine dose is associated with decreased survival among adults after in-hospital, nonshockable cardiac arrest. Whether this association is true in the pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest population remains unknown. To determine whether time to first epinephrine dose is associated with outcomes in pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest. We performed an analysis of data from the Get With the Guidelines-Resuscitation registry. We included US pediatric patients (age <18 years) with an in-hospital cardiac arrest and an initial nonshockable rhythm who received at least 1 dose of epinephrine. A total of 1558 patients (median age, 9 months [interquartile range [IQR], 13 days-5 years]) were included in the final cohort. Time to epinephrine, defined as time in minutes from recognition of loss of pulse to the first dose of epinephrine. The primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival at 24 hours, and neurological outcome. A favorable neurological outcome was defined as a score of 1 to 2 on the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category scale. Among the 1558 patients, 487 (31.3%) survived to hospital discharge. The median time to first epinephrine dose was 1 minute (IQR, 0-4; range, 0-20; mean [SD], 2.6 [3.4] minutes). Longer time to epinephrine administration was associated with lower risk of survival to discharge in multivariable analysis (multivariable-adjusted risk ratio [RR] per minute delay, 0.95 [95% CI, 0.93-0.98]). Longer time to epinephrine administration was also associated with decreased risk of ROSC (multivariable-adjusted RR per minute delay, 0.97 [95% CI, 0.96-0.99]), decreased risk of survival at 24 hours (multivariable-adjusted RR per minute delay, 0.97 [95% CI, 0.95-0.99]), and decreased risk of survival with favorable neurological outcome (multivariable-adjusted RR per minute delay, 0.95 [95% CI, 0.91-0.99]). Patients with time to

  1. Adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in philadelphia from 2008-2012: An epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieski, David F; Agarwal, Anish K; Abella, Benjamin S; Neumar, Robert W; Mechem, Crawford; Cater, Sarah Wallace; Shofer, Frances S; Leary, Marion; Pajerowski, William P; Becker, Lance B; Carr, Brendan; Merchant, Raina; Band, Roger A

    2017-06-01

    Wide variation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival has been reported, with low survival in urban settings. We sought to describe the epidemiology of OHCA in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the fifth largest U.S. city, and identify potential areas for targeted interventions to improve survival. Retrospective chart review of adult, non-traumatic, OHCA occurring in Philadelphia between 2008 and 2012. We determined incidence and epidemiological factors including: demographics, initial cardiac rhythm, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, automated external defibrillator use, return of spontaneous circulation and 30-day survival. 5198 cases of adult, non-traumatic OHCA were identified. The incidence was 81.5/100,000. The majority of cases occurred in a residence (76.2%); 30.4% were witnessed events; the initial cardiac rhythm was pulseless ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation in 6.2% of cases, pulseless electrical activity in 21.0%, asystole in 38.3% and was unknown or undocumented in the remaining 34.5%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated increased 30-day survival with younger age, shockable cardiac rhythms, and daytime arrest. 30-day survival was 8.1% for EMS-assessed patients and 8.6% for EMS-transported patients. Philadelphia's reported incidence is consistent with urban settings although the survival rate is higher than other urban centers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Transient cardiac arrest in patient with left ventricular noncompaction (spongiform cardiomyopathy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Shinya; Ito, Hiroshi; Kawaai, Hiroyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC), also known as spongiform cardiomyopathy, is a severe disease that has not previously been discussed with respect to general anesthesia. We treated a child with LVNC who experienced cardiac arrest. Dental treatment under general anesthesia was scheduled because the patient had a risk of endocarditis due to dental caries along with a history of being uncooperative for dental care. During sevoflurane induction, severe hypotension and laryngospasm resulted in cardiac arrest. Basic life support (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) was initiated to resuscitate the child, and his cardiorespiratory condition improved. Thereafter, an opioid-based anesthetic was performed, and recovery was smooth. In LVNC, opioid-based anesthesia is suggested to avoid the significant cardiac suppression seen with a volatile anesthetic, once intravenous access is established. Additionally, all operating room staff should master Advanced Cardiac Life Support/Pediatric Advanced Life Support (including intraosseous access), and more than 1 anesthesiologist should be present to induce general anesthesia, if possible, for this high-risk patient.

  3. Acute kidney injury after cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandroni, Claudio; Dell'anna, Antonio M; Tujjar, Omar; Geri, Guillaume; Cariou, Alain; Taccone, Fabio S

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of and the risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac arrest (CA), and the association of AKI with outcome have not been systematically investigated so far. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, studies on adult patients (dating from January 1966 to August 2015) published as full-text articles were screened. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality using the Quality Assessment Tool of the U.S. National Institute of Health. Data were summarized using weighted means. Eight studies (total 1693 patients; 68% males) were included. The incidence of AKI was 37%. In six studies where a standard AKI definition (RIFLE, AKIN or KDIGO) was used, the incidence for AKI stage 1 or higher was 52%. AKI occurred at a median of 1-2 days from cardiac arrest in 6/8 studies. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) was used in 239 AKI patients (33%), of whom five (2%) still needed RRT at 30 days after CA. An initial non-shockable rhythm, a longer duration of arrest, higher creatinine levels on admission, and the presence of shock or higher blood lactate after resuscitation were significant predictors of AKI occurrence. Hospital mortality was significantly higher in AKI vs. non-AKI patients (OR 2.63 [1.86-3.68]; Passociated with increased mortality. Decreased renal function on admission, an initial non-shockable rhythm and both pre-arrest and post-arrest markers of hypoperfusion are associated with increased risk of AKI in this setting.

  4. Women have worse cognitive, functional, and psychiatric outcomes at hospital discharge after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sachin; Presciutti, Alex; Verma, Jayati; Pavol, Marykay A; Anbarasan, Deepti; Brodie, Daniel; Rabbani, Leroy E; Roh, David J; Park, Soojin; Claassen, Jan; Stern, Yaakov

    2018-04-01

    To examine gender differences among cardiac arrest (CA) survivors' cognitive, functional, and psychiatric outcomes at discharge. This is a prospective, observational cohort of 187 CA patients admitted to Columbia University Medical Center, considered for Targeted Temperature Management (TTM), and survived to hospital discharge between September 2015 and July 2017. Patients with sufficient mental status at hospital discharge to engage in the Repeatable Battery for Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), Modified Lawton Physical Self-Maintenance Scale (M-PSMS), Cerebral Performance Category Scale (CPC), Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist - Civilian Version (PCL-C) were included. Fisher's exact, Wilcoxon Rank Sum, and regression analysis were utilized. 80 patients (38% women, 44% white, mean age 53 ± 17 years) were included. No significant gender differences were found for age, race, Charlson Comorbidity Index, premorbid CPC or psychiatric diagnoses, arrest related variables, discharge CPC, or PCL-C scores. Women had significantly worse RBANS (64.9 vs 74.8, p = .01), M-PSMS (13.6 vs 10.6, p = .02), and CES-D (22.8 vs 14.3, p = .02) scores. These significant differences were maintained in multivariate models after adjusting for age, initial rhythm, time to return of spontaneous circulation, and TTM. Women have worse cognitive, functional, and psychiatric outcomes at hospital discharge after cardiac arrest than men. Identifying factors contributing to these differences is of great importance in cardiac arrest outcomes research. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Relationship between arterial partial oxygen pressure after resuscitation from cardiac arrest and mortality in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lee P; Durward, Andrew; Tibby, Shane M

    2012-07-17

    Observational studies in adults have shown a worse outcome associated with hyperoxia after resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Extrapolating from adult data, current pediatric resuscitation guidelines recommend avoiding hyperoxia. We investigated the relationship between arterial partial oxygen pressure and survival in patients admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) after cardiac arrest. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the Pediatric Intensive Care Audit Network (PICANet) database between 2003 and 2010 (n=122,521). Patients aged oxygen status and outcome was modeled with logistic regression, with nonlinearities explored via multivariable fractional polynomials. Covariates included age, sex, ethnicity, congenital heart disease, out-of-hospital arrest, year, Pediatric Index of Mortality-2 (PIM2) mortality risk, and organ supportive therapies. Of 1875 patients, 735 (39%) died in PICU. Based on the first arterial gas, 207 patients (11%) had hyperoxia (Pa(O)(2) ≥300 mm Hg) and 448 (24%) had hypoxia (Pa(O)(2) <60 mm Hg). We found a significant nonlinear relationship between Pa(O)(2) and PICU mortality. After covariate adjustment, risk of death increased sharply with increasing hypoxia (odds ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.80-2.21 at Pa(O)(2) of 23 mm Hg). There was also an association with increasing hyperoxia, although not as dramatic as that for hypoxia (odds ratio, 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-1.37 at 600 mm Hg). We observed an increasing mortality risk with advancing age, which was more pronounced in the presence of congenital heart disease. Both severe hypoxia and, to a lesser extent, hyperoxia are associated with an increased risk of death after PICU admission after cardiac arrest.

  6. Cardiac Arrest following a Myocardial Infarction in a Child Treated with Methylphenidate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Kim; Gormsen, Lise Kirstine; Kim, Won Yong

    2015-01-01

    The use of psychostimulants labeled to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder increases. Among side effects these drugs raise blood pressure and heart rate, and the safety has been scrutinised in recent years. Data from large epidemiological studies, including over a million person......-years, did not report any cases of myocardial infarction in current users of methylphenidate, and the risk of serious adverse cardiac events was not found to be increased. We present a case with an 11-year-old child, treated with methylphenidate, who suffered cardiac arrest and was diagnosed with a remote...... myocardial infarction. This demonstrates that myocardial infarction can happen due to methylphenidate exposure in a cardiac healthy child, without cardiovascular risk factors....

  7. Population density predicts outcome from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehme, Ziad; Andrew, Emily; Cameron, Peter A; Bray, Janet E; Bernard, Stephen A; Meredith, Ian T; Smith, Karen

    2014-05-05

    To examine the impact of population density on incidence and outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Data were extracted from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry for all adult OHCA cases of presumed cardiac aetiology attended by the emergency medical service (EMS) between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2011. Cases were allocated into one of five population density groups according to their statistical local area: very low density (≤ 10 people/km(2)), low density (11-200 people/km(2)), medium density (201-1000 people/km(2)), high density (1001-3000 people/km(2)), and very high density (> 3000 people/km(2)). Survival to hospital and survival to hospital discharge. The EMS attended 27 705 adult presumed cardiac OHCA cases across 204 Victorian regions. In 12 007 of these (43.3%), resuscitation was attempted by the EMS. Incidence was lower and arrest characteristics were consistently less favourable for lower population density groups. Survival outcomes, including return of spontaneous circulation, survival to hospital and survival to hospital discharge, were significantly poorer in less densely populated groups (P populations, the risk-adjusted odds ratios of surviving to hospital discharge were: low density, 1.88 (95% CI, 1.15-3.07); medium density, 2.49 (95% CI, 1.55-4.02); high density, 3.47 (95% CI, 2.20-5.48) and very high density, 4.32 (95% CI, 2.67-6.99). Population density is independently associated with survival after OHCA, and significant variation in the incidence and characteristics of these events are observed across the state.

  8. An early, novel illness severity score to predict outcome after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenberger, Jon C; Tisherman, Samuel A; Holm, Margo B; Guyette, Francis X; Callaway, Clifton W

    2011-11-01

    Illness severity scores are commonly employed in critically ill patients to predict outcome. To date, prior scores for post-cardiac arrest patients rely on some event-related data. We developed an early, novel post-arrest illness severity score to predict survival, good outcome and development of multiple organ failure (MOF) after cardiac arrest. Retrospective review of data from adults treated after in-hospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a single tertiary care facility between 1/1/2005 and 12/31/2009. In addition to clinical data, initial illness severity was measured using serial organ function assessment (SOFA) scores and full outline of unresponsiveness (FOUR) scores at hospital or intensive care unit arrival. Outcomes were hospital mortality, good outcome (discharge to home or rehabilitation) and development of multiple organ failure (MOF). Single-variable logistic regression followed by Chi-squared automatic interaction detector (CHAID) was used to determine predictors of outcome. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the independent association between predictors and each outcome. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test was used to evaluate goodness of fit. The n-fold method was used to cross-validate each CHAID analysis and the difference between the misclassification risk estimates was used to determine model fit. Complete data from 457/495 (92%) subjects identified distinct categories of illness severity using combined FOUR motor and brainstem subscales, and combined SOFA cardiovascular and respiratory subscales: I. Awake; II. Moderate coma without cardiorespiratory failure; III. Moderate coma with cardiorespiratory failure; and IV. Severe coma. Survival was independently associated with category (I: OR 58.65; 95% CI 27.78, 123.82; II: OR 14.60; 95% CI 7.34, 29.02; III: OR 10.58; 95% CI 4.86, 23.00). Category was also similarly associated with good outcome and development of MOF. The proportion of subjects in each category changed

  9. Early central diabetes insipidus: An ominous sign in post-cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Minjung Kathy; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Tae Rim; Yoon, Hee; Hwang, Sung Yeon; Cha, Won Chul; Shin, Tae Gun; Sim, Min Seob; Jo, Ik Joon; Song, Keun Jeong; Rhee, Joong Eui; Jeong, Yeon Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) after cardiac arrest is not well described. Thus, we aim to study the occurrences, outcomes, and risk factors of CDI of survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We retrospectively analyzed post-OHCA patients treated at a single center. Central diabetes insipidus was retrospectively defined by diagnostic criteria. One-month cerebral performance category (CPC) scores were collected for outcomes. Of the 169 patients evaluated, 36 patients (21.3%) were diagnosed with CDI. All CDI patients had a poor neurologic outcome of either CPC 4 (13.9%) or CPC 5 (86.1%), and CDI was strongly associated with mortality. Age (odds ratio [OR], 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-0.99), respiratory arrest (OR, 6.62; 95% CI, 1.23-35.44), asphyxia (OR, 9.26; 95% CI, 2.17-34.61), and gray to white matter ratio on brain computed tomogram (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.95) were associated with the development of CDI. The onset of CDI was earlier (P diabetes insipidus patients with death or brain death had earlier occurrence of CDI and more maximum urine output. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Barriers to patient positioning for telephone cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlais, Blake T; Panczyk, Micah; Sutter, John; Fukushima, Hidetada; Wu, Zhixin; Iwami, Taku; Spaite, Daniel; Bobrow, Bentley

    2017-06-01

    9-1-1 callers often face barriers preventing them from starting Telephone CPR (TCPR). The most common problem is getting patients to a hard, flat surface. This study describes barriers callers report when trying to move patients to a hard, flat surface and assesses conditions associated with overcoming these barriers. We audited 2396 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) audio recordings. A barrier was defined as any statement by the caller that the rescuer could not move the patient to the ground and into a supine position. Barriers were recorded and TCPR process metrics compared across the barrier and non-barrier groups. There were 802 OHCAs in the study group. Roughly 26% had a barrier. Telecommunicators were less likely to start TCPR instructions in the barrier group than in the non-barrier group (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.45-0.88; p=0.007). Telecommunicator-directed bystander chest compressions were more than twice as likely to start in the non-barrier group (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.6-3.2; p<0.001). Median time to first compression was longer in the barrier group (276s vs 171s; p<0.001). Rescuers were 3.7 times more likely to overcome a barrier and start compressions (OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 2.0-6.8; p<0.001) when multiple bystanders were present. Inability to move patients to a hard, flat surface is associated with a reduced rate of TCPR and increased time to first compression. Assessing the conditions under which such barriers are overcome is important for telecommunicator training and can help improve rates and timeliness of TCPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Study regarding the survival of patients suffering a traumatic cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, V; Tudorache, O; Nicolau, M; Strambu, V

    2015-01-01

    Severe trauma is the most frequent cause of death in young people, in civilized countries with major social and vital costs. The speed of diagnostic decision making and the precocity of treatment approaches are both essential and depend on the specialists' colaboration. The present study aims to emphasize the actual situation of medical interventions in case of cardiorespiratory arrest due to trauma. 1387 patients who suffered a cardio respiratory arrest both traumatic and non-traumatic were included in order to point out the place of traumatic arrest. Resuscitation of such patients is considered useless and resource consumer by many trauma practitioners who are reporting survival rates of 0%-3.5%. As the determinant of lesions, trauma etiology was as it follows car accidents - 43%, high falls - 30%, suicidal attempts - 3%, domestic violence - 3%, other causes - 21%. Hypovolemia remains the major cause of cardiac arrest and death and that is why the efforts of emergency providers (trauma team) must be oriented towards "hidden death" in order to avoid it. This condition could be revealed and solved easier with minimal diagnostic and therapeutic maneuvers in the emergency department.

  12. The effect of time to defibrillation and targeted temperature management on functional survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, Ian R; Lin, Steve; Thorpe, Kevin E; Morrison, Laurie J

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac arrest physiology has been proposed to occur in three distinct phases: electrical, circulatory and metabolic. There is limited research evaluating the relationship of the 3-phase model of cardiac arrest to functional survival at hospital discharge. Furthermore, the effect of post-cardiac arrest targeted temperature management (TTM) on functional survival during each phase is unknown. To determine the effect of TTM on the relationship between the time of initial defibrillation during each phase of cardiac arrest and functional survival at hospital discharge. This was a retrospective observational study of consecutive adult (≥18 years) out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients with initial shockable rhythms. Included patients obtained a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and were eligible for TTM. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine predictors of functional survival at hospital discharge. There were 20,165 OHCA treated by EMS and 871 patients were eligible for TTM. Of these patients, 622 (71.4%) survived to hospital discharge and 487 (55.9%) had good functional survival. Good functional survival was associated with younger age (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.93-0.95), shorter times from collapse to initial defibrillation (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.65-0.82), and use of post-cardiac arrest TTM (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.07-2.30). Functional survival decreased during each phase of the model (65.3% vs. 61.7% vs. 50.2%, Pdefibrillation and was decreased during each successive phase of the 3-phase model. Post-cardiac arrest TTM was associated with improved functional survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Implementation of mild therapeutic hypothermia for post-resuscitation care of sudden cardiac arrest survivors in cardiology units in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołtowski, Łukasz; Malesa, Karolina; Tomaniak, Mariusz; Stępińska, Janina; Średniawa, Beata; Karolczyk, Paulina; Puchta, Dominika; Kowalik, Robert; Kremis, Elżbieta; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Banaszewski, Marek; Opolski, Grzegorz; Bagińska, Marta

    2017-11-01

    The post-cardiac arrest (CA) period is often associated with secondary damage of the brain that leads to severe neurological deficits. The current practice guidelines recommend the use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) to prevent neurological deficit and improve survival. The aim of the study was to investigate the implementation of medical guidelines in clinical practice and to evaluate the barriers for implementation of TH in cardiology units in Poland. A telephone survey, fax and online inquiry form were used to assess the implementation of TH in cardiology units in the management of unconscious patients after cardiac arrest (CA). The questions addressed the local practice, TH protocol, reasons for not using TH and outcomes of CA patients. We obtained information from 79 units out of 150 asked (53%). At the time of the survey, 24 units (30.8%) were using TH as part of their post-CA management. Of all CA patients, 45% underwent TH in cardiac intensive care units (CICU), 37.5% in the coronary care unit (CCU) and 12.5% in the intensive care unit (ICU). The major barrier for the implementation of TH declared by the non-cooling centers was lack of sufficient knowledge regarding the technique and protocol, as well as experience (37%); access to dedicated equipment was not perceived as an obstacle. The number of cardiology units that provide TH for comatose CA patients is low. The main limiting factor for wider use of TH is lack of knowledge and experience. There is a clear need for urgent educational activities for cardiology units. The benefits of TH still have not reached their potential in cardiology units.

  14. In-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, Marie L; Langendijk, Pim N J; Koopmans, Richard P

    2007-01-01

    -prolonging drugs (42/140). The risk was more pronounced in patients receiving doses > 1 defined daily dose (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1, 5.9), patients taking > 1 QTc-prolonging drug simultaneously (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.6, 14) and patients taking pharmacokinetic interacting drugs concomitantly (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.2, 13......). CONCLUSIONS: Use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs in hospitalized patients with several underlying disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiac arrest. The effect is dose related and pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions increase the risk substantially. Physicians caring for inpatients......AIMS: QTc interval-prolonging drugs have been linked to cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac arrest and sudden death. In this study we aimed to quantify the risk of cardiac arrest associated with the use of non-antiarrhythmic QTc-prolonging drugs in an academic hospital setting. METHODS: We performed...

  15. Development of a theoretical guide for nursing care in cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliandra Bittencourt da Silva

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the knowledge on cardiorespiratory arrest among nurses in a hospital of Vale do Paraíba, São Paulo, Brazil, and develop a theoretical guide for care of this emergency. We prepared an instrument of data collection based on relevant literature and the 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR, from August to October 2012. The sample consisted of 41 nurses who deliver care activities in various units of the hospital. The study showed that professional participants said they were able to act in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, however, there were limitations of knowledge about the theme. Given the above, we developed a theoretical guide for cardiac arrest care based on scientific literature and covering questions submitted by nurses.

  16. [Diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia after myocardial infarction and cardiac arrest: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartigny, G; Faivre, V; Stamboul, K; Aulagne, J; Cottin, Y

    2015-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome is now a well-known disease, with codified treatments. The main presentation is chest pain, but more and more cases are revealed by cardiorespiratory arrest thanks to pre-hospital care. And, depending on the evolution in such situations, cardiocirculatory support techniques like extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can be implemented. If the more common cause of SCA is atherosclerosis, consequence of the combination of one or more cardiovascular risk factors, there are rare aetiologies, which include myeloproliferative syndromes, in particular essential thrombocythemia. We describe the case of a 34-year-old man presenting with anterior ST-elevation myocardial infarction complicated by an initial cardiac arrest, whose aetiology is unknown essential thrombocythemia, and its therapeutic management requiring circulatory support by ECMO and IMPELLA(®) techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation after protracted ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest: case report and discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Laban, Riyad B; Migneault, David; Grant, Meghan R; Dhingra, Vinay; Fung, Anthony; Cook, Richard C; Sweet, David

    2015-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a method to provide temporary cardiac and respiratory support to critically ill patients. In recent years, the role of ECMO in emergency departments (EDs) for select adults has increased. We present the dramatic case of a 29-year-old man who was placed on venoarterial ECMO for cardiogenic shock and respiratory failure following collapse and protracted ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest in our ED. Resuscitation efforts prior to ECMO commencement included 49 minutes of virtually continuous cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), 11 defibrillations, administration of numerous medications, including a thrombolytic agent, while CPR was ongoing, percutaneous coronary intervention and stenting for a mid-left anterior descending coronary artery dissection and thrombotic occlusion, inotropic support, and intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation. Over the next 48 hours following ECMO commencement, the patient's cardiorespiratory function rapidly improved, and he was discharged home 9 days after admission with no neurologic sequelae. The history, indications, and increasing role of ECMO in a range of conditions, including cardiac arrest, are reviewed.

  18. National Institutes of Health-Funded Cardiac Arrest Research: A 10-Year Trend Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coute, Ryan A; Panchal, Ashish R; Mader, Timothy J; Neumar, Robert W

    2017-07-12

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is a leading cause of death in the United States, claiming over 450 000 lives annually. Improving survival depends on the ability to conduct CA research and on the translation and implementation of research findings into practice. Our objective was to provide a descriptive analysis of annual National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding for CA research over the past decade. A search within NIH RePORTER for the years 2007 to 2016 was performed using the terms: "cardiac arrest" or "cardiopulmonary resuscitation" or "heart arrest" or "circulatory arrest" or "pulseless electrical activity" or "ventricular fibrillation" or "resuscitation." Grants were reviewed and categorized as CA research (yes/no) using predefined criteria. The annual NIH funding for CA research, number of individual grants, and principal investigators were tabulated. The total NIH investment in CA research for 2015 was calculated and compared to those for other leading causes of death within the United States. Interrater reliability among 3 independent reviewers for fiscal year 2015 was assessed using Fleiss κ. The search yielded 2763 NIH-funded grants, of which 745 (27.0%) were classified as CA research (κ=0.86 [95%CI 0.80-0.93]). Total inflation-adjusted NIH funding for CA research was $35.4 million in 2007, peaked at $76.7 million in 2010, and has decreased to $28.5 million in 2016. Per annual death, NIH invests ≈$2200 for stroke, ≈$2100 for heart disease, and ≈$91 for CA. This analysis demonstrates that the annual NIH investment in CA research is low relative to other leading causes of death in the United States and has declined over the past decade. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  19. Influence of Chest Compressions on Circulation during the Peri-Cardiac Arrest Period in Porcine Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Xu

    Full Text Available Starting chest compressions immediately after a defibrillation shock might be harmful, if the victim already had a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and yet was still being subjected to external compressions at the same time. The objective of this study was to study the influence of chest compressions on circulation during the peri-cardiac arrest period.Prospective, randomized controlled study.Animal experimental center in Peking Union Medical Collage Hospital, Beijing, China.Healthy 3-month-old male domestic pigs.44 pigs (28±2 kg were randomly assigned to three groups: Group I (non-arrested with compressions (n = 12; Group II (arrested with compressions only (n = 12; Group III (ROSC after compressions and defibrillation (n = 20. In Groups I and II, compressions were performed to a depth of 5cm (Ia and IIa, n = 6 or a depth of 3cm (Ib and IIb, n = 6 respectively, while in Group III, the animals which had just achieved ROSC (n = 18 were compressed to a depth of 5cm (IIIa, n = 6, a depth of 3cm (IIIb, n = 6, or had no compressions (IIIc, n = 6. Hemodynamic parameters were collected and analyzed.Hemodynamics were statistically different between Groups Ia and Ib when different depths of compressions were performed (p < 0.05. In Group II, compressions were beneficial and hemodynamics correlated with the depth of compressions (p < 0.05. In Group III, compressions that continued after ROSC produced a reduction in arterial pressure (p < 0.05.Chest compressions might be detrimental to hemodynamics in the early post-ROSC stage. The deeper the compressions were, the better the effect on hemodynamics during cardiac arrest, but the worse the effect on hemodynamics after ROSC.

  20. Automated external cardioversion defibrillation monitoring in cardiac arrest: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Bakhtiar; Bloom, Heather; Veledar, Emir; House, Dorothy; Norvel, Robert; Dudley, Samuel C; Zafari, A Maziar

    2008-06-11

    In-hospital cardiac arrest has a poor prognosis despite active electrocardiography monitoring. The initial rhythm of approximately 25% of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) events is pulseless ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF). Early defibrillation is an independent predictor of survival in CPR events caused by VT/VF. The automated external cardioverter defibrillator (AECD) is a device attached by pads to the chest wall that monitors, detects, and within seconds, automatically delivers electric countershock to an appropriate tachyarrhythmia. To evaluate safety of AECD monitoring in hospitalized patients. To evaluate whether AECDs provide earlier defibrillation than hospital code teams. The study is a prospective trial randomizing patients admitted to the telemetry ward to standard CPR (code team) or standard CPR plus AECD monitoring (PowerHeart CRM). The AECD is programmed to deliver one 150 J biphasic shock to patients in sustained VT/VF. Data is collected using the Utstein criteria for cardiac arrest. The primary endpoint is time-to-defibrillation; secondary outcomes include neurological status and survival to discharge, with 3-year follow-up. To date, 192 patients have been recruited in the time period between 10/10/2006 to 7/20/2007. A total of 3,655 hours of telemetry data have been analyzed in the AECD arm. The AECD has monitored ambulatory telemetry patients in sinus rhythm, sinus tachycardia, supraventricular tachycardia, atrial flutter or fibrillation, with premature ventricular complexes and non-sustained VT without delivery of inappropriate shocks. One patient experienced sustained VT during AECD monitoring, who was successfully defibrillated (17 seconds after meeting programmed criteria). There are no events to report in the control arm. The patient survived the event without neurological complications. During the same time period, mean time to shock for VT/VF cardiac arrest occurring outside the telemetry ward was

  1. Prognosis for children in cardiac arrest shortly after blunt cranial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdel, Lars; Winston, Ken R

    2010-10-01

    The goal of this investigation is to determine the success rate of aggressive cardiorespiratory resuscitation in children who experience blunt cranial trauma of sufficient magnitude to quickly cause cardiac arrest. The records of all the children who, within a 6-year period, suffered cardiac arrest at the scene of injury, during transport or in the emergency department of a level one pediatric trauma center, as a consequence of blunt cranial trauma, form the basis of this study. One of the 40 children who met the inclusion criteria survived. Their ages ranged from 1 month to 16 years, and all had a Glasgow Coma Score of 3 at the scene of injury. Forty-two percent were passengers in motor vehicles, and 32% were victims of nonaccidental trauma. Eleven of the 17 children in the motor vehicle crash were not properly restrained. Eleven of the unrestrained children plus two who were properly restrained were ejected at the time of impact. The average cardiopulmonary resuscitation time was 36 (2-107) minutes. A sinus rhythm was established in 50% but was not sustained in most. The sole survivor was an 8-year-old boy who was ejected and had asystole at the scene. At discharge, he was walking well but had cranial nerve deficits and learning disability. Survival in 40 consecutive children with documented cardiac arrest caused by blunt cranial trauma was 2.5%. This series, when combined with other published reports, is supportive of the position that aggressive resuscitation is rarely successful after 10 minutes and futile after 20 minutes.

  2. Ambulance cardiopulmonary resuscitation: outcomes and associated factors in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell Ortiz, Fernando; García Del Águila, Javier; Fernández Del Valle, Patricia; J Mellado-Vergel, Francisco; Vergara-Pérez, Santiago; R Ruiz-Montero, María; Martínez-Lara, Manuela; J Gómez-Jiménez, Francisco; Gonzáez-Lobato, Ismael; García-Escudero, Guillermo; Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Caballero-García, Auxiliadora; Vivar-Díaz, Itziar; Olavarría-Govantes, Luis

    2018-06-01

    To assess factors associated with survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during ambulance transport. Retrospective analysis of a registry of OHCA cases treated between 2008 and 2014. We included patients who had not recovered circulation at the time it was decided to transport to a hospital and who were rejected as non-heart-beating donors. Multivariate analysis was used to explore factors associated with the use of ambulance CPR, survival, and neurologic outcome. Out of a total of 7241 cases, 259 (3.6%) were given CPR during emergency transport. The mean (SD) age was 51.6 (23.6) years; 27 (10.1%) were aged 16 years or younger. The following variables were associated with the use of CPR during transport: age 16 years or under (odds ratio [OR], 6.48; 95% CI, 3.91-10.76); P<.001)], witnessed OHCA (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.16-2.26; P=.004), cardiac arrest outside the home (OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 2.38-4.21; P<.001), noncardiac cause (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.07-2.02; P=.019], initially shockable rhythm (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.17-2.37; P=.004), no prior basic life support (OR, 3.48; 95% CI, 2.58-4.70; P<.001), and orotracheal intubation (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.24-2.99; P=.003). One patient (0.38%) survived to discharge with good neurologic outcome. Ambulance CPR by a physician on board is applied in few OHCA cases. Young patient age, cardiac arrest outside the home, the presence of a witness, lack of a shockable rhythm on responder arrival, lack of basic life support prior to responder arrival, noncardiac cause, and orotracheal intubation are associated with the use of ambulance CPR, a strategy that can be considered futile.

  3. Temperature variability during targeted temperature management is not associated with neurological outcomes following cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeri, Arash; Bhatia, Nirmanmoh; Holmes, Benjamin; Borges, Nyal; Armstrong, William; Xu, Meng; Farber-Eger, Eric; Wells, Quinn S; McPherson, John A

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies on comatose survivors of cardiac arrest undergoing targeted temperature management (TTM) have shown similar outcomes at multiple target temperatures. However, details regarding core temperature variability during TTM and its prognostic implications remain largely unknown. We sought to assess the association between core temperature variability and neurological outcomes in patients undergoing TTM following cardiac arrest. We analyzed a prospectively collected cohort of 242 patients treated with TTM following cardiac arrest at a tertiary care hospital between 2007 and 2014. Core temperature variability was defined as the statistical variance (i.e. standard deviation squared) amongst all core temperature recordings during the maintenance phase of TTM. Poor neurological outcome at hospital discharge, defined as a Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score>2, was the primary outcome. Death prior to hospital discharge was assessed as the secondary outcome. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between temperature variability and neurological outcome or death at hospital discharge. A poor neurological outcome was observed in 147 (61%) patients and 136 (56%) patients died prior to hospital discharge. In multivariable logistic regression, increased core temperature variability was not associated with increased odds of poor neurological outcomes (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.11-1.38, p=0.142) or death (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.12-1.53, p=0.193) at hospital discharge. In this study, individual core temperature variability during TTM was not associated with poor neurological outcomes or death at hospital discharge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Take Heart America: A comprehensive, community-wide, systems-based approach to the treatment of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lick, Charles J; Aufderheide, Tom P; Niskanen, Robert A; Steinkamp, Janet E; Davis, Scott P; Nygaard, Susan D; Bemenderfer, Kim K; Gonzales, Louis; Kalla, Jeffrey A; Wald, Sarah K; Gillquist, Debbie L; Sayre, Michael R; Osaki Holm, Susie Y; Oski Holm, Susie Y; Oakes, Dana A; Provo, Terry A; Racht, Ed M; Olsen, John D; Yannopoulos, Demetris; Lurie, Keith G

    2011-01-01

    To determine out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival rates before and after implementation of the Take Heart America program (a community-based initiative that sequentially deployed all of the most highly recommended 2005 American Heart Association resuscitation guidelines in an effort to increase out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival). Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in Anoka County, MN, and greater St. Cloud, MN, from November 2005 to June 2009. Two sites in Minnesota with a combined population of 439,692 people (greater St. Cloud and Anoka County) implemented: 1) widespread cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator skills training in schools and businesses; 2) retraining of all emergency medical services personnel in methods to enhance circulation, including minimizing cardiopulmonary resuscitation interruptions, performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation before and after single-shock defibrillation, and use of an impedance threshold device; 3) additional deployment of automated external defibrillators in schools and public places; and 4) protocols for transport to and treatment by cardiac arrest centers for therapeutic hypothermia, coronary artery evaluation and treatment, and electrophysiological evaluation. More than 28,000 people were trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator use in the two sites. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates increased from 20% to 29% (p = .086, odds ratio 1.7, 95% confidence interval 0.96-2.89). Three cardiac arrest centers were established, and hypothermia therapy for admitted out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims increased from 0% to 45%. Survival to hospital discharge for all patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in these two sites improved from 8.5% (nine of 106, historical control) to 19% (48 of 247, intervention phase) (p = .011, odds ratio 2.60, confidence interval 1.19-6.26). A financial analysis revealed that the cardiac arrest centers

  5. Emergency cricothyrotomy for trismus caused by instantaneous rigor in cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hee; Jung, Koo Young

    2012-07-01

    Instantaneous rigor as muscle stiffening occurring in the moment of death (or cardiac arrest) can be confused with rigor mortis. If trismus is caused by instantaneous rigor, orotracheal intubation is impossible and a surgical airway should be secured. Here, we report 2 patients who had emergency cricothyrotomy for trismus caused by instantaneous rigor. This case report aims to help physicians understand instantaneous rigor and to emphasize the importance of securing a surgical airway quickly on the occurrence of trismus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and return of spontaneous circulation: it's complicated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beseda, Ryan; Smith, Susan; Veenstra, Amy

    2014-12-01

    Providing evidence-based care to patients with return of spontaneous circulation after a cardiac arrest is a recent complex innovation. Once resuscitated patients must be assessed for appropriateness for therapeutic hypothermia, be cooled in a timely manner, maintained while hypothermic, rewarmed within a specified time frame, and then assessed for whether hypothermia was successful for the patient through neuroprognostication. Nurses caring for therapeutic hypothermia patients must be knowledgeable and prepared to provide care to the patient and family. This article provides an overview of the complexity of therapeutic hypothermia for patients with return of spontaneous circulation in the form of a case study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental study of arrhythmia due to mild therapeutic hypothermia after resuscitation of cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Binbin; Pont, Oriol; Laurent, Gabriel; Jacquir, Sabir; Binczak, Stéphane; Yahia, Hussein

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Introduction: One of the important challenges after cardiac arrest (CA) is the neurological damage of the brain. In case of resuscitation after CA, the brain suffers the ischemia and the inflammation from reperfusion. To days, the only therapy available is the mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) : put the patient under 34°C-32°C during 12-24 hours. Even though that MTH has been shown to increase the hospital survival rate, it has many adverse effects, among which the ca...

  8. Long-term survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Nana G; Mantoni, Teit; Nielsen, Søren L

    2007-01-01

    an initial rhythm of VF, 13% had asystole, 10% had PEA and 2% were unknown. Survival was 87% after one year and survival after 10 years was 46% with a significantly lower survival for patients over 60 years. CONCLUSION: Long-term survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a physician-staffed emergency......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the long-term survival after OHCA. METHODS: All OHCA-calls where the Copenhagen Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) was involved from 1994 to1998 are included in this study. Data were collected prospectively. Data on long-term survival was obtained...

  9. Bystander defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Public vs Residential Locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Møller; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    in bystander defibrillation and subsequent survival according to a public or a residential location of the cardiac arrest after nationwide initiatives in Denmark to facilitate bystander-mediated resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation. Design, Setting, and Participants: This nationwide study......). Conclusions and Relevance: Initiatives to facilitate bystander defibrillationwere associated with a marked increase in bystander defibrillation in public locations, whereas bystander defibrillation remained limited in residential locations. Concomitantly, survival increased after bystander defibrillation......, 2016. Exposures: Nationwide initiatives to facilitate bystander resuscitative efforts, including bystander defibrillation, consisted of resuscitation training of Danish citizens, dissemination of on-site AEDs, foundation of an AED registry linked to emergency medical dispatch centers, and dispatcher...

  10. EMuRgency: Addressing cardiac arrest with socio-technical innovation in a smart learning region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Jeschke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the EMuRgency project. The project has the goal to increase awareness and competences regarding the problem of cardiac arrest in the Euregio Meuse-Rhine (EMR and to use socio-technical innovations to transfer it into a smart learning region. Based on the conscious competence framework solutions for stakeholders on different levels of the framework are introduced, namely a public display network, mobile learning apps and a volunteer notification system. Finally, a future research outlook is given.

  11. Debriefing bystanders of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is valuable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Hansen, Carolina Malta; Fjordholt, Martin

    2014-01-01

    AIM OF THE STUDY: To explore the concept of debriefing bystanders after participating in an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation attempt including (1) bystanders' most commonly addressed reactions after participating in a resuscitation attempt when receiving debriefing from medical dispat...... Dispatch Centres is a low complexity and a low cost intervention though the logistic challenges have to be considered....... the phenomenological approach. RESULTS: Six themes emerged from analysis of debriefing audio files: (1) identification of OHCA; (2) emotional and perceptual experience with OHCA; (3) collaboration with healthcare professionals; (4) patients outcome; (5) coping with the experience and (6) general reflections. When...

  12. Combining creatinine and volume kinetics identifies missed cases of acute kidney injury following cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Fluid resuscitation in the critically ill often results in a positive fluid balance, potentially diluting the serum creatinine concentration and delaying diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods Dilution during AKI was quantified by combining creatinine and volume kinetics to account for fluid type, and rates of fluid infusion and urine output. The model was refined using simulated patients receiving crystalloids or colloids under four glomerular filtration rate (GFR) change scenarios and then applied to a cohort of critically ill patients following cardiac arrest. Results The creatinine concentration decreased during six hours of fluid infusion at 1 litre-per-hour in simulated patients, irrespective of fluid type or extent of change in GFR (from 0% to 67% reduction). This delayed diagnosis of AKI by 2 to 9 hours. Crystalloids reduced creatinine concentration by 11 to 19% whereas colloids reduced concentration by 36 to 43%. The greatest reduction was at the end of the infusion period. Fluid dilution alone could not explain the rapid reduction of plasma creatinine concentration observed in 39 of 49 patients after cardiac arrest. Additional loss of creatinine production could account for those changes. AKI was suggested in six patients demonstrating little change in creatinine, since a 52 ± 13% reduction in GFR was required after accounting for fluid dilution and reduced creatinine production. Increased injury biomarkers within a few hours of cardiac arrest, including urinary cystatin C and plasma and urinary Neutrophil-Gelatinase-Associated-Lipocalin (biomarker-positive, creatinine-negative patients) also indicated AKI in these patients. Conclusions Creatinine and volume kinetics combined to quantify GFR loss, even in the absence of an increase in creatinine. The model improved disease severity estimation, and demonstrated that diagnostic delays due to dilution are minimally affected by fluid type. Creatinine sampling should be delayed at least

  13. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival in rural Northwest Ireland: 17 years' experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Masterson, Siobhán

    2011-05-01

    SAVES, the name used to describe a register of survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), was established in rural Northwest Ireland in 1992. From 1992 to 2008, 80 survivors were identified (population 239,000 (2006)). Most incidents were witnessed (69\\/70) and all were in shockable rhythm at the time of first rhythm analysis (66\\/66). Of 66 patients who could be traced, 46 were alive in December 2008. Average survival rates appeared to increase over the lifetime of the database. SAVES has also contributed to the development of a national OHCA register.

  14. Medical attention proposal for patients under the iodo therapy in cardiac arrest cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, A.L.; Bacelar, A.; Campomar, A.; Fialkowski, S.; Zaluski, M.A.; Lucena, A.F.

    1996-01-01

    This research has like aim to present a proposition about how to attend the patients which are under the iodo therapy, and the possibility they can show a cardiac arrest during their hospitalization. The physical medical department with the nurse group and the team of ICU (Intensive Care Unit) looked for to establish basic norms of radiological protection in order to avoid the radiation and contamination of all workers involved with one patient, without changing the routine of attendance service. We analyzed all rules of service including the attendance the hospital room and mainly if it is necessary to lead the patient to the ICU. (authors). 4 refs

  15. Successful emergency splenectomy during cardiac arrest due to cytomegalovirus-induced atraumatic splenic rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glesner, Matilde Kanstrup; Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Nielsen, Jesper Meng Rahn

    2015-01-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with fever and a petechial rash on suspicion of meningitis. Shortly after arriving she developed cardiac arrest. Blood work up showed severe lactate acidosis, anaemia and thrombocytopenia. A focused assessment with sonography in trauma...... for 14 days with ganciclovir and meropenem and discharged on recovery. Atraumatic splenic rupture caused by viral infection is a rare condition although well described. In the case of our patient, thrombocytopenia added to the severity of the splenic rupture. A multidisciplinary team approach...

  16. Resuscitation of patients suffering from sudden cardiac arrests in nursing homes is not futile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Lippert, Freddy K

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has increased in recent years, and new data are therefore needed to avoid unsubstantiated statements when debating futility of resuscitation attempts following OHCA in nursing home (NH)-residents. We aimed to investigate the outcome...... to OHCA in non-nursing homes (non-NH). Overall 30-day survival rate was 9% in NH and 18% in non-NH, p...% for non-NH-patients, pNursing home residents resuscitated from OHCA and admitted to hospital have similar...

  17. The impact of telemetry on survival of in-hospital cardiac arrests in non-critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverley, Kelby; Mousavi, Negareh; Stronger, Lyle; Ann-Bordun, Kimberly; Hall, Lillian; Tam, James W; Tischenko, Alex; Jassal, Davinder S; Philipp, Roger K

    2013-07-01

    Since the introduction of telemetry over a half century ago, it has expanded to various units and wards within health care institutions outside of the traditional critical care setting. Little is known on whether routine telemetry use is beneficial in this patient population. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of telemetry monitoring on survival of in-hospital cardiac arrests in patients admitted to non-critical care units. A retrospective study of cardiac arrests in patients admitted to non-critical care units within the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority from 2002 to 2006 inclusive was performed. Baseline demographic, cardiac arrest, and outcome data were collected. Of the total 668 patients, the mean age was 70±14 years with 404 (61%) males. Patients presenting with asystole or pulseless electrical activity (PEA) demonstrated an increased mortality as compared to those presenting with ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). Overall, 268 of 668 patients (40%) survived their initial arrest, 66 (10%) survived to hospital discharge and 49 (7%) survived transfer to another facility. Patients on telemetry vs. no telemetry had higher survival rates immediately following cardiac arrest (66% vs. 34%, OR=3.67, p=0.02), as well as higher survival to hospital discharge (30% vs. 6%, OR=7.17, p=0.01). Finally, patients with cardiac arrest during the night and early morning benefited proportionally the greatest from telemetry use. Regardless of whether cardiac arrest was witnessed or unwitnessed, telemetry use was an independent and strong predictor of survival to hospital discharge. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Effect of Antibiotic Prophylaxis on Early-Onset Pneumonia in Cardiac Arrest Patients Treated with Therapeutic Hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Jung Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infectious complications frequently occur after cardiac arrest and may be even more frequent after therapeutic hypothermia. Pneumonia is the most common infectious complication associated with therapeutic hypothermia, and it is unclear whether prophylactic antibiotics administered during this intervention can decrease the development of early-onset pneumonia. We investigated the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on the development of pneumonia in cardiac arrest patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who were admitted for therapeutic hypothermia after resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 2010 and July 2015. Patients who died within the first 72 hours or presented with pneumonia at the time of admission were excluded. Early-onset pneumonia was defined as pneumonia that developed within 5 days of admission. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy was defined as the administration of any parenteral antibiotics within the first 24 hours without any evidence of infection. Results: Of the 128 patients admitted after cardiac arrest, 68 were analyzed and 48 (70.6% were treated with prophylactic antibiotics within 24 hours. The frequency of early-onset pneumonia was not significantly different between the prophylactic antibiotic group and the control group (29.2% vs 30.0%, respectively, p = 0.945. The most commonly used antibiotic was third-generation cephalosporin, and the class of prophylactic antibiotics did not influence early-onset pneumonia. Conclusion: Antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac arrest patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia did not reduce the frequency of pneumonia.

  19. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Katowice (Poland): outcome report according to the "Utstein style".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudner, Robert; Jalowiecki, Przemyslaw; Karpel, Ewa; Dziurdzik, Piotr; Alberski, Bogdan; Kawecki, Piotr

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the city of Katowice, Poland, during a period of 1 year prior to the planned reorganization of the national emergency system. Data were collected prospectively according to a modified Utstein style. To ensure accurate data collection, a special method of reporting resuscitation events with the use of a tape-recorder was introduced. Patients were followed for a 1-year period. Between 1 July 2001 and 30 June 2002, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was confirmed in 1153 patients. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted in 188 patients. Cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac aetiology (147) was bystander witnessed in 105 (71%) cases and lay-bystander basic life support was performed in 35 (24%). In the group of bystander witnessed arrest ventricular fibrillation (VF) or tachycardia was documented in 59, asystole in 40 and other non-perfusing rhythms in six patients. Of 147 patients with cardiac aetiology, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved in 64 (44%) patients, 15 (10%) were discharged alive and 9 (6%) were alive 1 year later. Most of these patients had a good neurological outcome. Time to first defibrillatory shock was significantly shorter for survivors (median 7 min) compared to non-survivors (median 10 min). The most important resuscitation and patient characteristics associated with survival were VF as initial rhythm, arrest witnessed, and lay-bystander CPR.

  20. Cyanide poisoning is a possible cause of cardiac arrest among fire victims, and empiric antidote treatment may improve outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaita, Yasuhiko; Tarui, Takehiko; Shoji, Takahiro; Miyauchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro

    2018-01-22

    Carbon monoxide and cyanide poisoning are important causes of death due to fire. Carbon monoxide is more regularly assessed than cyanide at the site of burn or smoke inhalation treatment due to its ease in assessment and simplicity to treat. Although several forensic studies have demonstrated the significance of cyanide poisoning in fire victims using blood cyanide levels, the association between the cause of cardiac arrest and the concentration of cyanide among fire victims has not been sufficiently investigated. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of cyanide-induced cardiac arrest in fire victims and to assess the necessity of early empiric treatment for cyanide poisoning. This study was a retrospective analysis of fire victims with cardiac arrest at the scene who were transported to a trauma and critical care center, Kyorin University Hospital, from January 2014 to June 2017. Patients whose concentration of cyanide was measured were included. Five patients were included in the study; all died despite cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Three of these victims were later found to have lethal cyanide levels (>3 μg/ml). Two of the patients had non-lethal carboxyhemoglobin levels under 50% and might have been saved if hydroxocobalamin had been administered during resuscitation. According to our results, cyanide-induced cardiac arrest may be more frequently present among fire victims than previously believed, and early empiric treatment with hydroxocobalamin may improve outcomes for these victims in cases where cardiac arrest is of short duration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A forgotten approach after cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial ınfarction: Neuroprotective therapeutic hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Özçelik

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In patients with spontaneous circulation after cardiopulmonary resuscitation, therapeutic hypothermia is defined as the reduction of body temperature to 32-34 ° C within the first 4-6 hours for neuroprotective purposes and to be maintained at this level for 12-24 hours after reaching the target temperature. Therapeutic hypothermia has been practiced since the 1940s. The aim of therapeutic hypothermia is to reduce cerebral edema, convulsive activity, metabolic demand and associated complications by providing low body heat. Therapeutic hypothermia is applied to increase life expectancy and quality of life. In out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, should be performed in comatose patients where initial rhythm is ventricular fibrillation and spontaneous circulation is returned. Herein, we present a 44 years old patient who had an aborted sudden cardiac death due to acute myocardial infarction and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation for 30 minutes and discharged after 6 days with a successful therapeutic hypothermia.

  2. Estimating cost-effectiveness of mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation training strategies to improve survival from cardiac arrest in private locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swor, Robert; Compton, Scott

    2004-01-01

    Most cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) trainees are young, and most cardiac arrests occur in private residences witnessed by older individuals. To estimate the cost-effectiveness of a CPR training program targeted at citizens over the age of 50 years compared with that of current nontargeted public CPR training. A model was developed using cardiac arrest and known demographic data from a single suburban zip code (population 36,325) including: local data (1997-1999) regarding cardiac arrest locations (public vs. private); incremental survival with CPR (historical survival rate 7.8%, adjusted odds ratio for CPR 2.0); arrest bystander demographics obtained from bystander telephone interviews; zip code demographics regarding population age and distribution; and 12.50 dollars per student for the cost of CPR training. Published rates of CPR training programs by age were used to estimate the numbers typically trained. Several assumptions were made: 1) there would be one bystander per. arrest; 2) the bystander would always perform CPR if trained; 3) cardiac arrest would be evenly distributed in the population; and 4) CPR training for a proportion of the population would proportionally increase CPR provision. Rates of arrest, bystanders by age, number of CPR trainees needed to result in increased arrest survival, and training cost per life saved for a one-year study period were calculated. There were 24.3 cardiac arrests per year, with 21.9 (90%) occurring in homes. In 66.5% of the home arrests, the bystander was more than 50 years old. To yield one additional survivor using the current CPR training strategy, 12,306 people needed to be trained (3,510 bystanders aged 50 years), which resulted in CPR provision to 7.14 additional patients. The training cost per life saved for a bystander aged 50 years was 785,040 dollars. Using a strategy of training only those cost of 53,383 dollars per life saved. Using these assumptions, current CPR training strategy is not a cost

  3. Blood levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Stoppe

    Full Text Available Ischemia-reperfusion injury following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is associated with a systemic inflammatory response, resulting in post-resuscitation disease. In the present study we investigated the response of the pleiotropic inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF to CPR in patients admitted to the hospital after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. To describe the magnitude of MIF release, we compared the blood levels from CPR patients with those obtained in healthy volunteers and with an aged- and gender-matched group of patients undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of extracorporeal circulation.Blood samples of 17 patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC after OHCA were obtained upon admission to the intensive care unit, and 6, 12, 24, 72 and 96 h later. Arrest and treatment related data were documented according to the Utstein style.In patients after ROSC, MIF levels at admission (475.2±157.8 ng/ml were significantly higher than in healthy volunteers (12.5±16.9 ng/ml, p<0.007 and in patients after cardiac surgery (78.2±41.6 ng/ml, p<0.007. Six hours after admission, MIF levels were decreased by more than 50% (150.5±127.2 ng/ml, p<0.007, but were not further reduced in the subsequent time course and remained significantly higher than the values observed during the ICU stay of cardiac surgical patients. In this small group of patients, MIF levels could not discriminate between survivors and non-survivors and were not affected by treatment with mild therapeutic hypothermia.MIF shows a rapid and pronounced increase following CPR, hence allowing a very early assessment of the inflammatory response. Further studies are warranted in larger patient groups to determine the prognostic significance of MIF.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01412619.

  4. Cardiac arrest associated with epileptic seizures: A case report with simultaneous EEG and ECG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Mehvari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ictal asystole is a rare, probably underestimated manifestation of epileptic seizures whose pathophysiology is still debated. This report describes two patients who had cardiac asystole at the end of their seizure. The first patient was a 13-year-old boy with complex partial seizures.. His MRI showed symmetrical signal abnormality in the bilateral parietooccipital lobe accompanied by mild gliosis and volume loss. During a 3-day long-term video-EEG monitoring, he had cardiac arrest at the end of one of his seizures that was secondarily generalized. The second one was a 42-year-old veteran with penetrating head trauma in the left frontal lobe due to shell injury. During long-term video-EEG monitoring, he had one generalized tonic–clonic seizure accompanied by bradycardia and cardiac asystole. Asystoles could have a role in the incidence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP, meaning that the presence of ictal bradycardia is a risk factor for SUDEP. In cases of epileptic cardiac dysrhythmia, prolonged simultaneous EEG/ECG monitoring may be required. Cardiological investigation should be included in epilepsy management.

  5. Association of public health initiatives with outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest at home and in public locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christopher B., Fordyce; Carolina M., Hansen; Kragholm, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Importance  Little is known about the influence of comprehensive public health initiatives according to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) location, particularly at home, where resuscitation efforts and outcomes have historically been poor.Objective  To describe temporal trends in bystander.......3%] in public) for whom resuscitation was attempted using data from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2014. The setting was 16 counties in North Carolina.Exposures  Patients were stratified by home vs public OHCA. Public health initiatives...... centers on recognition of cardiac arrest.Main Outcomes and Measures  Association of resuscitation efforts with survival and neurological outcomes from 2010 through 2014.Results  Among home OHCA patients (n = 5602), the median age was 64 years, and 62.2% were male; among public OHCA patients (n = 2667...

  6. Clinical predictors of shockable versus non-shockable rhythms in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granfeldt, Asger; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Steen Møller

    2016-01-01

    Aim To identify factors associated with a non-shockable rhythm as first recorded heart rhythm. Methods Patients ≥18 years old suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between 2001 and 2012 were identified in the population-based Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Danish administrative registries were...... used to identify chronic diseases (within 10 years) and drug prescriptions (within 180 days). A multivariable logistic regression model, including patient related and cardiac arrest related characteristics, was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) for factors associated with non-shockable rhythm. Results...... compared to patients with shockable rhythm. In the adjusted multivariable regression model, pre-existing non-cardiovascular disease and drug prescription were associated with a non-shockable rhythm e.g. chronic obstructive lung disease (OR 1.44 [95% CI: 1.32–1.58]); and the prescription for antidepressants...

  7. [Cardiac arrest after epidural anesthesia for a esthetic plastic surgery: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Larissa Cardoso; Carmona, Bruno Mendes; de Nazareth Chaves Fascio, Mário; de Souza, Iris Santos; de Azevedo, Rui Antonio Aquino; Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó

    Cardiac arrest during neuraxial anesthesia is a serious adverse event, which may lead to significant neurological damage and death if not treated promptly. The associated mechanisms are neglected respiratory failure, extensive sympathetic block, local anaesthetic toxicity, total spinal block, in addition to the growing awareness of the vagal predominance as a predisposing factor. In the case reported, the patient was 25 years old, ASA I, scheduled for aesthetic lipoplasty. After sedation with midazolam and fentany, epidural anesthesia in interspaces T12-L1 and T2-T3 and catheter insertion into inferior puncture were performed. The patient remained in the supine position for 10minutes. Then, she was placed in the prone position, developing asystolic cardiac arrest 20minutes after the completion of neuraxial blockade. The medical team immediately placed the patient in the supine position and began cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Spontaneous circulation was achieved after twenty minutes of resuscitation. We discuss in this report the exacerbated vagal response as the main event mechanism. The patient's successful outcome emphasizes the importance of anaesthetic monitoring by anesthesiologists, prompt recognition and treatment of rhythm changes on the electrocardiogram. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Extracorporeal Life Support Increases Survival After Prolonged Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnet, Ingrid Anna Maria; Ettl, Florian; Schober, Andreas; Warenits, Alexandra-Maria; Grassmann, Daniel; Wagner, Michael; Schriefl, Christoph; Clodi, Christian; Teubenbacher, Ursula; Högler, Sandra; Weihs, Wolfgang; Sterz, Fritz; Janata, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) may increase end organ perfusion and thus survival when conventional CPR fails. The aim was to investigate, if after ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest in rodents ECLS improves outcome compared with conventional CPR. In 24 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (460-510 g) resuscitation was started after 10 min of no-flow with ECLS (consisting of an open reservoir, roller pump, and membrane oxygenator, connected to cannulas in the jugular vein and femoral artery, n = 8) or CPR (mechanical chest compressions plus ventilations, n = 8) and compared with a sham group (n = 8). After return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), all rats were maintained at 33°C for 12 h. Survival to 14 days, neurologic deficit scores and overall performance categories were assessed. ECLS leads to sustained ROSC in 8 of 8 (100%) and neurological intact survival to 14 days in 7 of 8 rats (88%), compared with 5 of 8 (63%) and 1 of 8 CPR rats. The median survival time was 14 days (IQR: 14-14) in the ECLS and 1 day (IQR: 0 to 5) for the CPR group (P = 0.004). In a rat model of prolonged ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest, ECLS with mild hypothermia produces 100% resuscitability and 88% long-term survival, significantly better than conventional CPR.

  9. Improvements in logistics could increase survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömsöe, A; Afzelius, S; Axelsson, C; Södersved Källestedt, M L; Enlund, M; Svensson, L; Herlitz, J

    2013-06-01

    In a review based on estimations and assumptions, to report the estimated number of survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was started and to speculate about possible future improvements in Sweden. An observational study. All ambulance organisations in Sweden. Patients included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry who suffered an OHCA between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2010. Approximately 80% of OHCA cases in Sweden in which CPR was started are included. None In 11 005 patients, the 1-month survival rate was 9.4%. There are approximately 5000 OHCA cases annually in which CPR is started and 30-day survival is achieved in up to 500 patients yearly (6 per 100 000 inhabitants). Based on findings on survival in relation to the time to calling for the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) and the start of CPR and defibrillation, it was estimated that, if the delay from collapse to (i) calling EMS, (ii) the start of CPR, and (iii) the time to defibrillation were reduced to <2 min, <2 min, and <8 min, respectively, 300-400 additional lives could be saved. Based on findings relating to the delay to calling for the EMS and the start of CPR and defibrillation, we speculate that 300-400 additional OHCA patients yearly (4 per 100 000 inhabitants) could be saved in Sweden. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  10. Resuscitation of patients suffering from sudden cardiac arrests in nursing homes is not futile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søholm, Helle; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Lippert, Freddy K; Køber, Lars; Wanscher, Michael; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has increased in recent years, and new data are therefore needed to avoid unsubstantiated statements when debating futility of resuscitation attempts following OHCA in nursing home (NH)-residents. We aimed to investigate the outcome and prognosis after OHCA in NH. Consecutive Emergency Medical Service (EMS) attended OHCA-patients in Copenhagen during 2007-2011 were included. Utstein-criteria for pre-hospital data and review of individual patient charts for in-hospital post-resuscitation care were collected. A total of 2541 consecutive OHCA-patients were recorded, 245 (10%) of who were current NH-residents. NH-patients were older, more frequently female, had more witnessed arrests, fewer shockable primary rhythm and assumed cardiac aetiology, but shorter time to the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) compared to OHCA in non-nursing homes (non-NH). Overall 30-day survival rate was 9% in NH and 18% in non-NH, pNursing home residents resuscitated from OHCA and admitted to hospital have similar survival rates as non-NH-patients when adjusting for known prognostic factors and pre-existing co-morbidity. A policy of not attempting resuscitation in nursing homes at all may therefore not be justified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Long-term effects of brief hypoxia due to cardiac arrest: Hippocampal reductions and memory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenova, Vess; Nicola, Raneen; Aharon-Peretz, Judith; Goldsher, Dorith; Kapeliovich, Michael; Gilboa, Asaf

    2018-02-21

    To examine the effects of brief hypoxia (memory and executive functions tasks. Patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) (n = 9), who were deemed neurologically intact on discharge, were compared to matched patients with myocardial infarction (MI) (n = 9). A battery of clinical and experimental memory and executive functions neuropsychological tests were administered and MRI scans for all patients were collected. Measures of subcortical and cortical volumes and cortical thickness were obtained using FreeSurfer. Manual segmentations of the hippocampus were also performed. APACHE-II scores were calculated based on metrics collected at admission to ICCU for all patients. Significant differences between the two groups were observed on several verbal memory tests. Both hippocampi were significantly reduced (p memory tasks, including recollection. Hippocampal volumes and several memory measures (but not other cognitive domains) were strongly correlated with APACHE-II scores on admission in the CA group, but not in the MI group CONCLUSIONS: Chronic patients with cardiac arrest who were discharged from hospital in "good neurological condition" showed an average of 10% reduction in hippocampal volume bilaterally and significant verbal memory deficits relative to matched controls with myocardial infarction, suggesting even brief hypoxic periods suffice to lead to specific hippocampal damage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Bystander efforts and 1-year outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Wissenberg, Mads; Mortensen, Rikke N.

    2017-01-01

    risks of anoxic brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause among patients who survived to day 30 after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We analyzed risks according to whether bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or defibrillation was performed and evaluated temporal...... with no bystander resuscitation (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47 to 0.82), as well as a lower risk of death from any cause (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.99) and a lower risk of the composite end point of brain damage, nursing home admission, or death (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% CI, 0...... changes in bystander interventions and outcomes. RESULTS Among the 2855 patients who were 30-day survivors of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during the period from 2001 through 2012, a total of 10.5% had brain damage or were admitted to a nursing home and 9.7% died during the 1-year follow-up period...

  13. 'Knocking-fingers' chest compression technique in infant cardiac arrest: single-rescuer manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Sung Oh; Kim, Hyung Il; Cha, Yong Sung; Kim, Oh Hyun; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Hyun; Cha, Kyoung-Chul

    2018-01-30

    We designed a new chest compression technique, the 'knocking-fingers' chest compression (KF) technique, for a single rescuer in infant cardiac arrest. We compared the effectiveness and feasibility between the KF technique and the two-finger (TF) and two-thumb encircling hands (TT) techniques. A prospective, randomized, crossover study was carried out to compare the quality of chest compression and ventilation between the KF, TF, and TT techniques using a 30 : 2 compression-to-ventilation ratio and mouth-to-mouth ventilation. The area of chest compression, finger(s) pain, and fatigability were measured to compare safety and feasibility. The total frequency of chest compression for 5 min was the highest with the KF technique, followed by the TF and TT techniques. The total frequency of ventilation for 5 min was higher with the KF and TF techniques compared with the TT technique. The total hands-off time was the shortest with the KF technique, followed by the TF and TT techniques. The area of chest compression was the smallest in KF technique. Participants complained of severe finger pain and high fatigability in TF technique. The single-rescuer KF chest compression technique is an effective alternative to the TF or TT techniques for infant cardiac arrest.

  14. Dual defibrillation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A retrospective cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Elliot M; Redman, Theodore T; Harper, Stephen A; Mapp, Julian G; Wampler, David A; Miramontes, David A

    2016-09-01

    The goal of our study is to determine if prehospital dual defibrillation (DD) is associated with better neurologically intact survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. This study is a retrospective cohort analysis of prospectively collected Quality Assurance/Quality Improvement data from a large urban fire based EMS system out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) database between Jan 2013 and Dec 2015. Our inclusion criteria were administration of DD or at least four conventional 200J defibrillations for cases of recurrent and refractory ventricular fibrillation (VF). We excluded any case with incomplete data. The primary outcome for our study was neurologically intact survival (defined as Cerebral Performance Category 1 and 2). A total of 3470 cases of OHCA were treated during the time period of Jan 2013 to Dec 2015. There were 302 cases of recurrent and refractory VF identified. Twenty-three cases had incomplete data. Of the remaining 279 cases, 50 were treated with DD and 229 received standard single shock 200J defibrillations. There was no statistically significant difference in the primary outcome of neurologically intact survival between the DD group (6%) and the standard defibrillation group (11.4%) (p=0.317) (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.15-1.72). Our retrospective cohort analysis on the prehospital use of DD in OHCA found no association with neurologically intact survival. Case-control studies are needed to further evaluate the efficacy of DD in the prehospital setting. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in nursing homes - A nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Marianne; Rajan, Shahzleen; Hansen, Steen Møller; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Riddersholm, Signe; Folke, Fredrik; Karlsson, Lena; Lippert, Freddy; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar; Søholm, Helle; Wissenberg, Mads; Gerds, Thomas A; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Kragholm, Kristian

    2018-02-07

    Survival among nursing home residents who suffers out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is sparsely studied. Deployment of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in nursing home facilities in Denmark is unknown. We examined 30-day survival following OHCA in nursing and private home residents. This register-based, nationwide, follow-up study identified OHCA-patients ≥18 years of age with a resuscitation attempt in nursing homes and private homes using Danish Cardiac Arrest Register data from June 1, 2001 to December 31, 2014. The primary outcome measure was 30-day survival. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess factors potentially associated with survival among nursing and private home residents separately. Of 26,999 OCHAs, 2516 (9.3%) occurred in nursing homes, and 24,483 (90.7%) in private homes. Nursing home residents were older (median 83 (Q1-Q3: 75-89) vs. 71 (Q1-Q3: 61-80) years), had more witnessed arrest (55.4% vs. 43.4%), received more bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (49.7% vs. 35.3%), but less pre-hospital defibrillation (15.1% vs. 29.8%). Registered AEDs increased in the period 2007-2014 from 1 to 211 in nursing homes vs. 1 to 488 in private homes. Average 30-day survival in nursing homes was 1.7% [95%CI: 1.2-2.2%] vs. 4.9% [95%CI: 4.6-5.2%] in private homes (P nursing vs. private home residents. Average 30-day survival after OHCA was very low in nursing home residents, but those who received early resuscitative efforts had higher chance of survival. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Public access defibrillation—results from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijovic, M; Bernard, S; Nehme, Z; Walker, T; Smith, K

    2014-12-01

    To assess the impact of automated external defibrillator (AED) use by bystanders in Victoria, Australia on survival of adults suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in a public place compared to those first defibrillated by emergency medical services (EMS). We analysed data from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry for individuals aged >15 years who were defibrillated in a public place between 1 July 2002 and 30 June 2013, excluding events due to trauma or witnessed by EMS. Of 2270 OHCA cases who arrested in a public place, 2117 (93.4%) were first defibrillated by EMS and 153 (6.7%) were first defibrillated by a bystander using a public AED. Use of public AEDs increased almost 11-fold between 2002/2003 and 2012/2013, from 1.7% to 18.5%, respectively (p defibrillation occurred sooner in bystander defibrillation (5.2 versus 10.0 min, p defibrillated patients was significantly higher than for those first defibrillated by EMS (45% versus 31%, p defibrillation by a bystander using an AED was associated with a 62% increase in the odds of survival to hospital discharge (adjusted odds ratio 1.62, 95% CI: 1.12–2.34, p = 0.010) compared to first defibrillation by EMS. Survival to hospital discharge is improved in patients first defibrillated using a public AED prior to EMS arrival in Victoria, Australia. Encouragingly, bystander AED use in Victoria has increased over time. More widespread availability of AEDs may further improve outcomes of OHCA in public places.

  17. Evaluation of coronary blood flow velocity during cardiac arrest with circulation maintained through mechanical chest compressions in a porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Henrik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical chest compressions (CCs have been shown capable of maintaining circulation in humans suffering cardiac arrest for extensive periods of time. Reports have documented a visually normalized coronary blood flow during angiography in such cases (TIMI III flow, but it has never been actually measured. Only indirect measurements of the coronary circulation during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs have been performed previously through measurement of the coronary perfusion pressure (CPP. In this study our aim was to correlate average peak coronary flow velocity (APV to CPP during mechanical CCs. Methods In a closed chest porcine model, cardiac arrest was established through electrically induced ventricular fibrillation (VF in eleven pigs. After one minute, mechanical chest compressions were initiated and then maintained for 10 minutes upon which the pigs were defibrillated. Measurements of coronary blood flow in the left anterior descending artery were made at baseline and during VF with a catheter based Doppler flow fire measuring APV. Furthermore measurements of central (thoracic venous and arterial pressures were also made in order to calculate the theoretical CPP. Results Average peak coronary flow velocity was significantly higher compared to baseline during mechanical chests compressions and this was observed during the entire period of mechanical chest compressions (12 - 39% above baseline. The APV slowly declined during the 10 min period of mechanical chest compressions, but was still higher than baseline at the end of mechanical chest compressions. CPP was simultaneously maintained at > 20 mmHg during the 10 minute episode of cardiac arrest. Conclusion Our study showed good correlation between CPP and APV which was highly significant, during cardiac arrest with on-going mechanical CCs in a closed chest porcine model. In addition APV was even higher during mechanical CCs compared to baseline. Mechanical

  18. Paramedics successfully perform humeral EZ-IO intraosseous access in adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampler, David; Schwartz, Daniel; Shumaker, Joi; Bolleter, Scotty; Beckett, Robert; Manifold, Craig

    2012-09-01

    Studies on humeral placement of the EZ-IO (Vidacare, Shavano Park, TX, USA) have shown mixed results. We performed a study to determine the first-attempt success rate at humeral placement of the EZ-IO by paramedics among prehospital adult cardiac arrest patients. A retrospective cohort analysis of data prospectively collected over a 9-month period. Data are a subset extracted from a prehospital cardiac arrest study. The cohort consisted of adult cardiac arrest patients in whom the EZ-IO placement was attempted in the humerus by paramedics. Choice of vascular access was at the discretion of the paramedic; options included tibial or humeral EZ-IO and intravenous. Primary outcome is the percentage of successful placements (stable, flow, without extravasation) on first attempt. Secondary outcomes are overall successful placement, complications, and reason for failure. Data were collected during a post-cardiac arrest interview. Humeral intraosseous (IO) access was attempted in 61% (n = 247) of 405 cardiac arrests evaluated with mean age of 63 (±16) years, 58% male. First-attempt successful placement was 91%. Successful placement was 94%, considering the second attempts. In the unsuccessful attempts, 2% reported obesity as the cause, 1% reported stable placement without flow, and 2% reported undocumented causes for failure. There were also 2% reports of successful placement with subsequent dislodgement. The results of this study suggest a high degree of paramedic proficiency in establishment of IO access in the proximal humerus of the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Few complications suggest that proximal humeral IO access is a reliable method for vascular access in this patient population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Determinants of occurrence and survival after sudden cardiac arrest-A European perspective: The ESCAPE-NET project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empana, Jean-Philippe; Blom, Marieke T; Bӧttiger, Bernd W; Dagres, Nikolaos; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Gislason, Gunnar; Jouven, Xavier; Meitinger, Thomas; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Schwartz, Peter J; Jonsson, Martin; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Truhlar, Anatolij; Tan, Hanno L

    2018-03-01

    The ESCAPE-NET project ("European Sudden Cardiac Arrest network- towards Prevention, Education and New Effective Treatments") aims to study: (1) risk factors and mechanisms for the occurrence of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in the population, and (2) risk factors and treatment strategies for survival after SCA on a European scale. This is an Horizon2020 funded program of the European Union, performed by a European public-private consortium of 16 partners across 10 EU countries. There are 11 deep-phenotyped SCA cohorts for the study of risk factors and treatment strategies for survival after SCA, and 5 deep-phenotyped observational prospective population cohorts for the study of risk factors for occurrence of SCA. Personalized risk scores for predicting SCA onset and for predicting survival after SCA will be derived and validated. The 11 clinical studies with SCA cases comprise 85,790 SCA cases; the 5 observational prospective population cohorts include 53,060 subjects. A total of 15,000 SCA samples will be genotyped for common and rare variants at the Helmholtz Zentrum München (Germany) using the Illumina Global Screening Array which contains > 770,000 SNPs, and after imputation, a database of an estimated > 9 million variants will be available for genome wide association studies. Standardization of risk factors definition and outcomes is ongoing. An Executive Committee has been created along with a Collaboration Policy document. ESCAPE-NET will complement ongoing efforts on SCA outside Europe and within Europe including the EuReCa project. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence of myocardial fibrosis patterns in patients with systolic dysfunction: prognostic significance for the prediction of sudden cardiac arrest or appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almehmadi, Fahad; Joncas, Sebastien Xavier; Nevis, Immaculate; Zahrani, Mohammad; Bokhari, Mahmoud; Stirrat, John; Fine, Nowell M; Yee, Raymond; White, James A

    2014-07-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement-cardiac magnetic resonance is increasingly performed in patients with systolic dysfunction. Numerous patterns of fibrosis are commonly reported among this population. However, the relative prevalence and prognostic significance of these findings remains uncertain. Three hundred eighteen consecutive patients referred for late gadolinium enhancement-cardiac magnetic resonance and a left ventricular ejection fraction 35% (40% versus 6%; P=0.005). Patients with systolic dysfunction frequently demonstrate multiple patterns of myocardial fibrosis. Of these, a midwall striae pattern of fibrosis is the strongest independent predictor of sudden cardiac arrest or appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator therapy. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Incidence and outcome from adult cardiac arrest occurring in the intensive care unit: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendijev, Ilmar; Nurmi, Jouni; Castrén, Maaret; Skrifvars, Markus B

    2014-04-01

    Significant amount of data on the incidence and outcome of out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest have been published. Cardiac arrest occurring in the intensive care unit has received less attention. To evaluate and summarize current knowledge of intensive care unit cardiac arrest including quality of data, and results focusing on incidence and patient outcome. We conducted a literature search of the PubMed, CINAHL and Cochrane databases with the following search terms (medical subheadings): heart arrest AND intensive care unit OR critical care OR critical care nursing OR monitored bed OR monitored ward OR monitored patient. We included articles published from the 1st of January 1990 till 31st of December 2012. After exclusion of all duplicates and irrelevant articles we evaluated quality of studies using a predefined quality assessment score and summarized outcome data. The initial search yielded 794 articles of which 780 were excluded. Three papers were added after a manual search of the eligible studies' references. One paper was identified manually from the literature published after our initial search was completed, thus the final sample consisted of 18 papers. Of the studies included thirteen were retrospective, two based on prospective registries and three were focused prospective studies. All except two studies were from a single institution. Six studies reported the incidence of intensive care unit cardiac arrest, which varied from 5.6 to 78.1 cardiac arrests per 1000 intensive care unit admissions. The most frequently reported initial cardiac arrest rhythms were non-shockable. Patient outcome was variable with survival to hospital discharge being in the range of 0-79% and long-term survival ranging from 1 to 69%. Nine studies reported neurological status of survivors, which was mostly favorable, either no neurological sequelae or cerebral performance score mostly of 1-2. Studies focusing on post cardiac surgery patients reported the best long

  2. Severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and presenting rhythm in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granfeldt, Asger; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Steen Møller

    2018-01-01

    of COPD in OHCA patients is associated with an increased prevalence of non-shockable rhythm. METHODS: This study included OHCA patients ≥40 years from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry (2001-2014). Population-based registries were used to identify chronic diseases and drug prescriptions. COPD was defined......INTRODUCTION: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with a non-shockable rhythm as presenting rhythm in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Whether the severity of the underlying disease is related to presenting rhythm is unknown. We hypothesize that increased severity...

  3. Factors Associated With Successful Resuscitation After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Temporal Trends in Survival and Comorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Hassager, Christian; Lippert, Freddy

    2015-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has an overall poor prognosis. We sought to identify what temporal trends and influencing factors existed for this condition in one region. METHODS: We studied consecutive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients from 2007 to 2011 with attempted...... (multivariate OR=1.14; 95% CI 0.91 to 1.44), and employment status (multivariate OR=1.17; 95% CI 0.89 to 1.56) were not independently associated with outcome. The number of patients with a high comorbidity burden (Charlson comorbidity index ≥3) increased during the study period (P trend ...% (P trend trend

  4. Full recovery two months after therapeutic hypothermia following cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a patient with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, J.; Cha, K.S.; Oh, J.H.; Lee, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic impairments are very common among patients who get a recovery of spontaneous circulation after suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Therapeutic hypothermia is established as a standardized therapeutic strategy for those patients in whom it decreases mortality rate and improves neurologic outcome. Herein, we report a case of patient who experienced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with ischaemic heart disease and ventricular arrhythmia and got a full recovery without any neurologic impediments 2 months after being managed with therapeutic hypothermia. (author)

  5. Differences between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in residential and public locations and implications for public-access defibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Fredrik; Gislason, Gunnar H; Lippert, Freddy

    2010-01-01

    The majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occur in residential locations, but knowledge about strategic placement of automated external defibrillators in residential areas is lacking. We examined whether residential OHCA areas suitable for placement of automated external defibrillat......The majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occur in residential locations, but knowledge about strategic placement of automated external defibrillators in residential areas is lacking. We examined whether residential OHCA areas suitable for placement of automated external...... defibrillators could be identified on the basis of demographic characteristics and characterized individuals with OHCA in residential locations....

  6. Interaction between emergency medical dispatcher and caller in suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest calls with focus on agonal breathing. A review of 100 tape recordings of true cardiac arrest cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bång, Angela; Herlitz, Johan; Martinell, Sven

    2003-01-01

    One of the objectives of this study was to assess the emergency medical dispatchers (EMDs) ability for the identification and prioritisation of cardiac arrest (CA) cases, and offering and achievements of dispatcher-assisted bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The other objective was to give an account of the frequency of agonal respiration in cardiac arrest calls and the caller's descriptions of breathing. Prospective study evaluating 100 tape recordings of the EMD calls of emergency medical service (EMS)-provided advanced life support- (ALS) cases, of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The quality of EMD-performed interviews was highly commended in 63% of cases, but insufficient or unapproved in the remaining 37%. The caller's state of mind was not a major problem for co-operation. Among the 100 cases, 24 were suspected to be unconscious and in respiratory arrest. A further 38 cases were presented as unconscious with abnormal breathing. In only 14 cases dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR was offered by the EMD, and in 11 of these it was attempted, and completed in eight. Only four of the cases were unconscious patients with abnormal breathing. The incidence of suspected agonal breathing was estimated to be approximately 30% and the descriptions were; difficulty, poorly, gasping, wheezing, impaired, occasional breathing. Among suspected cardiac arrest cases, EMDs offer CPR instruction to only a small fraction of callers. A major obstacle was the presentation of agonal breathing. Patients with a combination of unconsciousness and agonal breathing should be offered dispatcher-assisted CPR instruction. This might improve survival in out-of hospital cardiac arrest.

  7. Accessory papillary muscles and papillary muscle hypertrophy are associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jae-Sun; Youn, Jong-Chan; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Park, Junbeom; Park, Jin-Kyu; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Joung, Boyoung; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2015-10-15

    The present study was performed for elucidating the associations between the morphology of the papillary muscles (PMs) and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). We retrospectively reviewed history, laboratory data, electrocardiography, echocardiography, coronary angiography, and cardiac CT/MRI for 190 patients with SCA. The prevalence of accessory PMs and PM hypertrophy in patients with SCA of unknown cause was compared with that in patients with SCA of known causes and 98 age- and sex-matched patients without SCA. An accessory PM was defined as a PM with origins separated from the anterolateral and posteromedial PMs, or a PM that branched into two or three bellies at the base of the anterolateral or posteromedial PM. PM hypertrophy was defined as at least one of the two PMs having a diameter of ≥1.1cm. In 49 patients (age 49.9±15.9years; 38 men) the cause of SCA was unknown, whereas 141 (age 54.2±16.6years; 121 men) had a known cause. The prevalence of accessory PMs was significantly higher in the unknown-cause group than in the known-cause group (24.5% and 7.8%, respectively; p=0.002) or the no-SCA group (7.1%, p=0.003). The same was true for PM hypertrophy (unknown-cause 12.2%, known-cause 2.1%, p=0.010; no SCA group 1.0%, p=0.006). By logistic regression, accessory PM and PM hypertrophy were independently associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause. An accessory PM and PM hypertrophy are associated with SCA of unknown cause. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-critical care telemetry and in-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Rami; Shah, Sachil; Donath, Elie; Hartmann, Nicholas; Rasmussen, Ann; Isaac, Shaun; Borzak, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Telemetry is increasingly used to monitor hospitalized patients with lower intensities of care, but its effect on in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) outcomes in non-critical care patients is unknown. Telemetry utilization in non-critical care patients does not affect IHCA outcomes. A retrospective cohort analysis of all patients in non-critical care beds that experienced a cardiac arrest in a university-affiliated teaching hospital during calendar years 2011 and 2012 was performed. Data were collected as part of AHA Get With the Guidelines protocol. The independent variable and exposure studied were whether patients were on telemetry or not. Telemetry was monitored from a central location. The primary endpoint was return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and the secondary end point was survival to discharge. Of 123 IHCA patients, the mean age was 75±15 and 74 (61%) were male. 80 (65%) patients were on telemetry. Baseline demographics were similar except for age; patients on telemetry were younger with mean age of 70.3 vs. 76.8 in the non-telemetry group (p=0.024). 72 patients (60%) achieved ROSC and 46 (37%) achieved survival to discharge. By univariate analysis, there was no difference between patients that had been on telemetry vs. no telemetry in ROSC (OR=1.13, p=0.76) or survival to discharge (OR=1.18, p=0.67). Similar findings were obtained with multivariate analysis for ROSC (0.91, p=0.85) and survival to discharge (OR=0.92, p=0.87). The use of cardiac telemetry in non-critical care beds, when monitored remotely in a central location, is not associated with improved IHCA outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Predicting survival causes after out of hospital cardiac arrest using data mining method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Duff, Franck; Muntean, Cristian; Cuggia, Marc; Mabo, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    The prognosis of life for patients with heart failure remains poor. By using data mining methods, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the most important criteria for predicting patient survival and to profile patients to estimate their survival chances together with the most appropriate technique for health care. Five hundred and thirty three patients who had suffered from cardiac arrest were included in the analysis. We performed classical statistical analysis and data mining analysis using mainly Bayesian networks. The mean age of the 533 patients was 63 (+/- 17) and the sample was composed of 390 (73 %) men and 143 (27 %) women. Cardiac arrest was observed at home for 411 (77 %) patients, in a public place for 62 (12 %) patients and on a public highway for 60 (11 %) patients. The belief network of the variables showed that the probability of remaining alive after heart failure is directly associated to five variables: age, sex, the initial cardiac rhythm, the origin of the heart failure and specialized resuscitation techniques employed. Data mining methods could help clinicians to predict the survival of patients and then adapt their practices accordingly. This work could be carried out for each medical procedure or medical problem and it would become possible to build a decision tree rapidly with the data of a service or a physician. The comparison between classic analysis and data mining analysis showed us the contribution of the data mining method for sorting variables and quickly conclude on the importance or the impact of the data and variables on the criterion of the study. The main limit of the method is knowledge acquisition and the necessity to gather sufficient data to produce a relevant model.

  10. Effects of adrenaline on rhythm transitions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neset, Andres; Nordseth, Trond; Kramer-Johansen, Jo; Wik, Lars; Olasveengen, Theresa M

    2013-11-01

    We wanted to study the effects of intravenous (i.v.) adrenaline (epinephrine) on rhythm transitions during cardiac arrest with initial or secondary ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia (VF/VT). Post hoc analysis of patients included in a randomised controlled trial of i.v. drugs in adult, non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients who were defibrillated and had a readable electrocardiography recording. Patients who received adrenaline were compared with patients who did not. Cardiac rhythms were annotated manually using the defibrillator data. Eight hundred and forty-nine patients were included in the randomised trial of which 223 were included in this analysis; 119 in the adrenaline group and 104 in the no-adrenaline group. The proportion of patients with one or more VF/VT episodes after temporary return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was higher in the adrenaline than in the no-adrenaline group, 24% vs. 12%, P = 0.03. Most relapses from ROSC to VF/VT in the no-adrenaline group occurred during the first 20 min of resuscitation, whereas patients in the adrenaline group experienced such relapses even after 20 min. Fibrillations from asystole or pulseless electrical activity, shock resistant VF/VT and the number of rhythm transitions per patient was higher in the adrenalin group compared with the no-adrenalin group: 90% vs. 69%, P adrenaline had more rhythm transitions from ROSC and non-shockable rhythms to VF/VT. © 2013 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Cardiac arrest secondary to acute coronary syndrome: a 4-year observational study of patient characteristics and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorecka, M; Hanley, A; Burke, F; Nolan, P; Crowley, J

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac arrest due to ischaemia is frequently the first manifestation of cardiovascular disease. We sought to describe the characteristics and outcomes of patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with a diagnosis of cardiac arrest secondary to acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We performed a retrospective analysis of patients admitted to the intensive care unit over a 4 year period. Baseline demographic characteristics, the use of therapeutic hypothermia, rates of percutaneous coronary intervention, co-morbidities and baseline left ventricular function were all documented. Outcomes included Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at time of discharge from the ICU, survival to hospital discharge, 6 months survival and left ventricular function at 6 months. We identified 31 admissions to the ICU following cardiac arrest due to ACS during the study period. 71 % of patients survived to hospital discharge and all of these were still alive at 6 months. 65 % had good neurological function (GCS > 13) when discharged from ICU. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction remained stable at 6 months. A significant proportion of patients admitted to the intensive care unit with a diagnosis of cardiac arrest secondary to acute coronary syndrome survive to hospital discharge with meaningful recovery in neurological and cardiac function.

  12. Validation of an ICD code for accurately identifying emergency department patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Shelby K; Chukwulebe, Steve B; Gaieski, David F; Abella, Benjamin S; Carr, Brendan G; Perman, Sarah M

    2018-01-16

    International classification of disease (ICD-9) code 427.5 (cardiac arrest) is utilized to identify cohorts of patients who suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), though the use of ICD codes for this purpose has never been formally validated. We sought to validate the utility of ICD-9 code 427.5 by identifying patients admitted from the emergency department (ED) after OHCA. Adult visits to a single ED between January 2007 and July 2012 were retrospectively examined and a keyword search of the electronic medical record (EMR) was used to identify patients. Cardiac arrest was confirmed; and ICD-9 information and location of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) were collected. Separately, the EMR was searched for patients who received ICD-9 code 427.5. The kappa coefficient (κ) was calculated, as was the sensitivity and specificity of the code for identifying OHCA. The keyword search identified 1717 patients, of which 385 suffered OHCA and 333 were assigned the code 427.5. The agreement between ICD-9 code and cardiac arrest was excellent (κ = 0.895). The ICD-9 code 427.5 was both specific (99.4%) and sensitive (86.5%). Of the 52 cardiac arrests that were not identified by ICD-9 code, 33% had ROSC before arrival to the ED. When searching independently on ICD-9 code, 347 patients with ICD-9 code 427.5 were found, of which 320 were "true" arrests. This yielded a positive predictive value of 92% for ICD-9 code 427.5 in predicting OHCA. ICD-9 code 427.5 is sensitive and specific for identifying ED patients who suffer OHCA with a positive predictive value of 92%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Successful resuscitation of hypermagnesaemic asystolic cardiac arrest with the use of early transvenous cardiac pacemaker: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M A; Crystal, C S; Helphenstine, J; Young, S E

    2006-03-01

    A 63 year old woman presented to the emergency department (ED) with 1 week of progressive dyspnoea, constipation, and generalized weakness. She had undergone spinal fustion surgery 10 days previously, and had a history of chronic renal insufficiency. The patient had been using milk of magnesia and magnesium citrate in unknown amounts to alleviate her constipation over this time frame. During her ED stay she became progressively hypotensive and bradycardic, and despite aggressive resuscitative measures she suffered an asystolic arrest 1 hour into her ED course. She was resuscitated with conventional therapy, but her haemodynamic profile did not improve significantly until transvenous cardiac pacing was employed. Her magnesium level was 10.4 mmol/l. Treatment of magnesium overload has focused upon haemodialysis, forced diuresis, and the use of intravenous calcium salts. Case reports have previously documented survival of moderately to severely ill patients when these modalities have been used. Likewise, failure of resuscitation despite use of these methods has been previously noted. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case clearly demonstrating the efficacy of transvenous cardiac pacing to successfully resuscitate a patient upon whom multiple vasopressors, fluids, and calcium previously had no clear effect.

  14. The association between tidal volume and neurological outcome following in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Ari; Grossestreuer, Anne V; Berg, Katherine M; Patel, Parth V; Ganley, Sarah; Casasola Medrano, Marcel; Cocchi, Michael N; Donnino, Michael W

    2018-03-01

    Prior investigation has found that mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volumes (Vt) following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is associated with better neurologic outcomes. The relationship between Vt and neurologic outcome following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) has not previously been explored. In the present study, we investigate the association between Vt and neurologic outcome following IHCA. This was an observational study using a prospectively collected database of IHCA patients at a tertiary care hospital in the United States. The relationship between time-weighted average Vt per predicted body weight (PBW) over the first 6- and 48 h after cardiac arrest and neurologic outcome were assessed using propensity-score adjusted logistic regression. Of 185 IHCA patients who received invasive mechanical ventilation within 6 h of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), the average Vt over the first 6 h was 7.7 ± 2.0 ml/kg and 68 (36.8%) patients received an average Vt > 8.0 ml/kg. Of 121 patients who received mechanical ventilation for at least 48 h post-ROSC, the average Vt was 7.6 ± 1.5 ml/kg and 46 (38.0%) patients received an average Vt > 8.0 ml/kg. There was no relationship between Vt/PBW over the first 6- or 48 h post-ROSC and neurologic outcome (OR 0.99; 95%CI 0.84-1.16; p = 0.89; OR 1.03; 95%CI 0.78-1.37; p = 0.83 respectively). This study did not identify a relationship between Vt and neurologic outcome following IHCA. This contrasts with results in OHCA, where higher Vt has been associated with worse neurologic outcome. Additional investigation is needed with respect to other potential benefits of low-Vt post IHCA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Automated external cardioversion defibrillation monitoring in cardiac arrest: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norvel Robert

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In-hospital cardiac arrest has a poor prognosis despite active electrocardiography monitoring. The initial rhythm of approximately 25% of in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR events is pulseless ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF. Early defibrillation is an independent predictor of survival in CPR events caused by VT/VF. The automated external cardioverter defibrillator (AECD is a device attached by pads to the chest wall that monitors, detects, and within seconds, automatically delivers electric countershock to an appropriate tachyarrhythmia. Study Objectives • To evaluate safety of AECD monitoring in hospitalized patients. • To evaluate whether AECDs provide earlier defibrillation than hospital code teams. Methods The study is a prospective trial randomizing patients admitted to the telemetry ward to standard CPR (code team or standard CPR plus AECD monitoring (PowerHeart CRM. The AECD is programmed to deliver one 150 J biphasic shock to patients in sustained VT/VF. Data is collected using the Utstein criteria for cardiac arrest. The primary endpoint is time-to-defibrillation; secondary outcomes include neurological status and survival to discharge, with 3-year follow-up. Results To date, 192 patients have been recruited in the time period between 10/10/2006 to 7/20/2007. A total of 3,655 hours of telemetry data have been analyzed in the AECD arm. The AECD has monitored ambulatory telemetry patients in sinus rhythm, sinus tachycardia, supraventricular tachycardia, atrial flutter or fibrillation, with premature ventricular complexes and non-sustained VT without delivery of inappropriate shocks. One patient experienced sustained VT during AECD monitoring, who was successfully defibrillated (17 seconds after meeting programmed criteria. There are no events to report in the control arm. The patient survived the event without neurological complications. During the same time period, mean time to

  16. The Efficacy of LUCAS in Prehospital Cardiac Arrest Scenarios: A Crossover Mannequin Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Gyory

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is critical for successful cardiac arrest outcomes. Mechanical devices may improve CPR quality. We simulated a prehospital cardiac arrest, including patient transport, and compared the performance of the LUCAS™ device, a mechanical chest compression-decompression system, to manual CPR. We hypothesized that because of the movement involved in transporting the patient, LUCAS would provide chest compressions more consistent with highquality CPR guidelines. Methods: We performed a crossover-controlled study in which a recording mannequin was placed on the second floor of a building. An emergency medical services (EMS crew responded, defibrillated, and provided either manual or LUCAS CPR. The team transported the mannequin through hallways and down stairs to an ambulance and drove to the hospital with CPR in progress. Critical events were manually timed while the mannequin recorded data on compressions. Results: Twenty-three EMS providers participated. Median time to defibrillation was not different for LUCAS compared to manual CPR (p=0.97. LUCAS had a lower median number of compressions per minute (112/ min vs. 125/min; IQR = 102-128 and 102-126 respectively; p<0.002, which was more consistent with current American Heart Association CPR guidelines, and percent adequate compression rate (71% vs. 40%; IQR = 21-93 and 12-88 respectively; p<0.002. In addition, LUCAS had a higher percent adequate depth (52% vs. 36%; IQR = 25-64 and 29-39 respectively; p<0.007 and lower percent total hands-off time (15% vs. 20%; IQR = 10-22 and 15-27 respectively; p<0.005. LUCAS performed no differently than manual CPR in median compression release depth, percent fully released compressions, median time hands off, or percent correct hand position. Conclusion: In our simulation, LUCAS had a higher rate of adequate compressions and decreased total hands-off time as compared to manual CPR. Chest compression

  17. Prevalence and risk factors for central diabetes insipidus in cardiac arrest survivor treated with targeted temperature management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hun; Lee, Byung Kook; Song, Kyoung Hwan; Jung, Yong Hun; Park, Jung Soo; Lee, Sung Min; Cho, Yong Soo; Kim, Jin Woong; Jeung, Kyung Woon

    2016-08-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a marker of severe brain injury. Here we aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of CDI in cardiac arrest survivors treated with targeted temperature management (TTM). This retrospective observational study included consecutive adult cardiac arrest survivors treated with TTM between 2008 and 2014. Central diabetes insipidus was confirmed if all of the following criteria were met: urine volume >50 cc kg(-1) d(-1), serum osmolarity >300 mmol/L, urine osmolarity 145 mEq/L. The primary outcome was the incidence of CDI. Of the 385 included patients, 45 (11.7%) had confirmed central CDI. Univariate analysis showed that younger age, nonwitness of collapse, nonshockable rhythm, a high incidence of asphyxia arrest, longer downtime, and lower initial core temperature were associated with CDI development. Patients with CDI had a higher incidence of poor neurologic outcomes at discharge and higher in-hospital mortality rate (20/45 vs 76/340, P= .001) as well as 180-day mortality (44/45 vs 174/340, Pdiabetes insipidus developed in 12% of cardiac arrest survivors treated with TTM, and those with CDI showed poor neurologic outcomes and high mortality rates. Younger age, nonshockable rhythm, long downtime, and asphyxia arrest were significant risk factors for development of CDI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Derivation and Internal Validation of a Mortality Prediction Tool for Initial Survivors of Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Mathias J; Moskowitz, Ari; Raymond, Tia T

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a clinical prediction score for predicting mortality in children following return of spontaneous circulation after in-hospital cardiac arrest. DESIGN: Observational study using prospectively collected data. SETTING: This was an analysis using data from the Get With The Guid...

  19. Targeted simulation and education to improve cardiac arrest recognition and telephone assisted CPR in an emergency medical communication centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Camilla; Skåre, Christiane; Kramer-Johansen, Jo; Birkenes, Tonje S; Myklebust, Helge; Hansen, Andreas E; Sunde, Kjetil; Olasveengen, Theresa M

    2017-05-01

    Recognition of cardiac arrest and prompt activation time by emergency medical dispatch are key process measures that have been associated with improved survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The aim of this study is to improve recognition of OHCA and time to initiation of telephone assisted chest compressions in an emergency medical communication centre (EMCC). A prospective, interventional study implementing targeted interventions in an EMCC. Interventions included: (1) lectures focusing on agonal breathing and interrogation strategy (2) simulation training (3) structured dispatcher feedback (4) web-based telephone assisted CPR training program. All ambulance-confirmed OHCA calls in the study period were assessed and relevant process and result measures were recorded pre- and post-intervention. Cardiac arrest was reported as (1) recognised, (2) not recognised or (3) delayed recognition. We included 331 and 230 calls pre- and post-intervention, respectively. Recognition of cardiac arrest improved significantly after intervention (89 vs. 95%, p=0.024). Delayed recognition was significantly reduced (21 vs. 6%, p>0.001), as was misinterpretation of agonal breathing (25 vs. 10%, pquality metrics can facilitate development of targeted education and training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Associations of arterial carbon dioxide and arterial oxygen concentrations with hospital mortality after resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmerhorst, Hendrik J. F.; Roos-Blom, Marie-José; van Westerloo, David J.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; de Jonge, Evert

    2015-01-01

    Arterial concentrations of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) during admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) may substantially affect organ perfusion and outcome after cardiac arrest. Our aim was to investigate the independent and synergistic effects of both parameters on hospital

  1. Are patients brain-dead after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest suitable as organ donors? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandroni, Claudio; Adrie, Christophe; Cavallaro, Fabio; Marano, Cristina; Monchi, Mehran; Sanna, Tommaso; Antonelli, Massimo

    2010-12-01

    To compare the outcome of organs retrieved from patients brain dead due to cardiac arrest (CA) with that of organs retrieved from patients brain dead due to other causes (non-CA). Systematic review. Clinical studies comparing the outcome of patients and organs retrieved from donors brain dead after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest with that of patients and organs retrieved from donors brain dead not due to cardiac arrest were considered for inclusion. Full-text articles were searched on MEDLINE, EmBASE, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Register of Systematic Reviews. One-year patient or organ survival rate. Four studies fulfilling inclusion criteria were found and three had sufficient quality to be included in final analysis. A total of 858 organs were transplanted from 741 donors. Since the transplanted organs (heart, liver, kidney, lung and intestine) were different in the three studies, metanalysis was not performed. There were no significant differences in 1-year survival rates between CA and non-CA groups. No significant differences were reported for 5-year survival rates, early recovery of transplanted organ function, and organ rejection rates. Survival rates of kidneys, livers, hearts and intestines retrieved from CA donors were not significantly different from that of organs transplanted from non-CA donors. Patients brain dead after having been resuscitated from cardiac arrest can be considered as potential donors for organ transplantation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Systematic downloading and analysis of data from automated external defibrillators used in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marco Bo; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Valuable information can be retrieved from automated external defibrillators (AEDs) used in victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). We describe our experience with systematic downloading of data from deployed AEDs. The primary aim was to compare the proportion of shockable...

  3. ICD-implantation guidelines versus clinical practice: a prospective study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, B.; van Alem, A. P.; Tukkie, R.; Simmers, T. A.; Koster, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was prospectively to compare clinical practice of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) use with current guidelines in out-of-hospitat cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors. Methods and results From January 2000 till March 2002, 70 consecutive patients (pts) discharged

  4. Quality of evidence in studies evaluating neuroimaging for neurologic prognostication in adult patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, David K; Geocadin, Romergryko G; Greer, David M

    2014-02-01

    Neuroimaging has been proposed as a predictor of neurologic outcome in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. We reviewed the quality and level of evidence of the current neuroimaging literature for predicting neurologic outcome in cardiac arrest patients treated with or without therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane Databases were searched using the terms "cardiac arrest," "cardiopulmonary resuscitation," "brain hypoxia," "brain anoxia," "brain hypoxia-ischaemia," "neuroimaging," and "prognosis." Eligible studies were reviewed and classified by level of evidence and methodological quality as defined by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). 928 studies were identified, 84 of which met inclusion criteria: 74 were supportive of neuroimaging to predict outcome, eight unsupportive, and two equivocal. Several studies investigated more than one imaging modality: 27 investigated computed tomography (CT), 46 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 18 alternate imaging modalities, including positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. No randomized controlled trials were identified. Seven cohort and case control studies were identified, only one of which was graded "good" quality, two were "fair" and four were "poor." Neuroimaging is an evolving modality as a prognostic parameter in cardiac arrest survivors. However, the quality of the available literature is not robust, highlighting the need for higher quality studies before neuroimaging can be supported as a standard tool for prognostication in the patient population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased intracranial pressure and cardiac arrest after heart transplantation. What about the Cushing response in a denervated heart? Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskopp, D; Kehl, G; Horch, C; Puskás, Z; Wassmann, H; Schuierer, G; Fingerhut, D

    1994-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy suffered cerebrovascular complications after heart transplantation (ischemic mass effect in the posterior cranial fossa). He had to be resuscitated from cardiac arrest with coma. After a modified cerebellar hemispherectomy the course was favorable.--The most conclusive explanation for the acute event is that a Cushing response was preserved even in the presumably denervated heart.

  6. Emergency response planning and sudden cardiac arrests in high schools after automated external defibrillator legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew M; Kannankeril, Prince J; Meredith, Mark

    2013-12-01

    To compare medical emergency response plan (MERP) and automated external defibrillator (AED) prevalence and define the incidence and outcomes of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in high schools before and after AED legislation. In 2011, Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association member schools were surveyed regarding AED placement, MERPs, and on-campus SCAs within the last 5 years. Results were compared with a similar study conducted in 2006, prior to legislation requiring AEDs in schools. Of the schools solicited, 214 (54%, total enrollment 182 289 students) completed the survey. Compared with 2006, schools in the 2011 survey had a significantly higher prevalence of MERPs (84% vs 71%, P defibrillators (90% vs 47%, P defibrillators but rates of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and overall compliance with guidelines remained low. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The impact of therapeutic hypothermia on neurological function and quality of life after cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Horsted, Tina I

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the impact of therapeutic hypothermia on cognitive function and quality of life in comatose survivors of out of Hospital Cardiac arrest (OHCA). METHODS: We prospectively studied comatose survivors of OHCA consecutively admitted in a 4-year period. Therapeutic hypothermia...... was implemented in the last 2-year period, intervention period (n=79), and this group was compared to patients admitted the 2 previous years, control period (n=77). We assessed Cerebral Performance Category (CPC), survival, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and self-rated quality of life (SF-36) 6 months after...... OHCA in the subgroup with VF/VT as initial rhythm. RESULTS: CPC in patients alive at hospital discharge was significantly better in the intervention period with a CPC of 1-2 in 97% vs. 71% in the control period, p=0.003, corresponding to an adjusted odds ratio of a favourable cerebral outcome of 17, p...

  8. BET1: Pre-hospital finger thoracostomy in patients with traumatic cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodie, Pritchard; Kerstin, Hogg

    2017-06-01

    A short cut review was carried out to see if 'finger' thoracostomy was a safe and effective procedure to use in the pre-hospital setting in patients with traumatic cardiac arrest. Three relevant papers were found describing the use of this technique in the pre-hospital setting. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results study weaknesses of these papers are tabulated. Finger thoracostomy appears to be an acceptable and effective technique for trained physicians in the pre-hospital setting. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Life Saving Apps: Linking Cardiac Arrest Victims to Emergency Services and Volunteer Responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim Choi Keung, Sarah N; Khan, Mohammed O; Smith, Christopher; Perkins, Gavin; Murphy, Paddie; Arvanitis, Theodoros N

    2016-01-01

    In cases of emergency, such as out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, the first few minutes are crucial for victims to receive care and have a positive outcome. However, emergency services often arrive on scene after those first few minutes, making any bridging solutions key. Finding a defibrillator or accessing a trained volunteer responder are some of the technological solutions that are being developed to support the chain of survival. This paper looks at technologies, in particular those linked to mobile apps that have been used to locate defibrillators and responder apps that enable responders to attend to nearby emergencies. We review a selection of apps and also assess the challenges and considerations for such apps.

  10. Prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajan, Shahzleen; Folke, Fredrik; Kragholm, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: It is unclear whether prolonged resuscitation can result in successful outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA). We assessed associations between duration of pre-hospital resuscitation on survival and functional outcome following OHCA in patients achieving pre-hospital return...... of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). METHODS: We included 1316 adult OHCA individuals with pre-hospital ROSC (2005-2011) handled by the largest nationwide ambulance provider in Denmark. Patients were stratified into 0-5, 6-10, 11-15, 16-20, 21-25 and >25min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by emergency......: Even those requiring prolonged resuscitation duration prior to ROSC had meaningful survival rates with the majority of survivors able to return to live in own homes. These data suggest that prolonged resuscitation is not futile....

  11. The Effects of Public Access Defibrillation on Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Josefine S; Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite recent advances, the average survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains automated external defibrillator is the most important intervention for patients with OHCA, showing survival proportions >50%. Accordingly, placement...... of automated external defibrillators in the community as part of a public access defibrillation program (PAD) is recommended by international guidelines. However, different strategies have been proposed on how exactly to increase and make use of publicly available automated external defibrillators....... This systematic review aimed to evaluate the effect of PAD and the different PAD strategies on survival after OHCA. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched on August 31, 2015 for observational studies reporting survival to hospital discharge in OHCA patients where...

  12. Prolonged cardiac arrest complicating a massive ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction associated with marijuana consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Orsini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recreational substance use and misuse constitute a major public health issue. The annual rate of recreational drug overdose-related deaths is increasing exponentially, making unintentional overdose as the leading cause of injury-related deaths in the United States. Marijuana is the most widely used recreational illicit drug, with approximately 200 million users worldwide. Although it is generally regarded as having low acute toxicity, heavy marijuana usage has been associated with life-threatening consequences. Marijuana is increasingly becoming legal in the United States for both medical and recreational use. Although the most commonly seen adverse effects resulting from its consumption are typically associated with neurobehavioral and gastrointestinal symptoms, cases of severe toxicity involving the cardiovascular system have been reported. In this report, the authors describe a case of cannabis-associated ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction leading to a prolonged cardiac arrest.

  13. Chest compression rates and survival following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Ahamed H; Guffey, Danielle; Pepe, Paul E; Brown, Siobhan P; Brooks, Steven C; Callaway, Clifton W; Christenson, Jim; Davis, Daniel P; Daya, Mohamud R; Gray, Randal; Kudenchuk, Peter J; Larsen, Jonathan; Lin, Steve; Menegazzi, James J; Sheehan, Kellie; Sopko, George; Stiell, Ian; Nichol, Graham; Aufderheide, Tom P

    2015-04-01

    Guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend a chest compression rate of at least 100 compressions/min. A recent clinical study reported optimal return of spontaneous circulation with rates between 100 and 120/min during cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the relationship between compression rate and survival is still undetermined. Prospective, observational study. Data is from the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Prehospital Resuscitation IMpedance threshold device and Early versus Delayed analysis clinical trial. Adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest treated by emergency medical service providers. None. Data were abstracted from monitor-defibrillator recordings for the first five minutes of emergency medical service cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Multiple logistic regression assessed odds ratio for survival by compression rate categories (compression fraction and depth, first rhythm, and study site. Compression rate data were available for 10,371 patients; 6,399 also had chest compression fraction and depth data. Age (mean±SD) was 67±16 years. Chest compression rate was 111±19 per minute, compression fraction was 0.70±0.17, and compression depth was 42±12 mm. Circulation was restored in 34%; 9% survived to hospital discharge. After adjustment for covariates without chest compression depth and fraction (n=10,371), a global test found no significant relationship between compression rate and survival (p=0.19). However, after adjustment for covariates including chest compression depth and fraction (n=6,399), the global test found a significant relationship between compression rate and survival (p=0.02), with the reference group (100-119 compressions/min) having the greatest likelihood for survival. After adjustment for chest compression fraction and depth, compression rates between 100 and 120 per minute were associated with greatest survival to hospital discharge.

  14. Risk Factor Analyses for the Return of Spontaneous Circulation in the Asphyxiation Cardiac Arrest Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Jun Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Animal models of asphyxiation cardiac arrest (ACA are frequently used in basic research to mirror the clinical course of cardiac arrest (CA. The rates of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC in ACA animal models are lower than those from studies that have utilized ventricular fibrillation (VF animal models. The purpose of this study was to characterize the factors associated with the ROSC in the ACA porcine model. Methods: Forty-eight healthy miniature pigs underwent endotracheal tube clamping to induce CA. Once induced, CA was maintained untreated for a period of 8 min. Two minutes following the initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, defibrillation was attempted until ROSC was achieved or the animal died. To assess the factors associated with ROSC in this CA model, logistic regression analyses were performed to analyze gender, the time of preparation, the amplitude spectrum area (AMSA from the beginning of CPR and the pH at the beginning of CPR. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve was used to evaluate the predictive value of AMSA for ROSC. Results: ROSC was only 52.1% successful in this ACA porcine model. The multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that ROSC significantly depended on the time of preparation, AMSA at the beginning of CPR and pH at the beginning of CPR. The area under the ROC curve in for AMSA at the beginning of CPR was 0.878 successful in predicting ROSC (95% confidence intervals: 0.773∼0.983, and the optimum cut-off value was 15.62 (specificity 95.7% and sensitivity 80.0%. Conclusions: The time of preparation, AMSA and the pH at the beginning of CPR were associated with ROSC in this ACA porcine model. AMSA also predicted the likelihood of ROSC in this ACA animal model.

  15. [Cardiac arrest in chronic metabolic alkalosis due to sodium bicarbonate abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiński, Grzegorz; Korta, Teresa; Debowska, Małgorzata; Kosiński, Cezary; Kubik, Tomasz; Romanik, Wojciech; Kański, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Moderate metabolic alkalosis has not been considered as a life-threatening situation by many authors, but when it persists and pH increases above 7.65, the situation may become critical. We present a case of a 61-yr-old alcoholic male patient, who had been consuming approximately 200 g of sodium bicarbonate daily for twenty years, due to persisitent heartburn and abdominal pains. The patient was admitted to the ITU after home cardiac arrest and resuscitation. On admission he was unconscious and in respiratory distress, with a GCS of 5. Blood gases revealed that his pH was 7.64, HCO3 44 mmol L(-1), K+ 2.4 mmol L(-1)l, Cl- 44 mmol L(-1), and lactate concentration over 15 mmol L(-1). He was treated with controlled hypercapnia, up to a PaCO2 of 63 mm Hg, sedation, and administration of a large amount of chloride (864 mmol during the first day). The patient regained consciousness after 48 h, was extubated and transferred to the internal medicine department where he died 3 days later. Chronic alkali abuse can lead to various metabolic disturbances, neurologic disturbances and cardiovascular compromise. In the described case, the exact cause of cardiac arrest remained unknown, but may have been caused by alkalosis combined with hypoxia, hypokalemia and poor general condition. The extreme metabolic alkalosis (pH 7.8) could also have been enhanced by the administration of i.v. sodium bicarbonate during resuscitation. The treatment of choice in such cases should consist of vigorous chloride containing fluid resuscitation, ammonium chloride and hemodialysis.

  16. Effect of defibrillation energy dose during in-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaney, Peter A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Atkins, Dianne L; Berg, Marc D; Samson, Ricardo A; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Berg, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of initial defibrillation attempts. We hypothesized that (1) an initial shock dose of 2 ± 10 J/kg would be less effective for terminating fibrillation than suggested in published historical data and (2) a 4 J/kg shock dose would be more effective. This was a National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation prospective, multisite, observational study of in-hospital pediatric (aged ≤18 years) ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia cardiac arrests from 2000-2008. Termination of ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia and event survival after initial shocks of 2 J/kg were compared with historic controls and a 4 J/kg shock dose. Of 266 children with 285 events, 173 of 285 (61%) survived the event and 61 of 266 (23%) survived to discharge. Termination of fibrillation after initial shock was achieved for 152 of 285 (53%) events. Termination of fibrillation with 2 ± 10 J/kg was much less frequent than that seen among historic control subjects (56% vs 91%; P < .001), but not different than 4 J/kg. Compared with 2 J/kg, an initial shock dose of 4 J/kg was associated with lower rates of return of spontaneous circulation (odds ratio: 0.41 [95% confidence interval: 0.21-0.81]) and event survival (odds ratio: 0.42 [95% confidence interval: 0.18-0.98]). The currently recommended 2 J/kg initial shock dose for in-hospital cardiac arrest was substantially less effective than previously published. A higher initial shock dose (4 J/kg) was not associated with superior termination of ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia or improved survival rates. The optimal pediatric defibrillation dose remains unknown.

  17. Policies allowing family presence during resuscitation and patterns of care during in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberger, Zachary D; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K; Nichol, Graham; Chan, Paul S; Curtis, J Randall; Cooke, Colin R

    2015-05-01

    A growing number of hospitals have begun to implement policies allowing for family presence during resuscitation (FPDR). However, the overall safety of these policies and their effect on resuscitation care is unknown. We conducted an observational cohort study of 252 hospitals in the United States with 41,568 adults with cardiac arrest. Multivariable hierarchical regression models were used to evaluate patterns of care at hospitals with and without an FPDR policy. Primary outcomes included return of spontaneous circulation and survival to discharge. Secondary outcomes included resuscitation quality, interventions, and facility-reported potential resuscitation systems errors. There were no significant differences in facility characteristics between hospitals with and without an FPDR policy, nor were there significant differences in return of spontaneous circulation (adjusted risk ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.06) or survival to discharge (adjusted risk ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.15). There was a small, borderline significant decrease in the mean time to defibrillation at hospitals with an FPDR policy compared with hospitals without the policy (mean difference, 0.32 minutes; 95% confidence interval, -0.01 to 0.64). Resuscitation quality, interventions, and facility-reported potential resuscitation systems errors did not meaningfully differ between hospitals with and without an FPDR policy. Hospitals with an FPDR policy generally have no statistically significant differences in outcomes and processes of care as hospitals without this policy, suggesting such policies may not negatively affect resuscitation care. Further study is warranted about the direct effect of FPDR attempts on adult patients with an in-hospital cardiac arrest and their families. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Systematic review of the effectiveness of prehospital critical care following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vopelius-Feldt, Johannes; Brandling, Janet; Benger, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    Improving survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a priority for modern emergency medical services (EMS) and prehospital research. Advanced life support (ALS) is now the standard of care in most EMS. In some EMS, prehospital critical care providers are also dispatched to attend OHCA. This systematic review presents the evidence for prehospital critical care for OHCA, when compared to standard ALS care. We searched the following electronic databases: PubMed, EmBASE, CINAHL Plus and AMED (via EBSCO), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, NHS Economic Evaluation Database, NIHR Health Technology Assessment Database, Google Scholar and ClinicalTrials.gov. Search terms related to cardiac arrest and prehospital critical care. All studies that compared patient-centred outcomes between prehospital critical care and ALS for OHCA were included. The review identified six full text publications that matched the inclusion criteria, all of which are observational studies. Three studies showed no benefit from prehospital critical care but were underpowered with sample sizes of 1028-1851. The other three publications showed benefit from prehospital critical care delivered by physicians. However, an imbalance of prognostic factors and hospital treatment in these studies systematically favoured the prehospital critical care group. Current evidence to support prehospital critical care for OHCA is limited by the logistic difficulties of undertaking high quality research in this area. Further research needs an appropriate sample size with adjustments for confounding factors in observational research design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of defibrillation efficacy between two pads placements in a pediatric porcine model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Yu, Tao; Quan, Weilun; Freeman, Gary; Li, Yongqin

    2012-06-01

    The placement of defibrillation pads at ideal anatomical sites is one of the major determinants of transthoracic defibrillation success. However, the optimal pads position for ventricular defibrillation is still undetermined. In the present study, we compared the effects of two different pads positions on defibrillation success rate in a pediatric porcine model of cardiac arrest. Eight domestic male pigs weighing 12-15 kg were randomized to receive shocks using either the anterior-posterior (AP) or the anterior-lateral (AL) position with pediatric pads. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was electrically induced and untreated for 30 s. A sequence of randomized biphasic electrical shocks ranging from 10 to 100 J was attempted. If the defibrillation failed to terminate VF, a 100 J rescuer shock was then delivered. After a recovery interval of 5 min, the sequence was repeated for a total of approximately 30 test shocks were attempted for each animal. The dose response curves were constructed and the defibrillation thresholds were compared between groups. The aggregated success rate was 65.6% for AP placement and 43.0% for AL one (p=0.0005) when shock energy was between 10 and 70 J. A significantly lower 50% defibrillation threshold was obtained for AP pads placement compared with traditional AL pads position (2.1±0.4 J/kg vs. 3.6±0.9 J/kg, p=0.041). In this pediatric porcine model of cardiac arrest, the anterior-posterior placement of pediatric pads yielded a higher success rate by lowering defibrillation threshold compared to the anterior-lateral position. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Epidemiology and aetiology of traumatic cardiac arrest in England and Wales - A retrospective database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Ed; Yates, David; Edwards, Antoinette; Fragoso-Iñiguez, Marisol; Jenks, Tom; Smith, Jason E

    2017-01-01

    Historically, reported survival from traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA) was extremely low. More recent publications have recorded survival to discharge of up to 8%. This improvement is likely to be multi-factorial; however, there are currently no published data describing the epidemiology or aetiology of TCA in England and Wales to guide future practice improvement. Population-based analysis of 2009-2015 Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN) data. The primary aim was to describe the 30-day survival following TCA. Patients of all ages with traumatic cardiac arrest pre-hospital or in the emergency department (ED) were included. Data are described as number (%), and median [interquartile range]. Two-group analysis with Chi-squared test was performed. During the study period 227,944 patients were included in the TARN database. Seven hundred and five (0.3%) suffered TCA: 74.3% were male, aged 44.3 [25.2-83.2] years, ISS 29 [21-75], and 601 (85.2%) had blunt injuries. 612 (86.8%) had a severe traumatic brain injury and or severe haemorrhage. Overall 30-day survival was 7.5% (95%CI 5.6-9.5) - 'pre-hospital only' TCA 11.5%, 'ED only' TCA 3.9%, p<0.02. No patients who were in TCA both pre-hospital and in the ED survived. This study has shown that short-term survival from TCA in this large civilian registry is 7.5%. Early and aggressive management of patients with TCA, using protocols that target the reversible causes of TCA, should be initiated. Further work to establish novel ways to manage patients with reversible causes of TCA is indicated. Resuscitation in this patient group is not futile. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Domains of concern of intimate partners of sudden cardiac arrest survivors after ICD implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Cynthia M; Pyper, Gail P; Benoliel, Jeanne Q

    2004-01-01

    There is limited research that describes the experiences of intimate partners of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) survivors. The purposes of this article are to (1) describe the domains of concern of intimate partners of SCA survivors during the first year after internal cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation and (2) outline strategies used by partners of SCA survivors in dealing with the concerns and demands of recovery in the first year after ICD implantation. This is a secondary analysis of interview data collected for the primary study "Family Experiences Following Sudden Cardiac Arrest." A grounded theory method was used to identify experiences of SCA survivors and their family members from hospitalization through the first year after ICD implantation. Data were collected from the SCA survivor and one intimate partner at 5 times: hospital discharge, and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postdischarge. Eight Domains of Concern were identified for intimate partners following SCA and ICD implantation during the first year. These included (1) Care of the survivor, (2) My (partner) self-care, (3) Relationship, (4) ICD, (5) Money, (6) Uncertain future, (7) Health care providers, and (8) Family. Five categories of strategies to deal with the Domains of Concerns were identified (1) Care of the survivor, (2) My (partner) self-care, (3) Relationship, (4) Uncertain future, and (5) Controlling the environment. Nursing intervention programs should include the intimate partner of SCA survivors and contain education and support in the following areas: (1) information on the function of the ICD, (2) normal progression of physical and emotional recovery experiences, (3) safety and maintenance of the ICD, (4) activities of daily living after an ICD, (5) strategies to assist with the survivors care, and (6) strategies to assist with partner self care.

  2. Minimal effects on ex vivo coagulation during mild therapeutic hypothermia in post cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, A C M; Ten Tusscher, B L; de Waard, M C; de Man, F R; Girbes, A R J; Beishuizen, A

    2014-10-01

    Mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) is being used to improve neurological outcome and survival in patients successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest. The impact on coagulation may be difficult to assess since most coagulation parameters are measured at 37°C and not at actual body core temperature. Therefore we investigated the effects of MTH both at body core (target) temperature of 32°C and at 37°C. Patients admitted at the ICU after cardiac arrest treated with MTH. Baseline blood samples, measured at 37°C were taken directly at arrival. The second and third samples were drawn within 1h and 24h after reaching target temperature and were measured at 32°C and 37°C. A final sample was drawn when the patient returned to normotemperature (measured at 37°C). Clotting time (CT) and maximum clotting formation (MCF) were measured with thromboelastometry. Upon reaching target temperature (32°C) Extem and Intem CT were increased compared to baseline with 57s (49-75) to 65s (59-72) and 165s (144-183) to 193s (167-212) respectively (median with IQR; P<0.05), with a further significant increase after 24h of hypothermia with 68s (57-80) and 221s (196-266). Samples analyzed at 32°C showed a significant longer CT of 12s in Extem and 33s in Intem compared to 37°C. MCF was not affected by MTH or adjustment of temperature. The mild effect of MTH on coagulation parameters remains unidentified when measured at 37°C. Although measurements at 32°C differ from those at 37°C, this does not appear to be of clinical relevance as all values were still within the reference range. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of a novel, resource appropriate resuscitation curriculum on Nicaraguan resident physician’s management of cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breena R. Taira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Project Strengthening Emergency Medicine, Investing in Learners in Latin America (SEMILLA created a novel, language and resource appropriate course for the resuscitation of cardiac arrest for Nicaraguan resident physicians. We hypothesized that participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program would significantly improve the physician’s management of simulated code scenarios. Methods: Thirteen Nicaraguan resident physicians were evaluated while managing simulated cardiac arrest scenarios before, immediately, and at 6 months after participating in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program. This project was completed in 2014 in Leon, Nicaragua. The Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest, a validated scoring system, was used to evaluate performance on a standardized simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Mixed effect logistic regression models were constructed to assess outcomes. Results: On the pre-course simulation exam, only 7.7% of subjects passed the test. Immediately post-course, the subjects achieved a 30.8% pass rate and at 6 months after the course, the pass rate was 46.2%. Compared with pre-test scores, the odds of passing the CASTest at 6 months after the course were 21.7 times higher (95% CI 4.2 to 112.8, P<0.001. Statistically significant improvement was also seen on the number of critical items completed (OR=3.75, 95% CI 2.71-5.19, total items completed (OR=4.55, 95% CI 3.4-6.11, and number of “excellent” scores on a Likert scale (OR=2.66, 95% CI 1.85-3.81. Conclusions: Nicaraguan resident physicians demonstrate improved ability to manage simulated cardiac arrest scenarios after participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation course and retain these skills.

  4. The occurrence of shivering in cardiac arrest survivors undergoing therapeutic hypothermia is associated with a good neurologic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sanjeev U; Lundbye, Justin B

    2013-05-01

    The incidence of shivering in cardiac arrest survivors who undergo therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is varied. Its occurrence is dependent on the integrity of multiple peripheral and central neurologic pathways. We hypothesized that cardiac arrest survivors who develop shivering while undergoing TH are more likely to have intact central neurologic pathways and thus have better neurologic outcome as compared to those who do not develop shivering during TH. Prospectively collected data on consecutive adult patients admitted to a tertiary center from 1/1/2007 to 11/1/2010 that survived a cardiac arrest and underwent TH were retrospectively analyzed. Patients who developed shivering during the cooling phase of TH formed the "shivering" group and those that did not formed the "non-shivering" group. The primary end-point: Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) scale; good (CPC 1-2) or poor (CPC 3-5) neurological outcome prior to discharge from hospital. Of the 129 cardiac arrest survivors who underwent TH, 34/94 (36%) patients in the "non-shivering" group as compared to 21/35 (60%) patients in the "shivering" group had good neurologic outcome (P=0.02). After adjusting for confounders using binary logistic regression, occurrence of shivering (OR: 2.71, 95% CI 1.099-7.41, P=0.04), time to return of spontaneous circulation (OR: 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-0.98, P=0.004) and initial presenting rhythm (OR: 4.0, 95% CI 1.63-10.0, P=0.002) were independent predictors of neurologic outcome. The occurrence of shivering in cardiac arrest survivors who undergo TH is associated with an increased likelihood of good neurologic outcome as compared to its absence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Selective cerebral perfusion prevents abnormalities in glutamate cycling and neuronal apoptosis in a model of infant deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R; Olson, Aaron K; Isern, Nancy G; Robillard-Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest is often required for the repair of complex congenital cardiac defects in infants. However, deep hypothermic circulatory arrest induces neuroapoptosis associated with later development of neurocognitive abnormalities. Selective cerebral perfusion theoretically provides superior neural protection possibly through modifications in cerebral substrate oxidation and closely integrated glutamate cycling. We tested the hypothesis that selective cerebral perfusion modulates glucose utilization, and ameliorates abnormalities in glutamate flux, which occur in association with neuroapoptosis during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Eighteen infant male Yorkshire piglets were assigned randomly to two groups of seven (deep hypothermic circulatory arrest or deep hypothermic circulatory arrest with selective cerebral perfusion for 60 minutes at 18℃) and four control pigs without cardiopulmonary bypass support. Carbon-13-labeled glucose as a metabolic tracer was infused, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance were used for metabolic analysis in the frontal cortex. Following 2.5 h of cerebral reperfusion, we observed similar cerebral adenosine triphosphate levels, absolute levels of lactate and citric acid cycle intermediates, and carbon-13 enrichment among three groups. However, deep hypothermic circulatory arrest induced significant abnormalities in glutamate cycling resulting in reduced glutamate/glutamine and elevated γ-aminobutyric acid/glutamate along with neuroapoptosis, which were all prevented by selective cerebral perfusion. The data suggest that selective cerebral perfusion prevents these modifications in glutamate/glutamine/γ-aminobutyric acid cycling and protects the cerebral cortex from apoptosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Electroencephalography Predicts Poor and Good Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest: A Two-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Andrea O; Tovar Quiroga, Diego F; Juan, Elsa; Novy, Jan; White, Roger D; Ben-Hamouda, Nawfel; Britton, Jeffrey W; Oddo, Mauro; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2017-07-01

    The prognostic role of electroencephalography during and after targeted temperature management in postcardiac arrest patients, relatively to other predictors, is incompletely known. We assessed performances of electroencephalography during and after targeted temperature management toward good and poor outcomes, along with other recognized predictors. Cohort study (April 2009 to March 2016). Two academic hospitals (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland; Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN). Consecutive comatose adults admitted after cardiac arrest, identified through prospective registries. All patients were managed with targeted temperature management, receiving prespecified standardized clinical, neurophysiologic (particularly, electroencephalography during and after targeted temperature management), and biochemical evaluations. We assessed electroencephalography variables (reactivity, continuity, epileptiform features, and prespecified "benign" or "highly malignant" patterns based on the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society nomenclature) and other clinical, neurophysiologic (somatosensory-evoked potential), and biochemical prognosticators. Good outcome (Cerebral Performance Categories 1 and 2) and mortality predictions at 3 months were calculated. Among 357 patients, early electroencephalography reactivity and continuity and flexor or better motor reaction had greater than 70% positive predictive value for good outcome; reactivity (80.4%; 95% CI, 75.9-84.4%) and motor response (80.1%; 95% CI, 75.6-84.1%) had highest accuracy. Early benign electroencephalography heralded good outcome in 86.2% (95% CI, 79.8-91.1%). False positive rates for mortality were less than 5% for epileptiform or nonreactive early electroencephalography, nonreactive late electroencephalography, absent somatosensory-evoked potential, absent pupillary or corneal reflexes, presence of myoclonus, and neuron-specific enolase greater than 75 µg/L; accuracy was highest for

  7. Effects of Intraosseous Tibial vs. Intravenous Vasopressin in a Hypovolemic Cardiac Arrest Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Fulkerson, MSN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study compared the effects of vasopressin via tibial intraosseous (IO and intravenous (IV routes on maximum plasma concentration (Cmax, the time to maximum concentration (Tmax, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, and time to ROSC in a hypovolemic cardiac arrest model. Methods: This study was a randomized prospective, between-subjects experimental design. A computer program randomly assigned 28 Yorkshire swine to one of four groups: IV (n=7, IO tibia (n=7, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR + defibrillation (n=7, and a control group that received just CPR (n=7. Ventricular fibrillation was induced, and subjects remained in arrest for two minutes. CPR was initiated and 40 units of vasopressin were administered via IO or IV routes. Blood samples were collected at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, and 4 minutes. CPR and defibrillation were initiated for 20 minutes or until ROSC was achieved. We measured vasopressin concentrations using highperformance liquid chromatography. Results: There was no significant difference between the IO and IV groups relative to achieving ROSC (p=1.0 but a significant difference between the IV compared to the CPR+ defibrillation group (p=0.031 and IV compared to the CPR-only group (p=0.001. There was a significant difference between the IO group compared to the CPR+ defibrillation group (p=0.031 and IO compared to the CPR-only group (p=0.001. There was no significant difference between the CPR + defibrillation group and the CPR group (p=0.127. There was no significant difference in Cmax between the IO and IV groups (p=0.079. The mean ± standard deviation of Cmax of the IO group was 58,709±25,463pg/mL compared to the IV group, which was 106,198±62,135pg/mL. There was no significant difference in mean Tmax between the groups (p=0.084. There were no significant differences in odds of ROSC between the tibial IO and IV groups. Conclusion: Prompt access to the vascular system using the IO route can circumvent

  8. FAMILY PRESENCE DURING RESUSCITATION AND PATTERNS OF CARE DURING IN-HOSPITAL CARDIAC ARREST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberger, Zachary D.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Nichol, Graham; Chan, Paul S.; Curtis, J. Randall; Cooke, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    Background A growing number of hospitals have begun to implement policies allowing for family presence during resuscitation (FPDR); the safety of these policies and their affect on patterns of care is unknown. Objective To measure the association between FPDR and processes and outcomes of care following in-hospital cardiac arrest. Design Observational cohort study. Setting Get With the Guidelines–Resuscitation (GWTG–R) a large, multicenter observational registry capturing in-hospital cardiac arrests. Participants 41,568 adult patients at 252 hospitals in the United States. Measurements The exposure was a hospital-level policy to allow FPDR. Primary outcomes included return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survival to discharge. Secondary outcomes included the quality, interventions, and self-reported potential systems errors associated with resuscitation. Results There were no significant differences in ROSC or survival to discharge in hospitals with and without a FPDR policy in unadjusted or adjusted analyses. There was a small, borderline significant decrease in the mean time to defibrillation at hospitals with a FPDR policy compared to hospitals without a FPDR policy during adjusted analysis (p=0.05). Similarly, there was a significant increase in the risk-adjusted median duration of resuscitation among non-survivors in hospitals with FPDR (P=0.04). Other resuscitation quality, pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions, and potential self-reported systems-level resuscitation errors did not meaningfully differ between hospitals with and without a FPDR policy. Limitation GWTG–R may not be representative of all hospitals. Furthermore, it does not collect information on whether families were actually present during the arrests recorded. Conclusion Hospitals with a policy allowing families to be present during resuscitation generally have similar outcome and processes of case as hospitals without a FPDR policy suggesting such policies do not

  9. Shockable rhythms and defibrillation during in-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; López-Herce, Jesús; del Castillo, Jimena; Bellón, José María

    2014-03-01

    To analyze the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) that included defibrillation during in-hospital cardiac arrest (IH-CA) in children. A prospective multicenter, international, observational study on pediatric IH-CA in 12 European and Latin American countries, during 24 months. Data from 502 children between 1 month and 18 years were collected using the Utstein template. Patients with a shockable rhythm that was treated by electric shock(s) were included. The primary endpoint was survival at hospital discharge. Univariate logistic regression analysis was performed to find outcome factors. Forty events in 37 children (mean age 48 months, IQR: 7-15 months) were analyzed. An underlying disease was present in 81.1% of cases and 24.3% had a previous CA. The main cause of arrest was a cardiac disease (56.8%). In 17 episodes (42.5%) ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (pVT) was the first documented rhythm, and in 23 (57.5%) it developed during CPR efforts. In 11 patients (27.5%) three or more shocks were needed to achieve defibrillation. Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was obtained in 25 cases (62.5%), that was sustained in 20 (50.0%); however only 12 children (32.4%) survived to hospital discharge. Children with VF/pVT as first documented rhythm had better sustained ROSC (64.7% vs. 39.1%, p=0.046) and survival to hospital discharge rates (58.8% vs. 21.7%, p=0.02) than those with subsequent VF/pVT. Survival rate was inversely related to duration of CPR. Clinical outcome was not related to the cause or location of arrest, type of defibrillator and waveform, energy dose per shock, number of shocks, or cumulative energy dose, although there was a trend to better survival with higher doses per shock (25.0% with 4Jkg(-1)) and worse with higher number of shocks and cumulative energy dose. The termination of pediatric VF/pVT in the IH-CA setting is achieved in a low percentage of instances with one electrical shock at 4Jkg(-1

  10. Association between population density and reported incidence, characteristics and outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömsöe, A; Svensson, L; Claesson, A; Lindkvist, J; Lundström, A; Herlitz, J

    2011-10-01

    To describe the reported incidence of out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and the characteristics and outcome after OHCA in relation to population density in Sweden. All patients participating in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register between 2008 and 2009 in (a) 20 of 21 regions (n=6457) and in (b) 165 of 292 municipalities (n=3522) in Sweden, took part in the survey. The regional population density varied between 3 and 310 inhabitants per km(2) in 2009. In 2008-2009, the number of reported cardiac arrests varied between 13 and 52 per 100,000 inhabitants and year. Survival to 1 month varied between 2% and 14% during the same period in different regions. With regard to population density, based on municipalities, bystander CPR (p=0.04) as well as cardiac etiology (p=0.002) were more frequent in less populated areas. Ambulance response time was longer in less populated areas (ppopulation density and survival to 1 month after OHCA or incidence (adjusted for age and gender) of OHCA. There was no significant association between population density and survival to 1 month after OHCA or incidence (adjusted for age and gender) of OHCA. However, bystander CPR, cardiac etiology and longer response times were more frequent in less populated areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation for breath-holding spells followed by cardiac arrest due to left main coronary artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyilmaz, Isa; Altin, Husnu Fırat; Yildiz, Okan; Erek, Ersin; Ergul, Yakup; Guzeltas, Alper

    2015-06-01

    Non-syndromic congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) leads to ventricular hypertrophy and increased oxygen consumption, and when combined with other factors reduces coronary blood flow, potentially resulting in myocardial ischemia and sudden cardiac death. While the anatomic obstruction of coronary circulation is as common in non-syndromic SVAS as in Williams syndrome, it often remains unacknowledged. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an elective procedure that can be used to support patients with cardiac arrest during diagnosis as a way to reduce cardiopulmonary load in preparation for surgery or further treatment. In this report, we describe the rare case of an infant with severe SVAS and mild valvular pulmonary and left main coronary artery stenosis, as well as breath-holding spells. After multiple cardiac arrests, the infant underwent diagnostic catheter angiography on ECMO and had the pathology surgically corrected. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  12. Use of a nursing checklist to facilitate implementation of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Kathleen Ryan; O'Brien, Molly; Pierce, Carol Daddio; Gazarian, Priscilla K

    2015-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia has become a widely accepted intervention that is improving neurological outcomes following return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest. This intervention is highly complex but infrequently used, and prompt implementation of the many steps involved, especially achieving the target body temperature, can be difficult. A checklist was introduced to guide nurses in implementing the therapeutic hypothermia protocol during the different phases of the intervention (initiation, maintenance, rewarming, and normothermia) in an intensive care unit. An interprofessional committee began by developing the protocol, a template for an order set, and a shivering algorithm. At first, implementation of the protocol was inconsistent, and a lack of clarity and urgency in managing patients during the different phases of the protocol was apparent. The nursing checklist has provided all of the intensive care nurses with an easy-to-follow reference to facilitate compliance with the required steps in the protocol for therapeutic hypothermia. Observations of practice and feedback from nursing staff in all units confirm the utility of the checklist. Use of the checklist has helped reduce the time from admission to the unit to reaching the target temperature and the time from admission to continuous electroencephalographic monitoring in the cardiac intensive care unit. Evaluation of patients' outcomes as related to compliance with the protocol interventions is ongoing. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  13. Organ donation in cardiac arrest patients treated with extracorporeal CPR: A single centre observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, Maria Chiara; Coppo, Anna; Vargiolu, Alessia; Villa, Jacopo; Rota, Matteo; Avalli, Leonello; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    In a consecutive cohort of cardiac arrest (CA) treated with extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (eCPR), we describe the incidence of brain death (BD), the eligibility for organ donation and the short-term follow-up of the transplanted organs. All refractory in- and out-of-hospital CA admitted to our Cardiac Intensive Care Unit between January 2011 and September 2016 treated with eCPR were enrolled in the study. 112 CA patients received eCPR. 82 (73.2%) died in hospital, 25 BD (22.3%) and 57 for other causes (50.9%). At the time of first neurological evaluation after rewarming, variables related to evolution to BD were a lower GCS (3 [3-3] vs. 8 [3-11], pdonation in BD patients was 56%, with 39 donated organs: 23 kidneys, 12 livers, and 4 lungs. 89.74% of the transplanted organs reached an early good functional recovery. In refractory CA patients treated with eCPR, the prevalence of BD is high. This population has a high potential for considering organ donation. Donated organs have a good outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The time dependent association of adrenaline administration and survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewy, Gordon A; Bobrow, Bentley J; Chikani, Vatsal; Sanders, Arthur B; Otto, Charles W; Spaite, Daniel W; Kern, Karl B

    2015-11-01

    Recommended for decades, the therapeutic value of adrenaline (epinephrine) in the resuscitation of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is controversial. To investigate the possible time-dependent outcomes associated with adrenaline administration by Emergency Medical Services personnel (EMS). A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from a near statewide cardiac resuscitation database between 1 January 2005 and 30 November 2013. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the effect of the time interval between EMS dispatch and the initial dose of adrenaline on survival. The primary endpoints were survival to hospital discharge and favourable neurologic outcome. Data from 3469 patients with witnessed OHCA were analyzed. Their mean age was 66.3 years and 69% were male. An initially shockable rhythm was present in 41.8% of patients. Based on a multivariable logistic regression model with initial adrenaline administration time interval (AATI) from EMS dispatch as the covariate, survival was greatest when adrenaline was administered very early but decreased rapidly with increasing (AATI); odds ratio 0.94 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.92-0.97). The AATI had no significant effect on good neurological outcome (OR=0.96, 95% CI=0.90-1.02). In patients with OHCA, survival to hospital discharge was greater in those treated early with adrenaline by EMS especially in the subset of patients with a shockable rhythm. However survival rapidly decreased with increasing adrenaline administration time intervals (AATI). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagnostic value and prognostic implications of early cardiac magnetic resonance in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Susana, Angela; De Lazzari, Manuel; Migliore, Federico; Vescovo, Giovanni; Scarpa, Daniele; Baritussio, Anna; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Giorgi, Benedetta; Basso, Cristina; Iliceto, Sabino; Bucciarelli Ducci, Chiara; Corrado, Domenico; Marra, Martina Perazzolo

    2018-03-15

    In patients who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), it is crucial to establish the underlying cause and its potential reversibility. The purpose of this study was to assess the incremental diagnostic and prognostic role of early cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in survivors of OHCA. Among 139 consecutive OHCA patients, the study enrolled 44 patients (median age 43 years; 84% male) who underwent coronary angiography and CMR ≤7 days after admission. The CMR protocol included T2-weighted sequences for myocardial edema and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) sequences for myocardial fibrosis. Coronary angiography identified obstructive coronary artery disease in 18 of 44 patients in whom CMR confirmed the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease by demonstrating subendocardial or transmural LGE. The presence of myocardial edema allowed differentiation between acute myocardial ischemia (n = 12) and postinfarction myocardial scar (n = 6). Among the remaining 26 patients without obstructive coronary artery disease, CMR in 19 (73%) showed dilated cardiomyopathy in 5, myocarditis in 4, mitral valve prolapse associated with LGE in 3, ischemic scar in 2, idiopathic nonischemic scar in 2, arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in 1, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 1, and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in 1. In this subgroup of 26 patients, 6 (23%) had myocardial edema. During mean follow-up of 36 ± 17 months, all 18 patients with myocardial edema had an uneventful outcome, whereas 9 of 26 (35%) without myocardial edema experienced sudden arrhythmic death (n = 1), appropriate defibrillator interventions (n = 5), and nonarrhythmic death (n = 3; P = .006). In survivors of OHCA, early CMR with a comprehensive tissue characterization protocol provided additional diagnostic and prognostic value. The identification of myocardial edema was associated with a favorable long-term outcome. Copyright © 2018 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Commence, continue, withhold or terminate?: a systematic review of decision-making in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Natalie E; Gott, Merryn; Slark, Julia

    2017-04-01

    When faced with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patient, prehospital and emergency resuscitation providers have to decide when to commence, continue, withhold or terminate resuscitation efforts. Such decisions may be made difficult by incomplete information, clinical, resourcing or scene challenges and ethical dilemmas. This systematic integrative review identifies all research papers examining resuscitation providers' perspectives on resuscitation decision-making for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients. A total of 14 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria: nine quantitative, four qualitative and one mixed-methods design. Five themes were identified, describing factors informing resuscitation provider decision-making: the arrest event; patient characteristics; the resuscitation scene; resuscitation provider perspectives; and medicolegal concerns. Established prognostic factors are generally considered important, but there is a lack of resuscitation provider consensus on other factors, indicating that decision-making is influenced by the perspective of resuscitation providers themselves. Resuscitation decision-making research typically draws conclusions from evaluation of cardiac arrest registry data or clinical notes, but these may not capture all salient factors. Future research should explore resuscitation provider perspectives to better understand these important decisions and the clinical, ethical, emotional and cognitive demands placed on resuscitation providers.

  17. Association between bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Kristian; Hansen, Steen M; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark

    2017-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed to examine rates of redeemed prescriptions of antidepressants and anxiolytics, used as markers for cerebral dysfunction in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors, and examine the association between bystander CPR and these psychoactive drugs. METHODS: We included all......,001 30-day survivors, 174 (8.6% died and 12.0% redeemed a first prescription for an antidepressant and 8.2% for an anxiolytic drug within one year after arrest. The corresponding frequencies for redeemed prescribed drugs among age- and sex-matched population controls were 7.5% and 5.2%, respectively...

  18. ECG changes on continuous telemetry preceding in-hospital cardiac arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Duc H; Hayase, Justin; Tiecher, Ricardo Dahmer; Bai, Yong; Hu, Xiao; Boyle, Noel G

    2015-01-01

    About 200,000 patients suffer from in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) annually. Identification of at-risk patients is key to improving outcomes. The use of continuous ECG monitoring in identifying patients at risk for developing IHCA has not been studied. To describe the profile and timing of ECG changes prior to IHCA. Retrospective, observational. Single 520-bed tertiary care hospital. IHCA in adults between April 2010 and March 2012 with at least 3 hours of continuous telemetry data immediately prior to IHCA. We evaluated up to 24 hours of telemetry data preceding IHCA for changes in PR, QRS, ST segment, arrhythmias, and QTc in ventricular tachycardia cases. We determined mechanism and likely clinical cause of the arrest by chart and telemetry review. We studied 81 IHCA patients, in whom the mechanism was ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation in 14 (18%), bradyasystolic in 21 (26%), and pulseless electrical activity (PEA) in 46 (56%). Preceding ECG changes were ST segment changes (31% of cases), atrial tachyarrhythmias (21%), bradyarrhythmias (28%), P wave axis change (21%),QRS prolongation (19%), PR prolongation (17%), isorhythmic dissociation (14%), nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (6%), and PR shortening (5%). At least one of these was present in 77% of all cases, and in 89% of IHCA caused by respiratory or multiorgan failure. Bradyarrhythmias were primarily seen with IHCA in the setting of respiratory or multiorgan failure, and PR and QRS prolongation with IHCA and concomitant multiorgan failure. This is a retrospective study with a limited number of cases; each patient serves as their own control, and a separate control population has not yet been studied. ECG changes are commonly seen preceding IHCA, and have a pathophysiologic basis. Automated detection methods for ECG changes could potentially be used to better identify patients at risk for IHCA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Survival and outcome prediction using the Apache III and the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) score in patients treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) following out-of-hospital, in-hospital or ICU cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrifvars, M B; Varghese, B; Parr, M J

    2012-06-01

    There are few data comparing outcome and the utility of severity of illness scoring systems following intensive care after out-of-hospital (OHCA), in-hospital (IHCA) and intensive care unit (ICUCA) cardiac arrest. We investigated survival, factors associated with survival and the correlation and accuracy of general and specific scoring systems, including the Apache III score and the OHCA score in OHCA, IHCA and ICUCA patients. Prospective analysis of data on all cardiac arrest patients treated in a tertiary hospital between August 1st 2008 and July 30th 2010. Collected data included resuscitation and post-resuscitation care data as defined by the Utstein Guidelines, Apache III on admission and the OHCA score on admission in OHCA and IHCA patients and after the arrest in ICUCA patients. Statistical methods were used to identify factors associated with outcome and the predictive ability and correlation of the aforementioned scores. Of a total of 3931 patients treated in the ICU, 51 were admitted following OHCA, 50 following IHCA and 22 suffered an ICUCA and had sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Survival at 30 days was highest among ICUCAs (67%) followed by IHCAs (38%) and OHCAs (29%). Using multivariate analysis delay ROSC was the only independent predictor of survival. The OHCA score performed with moderate accuracy for predicting 30-day mortality (area under the curve 0.77 [0.69-0.86] and was slightly better than the Apache III score 0.71 (0.61-0.80). Using multiple logistic regression the Apache III and the OHCA score were both independent predictors of hospital survival and correlation between these two scores was weak (correlation coefficient of 0.244). Latency to ROSC seems to be the most important determinant of survival in patients following ICU care after a cardiac arrest in this single center trial. The OHCA score and the Apache III score offer moderate predictive accuracy in ICU cardiac arrest patients but correlated weakly with each

  20. Autonomous CaMKII Activity as a Drug Target for Histological and Functional Neuroprotection after Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiying Deng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII is a major mediator of physiological glutamate signaling, but its role in pathological glutamate signaling (excitotoxicity remains less clear, with indications for both neuro-toxic and neuro-protective functions. Here, the role of CaMKII in ischemic injury is assessed utilizing our mouse model of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR. CaMKII inhibition (with tatCN21 or tatCN19o at clinically relevant time points (30 min after resuscitation greatly reduces neuronal injury. Importantly, CaMKII inhibition also works in combination with mild hypothermia, the current standard of care. The relevant drug target is specifically Ca2+-independent “autonomous” CaMKII activity generated by T286 autophosphorylation, as indicated by substantial reduction in injury in autonomy-incompetent T286A mutant mice. In addition to reducing cell death, tatCN19o also protects the surviving neurons from functional plasticity impairments and prevents behavioral learning deficits, even at extremely low doses (0.01 mg/kg, further highlighting the clinical potential of our findings.

  1. Dealing with a life changing event: The influence of spirituality and coping style on quality of life after survival of a cardiac arrest or myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachelder, E M; Moulaert, V R M P; van Heugten, C; Gorgels, T; Wade, D T; Verbunt, J A

    2016-12-01

    Survivors of a cardiac arrest often have cognitive and emotional problems. As a cardiac arrest is also an obvious life-threatening event, other psychological sequelae associated with surviving such as spirituality may also affect quality of life. To determine the relationship between spirituality, coping and quality of life in cardiac patients both with and without a cardiac arrest. In this retrospective cohort study, participants received a questionnaire by post. The primary outcome measure was quality of life (LiSat-9). Secondary outcome measures were spiritual well-being (FACIT-Sp12), coping style (UPCC), emotional well-being (HADS, IES), fatigue (FSS) and daily activities (FAI). Statistical analyses included multiple regression analyses. Data were available from 72 (60% response rate) cardiac arrest survivors and 98 (47%) patients with a myocardial infarction. Against our hypothesis, there were no differences in spirituality or other variables between the groups, with the exception of more depressive symptoms in patients with myocardial infarction without arrest. Analysis of the total data set (170 participants) found that a better quality of life was associated with higher levels of meaning and peace in life, higher levels of social and leisure activities, and lower levels of fatigue. Quality of life after a cardiac arrest and after a myocardial infarction without arrest are not different; fatigue, a sense of meaning and peace, and level of extended daily activities are factors related to higher life satisfaction. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Ranking Businesses and Municipal Locations by Spatiotemporal Cardiac Arrest Risk to Guide Public Defibrillator Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christopher L F; Brooks, Steven C; Morrison, Laurie J; Chan, Timothy C Y

    2017-03-21

    Efforts to guide automated external defibrillator placement for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) treatment have focused on identifying broadly defined location categories without considering hours of operation. Broad location categories may be composed of many businesses with varying accessibility. Identifying specific locations for automated external defibrillator deployment incorporating operating hours and time of OHCA occurrence may improve automated external defibrillator accessibility. We aim to identify specific businesses and municipal locations that maximize OHCA coverage on the basis of spatiotemporal assessment of OHCA risk in the immediate vicinity of franchise locations. This study was a retrospective population-based cohort study using data from the Toronto Regional RescuNET Epistry cardiac arrest database. We identified all nontraumatic public OHCAs occurring in Toronto, ON, Canada, from January 2007 through December 2015. We identified 41 unique businesses and municipal location types with ≥20 locations in Toronto from the YellowPages, Canadian Franchise Association, and the City of Toronto Open Data Portal. We obtained their geographic coordinates and hours of operation from Web sites, by phone, or in person. We determined the number of OHCAs that occurred within 100 m of each location when it was open (spatiotemporal coverage) for Toronto overall and downtown. The businesses and municipal locations were then ranked by spatiotemporal OHCA coverage. To evaluate temporal stability of the rankings, we calculated intraclass correlation of the annual coverage values. There were 2654 nontraumatic public OHCAs. Tim Hortons ranked first in Toronto, covering 286 OHCAs. Starbucks ranked first in downtown, covering 110 OHCAs. Coffee shops and bank machines from the 5 largest Canadian banks occupied 8 of the top 10 spots in both Toronto and downtown. The rankings exhibited high temporal stability with intraclass correlation values of 0.88 (95

  3. Cerebral oximetry and its role in adult cardiac, non-cardiac surgery and resuscitation from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, D W; Kunst, G

    2017-01-01

    Monitors using near-infra red spectroscopy to assess cerebral oxygenation levels non-invasively in discrete areas of the brain have been used clinically for over 20 years. Interest has intensified recently, especially during cardiac surgery, and there are now five commercially available devices. Despite the attraction of being able to measure oxygen supply/demand in such a critical area, there has been only limited uptake of this technology in overall clinical anaesthetic practice. This narrative review aims to explore not only the rationale for using this technology but also the factors which have restricted its more widespread use. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation Systems of Care: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, James J; Carr, Brendan; Sasson, Comilla; Bobrow, Bentley J; Callaway, Clifton W; Neumar, Robert W; Ferrer, Jose Maria E; Garvey, J Lee; Ornato, Joseph P; Gonzales, Louis; Granger, Christopher B; Kleinman, Monica E; Bjerke, Chris; Nichol, Graham

    2018-02-26

    The American Heart Association previously recommended implementation of cardiac resuscitation systems of care that consist of interconnected community, emergency medical services, and hospital efforts to measure and improve the process of care and outcome for patients with cardiac arrest. In addition, the American Heart Association proposed a national process to develop and implement evidence-based guidelines for cardiac resuscitation systems of care. Significant experience has been gained with implementing these systems, and new evidence has accumulated. This update describes recent advances in the science of cardiac resuscitation systems and evidence of their effectiveness, as well as recent progress in dissemination and implementation throughout the United States. Emphasis is placed on evidence published since the original recommendations (ie, including and since 2010). © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Ambient Air Pollution and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ruixue; Zhou, Guopeng; Zhu, Tong; Li, Xueying; Wang, Guangfa

    2017-04-14

    Air pollutants are associated with cardiovascular death; however, there is limited evidence of the effects of different pollutants on out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) in Beijing, China. We aimed to investigate the associations of OHCAs with the air pollutants PM 2.5-10 (coarse particulate matter), PM 2.5 (particles ≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), sulfur dioxide (SO₂), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone (O₃) between 2013 and 2015 using a time-stratified case-crossover study design. We obtained health data from the nationwide emergency medical service database; 4720 OHCA cases of cardiac origin were identified. After adjusting for relative humidity and temperature, the highest odds ratios of OHCA for a 10 μg/m³ increase in PM 2.5 were observed at Lag Day 1 (1.07; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-1.10), with strong associations with advanced age (aged ≥70 years) (1.09; 95% CI: 1.05-1.13) and stroke history (1.11; 95% CI: 1.06-1.16). PM 2.5-10 and NO₂ also showed significant associations with OHCAs, whereas SO₂, CO, and O₃ had no effects. After simultaneously adjusting for NO₂ and SO₂ in a multi-pollutant model, PM 2.5 remained significant. The effects of PM 2.5 in the single-pollutant models for cases with hypertension, respiratory disorders, diabetes mellitus, and heart disease were higher than those for cases without these complications; however, the differences were not statistically significant. The results support that elevated PM 2.5 exposure contributes to triggering OHCA, especially in those who are advanced in age and have a history of stroke.

  6. Syncope and risk of sudden cardiac arrest in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aro, Aapo L; Rusinaru, Carmen; Uy-Evanado, Audrey; Reinier, Kyndaron; Phan, Derek; Gunson, Karen; Jui, Jonathan; Chugh, Sumeet S

    2017-03-15

    Syncope has been associated with increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in specific patient populations, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and long QT syndrome, but data are lacking on the risk of SCA associated with syncope among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), the most common cause of SCA. We investigated this association among CAD patients in the community. All cases of SCA due to CAD were prospectively identified in Portland, Oregon (population approximately 1 million) as part of the Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study 2002-2015, and compared to geographical controls. Detailed clinical information including history of syncope and cardiac investigations was obtained from medical records. 2119 SCA cases (68.4±13.8years, 66.9% male) and 746 controls (66.7±11.7years, 67.0% male) were included in the analysis. 143 (6.8%) of cases had documented syncope prior to the SCA. SCA cases with syncope were >5years older and had more comorbidities than other SCA cases. After adjusting for clinical factors and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), syncope was associated with increased risk of SCA (OR 2.8; 95%CI 1.68-4.85). When analysis was restricted to subjects with LVEF ≥50%, the risk of SCA associated with syncope remained significantly elevated (adjusted OR 3.1; 95%CI 1.68-5.79). Syncope was associated with increased risk of SCA in CAD patients even with preserved LV function. These findings suggest a role for this clinical marker among patients with CAD and normal LVEF, a large sub-group without any current means of SCA risk stratification. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Targeted Temperature Management for 48 vs 24 Hours and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Hans; Søreide, Eldar; de Haas, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Importance: International resuscitation guidelines recommend targeted temperature management (TTM) at 33°C to 36°C in unconscious patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for at least 24 hours, but the optimal duration of TTM is uncertain. Objective: To determine whether TTM at 33°C for 48....... Secondary outcomes included 6-month mortality, including time to death, the occurrence of adverse events, and intensive care unit resource use. Results: In 355 patients who were randomized (mean age, 60 years; 295 [83%] men), 351 (99%) completed the trial. Of these patients, 69% (120/175) in the 48-hour......: In unconscious survivors from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest admitted to the ICU, targeted temperature management at 33°C for 48 hours did not significantly improve 6-month neurologic outcome compared with targeted temperature management at 33°C for 24 hours. However, the study may have had limited power...

  8. Recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by medical dispatchers in emergency medical dispatch centres in two countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Andréll, Cecilia; Viereck, Søren

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains low. Early recognition by emergency medical dispatchers is essential for an effective chain of actions, leading to early cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of an automated external defibrillator and rapid dispatching...... of the emergency medical services. AIM: To analyse and compare the accuracy of OHCA recognition by medical dispatchers in two countries. METHOD: An observational register-based study collecting data from national cardiac arrest registers in Denmark and Sweden during a six-month period in 2013. Data were analysed...... in two steps; registry data were merged with electronically registered emergency call data from the emergency medical dispatch centres in the two regions. Cases with missing or non-OHCA dispatch codes were analysed further by auditing emergency call recordings using a uniform data collection template...

  9. Advanced life support therapy and on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients: Applying signal processing and pattern recognition methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygve Eftestøl

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In the US alone, several hundred thousands die of sudden cardiac arrests each year. Basic life support defined as chest compressions and ventilations and early defibrillation are the only factors proven to increase the survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and are key elements in the chain of survival defined by the American Heart Association. The current cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines treat all patients the same, but studies show need for more individualiza- tion of treatment. This review will focus on ideas on how to strengthen the weak parts of the chain of survival including the ability to measure the effects of therapy, improve time efficiency, and optimize the sequence and quality of the various components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  10. Lay bystanders' perspectives on what facilitates cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of automated external defibrillators in real cardiac arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Rosenkranz, Simone Mørk; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    obligation to act. CONCLUSIONS: Several factors other than previous hands-on CPR training facilitate lay bystander instigation of CPR and AED use. The recognition and modification of these factors may increase lay bystander CPR rates and patient survival following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest....... factors encourage lay bystanders to initiate CPR and AED use in a cohort of bystanders previously trained in CPR techniques who were present at an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS AND RESULTS: One-hundred and twenty-eight semistructured qualitative interviews with CPR-trained lay bystanders......, until data saturation. We used cross-sectional indexing (using software), and inductive in-depth thematic analyses, to identify those factors that facilitated CPR and AED use. In addition to prior hands-on CPR training, the following were described as facilitators: prior knowledge that intervention...

  11. Uhl’s anomaly: A one and a half ventricular repair in a patient presenting with cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginald Chounoune

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Uhl’s anomaly, first reported in 1952, is an extremely rare congenital cardiac defect characterized by partial or complete loss of the right ventricular myocardium and unknown etiology. Fewer than 100 cases have been described. The response to medical management is poor and there is no known ideal surgical approach or timing for treatment. We report the case of a previously active adolescent male presenting with cardiac arrest, who underwent successful bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis (“Glenn” anastomosis with right atrial reduction and right ventricular free wall plication.

  12. Public knowledge of how to use an automatic external defibrillator in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, K L; Leung, L P; Poon, H T; Chiu, H Y; Liu, H L; Tang, W Y

    2016-12-01

    The survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Hong Kong is low. A long delay between collapse and defibrillation is a contributing factor. Public access to defibrillation may shorten this delay. It is unknown, however, whether Hong Kong's public is willing or able to use an automatic external defibrillator. This study aimed to evaluate public knowledge of how to use an automatic external defibrillator in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. A face-to-face semi-structured questionnaire survey of the public was conducted in six locations with a high pedestrian flow in Hong Kong. In this study, 401 members of the public were interviewed. Most had no training in first aid (65.8%) or in use of an automatic external defibrillator (85.3%). Nearly all (96.5%) would call for help for a victim of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest but only 18.0% would use an automatic external defibrillator. Public knowledge of automatic external defibrillator use was low: 77.6% did not know the location of an automatic external defibrillator in the vicinity of their home or workplace. People who had ever been trained in both first aid and use of an automatic external defibrillator were more likely to respond to and help a victim of cardiac arrest, and to use an automatic external defibrillator. Public knowledge of automatic external defibrillator use is low in Hong Kong. A combination of training in first aid and in the use of an automatic external defibrillator is better than either one alone.

  13. A comparative study of defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance during simulated cardiac arrest in nursing student teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikeland Husebø, Sissel I; Bjørshol, Conrad A; Rystedt, Hans; Friberg, Febe; Søreide, Eldar

    2012-04-02

    Although nurses must be able to respond quickly and effectively to cardiac arrest, numerous studies have demonstrated poor performance. Simulation is a promising learning tool for resuscitation team training but there are few studies that examine simulation for training defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (D-CPR) in teams from the nursing education perspective. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which nursing student teams follow the D-CPR-algorithm in a simulated cardiac arrest, and if observing a simulated cardiac arrest scenario and participating in the post simulation debriefing would improve team performance. We studied video-recorded simulations of D-CPR performance in 28 nursing student teams. Besides describing the overall performance of D-CPR, we compared D-CPR performance in two groups. Group A (n = 14) performed D-CPR in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario, while Group B (n = 14) performed D-CPR after first observing performance of Group A and participating in the debriefing. We developed a D-CPR checklist to assess team performance. Overall there were large variations in how accurately the nursing student teams performed the specific parts of the D-CPR algorithm. While few teams performed opening the airways and examination of breathing correctly, all teams used a 30:2 compression: ventilation ratio.We found no difference between Group A and Group B in D-CPR performance, either in regard to total points on the check list or to time variables. We found that none of the nursing student teams achieved top scores on the D-CPR-checklist. Observing the training of other teams did not increase subsequent performance. We think all this indicates that more time must be assigned for repetitive practice and reflection. Moreover, the most important aspects of D-CPR, such as early defibrillation and hands-off time in relation to shock, must be highlighted in team-training of nursing students.

  14. Improved prognosis after using mild hypothermia to treat cardiorespiratory arrest due to a cardiac cause: comparison with a control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrejón, Sergio; Cortés, Marcelino; Salto, María L; Benittez, Luiz C; Rubio, Rafael; Juárez, Miriam; López de Sá, Esteban; Bueno, Héctor; Sánchez, Pedro L; Fernández Avilés, Francisco

    2009-07-01

    Patients who survive a cardiac arrest have a poor short-term prognosis in terms of mortality and neurological function. The use of mild hypothermia has been investigated in only a few randomized studies, but appears to be effective for treating these patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of this treatment on survival and neurological outcomes. We compared mild hypothermia and usual treatment in patients who had experienced a prolonged cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia and who showed signs of neurological damage. Patient were divided into two groups: a control group of 28 patients and a group of 41 patients who were treated with hypothermia. Patients were assessed at discharge and at 6 months. There was no significant difference between the two groups in baseline characteristics, including those of the cardiac arrest, or in the time to treatment. At discharge, neurological status was good in 18 patients (43.9%) in the hypothermia group but in only five (17.9%) in the control group (risk ratio=2.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-3.98; P=.029). At 6 months after discharge, neurological status was found to be good in 19 patients (46.3%) in the treatment group and six (21.4%) in the control group (risk ratio=2.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-3.36; P=.038). The effect of hypothermia may have been affected by various confounding factors. Our findings demonstrate that hypothermic treatment after cardiac arrest prolonged by ventricular fibrillation or tachycardia helps improve the prognosis of anoxic encephalopathy.

  15. Mechanical versus manual chest compression for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (PARAMEDIC): a pragmatic, cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gavin D; Lall, Ranjit; Quinn, Tom; Deakin, Charles D; Cooke, Matthew W; Horton, Jessica; Lamb, Sarah E; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Woollard, Malcolm; Carson, Andy; Smyth, Mike; Whitfield, Richard; Williams, Amanda; Pocock, Helen; Black, John J M; Wright, John; Han, Kyee; Gates, Simon

    2015-03-14

    Mechanical chest compression devices have the potential to help maintain high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but despite their increasing use, little evidence exists for their effectiveness. We aimed to study whether the introduction of LUCAS-2 mechanical CPR into front-line emergency response vehicles would improve survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The pre-hospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PARAMEDIC) trial was a pragmatic, cluster-randomised open-label trial including adults with non-traumatic, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest from four UK Ambulance Services (West Midlands, North East England, Wales, South Central). 91 urban and semi-urban ambulance stations were selected for participation. Clusters were ambulance service vehicles, which were randomly assigned (1:2) to LUCAS-2 or manual CPR. Patients received LUCAS-2 mechanical chest compression or manual chest compressions according to the first trial vehicle to arrive on scene. The primary outcome was survival at 30 days following cardiac arrest and was analysed by intention to treat. Ambulance dispatch staff and those collecting the primary outcome were masked to treatment allocation. Masking of the ambulance staff who delivered the interventions and reported initial response to treatment was not possible. The study is registered with Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN08233942. We enrolled 4471 eligible patients (1652 assigned to the LUCAS-2 group, 2819 assigned to the control group) between April 15, 2010 and June 10, 2013. 985 (60%) patients in the LUCAS-2 group received mechanical chest compression, and 11 (improvement in 30 day survival with LUCAS-2 compared with manual compressions. On the basis of ours and other recent randomised trials, widespread adoption of mechanical CPR devices for routine use does not improve survival. National Institute for Health Research HTA - 07/37/69. Copyright © 2015 Perkins et al. Open Access

  16. Adrenaline (epinephrine) dosing period and survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest: a retrospective review of prospectively collected data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sam A; Huszti, Ella; Bradley, Steven M; Chan, Paul S; Bryson, Chris L; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Nichol, Graham

    2014-03-01

    Expert guidelines for treatment of cardiac arrest recommend administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) every three to five minutes. However, the effects of different dosing periods of epinephrine remain unclear. We sought to evaluate the association between epinephrine average dosing period and survival to hospital discharge in adults with an in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA). We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 20,909 IHCA events from 505 hospitals participating in the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation (GWTG-R) quality improvement registry. Epinephrine average dosing period was defined as the time between the first epinephrine dose and the resuscitation endpoint, divided by the total number of epinephrine doses received subsequent to the first epinephrine dose. Associations with survival to hospital discharge were assessed by using generalized estimating equations to construct multivariable logistic regression models. Compared to a referent epinephrine average dosing period of 4 to <5 min per dose, survival to hospital discharge was significantly higher in patients with the following epinephrine average dosing periods: for 6 to <7 min/dose, adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.41 (95%CI: 1.12, 1.78); for 7 to <8 min/dose, adjusted OR, 1.30 (95%CI: 1.02, 1.65); for 8 to <9 min/dose, adjusted OR, 1.79 (95%CI: 1.38, 2.32); for 9 to <10 min/dose, adjusted OR, 2.17 (95%CI: 1.62, 2.92). This pattern was consistent for both shockable and non-shockable cardiac arrest rhythms. Less frequent average epinephrine dosing than recommended by consensus guidelines was associated with improved survival of in-hospital cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Management of Maternal Cardiac Arrest in the Third Trimester of Pregnancy: A Simulation-Based Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn Adams

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate confidence, knowledge, and competence after a simulation-based curriculum on maternal cardiac arrest in an Obstetrics & Gynecologic (OBGYN residency program. Methods. Four simulations with structured debriefing focusing on high yield causes and management of maternal cardiac arrest were executed. Pre- and post-individual knowledge tests (KT and confidence surveys (CS were collected along with group scores of critical performance steps evaluated by content experts for the first and final simulations. Results. Significant differences were noted in individual KT scores (pre: 58.9±8.9 versus post: 72.8±6.1, p=0.01 and CS total scores (pre: 22.2±6.4 versus post: 29.9±3.4, p=0.007. Significant differences were noted in airway management, p=0.008; appropriate cycles of drug/shock-CPR, p=0.008; left uterine displacement, p=0.008; and identifying causes of cardiac arrest, p=0.008. Nonsignificant differences were noted for administration of appropriate drugs/doses, p=0.074; chest compressions, p=0.074; bag-mask ventilation before intubation, p=0.074; and return of spontaneous circulation identification, p=0.074. Groups remained noncompetent in team leader tasks and considering therapeutic hypothermia. Conclusion. This study demonstrated improved OBGYN resident knowledge, confidence, and competence in the management of third trimester maternal cardiac arrest. Several skills, however, will likely require more longitudinal curricular exposure and training to develop and maintain proficiency.

  18. Towards the Automated Analysis and Database Development of Defibrillator Data from Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygve Eftestøl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. During resuscitation of cardiac arrest victims a variety of information in electronic format is recorded as part of the documentation of the patient care contact and in order to be provided for case review for quality improvement. Such review requires considerable effort and resources. There is also the problem of interobserver effects. Objective. We show that it is possible to efficiently analyze resuscitation episodes automatically using a minimal set of the available information. Methods and Results. A minimal set of variables is defined which describe therapeutic events (compression sequences and defibrillations and corresponding patient response events (annotated rhythm transitions. From this a state sequence representation of the resuscitation episode is constructed and an algorithm is developed for reasoning with this representation and extract review variables automatically. As a case study, the method is applied to the data abstraction process used in the King County EMS. The automatically generated variables are compared to the original ones with accuracies ≥90% for 18 variables and ≥85% for the remaining four variables. Conclusions. It is possible to use the information present in the CPR process data recorded by the AED along with rhythm and chest compression annotations to automate the episode review.

  19. Comorbidity burden is not associated with higher mortality after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Nielsen, Niklas; Kuiper, Michael; Friberg, Hans; Søholm, Helle; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Frydland, Martin; Hassager, Christian

    We investigated whether comorbidity burden of comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) affects outcome and if comorbidity modifies the effect of target temperature management (TTM) on final outcome. The TTM trial randomized 939 patients to 24 h of TTM at either 33 or 36 °C with no difference regarding mortality and neurological outcome. This post-hoc study of the TTM-trial formed a modified comorbidity index (mCI), based on available comorbidities from the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) decreased with higher comorbidity group, p = 0.01. Comorbidity groups were univariately associated with higher mortality compared to mCI0 (HR mCI1 : 1.55, CI: 1.25-1.93, p the influence was no longer significant. The association between mCI and mortality was not modified by TTM. Comorbidity burden is associated with lower rates of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation after OHCA.

  20. Anxiety and depression among out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, G; Nilsson, G; Nielsen, N

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) may experience psychological distress but the actual prevalence is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate anxiety and depression within a large cohort of OHCA-survivors. METHODS: OHCA-survivors randomized to targeted temperature...... of 33 °C or 36 °C within the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM-trial) attended a follow-up after 6 months that included the questionnaire Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). A control group with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) completed the same follow-up. Correlations...... to variables assumed to be associated with anxiety and depression in OHCA-survivors were tested. RESULTS: At follow-up 278 OHCA-survivors and 119 STEMI-controls completed the HADS where 24% of OHCA-survivors (28% in 33 °C group/22% in 36 °C group, p=0.83) and 19% of the STEMI-controls reported symptoms...

  1. Sudden cardiac arrests, automated external defibrillators, and medical emergency response plans in Tennessee high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Mark L; Watson, Andrew M; Gregory, Andrew; Givens, Timothy G; Abramo, Thomas J; Kannankeril, Prince J

    2013-03-01

    Schools are important public locations of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), and the American Heart Association (AHA) recommends medical emergency response plans (MERPs), which may include an automated external defibrillator (AED) in schools. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of SCA and the prevalence of AEDs and MERPs in Tennessee high schools. Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association member schools were surveyed regarding SCA on campus within 5 years, AED presence, and MERP characteristics. Of 378 schools, 257 (68%) completed the survey. There were 21 (5 student and 16 adult) SCAs on school grounds, yielding a 5-year incidence of 1 SCA per 12 high schools. An AED was present at 11 of 21 schools with SCA, and 6 SCA victims were treated with an AED shock. A linear increase in SCA frequency was noted with increasing school size (schools, 71% had an MERP, 48% had an AED, and only 4% were fully compliant with AHA recommendations. Schools with a history of SCA were more likely to be compliant (19% vs. 3%, P = 0.011). The 5-year incidence of SCA in Tennessee high schools is 1 in 12, but increases to 1 in 7 for schools with more than 1000 students. Compliance with AHA guidelines for MERPs is poor, but improved in schools with recent SCA. Future recommendations should encourage the inclusion of AED placement in schools with more than 1000 students.

  2. Neural Correlates of Consciousness at Near-Electrocerebral Silence in an Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donald E; Lee, Lauren G; Siu, Danny; Bazrafkan, Afsheen K; Farahabadi, Maryam H; Dinh, Tin J; Orellana, Josue; Xiong, Wei; Lopour, Beth A; Akbari, Yama

    2017-04-01

    Recent electrophysiological studies have suggested surges in electrical correlates of consciousness (i.e., elevated gamma power and connectivity) after cardiac arrest (CA). This study examines electrocorticogram (ECoG) activity and coherence of the dying brain during asphyxial CA. Male Wistar rats (n = 16) were induced with isoflurane anesthesia, which was washed out before asphyxial CA. Mean phase coherence and ECoG power were compared during different stages of the asphyxial period to assess potential neural correlates of consciousness. After asphyxia, the ECoG progressed through four distinct stages (asphyxial stages 1-4 [AS1-4]), including a transient period of near-electrocerebral silence lasting several seconds (AS3). Electrocerebral silence (AS4) occurred within 1 min of the start of asphyxia, and pulseless electrical activity followed the start of AS4 by 1-2 min. AS3 was linked to a significant increase in frontal coherence between the left and right motor cortices (p neural activity. Specifically, the burst in frontal coherence and posterior shift of ECoG power that we find during this period immediately preceding CA may be a neural correlate of conscious processing.

  3. Surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: just a matter of defibrillators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Gasparetto, Nicola; Stella, Federica; Bortoluzzi, Andrea; Cacciavillani, Luisa; Basso, Cristina

    2014-08-01

    Out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a leading cause of death all over the world. Although the outcome of OHCA resulting from 'nonshockable' rhythms (asystole and pulseless electrical activity) is poor regardless of resuscitation efforts, 'shockable' rhythms such as ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation may carry a good prognosis if early defibrillation is performed. At present, simplified cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques (hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation) and automated external defibrillators (AEDs) offer lay people the possibility to provide lifesaving treatment to OHCA victims in the critical minutes before the arrival of the emergency medical system. Programs aimed at increasing provision of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of AEDs by lay people have been set up in different countries, including Italy, and have contributed to improve survival rates. However, success of these programs critically depends on appropriate planning and design, and on cultural predisposition of witnesses to undertake immediate measures of resuscitation in the case of OHCA. Placement of a large number of AEDs may carry high costs and little benefits if it is uncoordinated and not preceded by educational campaigns to spread widely the 'culture of resuscitation' in the population.

  4. ED crowding and the outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jiwon; Kim, Joonghee; Jo, You Hwan; Kim, Kyuseok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Taeyun; Lee, Jungyoup; Hwang, Ji Eun; Jung, Euigi

    2015-11-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding is a worldwide problem associated with adverse outcomes. This study was performed to investigate the association between ED overcrowding and the outcomes and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Prospectively collected data including patients' demographics, Utstein factors, and outcomes on 608 consecutive OHCA patients at a single ED from January 2008 to December 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were categorized into 4 groups according to ED occupancy rate. The primary outcome was resuscitation outcome, a composite of rates of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival at discharge, and neurologic outcome at 6months. The secondary outcome was resuscitation quality assessed by time to advanced airway, time to first drug administration, resuscitation duration in refractory cases, and rate of initiation of therapeutic hypothermia after ROSC in the ED. There was no significant difference in rates of ROSC, survival at discharge, and good neurologic outcome according to ED occupancy rate in the univariate and multivariate analyses (P>.05). In addition, ED overcrowding was not associated with resuscitation quality (P>.05). Emergency department overcrowding was not associated with the outcomes of OHCA or resuscitation quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Population density, call-response interval, and survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of geographic variation on outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The present study investigated the relationship between population density, time between emergency call and ambulance arrival, and survival of OHCA, using the All-Japan Utstein-style registry database, coupled with geographic information system (GIS) data. Methods We examined data from 101,287 bystander-witnessed OHCA patients who received emergency medical services (EMS) through 4,729 ambulatory centers in Japan between 2005 and 2007. Latitudes and longitudes of each center were determined with address-match geocoding, and linked with the Population Census data using GIS. The endpoints were 1-month survival and neurologically favorable 1-month survival defined as Glasgow-Pittsburgh cerebral performance categories 1 or 2. Results Overall 1-month survival was 7.8%. Neurologically favorable 1-month survival was 3.6%. In very low-density (population size may lead to inequality in health outcomes between urban and rural areas. PMID:21489299

  6. Double Sequential External Defibrillation and Survival from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Martin; Cheskes, Sheldon; Ross, Garry; Verbeek, P Richard

    2016-01-01

    Patients who present in ventricular fibrillation are typically treated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), epinephrine, antiarrhythmic medications, and defibrillation. Although these therapies have shown to be effective, some patients remain in a shockable rhythm. Double sequential external defibrillation has been described as a viable option for patients in refractory ventricular fibrillation. To describe the innovative use of two defibrillators used to deliver double sequential external defibrillation by paramedics in a case of refractory ventricular fibrillation resulting in prehospital return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge with good neurologic function. A 28-year-old female sustained a witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Bystander CPR was performed by her husband followed by paramedics providing high-quality CPR, antiarrhythmic medication, and 6 biphasic defibrillations using standard energy levels. Double sequential external defibrillation was applied and a return of spontaneous circulation was attained on scene and maintained through to arrival to the emergency department. Following admission to hospital the patient was diagnosed with long QT syndrome. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator was placed and the patient was discharged with a Cerebral Performance Category of 2 as well as a modified Rankin Scale of 2 after an 18-day hospital stay. The patient's functional status continued to improve post discharge. The addition of double sequential external defibrillation as part of a well-organized resuscitation effort may be a valid treatment option for OHCA patients who present in refractory ventricular fibrillation.

  7. Retrospective evaluation of current-based impedance compensation defibrillation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bihua; Yin, Changlin; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Quan, Weilun; Tan, Qing; Freeman, Gary; Li, Yongqin

    2013-05-01

    Transthoracic impedance (TTI) is a principal parameter that influences the intracardiac current flow and defibrillation outcome. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the performance of current-based impedance compensation defibrillation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. ECG recordings, along with TTI measurements were collected from multiple emergency medical services (EMSs) in the USA. All the EMSs in this study used automated external defibrillators (AEDs) which employing rectilinear biphasic (RLB) waveform. The distribution and change of TTI between successive shocks, the influence of preceding shock results on the subsequent shock outcome, and the performance of current-based impedance compensation defibrillation was evaluated. A total of 1166 shocks from 594 OHCA victims were examined in this study. The average TTI for the 1st shock was 134.8 Ω and a significant decrease in TTI was observed for the 2nd (pdefibrillation success. The success rate remained unchanged over the whole spectrum of TTI. The average TTI was relatively higher in this OHCA population treated with RLB defibrillation as compared with previously reported data. TTI was significantly decreased after 1st and 2nd successive escalating shock but kept constant after the 3rd shock. Preceding shock success was a better predictor of subsequent defibrillation outcome other than TTI. Current-based impedance compensation defibrillation resulted in equivalent success rate for high impedance patients when compared with those of low impedance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of argon on temperature modulation and neurological outcome in hypothermia treated rats following cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brücken, Anne; Bleilevens, Christian; Föhr, Philipp; Nolte, Kay; Rossaint, Rolf; Marx, Gernot; Fries, Michael; Derwall, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    Combining xenon and mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) after cardiac arrest (CA) confers a degree of protection that is greater than either of the two interventions alone. However, xenon is very costly which might preclude a widespread use. We investigated whether the inexpensive gas argon would enhance hypothermia induced neurologic recovery in a similar manner. Following nine minutes of CA and three minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation 21 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive MTH (33°C for 6h), MTH plus argon (70% for 1h), or no treatment. A first day condition score assessed behaviour, motor activity and overall condition. A neurological deficit score (NDS) was calculated daily for seven days following the experiment before the animals were killed and the brains harvested for histopathological analysis. All animals survived. Animals that received MTH alone showed best overall neurologic function. Strikingly, this effect was abolished in the argon-augmented MTH group, where animals showed worse neurologic outcome being significant in the first day condition score and on day one to three and five in the NDS in comparison to MTH treated rats. Results were reflected by the neurohistopathological analysis. Our study demonstrates that argon augmented MTH does not improve functional recovery after CA in rats, but may even worsen neurologic function in this model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Drones may be used to save lives in out of hospital cardiac arrest due to drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claesson, A; Svensson, L; Nordberg, P; Ringh, M; Rosenqvist, M; Djarv, T; Samuelsson, J; Hernborg, O; Dahlbom, P; Jansson, A; Hollenberg, J

    2017-05-01

    Drowning leading to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and death is a major public health concern. Submersion with duration of less than 10min is associated with favorable neurological outcome and nearby bystanders play a considerable role in rescue and resuscitation. Drones can provide a visual overview of an accident scene, their potential as lifesaving tools in drowning has not been evaluated. The aim of this simulation study was to evaluate the efficiency of a drone for providing earlier location of a submerged possible drowning victim in comparison with standard procedure. This randomized simulation study used a submerged manikin placed in a shallow (drone transmitting video to a tablet (intervention). Time from start to contact with the manikin was the primary endpoint. Twenty searches were performed in total, 10 for each group. The median time from start to contact with the manikin was 4:34min (IQR 2:56-7:48) for the search party (control) and 0:47min (IQR 0:38-0:58) for the drone-system (intervention) respectively (pdrone was 3:38min (IQR 2:02-6:38). A drone transmitting live video to a tablet is feasible, time saving in comparison to traditional search parties and may be used for providing earlier location of submerged victims at a beach. Drone search can possibly contribute to earlier onset of CPR in drowning victims. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Tempol on Cerebral Resuscitation Caused by Asphyxia-Induced Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Dan; Wu, Xiaofeng; Meng, Lingxin

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect and mechanism of the nitrogen oxide 4-hydroxy- 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (Tempol) on cerebral resuscitation caused by asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest. Airway occlusion-induced asphyxia at the end of expiration was used to establish the rat cerebral ischaemia-hypoxia injury model. A total of 90 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the three groups. The Tempol and conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) groups were further divided into four subgroups according to different time points. After cerebral ischaemia, independent heart rate following asphyxia appeared earlier, and the success rate of primary recovery and the neurological function score of rats were higher in the Tempol group than in the conventional CPR group. The serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels in the Tempol and conventional CPR groups were significantly higher within 6 to 48 h than that in the blank control group. The serum NSE level was significantly lower in the Tempol group than the conventional CPR group. After global cerebral ischaemia-hypoxia, the antioxidant Tempol improved cerebral resuscitation by reducing oxidative stress injuries and post-CPR cerebral damage. The NSE level can be used as an early detection index in the diagnosis of global cerebral ischaemia-hypoxia injuries. Cerebral ischemia; Neuron-specific enolase; Rats; Tempol.

  11. Adenosine-induced cardiac arrest as an alternative to temporary clipping during intracranial aneurysm surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarakhao, Patcharin; Thiarawat, Peeraphong; Rezai Jahromi, Behnam; Kozyrev, Danil A; Teo, Mario K; Choque-Velasquez, Joham; Luostarinen, Teemu; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2017-10-27

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of adenosine-induced cardiac arrest (AiCA) on temporary clipping (TC) and the postoperative cerebral infarction rate among patients undergoing intracranial aneurysm surgery. METHODS In this retrospective matched-cohort study, 65 patients who received adenosine for decompression of aneurysms during microsurgical clipping were identified (Group A) and randomly matched with 65 selected patients who underwent clipping but did not receive adenosine during surgery (Group B). The matching criteria included age, Fisher grade, aneurysm size, rupture status, and location of aneurysms. The primary outcomes were TC time and the postoperative infarction rate. The secondary outcome was the incidence of intraoperative aneurysm rupture (IAR). RESULTS In Group A, 40 patients underwent clipping with AiCA alone and 25 patients (38%) received AiCA combined with TC, and in Group B, 60 patients (92%) underwent aneurysm clipping under the protection of TC (OR 0.052; 95% CI 0.018-0.147; p AiCA is a useful technique for microneurosurgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms. AiCA can minimize the use of TC and does not increase the risk of IAR and postoperative infarction.

  12. A Comparison of Cooling Techniques to Treat Cardiac Arrest Patients with Hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Finley Caulfield

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We sought to compare the performance of endovascular cooling to conventional surface cooling after cardiac arrest. Methods. Patients in coma following cardiopulmonary resuscitation were cooled with an endovascular cooling catheter or with ice bags and cold-water-circulating cooling blankets to a target temperature of 32.0–34.0∘C for 24 hours. Performance of cooling techniques was compared by (1 number of hourly recordings in target temperature range, (2 time elapsed from the written order to initiate cooling and target temperature, and (3 adverse events during the first week. Results. Median time in target temperature range was 19 hours (interquartile range (IQR, 16–20 in the endovascular group versus. 10 hours (IQR, 7–15 in the surface group (P=.001. Median time to target temperature was 4 (IQR, 2.8–6.2 and 4.5 (IQR, 3–6.5 hours, respectively (P=.67. Adverse events were similar. Conclusion. Endovascular cooling maintains target temperatures better than conventional surface cooling.

  13. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest in Lower Austria--a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliegel, Andreas; Gamper, Gunnar; Mayr, Harald

    2011-04-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) after cardiac arrest in Lower Austria. A questionnaire was sent to intensive care units (ICUs) in Lower Austria. Methods of inducing and maintaining hypothermia, the practise of rewarming, concomitant therapies and reasons not to cool were documented. Of the 23 ICUs 10 (43%) used TH. Nine (39%) cooled their patients to 32-34°C and one to 34-35°C. Duration of cooling was 24 h (n=8, 35%), 24-48 h (n=1) or 48 h (n=1). For induction of hypothermia, ICUs used cold infusions (n=5, 22%), surface (n=7, 30%) or endovascular cooling (n=6, 26%). The same methods were used during the maintenance period. Reasons not to cool were insufficient staff resources (n=4, 17%), technical complexity of cooling (n=4, 17%) and too little information (n=3, 13%). In conclusion, TH has been poorly implemented in Lower Austria. The reasons for not using hypothermia could possibly be dispelled by education.

  14. [Quality of life and posttraumatic stress disorder after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Auenmüller, I; Christ, M; Brand, M; Dierschke, W; Trappe, H-J

    2018-01-26

    Survival rate after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is increasing. However, there is a lack of data concerning long-term quality of life of affected patients. This study aims to investigate the psychological effects of out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. All patients who were admitted to our hospital after OHCA between 01 January 2008 and 30 June 2015 and could be discharged in good neurological condition were asked to fill out the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). For statistical analysis, the mean, standard deviation and student's t‑test were used (level of significance p posttraumatic stress disorder in 2 of the 20 patients (10%). Even in patients who could be discharged from the hospital after OHCA in good neurological condition, the quality of life is significantly lower compared to the standard population but not compared to patients with myocardial infarction. The data also suggest that a relevant number of patients after OHCA is affected by posttraumatic stress disorder. Further research efforts on optimization of post-resuscitation care should not only focus on survival rates but also on improving quality of life.

  15. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests and Outdoor Air Pollution Exposure in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichmann, Janine; Folke, Fredrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian Tobias

    2013-01-01

    -of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) and hourly and daily outdoor levels of PM10, PM2.5, coarse fraction of PM (PM10-2.5), ultrafine particle proxies, NOx, NO2, O3 and CO in Copenhagen, Denmark, for the period 2000–2010. Susceptible groups by age and sex was also investigated. A case-crossover design was applied. None...... of the hourly lags of any of the pollutants were significantly associated with OHCA events. The strongest association with OHCA events was observed for the daily lag4 of PM2.5, lag3 of PM10, lag3 of PM10-2.5, lag3 of NOx and lag4 of CO. An IQR increase of PM2.5 and PM10 was associated with a significant...... increase of 4% (95% CI: 0%; 9%) and 5% (95% CI: 1%; 9%) in OHCA events with 3 days lag, respectively. None of the other daily lags or other pollutants was significantly associated with OHCA events. Adjustment for O3 slightly increased the association between OHCA and PM2.5 and PM10. No susceptible groups...

  16. Greater temperature variability is not associated with a worse neurological outcome after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Leda; Lamanna, Irene; Fontana, Vito; Donadello, Katia; Dell'anna, Antonio Maria; Creteur, Jacques; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Pappalardo, Federico; Taccone, Fabio Silvio

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous alterations in temperature homeostasis after cardiac arrest (CA) are associated with worse outcome. However, it remains unclear the prognostic role of temperature variability (TV) during cooling procedures. We hypothesized that low TV during targeted temperature management (TTM) would be associated with a favourable neurological outcome after CA. We reviewed data from all comatose patients after in-hospital or out-of-hospital CA admitted to our Department of Intensive Care between December 2006 and January 2014 who underwent TTM (32-34°C) and survived at least 24h. We collected demographic data, CA characteristics, intensive care unit (ICU) survival and neurological outcome at three months (favourable neurological outcome was defined as cerebral performance category 1-2). TV was expressed using the standard deviation (SD) of all temperature measurements during hypothermia; high TV was defined as an SD >1°C. Of the 301 patients admitted over the study period, 72 patients were excluded and a total of 229 patients were studied; 88 had a favourable neurological outcome. The median temperature on ICU admission was 35.8 [34.9-36.9]°C and the median time to hypothermia (body temperature temperature were independent predictors of favourable neurological outcome, but TV was not. Among comatose survivors treated with TTM after CA, 25% of patients had high TV; however, this was not associated with a worse neurologic outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effects of pre-arrest heparin administration dose for cardiac arrest model using extracorporeal lung and a heart assist (ECLHA) in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Keisuke; Okamoto, Taisuke; Tashiro, Masafumi; Tanimoto, Hironari; Terasaki, Hidenori

    2006-05-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have shown that marked activation of blood coagulation occurs in cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Extracorporeal lung and heart assist (ECLHA) is applied in CA patients who cannot be rescued using conventional therapies. We hypothesized that the dose of heparin administered during the pre-arrest period would influence the outcome in a canine model of CA induced by 15 min of normothermia followed by ECLHA, which consists of heparin coating membrane lung and tubing. We therefore investigated the effects of two dose regimes of the pre-arrest heparin for this model. Twelve mongrel female dogs were divided into two groups: a group given 200 U/kg heparin (H200, n=6) and a group given 700 U/kg heparin (H700, n=6), group during pre-arrest period. Normothermic ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced in all dogs for 15 min, followed by 24h of ECLHA with rapidly induced mild hypothermia (33 degrees C) and 120 h of intensive care. Outcome evaluations included: (1) activated coagulation time (ACT); (2) catecholamine dose; (3) hematocrit (Hct) and platelet count; (4) survival rate; (5) neurological deficit scores (NDS); (6) postmortal macroscopic examination with the exception of the brain. In the H200 group, four dogs died of cardiogenic shock within 28 h. The autopsy revealed extensive patchy hemorrhages in the heart and intestine. In the H700 group, the amount of dopamine was significantly lower (6+/-10mg versus 75+/-41 mg, parrest period even if ECLHA circuit was coated with heparin.

  18. Determining risk for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by location type in a Canadian urban setting to guide future public access defibrillator placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Steven C; Hsu, Jonathan H; Tang, Sabrina K; Jeyakumar, Roshan; Chan, Timothy C Y

    2013-05-01

    Automated external defibrillator use by lay bystanders during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest rarely occurs but can improve survival. We seek to estimate risk for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by location type and evaluate current automated external defibrillator deployment in a Canadian urban setting to guide future automated external defibrillator deployment. This was a retrospective analysis of a population-based out-of-hospital cardiac arrest database. We included consecutive public location, nontraumatic, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occurring in Toronto from January 1, 2006, to June 30, 2010, captured in the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium Epistry database. Two investigators independently categorized each out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and automated external defibrillator location into one of 38 categories. Total site counts in each location category were used to estimate average annual per-site cardiac arrest incidence and determine the relative automated external defibrillator coverage for each location type. There were 608 eligible out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases. The top 5 location categories by average annual out-of-hospital cardiac arrests per site were race track/casino (0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0 to 1.63), jail (0.62; 95% CI 0.3 to 1.06), hotel/motel (0.15; 95% CI 0.12 to 0.18), hostel/shelter (0.14; 95% CI 0.067 to 0.19), and convention center (0.11; 95% CI 0 to 0.43). Although schools were relatively lower risk for cardiac arrest, they represented 72.5% of automated external defibrillator-covered locations in the study region. Some higher-risk location types such as hotel/motel, hostel/shelter, and rail station were severely underrepresented with respect to automated external defibrillator coverage. We have identified types of locations with higher per-site risk for cardiac arrest relative to others. We have also identified potential mismatches between cardiac arrest risk by location type and registered automated external

  19. Bilateral tension pneumothoraces leading to cardiac arrest after coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alozie, Anthony; Westphal, Bernd; Yerebakan, Can; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2012-12-01

    Bilateral pneumothoraces are a very rare event. In clinical settings, inadvertent incursion into the pleural space resulting from diagnostic or therapeutic medical interventions such as bilateral venipunctures or damage to the lung parenchyma due to high pressure ventilation may be causative. Bilateral pneumothoraces postcardiac surgery are rarely reported. We present the case of bilateral tension pneumothoraces leading up to cardiorespiratory arrest in a 57-year-old male, weighing 130 kg, who underwent without any complications a coronary artery bypass surgery. Thoracic chest tubes (retrosternal and intrapericardial) and a left pleural tube were removed 24 hours prior to the incident. Diffuse sternal pain sensation accompanied by slow progressive respiratory distress and confusion shortly before the incident were all developed over a period of 12 hours. A prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation and bilateral chest tube insertion had prevented a fatality in the patient. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Survival of cardiac arrest patients on ski slopes: A 10-year analysis of the Northern French Alps Emergency Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglino, Damien; Maignan, Maxime; Michalon, Arnaud; Turk, Julien; Buse, Sarah K; Blancher, Marc; Aufderheide, Tom P; Belle, Loïc; Savary, Dominique; Ageron, François-Xavier; Debaty, Guillaume

    2017-10-01

    Intense physical activity, cold and altitude make mountain sports a cause of increased risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The difficulties of pre-hospital management related to this challenging environment could be mitigated by the presence of ski-patrollers in ski areas and use of helicopters for medical rescue. We assess whether this particular situation positively impacts the chain of survival compared to the general population. Analysis of prospectively collected data from the cardiac arrest registry of the Northern French Alps Emergency Network (RENAU) from 2004 to 2014. 19,341 OHCAs were recorded during the period, including 136 on-slope events. Compared to other OHCAs, on-slope patients were younger (56 [40-65] vs. 66 [52-79] years, pski slopes presented a higher survival rate, possibly explained by a healthier population, the efficiency of resuscitation by ski-patrols and similar time to ALS facilities compared to other cardiac arrests. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest and targeted temperature management 33°C versus 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragancea, Irina; Horn, Janneke; Kuiper, Michael

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The reliability of some methods of neurological prognostication after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has been questioned since the introduction of induced hypothermia. The aim of this study was to determine whether different treatment temperatures after resuscitation affected the prog......BACKGROUND: The reliability of some methods of neurological prognostication after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has been questioned since the introduction of induced hypothermia. The aim of this study was to determine whether different treatment temperatures after resuscitation affected...... the prognostic accuracy of clinical neurological findings and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) in comatose patients. METHODS: We calculated sensitivity and false positive rate for Glasgow Coma Scale motor score (GCS M), pupillary and corneal reflexes and SSEP to predict poor neurological outcome using...... prospective data from the Target Temperature Management after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Trial which randomised 939 comatose survivors to treatment at either 33 °C or 36 °C. Poor outcome was defined as severe disability, vegetative state or death (Cerebral Performance Category scale 3-5) at six months...

  2. Factors impacting upon timely and adequate allocation of prehospital medical assistance and resources to cardiac arrest patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Camilla; Sunde, Kjetil; Ramsdal, Helge; Hebbert, Susan R; Soilammi, Linda; Westmark, Fredrik; Nordum, Fredrik; Hansen, Andreas E; Steen-Hansen, Jon E; Olasveengen, Theresa M

    2016-12-01

    Explore, understand and address issues that impact upon timely and adequate allocation of prehospital medical assistance and resources to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Mixed-methods design obtaining data for one year in three emergency medical communication centres (EMCC); Oslo-Akershus (OA), Vestfold-Telemark (VT) and Østfold (Ø). Data collection included quantitative data from analysis of dispatch logs, ambulance records and audio files. Qualitative data were collected through in-depth interviews and non-participant observations. OA-, VT- and Ø-EMCC responded to 1095 OHCAs and 579 of these calls were included for further analysis (333, 143 and 103, respectively). There were significant site differences in their recognition of OHCA (89, 94 and 78%, respectively, pmisinterpretation of agonal breathing. Interviews and observations revealed individual differences in protocol use, interrogation strategy and assessment of breathing. Use of protocol was only part of decision making, dispatchers trusted their own clinical experience and intuition, and used assumptions about the patient and the situation as part of decision making. Agonal breathing continues to be the main barrier to recognition of cardiac arrest. Individual differences among dispatchers' strategies can directly impact on performance, mainly due to the wide definition of cardiac arrest and lack of uniform tools for assessment of breathing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Intraoperative cardiac arrest: A 10-year study of patients undergoing tumorous surgery in a tertiary referral cancer center in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Wang, Yufeng; Wang, Yue; Dong, Jiaxu; Nie, Chaoran; Chen, Meng; Hou, Lina

    2017-04-01

    Intraoperative cardiac arrest (IOCA) is a lethal complication of noncardiac surgery. According to several reports, immediate survival after IOCA is approximately 50%. In this study, a retrospective case analysis was performed to determine the incidence of IOCA, the potential causes of cardiac arrest, and the risk factors of no resuscitation in patients undergoing tumorous surgery.The medical records of surgery patients who experienced cardiac arrest during the intraoperative period between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. The general conditions of the patients with IOCA were compared between the successfully resuscitated group and the unresuscitated group.Fifteen patients with IOCA among 142,853 patients undergoing tumorous surgery were reviewed during the study period. Immediate survival after IOCA was 60%. Hospital survival was 46.7%. The incidence of IOCA decreased during 2010 to 2014 when compared with the rate during 2005 to 2009 (P factors affecting the success of resuscitation after IOCA included American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status (ASA PS) classification ≥ III (P factors leading to unsuccessful resuscitation after IOCA were ASA PS classification ≥ III and preoperative tachycardia.

  4. [Factors predicting survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest managed with semiautomatic external defibrillators in Galicia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Araujo, Lorena; Costa-Parcero, Manuel; González-González, María Dolores; Sánchez-Santos, Luis; Iglesias-Vázquez, José Antonio; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    To determine prognostic factors in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests managed with semiautomatic external defibrillators (SAEDs) by emergency health service responders in Galicia, Spain. Retrospective descriptive study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests treated with SAEDs over a period of 5 years. We collected Utstein outcome data from the database and analyzed the following variables: sex, age, date and time of cardiac event, rural vs urban setting, type of location, witnessed or not, bystander resuscitation attempts or not, time first heart rhythm was detected, use of orotracheal intubation or not, time of call for help, and time to arrival of emergency responders. We analyzed 2005 cases (0.14/1000 person-years; 68.2% male, 70.8% in rural locations, 61% at home). Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved in situ in 10.9% (in 29.9% of patients with shockable rhythms and in 3.3% of those in asystole). Intubation was necessary in 15.7%; ROSC was achieved in 24.8% of the intubated patients. ROSC was achieved in significantly more patients when responders arrived soon after the call for help (mean: 12 minutes, 26 seconds) than when arrival was delayed (mean: 16 minutes, 16 seconds when ROSC was not achieved; PGalicia were the presence of a shockable rhythm, shorter response time, continuation of basic life support measures including advanced airway management, bystander life-support maneuvers, an urban location, and night timing of the arrest.

  5. Epidemiology and outcomes of poisoning-induced out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Ho; Shin, Sang Do; Song, Kyoung Jun; Park, Chang Bae; Ro, Young Sun; Kwak, Young Ho

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to describe and compare the epidemiologic features and outcomes among patients with poisoning-induced out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (POHCAs) according to causative agent groups. We identified emergency medical service (EMS)-treated POHCA patients from a nationwide OHCA registry between 2006 and 2008, which was derived from EMS run sheets and followed by hospital record review. Utstein elements were collected and hospital outcomes (survival to admission and to discharge) were measured. We compared risk factors and outcomes according to the main poisons. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from a multivariate logistic regression model for hospital outcomes. The total number of non-cardiac aetiology OHCAs was 20,536. Of these, the number of EMS-assessed and EMS-treated POHCAs was 900 (4.4%). For EMS-treated POHCAs, insecticides (n=111, 15.5%) including organophosphate and carbamates; herbicides (n=94, 13.2%); unknown pesticides (n=142, 19.9%); non-pesticide drugs (n=120, 16.8%); and unknown poisons (n=247, 6%) were identified. The survival to admission rate was 22.5% for insecticides, 3.2% for herbicides, 16.2% for unknown pesticides, 16.7% for non-pesticides and 11.3% for the unknown group. The survival to discharge rates were 9.9% for insecticides, 0.0% for herbicides, 2.1% for unknown pesticides, 3.3% for non-pesticides and 3.2% for the unknown group. The adjusted OR for each group for survival to admission was significantly lower when compared with insecticides: herbicides (OR=0.11, 95% CI=0.03-0.44), non-pesticide drugs (OR=0.28, 95% CI=0.13-0.61) and unknown group (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.21-0.76). The adjusted OR for each group for survival to discharge was significantly lower when compared with insecticides: herbicides (OR99.9), unknown pesticides (OR=0.23, 95% CI=0.0.06-0.87), non-pesticide drugs (OR=0.14, 95% CI=0.04-0.54) and unknown group (OR=0.30, 95% CI=0.11-0.83). Using a nationwide OHCA registry, we found

  6. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions-A nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2010-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...... providers assisted by paramedics, nurse anesthetists or physician-manned ambulances (Advanced Life Support (ALS) capability) in a nationwide, unselected cohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases....

  7. Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is hampered by interruptions in chest compressions--a nationwide prospective feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Niels Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2011-01-01

    Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a critical determinant of outcome following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of our study was to evaluate the quality of CPR provided by emergency medical service providers (Basic Life Support (BLS) capability) and emergency medical service...... providers assisted by paramedics, nurse anesthetists or physician-manned ambulances (Advanced Life Support (ALS) capability) in a nationwide, unselected cohort of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases....

  8. Cerebral physiology and preservation during cardiac arrest Fisiología y preservación cerebral durante el paro cardíaco: vulnerabilidad del cerebro

    OpenAIRE

    Luis M. Gómez

    1991-01-01

    Cerebral physiology during cardiac arrest is discussed with particular Interest on selective neuronal damage. Previous concepts on brain tolerance to hypoxia are analyzed and new information about brain function prognosis after cardiac arrest is presented. Therapeutic alternatives for brain preservation are discussed with emphasis on the lack of effectiveness of barbiturates, the results of research with other d...

  9. Developing quality indicators for the appropriateness of resuscitation in prehospital atraumatic cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudzen, Corita R; Liddicoat, Rebecca; Hoffman, Jerome R; Koenig, William; Lorenz, Karl A; Asch, Steven M

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims do not survive or suffer severe neurological impairment. We sought to develop a set of straightforward clinical indicators that paramedics could use to better match resuscitation attempts to those most likely to benefit. In partnership with the Los Angeles County Emergency Medical Services, we used the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method of quantifying expert opinion regarding the risks and benefits of medical procedures. We presented available scientific evidence related to potential indicators of the quality of resuscitative care to stakeholder-nominated experts. Forty-one candidate indicators incorporated key variables, including initial rhythm, patient preferences, presence of witnesses, and place of arrest. Nine panelists, including palliative care and emergency medical specialists, rated the appropriateness of paramedic use of each indicator by using a 1-9 scale. An indicator was considered appropriate if the potential benefits outweighed the potential harm to the patient or their family. Indicators were retained if median score was >/=7. The expert panel voted to retain 28 quality indicators. Three addressed signs of irreversible death (e.g., dependent lividity), 8 addressed patient preferences (e.g., inquiring about DNR status), and the remainder addressed combinations of initial rhythm and other prognostic signs (e.g., "If initial rhythm is asystole and patient is known by apparent surrogate decision maker to have a terminal illness, then forgo resuscitation."). Our experts recommended a series of much more liberal criteria for forgoing resuscitation than is currently practiced. This includes ascertaining and honoring patient preferences, either through written documents or family members, and combinations of clinical criteria that predict poor neurological outcome, such as asystole, terminal illness, age greater than 70, and response time greater than 15 minutes. These quality indicators expand on

  10. The Effect of Successful Intubation on Patient Outcomes After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Taipei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wen-Chu; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Chu, Hsin-Lan; Chen, Albert Y; Wen, Shin-Yi; Yang, Wen-Shuo; Chien, Yu-Chun; Wang, Yao-Cheng; Lee, Bin-Chou; Wang, Huei-Chih; Huang, Edward Pei-Chuan; Yang, Chih-Wei; Sun, Jen-Tang; Chong, Kah-Meng; Lin, Hao-Yang; Hsu, Shu-Hsien; Chen, Shey-Ying; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming

    2018-03-01

    The effect of out-of-hospital intubation in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remains controversial. The Taipei City paramedics are the earliest authorized to perform out-of-hospital intubation among Asian areas. This study evaluates the association between successful intubation and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival in Taipei. We analyzed 6 years of Utstein-based registry data from nontrauma adult patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who underwent out-of-hospital airway management including intubation, laryngeal mask airway, or bag-valve-mask ventilation. The primary analysis was intubation success on patient outcomes. The primary outcome was survival to discharge and the secondary outcomes included sustained return of spontaneous circulation and favorable neurologic survival. Sensitivity analysis was performed with intubation attempts rather than intubation success. Subgroup analysis of advanced life support-serviced districts was also performed. A total of 10,853 cases from 2008 to 2013 were analyzed. Among out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients receiving airway management, successful intubation, laryngeal mask airway, and bag-valve-mask ventilation was reported in 1,541, 3,099, and 6,213 cases, respectively. Compared with bag-valve-mask device use, successful out-of-hospital intubation was associated with improved chances of sustained return of spontaneous circulation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.91; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.66 to 2.19), survival to discharge (aOR 1.98; 95% CI 1.57 to 2.49), and favorable neurologic outcome (aOR 1.44; 95% CI 1.03 to 2.03). The results were comparable in sensitivity and subgroup analyses. In nontrauma adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Taipei, successful out-of-hospital intubation was associated with improved odds of sustained return of spontaneous circulation, survival to discharge, and favorable neurologic outcome. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by

  11. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) plus delayed defibrillation versus immediate defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; He, Qing; Yang, Li J; Liu, Guan J; Jones, Alexander

    2014-09-12

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a common health problem associated with high levels of mortality. Cardiac arrest is caused by three groups of dysrhythmias: ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT), pulseless electric activity (PEA) and asystole. The most common dysrhythmia found in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is VF. During VF or VT, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) provides perfusion and oxygenation to the tissues, whilst defibrillation restores a viable cardiac rhythm. Early successful defibrillation is known to improve outcomes in VF/VT. However, it has been hypothesized that a period of CPR before defibrillation creates a more conducive physiological environment, increasing the likelihood of successful defibrillation. The order of priority of CPR versus defibrillation therefore remains in contention. As previous studies have remained inconclusive, we conducted a systematic review of available evidence in an attempt to draw conclusions on whether CPR plus delayed defibrillation or immediate defibrillation resulted in better outcomes in OHCA. To examine whether an initial one and one-half to three minutes of CPR administered by paramedics before defibrillation versus immediate defibrillation on arrival influenced survival rates, neurological outcomes or rates of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in OHCA. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials (CENTRAL) (2013, Issue 6); MEDLINE (Ovid) (1948 to May 2013); EMBASE (1980 to May 2013); the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (1980 to May 2013) and the China Academic Journal Network Publishing Database (China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), 1980 to May 2013). We included studies published in all languages. We also searched the Current Controlled Trials and Clinical Trials databases for ongoing trials. We screened the references lists of studies included in our review against the reference

  12. Biphasic versus monophasic waveforms for transthoracic defibrillation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faddy, Steven C; Jennings, Paul A

    2016-02-10

    Transthoracic defibrillation is a potentially life-saving treatment for people with ventricular fibrillation (VF) and haemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia (VT). In recent years, biphasic waveforms have become more commonly used for defibrillation than monophasic waveforms. Clinical trials of internal defibrillation and transthoracic defibrillation of short-duration arrhythmias of up to 30 seconds have demonstrated the superiority of biphasic waveforms over monophasic waveforms. However, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) involves a duration of VF/VT of several minutes before defibrillation is attempted. To determine the efficacy and safety of biphasic defibrillation waveforms, compared to monophasic, for resuscitation of people experiencing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We searched the following electronic databases for potentially relevant studies up to 10 September 2014: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE. Also we checked the bibliographies of relevant studies and review articles, contacted authors of published reviews and reviewed webpages (including those of device manufacturers) relevant to the review topic. We handsearched the abstracts of conference proceedings for the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology, European Resuscitation Council, Society of Critical Care Medicine and European Society of Intensive Care Medicine. Regarding language restrictions, we did not apply any. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared biphasic and monophasic waveform defibrillation in adults with OHCA. Two review authors independently screened the literature search results. Two review authors independently extracted data from the included trials and performed 'Risk of bias' assessments. We resolved any disagreements by discussion and consensus. The primary outcome was the risk of failure to achieve return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC

  13. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Asphyxial Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Due to Drowning: A Systematic Review of Case Series and Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, K-F; Leung, Reynold; Leung, Ling-Pong

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this review was to summarize published evidence of the effectiveness of therapeutic hypothermia in patients with drowning-associated asphyxial out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and to explore any preliminary favorable factors in the management of therapeutic hypothermia to improve survival and neurological outcome. Drowning may result in asphyxial OHCA or hypothermic OHCA, but the former does not provide any potential neuroprotective effect as the latter may do. Electronic literature searches of Ovid Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Scopus were performed for all years from inception to July 2016. Primary studies in the form of case reports, letters to the editor, and others with higher quality are included, but guidelines, reviews, editorials, textbook chapters, conference abstracts, and nonhuman studies are excluded. Non-English articles are excluded. Relevant studies are then deemed eligible if the drowning OHCA patient's initial temperature was above 28°C, which implies asphyxial cardiac arrest, and intentional therapeutic hypothermia was instituted. Because of the narrow scope of interest and strict definition of the condition, limited studies addressed it, and no randomized controlled trials (RCT) could be selected. Thirteen studies covering 35 patients are included. No quantitative synthesis, assessment of study quality, or assessment of bias was performed. It is conjectured that extended therapeutic hypothermia of 48-72 hours might help prevent reperfusion injury during the intermediate phase of postcardiac arrest care to benefit patients of drowning-associated asphyxial OHCA, but this finding only serves as preliminary observation for future research. No conclusive recommendation could be made regarding the duration of and the time of onset of therapeutic hypothermia. Future research should put effort on RCT, particularly the effect of extended duration of 48-72 hours. Important parameters should be reported in detail. Asphyxial

  14. Excessive chest compression rate is associated with insufficient compression depth in prehospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsieurs, Koenraad G; De Regge, Melissa; Vansteelandt, Kristof; De Smet, Jeroen; Annaert, Emmanuel; Lemoyne, Sabine; Kalmar, Alain F; Calle, Paul A

    2012-11-01

    BACKGROUND AND GOAL OF STUDY: The relationship between chest compression rate and compression depth is unknown. In order to characterise this relationship, we performed an observational study in prehospital cardiac arrest patients. We hypothesised that faster compressions are associated with decreased depth. In patients undergoing prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation by health care professionals, chest compression rate and depth were recorded using an accelerometer (E-series monitor-defibrillator, Zoll, U.S.A.). Compression depth was compared for rates 120/min. A difference in compression depth ≥0.5 cm was considered clinically significant. Mixed models with repeated measurements of chest compression depth and rate (level 1) nested within patients (level 2) were used with compression rate as a continuous and as a categorical predictor of depth. Results are reported as means and standard error (SE). One hundred and thirty-three consecutive patients were analysed (213,409 compressions). Of all compressions 2% were 120/min, 36% were 5 cm. In 77 out of 133 (58%) patients a statistically significant lower depth was observed for rates >120/min compared to rates 80-120/min, in 40 out of 133 (30%) this difference was also clinically significant. The mixed models predicted that the deepest compression (4.5 cm) occurred at a rate of 86/min, with progressively lower compression depths at higher rates. Rates >145/min would result in a depth compression depth for rates 80-120/min was on average 4.5 cm (SE 0.06) compared to 4.1 cm (SE 0.06) for compressions >120/min (mean difference 0.4 cm, Pcompression rates and lower compression depths. Avoiding excessive compression rates may lead to more compressions of sufficient depth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Spatial Variation and Resuscitation Process Affecting Survival after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests (OHCA.

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    Chien-Chou Chen

    Full Text Available Ambulance response times and resuscitation efforts are critical predictors of the survival rate after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA. On the other hand, rural-urban differences in the OHCA survival rates are an important public health issue.We retrospectively reviewed the January 2011-December 2013 OHCA registry data of Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. With particular focus on geospatial variables, we aimed to unveil risk factors predicting the overall OHCA survival until hospital admission. Spatial analysis, network analysis, and the Kriging method by using geographic information systems were applied to analyze spatial variations and calculate the transport distance. Logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors for OHCA survival.Among the 4,957 patients, the overall OHCA survival to hospital admission was 16.5%. In the multivariate analysis, female sex (adjusted odds ratio:, AOR, 1.24 [1.06-1.45], events in public areas (AOR: 1.30 [1.05-1.61], exposure to automated external defibrillator (AED shock (AOR: 1.70 [1.30-2.23], use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA (AOR: 1.35 [1.16-1.58], non-trauma patients (AOR: 1.41 [1.04-1.90], ambulance bypassed the closest hospital (AOR: 1.28 [1.07-1.53], and OHCA within the high population density areas (AOR: 1.89 [1.55-2.32] were positively associated with improved OHCA survival. By contrast, a prolonged total emergency medical services (EMS time interval was negatively associated with OHCA survival (AOR: 0.98 [0.96-0.99].Resuscitative efforts, such as AED or LMA use, and a short total EMS time interval improved OHCA outcomes in emergency departments. The spatial heterogeneity of emergency medical resources between rural and urban areas might affect survival rate.

  16. Digitization of Electrocardiogram From Telemetry Prior to In-hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attin, Mina; Wang, Lu; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Lin, Chii-Dean; Lemus, Hector; Spadafore, Maxwell; Najarian, Kayvan

    2016-03-01

    Analyzing telemetry electrocardiogram (ECG) data over an extended period is often time-consuming because digital records are not widely available at hospitals. Investigating trends and patterns in the ECG data could lead to establishing predictors that would shorten response time to in-hospital cardiac arrest (I-HCA). This study was conducted to validate a novel method of digitizing paper ECG tracings from telemetry systems in order to facilitate the use of heart rate as a diagnostic feature prior to I-HCA. This multicenter study used telemetry to investigate full-disclosure ECG papers of 44 cardiovascular patients obtained within 1 hr of I-HCA with initial rhythms of pulseless electrical activity and asystole. Digital ECGs were available for seven of these patients. An algorithm to digitize the full-disclosure ECG papers was developed using the shortest path method. The heart rate was measured manually (averaging R-R intervals) for ECG papers and automatically for digitized and digital ECGs. Significant correlations were found between manual and automated measurements of digitized ECGs (p < .001) and between digitized and digital ECGs (p < .001). Bland-Altman methods showed bias = .001 s, SD = .0276 s, lower and upper 95% limits of agreement for digitized and digital ECGs = .055 and -.053 s, and percentage error = 0.22%. Root mean square (rms), percentage rms difference, and signal to noise ratio values were in acceptable ranges. The digitization method was validated. Digitized ECG provides an efficient and accurate way of measuring heart rate over an extended period of time. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Long-term survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients with malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Saee Byel; Kim, Kyung Su; Suh, Gil Joon; Kwon, Woon Yong; You, Kyoung Min; Park, Min Ji; Ko, Jung-In; Kim, Taegyun

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the 1-year survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients with malignancy was different from that of those without malignancy. All adult OHCA patients were retrospectively analyzed in a single institution for 6years. The primary outcome was 1-year survival, and secondary outcomes were sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival to hospital admission, survival to discharge and discharge with a good neurological outcome (CPC 1 or 2). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis were performed to test the effect of malignancy. Among 341 OHCA patients, 59 patients had malignancy (17.3%). Sustained ROSC, survival to admission, survival to discharge and discharge with a good CPC were not different between the two groups. The 1-year survival rate was lower in patients with malignancy (1.7% vs 11.4%; P=0.026). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that patients with malignancy had a significantly lower 1-year survival rate when including all patients (n=341; P=0.028), patients with survival to admission (n=172, P=0.002), patients with discharge CPC 1 or 2 (n=18, P=0.010) and patients with discharge CPC 3 or 4 (n=57, P=0.008). Malignancy was an independent risk factor for 1-year mortality in the Cox proportional hazard regression analysis performed in patients with survival to admission and survival to discharge. Although survival to admission, survival to discharge and discharge with a good CPC rate were not different, the 1-year survival rate was significantly lower in OHCA patients with malignancy than in those without malignancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. "Stayin' alive": a novel mental metronome to maintain compression rates in simulated cardiac arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, John W; Sturgell, Jeremy L; Matlock, David L; Bockewitz, Elizabeth G; Barker, Lisa T

    2012-11-01

    A novel and yet untested memory aid has anecdotally been proposed for aiding practitioners in complying with American Heart Association (AHA) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) compression rate guidelines (at least 100 compressions per minute). This study investigates how subjects using this memory aid adhered to current CPR guidelines in the short and long term. A prospective observational study was conducted with medical providers certified in 2005 AHA guideline CPR. Subjects were randomly paired and alternated administering CPR compressions on a mannequin during a standardized cardiac arrest scenario. While performing compressions, subjects listened to a digital recording of the Bee Gees song "Stayin' Alive," and were asked to time compressions to the musical beat. After at least 5 weeks, the participants were retested without directly listening to the recorded music. Attitudinal views were gathered using a post-session questionnaire. Fifteen subjects (mean age 29.3 years, 66.7% resident physicians and 80% male) were enrolled. The mean compression rate during the primary assessment (with music) was 109.1, and during the secondary assessment (without music) the rate was 113.2. Mean CPR compression rates did not vary by training level, CPR experience, or time to secondary assessment. Subjects felt that utilizing the music improved their ability to provide CPR and they felt more confident in performing CPR. Medical providers trained to use a novel musical memory aid effectively maintained AHA guideline CPR compression rates initially and in long-term follow-up. Subjects felt that the aid improved their technical abilities and confidence in providing CPR. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Improving Providers' Role Definitions to Decrease Overcrowding and Improve In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Marion; Schweickert, William; Neefe, Stacie; Tsypenyuk, Boris; Falk, Scott Austin; Holena, Daniel N

    2016-07-01

    How nontechnical factors such as inadequate role definition and overcrowding affect outcomes of in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is unknown. Using a bundled intervention, we sought to improve providers' role definitions and decrease overcrowding during IHCA events. To determine if a bundled intervention consisting of a nurse/physician leadership dyad, visual cues for provider roles, and a "role check" would lead to reductions in crowding and improve perceptions of communication and team leadership. Baseline data on the number and type of IHCA providers were collected. Providers were asked to complete a postevent survey rating communication and leadership. A bundled intervention was then introduced. Data were then obtained for the subsequent IHCA events. Twenty ICHA events were captured before and 34 after the intervention. The number of physicians present at pulse checks 2 (median [interquartile range]: 6 [5-8] before vs 5 [3-6] after, P = .02) and 3 (7 [5-9] vs 4 [4-5], P = .004) decreased significantly after the intervention. The overall number of providers at the third pulse check (18 [14-22] before vs 14 [12-16] after, P = .04) also decreased after the intervention. On a 10-point Likert scale, ratings of communication (8 [7-8]) and physician leadership (8 [7-9]) did not differ significantly from before to after the intervention. Both the physician leads (90%) and patients' primary nurses (97%) were able to identify clear nurse leaders. A bundled intervention targeted at improving IHCA response led to a decrease in overcrowding at ICHA events without substantial changes in the perceptions of communication or physician leadership. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  20. Potential cardiac arrest - an observational study of pre-hospital medical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariassen, Erik; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2016-06-01

    A previous study showed that Norwegian GPs on call attended around 40% of out-of-hospital medical emergencies. We wanted to investigate the alarms of prehospital medical resources and the doctors' responses in situations of potential cardiac arrests. A three-month prospective data collection was undertaken from three emergency medical communication centres, covering a population of 816,000 residents. From all emergency medical events, a sub-group of patients who received resuscitation, or who were later pronounced dead at site, was selected for further analysis. 5,105 medical emergencies involving 5,180 patients were included, of which 193 met the inclusion criteria. The GP on call was alarmed in 59 %, and an anaesthesiologist in 43 % of the cases. When alarmed, a GP attended in 84 % and an anaesthesiologist in 87 % of the cases. Among the patients who died, the GP on call was alarmed most frequently. Events involving patients in need of resuscitation are rare, but medical response in the form of the attendance of prehospital personnel is significant. Norwegian GPs have a higher call-out rate for patients in severe situations where resuscitation was an option of treatment, compared with other "red-response" situations. Key points This study investigates alarms of and call-outs among GPs and anaesthesiologists on call, in the most acute clinical situations: Medical emergencies involving patients in need of resuscitation were rare. The health care contribution by pre-hospital personnel being called out was significant. Compared with other acute situations, the GP had a higher attendance rate to patients in life-threatening situations.

  1. A smartphone application for dispatch of lay responders to out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Ellinor; Claesson, Andreas; Nordberg, Per; Djärv, Therese; Lundgren, Peter; Folke, Fredrik; Forsberg, Sune; Riva, Gabriel; Ringh, Mattias

    2018-05-01

    Dispatch of lay volunteers trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) may improve survival in cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The aim of this study was to investigate the functionality and performance of a smartphone application for locating and alerting nearby trained laymen/women in cases of OHCA. A system using a smartphone application activated by Emergency Dispatch Centres was used to locate and alert laymen/women to nearby suspected OHCAs. Lay responders were instructed either to perform CPR or collect a nearby AED. An online survey was carried out among the responders. From February to August 2016, the system was activated in 685 cases of suspected OHCA. Among these, 224 cases were Emergency Medical Services (EMSs)-treated OHCAs (33%). EMS-witnessed cases (n = 11) and cases with missing survey data (n = 15) were excluded. In the remaining 198 OHCAs, lay responders arrived at the scene in 116 cases (58%), and prior to EMSs in 51 cases (26%). An AED was attached in 17 cases (9%) and 4 (2%) were defibrillated. Lay responders performed CPR in 54 cases (27%). Median distance to the OHCA was 560 m (IQR 332-860 m), and 1280 m (IQR 748-1776 m) via AED pick-up. The survey-answering rate was 82%. A smartphone application can be used to alert CPR-trained lay volunteers to OHCAs for CPR. Further improvements are needed to shorten the time to defibrillation before EMS arrival. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prediction of the outcome in cardiac arrest patients undergoing hypothermia using EEG wavelet entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshirvaziri, Hana; Ramezan-Arab, Nima; Asgari, Shadnaz

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is the leading cause of death in the United States. Induction of hypothermia has been found to improve the functional recovery of CA patients after resuscitation. However, there is no clear guideline for the clinicians yet to determine the prognosis of the CA when patients are treated with hypothermia. The present work aimed at the development of a prognostic marker for the CA patients undergoing hypothermia. A quantitative measure of the complexity of Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals, called wavelet sub-band entropy, was employed to predict the patients' outcomes. We hypothesized that the EEG signals of the patients who survived would demonstrate more complexity and consequently higher values of wavelet sub-band entropies. A dataset of 16-channel EEG signals collected from CA patients undergoing hypothermia at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center was used to test the hypothesis. Following preprocessing of the signals and implementation of the wavelet transform, the wavelet sub-band entropies were calculated for different frequency bands and EEG channels. Then the values of wavelet sub-band entropies were compared among two groups of patients: survived vs. non-survived. Our results revealed that the brain high frequency oscillations (between 64100 Hz) captured from the inferior frontal lobes are significantly more complex in the CA patients who survived (p-value <; 0.02). Given that the non-invasive measurement of EEG is part of the standard clinical assessment for CA patients, the results of this study can enhance the management of the CA patients treated with hypothermia.

  3. Solar radiation and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-11-01

    Although several studies have estimated the effects of temperature on mortality and morbidity, little is known regarding the burden of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) attributable to solar radiation. We obtained data for all cases of OHCA and meteorological data reported between 2011 and 2014 in 3 Japanese prefectures: Hokkaido, Ibaraki, and Fukuoka. We first examined the relationship between daily solar radiation and OHCA risk for each prefecture using time-varying distributed lag non-linear models and then pooled the results in a multivariate random-effects meta-analysis. The attributable fractions of OHCA were calculated for low and high solar radiation, defined as solar radiation below and above the minimum morbidity solar radiation, respectively. The minimum morbidity solar radiation was defined as the specific solar radiation associated with the lowest morbidity risk. A total of 49,892 cases of OHCA occurred during the study period. The minimum morbidity solar radiation for each prefecture was the 100th percentile (72.5 MJ/m 2 ) in Hokkaido, the 83rd percentile (59.7 MJ/m 2 ) in Ibaraki, and the 70th percentile (53.8 MJ/m 2 ) in Fukuoka. Overall, 20.00% (95% empirical confidence interval [eCI]: 10.97-27.04) of the OHCA cases were attributable to daily solar radiation. The attributable fraction for low solar radiation was 19.50% (95% eCI: 10.00-26.92), whereas that for high solar radiation was 0.50% (95% eCI: -0.07-1.01). Low solar radiation was associated with a substantial attributable risk for OHCA. Our findings suggest that public health efforts to reduce OHCA burden should consider the solar radiation level. Large prospective studies with longitudinal collection of individual data is required to more conclusively assess the impact of solar radiation on OHCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Monitoring of immune activation using biochemical changes in a porcine model of cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Amann

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In animal models, immune activation is often difficult to assess because of the limited availability of specific assays to detect cytokine activities. In human monocytes/macrophages, interferon-γ induces increased production of neopterin and an enhanced activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, which degrades tryptophan via the kynurenine pathway. Therefore, monitoring of neopterin concentrations and of tryptophan degradation can serve to detect the extent of T helper cell 1-type immune activation during cellular immune response in humans. In a porcine model of cardiac arrest, we examined the potential use of neopterin measurements and determination of the tryptophan degradation rate as a means of estimating the extent of immune activation. Urinary neopterin concentrations were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and radioimmunoassay (RIA (BRAHMS Diagnostica, Berlin, Germany. Serum and plasma tryptophan and kynurenine concentrations were also determined using HPLC. Serum and urine neopterin concentrations were not detectable with HPLC in these specimens, whereas RIA gave weakly (presumably false positive results. The mean serum tryptophan concentration was 39.0 Ī 6.2 μmol/l, and the mean kynurenine concentration was 0.85 Ī 0.33 μmol/l. The average kynurenine-per-tryptophan quotient in serum was 21.7Ī 8.4 nmol/μmol, and that in plasma was 20.7Ī 9.5 nmol/μmol (n = 7, which corresponds well to normal values in humans. This study provides preliminary data to support the monitoring of tryptophan degradation but not neopterin concentrations as a potential means of detecting immune activation in a porcine model. The kynurenine-per-tryptophan quotient may serve as a short-term measurement of immune activation and hence permit an estimate of the extent of immune activation.

  5. Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS response to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

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    Lyon Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA is a common medical emergency with significant mortality and significant neurological morbidity. Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS may be tasked to OHCA. We sought to assess the impact of tasking a HEMS service to OHCA and characterise the nature of these calls. Method Retrospective case review of all HEMS calls to Surrey and Sussex Air Ambulance, United Kingdom, over a 1-year period (1/9/2010-1/9/2011. All missions to cases of suspected OHCA, of presumed medical origin, were reviewed systematically. Results HEMS was activated 89 times to suspected OHCA. This represented 11% of the total HEMS missions. In 23 cases HEMS was stood-down en-route and in 2 cases the patient had not suffered an OHCA on arrival of HEMS. 25 patients achieved return-of-spontaneous circulation (ROSC, 13 (52% prior to HEMS arrival. The HEMS team were never first on-scene. The median time from first collapse to HEMS arrival was 31 minutes (IQR 22–40. The median time from HEMS activation to arrival on scene was 17 minutes (IQR 11.5-21. 19 patients underwent pre-hospital anaesthesia, 5 patients had electrical or chemical cardioversion and 19 patients had therapeutic hypothermia initiated by HEMS. Only 1 post-OHCA patient was transported to hospital by air. The survival to discharge rate was 6.3%. Conclusion OHCA represents a significant proportion of HEMS call outs. HEMS most commonly attend post-ROSC OHCA patients and interventions, including pre-hospital anaesthesia and therapeutic hypothermia should be targeted to this phase. HEMS are rarely first on-scene and should only be tasked as a first response to OHCA in remote locations. HEMS may be most appropriately utilised in OHCA by only attending the scene if a patient achieves ROSC.

  6. The value of arterial blood gas parameters for prediction of mortality in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

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    Katharina Isabel von Auenmueller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Sudden cardiac death is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and early prognostication remains challenging. There is a lack of valid parameters for the prediction of survival after cardiac arrest. Aims: This study aims to investigate if arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Materials and Methods: All patients who were admitted to our hospital after resuscitation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2013, were included in this retrospective study. The patient's survival 5 days after resuscitation defined the study end-point. For the statistical analysis, the mean, standard deviation, Student's t-test, Chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were used (level of significance P< 0.05. Results: Arterial blood gas samples were taken from 170 patients. In particular, pH < 7.0 (odds ratio [OR]: 7.20; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.11–16.69; P< 0.001 and lactate ≥ 5.0 mmol/L (OR: 6.79; 95% CI: 2.77–16.66; P< 0.001 showed strong and independent correlations with mortality within the first 5 days after hospital admission. Conclusion: Our study results indicate that several arterial blood gas parameters correlate with mortality of patients after out-of-hospital resuscitation. The most relevant parameters are pH and lactate because they are strongly and independently associated with mortality within the first 5 days after resuscitation. Despite this correlation, none of these parameters by oneself is strong enough to allow an early prognostication. Still, these parameters can contribute as part of a multimodal approach to assessing the patients' prognosis.

  7. The benefits of youth are lost on the young cardiac arrest patient [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Griffith

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Children and young adults tend to have reduced mortality and disability after acquired brain injuries such as trauma or stroke and across other disease processes seen in critical care medicine. However, after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA, outcomes are remarkably similar across age groups. The consistent lack of witnessed arrests and a high incidence of asphyxial or respiratory etiology arrests among pediatric and young adult patients with OHCA account for a substantial portion of the difference in outcomes. Additionally, in younger children, differences in pre-hospital response and the activation of developmental apoptosis may explain more severe outcomes after OHCA. These require us to consider whether present practices are in line with the science. The present recommendations for compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation in young adults, normothermia as opposed to hypothermia (33°C after asphyxial arrests, and paramedic training are considered within this review in light of existing evidence. Modifications in present standards of care may help restore the benefits of youth after brain injury to the young survivor of OHCA.

  8. Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Relation to Age and Early Identification of Patients With Minimal Chance of Long-Term Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Folke, Fredrik; Hansen, Carolina Malta

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has increased during the last decade in Denmark. We aimed to study the impact of age on changes in survival and whether it was possible to identify patients with minimal chance of 30-day survival. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using data from...... the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry (2001─2011), we identified 21 480 patients ≥18 years old with a presumed cardiac-caused out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for which resuscitation was attempted. Patients were divided into 3 preselected age-groups: working-age patients 18 to 65 years of age (33.......7%, 30.3%, and 23.4%; and prehospital shock from a defibrillator in 54.7%, 45.0%, and 33.8% (all Phospital arrival increased: working-age patients, from 12.1% to 34.6%; early senior patients, from 6.4% to 21.5%; and late senior patients...

  9. Uncontrolled organ donation following prehospital cardiac arrest: a potential solution to the shortage of organ donors in the United Kingdom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Keith J; Bramhall, Simon; Mayer, David; Muiesan, Paolo

    2011-05-01

    Uncontrolled donation after cardiac death (DCD) could increase the donor pool in the UK. Air ambulance (AA) teams may be well placed to recruit these donors. They cover large geographical areas, have short transfer times and tasked predominantly to life-threatening cases. The potential to recruit from this pool of donors was reviewed. Seventy-five month activity of an AA unit was analysed identifying patients who entered prehospital cardiac arrest (PHCA). Patients over 70 years of age were excluded as were those whose cardiac arrest was unwitnessed. A minimum potential donor pool was estimated based upon patients dying of medical causes. Rates of bystander resuscitation, mechanism of death and patient demographic data were observed. During 10,022 missions 534 patients entered PHCA. A total of 106 patients met inclusion criteria. There were 12 paediatric cases; 39 cases of 17-50 year olds and 55 cases of 50-70 year olds. Medical and traumatic causes of death accounted for 60 and 46 cases respectively. Bystander resuscitation efforts were provided in 47% of cases. A regional AA could contribute to a national uncontrolled DCD programme. Given that there are 31 AA's in England and Wales, we estimate that there could be a minimum of 300 additional potential donors annually. © 2011 The Authors. Transplant International © 2011 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  10. Delayed AICD therapy and cardiac arrest resulting from undersensing of ventricular fibrillation in a subject with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy–A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Ashley; Healey, Jeffrey S.; Ribas, Carlos S.; Nair, Girish M.

    2015-01-01

    Defibrillation testing is no longer routinely performed after automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (AICD) implantation. However, certain subjects undergoing AICD implantation may be at higher risk of undersensing of ventricular arrhythmias resulting in potentially fatal outcomes. We present the case of a 30-year-old woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM; ‘asymmetric septal hypertophy’ morphologic variant) and prophylactic AICD who experienced an out of hospital cardiac arrest. AICD interrogation revealed undersensing as a result of intermittent high amplitude electrograms during an episode of ventricular fibrillation (VF). The subject underwent replacement and repositioning of the AICD lead along with pulse generator replacement (that utilized a different VF sensing algorithm) with appropriate sensing of VF and successful defibrillation testing. The presence of intermittent high amplitude electrograms during episodes of VF in AICDs using the AGC function should be recognized as a situation that may necessitate interventions to prevent undersensing and consequent delay in therapy. PMID:26937098

  11. Delayed AICD therapy and cardiac arrest resulting from undersensing of ventricular fibrillation in a subject with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Ashley; Healey, Jeffrey S; Ribas, Carlos S; Nair, Girish M

    2015-01-01

    Defibrillation testing is no longer routinely performed after automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (AICD) implantation. However, certain subjects undergoing AICD implantation may be at higher risk of undersensing of ventricular arrhythmias resulting in potentially fatal outcomes. We present the case of a 30-year-old woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM; 'asymmetric septal hypertophy' morphologic variant) and prophylactic AICD who experienced an out of hospital cardiac arrest. AICD interrogation revealed undersensing as a result of intermittent high amplitude electrograms during an episode of ventricular fibrillation (VF). The subject underwent replacement and repositioning of the AICD lead along with pulse generator replacement (that utilized a different VF sensing algorithm) with appropriate sensing of VF and successful defibrillation testing. The presence of intermittent high amplitude electrograms during episodes of VF in AICDs using the AGC function should be recognized as a situation that may necessitate interventions to prevent undersensing and consequent delay in therapy.

  12. Delayed AICD therapy and cardiac arrest resulting from undersensing of ventricular fibrillation in a subject with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy–A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Chin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Defibrillation testing is no longer routinely performed after automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (AICD implantation. However, certain subjects undergoing AICD implantation may be at higher risk of undersensing of ventricular arrhythmias resulting in potentially fatal outcomes. We present the case of a 30-year-old woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM; ‘asymmetric septal hypertophy’ morphologic variant and prophylactic AICD who experienced an out of hospital cardiac arrest. AICD interrogation revealed undersensing as a result of intermittent high amplitude electrograms during an episode of ventricular fibrillation (VF. The subject underwent replacement and repositioning of the AICD lead along with pulse generator replacement (that utilized a different VF sensing algorithm with appropriate sensing of VF and successful defibrillation testing. The presence of intermittent high amplitude electrograms during episodes of VF in AICDs using the AGC function should be recognized as a situation that may necessitate interventions to prevent undersensing and consequent delay in therapy.

  13. Safety and feasibility of nasopharyngeal evaporative cooling in the emergency department setting in survivors of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, H-J; Eichwede, F; Födisch, M; Taccone, F S; Wöbker, G; Schwab, T; Hopf, H-B; Tonner, P; Hachimi-Idrissi, S; Martens, P; Fritz, H; Bode, Ch; Vincent, J-L; Inderbitzen, B; Barbut, D; Sterz, F; Janata, A

    2010-08-01

    Mild therapeutic hypothermia improves survival and neurologic recovery in primary comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Cooling effectivity, safety and feasibility of nasopharyngeal cooling with the RhinoChill device (BeneChill Inc., San Diego, USA) were determined for induction of therapeutic hypothermia. Eleven emergency departments and intensive care units participated in this multi-centre, single-arm descriptive study. Eighty-four patients after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest were cooled with nasopharyngeal delivery of an evaporative coolant for 1h. Subsequently, temperature was controlled with systemic cooling at 33 degrees C. Cooling rates, adverse events and neurologic outcome at hospital discharge using cerebral performance categories (CPC; CPC 1=normal to CPC 5=dead) were documented. Temperatures are presented as median and the range from the first to the third quartile. Nasopharyngeal cooling for 1h reduced tympanic temperature by median 2.3 (1.6; 3.0) degrees C, core temperature by 1.1 (0.7; 1.5) degrees C. Nasal discoloration occurred during the procedure in 10 (12%) patients, resolved in 9, and was persistent in 1 (1%). Epistaxis was observed in 2 (2%) patients. Periorbital gas emphysema occurred in 1 (1%) patient and resolved spontaneously. Thirty-four of 84 patients (40%) patients survived, 26/34 with favorable neurological outcome (CPC of 1-2) at discharge. Nasopharyngeal evaporative cooling used for 1h in primary cardiac arrest survivors is feasible and safe at flow rates of 40-50L/min in a hospital setting. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. MIF reflects tissue damage rather than inflammation in post-cardiac arrest syndrome in a real life cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Julia; Rammos, Christos; Totzeck, Matthias; Stock, Pia; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush; Luedike, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Following successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest (CA), neurological impairment and other types of organ dysfunction cause significant morbidity and mortality-a condition termed post-cardiac arrest syndrome. Whole-body ischemia/reperfusion with oxygen debt activates immunologic and coagulation pathways increasing the risk of multiple organ failure and infection. We here examined the role of the pro-inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in post-cardiac arrest syndrome. MIF plasma levels of n=16 patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after CA were assessed with a previously validated method and compared to markers of systemic inflammation and cellular damage. ICU patients without former CA and healthy volunteers served as controls. MIF levels in patients after ROSC were higher compared to those in healthy volunteers and ICU patients without CA. Kaplan-Meyer analysis revealed a distinctly elevated mortality since day one that further increased towards an elevated 60-days-mortality in patients with high plasma MIF. ROC curve identified plasma MIF as a predictor for mortality in patients after CA. Correlation with inflammatory parameters revealed that high MIF levels did not mirror post CA inflammatory syndrome, but distinctive cellular damage after ROSC as there were strong correlations with markers of cellular damage like LDH and GOT/GPT. High MIF levels were associated with elevated 60-days-mortality and high MIF predicted mortality after CA. We found a close relation between circulating MIF levels and cellular damage, but not with an inflammatory syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reliability of Pulse Oximetry during Progressive Hypoxia, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, and Recovery in a Piglet Model of Neonatal Hypoxic Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohammad Ahmad; Weber, Claudia; Waitz, Markus; Huang, Li; Hummler, Helmut D; Mendler, Marc Robin

    2017-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is widely used in intensive care and emergency conditions to monitor arterial oxygenation and to guide oxygen therapy. To study the reliability of pulse oximetry in comparison with CO-oximetry in newborn piglets during progressive hypoxia, cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Thirty-three newborn piglets were exposed to hypoxia until asystole occurred and then resuscitated until ROSC. Arterial oxygen saturation was monitored continuously by pulse oximetry (SpO2) with one sensor applied to the wrist of the right forelimb (FL) and another to the thigh of the left hind limb (HL). Arterial functional oxygen saturation (SaO2) was measured at baseline and at predefined intervals during each phase of the experiment. SpO2 was compared with coinciding SaO2 values and bias considered whenever the difference (SpO2 - SaO2) was beyond ±5%. Bias values were lower at the baseline measurements (-3.7 ± 2.3% in FL and -4.1 ± 3.4% in HL) as well as after ROSC (1.5 ± 4.2% in FL and 0.2 ± 4.6% in HL) with higher precision and accuracy than during other experiment phases. During hypoxia induction, cardiac arrest, and CPR, there was a marked decrease in precision and accuracy as well as an increase in bias up to 43 ± 26 and 56 ± 27% in FL and HL, respectively, over a range of SaO2 from 13 to 51%. Pulse oximetry showed increased bias and decreased accuracy and precision during marked hypoxemia in a model of neonatal hypoxic cardiac arrest. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Serial plasma choline measurements after cardiac arrest in patients undergoing mild therapeutic hypothermia: a prospective observational pilot trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Storm

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Choline is related to phospholipid metabolism and is a marker for global ischaemia with a small reference range in healthy volunteers. The aim of our study was to characterize the early kinetics of plasma free choline in patients after cardiac arrest. Additionally, we investigated the potential of plasma free choline to predict neurological outcome. METHODS: Twenty patients admitted to our medical intensive care unit were included in this prospective, observational trial. All patients were enrolled between May 2010 and May 2011. They received post cardiac arrest treatment including mild therapeutic hypothermia which was initiated with a combination of cold fluid and a feedback surface cooling device according to current guidelines. Sixteen blood samples per patient were analysed for plasma free choline levels within the first week after resuscitation. Choline was detected by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Most patients showed elevated choline levels on admission (median 14.8 µmol/L; interquartile range; IQR 9.9-20.1 which subsequently decreased. 48 hours after cardiac arrest choline levels in all patients reached subnormal levels at a median of 4.0 µmol/L (IQR 3-4.9; p = 0.001. Subsequently, choline levels normalized within seven days. There was no significant difference in choline levels when groups were analyzed in relation to neurological outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate a choline deficiency in the early postresucitation phase. This could potentially result in impaired cell membrane recovery. The detailed characterization of the early choline time course may aid in planning of choline supplementation trials. In a limited number of patients, choline was not promising as a biomarker for outcome prediction.

  17. Effects of sodium hydrosulfide on intestinal mucosal injury in a rat model of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hao; Chen, Di; Liu, Beibei; Xie, Xuemeng; Zhang, Jincheng; Yang, Guangtian

    2013-07-19

    Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can lead to intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Increasing studies have indicated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is in favor of a variety of tissue I/R injury. The purpose of this study was to explore whether sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a H2S donor, can protect intestinal mucosa after CPR and its potential mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6min cardiac arrest induced by transcutaneous electrical epicardium stimulation and then resuscitated successfully. A bolus of either NaHS (0.5mg/kg) or placebo (NaCl 0.9%) was blindly injected 1min before the start of CPR intravenously, followed by a continuous injection of NaHS (2mg/kg/h) or placebo for 3h. Intestinal and plasma samples were collected for assessments 24h after CPR. We found that NaHS can markedly alleviate cardiac arrest induced intestinal mucosal injury. Rats treated with NaHS showed a lower malondialdehyde content, higher superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione content in intestine after CPR. Increased intestinal myeloperoxidase activity was significantly decreased by NaHS after CPR. Moreover, a reduced intestinal apoptotic cells after CPR were evident when pretreated with NaHS. Further studies indicated that NaHS enhances the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in intestine after CPR. Our data demonstrated that NaHS treatment before CPR induces intestinal mucosal protection 24h post-resuscitation. The protective effects may be through oxidative stress reduction, inflammation alleviation, apoptosis inhibition and HIF-1α activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Post-Resuscitation ECG for Selection of Patients for Immediate Coronary Angiography in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stær-Jensen, Henrik; Nakstad, Espen Rostrup; Fossum, Eigil; Mangschau, Arild; Eritsland, Jan; Drægni, Tomas; Jacobsen, Dag; Sunde, Kjetil; Andersen, Geir Øystein

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to investigate coronary angiographic findings in unselected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients referred to immediate coronary angiography (ICA) irrespective of their first postresuscitation ECG and to determine whether this ECG is useful to select patients with no need of ICA. All resuscitated patients admitted after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest without a clear noncardiac cause underwent ICA. Patients were retrospectively grouped according to the postresuscitation ECG blinded for ICA results: (1) ST elevation or presumably new left bundle branch block, (2) other ECG signs indicating myocardial ischemia, and (3) no ECG signs indicating myocardial ischemia. All coronary angiograms were reevaluated blinded for postresuscitation ECGs. Two hundred and ten patients were included with mean age 62±12 years. Six-months survival with good neurological outcome was 54%. Reduced Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow (0-2) was found in 55%, 34%, and 18% and a ≥90% coronary stenosis was present in 25%, 27%, and 19% of patients in group 1, 2, and 3, respectively. An acute coronary occlusion was found in 11% of patients in group 3. ST elevation/left bundle branch block identified patients with reduced Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (0-2) flow with 70% sensitivity and 62% specificity. Among patients with initial nonshockable rhythms (24%), 32% had significantly reduced Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow. Initial ECG findings are not reliable in detecting patients with an indication for ICA after experiencing a cardiac arrest. Even in the absence of ECG changes indicating myocardial ischemia, an acute culprit lesion may be present and patients may benefit from emergent revascularization. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATIONURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01239420. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Out of hospital cardiac arrest outside home in Sweden, change in characteristics, outcome and availability for public access defibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenqvist Mårten

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large proportion of patients who suffer from out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA outside home are theoretically candidates for public access defibrillation (PAD. We describe the change in characteristics and outcome among these candidates in a 14 years perspective in Sweden. Methods All patients who suffered an OHCA in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR was attempted between 1992 and 2005 and who were included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register (SCAR. We included patients in the survey if OHCA took place outside home excluding crew witnessed cases and those taken place in a nursing home. Results 26% of all OHCAs (10133 patients out of 38710 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Within this group, the number of patients each year varied between 530 and 896 and the median age decreased from 68 years in 1992 to 64 years in 2005 (p for trend = 0.003. The proportion of patients who received bystander CPR increased from 47% in 1992 to 58% in 2005 (p for trend The median time from cardiac arrest to defibrillation among witnessed cases was 12 min in 1992 and 10 min in 2005 (p for trend = 0.029. Survival to one month among all patients increased from 8.1% to 14.0% (p for trend = 0.01. Among patients found in a shockable rhythm survival increased from 15.3% in 1992 to 27.0% in 2005 (p for trend Conclusion In Sweden, there was a change in characteristics and outcome among patients who suffer OHCA outside home. Among these patients, bystander CPR increased, but the occurrence of VF decreased. One-month survival increased moderately overall and highly significantly among patients found in VF, even though the time to defibrillation changed only moderately.

  20. Changes in left ventricular systolic and diastolic function on serial echocardiography after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentzer, Jacob C; Anavekar, Nandan S; Mankad, Sunil V; White, Roger D; Kashani, Kianoush B; Barsness, Gregory W; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Pislaru, Sorin V

    2018-02-10

    Reversible myocardial dysfunction is common after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The aim of this study was to determine if changes on serial transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) can predict long-term mortality in OHCA subjects. This is a single-center historical cohort study of OHCA subjects undergoing targeted temperature management who received >1 TTE during hospitalization. Two-dimensional and Doppler parameters of systolic and diastolic function were compared between paired TTE. Univariate analysis was used to determine associations between TTE parameters and all-cause mortality. Fifty-nine patients were included; mean age was 59.4 ± 11.2 years (75% male). Initial rhythm was shockable in 90%. Initial TTE was done a median of 10.4 h after admission and repeat TTE was done 5.7 ± 4.1 days later. Between TTE studies, there were significant increases in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, from 32% to 43%), cardiac output, stroke volume, and other Doppler-derived hemodynamic parameters, while systemic vascular resistance decreased (all p TTE were not associated with follow-up mortality. Patients who died during follow-up (n = 16, 27%) had smaller increases in LVEF and cardiac output-derived hemodynamic parameters than long-term survivors (p TTE after OHCA, consistent with reversible post-arrest myocardial dysfunction. The magnitude of those changes is greater in long-term survivors, emphasizing that the degree of recovery from post-arrest myocardial dysfunction may be more important than its initial severity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of spontaneous pulse using the acceleration signals acquired from CPR feedback sensor in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liang; Chen, Gang; Yang, Zhengfei; Yu, Tao; Quan, Weilun; Li, Yongqin

    2017-01-01

    Reliable detection of return of spontaneous circulation with minimal interruptions of chest compressions is part of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and routinely done by checking pulsation of carotid arteries. However, manual palpation was time-consuming and unreliable even if performed by expert clinicians. Therefore, automated accurate pulse detection with minimal interruptions of chest compression is highly desirable during cardiac arrest especially in out-of-hospital settings. To investigate whether the acceleration (ACC) signals acquired from accelerometer-based CPR feedback sensor can be used to distinguish perfusing rhythm (PR) from pulseless electrical activity (PEA) in a porcine model of cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest was induced in 49 male adult pigs. ECG, arterial blood pressure (ABP) and ACC waveforms were simultaneously recorded during CPR. 3-second segments containing compression-free signals during chest compression pauses were extracted and only those segments with organized rhythm were used for analysis. PR was defined as systolic arterial pressure >60 mmHg and pulse pressure >10 mmHg, while PEA was defined as an organized rhythm that does not meet the above criteria for PR. Peak correlation coefficient (CCp) of the cross-correlation function between pre-processed ECG and ACC, was used to discriminate PR and PEA. 63 PR and 153 PEA were identified from the total of 1025 extracted segments. CCp was significantly higher for PR as compared to PEA (0.440±0.176 vs. 0.067±0.042, pfeedback sensor can be used to detect the presence of spontaneous pulse with high accuracy.

  2. Predictors of good neurologic outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 min in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients undergoing therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Shin; Lee, Byung Kook; Youn, Chun Song; Kim, Youn-Jung; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong-Woo; Kim, Won Young

    2018-04-01

    Neurologically intact survival after cardiac arrest is possible even after prolonged resuscitation efforts. However, the factors associated with good neurologic outcome in these patients remain unknown. This study identifies predictors associated with good neurologic outcome after resuscitation beyond 30 min in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients treated with targeted temperature management (TTM). This multicenter, registry-based, retrospective cohort study conducted in 24 hospitals across South Korea between 2007 and 2012 includes adult (≥18 years) non-traumatic OHCA patients with prolonged (>30 min) downtime who underwent TTM treatment. Good neurologic outcomes were defined as cerebral performance category scores of ≤2. Of the 930 comatose adult cardiac arrest patients treated with TTM, 423 patients with prolonged downtime were included. A total of 76 (18.0%) had good neurologic outcome. Multivariable analysis reveal that age good neurologic outcome. The sensitivity and specificity for good neurologic outcome in patients with age <65 years, shockable rhythm, and witnessed arrest are 90.8% and 41.2, 67.6 and 79.5%, and 81.6 and 41.2%, respectively. In prolonged cardiac arrest patients, initial shockable rhythm, age <65 years, or witnessed arrest are predictors for neurologic intact survival.

  3. Activity and Life After Survival of a Cardiac Arrest (ALASCA and the effectiveness of an early intervention service: design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakx Wilbert GM

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac arrest survivors may experience hypoxic brain injury that results in cognitive impairments which frequently remain unrecognised. This may lead to limitations in daily activities and participation in society, a decreased quality of life for the patient, and a high strain for the caregiver. Publications about interventions directed at improving quality of life after survival of a cardiac arrest are scarce. Therefore, evidence about effective rehabilitation programmes for cardiac arrest survivors is urgently needed. This paper presents the design of the ALASCA (Activity and Life After Survival of a Cardiac Arrest trial, a randomised, controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effects of a new early intervention service for survivors of a cardiac arrest and their caregivers. Methods/design The study population comprises all people who survive two weeks after a cardiac arrest and are admitted to one of the participating hospitals in the Southern part of the Netherlands. In a two-group randomised, controlled clinical trial, half of the participants will receive an early intervention service. The early intervention service consists of several consultations with a specialised nurse for the patient and their caregiver during the first three months after the cardiac arrest. The intervention is directed at screening for cognitive problems, provision of informational, emotional and practical support, and stimulating self-management. If necessary, referral to specialised care can take place. Persons in the control group will receive the care as usual. The primary outcome measures are the extent of participation in society and quality of life of the patient one year after a cardiac arrest. Secondary outcome measures are the level of cognitive, emotional and cardiovascular impairment and daily functioning of the patient, as well as the strain for and quality of life of the caregiver. Participants and their caregivers will be followed

  4. Mortality and neurological outcome in the elderly after target temperature management for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Pellis, Tommaso; Kuiper, Michael

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess older age as a prognostic factor in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital-cardiac arrest (OHCA) and the interaction between age and level of target temperature management. METHODS AND RESULTS: 950 patients included in the target temperature management (TTM) trial were randomly...... allocation was not statistically significant for either mortality or neurological outcome. CONCLUSION: Increasing age is associated with significantly increased mortality after OHCA, but mortality rate is not influenced by level of target temperature. Risk of poor neurological outcome also increases with age...

  5. Neuroprotective Effects of the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Analog Exenatide After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Schmidt, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In-hospital mortality in comatose patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is ≈50%. In OHCA patients, the leading cause of death is neurological injury secondary to ischemia and reperfusion. Glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs are approved for type 2 diabetes...... mellitus; preclinical and clinical data have suggested their organ-protective effects in patients with ischemia and reperfusion injury. The aim of this trial was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1 analog exenatide in resuscitated OHCA patients. METHODS: We randomly...

  6. High School Automated External Defibrillator Programs as Markers of Emergency Preparedness for Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toresdahl, Brett G.; Harmon, Kimberly G.; Drezner, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: School-based automated external defibrillator (AED) programs have demonstrated a high survival rate for individuals suffering sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in US high schools. Objective: To examine the relationship between high schools having an AED on campus and other measures of emergency preparedness for SCA. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: United States high schools, December 2006 to September 2009. Patients or Other Participants: Principals, athletic directors, school nurses, and certified athletic trainers represented 3371 high schools. Main Outcome Measure(s): Comprehensive surveys on emergency planning for SCA submitted by high school representatives to the National Registry for AED Use in Sports from December 2006 to September 2009. Schools with and without AEDs were compared to assess other elements of emergency preparedness for SCA. Results: A total of 2784 schools (82.6%) reported having 1 or more AEDs on campus, with an average of 2.8 AEDs per school; 587 schools (17.4%) had no AEDs. Schools with an enrollment of more than 500 students were more likely to have an AED (relative risk [RR] = 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08, 1.16, P defibrillation (RR = 3.45, 95% CI = 2.97, 3.99, P < .01), establish an emergency action plan for SCA (RR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.67, 2.00, P < .01), review the emergency action plan at least annually (RR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.58, 2.50, P < .01), consult emergency medical services to develop the emergency action plan (RR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.32, P < .01), and establish a communication system to activate emergency responders (RR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.01, 1.08, P < .01). Conclusions: High schools with AED programs were more likely to establish a comprehensive emergency response plan for SCA. Implementing school-based AED programs is a key step associated with emergency planning for young athletes with SCA. PMID:23672389

  7. Unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) in out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claesson, A; Fredman, D; Svensson, L; Ringh, M; Hollenberg, J; Nordberg, P; Rosenqvist, M; Djarv, T; Österberg, S; Lennartsson, J; Ban, Y

    2016-10-12

    The use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) prior to EMS arrival can increase 30-day survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) significantly. Drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) can fly with high velocity and potentially transport devices such as AEDs to the site of OHCAs. The aim of this explorative study was to investigate the feasibility of a drone system in decreasing response time and delivering an AED. Data of Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates from historical OHCA in Stockholm County was used in a model using a Geographic Information System (GIS) to find suitable placements and visualize response times for the use of an AED equipped drone. Two different geographical models, urban and rural, were calculated using a multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) model. Test-flights with an AED were performed on these locations in rural areas. In total, based on 3,165 retrospective OHCAs in Stockholm County between 2006-2013, twenty locations were identified for the potential placement of a drone. In a GIS-simulated model of urban OHCA, the drone arrived before EMS in 32 % of cases, and the mean amount of time saved was 1.5 min. In rural OHCA the drone arrived before EMS in 93 % of cases with a mean amount of time saved of 19 min. In these rural locations during (n = 13) test flights, latch-release of the AED from low altitude (3-4 m) or landing the drone on flat ground were the safest ways to deliver an AED to the bystander and were superior to parachute release. The difference in response time for EMS between urban and rural areas is substantial, as is the possible amount of time saved using this UAV-system. However, yet another technical device needs to fit into the chain of survival. We know nothing of how productive or even counterproductive this system might be in clinical reality. To use drones in rural areas to deliver an AED in OHCA may be safe and feasible. Suitable placement of drone systems can be designed by using GIS models

  8. The impact of cardiac arrest on the long-term wellbeing and caregiver burden of family caregivers: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijnen, Helena Gfm; Rasquin, Sascha Mc; van Heugten, Caroline M; Verbunt, Jeanine A; Moulaert, Véronique Rm

    2017-09-01

    The purpose was to gain insight in the functioning of caregivers of cardiac arrest survivors at 12 months after a cardiac arrest. Secondly, the course of the wellbeing of the caregivers during the first year was studied. Finally, factors that are associated with a higher care burden at 12 months after the cardiac arrest were investigated. A total of 195 family caregivers of cardiac arrest survivors were included. Quality of life (SF-36, EuroQol-VAS), caregiver strain (CSI) and emotional functioning (HADS, IES) were measured at two weeks, three months and one year after the cardiac arrest. Thereby, the caregiver was asked to fill out the cognitive failure questionnaire (CFQ) to evaluate their view on the cognitive status of the patient. Caregiver strain was high in 16 (15%) of the caregivers at 12 months. Anxiety was present in 33 (25%) caregivers and depression in 18 (14%) caregivers at 12 months. The repeated measures MANOVA showed that during the first year the following variables improved significantly: SF-36 domains social and mental health, role physical, role emotional and vitality, caregiver strain, HADS and IES ( Pcaregiver strain correlated significantly (explained variance 63%, P=0.03) with caregiver HADS ( P=0.01), EuroQol-VAS ( P=0.02), and the CFQ ( Pcaregivers improves during the first year up to normal levels, but caregivers with emotional problems or perceived cognitive problems at 12 months are at risk for developing a higher care burden.

  9. Serum Potassium Changes During Therapeutic Hypothermia After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest-Should It Be Treated?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soeholm, Helle; Kirkegaard, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with adverse events, for example hypokalemia and arrhythmias. In the present study, we report the impact of serum potassium changes related to the rate of cardiac arrhythmias, and the advantages...... and disadvantages of potassium supplementation are discussed. Methods: Fifty-four consecutive patients suffering from OHCA and treated with TH (32-34°C) for 24 hours at one University Hospital were included and followed for 48 hours. Results: Serum potassium levels decreased during cooling from a median admission...... value of 4.0 mmol/L (quartiles 3.6-4.5 mmol/L) to a nadir of 3.6 mmol/L (3.5-3.9 mmol/L) 6 hours after target temperature (p=0.005), and 76% reached values of values of >5.5 mmol/L. Potassium supplementation was initiated at 3...

  10. Association between oxidative stress index and post-CPR early mortality in cardiac arrest patients: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Hasan; Türkdoğan, Kenan Ahmet; Zorlu, Ali; Aydın, Hüseyin; Kurt, Recep; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2015-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a series of lifesaving actions that improve the chance of survival following cardiac arrest (CA). Many clinical and laboratory parameters, such as the presence of asystole, out-of-hospital CPR, and duration of cardiac arrest, are associated with failed CPR in patients with CA. Asystole is a state of no cardiac electrical activity, along with the absence of contractions of the myocardium and absence of cardiac output. Oxidative stress index (OSI), which is the ratio of total oxidative status to total antioxidant status, increases by ischemia-reperfusion injury. We investigated whether OSI levels in patients with CA could predict early mortality after CPR. This study has a prospective observational cohort design. Five patients with a history of cancer, four patients who developed hemolysis in their blood, six patients who were transferred to our hospital from other hospitals, and six patients in whom blood samples for OSI could not be stored properly were excluded. Finally, a total of 90 in-hospital or out-of-hospital CA patients and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers as the control group were evaluated prospectively. The patients were classified according to the CPR response into a successful group (n=46) and a failed group (n=44). Comparisons between groups were performed using one-way ANOVA with post hoc analysis by Tukey's HSD or independent samples t-test and the Kruskal-Wallis tests or Mann- Whitney U test for normally and abnormally distributed data, respectively. Also, we used chi-square test, Spearman's correlation test, univariate and multible logistic regression analyses, and receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. OSI was 3.0±4.0, 5.6±4.3, and 8.7±3.8 in the control group, the successful CPR group, and the failed CPR group, respectively (pOSI on admission, ischemia-modified albumin, presence of asystole, mean duration of cardiac arrest, out-of-hospital CPR, pH, and potassium and sodium levels were

  11. Effectiveness of silver diamine fluoride in caries prevention and arrest: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Violeta; Toro, Milagros J.; Elías-Boneta, Augusto R.; Encarnación-Burgos, Angeliz

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of silver diamine fluoride (SDF) in preventing and arresting caries in the primary dentition and permanent first molars. A systematic review (SR) was performed by 2 independent reviewers using 3 electronic databases (PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Scopus). The database search employed the following key words: “topical fluorides” AND “children” AND “clinical trials”; “topical fluorides” OR “silver diamine fluoride” AN...

  12. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial infarction in Denmark in the years 2001-2012, a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Jensen, Matilde; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Lassen, Jens F

    2017-01-01

    in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (ORPCI: 3.67, CI: 1.35-9.97, p=0. 01). An early, but not late implantable cardioverter defibrillator was associated with increased survival (event time ratioEarly ICD: 1.45, CI: 1.11-1.90, p=0.01). Chronic heart failure, higher age groups......, Charlson Comorbidity Index levels 1 to ⩾3 and male sex were associated with lower survival. Highest income was associated with higher survival. CONCLUSION: Cardioverter defibrillator implantation rates in patients surviving an myocardial infarction-out-of-hospital cardiac arrest increased from 14% to 19......AIM: The purpose of this study was to describe the implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillator after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest caused by myocardial infarction in Denmark 2001-2012 and subsequent survival. METHODS: The Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry was used to identify patients ⩾18...

  13. A randomised, double-blind, multi-centre trial comparing vasopressin and adrenaline in patients with cardiac arrest presenting to or in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Tiah, Ling; Leong, Benjamin Sieu-Hon; Tan, Elaine Ching Ching; Ong, Victor Yeok Kein; Tan, Elizabeth Ai Theng; Poh, Bee Yen; Pek, Pin Pin; Chen, Yuming

    2012-08-01

    To compare vasopressin and adrenaline in the treatment of patients with cardiac arrest presenting to or in the Emergency Department (ED). A randomised, double-blind, multi-centre, parallel-design clinical trial in four adult hospitals. Eligible cardiac arrest patients (confirmed by the absence of pulse, unresponsiveness and apnea) aged >16 (aged>21 for one hospital) were randomly assigned to intravenous adrenaline (1mg) or vasopressin (40 IU) at ED. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or contraindication for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) were excluded. Patients received additional open label doses of adrenaline as per current guidelines. Primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge (defined as participant discharged alive or survival to 30 days post-arrest). The study recruited 727 participants (adrenaline = 353; vasopressin = 374). Baseline characteristics of the two groups were comparable. Eight participants (2.3%) from adrenaline and 11 (2.9%) from vasopressin group survived to hospital discharge with no significant difference between groups (p = 0.27, RR = 1.72, 95% CI = 0.65-4.51). After adjustment for race, medical history, bystander CPR and prior adrenaline given, more participants survived to hospital admission with vasopressin (22.2%) than with adrenaline (16.7%) (p = 0.05, RR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.02-2.04). Sub-group analysis suggested improved outcomes for vasopressin in participants with prolonged arrest times. Combination of vasopressin and adrenaline did not improve long term survival but seemed to improve survival to admission in patients with prolonged cardiac arrest. Further studies on the effect of vasopressin combined with therapeutic hypothermia on patients with prolonged cardiac arrest are needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Continuous Quality Improvement Efforts Increase Survival with Favorable Neurologic Outcome after Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporer, Karl; Jacobs, Michael; Derevin, Leo; Duval, Sue; Pointer, James

    2017-01-01

    To assess system-wide implementation of specific therapies focused on perfusion during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and cerebral recovery after Return of Spontaneous Circulation (ROSC). Before and after retrospective analysis of an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest database. Implementation trial in the urban/suburban community of Alameda County, California, USA, population 1.6 million, from November 2009-December 2012. Adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) who received CPR and/or defibrillation. The impedance threshold device was used throughout this study and there was an increased use of mechanical CPR (mCPR) and in-hospital therapeutic hypothermia (HTH). Rates of ROSC, survival to hospital discharge and Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) scores were compared using univariate and multivariable analyses. A total of 2,926 adult non-traumatic patients with OHCA received CPR during the study period. From 2009-2011 to 2012, there was an increase in ROSC from 29.0% to 34.4% (p = 0.003) and a non-significant increase in hospital discharge from 10.2% to 12.0% (p = 0.16). There was a 76% relative increase in survival with favorable neurologic function between the two periods, as determined by CPC ≤ 2, from 4.5% to 7.9% (unadjusted OR = 1.80; CI = 1.31, 2.48; p improved survival by 74% with favorable neurologic function following OHCA.

  15. Predict Defibrillation Outcome Using Stepping Increment of Poincare Plot for Out-of-Hospital Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yushun; Lu, Yubao; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Hehua; Li, Yongqin

    2015-01-01

    Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation together with early defibrillation is a key point in the chain of survival for cardiac arrest. Optimizing the timing of defibrillation by predicting the possibility of successful electric shock can guide treatments between defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation and improve the rate of restoration of spontaneous circulation. Numerous methods have been proposed for predicting defibrillation success based on quantification of the ventricular fibrillation waveform during past decades. To date, however, no analytical technique has been widely accepted for clinical application. In the present study, we investigate whether median stepping increment that is calculated from the Euclidean distance of consecutive points in Poincare plot could be used to predict the likelihood of successful defibrillation. Electrocardiographic recordings of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients were obtained from the external defibrillators. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic curve and compared with the results of other established features. The results indicated that median stepping increment has comparable performance to the established methods in predicting the likelihood of successful defibrillation.

  16. Crystalloid vs. hypertonic crystalloid-colloid solutions for induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia after experimental cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miclescu, Adriana; Sharma, Hari Shanker; Wiklund, Lars

    2013-02-01

    To compare cerebral and hemodynamic consequences of different volumes of cold acetated Ringer's solution or cold hypertonic saline dextran administered in order to achieve mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest (CA) in a pig model of experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Using an experimental pig model of 12 min CA (followed by 8 min CPR or no resuscitation) we compared four groups of piglets: a control group, a normothermic group and two groups with different solutions administered for induction of hypothermia. The control group of 5 piglets underwent 12 min CA without subsequent CPR, after which the brain of the animals was removed immediately. After restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) the resuscitated piglets were randomized into a normothermic group (NT group=10), and two hypothermic groups that received cold infusions of either 30 mL/kg acetated Ringer's solution (Much fluid group, M, n=10) or 3mL/kg hypertonic saline dextran solution (Less fluid group, L, n=10), respectively, administered during 30 min. Additional external cooling with ice packs was used in hypothermic groups. Sixty or 180min after ROSC the experiment was terminated. Immediately after arrest the brain was removed for histological analyses. The median time to reach the target core temperature of 34 °C after ROSC was 51.5±7.8 min in L group and 48.8±8.6 min in M group. Less cerebral tissue content of water (psmall volumes of cold hypertonic crystalloid-colloids is less as effective as crystalloid's induced hypothermia in mitigating brain injury after cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Therapeutic hypothermia activates the endothelin and nitric oxide systems after cardiac arrest in a pig model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Zoerner

    Full Text Available Post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction is a major cause of mortality in patients receiving successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH is the recommended treatment after resuscitation from cardiac arrest (CA and is known to exert neuroprotective effects and improve short-term survival. Yet its cytoprotective mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, our aim was to determine the possible effect of MTH on vasoactive mediators belonging to the endothelin/nitric oxide axis in our porcine model of CA and CPR. Pigs underwent either untreated CA or CA with subsequent CPR. After state-of-the-art resuscitation, the animals were either left untreated, cooled between 32-34 °C after ROSC or treated with a bolus injection of S-PBN (sodium 4-[(tert-butylimino methyl]benzene-3-sulfonate N-oxide until 180 min after ROSC, respectively. The expression of endothelin 1 (ET-1, endothelin converting enzyme 1 (ECE-1, and endothelin A and B receptors (ETAR and ETBR transcripts were measured using quantitative real-time PCR while protein levels for the ETAR, ETBR and nitric oxide synthases (NOS were assessed using immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. Our results indicated that the endothelin system was not upregulated at 30, 60 and 180 min after ROSC in untreated postcardiac arrest syndrome. Post-resuscitative 3 hour-long treatments either with MTH or S-PBN stimulated ET-1, ECE-1, ETAR and ETBR as well as neuronal NOS and endothelial NOS in left ventricular cardiomyocytes. Our data suggests that the endothelin and nitric oxide pathways are activated by MTH in the heart.

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation: an effective secondary prevention intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Fiona

    A combination of quantitative and qualitative research was used to determine the effectiveness of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme in a cohort of patients referred to the service at a London hospital. Quantitative data analysis provided evidence of effectiveness of participation in CR in reduced hospital readmission rates and use of recognised pharmacological management strategies. Self-reported physical activity levels and quality of life (QOL) in individuals who participated in the cardiac rehabilitation programme were qualitatively measured with questionnaires. Results provided evidence of benefit in continued participation in exercise. However, there was no evidence of benefit to QOL status post participation at 1 year. A p-value of 0.001 provided significant statistical evidence supporting the hypothesis of benefit in continued participation in exercise in participants following attendance at a cardiac rehabilitation programme. QOL status; a statistically significant p-value of 0.001 rejected the hypothesis (H1) of benefit. This would imply that participation CR programmes does not appear to provide sustained benefits in QOL. A number of moderating variables were suggested as explaining the finding such as homogeneity of respondents, age, mood bias and the timeframe of 1 year between participation in rehabilitation and self-reporting. CR appears to be an effective but time-limited intervention in relation to improvements in QOL. Collaborative working partnerships between specialist interventions, such as CR with chronic disease management strategies may provide greater sustainability of benefits gained from participation in cardiac rehabilitation programmes.

  19. Cognitive function in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest after target temperature management at 33°C versus 36°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, Gisela; Nielsen, Niklas; Friberg, Hans

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Target temperature management is recommended as a neuroprotective strategy after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Potential effects of different target temperatures on cognitive impairment commonly described in survivors have not been investigated sufficiently. The primary aim...... of this study was to evaluate whether a target temperature of 33°C compared with 36°C was favorable for cognitive function; the secondary aim was to describe cognitive impairment in cardiac arrest survivors in general. METHODS AND RESULTS: Study sites included 652 cardiac arrest survivors originally randomized...... and stratified for site to temperature control at 33°C or 36°C within the Target Temperature Management trial. Survival until 180 days after the arrest was 52% (33°C, n=178/328; 36°C, n=164/324). Survivors were invited to a face-to-face follow-up, and 287 cardiac arrest survivors (33°C, n=148/36°C, n=139) were...

  20. Renal Doppler and Novel Biomarkers to Assess Acute Kidney Injury in a Swine Model of Ventricular Fibrillation Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Mei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Majority of the research on cardiac arrest (CA have focused on post-CA brain injury and myocardial dysfunction, the renal dysfunction and acute kidney injury (AKI in other critical illnesses after CA have not been well described. This study was designed to assess AKI with renal Doppler and novel AKI biomarkers in a swine model of ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VFCA. Methods: Thirty healthy piglets were divided into VFCA group (n = 22 and Sham group (n = 8 in a blinded manner. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output were recorded continuously. Cardiac arrest (CA was induced by programmed electric stimulation in the VFCA group, and then cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed. Twenty piglets returned of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and received intensive care. Blood and urine samples were collected for AKI biomarkers testing, and Color Doppler flow imaging was performed at baseline, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h, respectively after ROSC. At ROSC 24 h, the animals were sacrificed and a semi-quantitative evaluation of pathologic kidney injury was performed. Results: In the VFCA group, corrected resistive index (cRI increased from 0.47 ± 0.03 to 0.64 ± 0.06, and pulsatility index (PI decreased from 0.82 ± 0.03 to 0.68 ± 0.04 after ROSC. Cystatin C (CysC in both serum and urine samples increased at ROSC 6 h, but neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL in serum increased to 5.34 ± 1.68 ng/ml at ROSC 6 h, and then decreased to 3.16 ± 0.69 ng/ml at ROSC 24 h while CysC increasing constantly. According to the renal histopathology, 18 of 20 animals suffered from kidney injury. The grade of renal injury was highly correlated with RI, cRI, NGAL, and CysC. Linear regression equation was established: Grade of renal injury = 0.002 × serum CysC + 6.489 × PI + 4.544 × cRI - 8.358 (r2 = 0.698, F = 18.506, P < 0.001. Conclusions: AKI is common in post-CA syndrome. Renal Doppler and novel AKI biomarkers in serum and

  1. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest in a patient with systemic sclerosis and Raynaud phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakal, Keren; Danckers, Mauricio; Denson, Joshua L; Sauthoff, Harald

    2015-02-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia favorably impacts neurologic outcomes in patients after cardiopulmonary arrest, although the appropriate target temperature is less clear. Its safety profile in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and Raynaud phenomenon (RP), who may be at increased risk for ischemic complications, has not been addressed in the literature, to our knowledge. Digital lesions are commonly seen in patients with SSc, and cold-induced myocardial ischemia has also been reported. We describe a case of a man with SSc, RP, and digital ulcers who underwent therapeutic hypothermia after cardiopulmonary arrest. He regained full neurologic function, and except for digital necrosis, no hypothermia-associated adverse events were observed. Other risk factors for ischemia, such as cocaine use, may have contributed to the development of the digital necrosis. However, clinicians should be aware of the risk for ischemic complications in patients with SSc and RP when considering the appropriate target temperature after cardiopulmonary arrest.

  2. Sensemaking in the formation of basic life support teams - a proof-of-concept, qualitative study of simulated in-hospital cardiac arrests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, Peter; Lauridsen, Johnny; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2018-01-01

    -orientation", "re-presentation" and/or "subordination" (among others). We sought to establish if elements of "sensemaking" occur in the formation of in-hospital cardiac arrest teams. METHODS: Videos of ten simulations of unannounced in-hospital cardiac arrests treated by basic life support (BLS) providers. We......-presentation and Sub-ordination. RESULTS: Sensemaking elements could be identified in seven of ten scenarios as part of team formation. Co-orientation was the element that was used most consistently, occurring in all of the eight scenarios that included sensemaking efforts. CONCLUSIONS: Sensemaking is an element...

  3. Intracellular pH in Gastric and Rectal Tissue Post Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Elaine M.; Steiner, Richard P.; LaManna, Joseph C.

    We directly measured pHi using the pH sensitive dye, neutral red. We defined pHi for rectal and gastric tissue in whole tissue and by layer under control and arrest conditions. Fifteen minutes of arrest was not sufficient time to alter the pHi at the rectal or gastric site. On initial inspection, the stomach may be more sensitive to ischemic changes than the rectum. Understanding the mechanism by which PCO2 generation is used to track clinical changes is vital to the early detection of tissue dysoxia in order to effectively treat and manage critically ill patients.

  4. Compound risk: History of traumatic stress predicts posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and severity in sudden cardiac arrest survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Lindsey; Ford, Jessica; Whited, Amanda; Cahill, John; Lampert, Rachel; Mosesso, Vincent N; Lawless, Christine; Sears, Samuel F

    2016-08-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) survivors can develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) which is associated with worse clinical outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of PTSD in a large sample of SCA survivors. Prior history of psychological trauma and the effects of repeated trauma exposure on subsequent PTSD and symptom severity after SCA were also explored. A retrospective, cross-sectional study of 188 SCA survivors from the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Association patient registry completed an online questionnaire that included measures of PTSD, trauma history, sociodemographics, general health, and cardiac history. Sixty-three (36.2%) SCA survivors in this sample scored above the clinical cutoff for PTSD. Female gender, worse general health, and younger age predicted PTSD symptoms after SCA. Additionally, 50.2% of SCA survivors (n = 95) reported a history of trauma exposure and 25.4% (n = 48) of the total sample endorsed a traumatic stress response to a historic trauma. Results indicated that a traumatic stress response to a historic trauma was a stronger predictor of PTSD after SCA (odds ratio = 4.77) than all other variables in the model. PTSD symptoms are present in over one-third of SCA survivors. While demographic or health history variables predicted PTSD after SCA, a history of traumatic stress response to a previous trauma emerged as the strongest predictor of these symptoms. Routine assessment and interdisciplinary management are discussed as potential ways to expedite survivors' recovery and return to daily living. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  5. Cardiac arrest in an obstetric patient using remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, R; Hyams, J; Bythell, V

    2013-03-01

    This case report describes the management of a patient, diagnosed with an intrauterine death at 31 weeks' gestation, who suffered a cardiorespiratory arrest during her induced labour while using a remifentanil PCA. She made a full recovery from resuscitation which included a peri-mortem caesarean section. Anaesthesia © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. Prognostic factors for death and survival with or without complications in cardiac arrest patients receiving CPR within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriphuwanun V

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Visith Siriphuwanun,1 Yodying Punjasawadwong,1 Worawut Lapisatepun,1 Somrat Charuluxananan,2 Ketchada Uerpairojkit2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Purpose: To determine prognostic factors for death and survival with or without complications in cardiac arrest patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR within 24 hours of receiving anesthesia for emergency surgery. Patients and methods: A retrospective cohort study approved by the Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai University Hospital Ethical Committee. Data used were taken from records of 751 cardiac arrest patients who received their first CPR within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery between January 1, 2003 and October 31, 2011. The reviewed data included patient characteristics, surgical procedures, American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA physical status classification, anesthesia information, the timing of cardiac arrest, CPR details, and outcomes at 24 hours after CPR. Univariate and polytomous logistic regression analyses were used to determine prognostic factors associated with the outcome variable. P-values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: The outcomes at 24 hours were death (638/751, 85.0%, survival with complications (73/751, 9.7%, and survival without complications (40/751, 5.3%. The prognostic factors associated with death were: age between 13–34 years (OR =3.08, 95% CI =1.03–9.19; ASA physical status three and higher (OR =6.60, 95% CI =2.17–20.13; precardiopulmonary comorbidity (OR =3.28, 95% CI =1.09–9.90; the condition of patients who were on mechanical ventilation prior to receiving anesthesia (OR =4.11, 95% CI =1.17–14.38; surgery in the upper abdominal site (OR =14.64, 95% CI =2.83–75.82; shock prior to cardiac arrest (OR =6.24, 95% CI =2.53–15

  7. Ventricular Fibrillation-Induced Cardiac Arrest Results in Regional Cardiac Injury Preferentially in Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery Territory in Piglet Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giridhar Kaliki Venkata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Decreased cardiac function after resuscitation from cardiac arrest (CA results from global ischemia of the myocardium. In the evolution of postarrest myocardial dysfunction, preferential involvement of any coronary arterial territory is not known. We hypothesized that there is no preferential involvement of any coronary artery during electrical induced ventricular fibrillation (VF in piglet model. Design. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Methods. 12 piglets were randomized to baseline and electrical induced VF. After 5 min, the animals were resuscitated according to AHA PALS guidelines. After return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, animals were observed for an additional 4 hours prior to cardiac MRI. Data (mean ± SD was analyzed using unpaired t-test; p value ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. Segmental wall motion (mm; baseline versus postarrest group in segment 7 (left anterior descending (LAD was 4.68±0.54 versus 3.31±0.64, p=0.0026. In segment 13, it was 3.82±0.96 versus 2.58±0.82, p=0.02. In segment 14, it was 2.42±0.44 versus 1.29±0.99, p=0.028. Conclusion. Postarrest myocardial dysfunction resulted in segmental wall motion defects in the LAD territory. There were no perfusion defects in the involved segments.

  8. Detection of spontaneous pulse using the acceleration signals acquired from CPR feedback sensor in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wei

    Full Text Available Reliable detection of return of spontaneous circulation with minimal interruptions of chest compressions is part of high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and routinely done by checking pulsation of carotid arteries. However, manual palpation was time-consuming and unreliable even if performed by expert clinicians. Therefore, automated accurate pulse detection with minimal interruptions of chest compression is highly desirable during cardiac arrest especially in out-of-hospital settings.To investigate whether the acceleration (ACC signals acquired from accelerometer-based CPR feedback sensor can be used to distinguish perfusing rhythm (PR from pulseless electrical activity (PEA in a porcine model of cardiac arrest.Cardiac arrest was induced in 49 male adult pigs. ECG, arterial blood pressure (ABP and ACC waveforms were simultaneously recorded during CPR. 3-second segments containing compression-free signals during chest compression pauses were extracted and only those segments with organized rhythm were used for analysis. PR was defined as systolic arterial pressure >60 mmHg and pulse pressure >10 mmHg, while PEA was defined as an organized rhythm that does not meet the above criteria for PR. Peak correlation coefficient (CCp of the cross-correlation function between pre-processed ECG and ACC, was used to discriminate PR and PEA.63 PR and 153 PEA were identified from the total of 1025 extracted segments. CCp was significantly higher for PR as compared to PEA (0.440±0.176 vs. 0.067±0.042, p<0.01 and highly correlated with ABP (r = 0.848, p<0.001. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 0.965, 93.6%, 97.5% and 96.7% for the ACC-based automatic spontaneous pulse detection.In this animal model, the ACC signals acquired from an accelerometer-based CPR feedback sensor can be used to detect the presence of spontaneous pulse with high accuracy.

  9. External validation of the ROSC after cardiac arrest (RACA) score in a physician staffed emergency medical service system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupari, Petteri; Skrifvars, Markus; Kuisma, Markku

    2017-03-29

    The return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest (RACA) score may have implications as a quality indicator for the emergency medical services (EMS) system. We aimed to validate this score externally in a physician staffed urban EMS system. We conducted a retrospective cohort study. Data on resuscitation attempts from the Helsinki EMS cardiac arrest registry from 1.1.2008 to 31.12.2010 were collected and analyzed. For each attempted resuscitation the RACA score variables were collected and the score calculated. The endpoint was ROSC defined as palpable pulse over 30 s. Calibration was assessed by comparing predicted and observed ROSC rates in the whole sample, separately for shockable and non-shockable rhythm, and separately for resuscitations lead by a specialist, registrar or medical supervisor (i.e., senior paramedic). Data are presented as medians and interquartile ranges. Statistical testing included chi-square test, the Mann-Whitney U test, Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test and calculation of 95% confidence intervals (CI) for proportions. A total of 680 patients were included of whom 340 attained ROSC. The RACA score was higher in patients with ROSC (0.62 [0.46-0.69] than in those without (0.46 [0.36-0.57]) (p system for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients would allow patient heterogeneity adjustment and measurement of quality of care in analogy to commoly used severity-of-illness- scores developed for the similar purposes for the general intensive care unit population. However, transferring RACA score to another country with different population and EMS system might affect the performance and generalizability of the score. This study found a good overall calibration and moderate discrimination of the RACA score in a physician staffed urban EMS system which suggests external validity of the score. Calibration was suboptimal in patients with a non-shockable rhythm which may due to a local do-not-attempt-resuscitation policy. The lower

  10. Early administration of epinephrine (adrenaline) in patients with cardiac arrest with initial shockable rhythm in hospital: propensity score matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars W; Kurth, Tobias; Chase, Maureen; Berg, Katherine M; Cocchi, Michael N; Callaway, Clifton; Donnino, Michael W

    2016-04-06

    To evaluate whether patients who experience cardiac arrest in hospital receive epinephrine (adrenaline) within the two minutes after the first defibrillation (contrary to American Heart Association guidelines) and to evaluate the association between early administration of epinephrine and outcomes in this population. Prospective observational cohort study. Analysis of data from the Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry, which includes data from more than 300 hospitals in the United States. Adults in hospital who experienced cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, including patients who had a first defibrillation within two minutes of the cardiac arrest and who remained in a shockable rhythm after defibrillation. Epinephrine given within two minutes after the first defibrillation. Survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge with a good functional outcome. A propensity score was calculated for the receipt of epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation, based on multiple characteristics of patients, events, and hospitals. Patients who received epinephrine at either zero, one, or two minutes after the first defibrillation were then matched on the propensity score with patients who were "at risk" of receiving epinephrine within the same minute but who did not receive it. 2978 patients were matched on the propensity score, and the groups were well balanced. 1510 (51%) patients received epinephrine within two minutes after the first defibrillation, which is contrary to current American Heart Association guidelines. Epinephrine given within the first two minutes after the first defibrillation was associated with decreased odds of survival in the propensity score matched analysis (odds ratio 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 0.82; P<0.001). Early epinephrine administration was also associated with a decreased odds of return of spontaneous circulation

  11. Association between patient unconscious or not alert conditions and cardiac arrest or high-acuity outcomes within the Medical Priority Dispatch System "Falls" protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Jeff; Olola, Christopher; Scott, Greg; Schultz, Bryon; Pertgen, Richard; Robinson, Don; Bagwell, Barry; Patterson, Brett

    2010-01-01

    Falls are one of the most common types of complaints received by 9-1-1 emergency medical dispatch centers. They can be accidental or may be caused by underlying medical problems. Though "not alert" falls patients with severe outcomes mostly are "hot" transported to the hospital, some of these cases may be due to other acute medical events (cardiac, respiratory, circulatory, or neurological), which may not always be apparent to the emergency medical dispatcher (EMD) during call processing. The objective of this study was to characterize the risk of cardiac arrest and "hot-transport" outcomes in patients with "not alert" condition, within the Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS®) Falls protocol descriptors. This retrospective study used 129 months of de-identified, aggregate, dispatch datasets from three US emergency communication centers. The communication centers used the Medical Priority Dispatch System version 11.3-OMEGA type (released in 2006) to interrogate Emergency Medical System callers, select dispatch codes assigned to various response configurations, and provide pre-arrival instructions. The distribution of cases and percentages of cardiac arrest and hot-transport outcomes, categorized by MPDS® code, was profiled. Assessment of the association between MPDS® Delta-level 3 (D-3) "not alert" condition and cardiac arrest and hot-transport outcomes then followed. Overall, patients within the D-3 and D-2 "long fall" conditions had the highest proportions (compared to the other determinants in the "falls" protocol) of cardiac arrest and hot-transport outcomes, respectively. "Not alert" condition was associated significantly with cardiac arrest and hot-transport outcomes (pdeterminant within the MPDS® "fall" protocol was associated significantly with severe outcomes for short falls (falls. As reported to 9-1-1, the complaint of a "fall" may include the presence of underlying conditions that go beyond the obvious traumatic injuries caused by the fall itself.

  12. Association of Public Health Initiatives With Outcomes for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest at Home and in Public Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, Christopher B; Hansen, Carolina M; Kragholm, Kristian; Dupre, Matthew E; Jollis, James G; Roettig, Mayme L; Becker, Lance B; Hansen, Steen M; Hinohara, Tomoya T; Corbett, Claire C; Monk, Lisa; Nelson, R Darrell; Pearson, David A; Tyson, Clark; van Diepen, Sean; Anderson, Monique L; McNally, Bryan; Granger, Christopher B

    2017-11-01

    Little is known about the influence of comprehensive public health initiatives according to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) location, particularly at home, where resuscitation efforts and outcomes have historically been poor. To describe temporal trends in bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first-responder defibrillation for OHCAs stratified by home vs public location and their association with survival and neurological outcomes. This observational study reviewed 8269 patients with OHCAs (5602 [67.7%] at home and 2667 [32.3%] in public) for whom resuscitation was attempted using data from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2014. The setting was 16 counties in North Carolina. Patients were stratified by home vs public OHCA. Public health initiatives to improve bystander and first-responder interventions included training members of the general population in CPR and in the use of automated external defibrillators, teaching first responders about team-based CPR (eg, automated external defibrillator use and high-performance CPR), and instructing dispatch centers on recognition of cardiac arrest. Association of resuscitation efforts with survival and neurological outcomes from 2010 through 2014. Among home OHCA patients (n = 5602), the median age was 64 years, and 62.2% were male; among public OHCA patients (n = 2667), the median age was 68 years, and 61.5% were male. After comprehensive public health initiatives, the proportion of patients receiving bystander CPR increased at home (from 28.3% [275 of 973] to 41.3% [498 of 1206], P public (from 61.0% [275 of 451] to 70.5% [424 of 601], P = .01), while first-responder defibrillation increased at home (from 42.2% [132 of 313] to 50.8% [212 of 417], P = .02) but not significantly in public (from 33.1% [58 of 175] to 37.8% [93 of 246], P = .17). Survival to discharge improved for arrests at home (from 5.7% [60 of 1057

  13. An Exploratory Study of Functional Status in Post Cardiac Arrest Survivors Discharged To Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Bangerter, Schuppel and Planta (2002) reporting on the quality of life in long-term survivors of out-of-hospital arrest, found that 49 out of the 50...random samplings of the population in both the United States and the United Kingdom . All reliability estimates exceeded accepted standards for measure...disease processes, social conditions, and random samplings of the population in both the United States and the United Kingdom . All reliability

  14. Cardiac arrest provoked by itraconazole and amiodarone interaction: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betrosian Alex

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Azoles, and specifically itraconazole, are often prescribed for the treatment of fungal diseases or empirically for persistent sepsis in patients who are neutropenic or in intensive care. Occasional cardiovascular adverse events have been associated with itraconazole use, and are usually attributed to the interaction of itraconazole with cisapride, terfenadine or digoxin. Its interaction with amiodarone has not been previously described. Case presentation A 65-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit at our facility for an extensive ischemic stroke associated with atrial fibrillation. Due to rapid ventricular response he was started on intravenous amiodarone and few days later itraconazole was also prescribed for presumed candidemia. After receiving the first dose our patient became profoundly hypotensive but responded rapidly to fluids and adrenaline. Then, two months later, itraconazole was again prescribed for confirmed fungemia. After receiving the first dose via a central venous catheter our patient became hypotensive and subsequently arrested. He was resuscitated successfully, and as no other cause was identified the arrest was attributed to septic shock and his antifungal treatment was changed to caspofungin. When sensitivity test results became available, antifungal treatment was down-staged to itraconazole and immediately after drug administration our patient suffered another arrest and was once again resuscitated successfully. This time the arrest was related to itraconazole, which was discontinued, and from then on our patient remained stable until his discharge to our neurology ward. Conclusions Itraconazole and amiodarone coadministration can lead to serious cardiovascular adverse events in patients who are critically ill. Intensivists, pharmacists and medical physicians should be aware of the interaction of these two commonly used drugs.

  15. Apples to apples or apples to oranges? International variation in reporting of process and outcome of care for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishiyama, Chika; Brown, Siobhan P.; May, Susanne; Iwami, Taku; Koster, Rudolph W.; Beesems, Stefanie G.; Kuisma, Markku; Salo, Ari; Jacobs, Ian; Finn, Judith; Sterz, Fritz; Nürnberger, Alexander; Smith, Karen; Morrison, Laurie; Olasveengen, Theresa M.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Shin, Sang Do; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Daya, Mohamud; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Herlitz, Johan; Strömsöe, Anneli; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Masterson, Siobhán; Wang, Henry; Christenson, Jim; Stiell, Ian; Davis, Dan; Huszti, Ella; Nichol, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) varies between communities, due in part to variation in the methods of measurement. The Utstein template was disseminated to standardize comparisons of risk factors, quality of care, and outcomes in patients with OHCA. We sought to assess whether

  16. Age-specific prognostication after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - The ethical dilemma between 'life-sustaining treatment' and 'the right to die' in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzgruber, Patrick; Sterz, Fritz; Poppe, Michael; Schober, Andreas; Lobmeyr, Elisabeth; Datler, Philip; Keferböck, Markus; Zeiner, Sebastian; Nürnberger, Alexander; Hubner, Pia; Stratil, Peter; Wallmueller, Christian; Weiser, Christoph; Warenits, Alexandra-Maria; van Tulder, Raphael; Zajicek, Andreas; Buchinger, Angelika; Testori, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    While prognostic values on survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have been well investigated, less attention has been paid to their age-specific relevance. Therefore, we aimed to identify suitable age-specific early prognostication in elderly patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in order to reduce the burden of unnecessary treatment and harm. In a prospective population-based observational trial on individuals suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, a total of 2223 patients receiving resuscitation attempts by the local emergency medical service in Vienna, Austria, were enrolled. Patients were stratified according to age as follows: young and middle-aged individuals (85 years). There was an increasing rate of 30-day mortality (+21.8%, p 85-year-olds. Frailty was directly associated with mortality (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.01-1.51, p = 0.049), showing a 30-day survival of 5.6% and a favourable neurological outcome of 1.1% among elderly individuals. An initially shockable electrocardiogram proved to be a suitable tool for risk assessment and decision making in order to predict a successful outcome in elderly victims of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, the outcomes of elderly patients seemed to be exceptionally poor in frail individuals and need to be considered in order to reduce unnecessary treatment decisions.

  17. The impact of serum potassium-influencing antihypertensive drugs on the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alharbi, Fawaz F.; Souverein, Patrick C.; de Groot, Mark C. H.; Blom, Marieke T.; de Boer, Anthonius; Klungel, Olaf H.; Tan, Hanno L.

    2017-01-01

    AimsSudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a complex multifactorial event and most commonly caused by ventricular tachycardia/ fibrillation (VT/ VF). Some antihypertensive drugs could induce hypokalaemia or hyperkalaemia, which may increase susceptibility to VT/VF and SCA. ObjectiveTo assess the association

  18. Early microcirculatory impairment during therapeutic hypothermia is associated with poor outcome in post-cardiac arrest children: a prospective observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, Erik A. B.; Verboom, Elyse M.; Top, Anke P. C.; Andrinopoulou, Eleni-Rosalina; Buysse, Corinne M. P.; Ince, Can; Tibboel, Dick

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate if the microcirculation is impaired during and after therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in children with return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest (CA) and to assess if microcirculatory impairment predicts mortality. This has been reported for post-CA adults, but

  19. Atrial Fibrillation Following Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Targeted Temperature Management - Are We Giving It the Attention it Deserves?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Erlinge, David

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Atrial fibrillation has been associated with increased mortality in the general population and mixed populations of critical ill. Atrial fibrillation can also affect patients during post-cardiac arrest care. We sought to assess the prognostic implications of atrial fibrillation follow...

  20. Local lay rescuers with AEDs, alerted by text messages, contribute to early defibrillation in a Dutch out-of-hospital cardiac arrest dispatch system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Jolande A.; Stieglis, Remy; Riedijk, Frank; Smeekes, Martin; van der Worp, Wim E.; Koster, Rudolph W.

    2014-01-01

    Public access defibrillation rarely reaches out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients in residential areas. We developed a text message (TM) alert system, dispatching local lay rescuers (TM-responders). We analyzed the functioning of this system, focusing on response times and early

  1. Temporal Trends in Coverage of Historical Cardiac Arrests Using a Volunteer-Based Network of Automated External Defibrillators Accessible to Laypersons and Emergency Dispatch Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malta Hansen, Carolina; Knudsen Lippert, Freddy; Wissenberg, Mads

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Although increased dissemination of Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) has been associated with more frequent AED use, the trade-off between the number of deployed AEDs and coverage of cardiac arrests remains unclear. We investigated how volunteer-based AED dissemination affected...

  2. Atrial Fibrillation Following Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Targeted Temperature Management-Are We Giving It the Attention it Deserves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Erlinge, David; Nielsen, Niklas; Horn, Janneke; Hovdenes, Jan; Bro-Jeppesen, John; Wanscher, Michael; Pehrson, Steen; Køber, Lars; Kjaergaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Atrial fibrillation has been associated with increased mortality in the general population and mixed populations of critical ill. Atrial fibrillation can also affect patients during post cardiac arrest care. We sought to assess the prognostic implications of atrial fibrillation following

  3. High-sensitivity troponin-T as a prognostic marker after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - A targeted temperature management (TTM) trial substudy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilje, Patrik; Koul, Sasha; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Devaux, Yvan; Friberg, Hans; Kuiper, Michael; Horn, Janneke; Nielsen, Niklas; Pellis, Tomasso; Stammet, Pascal; Wise, Matthew P.; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Hassager, Christian; Erlinge, David

    2016-01-01

    Predicting outcome of unconscious patients after successful resuscitation is challenging and better prognostic markers are highly needed. Ischemic heart disease is a common cause of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Whether or not high-sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT) is a prognostic marker

  4. Pre-hospital Assessment of the Role of Adrenaline: Measuring the Effectiveness of Drug administration In Cardiac arrest (PARAMEDIC-2): Trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gavin D; Quinn, Tom; Deakin, Charles D; Nolan, Jerry P; Lall, Ranjit; Slowther, Anne-Marie; Cooke, Matthew; Lamb, Sarah E; Petrou, Stavros; Achana, Felix; Finn, Judith; Jacobs, Ian G; Carson, Andrew; Smyth, Mike; Han, Kyee; Byers, Sonia; Rees, Nigel; Whitfield, Richard; Moore, Fionna; Fothergill, Rachael; Stallard, Nigel; Long, John; Hennings, Susie; Horton, Jessica; Kaye, Charlotte; Gates, Simon

    2016-11-01

    Despite its use since the 1960s, the safety or effectiveness of adrenaline as a treatment for cardiac arrest has never been comprehensively evaluated in a clinical trial. Although most studies have found that adrenaline increases the chance of return of spontaneous circulation for short periods, many studies found harmful effects on the brain and raise concern that adrenaline may reduce overall survival and/or good neurological outcome. The PARAMEDIC-2 trial seeks to determine if adrenaline is safe and effective in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. This is a pragmatic, individually randomised, double blind, controlled trial with a parallel economic evaluation. Participants will be eligible if they are in cardiac arrest in the out-of-hospital environment and advanced life support is initiated. Exclusions are cardiac arrest as a result of anaphylaxis or life threatening asthma, and patient known or appearing to be under 16 or pregnant. 8000 participants treated by 5 UK ambulance services will be randomised between December 2014 and August 2017 to adrenaline (intervention) or placebo (control) through opening pre-randomised drug packs. Clinical outcomes are survival to 30 days (primary outcome), hospital discharge, 3, 6 and 12 months, health related quality of life, and neurological and cognitive outcomes (secondary outcomes). Trial registration (ISRCTN73485024). Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Target Temperature Management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest--a randomized, parallel-group, assessor-blinded clinical trial--rationale and design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niklas; Wetterslev, Jørn; al-Subaie, Nawaf

    2012-01-01

    Experimental animal studies and previous randomized trials suggest an improvement in mortality and neurologic function with induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest. International guidelines advocate the use of a target temperature management of 32°C to 34°C for 12 to 24 hours after resuscitation...... in the control groups. The optimal target temperature management strategy is not known....

  6. Successful Resuscitation of Maternal Cardiac Arrest With Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Guided by Rotational Thromboelastometry and Transesophageal Echocardiography: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Hannah; Barrett, Helen L; Lee, Julie; Pincus, Jason M; Kimble, Rebecca M; Eley, Victoria A

    2017-10-26

    We present a case of maternal cardiac arrest during an elective cesarean delivery. Transesophageal echocardiography identified a large pulmonary artery mass, and guided resuscitation efforts. After return of spontaneous circulation, the patient developed disseminated intravascular coagulation with massive hemorrhage. Blood product selection and volume replacement were guided by rotational thromboelastometry and transesophageal echocardiography, respectively. Correction of coagulopathy was observed clinically and confirmed by rotational thromboelastometry. The patient fully recovered without neurological deficit.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  7. Effective deployment of public-access automated external defibrillators to improve out-of-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Shinji; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2017-10-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a major health concern in Japan and other developed countries with aging populations. Improvements in OHCA outcomes require streamlining the chain of survival. Deployment of public-access automated external defibrillators (PADs) and defibrillation by bystanders is one strategy that may streamline the chain by reducing the time to defibrillation in individuals with shockable rhythms. Although the effectiveness of PAD programs in increasing survival to discharge has been reported, there have been criticisms and concerns about the small population impact, cost-effectiveness, and potential negative impact on those with nonshockable rhythms. This article reviews relevant literature regarding the effectiveness and concerns regarding PAD for OHCA.

  8. Peri-cardiac arrest following blunt bicycle handlebar trauma to the iliac vessels: management of a rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Emma L; Chandrasekar, Ramasubramanyan

    2012-12-01

    Iliac vessel disruption following blunt trauma is an unusual presentation, particularly in the absence of an orthopaedic injury. We present the unique case of a 14-year-old boy who sustained a blunt bicycle handlebar impalement that resulted in complete transection of the external iliac artery and laceration of the external iliac vein, without a skeletal fracture. The patient deteriorated rapidly, entering hypovolaemic shock and peri-cardiac arrest at anaesthetic induction. Once haemodynamic stability was achieved, the lacerated external iliac vein was used to form an interposition graft to repair the external iliac artery. The rare occurrence and lack of familiarity with this injury, combined with the potential for fatal exsanguination if not swiftly diagnosed makes this case crucial to highlight. Blunt bicycle handlebar injury should carry a high suspicion of severe vascular compromise. If diagnosed this should be rapidly managed with aggressive resuscitation and revascularisation.

  9. Early Administration of Glutamine Protects Cardiomyocytes from Post-Cardiac Arrest Acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Ren Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Postcardiac arrest acidosis can decrease survival. Effective medications without adverse side effects are still not well characterized. We aimed to analyze whether early administration of glutamine could improve survival and protect cardiomyocytes from postcardiac arrest acidosis using animal and cell models. Forty Wistar rats with postcardiac arrest acidosis (blood pH < 7.2 were included. They were divided into study (500 mg/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, n=20 and control (normal saline, n=20 groups. Each of the rats received resuscitation. The outcomes were compared between the two groups. In addition, cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells were exposed to HBSS with different pH levels (7.3 or 6.5 or to culture medium (control. Apoptosis-related markers and beating function were analyzed. We found that the duration of survival was significantly longer in the study group (p<0.05. In addition, in pH 6.5 or pH 7.3 HBSS buffer, the expression levels of cell stress (p53 and apoptosis (caspase-3, Bcl-xL markers were significantly lower in cardiomyocytes treated with 50 mM L-glutamine than those without L-glutamine (RT-PCR. L-glutamine also increased the beating function of cardiomyocytes, especially at the lower pH level (6.5. More importantly, glutamine decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased these cells’ beating function at a low pH level.

  10. Association between bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundgaard, Kristian; Hansen, Steen M; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Malta; Lippert, Freddy; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Nielsen, Jimmi; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen; Kragholm, Kristian

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to examine rates of redeemed prescriptions of antidepressants and anxiolytics, used as markers for cerebral dysfunction in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors, and examine the association between bystander CPR and these psychoactive drugs. We included all 30-day survivors of OHCA in Denmark between 2001 and 2011, who had not redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants or anxiolytics in the last six months prior to OHCA. Main outcome measures were redeemed prescriptions of antidepressants and anxiolytics within one year after OHCA. Among 2,001 30-day survivors, 174 (8.6% died and 12.0% redeemed a first prescription for an antidepressant and 8.2% for an anxiolytic drug within one year after arrest. The corresponding frequencies for redeemed prescribed drugs among age- and sex-matched population controls were 7.5% and 5.2%, respectively. Among survivors who received bystander CPR, prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics were redeemed in 11.1% [95% CI 9.2-13.3%] and 6.3% [95% CI 4.9-8.0%] of the cases, respectively, versus 17.2% [95% CI 13.9-21.1%] and 13.4% [95% CI 10.5-17.0%], respectively, among patients who had not received bystander CPR. Adjusted for age, sex, year of arrest, comorbidity, witnessed status and socioeconomic status, bystander CPR was associated with significant reductions in redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants, Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.71 [95% CI 0.52-0.98], P=0.031; and anxiolytics, HR 0.55 [95% CI 0.38-0.81], P=0.002. Relative to no bystander CPR, redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics were significantly lower among 30-day survivors of OHCA who received bystander CPR, suggesting a cerebral dysfunction-lowering potential of bystander CPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Expansion of the kidney donor pool by using cardiac death donors with prolonged time to cardiorespiratory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, A W N; Harper, S; Jackson, C H; Wells, A C; Summers, D M; Gjorgjimajkoska, O; Sharples, L D; Bradley, J A; Pettigrew, G J

    2011-05-01

    Donation after Cardiac Death (DCD) is an increasingly important source of kidney transplants, but because of concerns of ischemic injury during the agonal phase, many centers abandon donation if cardiorespiratory arrest has not occurred within 1 h of controlled withdrawal of life-supporting treatment (WLST). We report the impact on donor numbers and transplant function using instead a minimum 'cut-off' time of 4 h. The agonal phase of 173 potential DCD donors was characterized according to the presence or absence of: acidemia; lactic acidosis; prolonged (>30 min) hypotension, hypoxia or oliguria, and the impact of these characteristics on 3- and 12-month transplant outcome evaluated by multivariable regression analysis. Of the 117 referrals who became donors, 27 (23.1%) arrested more than 1 h after WLST. Longer agonal-phase times were associated with greater donor instability, but surprisingly neither agonal-phase instability nor its duration influenced transplant outcome. In contrast, 3- and 12-month eGFR in the 190 transplanted kidneys was influenced independently by donor age, and 3-month eGFR by cold ischemic time. DCD kidney numbers are increased by 30%, without compromising transplant outcome, by lengthening the minimum waiting time after WLST from 1 to 4 h. ©2011 The Authors Journal compilation©2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  12. Neuroprotective effect of intracarotid cold saline infusion following cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a hypothermic cardiac arrest canine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-zheng SHUAI

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effect of intracarotid cold saline infusion (ICSI on neurological outcomes in canines with cardiac arrest (CA introduced by severe hypothermia. Methods Restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC after hypothermic CA was induced in 10 Beagle dogs. These 10 dogs were randomly divided into 2 groups (5 each. Dogs in control group were rewarmed using warn water bath, and dogs in experimental group received the bath rewarming plus ICSI for 6 hours to maintain the brain temperature <36℃. In both groups, the Neurologic Disability Scores (NDS were recorded at 24h after the ROSC, and their brains were removed for pathologic analysis using hematoxylin and eosin stain. The brain water content and s100β of serum level were also measured. Results The water content (79.43%±0.72% vs. 80.79%±1.06%, P<0.05 and serum level of s100β (119.83±42.93pg/ml vs. 329.82±190.39pg/ml, P<0.05 were significantly lower in experimental group than in the control group. Control group presented obvious pathological damage of the hippocampal pyramidal cells. There was no significant difference in NDS between the two groups. Conclusion ICSI could reduce the production of s100β and pathological brain damage in post-arrest hypothermic canines. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.10.08

  13. Microdialysis Assessment of Cerebral Perfusion during Cardiac Arrest, Extracorporeal Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Rats - A Pilot Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Schober

    Full Text Available Cerebral metabolic alterations during cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and extracorporeal cardiopulmonary life support (ECLS are poorly explored. Markers are needed for a more personalized resuscitation and post-resuscitation care. Aim of this study was to investigate early metabolic changes in the hippocampal CA1 region during ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VF-CA and ECLS versus conventional CPR. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (350g underwent 8min untreated VF-CA followed by ECLS (n = 8; bloodflow 100ml/kg, mechanical CPR (n = 18; 200/min until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Shams (n = 2 were included. Glucose, glutamate and lactate/pyruvate ratio were compared between treatment groups and animals with and without ROSC. Ten animals (39% achieved ROSC (ECLS 5/8 vs. CPR 5/18; OR 4,3;CI:0.7-25;p = 0.189. During VF-CA central nervous glucose decreased (0.32±0.1mmol/l to 0.04±0.01mmol/l; p<0.001 and showed a significant rise (0.53±0.1;p<0.001 after resuscitation. Lactate/pyruvate (L/P ratio showed a 5fold increase (31 to 164; p<0.001; maximum 8min post ROSC. Glutamate showed a 3.5-fold increase to (2.06±1.5 to 7.12±5.1μmol/L; p<0.001 after CA. All parameters normalized after ROSC with no significant differences between ECLS and CPR. Metabolic changes during ischemia and resuscitation can be displayed by cerebral microdialysis in our VF-CA CPR and ECLS rat model. We found similar microdialysate concentrations and patterns of normalization in both resuscitation methods used. Institutional Protocol Number: GZ0064.11/3b/2011.

  14. Microdialysis Assessment of Cerebral Perfusion during Cardiac Arrest, Extracorporeal Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Rats – A Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Andreas; Warenits, Alexandra M.; Testori, Christoph; Weihs, Wolfgang; Hosmann, Arthur; Högler, Sandra; Sterz, Fritz; Janata, Andreas; Scherer, Thomas; Magnet, Ingrid A. M.; Ettl, Florian; Laggner, Anton N.; Herkner, Harald; Zeitlinger, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic alterations during cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and extracorporeal cardiopulmonary life support (ECLS) are poorly explored. Markers are needed for a more personalized resuscitation and post—resuscitation care. Aim of this study was to investigate early metabolic changes in the hippocampal CA1 region during ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VF-CA) and ECLS versus conventional CPR. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (350g) underwent 8min untreated VF-CA followed by ECLS (n = 8; bloodflow 100ml/kg), mechanical CPR (n = 18; 200/min) until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Shams (n = 2) were included. Glucose, glutamate and lactate/pyruvate ratio were compared between treatment groups and animals with and without ROSC. Ten animals (39%) achieved ROSC (ECLS 5/8 vs. CPR 5/18; OR 4,3;CI:0.7–25;p = 0.189). During VF-CA central nervous glucose decreased (0.32±0.1mmol/l to 0.04±0.01mmol/l; p<0.001) and showed a significant rise (0.53±0.1;p<0.001) after resuscitation. Lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio showed a 5fold increase (31 to 164; p<0.001; maximum 8min post ROSC). Glutamate showed a 3.5-fold increase to (2.06±1.5 to 7.12±5.1μmol/L; p<0.001) after CA. All parameters normalized after ROSC with no significant differences between ECLS and CPR. Metabolic changes during ischemia and