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Sample records for prevent bacterial contamination

  1. Bacterial contamination of blood products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palavecino, Elizabeth; Jacobs, Michael; Yomtovian, Roslyn

    2004-11-01

    The occurrence of a septic reaction resulting from bacterial contamination of blood products, particularly with room-temperature stored platelets, is the most common transfusion-associated infectious risk in the United States. Bacterial contamination of blood products was first identified more than 60 years ago; yet, strategies to resolve this problem have proved daunting despite ongoing awareness and increasing concern especially in the last few years. With the recent US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of culture methods for quality control testing of platelet units and the promulgation of accreditation standards by the College of American Pathologists and American Association of Blood Banks to detect bacterially contaminated platelet units and to prevent transfusion of these units, blood banks and transfusion services have finally started to address this problem, in a more standardized manner. Furthermore, as new methods of interdicting, inactivating and detecting bacterially contaminated blood products emerge, it is hoped that the problem of bacterial contamination of blood products will be overcome.

  2. Nanocomposited coatings produced by laser-assisted process to prevent silicone hydogels from protein fouling and bacterial contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Guobang; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Jin, E-mail: jzhang@eng.uwo.ca

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Nanocomposited-coating was deposited on silicone hydrogel by using the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) process. The ZnO–PEG nanocomposited coating reduces over 50% protein absorption on silicone hydrogel, and can inhibit the bacterial growth efficiently. - Highlights: • We developed a nanocomposited coating to prevent silicone hydrogel from biofouling. • Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation can deposit inorganic–organic nanomaterials. • The designed nanocomposited coating reduces protein absorption by over 50%. • The designed nanocomposited coating shows significant antimicrobial efficiency. - Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles incorporating with polyethylene glycol (PEG) were deposited together on the surface of silicone hydrogel through matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). In this process, frozen nanocomposites (ZnO–PEG) in isopropanol were irradiated under a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm for 1 h. Our results indicate that the MAPLE process is able to maintain the chemical backbone of polymer and prevent the nanocomposite coating from contamination. The ZnO–PEG nanocomposited coating reduces over 50% protein absorption on silicone hydrogel. The cytotoxicity study shows that the ZnO–PEG nanocomposites deposited on silicone hydrogels do not impose the toxic effect on mouse NIH/3T3 cells. In addition, MAPLE-deposited ZnO–PEG nanocomposites can inhibit the bacterial growth significantly.

  3. Non-return valves do not prevent backflow and bacterial contamination of intravenous infusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellger, B.; Kiski, D.; Diem, E.; van den Heuvel, I.; Freise, H.; Van Aken, H.; Hinder, F.; Friedrich, A. W.

    Non-return valves (NRVs) are designed to avoid backflow of infusion fluid against the designated direction of flow (DDF) when more than one infusion is delivered via one venous access. We tested in vitro whether NRVs reliably prevent flow against the DDF at clinically relevant low flow rates. Since

  4. Microconductometric Detection of Bacterial Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarra EL ICHI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Several approaches can be used for the electrochemical detection of bacterial contamination. Their performance can be assessed by the ability to detect bacteria at very low concentrations within a short-time response. We have already demonstrated that a conductometric biosensor based on interdigitated thin-film electrodes is adapted to detect bacteria in clinical samples like serum and compatible with microfluidic fabrication. The type of interdigitated microelectrodes influences the performance of the biosensor. This was shown by the results obtained in this work. A magnetic-nanoparticles based immunosensor was designed using gold screen-printed electrodes. The immunosensor was able to specifically detect E. coli in the range of 1-103 CFU mL-1. The new transducer offered a larger active sensing surface with a lower cost and a robust material. Accuracy of the conductance value was enhanced by differential measurements. The immunosensor is compatible with a microfluidic system.

  5. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the emergence and increasing prevalence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to available antibiotics. Conventional antibiotics generally kill bacteria by interfering with vital cellular functions, an approach...... that imposes selection pressure for resistant bacteria. New approaches are urgently needed. Targeting bacterial virulence functions directly is an attractive alternative. An obvious target is bacterial adhesion. Bacterial adhesion to surfaces is the first step in colonization, invasion, and biofilm formation....... As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  6. Susceptibility of Some Bacterial Contaminants Recovered from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the susceptibility of bacterial contaminants recovered from cosmetics to preservatives and antibiotics. Methods: Nine bacterial isolates recovered from various brands of commercially available cosmetics marketed in Jordan were tested for their susceptibility pattern against two paraben esters and two ...

  7. Susceptibility of Some Bacterial Contaminants Recovered from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the susceptibility of bacterial contaminants recovered from cosmetics to preservatives and antibiotics. Methods: Nine bacterial isolates recovered from various brands of commercially available cosmetics marketed in Jordan were tested for their susceptibility pattern against two paraben esters and two.

  8. Skin contamination - prevention and decontaminating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed examination is made of the structure of human skin. Measures were drawn up to prevent skin contamination in nuclear installations as well as contaminated skin was decontaminated from the personnel. By systematically applying these measures a significant level of success was achieved in preventing contamination in nuclear installations. Cases where more far-reaching chemical methods had to be used were kept to a minimum. (R.P.)

  9. Prevalence of antibacterial resistant bacterial contaminants from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mobile phones contaminated with bacteria may act as fomites. Antibiotic resistant bacterial contamination of mobile phones of inpatients was studied. One hundred and six samples were collected from mobile phones of patients admitted in various hospitals in Jazan province of Saudi Arabia. Eighty-nine (83.9%) out of 106 ...

  10. A study of bacterial contamination of rattlesnake venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Garcia-Lima

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied the bacterial contamination of rattlesnake venom isolated from snakes in captivity and wild snakes caught recently. The captive snakes showed a relatively high incidence of bacterial contamination of their venom.

  11. Pathogenic bacterial contaminations in hospital cafeteria foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanasena, Paweena; Somboonwatthanakul, Issaraporn

    2010-02-01

    This study aims to examine the pathogenic bacterial contaminations in foods sold in hospital cafeteria. A study was conducted between April and September of 2008 using cafeteria located in Mahasarakham provincial hospital, Thailand, as a study area. The cafeteria foods were evaluated for contaminations with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus faecalis, which have been earlier reported to cause nosocomial outbreaks. Of 33 different types of ready-to-eat foods, the majority (54.54%) were found to have bacteria >10(7) colony forming units per gram of food (cfu g(-1)), whereas 36.36% and only 9.10% of them were found to have bacteria at 10(6)-10(7) and foods were also shown to be contaminated with Escherichia coli (57.57%), followed by Streptococcus faecalis (51.51%), Staphylococcus aureus (48.48%) and Salmonella typhimurium (27.27%), respectively. In contrast, of 7 different types of freshly-made foods, the majority (71.42%) were found to have bacterial foods (42.85%), followed by Escherichia coli and Streptococcus faecalis at equal percentages (14.28%). None of the freshly-made foods were found to be contaminated with Streptococcus typhimurium. The results concluded that a number of ready-to-eat foods sold in the Mahasarakham hospital cafeteria were contaminated with several pathogenic bacteria at unacceptable levels. Healthcare authorities should be more aware that ready-to-eat cafeteria foods that are heavily contaminated with pathogenic bacteria may be harmful to healthcare workers and visitors and may result in nosocomial infections of the patients.

  12. Hydrodebridement of wounds: effectiveness in reducing wound bacterial contamination and potential for air bacterial contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong David G

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to assess the level of air contamination with bacteria after surgical hydrodebridement and to determine the effectiveness of hydro surgery on bacterial reduction of a simulated infected wound. Methods Four porcine samples were scored then infected with a broth culture containing a variety of organisms and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. The infected samples were then debrided with the hydro surgery tool (Versajet, Smith and Nephew, Largo, Florida, USA. Samples were taken for microbiology, histology and scanning electron microscopy pre-infection, post infection and post debridement. Air bacterial contamination was evaluated before, during and after debridement by using active and passive methods; for active sampling the SAS-Super 90 air sampler was used, for passive sampling settle plates were located at set distances around the clinic room. Results There was no statistically significant reduction in bacterial contamination of the porcine samples post hydrodebridement. Analysis of the passive sampling showed a significant (p 3 to 16780 CFUs/m3 were observed with active sampling of the air whilst using hydro surgery equipment compared with a basal count of 582 CFUs/m3. During removal of the wound dressing, a significant increase was observed relative to basal counts (p Conclusion The results suggest a significant increase in bacterial air contamination both by active sampling and passive sampling. We believe that action might be taken to mitigate fallout in the settings in which this technique is used.

  13. Spectrophotometric Analysis of Bacterial Contamination in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Sarah

    2010-10-01

    Bacterial contamination in water is a hazard everywhere from wells in third world countries to reclaimed water on the International Space Station. Traditional lab techniques detect bacteria in approximately 48 hours, while optical techniques can detect bacteria in as little as six hours. The Beer-Lambert Law states that absorption of light is directly correlated to the concentration of a solute in a solution. By passing light through a sample of contaminated broth, the transmittance and in turn the absorption of the solution can be observed. The transmittance data alone follows the inverse of the bacterial growth curve. A sharp drop in transmittance represents the exponential growth phase of bacteria. This drop is observed between six and eight hours following the inoculation of the laboratory samples with Escherichia coli, using both a standard lab monochrometer as well as a device designed for this study. The Optical Bacteria Detection (OBD) was designed to be effective and inexpensive, with a limited use of consumables and minimum waste generation. The OBD device uses a phototransistor as a sensor and an LED with wavelength of approximately 500 nm. Data from the monochrometer shows the sudden decrease in transmittance is most pronounced at this wavelength. The OBD can be tuned to test for other bacteria, such as Salmonella and Vibrio fisheri by changing the wavelength of the LED light source.

  14. Survey of bacterial contamination of environment of swimming pools in Yazd city, in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jafari Mansoorian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infections are readily transmitted as a result of bacterial contamination of swimming pools. Therefore, hygiene and preventing the contamination of swimming pools is of particular importance. The objective of this study was to determine the amount of bacterial contamination in indoor pools of Yazd in 2013. Methods: In this descriptive and analytical study, all indoor swimming pools of Yazd (12 pools were evaluated during the spring and summer of 2013, in terms of bacterial contamination. In order to determine contamination, a sterile cotton swab was used for sampling. On average, 45 samples were taken from different surfaces in each pool (shower, dressing room, sitting places in sauna, platforms and around the pool. In total, about 540 samples from all pools were tested for bacterial contamination. Results: The results show that from 540 samples, bacterial contamination was observed in about 93 samples (17.22%; and was seen more in showers, edges of the pool and jacuzzis, and the slippers used in swimming pools. The most important isolated bacteria types were E. coli, Actinobacteria, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia. Conclusion: The results indicate the presence of bacterial contamination on the surface of these places. It is recommended that health authorities should pay more attention to cleaning and disinfecting surfaces around the pool, showers, dressing rooms etc, to prevent infectious disease transfer as a result of contact with contaminated swimming pool surfaces.

  15. Contamination sources, prevention, and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination is defined as anything other than cotton in cotton lint. Worldwide, contamination is on the rise and plastic contamination has increased at a faster rate than contamination overall. In the U.S., there are many sources of plastic contaminants, such as plastic trash that collects in cott...

  16. High enteric bacterial contamination of drinking water in Jigjiga city ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    2016;30(3):118-128]. Key words: Contamination, drinking water, households, enteric bacteria, Jigjiga. Introduction ... High enteric bacterial contamination of drinking of water in Jigjiga city, Eastern Ethiopia 119. Ethiop. J. Health Dev. 2016 ..... people's tendency to fetch water for toilet services with contaminated toilet articles ...

  17. [Construction of groundwater contamination prevention mapping system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Jie; He, Jiang-Tao; Lu, Yan; Liu, Li-Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Liang

    2012-09-01

    Groundwater contamination prevention mapping is an important component of groundwater contamination geological survey and assessment work, which could provide the basis for making and implementing groundwater contamination prevention planning. A groundwater contamination prevention mapping system was constructed in view of the synthetic consideration on nature perspective derived from groundwater contamination sources and aquifer itself, social-economic perspective, policy perspective derived from outside. During the system construction process, analytic hierarchy process and relevant overlaying principles were used to couple groundwater contamination risk assessment, groundwater value as well as wellhead protection area zoning. Data processing and visualization of mapping results were achieved in the GIS environment. The research on groundwater contamination prevention mapping in Beijing Plain indicated that the final groundwater prevention map was in accordance with the actual conditions and well reflected the priorities of groundwater prevention, which could play a guidance role in designing and implementing further practical prevention and supervision measures. Besides, because of the dynamical properties of the system components, it was suggested to analyze the update frequency of the mapping.

  18. Algal-bacterial interactions in metal contaminated floodplain sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boivin, M.E.Y.; Greve, G.D.; Garcia-Meza, J.V.; Massieux, B.; Sprenger, W.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Breure, A.M.; Rutgers, M.; Admiraal, W.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate algal-bacterial interactions in a gradient of metal contaminated natural sediments. By means of multivariate techniques, we related the genetic structure (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, DGGE) and the physiological structure (community-level physiological profiling, CLPP) of the bacterial communities to the species composition of the algal communities and to the abiotic environmental variables, including metal contamination. The results revealed that genetic and physiological structure of the bacterial communities correlated with the species composition of the algal community, but hardly to the level of metal pollution. This must be interpreted as an indication for a strong and species-specific linkage of algal and bacterial species in floodplain sediments. Metals were, however, not proven to affect either the algal or the bacterial communities of the Dutch river floodplains. - Algal and bacterial communities in floodplain sediments are interlinked, but are not affected by metal pollution

  19. Bacterial contamination of street vending food in Kumasi, Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Street vending foods are readily available sources of meals for many people but the biological safe-ty of such food is always in doubt. The aim of this study is to ascertain bacterial isolate and deter-mine total counts of bacterial species responsible for the contamination of the street vending food in Kumasi so as to determine ...

  20. Bacterial Contaminants of Poultry Meat: Sources, Species, and Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Rouger, Amélie; Tresse, Odile; Zagorec, Monique

    2017-01-01

    With the constant increase in poultry meat consumption worldwide and the large variety of poultry meat products and consumer demand, ensuring the microbial safety of poultry carcasses and cuts is essential. In the present review, we address the bacterial contamination of poultry meat from the slaughtering steps to the use-by-date of the products. The different contamination sources are identified. The contaminants occurring in poultry meat cuts and their behavior toward sanitizing treatments ...

  1. The normal bacterial flora prevents GI disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. The normal bacterial flora prevents GI disease. Inhibits pathogenic enteric bacteria. Decrease luminal pH; Secrete bacteriocidal proteins; Colonization resistance; Block epithelial binding – induce MUC2. Improves epithelial and mucosal barrier integrity. Produce ...

  2. High level bacterial contamination of secondary school students' mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõljalg, Siiri; Mändar, Rando; Sõber, Tiina; Rööp, Tiiu; Mändar, Reet

    2017-06-01

    While contamination of mobile phones in the hospital has been found to be common in several studies, little information about bacterial abundance on phones used in the community is available. Our aim was to quantitatively determine the bacterial contamination of secondary school students' mobile phones. Altogether 27 mobile phones were studied. The contact plate method and microbial identification using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer were used for culture studies. Quantitative PCR reaction for detection of universal 16S rRNA, Enterococcus faecalis 16S rRNA and Escherichia coli allantoin permease were performed, and the presence of tetracycline ( tet A, tet B, tet M), erythromycin ( erm B) and sulphonamide ( sul 1) resistance genes was assessed. We found a high median bacterial count on secondary school students' mobile phones (10.5 CFU/cm 2 ) and a median of 17,032 bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies per phone. Potentially pathogenic microbes ( Staphylococcus aureus , Acinetobacter spp. , Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus cereus and Neisseria flavescens ) were found among dominant microbes more often on phones with higher percentage of E. faecalis in total bacterial 16S rRNA. No differences in contamination level or dominating bacterial species between phone owner's gender and between phone types (touch screen/keypad) were found. No antibiotic resistance genes were detected on mobile phone surfaces. Quantitative study methods revealed high level bacterial contamination of secondary school students' mobile phones.

  3. Bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates: pathogen detection and inactivation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Védy

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the reduction of transfusion related viral transmission has been a priority during the last decade, bacterial infection transmitted by transfusion still remains associated to a high morbidity and mortality, and constitutes the most frequent infectious risk of transfusion. This problem especially concerns platelet concentrates because of their favorable bacterial growth conditions. This review gives an overview of platelet transfusion-related bacterial contamination as well as on the different strategies to reduce this problem by using either bacterial detection or inactivation methods.

  4. Bacterial contamination of computer touch screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerba, Charles P; Wuollet, Adam L; Raisanen, Peter; Lopez, Gerardo U

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the occurrence of opportunistic bacterial pathogens on the surfaces of computer touch screens used in hospitals and grocery stores. Opportunistic pathogenic bacteria were isolated on touch screens in hospitals; Clostridium difficile and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus and in grocery stores; methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Enteric bacteria were more common on grocery store touch screens than on hospital computer touch screens. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. A study of bacterial contamination of rattlesnake venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Garcia-Lima

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied the bacterial contamination of rattlesnake venom isolated from snakes in captivity and wild snakes caught recently. The captive snakes showed a relatively high incidence of bacterial contamination of their venom.Os autores estudaram a contaminação bacteriana do veneno dë cascavéis mantidas em cativeiro e das recentemente capturadas. Verificaram que os venenos dos animais cativos apresentaram alta incidência de contaminação e os tidos como recentemente capturados estavam com baixa contaminação aparente.

  6. Bacterial contamination of traditional ice creams in Kermanshah in 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Sina Emami; Alisha Akya; Anis 1Hossain Zadeh; Sodabeh Barkhordar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ice cream is a dairy product that is very popular during warm seasons. Ice cream can be contaminated with various microorganisms including pathogenic bacteria if hygienic procedures are not followed during preparation, distribution and preservation processes. This may put the health of people using ice cream at risk. Our study aimed to examine the bacterial contamination of traditional ice creams in Kermanshah city during 2008. Methods: During summer 2008, 80 samples of tradit...

  7. Bacterial Contaminants of Poultry Meat: Sources, Species, and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, Amélie; Zagorec, Monique

    2017-01-01

    With the constant increase in poultry meat consumption worldwide and the large variety of poultry meat products and consumer demand, ensuring the microbial safety of poultry carcasses and cuts is essential. In the present review, we address the bacterial contamination of poultry meat from the slaughtering steps to the use-by-date of the products. The different contamination sources are identified. The contaminants occurring in poultry meat cuts and their behavior toward sanitizing treatments or various storage conditions are discussed. A list of the main pathogenic bacteria of concern for the consumer and those responsible for spoilage and waste of poultry meat is established. PMID:28841156

  8. Classification of bacterial contamination using image processing and distributed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, W M; Bayraktar, B; Bhunia, A; Hirleman, E D; Robinson, J P; Rajwa, B

    2013-01-01

    Disease outbreaks due to contaminated food are a major concern not only for the food-processing industry but also for the public at large. Techniques for automated detection and classification of microorganisms can be a great help in preventing outbreaks and maintaining the safety of the nations food supply. Identification and classification of foodborne pathogens using colony scatter patterns is a promising new label-free technique that utilizes image-analysis and machine-learning tools. However, the feature-extraction tools employed for this approach are computationally complex, and choosing the right combination of scatter-related features requires extensive testing with different feature combinations. In the presented work we used computer clusters to speed up the feature-extraction process, which enables us to analyze the contribution of different scatter-based features to the overall classification accuracy. A set of 1000 scatter patterns representing ten different bacterial strains was used. Zernike and Chebyshev moments as well as Haralick texture features were computed from the available light-scatter patterns. The most promising features were first selected using Fishers discriminant analysis, and subsequently a support-vector-machine (SVM) classifier with a linear kernel was used. With extensive testing we were able to identify a small subset of features that produced the desired results in terms of classification accuracy and execution speed. The use of distributed computing for scatter-pattern analysis, feature extraction, and selection provides a feasible mechanism for large-scale deployment of a light scatter-based approach to bacterial classification.

  9. Case Study: A Novel Bacterial Contamination in Cell Culture Production--Leptospira licerasiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joseph; Bergevin, Jesse; Kiss, Robert; Walker, Gordon; Battistoni, Todd; Lufburrow, Patricia; Lam, Harry; Vinther, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Leptospira licerasiae, a novel bacterial contaminant found in Genentech cell culture manufacturing operations, poses a challenge to current microbial control strategies in upstream cell culture processes, as this microorganism is fully capable of passing through 0.1 μm sterilizing-grade filtration and is not detectable by standard microbiological methods described in major pharmaceutical compendia for microbial screening and quantification required for release of raw materials, in-process intermediates, and finished products in biopharmaceutical production. The root cause investigation was greatly aided by the genetic identification of the contaminant and subsequent confirmation by cultural method and real-time polymerase chain reaction assay from the affected product batches. The purpose of this case study is to share knowledge on the novel contaminant, L. licerasiae, and potential routes of contamination in the cell culture manufacturing environment from a series of investigations involving root cause analysis, impact assessments, risk assessment, and global corrective and preventative action, as well as to provide guidance on the detection and prevention of Leptospira contamination with the intent to aid the industry to continually improve microbial control strategies for the benefit of patients. Leptospira licerasiae, a novel bacterial contaminant found in cell culture manufacturing operations, poses a challenge to current microbial control strategies in upstream cell culture processes because this microorganism is capable of passing through 0.1 μm sterilizing-grade membrane filters and is not detectable by standard microbiological methods used in biopharmaceutical production. The root cause investigation was greatly aided by the genetic identification of the contaminant and subsequent confirmation by cultural method and real-time polymerase chain reaction assay from the affected product batches. The purpose of this case study is to share knowledge on the

  10. Method of inactivation of viral and bacterial blood contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackett, R.; Goodrich, R.P.; Van Borssum Waalkes, M.; Wong, V.A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for inactivating viral and/or bacterial contamination in blood cellular matter, such as erythrocytes and platelets, or protein fractions. The cells or protein fractions are mixed with chemical sensitizers and irradiated with, for example, gamma or X-ray radiation

  11. Monitoring bacterial faecal contamination in waters using multiplex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monitoring of sanitary quality or faecal pollution in water is currently based on quantifying some bacterial indicators such as Escherichia coli and faecal enterococci. Using a multiplex real-time PCR assay for faecal enterococci and Bacteroides spp., the detection of faecal contamination in non-treated water can be done in a ...

  12. Molecular analysis of cross-bacterial contamination detected in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the isolate Delftia acidovorans BP(R2) and it is also coupled to protein with molecular weight 25-26 KDa. As well as, this bacterial contamination was the reason for the false positive results observed during the detection of HCV infections. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management Vol. 9(1) 2005: 5-10.

  13. Bacterial contamination of white coats and hands of healthcare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Transmission of hospital acquired infections (HAIs) may be associated with contamination of healthcare workers' (HCWs) hands and white coats. Objective: The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of HCWs' white coats in transmitting HAIs and to determine the association between bacterial ...

  14. A survey on Bacterial Contamination of Food Supply in the West of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tehereh Faramarzi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Transfer of food born diseases is a common problem in hygiene and public health. The bacteria are the most important factors of food contamination and intoxications. The aim of this study is to determine the bacterial contamination of food supply in the west of Tehran supermarkets. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 642 samples of foods were taken randomly from west of Tehran supermarkets. The levels of bacterial contamination of the foods were assessed in the department of food and drug microbiology of lab, affiliated to Iran University of medical science. Results: Salads were the most (50% and protein products (6.36% the least rate in terms of mesophilic bacteria contamination. Also, sweets (13.46% and protein products (1.73% in terms of Coliforms. Salads (58.33% and dairy products (9.84% with respect to Escherichia coli, sweets (4.81% and salads (0% in terms of Staphylococcus aureus, sweets (4.81% and dairy products (0.39% with respect to Bacillus cereus, were the most and least contaminated foods, respectively. Conclusion: In overall, salads had the most contamination percentage with respect to mesophilic bacteria, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus (P . According to our study, we conclude that training of dealers and food suppliers are necessary and healthy principals should be followed. Also supervision on food packing and storage should be considered to prevent food microbial contamination.

  15. Bacterial contamination of traditional ice creams in Kermanshah in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Emami

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ice cream is a dairy product that is very popular during warm seasons. Ice cream can be contaminated with various microorganisms including pathogenic bacteria if hygienic procedures are not followed during preparation, distribution and preservation processes. This may put the health of people using ice cream at risk. Our study aimed to examine the bacterial contamination of traditional ice creams in Kermanshah city during 2008. Methods: During summer 2008, 80 samples of traditional ice creams were collected. The samples were examined according to the Iranian National Standard protocols for E. coli, Coliforms,  Salmonella,  Staphylococcus aureus and complete count of microorganisms. Results: Overall, 62 (77.5% samples had microbial contaminations more than the standard limit. Results showed 59 (73.75% and 54 (67.5 % of the samples contained a high number of microorganisms and coliform, respectively. Furthermore 30 (37.5% and 23 (28.75% of the samples were contaminated with E. coli and S. aureus, respectively. However, Salmonella spp. was not found in any of the ice cream samples. Conclusion: The traditional ice creams tested in Kermanshah were heavily contaminated with bacteria. It could be due to the inappropriate preparation and preservation procedures using unpasteurized milk and other materials.  Contaminations may also be induced by personals. So it is recommended to apply the hygienic procedures for preparation and preservation of ice cream including the use of pasteurized milk and other materials.

  16. Bacterial hand contamination and transfer after use of contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapka, Carrie A; Campbell, Esther J; Maxwell, Sheri L; Gerba, Charles P; Dolan, Michael J; Arbogast, James W; Macinga, David R

    2011-05-01

    Bulk-soap-refillable dispensers are prone to extrinsic bacterial contamination, and recent studies demonstrated that approximately one in four dispensers in public restrooms are contaminated. The purpose of this study was to quantify bacterial hand contamination and transfer after use of contaminated soap under controlled laboratory and in-use conditions in a community setting. Under laboratory conditions using liquid soap experimentally contaminated with 7.51 log(10) CFU/ml of Serratia marcescens, an average of 5.28 log(10) CFU remained on each hand after washing, and 2.23 log(10) CFU was transferred to an agar surface. In an elementary-school-based field study, Gram-negative bacteria on the hands of students and staff increased by 1.42 log(10) CFU per hand (26-fold) after washing with soap from contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers. In contrast, washing with soap from dispensers with sealed refills significantly reduced bacteria on hands by 0.30 log(10) CFU per hand (2-fold). Additionally, the mean number of Gram-negative bacteria transferred to surfaces after washing with soap from dispensers with sealed-soap refills (0.06 log(10) CFU) was significantly lower than the mean number after washing with contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers (0.74 log(10) CFU; P soap (P soap from bulk-soap-refillable dispensers can increase the number of opportunistic pathogens on the hands and may play a role in the transmission of bacteria in public settings.

  17. Linking bacterial diversity and geochemistry of uranium-contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kelly; Zholi, Alma; Frabutt, Dylan; Flood, Matthew; Floyd, Dalton; Tiquia, Sonia M

    2012-01-01

    To understand the link between bacterial diversity and geochemistry in uranium-contaminated groundwater, microbial communities were assessed based on clone libraries of 16S rDNA genes from the USDOE Oak Ridge Field Research Centre (FRC) site. Four groundwater wells (GW835, GW836, FW113-47 and FW215-49) with a wide range of pH (3 to 7), nitrate (44 to 23,400 mg L(-1)), uranium (0.73 to 60.36 mg L(-1)) and other metal contamination, were investigated. Results indicated that bacterial diversity correlated with the geochemistry of the groundwater. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. The highly contaminated well (FW113-47) had lower gene diversity than less contaminated wells (FW215-49, GW835 and GW836). The high concentrations of contaminants present in well FW113-47 stimulated the growth of organisms capable of reducing uranium (Shewanella and Pseudomonas), nitrate (Pseudomonas, Rhodanobacter and Xanthomonas) and iron (Stenotrophomonas), and which were unique to this well. The clone libraries consisted primarily of sequences closely related to the phylum Proteobacteria, with FW-113-47 almost exclusively containing this phylum. Metal-reducing bacteria were present in all four wells, which may suggest that there is potential for successful bioremediation of the groundwater at the Oak Ridge FRC. The microbial community information gained from this study and previous studies at the site can be used to develop predictive multivariate and geographical information system (GIS) based models for microbial populations at the Oak Ridge FRC. This will allow for a better understanding of what organisms are likely to occur where and when, based on geochemistry, and how these organisms relate to bioremediation processes at the site.

  18. Acanthamoeba, bacterial, and fungal contamination of contact lens storage cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, T B; Cursons, R T; Sherwan, J F; Rose, P R

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Microbial corneal infection is the most serious complication of contact lens wear. Contact lens cases are a recognised potential source of pathogens associated with corneal ulcers. METHODS--This survey established the incidence of protozoal, bacterial, and fungal contact lens case contamination in 101 asymptomatic daily wear cosmetic contact lens wearers from a domiciliary contact lens practice. RESULTS--Eighty two (81%) contact lens cases were found to be contaminated, with 19 (19%) sterile. Of all contact lens cases, 78 (77%) grew bacteria, 24 (24%) fungi, and 20 (20%) protozoa. Acanthamoeba spp were isolated from eight (8%) contact lens cases. Fifty six (55%) contact lens cases yielded mixed bacterial contamination. This is the first contact lens case survey in which hydrogen peroxide disinfection was the major method of contact lens disinfection (75% of subjects) and no home made saline was used. All the contaminating organisms were shown to possess the enzyme catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. The polymicrobial nature of the biofilms found in many contact lens cases is illustrated electron micrographically. CONCLUSION--Based on data from this and previous studies, the authors conclude with recommendations for contact lens wearers: (1) regular scrubbing of contact lens case interior to disrupt biofilms; (2) exposure of contact lens case to very hot water (> or = 70 degrees C) will kill Acanthamoeba contaminants; (3) allow contact lens case to air dry between uses; (4) if hydrogen peroxide disinfection is preferred, use a two step system; (5) replace contact lens case regularly. Images PMID:7626578

  19. Evaluation of Bacterial Contamination as an Indicator of Viral Contamination in a Sedimentary Aquifer in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamazo, P; Victoria, M; Schijven, J F; Alvareda, E; Tort, L F L; Ramos, J; Burutaran, L; Olivera, M; Lizasoain, A; Sapriza, G; Castells, M; Colina, R

    2018-03-21

    In Uruguay, groundwater is frequently used for agricultural activities, as well as for human consumption in urban and rural areas. As in many countries worldwide, drinking water microbiological quality is evaluated only according to bacteriological standards and virological analyses are not mentioned in the legislation. In this work, the incidence of human viral (Rotavirus A, Norovirus GII, and human Adenovirus) and bacterial (total and thermotolerant coliform and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) contamination in groundwater in the Salto district, Uruguay, as well as the possible correlation between these groups of microorganisms, was studied. From a total of 134 groundwater samples, 42 (32.1%) were positive for Rotavirus, only 1 (0.7%) for both Rotavirus and Adenovirus, and 96 (72.6%) samples were positive for bacterial indicators. Results also show that Rotavirus presence was not associated with changes in chemical composition of the aquifer water. Bacteriological indicators were not adequate to predict the presence of viruses in individual groundwater samples (well scale), but a deeper spatial-temporal analysis showed that they are promising candidates to assess the viral contamination degree at aquifer scale, since from the number of wells with bacterial contamination the number of wells with viral contamination could be estimated.

  20. Evaluation of Bacterial Contamination in Anesthesia Breathing Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Farnia

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Hospital infections are one of the important reasons of mortality and incurred expenses. Therefore, we must control these infections by identifying contamination sources. The aim of this study was the determination of bacterial pollution of corrugated anesthesia sets in surgical rooms. Methods: This study was an analytic-description one performed in training hospitals of Yazd city. Research sample was 440 cases provided from different parts of corrugate after completing the anesthesia period by wet sterile swabs and transferred to culture media. On Thursday, each week, a sample from different parts of tube after sterilizing with cetrimide solution was obtained. Finally, after 24 hours, culture medias were studied for colony growth. Results: Obtained results indicated that of 440 cases taken samples, 343 cases were without bacterial pollution, 71 cases (19.29% had bacterial pollution of samples before sterilizing and 26 cases (36.1% were polluted after tube sterilizing. Conclusion: Sampling and culturing from used equipment and tools in hospital is one of the important actions for identifying and controlling hospital infections. Obtained results from this study indicated that of 440 cases, there were 97 cases of pollution. Therefore, it is suggested that anti bacterial filters should be installed before Y form piece of tubes in anesthesia machines and disposable corrugated tubes should replace traditional tubes. In addition, it seems necessary that wider investigations should be done.

  1. Bacterial sulfate reduction limits natural arsenic contamination in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Holm, Thomas R.; Park, Jungho; Jin, Qusheng; Sanford, Robert A.; Fouke, Bruce W.; Bethke, Craig M.

    2004-11-01

    Natural arsenic contamination of groundwater, increasingly recognized as a threat to human health worldwide, is characterized by arsenic concentrations that vary sharply over short distances. Variation in arsenic levels in the Mahomet aquifer system, a regional glacial aquifer in central Illinois, appears to arise from variable rates of bacterial sulfate reduction in the subsurface, not differences in arsenic supply. Where sulfate-reducing bacteria are active, the sulfide produced reacts to precipitate arsenic, or coprecipitate it with iron, leaving little in solution. In the absence of sulfate reduction, methanogenesis is the dominant type of microbial metabolism, and arsenic accumulates to high levels.

  2. Bacterial Hand Contamination and Transfer after Use of Contaminated Bulk-Soap-Refillable Dispensers▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapka, Carrie A.; Campbell, Esther J.; Maxwell, Sheri L.; Gerba, Charles P.; Dolan, Michael J.; Arbogast, James W.; Macinga, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk-soap-refillable dispensers are prone to extrinsic bacterial contamination, and recent studies demonstrated that approximately one in four dispensers in public restrooms are contaminated. The purpose of this study was to quantify bacterial hand contamination and transfer after use of contaminated soap under controlled laboratory and in-use conditions in a community setting. Under laboratory conditions using liquid soap experimentally contaminated with 7.51 log10 CFU/ml of Serratia marcescens, an average of 5.28 log10 CFU remained on each hand after washing, and 2.23 log10 CFU was transferred to an agar surface. In an elementary-school-based field study, Gram-negative bacteria on the hands of students and staff increased by 1.42 log10 CFU per hand (26-fold) after washing with soap from contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers. In contrast, washing with soap from dispensers with sealed refills significantly reduced bacteria on hands by 0.30 log10 CFU per hand (2-fold). Additionally, the mean number of Gram-negative bacteria transferred to surfaces after washing with soap from dispensers with sealed-soap refills (0.06 log10 CFU) was significantly lower than the mean number after washing with contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers (0.74 log10 CFU; P soap (P soap from bulk-soap-refillable dispensers can increase the number of opportunistic pathogens on the hands and may play a role in the transmission of bacteria in public settings. PMID:21421792

  3. Bacterial Contamination of Endodontic Materials before and after Clinical Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Media; Koller, Garrit; Niazi, Sadia; Patel, Shanon; Mannocci, Francesco; Bruce, Kenneth; Foschi, Federico

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial contamination in endodontic consumables (gutta-percha points, rubber dams, paper mixing pads, caulking agents, and endodontic instrument sponges [EISs]) before and after clinical use and storage. Materials were randomly sampled in triplicates at 3 time points (t 0 , at package opening; t 1 , at 7 days; and t 2 , at 14 days) during their clinical usage. The gutta-percha points and caulking agent (25 mg) were added to 1 mL phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The rubber dam, paper mixing pad, and EIS were added to 25 mL PBS. After vortexing, centrifuging, and removing the supernatant, the pellet was resuspended in 1 mL PBS, plated on fastidious anaerobic agar, and incubated aerobically and anaerobically. The grown colonies were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The total bacterial load was calculated in the remaining volume (800 μL) from each sample by quantitative polymerase chain reaction after DNA extraction. All tested materials showed a varied number of contaminated samples at the 3 time points (except EIS at t 0 ) using MALDI-TOF MS. The most isolated genera were Propionibacterium (42%) and Staphylococcus (32%). By using non-culture-based approaches, all tested materials at the 3 time points (except gutta-percha at t 0 and the caulking agent at t 0, t 1, and t 2 ) carried bacterial DNA. The majority of the tested materials harbored bacteria in their samples before and after clinical storage. Nosocomial infection derived from commonly used consumables could have an impact on the outcome of endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Airtight clothing for preventing radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takimoto, Yoshinori.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To completely prevent the radioactive contaminations at the time of wearing or removing the airtight clothing, and further to facilitate wearing and removal of the same, air supply thereto and other works. Constitution: A duct having a large caliber and communicating with an air supply chamber is provided at the rear part of the airtight clothing. Since this duct is constituted in an expansible and contractible manner, the operator can pass the duct to wear or remove the airtight clothing. Since the airtight clothing according to the present invention is not cut off from its neck portion, the radiation protection is complete. Further, since the air supply duct has a great caliber, the wearing and removal of the airtight clothing become easy and further a large quantity of air can be supplied therein. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. X-rays control bacterial contamination in food products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zani, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    In order to control the lack of bacterial contamination of liquid food products, 'Nestle clinical nutrition' firm uses a new system based on the X-ray image of the content of sealed tins when these tins undergo a quick move on the conveyor belt. This moves induces a wave of product inside the tin and the amplitude of that wave is directly linked to the viscosity of the product which is linked to the presence or not of bacteria. The X-ray image is processed and the wave is characterized by 5 parameters. Any tin for which one at least of the 5 parameters does not match the calibration values is discarded. This system can process 10 tins per second. (A.C.)

  6. Bacterial community analysis of contaminant soils from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M.H.; Chapon, V.; Berthomieu, C.; Piette, L.; Le Marrec, C.; Coppin, F.; Fevrier, L.; Martin-Garin, A.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Shortly after the Chernobyl accident in 1986, vegetation, contaminated soil and other radioactive debris were buried in situ in trenches. The aims of this work are to analyse the structure of bacterial communities evolving in this environment since 20 years, and to evaluate the potential role of microorganisms in radionuclide migration in soils. Therefore, soil samples exhibiting contrasted radionuclides content were collected in and around the trench number 22. Bacterial communities were examined using a genetic fingerprinting method that allowed a comparative profiling of the samples (DGGE), with universal and group-specific PCR primers. Our results indicate that Chernobyl soil samples host a wide diversity of Bacteria, with stable patterns for Firmicutes and Actinobacteria and more variable for Proteobacteria. A collection of 650 aerobic and anaerobic culturable isolates was also constructed. A phylogenetic analysis of 250 heterotrophic aerobic isolates revealed that 5 phyla are represented: Beta-, Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and spore-forming Firmicutes, which is largely dominant. These collection will be screened for the presence of radionuclide-accumulating species in order to estimate the potential influence of microorganisms in radionuclides migration in soils

  7. Traditional insulin-use practices and the incidence of bacterial contamination and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, L M; Bingham, P R; Riddle, M C

    1984-01-01

    While complex procedures are usually recommended to prevent infection at insulin injection sites, adherence to these procedures is imperfect and their value incompletely established. Among 254 adult insulin users in two clinic populations, the reported prevalence of complete performance of four traditional insulin-use practices (handwashing, vial prep, skin prep, discarding of plastic syringes after one use) was 29%, and none of the individual practices considered was performed regularly by more than two-thirds of the subjects. Even so, there was no infection at 2828 injection sites, and there was no significant bacterial contamination of insulin or syringes. These findings fail to support the view that traditional practices provide protection to insulin users against infection or bacterial growth in insulin or syringes. The authors suggest that modification of traditional teaching methods would do no harm, and that benefits could include financial savings, improved client success with self-care, and enhanced health care provider credibility.

  8. Procedures involving lipid media for detection of bacterial contamination in breweries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vuuren, H J; Louw, H A; Loos, M A; Meisel, R

    1977-01-01

    The liquid equivalent of universal beer agar, designated universal beer liquid medium, and its beer-free equivalent, universal liquid medium (UL), were equally effective in demonstrating bacterial contamination in 120 of 200 samples from different stages of commercial brewing process. Growth of the contaminants after 3 days was consistently more luxuriant in the UL medium. A yeast-water substrate medium failed to reveal many contaminants detected with UL in 392 samples from three breweries and revealed only a few not detected with UL. The use of UL and a lactose-peptone medium, with microscope examination of the media for bacterial growth, permitted detection of 93% of the known contaminants compared to 87%, detected with UL alone; this combination or universal beer liquid medium plus lactose-peptone medium can therefore be recommended for the detection of bacterial contaminants in brewery samples. Bacterial contamination of pitching yeasts appeared to be a particular problem in the breweries investigated. PMID:848948

  9. Bacterial contamination of table eggs and the influence of housing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reu, de K.; Messens, W.; Heyndrickx, M.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Uyttendaele, M.; Herman, L.

    2008-01-01

    With the introduction of alternative housing systems for laying hens in the EU, recent research has focussed on the bacterial contamination of table eggs, e.g. eggshell and egg content contamination. Contamination of eggshells with aerobic bacteria is generally higher for nest eggs from non-cage

  10. Dimensionless Analysis Applied to Bacterial Chemotaxis towards NAPL Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; GAO, B.; Zhong, W.; Kihaule, K. S.; Ford, R.

    2017-12-01

    The use of chemotactic bacteria in bioremediation may improve the efficiency and decrease the cost of restoration, which means it has the potential to address environmental problems caused by oil spills. However, most previous studies were focused at the laboratory-scale and there lacks a formalism that can use these laboratory-scale results as input to evaluate the relative importance of chemotaxis at the field scale. In this study, a dimensionless equation is formulated to solve this problem. First, the main influential factors were extracted based on previous researches in environmental bioremediation and then five sets of dimensionless numbers were obtained according to Buckingham theory. After collecting basic parameter values and supplementary calculations to determine the concentration gradient of the chemoattractant, all dimensionless numbers were calculated and categorized into two types, those that were sensitive to chemotaxis or those to groundwater velocity. The bacteria ratio (BR), defined as the ratio of maximum bacteria concentration to its original value, was correlated with a combination of dimensionless numbers to yield, BR=cP1-0.085P20.329P30.1P4-0.098. For a bacterial ratio greater than one, the bioremediation strategy based on chemotaxis is expected to be effective, and chemotactic bacteria are expected to accumulate around NAPL contaminant sources efficiently.

  11. Platelet transfusion therapy in sub-Saharan Africa: bacterial contamination, recipient characteristics and acute transfusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Heather A.; Ddungu, Henry; Angom, Racheal; Baluku, Hannington; Kajumbula, Henry; Kyeyune-Byabazaire, Dorothy; Orem, Jackson; Ramirez-Arcos, Sandra; Tobian, Aaron A.R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Little data are available on bacterial contamination (BC) of platelet units or acute transfusion reactions to platelet transfusions (PT) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Methods This prospective observational study evaluated the rate of BC of whole blood derived platelet units (WB-PU), the utility of performing Gram stains (GS) to prevent septic reactions, characteristics of patients receiving PT and the rate of acute reactions associated with PT at the Uganda Cancer Institute in Kampala, Uganda. An aliquot of each WB-PU studied was taken to perform GS and culture using the Bactec™ 9120 instrument. Study participants were monitored for reactions. Results 337 WB-PU were evaluated for BC, of which 323 units were transfused in 151 transfusion episodes to 50 patients. The frequency of BC ranged from 0.3%–2.1% (according to criteria used to define BC). The GS had high specificity (99.1%), but low sensitivity to detect units with BC. The median platelet count prior to PT was 10,900 (IQR 6,000–18,900) cells/μL. 78% of PT were given to patients with no bleeding. Acute reactions occurred in 11 transfusion episodes, involving 13 WB-PU, for a rate of 7.3% (95%CI=3.7–12.7%) per transfusion episode. All recipients of units with positive bacterial cultures were receiving antibiotics at the time of transfusion; none experienced a reaction. Conclusions The rate of BC observed in this study is lower than previously reported in SSA, but still remains a safety issue. As GS appears to be an ineffective screening tool, alternate methods should be explored to prevent transfusing bacterially-contaminated platelets in SSA. PMID:27079627

  12. Bacterial contamination of platelet components not detected by BacT/ALERT®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, M A; Fenning, S; Maguire, K A; Morris, K G

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the possible causes for false negative results in BacT/ALERT ® 3D Signature System despite bacterial contamination of platelet units. The Northern Ireland Blood Transfusion Service (NIBTS) routinely extends platelet component shelf life to 7 days. Components are sampled and screened for bacterial contamination using an automated microbial detection system, the BacT/ALERT ® 3D Signature System. We report on three platelet components with confirmed bacterial contamination, which represent false negative BacT/ALERT ® results and near-miss serious adverse events. NIBTS protocols for risk reduction of bacterial contamination of platelet components are described. The methodology for bacterial detection using BacT/ALERT ® is outlined. Laboratory tests, relevant patient details and relevant follow-up information are analysed. In all three cases, Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the platelet residue and confirmed on terminal sub-culture using BacT/ALERT ® . In two cases, S. aureus with similar genetic makeup was isolated from the donors. Risk reduction measures for bacterial contamination of platelet components are not always effective. Automated bacterial culture detection does not eliminate the risk of bacterial contamination. Visual inspection of platelet components prior to release, issue and administration remains an important last line of defence. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  13. Oxygen measurements in platelet fluids - a new non-invasive method to detect bacterial contaminations in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, M M; Hourfar, M K; Huber, E; Sireis, W; Weichert, W; Seifried, E; Tonn, T; Schmidt, M

    2012-06-01

    The residual risk for bacterial contamination in blood components especially in platelets is one to two orders of magnitude higher than for transfusion relevant viral infections. The majority of all bacterial transmitted fatalities occurred at the end of platelet shelf life. Therefore, the maximum shelf life of platelet concentrates (PC) was reduced to 4 days after blood donation in Germany in 2008. A new continuous non-invasive bacterial detection method was developed by O(2) measurements in the platelet fluids and tested with 10 transfusion relevant bacteria species. The bacterial concentration at the time point of a positive signal of PreSense O(2) ranged between 10(2) and 10(5) CFU mL(-1) . Harmful transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection would have probably been prevented by this novel technology. Only strict anaerobic bacteria strains like Clostridium perfringens were not detected within the study period of 72 h. The described non-invasive bacterial detection method represents a new approach to prevent transmission of bacterial infection in platelets. The method is characterised by the advantage that all investigations can be performed until right up to the time of transfusion, and therefore, reduce the risk for sample errors to a minimum. © 2012 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2012 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  14. An investigation into the bacterial contamination of goniolenses in use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundon, Rachael; Scurrell, Emma; Mould, John; Hayton-Lee, Emma; Heinrich, Christine

    2017-12-18

    Objectives To report the incidence and evaluate the clinical significance of goniolens bacterial contamination in clinical use in dogs with three different usage protocols and one with an added cleaning protocol. Animals Studied and Methods Three groups of twenty dogs undergoing gonioscopy at a private practice in the UK had the goniolenses swabbed for bacteriology culture and identification prior to placement on the cornea. Three protocols of lens use, with 2 different types of goniolens, were studied. One protocol was then repeated with 21 dogs with a lens cleaning protocol prior to storage. Results Low levels of bacterial contamination were found in all 3 initial groups (10-15%). No correlation was found between usage protocol used and rate of contamination and no correlation was found between length of storage between use and contamination. All bacteria cultured were considered naturally occurring commensals for the canine eye and environment. The group with a cleaning protocol had a 4.7% contamination rate. This was not statistically different from the non-cleaning groups. Conclusions The rate of bacterial contamination of goniolenses in clinical practice is low and the bacterial contaminants consist of commensal bacteria, unlikely to be of detriment to the eye. Minimal contamination of the goniolenses was found and this did not appear to be of clinical significance. The introduction of a simple cleaning protocol did not produce a statistically significant reduction in bacterial contamination. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  15. Bacterial community changes in response to oil contamination and perennial crop cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lijuan; Penttinen, Petri; Mikkonen, Anu; Lindström, Kristina

    2018-03-12

    We investigated bacterial community dynamics in response to used motor oil contamination and perennial crop cultivation by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing in a 4-year field study. Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, and Gemmatimonadetes were the major bacterial phyla, and Rhodococcus was the most abundant genus. Initially, oil contamination decreased the overall bacterial diversity. Actinobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria were sensitive to oil contamination, exhibiting clear succession with time. However, bacterial communities changed over time, regardless of oil contamination and crop cultivation. The abundance difference of most OTUs between oil-contaminated and non-contaminated plots remained the same in later sampling years after the initial abundance difference induced by oil spike. The abundances of three oil-favored actinobacteria (Lysinimonas, Microbacteriaceae, and Marmoricola) and one betaproteobacterium (Aquabacterium) changed in different manner over time in oil-contaminated and non-contaminated soil. We propose that these taxa are potential bio-indicators for monitoring recovery from motor oil contamination in boreal soil. The effect of crop cultivation on bacterial communities became significant only after the crops achieved stable growth, likely associated with plant material decomposition by Bacteroidetes, Armatimonadetes and Fibrobacteres.

  16. Isolation and screening of azo dye decolorizing bacterial isolates from dye-contaminated textile wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Mahmood

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are released into wastewater streams without any pretreatment and pollute water and soilenvironments. To prevent contamination of our vulnerable resources, removal of these dye pollutants is of greatimportance. For this purpose, wastewater samples were collected from dye-contaminated sites of Faisalabad. About200 bacterial isolates were isolated through enrichment and then tested for their potential to remove RemazolBlack-B azo dye in liquid medium. Five bacterial isolates capable of degrading Remazol Black-B azo dye efficientlywere screened through experimentation on modified mineral salt medium. Isolate SS1 (collected from wastewater ofSupreme Textile Industry was able to completely remove the Remazol Black-B dye from the liquid medium in 18 h.Further, the isolate showed the best performance at the dye concentration of 100 mg L-1 medium (pH 7 and attemperature 35oC. Similarly, yeast extract proved to be the best carbon source for decolorization purpose. Theresults imply that the isolate SS1 could be used for the removal of the reactive dyes from textile effluents.

  17. Bacterial contaminations of informally marketed raw milk in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Milk has an outstanding nutritional quality but is also an excellent medium for bacterial growth and an important source of bacterial infection when consumed without pasteurization. Objective: To estimate the bacterial health risk of milk consumption in Accra and Kumasi, the twomajor cities in Ghana. Method: A ...

  18. The bacterial contamination rate of glucose meter test strips in the hospital setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid A.; Saeb, Amr T. M.; AlNaqeb, Dhekra M.; AlQumaidi, Hamed M.; AlMogbel, Turki A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the rate of bacterial contamination of the multi-use vial and single-use packed glucose meter strips, and to identify the type and frequency of various bacterial contamination in different hospital wards. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted by a team from the Strategic Center for Diabetes Research in 7 general hospitals in the Central region of Saudi Arabia during the period from August to September 2014 to assess the bacterial contamination rate of the unused strips. A total of 10,447 strips were cultured using proper agar media and incubated both aerobically and anaerobically. Results: The total bacterial contamination rate for the multi-use vials glucose strips was 31.7%, while single-use packed strips were not contaminated at all. Ministry of Health hospitals had the highest contamination rates compared with other hospitals. Critical, obstetric, and surgical wards had the highest bacterial isolates number, where most were in the risk group 3 according to the National Institute of Health guidelines. Staphylococcus species were the most common bacteria found. Conclusion: Glucose meter strips should be recognized as a source of bacterial contamination that could be behind serious hospital acquired infections. The hospital infection control team should adopt proper measures to implement protocols for glucose meter cleaning and glucose strips handling. PMID:27570855

  19. High bacterial biodiversity increases degradation performance of hydrocarbons during bioremediation of contaminated harbor marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Anno, Antonio; Beolchini, Francesca; Rocchetti, Laura; Luna, Gian Marco; Danovaro, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    We investigated changes of bacterial abundance and biodiversity during bioremediation experiments carried out on oxic and anoxic marine harbor sediments contaminated with hydrocarbons. Oxic sediments, supplied with inorganic nutrients, were incubated in aerobic conditions at 20 °C and 35 °C for 30 days, whereas anoxic sediments, amended with organic substrates, were incubated in anaerobic conditions at the same temperatures for 60 days. Results reported here indicate that temperature exerted the main effect on bacterial abundance, diversity and assemblage composition. At higher temperature bacterial diversity and evenness increased significantly in aerobic conditions, whilst decreased in anaerobic conditions. In both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, biodegradation efficiencies of hydrocarbons were significantly and positively related with bacterial richness and evenness. Overall results presented here suggest that bioremediation strategies, which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity rather than the selection of specific taxa, may significantly increase the efficiency of hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated marine sediments. - Highlights: ► Bioremediation performance was investigated on hydrocarbon contaminated sediments. ► Major changes in bacterial diversity and assemblage composition were observed. ► Temperature exerted the major effect on bacterial assemblages. ► High bacterial diversity increased significantly biodegradation performance. ► This should be considered for sediment remediation by bio-treatments. - Bioremediation strategies which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity may significantly increase the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in contaminated marine sediments.

  20. Biofilm formation and ethanol inhibition by bacterial contaminants of biofuel fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Joseph O; Leathers, Timothy D; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Anderson, Amber M; Nunnally, Melinda S

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial contaminants can inhibit ethanol production in biofuel fermentations, and even result in stuck fermentations. Contaminants may persist in production facilities by forming recalcitrant biofilms. A two-year longitudinal study was conducted of bacterial contaminants from a Midwestern dry grind corn fuel ethanol facility. Among eight sites sampled in the facility, the combined liquefaction stream and yeast propagation tank were consistently contaminated, leading to contamination of early fermentation tanks. Among 768 contaminants isolated, 92% were identified as Lactobacillus sp., with the most abundant species being Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus mucosae, and Lactobacillus fermentum. Seven percent of total isolates showed the ability to form biofilms in pure cultures, and 22% showed the capacity to significantly inhibit ethanol production. However, these traits were not correlated. Ethanol inhibition appeared to be related to acetic acid production by contaminants, particularly by obligately heterofermentative species such as L. fermentum and L. mucosae. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Overcoming bacterial contamination of fuel ethanol fermentations -- alterntives to antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel ethanol fermentations are not performed under aseptic conditions and microbial contamination reduces yields and can lead to costly "stuck fermentations". Antibiotics are commonly used to combat contaminants, but these may persist in the distillers grains co-product. Among contaminants, it is kn...

  2. Contaminants in blood cultures: Importance, implications, interpretation and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargère, Sylvie; Cormier, Hélène; Verdon, Renaud

    2018-04-02

    Despite the development of new microbiological technologies, blood cultures remain the first line tool for the diagnosis of bloodstream infections. Their diagnostic value may be affected when a microorganism of questionable evidence is isolated, for example, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Bacillus spp., viridans group streptococci, Corynebacterium spp., Propionibacterium spp., and Micrococcus spp. Finally, making a correct diagnosis of pathogenicity (vs contamination) is very challenging. To review the current ways of dealing with the problem of blood culture contaminants and to provide practical suggestions to decrease blood culture contamination rates. PubMed electronic databases and existing reviews were searched up to December 2017 to retrieve relevant publications related to the topic. This review describes the burden of blood culture contamination, and analyses the main current issues and controversies in interpreting the occurrence of potential blood culture contaminants. It focuses on the best described approaches to decide whether blood culture contamination is present or not, and discusses the different strategies of prevention in adults. Each institution should have an efficient policy to prevent blood culture contamination, emphasizing the importance to follow guidelines for prescribing and collecting blood cultures. Training healthcare workers should focus on detrimental influence on patient care, and highlight the work and costs due to contaminants. The accurate differentiation of a contaminant from a true pathogen relies on a multidisciplinary approach and clinical judgment of experienced practitioners. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Prevention of airborne contamination and cross-contamination in germ-free mice by laminar flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaij, D. van der; Andres, A.H.

    1971-01-01

    The efficacy of horizontal and vertical laminar flow units (equipped with high-efficiency air filters) in the prevention of cross-contamination between cages and of contamination from outside has been demonstrated. With germ-free mice and using germ-free standard techniques for sterilization and for

  4. Response Mechanisms of Bacterial Degraders to Environmental Contaminants on the Level of Cell Walls and Cytoplasmic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavomíra Murínová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial strains living in the environment must cope with the toxic compounds originating from humans production. Surface bacterial structures, cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, surround each bacterial cell and create selective barriers between the cell interior and the outside world. They are a first site of contact between the cell and toxic compounds. Organic pollutants are able to penetrate into cytoplasmic membrane and affect membrane physiological functions. Bacteria had to evolve adaptation mechanisms to counteract the damage originated from toxic contaminants and to prevent their accumulation in cell. This review deals with various adaptation mechanisms of bacterial cell concerning primarily the changes in cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall. Cell adaptation maintains the membrane fluidity status and ratio between bilayer/nonbilayer phospholipids as well as the efflux of toxic compounds, protein repair mechanisms, and degradation of contaminants. Low energy consumption of cell adaptation is required to provide other physiological functions. Bacteria able to survive in toxic environment could help us to clean contaminated areas when they are used in bioremediation technologies.

  5. Response mechanisms of bacterial degraders to environmental contaminants on the level of cell walls and cytoplasmic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murínová, Slavomíra; Dercová, Katarína

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial strains living in the environment must cope with the toxic compounds originating from humans production. Surface bacterial structures, cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, surround each bacterial cell and create selective barriers between the cell interior and the outside world. They are a first site of contact between the cell and toxic compounds. Organic pollutants are able to penetrate into cytoplasmic membrane and affect membrane physiological functions. Bacteria had to evolve adaptation mechanisms to counteract the damage originated from toxic contaminants and to prevent their accumulation in cell. This review deals with various adaptation mechanisms of bacterial cell concerning primarily the changes in cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall. Cell adaptation maintains the membrane fluidity status and ratio between bilayer/nonbilayer phospholipids as well as the efflux of toxic compounds, protein repair mechanisms, and degradation of contaminants. Low energy consumption of cell adaptation is required to provide other physiological functions. Bacteria able to survive in toxic environment could help us to clean contaminated areas when they are used in bioremediation technologies.

  6. High bacterial contamination rate of electrocautery tips during total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Hussein; Zahar, Akos; Lausmann, Christian; Gehrke, Thorsten; Fickenscher, Helmut; Suero, Eduardo M; Gebauer, Matthias; Citak, Mustafa

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the study was to quantify the bacterial contamination rate of electrocautery tips during primary total joint replacement (TJR), as well as during aseptic and septic revision TJR. A total of 150 electrocautery tips were collected between April and July 2017. TJR surgeries were divided into three groups: (1) primary, (2) aseptic and (3) septic revisions. In each group, a total of 50 electrocautery tips were collected. A monopolar electrocautery with a reusable stainless-steel blade tip was used in all cases. The rate of bacterial contamination was determined for all groups. Correlation of exposure time and type of surgery was analyzed. The overall bacterial contamination rate was 14.7% (95% CI 9.4 to 21.4%). The highest contamination rate occurred in the septic revision group (30.0%; 95% CI 17.9 to 44.6%), followed by the primary cases group (10.0%; 95% CI 3.3 to 21.8%) and the aseptic revision group (4.0%; 95% CI 0.5 to 13.7%). Exposure time did not affect the bacterial contamination rate. In 12 out of 15 (80%) contaminations identified in the septic group, we found the same causative microorganism of the prosthetic joint infection on the electrocautery tip. The bacterial contamination of the electrocautery tips is relatively high, especially during septic hip revision arthroplasty. Electrocautery tips should be changed after debridement of infected tissue.

  7. Impact of oil contamination and biostimulation on the diversity of indigenous bacterial communities in soil microcosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, FF; Rosado, AS; Sebastian, GV; Casella, R; Machado, PLOA; Holmstrom, C; Kjelleberg, S; van Elsas, JD; Seldin, L

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of oil contamination and biostimulation (soil pH raise, and nitrogen, phosphate and sulphur addition) on the diversity of a bacterial community of an acidic Cambisol under Atlantic Forest. The experiment was based on the enumeration of bacterial

  8. Mechanism of cell integration on biomaterial implant surfaces in the presence of bacterial contamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yue, Chongxia; van der Mei, Henny C.; Kuijer, Roel; Busscher, Henk J.; Rochford, Edward T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial contamination during biomaterial implantation is often unavoidable, yielding a combat between cells and bacteria. Here we aim to determine the modulatory function of bacterial components on stem-cell, fibroblast, and osteoblast adhesion to a titanium alloy, including the role of

  9. Bacterial contamination of water samples in Gabon, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Ehrhardt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of water is a major burden in the public health setting of developing countries. We therefore assessed the quality of water samples in Gabon in 2013. The main findings were a contamination rate with coliforms of 13.5% and the detection of a possible environmental reservoir for extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria.

  10. Evaluation of bacterial contamination of 'suya' at Nsukka, Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and four (304) test samples in the course of "suya" meat processing and after display for sale were collected from seven centers for bacteria load screening. The result showed that all the samples tested were contaminated to varying degrees. The level of contamination however was highest in the fresh meat ...

  11. Bacterial endophytes enhance phytostabilization in soils contaminated with uranium and lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Muhammad Tayyab; Najam-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Idrees, Muhammad; Ullah, Inayat; Afzal, Muhammad

    2017-10-03

    The combined use of plants and bacteria is a promising approach for the remediation of polluted soil. In the current study, the potential of bacterial endophytes in partnership with Leptochloa fusca (L.) Kunth was evaluated for the remediation of uranium (U)- and lead (Pb)-contaminated soil. L. fusca was vegetated in contaminated soil and inoculated with three different endophytic bacterial strains, Pantoea stewartii ASI11, Enterobacter sp. HU38, and Microbacterium arborescens HU33, individually as well as in combination. The results showed that the L. fusca can grow in the contaminated soil. Bacterial inoculation improved plant growth and phytoremediation capacity: this manifested in the form of a 22-51% increase in root length, 25-62% increase in shoot height, 10-21% increase in chlorophyll content, and 17-59% more plant biomass in U- and Pb-contaminated soils as compared to plants without bacterial inoculation. Although L. fusca plants showed potential to accumulate U and Pb in their root and shoot on their own, bacterial consortia further enhanced metal uptake capacity by 53-88% for U and 58-97% for Pb. Our results indicate that the combination of L. fusca and endophytic bacterial consortia can effectively be used for the phytostabilization of both U- and Pb-contaminated soils.

  12. Bacterial contamination of mussels at Mahe estuary, Malabar coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gore, P.S.; Raveendran, O.; Iyer, T.S.G.; Varma, P.R.G.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Mussel samples from the mussel bed and near-by market, beach sand, sediment and water from the Mahe Estuary, Kerala, India were analysed for the bacterial quality. Indicator bacteria such as Escherichia coli and faecal streptococci were isolated...

  13. Preventing PCR amplification carryover contamination in a clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanzadeh, Jaber

    2004-01-01

    During the past two decades PCR and several other DNA/RNA amplification techniques have become important diagnostic tools in clinical laboratories. Amplification products contamination has been the main impediment to using these techniques routinely in diagnostic laboratories. Over the years, several creative pre- and post-amplification methods have been developed that prevent amplicon carryover contamination. These procedures, coupled with automated systems that employ real-time amplification and simultaneous detection in a closed system, have substantially reduced the possibility of false positive results due to amplification products carryover contamination.

  14. Quality assurance in the egg production chain to reduce the bacterial contamination of the eggshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Reu, K; Grijspeerdt, K; Heyndrickx, M; Uyttendaele, M; Herman, L

    2003-01-01

    Washing eggs in sterile plastic bags with diluent is an efficient sample preparation method for the determination of the bacterial contamination on eggshells. The total count of aerobic bacteria and the total count of Gramnegative bacteria on the eggshell can be used to detect critical contamination points in the egg production chain. The number of eggs to be sampled in a point of the production chain was determined on a statistical basis and fixed on 40 for non-graded eggs and on 20 for graded eggs. In two production chains, one cage production and one organic production system, critical contamination points were identified. The influence of the housing system on the bacterial contamination of the eggshell at the stable was studied. A positive correlation was found between the initial bacterial eggshell contamination and the concentration of bacteria in the air of the poultry houses. With the exception of heavily soiled shells, like shells from ground eggs, there is a poor correlation between the level of bacterial contamination and the visual eggshell contamination.

  15. Microbial Biofilm and Bacterial Contamination on Pig Carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Morar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to emphasize the presence of biofilm on meat surfaces using epifluorescences microscopy and establishing the microbial contamination level by classical microbiological methods. The research was performed in a pork slaughterhouse. The presence of microbial biofilm and the level of contamination were performed on surfaces from pig carcasses and cut pieces. Clusters of microorganisms included in a biofilm matrix were found on the surface of carcasses on sternal region, coast region, coccigian region and on surfaces of cut pieces: chop, front of thighs. Microbial biofilm was present on carcasses and cut pieces at least 3 days length, in regions with high humidity and microbial contamination level ranged of 102- 103 cfu/ cm2. The microbial load of the surfaces was assessed using the following microbiological indicators: total viable count (TVC, the number of enterobacteria and Pseudomonas genus. The level of carcasses contamination ranged on average from 1.3 x 10 cfu/ cm2 (neck to 2.6 x 103 cfu/cm2 (front of pulp. The proportion of Enterobacteriaceae-positive samples was 60%, with a low level of contamination (less than 1 cfu/ cm2. Germs of the Pseudomonas genus were absent in all the analyzed samples.

  16. Method of preventing contaminations in radioactive material handling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Shunji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the contamination on the floor surface of working places by laying polyvinyl butyral sheets over the floor surface, replacing when the sheets are contaminated, followed by burning. Method: Polyvinyl butyral sheets comprising 50 - 70 mol% of butyral component are laid in a radioactive material handling facility, radioactive materials are handled on the polyvinyl butyral sheets and the sheets are replaced when contaminated. The polyvinyl butyral sheets used contain 62 - 68 mol% of butyral component and has 0.03 - 0.2 mm thickness. The contaminated sheets are subjected to burning processing. This can surely collect radioactive materials and the sheets have favorable burnability, releasing no corrosive or deleterious gases. In addition, they are inexpensive and give no hindrance to the workers walking. (Takahashi, M.)

  17. Wound Dressing Procedure and Prevention of Contamination and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malawi Medical Journal. Wound Dressing Procedure and Prevention of Contamination and. Cross Infection. By: Chimwaza AF, MRN, MRN, Bsc (Hons) MSN Lecturer. Kachingwe-Sisya M., MRN, MRM. Bsc Nsg Edu. & Adm. MSN. Lecturer. Medical Surgical Nursing Department. Kamuzu College of Nursing. Blantyre. Malawi.

  18. Bacterial contamination of groundwater in urban area of Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubair, A.; Rippey, B.

    1999-01-01

    Well-water samples (in=193) were collected from urban areas of five districts of Karachi during the period 1993 to 1995 to evaluate its bacteriological quality and their impact on city environment and morbidity patterns of inhabitants. Samples were analyzed by the standard method American Public Health Association. The bacteriological contamination level suggest that the groundwater of Chaahi is mainly affected by contamination of wastewater containing high levels of coliform and faecal coliform bacteria. This study points towards serious need to control the seepage from sewerage system and use of contaminated well-water should be discouraged to reduce the incidence of water-borne diseases in order to improve the quality of life and health. (author)

  19. Aseptic and Bacterial Meningitis: Evaluation, Treatment, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Hillary R; Boyle, Sean D

    2017-09-01

    The etiologies of meningitis range in severity from benign and self-limited to life-threatening with potentially severe morbidity. Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency that requires prompt recognition and treatment. Mortality remains high despite the introduction of vaccinations for common pathogens that have reduced the incidence of meningitis worldwide. Aseptic meningitis is the most common form of meningitis with an annual incidence of 7.6 per 100,000 adults. Most cases of aseptic meningitis are viral and require supportive care. Viral meningitis is generally self-limited with a good prognosis. Examination maneuvers such as Kernig sign or Brudzinski sign may not be useful to differentiate bacterial from aseptic meningitis because of variable sensitivity and specificity. Because clinical findings are also unreliable, the diagnosis relies on the examination of cerebrospinal fluid obtained from lumbar puncture. Delayed initiation of antibiotics can worsen mortality. Treatment should be started promptly in cases where transfer, imaging, or lumbar puncture may slow a definitive diagnosis. Empiric antibiotics should be directed toward the most likely pathogens and should be adjusted by patient age and risk factors. Dexamethasone should be administered to children and adults with suspected bacterial meningitis before or at the time of initiation of antibiotics. Vaccination against the most common pathogens that cause bacterial meningitis is recommended. Chemoprophylaxis of close contacts is helpful in preventing additional infections.

  20. Bacterial Community Dynamics in Dichloromethane-Contaminated Groundwater Undergoing Natural Attenuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Wright

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The uncontrolled release of the industrial solvent methylene chloride, also known as dichloromethane (DCM, has resulted in widespread groundwater contamination in the United States. Here we investigate the role of groundwater bacterial communities in the natural attenuation of DCM at an undisclosed manufacturing site in New Jersey. This study investigates the bacterial community structure of groundwater samples differentially contaminated with DCM to better understand the biodegradation potential of these autochthonous bacterial communities. Bacterial community analysis was completed using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of groundwater samples (n = 26 with DCM contamination ranging from 0.89 to 9,800,000 μg/L. Significant DCM concentration-driven shifts in overall bacterial community structure were identified between samples, including an increase in the abundance of Firmicutes within the most contaminated samples. Across all samples, a total of 6,134 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs were identified, with 16 taxa having strong correlations with increased DCM concentration. Putative DCM degraders such as Pseudomonas, Dehalobacterium and Desulfovibrio were present within groundwater across all levels of DCM contamination. Interestingly, each of these taxa dominated specific DCM contamination ranges respectively. Potential DCM degrading lineages yet to be cited specifically as a DCM degrading organisms, such as the Desulfosporosinus, thrived within the most heavily contaminated groundwater samples. Co-occurrence network analysis revealed aerobic and anaerobic bacterial taxa with DCM-degrading potential were present at the study site. Our 16S rRNA gene survey serves as the first in situ bacterial community assessment of contaminated groundwater harboring DCM concentrations ranging over seven orders of magnitude. Diversity analyses revealed known as well as potentially novel DCM degrading taxa within defined DCM concentration

  1. Bacterial contamination of hemodialysis water in three randomly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-05

    Nov 5, 2015 ... CFU, especially at points such as the source water and the inlet to the machine in addition to the dialysate [Table 2]. Centre B has grossly contaminated isolates at virtually all the points [Table 2]. Table 1: Baseline data of dialysis centers and their water distribution systems. Center A. Center B. Center C.

  2. Analysis of bacterial strains from contaminated and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-05-02

    May 2, 2007 ... affecting the potential special programs leading towards the discovery of new commonly used materials that can be readily eliminated from biosphere, and have designed novel strategies aimed at facilitating the transformation of contaminants (Zinn et al., 2001). Biopolymers are gaining much more interest ...

  3. Fungal and bacterial contaminants of six spices and spice products ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aijay

    Sci. Technol. rosemary oil had about half the incidence of colon cancer or lung cancer compared with animals not eating ... processing, there is the problem of food contamination caused by people who are carriers of pathogens such as ... five patterns of infection. A.niger, A. fumigatus, and A. nidulans showed a continuous ...

  4. Bacterial contamination of re-usable laryngoscope blades during the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We aimed to assess the level of microbial contamination of re-usable laryngoscope blades at a public hospital in South Africa. Setting. The theatre complex of a secondary-level public hospital in Johannesburg. Methods. Blades from two different theatres were sampled twice daily, using a standardised technique, over a ...

  5. Bacterial contamination of medical doctors' white coats as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    potential risk (Douse et al., 2004). White coats are known to be potentially contaminated with pathogenic bacteria and there has been always a concern about the risk of transmitting pathogenic bacteria in hospital settings (Zachary et al.,. 2001; Chacko et al., 2003; Burden et al.,. 2011; Burden et al., 2013; Robati et al., 2013).

  6. Bacterial community structure and abundances of antibiotic resistance genes in heavy metals contaminated agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengli; Zhao, Xiaoxue; Li, Qingbo; Liu, Jia; Ding, Jizhe; Wu, Huiying; Zhao, Zongsheng; Ba, Yue; Cheng, Xuemin; Cui, Liuxin; Li, Hongping; Zhu, Jingyuan

    2018-01-22

    Soil contamination with heavy metals is a worldwide problem especially in China. The interrelation of soil bacterial community structure, antibiotic resistance genes, and heavy metal contamination in soil is still unclear. Here, seven agricultural areas (G1-G7) with heavy metal contamination were sampled with different distances (741 to 2556 m) to the factory. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Shannon index were used to analyze bacterial community diversity. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR was used to detect the relative abundance of ARGs sul1, sul2, tetA, tetM, tetW, one mobile genetic elements (MGE) inti1. Results showed that all samples were polluted by Cadmium (Cd), and some of them were polluted by lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn). DGGE showed that the most abundant bacterial species were found in G7 with the lightest heavy metal contamination. The results of the principal component analysis and clustering analysis both showed that G7 could not be classified with other samples. The relative abundance of sul1 was correlated with Cu, Zn concentration. Gene sul2 are positively related with total phosphorus, and tetM was associated with organic matter. Total gene abundances and relative abundance of inti1 both correlated with organic matter. Redundancy analysis showed that Zn and sul2 were significantly related with bacterial community structure. Together, our results indicate a complex linkage between soil heavy metal concentration, bacterial community composition, and some global disseminated ARG abundance.

  7. Dynamic Effects of Biochar on the Bacterial Community Structure in Soil Contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Bian, Yongrong; Wang, Fang; Xu, Min; Ni, Ni; Yang, Xinglun; Gu, Chenggang; Jiang, Xin

    2017-08-16

    Amending soil with biochar is an effective soil remediation strategy for organic contaminants. This study investigated the dynamic effects of wheat straw biochar on the bacterial community structure during remediation by high-throughput sequencing. The wheat straw biochar amended into the soil significantly reduced the bioavailability and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Biochar amendment helped to maintain the bacterial diversity in the PAH-contaminated soil. The relationship between the immobilization of PAHs and the soil bacterial diversity fit a quadratic model. Before week 12 of the incubation, the incubation time was the main factor contributing to the changes in the soil bacterial community structure. However, biochar greatly affected the bacterial community structure after 12 weeks of amendment, and the effects were dependent upon the biochar type. Amendment with biochar mainly facilitated the growth of rare bacterial genera (relative abundance of 0.01-1%) in the studied soil. Therefore, the application of wheat straw biochar into PAH-contaminated soil can reduce the environmental risks of PAHs and benefit the soil microbial ecology.

  8. A review of current strategies to reduce intraoperative bacterial contamination of surgical wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Surgical site infections are a mean topic in cardiac surgery, leading to a prolonged hospitalization, and substantially increased morbidity and mortality. One source of pathogens is the endogenous flora of the patient?s skin, which can contaminate the surgical site. A number of preoperative skin care strategies are performed to reduce bacterial contamination like preoperative antiseptic showering, hair removal, antisepsis of the skin, adhesive barrier drapes, and antimicrobial prophylaxis. Fu...

  9. Bacterial Endophytes Isolated from Plants in Natural Oil Seep Soils with Chronic Hydrocarbon Contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Lumactud, Rhea; Shen, Shu Yi; Lau, Mimas; Fulthorpe, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial endophytic communities of four plants growing abundantly in soils highly contaminated by hydrocarbons were analyzed through culturable and and culture-independent means. Given their tolerance to the high levels of petroleum contamination at our study site, we sought evidence that Achillea millefolium, Solidago canadensis, Trifolium aureum and Dactylis glomerata support high levels of hydrocarbon degrading endophytes. A total of 190 isolates were isolated from four plant species....

  10. Effect of irradiation on the detection of bacterial DNA in contaminated food samples by DNA hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, T.F.; Towner, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    A membrane-based DNA hybridization technique was used in a model system to examine the effect of irradiation treatment on the detection of bacterial contamination in foodstuffs. Although hybridization signals were reduced compared with otherwise identical unirradiated food samples, artificial contamination levels in excess of 10 5 cfu per test could be distinguished in 12 of the 13 foods examined following the irradiation process. In no case were viable bacteria detected following irradiation treatment. (Author)

  11. Characterization of the contaminant bacterial communities in sugarcane first-generation industrial ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatelli, Maria L; Quecine, Maria C; Silva, Mariana S; Labate, Carlos A

    2017-09-15

    The industrial ethanolic fermentation process is operated in distilleries, either in fed-batch or continuous mode. A consequence of the large industrial ethanol production is bacterial contamination in the fermentation tanks, which is responsible for significant economic losses. To investigate this community, we accessed the profile of bacterial contaminant from two distilleries in Brazil, each operating a different fermentation mode, throughout sugarcane harvest of 2013-2014. Bacterial communities were accessed through Illumina culture-independent 16S rDNA gene sequencing, and qPCR was used to quantify total bacteria abundance. Both ethanol production modes showed similar bacterial abundance, around 105 gene copies/mL. 16S rDNA sequencing showed that 92%-99% of the sequences affiliated to Lactobacillus genus. Operational taxonomic units differently represented belonged mainly to Lactobacillus, but also to Weissella, Pediococcus, Acetobacter and Anaeosporobacter, although in lower abundance. Alpha-diversity only showed a correlation through the fermentation tanks in continuous mode, where it was always higher in the second and third tanks. Beta-diversity clearly separated the two distilleries and metagenome prediction reinforces clusterization within distilleries. Despite certain variations between bacterial community in the distilleries throughout harvest season, Lactobacillus were the main genera reported in both distilleries and bacterial community seemed to persist along time, suggesting bacterial reinfestation. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Study of correlation between viral and bacterial contamination of waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoffi, Nessrine

    2013-01-01

    Our study was developped following two main axes: the detection of fecal indicators (Escherichia coli) and the investigation of enteroviruses indicators of viral contamination in 3 Tunisian WWTP residues. The detection of enetroviruses was performed by real time PCR. Enteroviruses were detected in all samples whiles, 26 pour cent strongly positive, 53 pour cent moderately positive and 21 pour cent weakly positive. In addition, all samples were contaminated by E.coli with a decrease of concentration in effluent compared to influent. The results showed that E. coli is sensitive to biological treatment in charguia. A correlation between viral and bacterial contamination may be considered.

  13. Rapid cleanup of bacterial DNA from samples containing aerosol contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menking, Darrell E.; Kracke, Suzanne K.; Emanuel, Peter A.; Valdes, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is an in vitro enzymatic, synthetic method used to amplify specific DNA sequences from organisms. Detection of DNA using gene probes allows for absolute identification not only of specific organisms, but also of genetic material in recombinant organisms. PCR is an exquisite biological method for detecting bacteria in aerosol samples. A major challenge facing detection of DNA from field samples is that they are almost sure to contain impurities, especially impurities that inhibit amplification through PCR. DNA is being extracted from air, sewage/stool samples, food, sputum, a water and sediment; however, multi- step, time consuming methods are required to isolate the DNA from the surrounding contamination. This research focuses on developing a method for rapid cleanup of DNA which combines extraction and purification of DNA while, at the same time, removing inhibitors from 'dirty samples' to produce purified, PCR-ready DNA. GeneReleaser produces PCR-ready DNA in a rapid five-minute protocol. GeneReleaser resin was able to clean up sample contain micrograms of typical aerosol and water contaminants. The advantages of using GR are that it is rapid, inexpensive, requires one-step, uses no hazardous material and produces PCR-ready DNA.

  14. Innovative Capping Technology To Prevent The Migration of Toxic Chemicals From Contaminated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capping is a common strategy for decreasing the risk associated with contaminated sediments in lakes and streams. Historically, caps have been designed to physically isolate contaminated sediments and prevent the transport of contaminants from sediments into the water above them...

  15. EFFECT OF REFINED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS CONTAMINATION ON BACTERIAL POPULATION AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CULTIVATED AGRICULTURAL SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale Sogo Olalemi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation into the effect of refined petroleum products contamination on bacterial population and physicochemical characteristics of cultivated agricultural soil was carried out. The soil samples obtained from the Teaching and Research Farm, Obakekere, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Ondo State were contaminated with varying volumes of petrol, diesel and kerosene. The results revealed higher bacterial populations in uncontaminated soils than contaminated soils. The counts of bacteria ranged from 3.0 × 105 to 5.0 × 105 cfu/g in uncontaminated soils and 1.0 × 105 to 3.0 × 105 cfu/g in contaminated soils. The isolated bacteria were identified as Bacillus subtilis, Flavobacterium lutescens, Micrococcus luteus, Corynebacterium variabilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens. The contamination had no significant effect on pH, potassium, sodium, organic carbon and nitrogen content of the soils, while the moisture, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium content of the contaminated soils were significantly different (P < 0.05 compared with the uncontaminated soils. The ability of Bacillus subtilis, Flavobacterium lutescens, Micrococcus luteus, and Pseudomonas fluorescens to utilize the refined petroleum products suggest that these bacteria had potential to bioremediate petroleum contaminated soils.

  16. Role of lauric acid-potassium hydroxide concentration on bacterial contamination of spray washed broiler carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed in a spray cabinet with various concentrations of lauric acid (LA)-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions. Fifty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing line of...

  17. Topical lotions utilized in outpatient rehabilitation clinics as a potential source of bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Henry G; Levine, David; Bage, Julie; Giles, David K; Collier, A Grace

    2018-02-26

    Soft tissue mobilization and massage requiring lotions or creams are commonly used interventions in outpatient rehabilitation clinics. For at least 50 years hand creams used in healthcare settings have been found to be contaminated by bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the current state of bacterial contamination of lotions used in clinics and to determine the efficacy of lotion preservatives to kill bacteria. Unopened containers of lotions were studied, along with 81 lotion containers used in 22 outpatient clinics in southeast Tennessee and northwest Georgia. Three sites on each container were sampled using sterile swabs. At a microbiology lab, bacterial growth media was inoculated and incubated. Of the 81 containers sampled, 16 supported bacterial growth (19.8%). Container threads displayed the highest contamination compared with other container locations (p < 0.01). No bacteria were found in unopened lotion containers, although when challenged with live bacterial cultures lotion preservatives did not kill bacteria tested. Enrichment cultures using lotions studied here supported the growth of several bacterial species. These findings suggest the need for standardized protocols to help reduce potential healthcare-associated infections due to use of lotions. Improved efficacy of preservatives added to lotions should be a priority.

  18. Assessment of bacterial contamination in the sectors of Clinical Medicine and Surgery Small Animal Veterinary Hospital, UFCG, PB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Alves Dias

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Dias R.A., Souza A.P. & Garino Júnior F. [Assessment of bacterial contamination in the sectors of Clinical Medicine and Surgery Small Animal Veterinary Hospital, UFCG, PB.] Avaliação da contaminação bacteriana nos setores de Clínica e Cirurgia de Pequenos Animais do Hospital Veterinário da UFCG, PB. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(2:173-177, 2015. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Av. Universitária, s/n, Bairro Santa Cecília, Patos, PB 58708-110, Brasil. E-mail: rafa.ad@hotmail.com With this study aimed to evaluate bacterial contamination sectors Clinic and Surgery Small Animal Veterinary Hospital UFCG, in order to prevent infections in patients attending hospital. An assessment of the environmental contamination of sectors before and after disinfection, where was collected samples of air, surfaces and hands of people who deal directly with the animals. Then the test was made of the effectiveness of disinfectants used. Of the 40 samples collected, was identified in 5 of them (12.5% Enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli and Klebisiella pneumoniae and in 22 samples (55% was identified Staphylococcus coagulase negative and positive. Was seen in the quantitative analysis that the number of cfu in some sample was above the indicated. The test showed that the disinfectant solution was effective against all micro-organisms found in the environments. The results indicate that more attention to procedures performed in the disinfection of areas evaluated, and also include measures to prevent contamination at these sites.

  19. Evaluation of radiation resistance of the bacterial contaminants from femoral heads processed for allogeneic transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer

    2009-01-01

    Femoral heads excised during surgery were obtained from patients who had a fractured neck of the femur and were processed as bone allograft. The bacterial contaminants were isolated from femoral heads at different stages of processing and identified based on morphological characteristics and biochemical tests. Bacterial contaminants on bone were mainly Gram-positive bacilli and cocci (58.3%). Twenty-four isolates from bone samples were screened for resistance to radiation. The D 10 values for Gram-negative bacteria isolated from femoral heads ranged from 0.17 to 0.65 kGy. Higher D 10 values 0.56-1.04 kGy were observed for Gram-positive bacterial isolates.

  20. The impact of overcrowding on the bacterial contamination of blood cultures in the ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Chi; Lee, Nan-Yao; Chuang, Ming-Che; Chen, Po-Lin; Chang, Chia-Ming; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2012-07-01

    This study aims to determine the risk factors associated with the bacterial contamination of blood cultures among adults visiting the emergency department (ED). Clinical variables and medical records of adults with bacterial growth of blood cultures in the ED as well as the degree of ED crowding, between August 2007 and July 2008, were prospectively collected. Of the 11 491 adults who underwent blood culture sampling, the medical records of 558 (4.86%) eligible patients with bacterial growth in their blood cultures were analyzed. Most patients (366, or 3.19%) had true bacteremia, whereas 192 (1.67%) were regarded as contaminated. In multivariate analyses, ED overcrowding (scoring was based on a National Emergency Department Overcrowding Study [NEDOCS] score ≥ 100 points) was independently associated with blood culture contamination (odds ratio [OR], 1.58; P = .04). In contrast, other medical comorbidities, such as liver cirrhosis (OR, 0.31; P = .02), thrombocytopenia (100 mg/L; OR, 0.24; P overcrowded (60-100), overcrowded (100-140), severely overcrowded (140-180), and dangerously overcrowded (180-200), there was a strong correlation between blood culture contamination rates and the degrees of ED crowding (γ = 0.99, P overcrowding may have an adverse impact on the quality of clinical care, including increasing the risk of blood culture contamination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bacterial Contamination of Iranian Paper Currency and Their Antibiotic Resistance Patterns

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    Farzaneh Firoozeh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paper currency is used in exchange for services, and thisis why the circulation of paper currency from person to person expandsmicroorganisms. Objectives:: Paper banknotes would be a vector for transmission of pathogenic microorganisms through handling. This study aimed to determine bacterial contamination of Iranian paper currencies in circulation and their antibiotic resistance patterns. Materials and Methods: In this study, 337 currency notes of different value were collected from markets, shops, restaurants, bus stations and banks in Kashan, Iran during April 2015 to March 2016. The currency notes transferred to microbiology laboratory and were tested for bacterial contamination using standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic resistance patterns of isolated bacteria were determined by disk diffusion method according to CLSI standards. The results and data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Of 337 currency notes, 262 (77.7% were identified with bacterial contamination. Bacteria isolated from currency notes were as follows: Bacillus spp 113 (43.1%, coagulase-negative Staphylococci 99 (37.7%, Escherichia coli 20 (7.6%, Enterococci species 14 (5.3%, Staphylococcus aureus 8 (3.1%, Klebsiella spp 4 (1.5%, Shigella species 2 (0.8%, Pseudomonas species 2 (0.8%. The most and least contaminated currency notes were 50000 and 500 Rials, respectively. The most resistance rates in gram negative rods were against nalidixicacid, and ampicillin. Also most resistance rates in Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Enterococci species were against ampicillin, erythromycin and tetracycline. Conclusion: Our study revealed that the bacterial contamination among Iranian paper currency in circulation especially those obtained from certain sources including shops and bus stations is high and in most cases these bacterial isolates are antibiotic resistant strains.

  2. Broad-Range Bacterial Capture from Fluid-Samples: Implications for Amplification-Free Contamination Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika WEBER

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fluid-Screen, Inc. presents a bacterial concentration and filtration method based on dielectrophoresis and alternating current kinetics. Dielectrophoresis has been previously shown to induce particle motion; however, bacterial capture efficiency and reproducibility have consistently been low, reducing its potential for practical applications. In this study, we introduce a novel, patent-pending electrode system optimized to simultaneously capture a wide range of bacterial species from a variety of aqueous solutions. Specifically, we show that the method of dielectrophoresis used induces responses in both characteristic Gram- negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis bacteria, as well as with Bacillus subtilis and Aestuariimicrobium kwangyangense. We have adapted the electrode design to create a bacterial sample preparatio unit, termed the sample sorter, that is able to capture multiple bacterial species and release them simultaneously for bacterial concentration and exchange from complex matrices to defined buffer media. This technology can be used on its own or in conjunction with standard bacterial detection methods such as mass spectroscopy. The Fluid-Screen product will dramatically improve testing and identification of bacterial contaminants in various industrial settings by eliminating the need for amplification of samples and by reducing the time to identification.

  3. Surface nano-structured materials to control bacterial contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Petkova, Petya Stoyanova

    2016-01-01

    The spread of bacteria and infections, initially associated with an increased number of hospital-acquired infections, has now extended into the community causing severe and difficult to treat diseases. Additionally, many of those diseases are evoked by bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics. Overcoming the ability of bacteria to develop resistance will potentially reduce the burden of these infections on the healthcare systems worldwide and prevent thousands of deaths each year. ...

  4. Viral and bacterial contamination in a sedimentary aquifer in Uruguay: evaluation of coliforms as regional indicators of viral contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamazo, Pablo; Colina, Rodney; Victoria, Matias; Alvareda, Elena; Burutatran, Luciana; Ramos, Julian; Olivera, María; Soler, Joan

    2015-04-01

    In many areas of Uruguay groundwater is the only source of water for human consumption and for industrial-agricultural economic activities. Traditionally considered as a safe source, groundwater is commonly used without any treatment. The Uruguayan law requires bacteriological (fecal) analysis for most water uses, but virological analyses are not mentioned in the legislation. In the Salto district, where groundwater is used for human consumption and for agricultural activities, bacterial contamination has been detected in several wells but no viruses analysis have been performed. The Republic University (UDELAR), with the support of the National Agency for Research and Innovation (ANII), is studying the incidence of virus and fecal bacteria in groundwater on an intensive agriculture area of the Salto district. An initial screening campaign of 44 wells was performed in which, besides total and fecal coliforms, rotavirus and adenovirus were detected. A subgroup of the screening wells (15) where selected for bimonthly sampling during a year. In accordance with literature results, single well data analysis shows that coliform and viral contamination can be considered as independent variables. However, when spatial data is integrated, coliform and viral contamination show linear correlation. In this work we present the survey results, we analyse the temporal incidence of variables like precipitation, temperature and chemical composition in well contamination and we discuss the value of coliforms as global indicator of viral contamination for the Salto aquifer.

  5. Stored Canine Whole Blood Units: What is the Real Risk of Bacterial Contamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglio, A; Stefanetti, V; Antognoni, M T; Cappelli, K; Capomaccio, S; Coletti, M; Passamonti, F

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial contamination of whole blood (WB) units can result in transfusion-transmitted infection, but the extent of the risk has not been established and may be underestimated in veterinary medicine. To detect, quantify, and identify bacterial microorganisms in 49 canine WB units during their shelf life. Forty-nine healthy adult dogs. Forty-nine WB units were included in the study. Immediately after collection, 8 sterile samples from the tube segment line of each unit were aseptically collected and tested for bacterial contamination on days 0, 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 of storage. A qPCR assay was performed on days 0, 21, and 35 to identify and quantify any bacterial DNA. On bacterial culture, 47/49 blood units were negative at all time points tested, 1 unit was positive for Enterococcus spp. on days 0 and 1, and 1 was positive for Escherichia coli on day 35. On qPCR assay, 26 of 49 blood units were positive on at least 1 time point and the bacterial loads of the sequences detected (Propionobacterium spp., Corynebacterium spp., Caulobacter spp., Pseudomonas spp., Enterococcus spp., Serratia spp., and Leucobacter spp.) were <80 genome equivalents (GE)/μL. Most of the organisms detected were common bacteria, not usually implicated in septic transfusion reactions. The very low number of GE detected constitutes an acceptable risk of bacterial contamination, indicating that WB units have a good sanitary shelf life during commercial storage. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Limiting bacterial contamination of enteral nutrient solutions: 6-year history with reduction of contamination at two institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerman, K E

    1992-02-01

    Running enteral nutrient solution (ENS) bacterial contamination logs that were collected over a 6-year time frame are presented. At hospital A, reconstituted ENS were prepared by the pharmacy department in bulk and were frozen in the final container. These solutions were cultured and counted after 12 hours of storage at room temperature to stimulate this institution's hang time. Major reductions in ENS bacterial counts occurred after improvements in sanitation, a reduction in solution hang time, the conversion to the use of sterile water for dilution and reconstitution of ENS, and most dramatically, after the incorporation of a preservative (potassium sorbate) to reconstituted ENS. At hospital B, ENS usage consisted of canned feedings that were prepared by nursing personnel and were transferred to the feeding container at the bedside. Reductions in final counts of contamination of ENS occurred after procedural changes, which included container changes every 24 hours, use of sterile water for dilution, cleansing of can lids with alcohol swabs before use, rinsing and air drying of intermittent feeding containers between feedings, and limiting feeding container fills to 4-hour hang time quantities. At both institutions, the value of an ongoing three-class enteral quality control program with a defined acceptance/rejection criteria was demonstrated in that ENS contamination was reduced to acceptable levels comparable with federal standards for milk and dairy products.

  7. REGIONAL EVALUATION OF BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION IN HOSPITAL ENVIRONMENT COCKROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vahabi, J. Rafinejad, P. Mohammadi, F. Biglarian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cockroaches play an important role in transmission of different diseases either mechanically and occasionally biologically. The aim of current study was on the identification of cockroaches and their contamination to different bacteria in two hospitals affiliated to the Kordestan University of Medical Sciences which was performed in 2003. Cockroaches were collected from different parts using sticky traps, direct collection, and by means of vacuum cleaner. Collected cockroaches were identified according to the reliable systematic keys. Some of the collected cockroaches were selected randomly for the presence of bacteria in their external parts as well as in the digestive tract using specific culture media. Totally 450 specimens were collected. From which 44.4% identified as American Cockroach, Periplaneta Americana and remaining German cockroach, Blattella germanica. Among collected cockroaches 58 specimens of German cockroaches and 40 American cockroaches were selected to search for the presence of bacteria. Results of culture media exhibited that 89.8% (88.98 of cockroaches were positive to the bacteria. The bacteria were found mainly on external parts (67% and remaining from alimentary canal. The main common bacteria was found Escherichia coli, however, only 5.1% was Escherichia sp., which was found on external parts. Among two hospitals it is found that Tohid hospital was more infected (97.5%. In the hospitals the infectivity of American cockroaches was more prevalent than other species. All the American cockroaches and 70% of German cockroaches were infected to at least one bacterium. Result showed that the presence of cockroaches in the hospitals can threaten the health of hospitalized patients. Both cosmopolitan species was found infected in the hospitals. Sanitation of different departments as well as different method of control is recommended in the context of Integrated Vector Management for cockroach control.

  8. Preventing Bacterial Infections using Metal Oxides Nanocoatings on Bone Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceac, L. D.; Straticiuc, S.; Hanganu, E.; Stafie, L.; Calin, G.; Gavrilescu, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays bone implant removal is caused by infection that occurs around it possibly acquired after surgery or during hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to reveal some metal oxides applied as coatings on bone implant thus limiting the usual antibiotics-resistant bacteria colonization. Therefore ZnO, TiO2 and CuO were synthesized and structurally and morphologically analized in order to use them as an alternative antimicrobial agents deposited on bone implant. XRD, SEM, and FTIR characterization techniques were used to identify structure and texture of these nanoscaled metal oxides. These metal oxides nanocoatings on implant surface play a big role in preventing bacterial infection and reducing surgical complications.

  9. Evolution of bacterial community during bioremediation of PAHs in a coal tar contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lors, C.; Ryngaert, A.; Perie, F.; Diels, L.; Damidot, D. [University of Lille, Lille (France)

    2010-11-15

    The monitoring of a windrow treatment applied to soil contaminated by mostly 2, 3- and 4-ring PAHs produced by coal tar distillation was performed by following the evolution of both PAH concentration and the bacterial community. Total and PAH-degrading bacterial community structures were followed by 165 rRNA PCR-DGGE in parallel with quantification by bacterial counts and 16 PAH measurements. Six months of biological treatment led to a strong decrease in 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAH concentrations (98, 97 and 82%, respectively). This result was associated with the activity of bacterial PAH-degraders belonging mainly to the Gamma proteobacteria, in particular the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas genera which were detected over the course of the treatment. This group was considered to be a good bioindicator to determine the potential PAH biodegradation of contaminated soil. Conversely other species like the Beta proteobacteria were detected after 3 months when 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAHs were almost completely degraded. Thus presence of the Beta proteobacteria group could be considered a good candidate indicator to estimate the endpoint of biotreatment of this type of PAH contaminated soil.

  10. Diversity of bacterial communities along a petroleum contamination gradient in desert soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Raeid M M; Al-Kindi, Sumaiya; Al-Kharusi, Samiha

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities in oil-polluted desert soils have been rarely studied compared to their counterparts from freshwater and marine environments. We investigated bacterial diversity and changes therein in five desert soils exposed to different levels of oil pollution. Automated rRNA intergenic spacer (ARISA) analysis profiles showed that the bacterial communities of the five soils were profoundly different (analysis of similarities (ANOSIM), R = 0.45, P pollution levels. Multivariate analyses of ARISA profiles revealed that the microbial communities in the S soil, which contains the highest level of contamination, were different from the other soils and formed a completely separate cluster. A total of 16,657 ribosomal sequences were obtained, with 42-89 % of these sequences belonging to the phylum Proteobacteria. While sequences belonging to Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria were encountered in all soils, sequences belonging to anaerobic bacteria from the classes Deltaproteobacteria, Clostridia, and Anaerolineae were only detected in the S soil. Sequences belonging to the genus Terriglobus of the class Acidobacteria were only detected in the B3 soil with the lowest level of contamination. Redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that oil contamination level was the most determinant factor that explained variations in the microbial communities. We conclude that the exposure to different levels of oil contamination exerts a strong selective pressure on bacterial communities and that desert soils are rich in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria that could potentially contribute to the degradation of hydrocarbons.

  11. The role indigenous bacterial isolates for bioremediation agent in the uranium contaminated aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochd Yazid

    2014-01-01

    A Research on the role of indigenous bacterial isolates for bio-remediation agent of the uranium contaminated in the aquatic environment has been conducted. The objective of the research is to study the role of Pseudomonas sp and Bacillus sp. have been isolated from low level uranium waste for bioremediation agent in their environment, such as the determination of efficiency of the uranium binding compared by the non indigenous bacterial, location of these binding and the influences of added acethyl acid stimulant. The uranium reduction studied was measured by weighting bacterial biomass and uranium concentration was measured by spectrophotometer. The acethyl acid stimulant addition has been done with the variation of concentration and volume. The efficiency of the uranium reduction by indigenous bacterial isolate such as Pseudomonas sp were 84.99 % and Bacillus sp were 52.70 %, so the reduction efficiency by non indigenous bacterial such as Pseudomonas aerogenes were 78.47 % and Bacillus subtilis were 45.22 % for 54 hours incubation time. The result of this research can be concluded that Pseudomonas sp and Bacillus sp. Indigenous bacterial have been isolates from the liquid uranium waste can contributed in bioremediation agent for uranium radionuclide in the environment for 60 ppm concentration with reduction efficiency 52.70 %-84.99 %, that is higher non indigenous bacterial for 54 hours incubation time, the stimulant addition of acethyl acid, the efficiency can be increased up to 99.8 %. (author)

  12. Nanosized Selenium: A Novel Platform Technology to Prevent Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi

    As an important category of bacterial infections, healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are considered an increasing threat to the safety and health of patients worldwide. HAIs lead to extended hospital stays, contribute to increased medical costs, and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In the United States, infections encountered in the hospital or a health care facility affect more than 1.7 million patients, cost 35.7 billion to 45 billion, and contribute to 88,000 deaths in hospitals annually. The most conventional and widely accepted method to fight against bacterial infections is using antibiotics. However, because of the widespread and sometimes inappropriate use of antibiotics, many strains of bacteria have rapidly developed antibiotic resistance. Those new, stronger bacteria pose serious, worldwide threats to public health and welfare. In 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported antibiotic resistance as a global serious threat that is no longer a prediction for the future but is now reality. It has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country. The most effective strategy to prevent antibiotic resistance is minimizing the use of antibiotics. In recent years, nanomaterials have been investigated as one of the potential substitutes of antibiotics. As a result of their vastly increased ratio of surface area to volume, nanomaterials will likely exert a stronger interaction with bacteria which may affect bacterial growth and propagation. A major concern of most existing antibacterial nanomaterials, like silver nanoparticles, is their potential toxicity. But selenium is a non-metallic material and a required nutrition for the human body, which is recommended by the FDA at a 53 to 60 μg daily intake. Nanosized selenium is considered to be healthier and less toxic compared with many metal-based nanomaterials due to the generation of reactive oxygen species from metals, especially heavy metals. Therefore, the objectives of

  13. Mechanism of cell integration on biomaterial implant surfaces in the presence of bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Chongxia; van der Mei, Henny C; Kuijer, Roel; Busscher, Henk J; Rochford, Edward T J

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial contamination during biomaterial implantation is often unavoidable, yielding a combat between cells and bacteria. Here we aim to determine the modulatory function of bacterial components on stem-cell, fibroblast, and osteoblast adhesion to a titanium alloy, including the role of toll-like-receptors (TLRs). Presence of heat-sacrificed Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced dose and cell-type dependent responses. Stem-cells were most sensitive to bacterial presence, demonstrating decreased adhesion number yet increased adhesion effort with a relatively large focal adhesion contact area. Blocking TLRs had no effect on stem-cell adhesion in presence of S. aureus, but blocking both TLR2 and TLR4 induced an increased adhesion effort in presence of E. coli. Neither lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, nor bacterial DNA provoked the same cell response as did whole bacteria. Herewith we suggest a new mechanism as to how biomaterials are integrated by cells despite the unavoidable presence of bacterial contamination. Stimulation of host cell integration of implant surfaces may open a new window to design new biomaterials with enhanced healing, thereby reducing the risk of biomaterial-associated infection of both "hardware-based" implants as well as of tissue-engineered constructs, known to suffer from similarly high infection risks as currently prevailing in "hardware-based" implants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Bacterial Contamination into Ready-to-Eat Foods Sold in Middle Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananchaipattana, Chiraporn; Bari, Md Latiful; Inatsu, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

     Bacterial contamination in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods prepared and sold by small businesses in middle Thailand was surveyed. The 135 samples were randomly purchased from open markets and supermarkets in Bangkok and Pathum Thani provinces during May 2013 to February 2015. The results indicated that the rate of contamination in cooked pork, chicken meat and cooked aquatic items were 13/39 (33%), 18/45 (40%) and 14/57 (25%), respectively and the rate of bacterial contamination of collected samples from open market and supermarket were 26/67 (39%) and 19/68 (27%), respectively. Therefore, no statistically significant difference of contamination rate between two kinds of market or among three categories of food. The most contaminated pathogenic bacteria was Staphylococcus aureus 27/135 (20%) while that of Salmonella spp. was the lowest 5/135 (4%) in each categories of collected food samples. Implementation of suitable hygienic practices in the small food businesses are thought to be required to reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses caused by the consumption of RTE foods sold in middle Thailand.

  15. Bacterial contamination of stethoscopes used by health workers: public health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uneke, Chigozie J; Ogbonna, Annayo; Oyibo, Patrick G; Onu, Christian M

    2010-08-04

    This study was designed to assess both the potential for bacterial transmission by stethoscopes used by health-care workers in Nigeria and the implications for patient safety and control of hospital-acquired infections. A structured questionnaire was administered to health workers and the surface of the diaphragm of their stethoscopes swabbed for bacteriological analysis using standard techniques. Of the 107 stethoscopes surveyed, 84 (79%) were contaminated with bacteria; 59 (81%) of the contaminated stethoscopes belonged to physicians and 25 (74%) were from other health workers. Isolates included Staphylococcus aureus (54%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19%), Enterococcus faecalis (14%), and Escherichia coli (13%). All stethoscopes that had never been cleaned were contaminated while lower levels of contamination were found on those cleaned one week or less before the survey (chi(2) = 22.4, P < .05). Contamination was significantly higher on stethoscopes cleaned with only water (100%) compared to those cleaned with alcohol (49%) (chi(2) = 30.17, P < .05). Significantly fewer (9%) stethoscopes from health workers who washed their hands after seeing each patient were contaminated when compared with the instruments (86%) of those who did not practice hand washing (chi(2) = 23.79, P < .05). E. coli showed the highest antibiotic resistance, while S. aureus showed the highest antibiotic susceptibility. Strict adherence to stethoscope disinfection practices by health workers can minimize cross-contamination and ensure improved patient safety in hospital environments.

  16. Bacterial Contamination of Clothes and Environmental Items in a Third-Level Hospital in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Cataño

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study evaluates the bacterial contamination rate of items in the hospital setting that are in frequent contact with patients and/or physicians. By determining the bacterial species and the associated antibiotic resistance that patients are exposed to. Methods. Hospital-based cross-sectional surveillance study of potential bacterial reservoirs. Cultures from 30 computer keyboards, 32 curtains, 40 cell phones, 35 white coats, and 22 ties were obtained. Setting. The study was conducted an urban academic 650-bed teaching hospital providing tertiary care to the city of Medellin, Colombia. Results. In total, 235 bacterial isolates were obtained from 159 surfaces sampled. 98.7% of the surfaces grew positive bacterial cultures with some interesting resistance profiles. Conclusion. There are significant opportunities to reduce patient exposure to frequently pathogenic bacteria in the hospital setting; patients are likely exposed to many bacteria through direct contact with white coats, curtains, and ties. They may be exposed to additional bacterial reservoirs indirectly through the hands of clinicians, using computer keyboards and cell phones.

  17. Bacterial contamination of automotive fuels in a tropical region: the case of Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    E. Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn; Blanco, Rigoberto

    2008-01-01

    Microbial contamination of fuel has been the cause of several problems in transportation and storage of these products. Due to the lack of previous studies related to these problems in Costa Rica, bacterial quality was evaluated biannually in automotive fuels stored in the four oil distribution facilities of the Costa Rican Petroleum Refinery (RECOPE). In 12 oil storage tanks, for a total of 96 samples, mesophilic, heterotrophic aerobic/facultative counts (ASTM D6974-04) and identification of...

  18. THE STUDY OF BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION OF MILK MIXES, MILK AND FRUIT AND BERRY ICE CREAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polishchuk G. E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbiological features of milk mixes and ice were studied during the principal process stages, which enabled to detect the highest risk points for bacterial contamination. Compared to known information, the impact was established of vegetable raw chemical composition and preliminary treatment on the presence and activity of certain groups of germs in higher water content mixes and ice. The microbiological features of higher water content milk mixes and ice were studied. The study purported to survey the bacterial contamination of milk mixes and ice of various chemical composition throughout the whole production cycle. Microbiological features were studied of typical composition milk mixes and ice stabilized with wheat flour and modern stabilization system. Comparative evaluation of microbiological features was conducted for new types of milk ices with apple puree and wheat germs. We analyzed the stage of development, stability, and die-off for various groups of germs at certain process stages. The initial raw materials as well as equipment, especially during freezing, were detected to be the worst sources of bacterial contamination. The necessity was proved to ensure thermal processing of cereals prior to adding them to the mix, before it is sent for pasteurization and freezing. The results of our study can be used to develop operational procedures for production of new types of ice, with due consideration for all specific conditions for prior treatment of vegetable raw and for sanitary state of facilities for production, sales, and consumption of finished product.

  19. Bacterial Endophytes Isolated from Plants in Natural Oil Seep Soils with Chronic Hydrocarbon Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumactud, Rhea; Shen, Shu Yi; Lau, Mimas; Fulthorpe, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial endophytic communities of four plants growing abundantly in soils highly contaminated by hydrocarbons were analyzed through culturable and culture-independent means. Given their tolerance to the high levels of petroleum contamination at our study site, we sought evidence that Achillea millefolium, Solidago canadensis, Trifolium aureum, and Dactylis glomerata support high levels of hydrocarbon degrading endophytes. A total of 190 isolates were isolated from four plant species. The isolates were identified by partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis, with class Actinobacteria as the dominant group in all species except S. canadensis, which was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria. Microbacterium foliorum and Plantibacter flavus were present in all the plants, with M. foliorum showing predominance in D. glomerata and both endophytic bacterial species dominated T. aureum. More than 50% of the isolates demonstrated degradative capabilities for octanol, toluene, naphthalene, kerosene, or motor oil based on sole carbon source growth screens involving the reduction of tetrazolium dye. P. flavus isolates from all the sampled plants showed growth on all the petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) substrates tested. Mineralization of toluene and naphthalene was confirmed using gas-chromatography. 16S based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed significant differences between the endophytic bacterial communities showing them to be plant host specific at this site. To our knowledge, this is the first account of the degradation potential of bacterial endophytes in these commonly occurring pioneer plants that were not previously known as phytoremediating plants.

  20. Bacterial endophytes isolated from plants in natural oil seep soils with chronic hydrocarbon contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea eLumactud

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial endophytic communities of four plants growing abundantly in soils highly contaminated by hydrocarbons were analyzed through culturable and and culture-independent means. Given their tolerance to the high levels of petroleum contamination at our study site, we sought evidence that Achillea millefolium, Solidago canadensis, Trifolium aureum and Dactylis glomerata support high levels of hydrocarbon degrading endophytes. A total of 190 isolates were isolated from four plant species. The isolates were identified by partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis, with class Actinobacteria as the dominant group in all species except Solidago canadensis, which was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria. Microbacterium foliorum and Plantibacter flavus were present in all the plants, with M. foliorum showing predominance in D. glomerata and both endophytic bacterial species dominated T. aureum. More than 50% of the isolates demonstrated degradative capabilities for octanol, toluene, naphthalene, kerosene or motor oil based on sole carbon source growth screens involving the reduction of tetrazolium dye. P. flavus isolates from all the sampled plants showed growth on all the petroleum hydrocarbons substrates tested. Mineralization of toluene and naphthalene was confirmed using gas-chromatography. 16S based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed significant differences between the endophytic bacterial communities showing them to be plant host specific at this site. To our knowledge, this is the first account of the degradation potential of bacterial endophytes in these commonly occurring pioneer plants that were not previously known as phytoremediating plants.

  1. Survey of Bacterial and Fungal Contaminations in Iranian Alginate, Foreign Alginate and Speedex Used for Impression in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Falah Tafti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Since impression materials usually contact with saliva, blood, and oral soft tissues, their microbial contamination are harmful in immunocompromised patients. The aim of the present study was to determine the bacterial and fungal contamination in common impression materials. Materials and Methods: In current lab trial study, 5 different samples from each 4 impression materials were homogenized in 1 ml Tween 80 and then 100µl of each sample were cultured onto blood agar, EMB, or sabouraud dextrose agar. Bacterial and fungal cultures were incubated at 37º C and 30º C, respectively. The isolated bacterial and fungal colonies were enumerated and identified using specific diagnostic media and tests. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Totally 75% of samples had one or several bacterial contaminations. Iranian alginate and Speedex (putty were the most contaminated samples. On the other hand, Speedex (light body and foreign alginate showed lower contamination. Species of Micrococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacilluses, Corynebacteria, gram negative Citrobacter, Actinomycetes and Neisseria were isolated from the analyzed impression materials. Aspergillus, Penicillium, Alternaria, Cladosporium and Sepdonium were the fungi isolated from impression materials. Statistical significant difference was shown between bacterial contamination of Iranian and foreign alginates (P=0.001. There was no statistical significant differences between the bacterial and fungal isolated colonies (CFU/gr of 4 tested impression materials (P=0.21. Conclusion: Several opportunistic bacteria and fungi were isolated from impression materials especially from Iranian alginate and Speedex putty which indicated their contamination.

  2. Impact of roadside ditch dredging on bacterial communities and biological contamination of a tidal creek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Chance E.; Barkovskii, Andrei L.

    2017-03-01

    Tidal creek networks form the primary hydrologic link between estuaries and land-based activities on barrier islands. A possible impact from the excavation of drainage ditch systems on bacterial communities and biological contamination was studied in the water column and sediments of headwater, mid-stream, and mouth sites of the intertidal Oakdale Creek on Sapelo Island, GA. Community analysis was performed using the MiSeq Illumina platform and revealed that dredging was the cause of a significant rise in Proteobacteria, especially γ-proteobacteria. Targeted biological contaminants included fecal indicator bacteria, Enterococcus spp. (Entero-1), pathogens, Shigella spp. (ipaH), and Salmonella spp (invA), virulence associated genes (VG's) of pathogenic E. coli (eaeA, hlyD, stx1, stx2, and set1B), integrons (intI1, intI2), and tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs). Incidence and gene concentrations of Shigella spp., eaeA and set1B, and of TRGs increased 3-20 folds after the onset of dredging, and followed the dredging schedule. Principal Component Analysis suggested possible common carriers for Shigella spp., some TRGs, and the pathogenic E. coli eaeA gene. At the site of dredging, all of the above contaminants were detected at high concentrations. We concluded that excavation of roadside ditches caused significant changes in bacterial composition and a rise in incidence and concentrations of biological contaminants in the creek. The authors suggest a different approach for the maintenance of this material be explored.

  3. The effect of heavy metal contamination on the bacterial community structure at Jiaozhou Bay, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie-feng Yao

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, determination of heavy metal parameters and microbiological characterization of marine sediments obtained from two heavily polluted sites and one low-grade contaminated reference station at Jiaozhou Bay in China were carried out. The microbial communities found in the sampled marine sediments were studied using PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting profiles in combination with multivariate analysis. Clustering analysis of DGGE and matrix of heavy metals displayed similar occurrence patterns. On this basis, 17 samples were classified into two clusters depending on the presence or absence of the high level contamination. Moreover, the cluster of highly contaminated samples was further classified into two sub-groups based on the stations of their origin. These results showed that the composition of the bacterial community is strongly influenced by heavy metal variables present in the sediments found in the Jiaozhou Bay. This study also suggested that metagenomic techniques such as PCR-DGGE fingerprinting in combination with multivariate analysis is an efficient method to examine the effect of metal contamination on the bacterial community structure.

  4. Bacterial microflora characteristics of plant samples from contaminated by radionuclides Chernobyl area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelena, Pavlina; Shevchenko, Julia; Molozhava, Olha; Berezhna, Valentina; Shylina, Julia; Guscha, Mykola

    2015-01-01

    Two serious nuclear accidents during the last quarter century (Chernobyl, 1986 and Fukushima, 2011) contaminated large agricultural areas with radioactivity. In radioactive areas all components of ecosystems, including microorganisms, exposed to ionizing radiation. The aim of this study was isolation and identification of dominant bacteria from plant samples, which were collected from the area of radioactive contamination and to compare it with bacteria isolated from plant collected in a non-radioactive area by their qualitative composition, physiological, biochemical and pathogenic characteristics. Bacteria were isolated from plant samples grown in a radioactive field located 5 km from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP). Physiological, biochemical and pathogenic properties were characterized from nine pure bacterial isolates. The common features of bacteria from radionuclide contaminated plant samples were increased synthesis of mucus and capsule creation. It was found that all selected isolates produce catalase, therefore, bacteria were resistant to oxidative stress. The increased pathogenicity of most bacteria isolated from the plant grown in radioactive Chernobyl area compare to the isolates from the plant without radioactive contamination was established from the phytopathogenic tests. Consequently, bacterial isolates from the plants grown in the radioactive environment tends to dominate enterobacteria similar to agents of opportunistic infections. (author)

  5. Prevalence of antibacterial resistant bacterial contaminants from mobile phones of hospital inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Kumar, B.; Hobani, Yahya Hasan; Abdulhaq, Ahmed; Jerah, Ahmed Ali; Hakami, Othman M.; Eltigani, Magdeldin; Bidwai, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phones contaminated with bacteria may act as fomites. Antibiotic resistant bacterial contamination of mobile phones of inpatients was studied. One hundred and six samples were collected from mobile phones of patients admitted in various hospitals in Jazan province of Saudi Arabia. Eighty-nine (83.9%) out of 106 mobile phones were found to be contaminated with bacteria. Fifty-two (49.0%) coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 12 (11.3%) Staphylococcus aureus, 7 (6.6%) Enterobacter cloacae, 3 (2.83%) Pseudomonas stutzeri, 3 (2.83%) Sphingomonas paucimobilis, 2 (1.8%) Enterococcus faecalis and 10 (9.4%) aerobic spore bearers were isolated. All the isolated bacteria were found to be resistant to various antibiotics. Hence, regular disinfection of mobile phones of hospital inpatients is advised. PMID:25292217

  6. Prevalence of antibacterial resistant bacterial contaminants from mobile phones of hospital inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Vinod Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phones contaminated with bacteria may act as fomites. Antibiotic resistant bacterial contamination of mobile phones of inpatients was studied. One hundred and six samples were collected from mobile phones of patients admitted in various hospitals in Jazan province of Saudi Arabia. Eighty-nine (83.9% out of 106 mobile phones were found to be contaminated with bacteria. Fifty-two (49.0% coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 12 (11.3% Staphylococcus aureus, 7 (6.6% Enterobacter cloacae, 3 (2.83% Pseudomonas stutzeri, 3 (2.83% Sphingomonas paucimobilis, 2 (1.8% Enterococcus faecalis and 10 (9.4% aerobic spore bearers were isolated. All the isolated bacteria were found to be resistant to various antibiotics. Hence, regular disinfection of mobile phones of hospital inpatients is advised.

  7. Field-based evidence for consistent responses of bacterial communities to copper contamination in two contrasting agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eLi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper contamination on China’s arable land could pose severe economic, ecological and healthy consequences in the coming decades. As the drivers in maintaining ecosystem functioning, the responses of soil microorganisms to long-term copper contamination in different soil ecosystems are still debated. This study investigated the impacts of copper gradients on soil bacterial communities in two agricultural fields with contrasting soil properties. Our results revealed consistent reduction in soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC with increasing copper levels in both soils, coupled by significant declines in bacterial abundance in most cases. Despite of contrasting bacterial community structures between the two soils, the bacterial diversity in the copper-contaminated soils showed considerably decreasing patterns when copper levels elevated. High-throughput sequencing revealed copper selection for major bacterial guilds, in particular, Actinobacteria showed tolerance, while Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi were highly sensitive to copper. The thresholds that bacterial communities changed sharply were 800 and 200 added copper mg kg-1 in the fluvo-aquic soil and red soil, respectively, which were similar to the toxicity thresholds (EC50 values characterized by SMBC. Structural equation model (SEM analysis ascertained that the shifts of bacterial community composition and diversity were closely related with the changes of SMBC in both soils. Our results provide field-based evidence that copper contamination exhibits consistently negative impacts on soil bacterial communities, and the shifts of bacterial communities could have largely determined the variations of the microbial biomass.

  8. Real-Time PCR Detection ofBurkholderia cepaciain Pharmaceutical Products Contaminated with Low Levels of Bacterial Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Luis; Jashari, Theranda; Vasquez, Jenifer; Zapata, Stephanie; Bochis, Joy; Kulko, Margarita; Ellman, Victoria; Gardner, Matthew; Choe, Tina

    2018-01-01

    A real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed to detect Burkholderia cepacia in pharmaceutical products contaminated with low levels of bacteria. Different pharmaceutical suspensions were artificially contaminated with B. cepacia , Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus , and Bacillus megaterium After a 24 h incubation in trypticase soy broth with Tween 20, samples were streaked on mannitol salt, phenyl ethyl alcohol, eosin methylene blue, MacConkey, and pseudomonas isolation agar. Microbial DNA was extracted from each sample by using a Tris-EDTA, proteinase K, Tween 20 buffer. Regular PCR targeting the 1.5 kilobases 16S rRNA eubacterial gene and cloning showed the predominant DNA in the extracted mix belonged to E. coli Selective media isolation of bacterial contamination showed B. cepacia only detected on pseudomonas isolation while eosin methylene blue and MacConkey detected only E. coli RT-PCR using primers PSL1 and PSR1 amplified a 209 bp 16S rRNA fragment using a Roche LightCycler 96 ® system with SYBR green I, a common double-stranded binding dye. The cycle at which fluorescence from amplification exceeds the background fluorescence was referred to as quantification cycle. All samples were found to be positive by standard microbiological testing and RT-PCR. B. cepacia was detected within 30 h in all contaminated samples using RT-PCR. Based upon standard curve analysis of B. cepacia DNA, the minimum DNA concentration that could be detected was 10 fg/uL with a correlation value of 0.98. RT-PCR detection of B. cepacia allowed faster quality control analysis, corrective actions, and process optimization. LAY ABSTRACT: A real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed to detect Burkholderia cepacia in pharmaceutical products contaminated with low levels of bacteria. B. cepacia is the number one reason for microbial contamination recalls of non-sterile drug products in the USA. RT-PCR using primers PSL1 and PSR1 amplified a

  9. Sanitizer efficacy in preventing cross-contamination of heads of lettuce during retail crisping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yangjin; Jang, Hyein; Guo, Mengqi; Gao, Jingwen; Matthews, Karl R

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to provide information regarding mitigation of cross-contamination through the use of sanitizer during crisping at retail outlets. Seven non-inoculated heads and one inoculated head (≈5 log CFU/g) of lettuce were placed into commercial sink filled with 76 L of tap water (TW), electrolyzed water (EW, free chlorine: 43 ± 6 ppm), lactic acid and phosphoric acid-based sanitizer (LPA, pH 2.89), or citric acid-based sanitizer (CA, pH 2.78) and soaked for 5 min. Two subsequent batches (eight non-inoculated heads per batch) were soaked in the same solution. Soaking with EW significantly reduced the population of S. enterica (2.8 ± 1.5 log CFU/g), E. coli O157:H7 (3.4 ± 1.1 log CFU/g), and L. monocytogenes (2.6 ± 0.7 log CFU/g) inoculated on Romaine lettuce compared to TW, LPA, and CA (p  0.05) or preventing cross-contamination. Soaking with EW prevented cross-contamination among lettuce heads and controlled bacterial populations in crisping water for three consecutive batches. EW may be an effective option as a sanitizer to minimizing the cross-contamination of leafy greens during the retail crisping. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacterial interference for prevention of urinary tract infection: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darouiche, R O; Hull, R A

    2000-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in this population. The bladders of patients with SCI, particularly those with indwelling bladder catheters, can become colonized by a variety of organisms, including those that may, and others that may not, cause symptoms of infection. The latter group of bacteria, so-called benign colonizers, are often left untreated because they may provide some protection against symptomatic infection with more pathogenic bacteria. In recent years, deliberate urogenital tract colonization with benign bacterial strains was studied with the objective of offering some protection against invasion by uropathogenic strains. When well-characterized strains of Lactobacillus sp. were used to colonize the vagina of women prone to frequent UTI, a moderate reduction in the rate of recurrent UTI was observed. In other studies, a non-pathogenic prototype of Escherichia coli (strain 83,972) causing asymptomatic bacteriuria was used for deliberate bladder colonization. These preliminary observations encourage the examination of the safety and preventive efficacy of this approach in human subjects.

  11. Development of an efficient bacterial consortium for the potential remediation of hydrocarbons from contaminated sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustuvmani Patowary

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia towards total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples 5 isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1 and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1 and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and Bacillus cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH after five weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons.

  12. Development of an Efficient Bacterial Consortium for the Potential Remediation of Hydrocarbons from Contaminated Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Patowary, Rupshikha; Kalita, Mohan C; Deka, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia toward total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples five isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1, and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1, and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and B. cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing) has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of TPH after 5 weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer) analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons.

  13. [Search for bacterial contamination of the aqueous humor during cataract surgery with and without local antibiotic prophylaxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Blancat, P; Burucoa, C; Boissonnot, M; Gobert, F; Risse, J F

    1995-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of anterior chamber at the end of cataract surgery, was compared between two techniques: extracapsular extraction and phacoemulsification. The effectiveness of preoperative antibiotic eyedrops using Norfloxacine 0.3% (Chibroxine) was also evaluated. The study focused on 101 patients grouped according to surgical technique and presence of preoperative antibiotic eyedrops. Conjunctival sampling was made the day prior the surgery, as well as in the operating room, after skin and conjunctival desinfection with povidone iodine in all the patients included in the study. Aqueous humour was collected at the end of surgery. Eight samples out of 101 were positive which represents 7.9% of the cases. In 75% of the cases, the anterior chamber aspirate showed a different germ or non-recurrent germ in the second conjunctival sample. None of the included patients developed endophthalmitis. The two most frequent pathogens were Propionibacterium acnes in 62.5% of the cases, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 50%. Another pathogen was found in a culture environment: Micrococcus roseus. In two samples, two different bacteria grew: Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Whatever the surgical technique, no statistically significant bacterial contamination was found. There was no significant statistical difference between patients who had local antibiotic eyedrops and those who did not. This study confirms the poor reliability of local antibiotic eyedrops to prevent surgical contamination. Furthermore performing an anterior chamber aspirate at the end of the surgery for risk patients would help the physician identify the pathogens involved in endophthalmitis in order to begin antibiotic treatment as soon as possible.

  14. Effect of negative air ions on the potential for bacterial contamination of plastic medical equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerr Kevin G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years there has been renewed interest in the use of air ionizers to control the spread of infection in hospitals and a number of researchers have investigated the biocidal action of ions in both air and nitrogen. By comparison, the physical action of air ions on bacterial dissemination and deposition has largely been ignored. However, there is clinical evidence that air ions might play an important role in preventing the transmission of Acinetobacter infection. Although the reasons for this are unclear, it is hypothesized that a physical effect may be responsible: the production of air ions may negatively charge items of plastic medical equipment so that they repel, rather than attract, airborne bacteria. By negatively charging both particles in the air and items of plastic equipment, the ionizers minimize electrostatic deposition on these items. In so doing they may help to interrupt the transmission of Acinetobacter infection in certain healthcare settings such as intensive care units. Methods A study was undertaken in a mechanically ventilated room under ambient conditions to accurately measure changes in surface potential exhibited by items of plastic medical equipment in the presence of negative air ions. Plastic items were suspended on nylon threads, either in free space or in contact with a table surface, and exposed to negative ions produced by an air ionizer. The charge build-up on the specimens was measured using an electric field mill while the ion concentration in the room air was recorded using a portable ion counter. Results The results of the study demonstrated that common items of equipment such as ventilator tubes rapidly developed a large negative charge (i.e. generally >-100V in the presence of a negative air ionizer. While most items of equipment tested behaved in a similar manner to this, one item, a box from a urological collection and monitoring system (the only item made from styrene

  15. Surface tailored organobentonite enhances bacterial proliferation and phenanthrene biodegradation under cadmium co-contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Asit [Future Industries Institute (formerly Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal (India); Biswas, Bhabananda [Future Industries Institute (formerly Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), ACT Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Sarkar, Binoy, E-mail: binoy.sarkar@unisa.edu.au [Future Industries Institute (formerly Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), ACT Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Patra, Ashok K. [Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal (India); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.naidu@newcastle.edu.au [Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), ACT Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    Co-contamination of soil and water with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metals makes biodegradation of the former extremely challenging. Modified clay-modulated microbial degradation provides a novel insight in addressing this issue. This study was conducted to evaluate the growth and phenanthrene degradation performance of Mycobacterium gilvum VF1 in the presence of a palmitic acid (PA)-grafted Arquad® 2HT-75-based organobentonite in cadmium (Cd)-phenanthrene co-contaminated water. The PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) adsorbed a slightly greater quantity of Cd than bentonite at up to 30 mg L{sup −1} metal concentration, but its highly negative surface charge imparted by carboxylic groups indicated the potential of being a significantly superior adsorbent of Cd at higher metal concentrations. In systems co-contained with Cd (5 and 10 mg L{sup −1}), the Arquad® 2HT-75-modified bentonite (AB) and PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) resulted in a significantly higher (72–78%) degradation of phenanthrene than bentonite (62%) by the bacterium. The growth and proliferation of bacteria were supported by ABP which not only eliminated Cd toxicity through adsorption but also created a congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. The macromolecules produced during ABP–bacteria interaction could form a stable clay-bacterial cluster by overcoming the electrostatic repulsion among individual components. Findings of this study provide new insights for designing clay modulated PAH bioremediation technologies in mixed-contaminated water and soil. - Highlights: • Surface tailored organobentonite synthesised and characterised • Modified clay adsorbs Cd and reduces toxicity to Mycobacterium gilvum. • It creates congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. • It enhances phenanthrene biodegradation in metal co-contaminated condition.

  16. Boar semen bacterial contamination in Italy and antibiotic efficacy in a modified extender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bresciani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the study were to identify microbial flora in boar semen under field conditions in northern Italy, to investigate antibiotic resistance and sensitivity of isolated bacteria, and to evaluate elimination of bacteria after storage in two types of extenders added with different antibiotics (amikacin vs gentamicin. A total of 60 boars were collected in 13 pig farms. Bacteriological and mycological investigations were performed immediately on raw semen samples, then at 48 and 120 h of storage on semen diluted randomly in a new short-term modified extender (ME-S or in a commercial one (CRONOSTM. Bacterial contamination was found in 63% of raw semen samples and different bacterial species were isolated: E.coli, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus epidermidis and aureus, Proteus spp., Streptococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. E. coli was the most isolated contaminant (53%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found only in one semen sample. The analysis of variance of factors affecting contamination levels was significant for the farm of origin (P<0.05 and not significant for the breed. Antibiotic resistance of these bacteria was assessed using different antibiotics. Significant differences (P<0.05 between observed and expected frequencies of bacterial isolates resistant or not to the antibiotics contained in the extenders were found. At 48 h of storage a reduction of aerobic contamination was found after ME-S dilution by 85.3% and after CRONOSTM by 63.8%. This paper proved the presence of pathogenic bacteria in semen. We thus believe it is highly advisable to perform periodic microbiological screening of boar semen in the swine industry to avoid the use of low sperm quality.

  17. Changes in the Bacterial Community Structure of Remediated Anthracene-Contaminated Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Delgado-Balbuena

    Full Text Available Mixing soil or adding earthworms (Eisenia fetida (Savigny, 1826 accelerated the removal of anthracene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, from a pasture and an arable soil, while a non-ionic surfactant (Surfynol® 485 inhibited the removal of the contaminant compared to the untreated soil. It was unclear if the treatments affected the soil bacterial community and consequently the removal of anthracene. Therefore, the bacterial community structure was monitored by means of 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in the pasture and arable soil mixed weekly, amended with Surfynol® 485, E. fetida or organic material that served as food for the earthworms for 56 days. In both soils, the removal of anthracene was in the order: mixing soil weekly (100% > earthworms applied (92% > organic material applied (77% > untreated soil (57% > surfactant applied (34% after 56 days. There was no clear link between removal of anthracene from soil and changes in the bacterial community structure. On the one hand, application of earthworms removed most of the contaminant from the arable soil and had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of the Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and Gemmatimonadetes, and an increase in that of the Proteobacteria compared to the unamended soil. Mixing the soil weekly removed all anthracene from the arable soil, but had little or no effect on the bacterial community structure. On the other hand, application of the surfactant inhibited the removal of anthracene from the arable soil compared to the untreated soil, but had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of Cytophagia (Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes and Planctomycetes and an increase in that of the Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. Additionally, the removal of anthracene was similar in the different treatments of both the arable and pasture soil

  18. Changes in the Bacterial Community Structure of Remediated Anthracene-Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Balbuena, Laura; Bello-López, Juan M.; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Rodríguez-Valentín, Analine; Luna-Guido, Marco L.; Dendooven, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Mixing soil or adding earthworms (Eisenia fetida (Savigny, 1826)) accelerated the removal of anthracene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, from a pasture and an arable soil, while a non-ionic surfactant (Surfynol® 485) inhibited the removal of the contaminant compared to the untreated soil. It was unclear if the treatments affected the soil bacterial community and consequently the removal of anthracene. Therefore, the bacterial community structure was monitored by means of 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in the pasture and arable soil mixed weekly, amended with Surfynol® 485, E. fetida or organic material that served as food for the earthworms for 56 days. In both soils, the removal of anthracene was in the order: mixing soil weekly (100%) > earthworms applied (92%) > organic material applied (77%) > untreated soil (57%) > surfactant applied (34%) after 56 days. There was no clear link between removal of anthracene from soil and changes in the bacterial community structure. On the one hand, application of earthworms removed most of the contaminant from the arable soil and had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of the Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and Gemmatimonadetes, and an increase in that of the Proteobacteria compared to the unamended soil. Mixing the soil weekly removed all anthracene from the arable soil, but had little or no effect on the bacterial community structure. On the other hand, application of the surfactant inhibited the removal of anthracene from the arable soil compared to the untreated soil, but had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of Cytophagia (Bacteroidetes), Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes and Planctomycetes and an increase in that of the Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes) and Proteobacteria. Additionally, the removal of anthracene was similar in the different treatments of both the arable and pasture soil, but the

  19. Prevention and mitigation of groundwater contamination from radioactive releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    This document gives basic information on potential pathways and mechanisms, by which radioactive materials from releases can reach man, and on modelling considerations to predict the behaviour of radioactive materials in the ground. The main objective is to present an overview of existing techniques for preventing the offsite releases of contaminants into the groundwater systems and techniques for mitigation of effects of such releases should they occur. The recommended techniques are fully applicable to any hazardous materials, such as organic liquids, and toxic materials or otherwise dangerous materials, the presence of which in the accessible biosphere can represent health risks as well as economic losses to the general public. 11 refs, 2 figs, 8 tabs

  20. Nasal colonization and bacterial contamination of mobile phones carried by medical staff in the operating room.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsiang Chang

    Full Text Available Mobile phones (MPs have been an essential part of the lives of healthcare professionals and have improved communication, collaboration, and sharing of information. Nonetheless, the widespread use of MPs in hospitals has raised concerns of nosocomial infections, especially in areas requiring the highest hygienic standards such as operating rooms (ORs. This study evaluated the incidence of bacterial contamination of the MPs carried by medical staff working in the OR and determined its association with bacterial colonization of this personnel.This is an observational cohort study. Medical staffs working in the OR were asked to take bacterial cultures from their MPs, anterior nares, and dominant hands. To identify the relation between MP contamination and bacterial colonization of the medical staff, genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus (SA was done via Staphylococcus protein A gene (spa typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE.A total of 216 swab samples taken from 72 medical-staff members were analyzed. The culture-positive rate was 98.1% (212/216. In 59 (27.3% samples, the bacteria were possible clinical pathogens. The anterior nares were the most common site of colonization by clinical pathogens (58.3%, 42/72, followed by MPs (13.9%, 10/72 and the dominant hand (9.7%, 7/72. SA was the most commonly isolated clinical pathogen and was found in 43 (19.9% samples. In 66 (94.3% of the 70 staff members for whom bacteria were detected on their MPs, the same bacteria were detected in nares or hand. Among 31 medical staff who were carriers of SA in the anterior nares or dominant hand, 8 (25.8% were found to have SA on their MPs, and genotyping confirmed the same SA strain in 7 (87.5% of them.A high rate of bacterial nasal colonization and MPs contamination were found among the OR medical staff. An MP may be a reservoir for pathogen contamination in the OR.

  1. Characterization of bacterial consortia for its use in bioremediation of gas-oil contaminated antarctic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruberto, L.; Vazquez, S.; Mestre, C.; Nogales, B.; Christie-Oleza, J.; Bosch, R.; Mac Cormack, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    Success of bio augmentation of chronically-contaminated soils is controversial, mainly because the inocula are frequently unable to establish in the matrix under bioremediation. In Antarctica, the environmental conditions and the restriction for the introduction of non-autochthonous organisms (imposed by the Antarctic Treaty) prevent inoculation with foreign bacteria. (Author)

  2. Effects of irradiation on the survival of bacterial contaminants in food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary concern about microbial safety of irradiated food is the survival of pathogenic spore forming bacteria. Clostridium sporogenes was selected as the spore forming test organism for conducting inoculated pack studies for its similarities to the most toxigenic Cl. botulinum, in radiation resistance. Minimum radiation dose applied (45 kGy under cryogenic condition, in -790C was determined to eliminate Cl. sporogenes spores and other bacterial contaminants in different kind of Indonesian chicken and beef dishes. In separate studies, irradiation doses of 3 – 7 kGy at cryogenic condition was used to improve the microbiological safety of a number chilled prepared meals. The dishes or ready to eat foods were packaged in air impermeable pouches. Irradiation process was carried out after inoculation on chicken and beef dishes with certain amounts of Cl. sporogenes spores. The evaluation of colony count differences between the irradiated and unirradiated foods revealed the effect of radiation on the survival of bacterial spores or other bacterial contaminants. It was demonstrated that a minimum dose of 45 kGy under cryogenic condition eliminated the spore of Cl. sporogenes, Bacillus spp and Staphylococcus spp. Irradiation at doses 5-7 kGy significantly reduced some potential pathogenic microorganisms in samples without affecting quality up to 3 months of storage at the refrigeration temperature.

  3. The effect of mobile laminar airflow units on airborne bacterial contamination during neurosurgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vogelsang, Ann-Christin; Förander, Petter; Arvidsson, Martin; Löwenhielm, Peter

    2018-03-23

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) after neurosurgery are potentially life threatening and entails great costs. SSI can occur from airborne bacteria in the operating room (OR), and ultraclean air is desired during infection-prone clean procedures. Door openings and the number of persons present in the OR affects the air quality. Mobile laminar airflow (MLAF) units, with horizontal laminar airflow, have previously shown to effectively reduce airborne bacterial contamination. To assess the effect of MLAF units on airborne bacterial contamination during neurosurgical procedures. In a quasi-experimental design, bacteria carrying particles (colony forming units, CFU) during neurosurgical procedures were measured with active air sampling in ORs with conventional turbulent ventilation, and with additional MLAF units. The MLAF units were shifted between ORs monthly. CFU count and bacterial species detection were conducted after incubation. Data was collected over a period of 18 months. A total of 233 samples were collected during 45 neurosurgical procedures. The use of MLAF units significantly reduced the numbers of CFU in the surgical site area (Pneurosurgery to ultraclean air levels. MLAF units can be a valuable addition when the main OR ventilation system is unable to produce ultraclean air in infection prone clean neurosurgery. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Investigation of the Rate of the Bacterial Contamination of the Ice Factories in Bandar Abbas, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Moradi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pollution of drinking water and ice is one of the most serious ways of water borne diseases spread. The purpose of this study was to investigate the bacterial contamination of the ice produced by ice factories in Bandar Abbas. Methods: In this descriptive ,cross-sectional study samples were collected from seven ice factories in Bandar Abbas. Sampling was done by standard method. Amount of the Contamination of ice and water to coliforms was investigated by the Multiple Tube method to determine the MPN, isolate bacteria and identify the microorganisms using conventional bacteriological techniques and counting the total count of bacteria by the Plate Count method on a nutrient agar medium. The data was analyzed by the SPSS software. Results: In this study, a total of 84 samples were investigated. Gram-positive bacteria (65.5% and gram-negative bacteria(34.5% were separated from each other. The MPN rate in samples and total count of bacteria were 0->1100 and 2×101×104 CFU/mL, respectively. Conclusion: The results suggest that necessary precautions be taken by environmental health specialists and other public health authorities in production, transportation and distribution of the ice blocks to reduce the rate of bacterial contamination.

  5. Evaluation of a pulsed xenon ultraviolet disinfection system to decrease bacterial contamination in operating rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haddad, Lynn; Ghantoji, Shashank S; Stibich, Mark; Fleming, Jason B; Segal, Cindy; Ware, Kathy M; Chemaly, Roy F

    2017-10-10

    Environmental cleanliness is one of the contributing factors for surgical site infections in the operating rooms (ORs). To decrease environmental contamination, pulsed xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV), an easy and safe no-touch disinfection system, is employed in several hospital environments. The positive effect of this technology on environmental decontamination has been observed in patient rooms and ORs during the end-of-day cleaning but so far, no study explored its feasibility between surgical cases in the OR. In this study, 5 high-touch surfaces in 30 ORs were sampled after manual cleaning and after PX-UV intervention mimicking between-case cleaning to avoid the disruption of the ORs' normal flow. The efficacy of a 1-min, 2-min, and 8-min cycle were tested by measuring the surfaces' contaminants by quantitative cultures using Tryptic Soy Agar contact plates. We showed that combining standard between-case manual cleaning of surfaces with a 2-min cycle of disinfection using a portable xenon pulsed ultraviolet light germicidal device eliminated at least 70% more bacterial load after manual cleaning. This study showed the proof of efficacy of a 2-min cycle of PX-UV in ORs in eliminating bacterial contaminants. This method will allow a short time for room turnover and a potential reduction of pathogen transmission to patients and possibly surgical site infections.

  6. [Newborn bacterial infection caused by materno-fetal contamination. Retrospective epidemiologic study at a maternity unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blond, M H; Gold, F; Quentin, R; Pierre, F; Kompanietz, J; Soutoul, J H; Laugier, J

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study of neonatal bacterial infection due to contamination from the mother was carried out in maternity unit. We analysed the results of taking bacterial swabs from the skin and GI tract in newborn children when there was a possibility, or even probability, from the criteria given that there would be infection. These results compare with different criteria. In 19 months there were 2,622 live born children; 40.6% of those had swabs taken; the infection rate was 0.61% of newborns, but 16% of the newborns, had asymptomatic colonisation by bacteria. The high risks of finding positive swabs as shown by increased infection rates by colonisation occurred where the mothers had high temperatures. Our results led us to change the criteria for antibiotic treatment immediately after birth, in newborn babies.

  7. Selective suppression of bacterial contaminants by process conditions during lignocellulose based yeast fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albers Eva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination of bacteria in large-scale yeast fermentations is a serious problem and a threat to the development of successful biofuel production plants. Huge research efforts have been spent in order to solve this problem, but additional ways must still be found to keep bacterial contaminants from thriving in these environments. The aim of this project was to develop process conditions that would inhibit bacterial growth while giving yeast a competitive advantage. Results Lactic acid bacteria are usually considered to be the most common contaminants in industrial yeast fermentations. Our observations support this view but also suggest that acetic acid bacteria, although not so numerous, could be a much more problematic obstacle to overcome. Acetic acid bacteria showed a capacity to drastically reduce the viability of yeast. In addition, they consumed the previously formed ethanol. Lactic acid bacteria did not show this detrimental effect on yeast viability. It was possible to combat both types of bacteria by a combined addition of NaCl and ethanol to the wood hydrolysate medium used. As a result of NaCl + ethanol additions the amount of viable bacteria decreased and yeast viability was enhanced concomitantly with an increase in ethanol concentration. The successful result obtained via addition of NaCl and ethanol was also confirmed in a real industrial ethanol production plant with its natural inherent yeast/bacterial community. Conclusions It is possible to reduce the number of bacteria and offer a selective advantage to yeast by a combined addition of NaCl and ethanol when cultivated in lignocellulosic medium such as wood hydrolysate. However, for optimal results, the concentrations of NaCl + ethanol must be adjusted to suit the challenges offered by each hydrolysate.

  8. Bacterial contamination of automotive fuels in a tropical region: the case of Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn; Blanco, Rigoberto

    2009-09-01

    Microbial contamination of fuel has been the cause of several problems in transportation and storage of these products. Due to the lack of previous studies related to these problems in Costa Rica, bacterial quality was evaluated biannually in automotive fuels stored in the four oil distribution facilities of the Costa Rican Petroleum Refinery (RECOPE). In 12 oil storage tanks, for a total of 96 samples, mesophilic, heterotrophic aerobic/facultative counts (ASTM D6974-04) and identification of bacteria presented in regular gas, premium gas and diesel from the bottom and superior part of the tanks were done; in the samples containing an aqueous phase, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) were also quantified by the most probable number technique (MPN), according to the ASTM D4412-84 standard. The higher contamination was shown at the bottom of the tanks (populations up to 10(4) UFC/l), especially if there was accumulated water, in which case populations reached 10(8) UFC/l. The most contaminated fuel was diesel (counts up to 10(4) UFC/l), whereas the less contaminated was premium gas. The less contaminated fuels were from the facilities of La Garita and Barranca, whereas the most contaminated were from Ochomogo. Nevertheless, the quantified populations did not cause significant alteration in quality physicochemical parameters in the samples analyzed. A total of 149 bacterial strains were isolated, 136 (91.3%) Gram positive and 13 (8.7%) Gram negative. The most frequent genera were Staphylococcus (24.0%), Micrococcus (21.9%), Bacillus (18.8%) and Kocuria (11.5%) among Gram positive bacteria and Pseudomonas (7.3%) among Gram negative bacteria. The majority of these genera have been found as fuel contaminants or even as degraders of this kind of products; nevertheless, some species for which their appearance or growth in hydrocarbons have not been described were found with low frequencies. SRB were present in counts up to 10(5) MPN/l in 42.9% of water containing samples

  9. The used of formalin, borax and initial bacterial contamination on otak-otak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsojo; Kadir I

    2013-01-01

    A research has been conducted to identify the used of formalin and borax content and also study the initial bacterial contamination on otak-otak. The wrapped and unwrapped samples were irradiated with a dose of 3 kGy Further, the samples were stored at room temperature (± 30°C) and low temperature (± 4°C) up to 4 weeks. The irradiation was done at a Multipurpose Panoramic Batch Irradiator (IRPASENA) with a dose rate of 1.149 kGy/h. Those samples were stored 4 weeks at 2 different temperatures and the total bacteria were observe every week. The measured parameter were formalin and borax content in otak-otak, the amount of total aerob bacteria, total coliforms, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus spp., identification of Salmonella. The results showed all samples used formalin but borax was not detected. Initial contamination of total aerob bacteria for unwrapped and wrapped samples were 4.3 x 10 7 and 2.0 x 10 7 cfu/g, respectively. Irradiation dose up to 3 kGy showed no bacterial growth on unwrapped and wrapped samples. Combination treatment of irradiation and storage at low temperature could eliminate all aerobic bacteria at the first week. Initial contamination of coliform bacteria on unwrapped and wrapped samples were 1.9 x 10 5 and 5.7 x 10 5 cfu/g, respectively. Initial contamination of E. coli on unwrapped and wrapped samples were 1.2 x 10 5 cfu/g. The total amount of Staphylococcus spp. on unwrapped and wrapped samples were 3.3 x 10 5 and 4.8 x 10 6 cfu/g, respectively. Irradiation at a dose of 3 kGy could eliminate coliform bacteria, E. coli and Staphylococcus spp in all samples observed. No Salmonella was detected in all samples observed. (author)

  10. Bacterial Contamination and Disinfection Status of Laryngoscopes Stored in Emergency Crash Carts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hyung Choi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To identify bacterial contamination rates of laryngoscope blades and handles stored in emergency crash carts by hospital and area according to the frequency of intubation attempts. Methods One hundred forty-eight handles and 71 blades deemed ready for patient use from two tertiary hospitals were sampled with sterile swabs using a standardized rolling technique. Samples were considered negative (not contaminated if no colonies were present on the blood agar plate after an 18-hour incubation period. Samples were stratified by hospital and according to the frequency of intubation attempts (10 attempts per year using the χ2-test and Fisher exact test. Results One or more species of bacteria were isolated from 4 (5.6% handle tops, 20 (28.2% handles with knurled surfaces, and 27 (18.2% blades. No significant differences were found in microbial contamination levels on the handle tops and blades between the two hospitals and two areas according to the frequency of intubation attempts. However, significant differences were found between the two hospitals and two areas in the level of microbial contamination on the handles with knurled surfaces (p<0.05. Conclusions Protocols and policies must be reviewed to standardize procedures to clean and disinfect laryngoscope blades and handles; handles should be re-designed to eliminate points of contact with the blade; and single-use, one-piece laryngoscopes should be introduced.

  11. 21 CFR 111.365 - What precautions must you take to prevent contamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... contamination? 111.365 Section 111.365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... contamination? You must take all the necessary precautions during the manufacture of a dietary supplement to prevent contamination of components or dietary supplements. These precautions include: (a) Performing...

  12. Controlling of bacterial flora contaminating animal diet and its components by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Fouly, M.Z.; El-Zawahry, Y.A.; Helal, G.A.; El-Hady, A.F.

    1991-01-01

    The total bacterial counts in complete diets were found to range between 10 3 -10 5 cells/g, which they ranged between 10 2 and 10 6 in the main components. One hundred and sixteen bacterial colonies were isolated from the animal diet samples and found to be gram positive belonging to three genera: Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Bacillus. The most radioresistant bacteria isolated at 7.5 KGy were identified as B. megaterium, B. licheniformis, B. pumilus, B.circulans and B.laterosporus. The D 1 0 values for the bacteria contaminated the diet samples ranged between 928 Gy and 2199 Gy. Meanwhile, the D 1 0 values of staph.aureus and Strapt.faecalis artificially contaminated the diet were 400 Gy and 1136 Gy, respectively. It could be recommended from obtained results that dose level of 10 KGy is quite sufficient to eliminate all pathogens from animal diets or their components. In addition, it decreases the microbial count to minimum counts and hence increases the diet shelf life.1 fig.,4 tab

  13. Analysis of bacterial contamination on surface of general radiography equipment and CT equipment in emergency room of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Dong Hee; KIm, Hyeong Gyun

    2016-01-01

    We aim to offer basic materials about infection management through conducting bacterial contamination test about general radiography equipment and CT equipment installed in ER of three general hospitals with 100 sickbeds or more located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province, and suggest management plan. It had been conducted from 1st December 2015 to 31st December, and objects were general radiography equipment and CT equipment of emergency room located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. For general radiography equipment, sources were collected from 4 places such as upper side of control box which employees use most, upper side of exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, upper side of stand bucky's grid, and where patients put their jaws on. For CT equipment, sources were collected from 3 places such as upper side of control box which radiography room employees use most, X-ray exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, and gantry inner. Surface contamination strain found at general radiography equipment in emergency room of radiology are Providencia stuartii(25%), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(18%), Enterobacter cloacae(8%), Pseudomonas species(8%), Staphylococcus epidermidis(8%), Gram negative bacilli(8%), and ungrown bacteria at incubator after 48 hours of incubation (67%) which is the biggest. Most bacteria were found at upper side of stand bucky-grid and stand bucky of radiology's general radiography equipment, and most sources of CT equipment were focused at patient table, which means it is contaminated by patients who have various diseases, and patients who have strains with decreased immunity may get severe diseases. Thus infection prevention should be made through 70% alcohol disinfection at both before test and after test

  14. Analysis of bacterial contamination on surface of general radiography equipment and CT equipment in emergency room of radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Dong Hee; KIm, Hyeong Gyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    We aim to offer basic materials about infection management through conducting bacterial contamination test about general radiography equipment and CT equipment installed in ER of three general hospitals with 100 sickbeds or more located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province, and suggest management plan. It had been conducted from 1st December 2015 to 31st December, and objects were general radiography equipment and CT equipment of emergency room located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. For general radiography equipment, sources were collected from 4 places such as upper side of control box which employees use most, upper side of exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, upper side of stand bucky's grid, and where patients put their jaws on. For CT equipment, sources were collected from 3 places such as upper side of control box which radiography room employees use most, X-ray exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, and gantry inner. Surface contamination strain found at general radiography equipment in emergency room of radiology are Providencia stuartii(25%), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(18%), Enterobacter cloacae(8%), Pseudomonas species(8%), Staphylococcus epidermidis(8%), Gram negative bacilli(8%), and ungrown bacteria at incubator after 48 hours of incubation (67%) which is the biggest. Most bacteria were found at upper side of stand bucky-grid and stand bucky of radiology's general radiography equipment, and most sources of CT equipment were focused at patient table, which means it is contaminated by patients who have various diseases, and patients who have strains with decreased immunity may get severe diseases. Thus infection prevention should be made through 70% alcohol disinfection at both before test and after test.

  15. Recalls of spices due to bacterial contamination monitored by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration: the predominance of Salmonellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Vibha; Ailes, Elizabeth; Wolyniak, Cecilia; Angulo, Frederick J; Klontz, Karl C

    2006-01-01

    From 1980 to 2000, the annual per capita consumption of spices in the United States increased by 60% (from 1.0 to 1.6 kg per person per year). Although spices are known to harbor various molds, fungi, and bacteria, relatively few reports have documented this group of foods as the cause of human illness. In recent years, however, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has noted an increased number of recalls of dried spices due to bacterial contamination. Accordingly, we reviewed spice recalls that took place in the United States from fiscal years 1970 to 2003. During the study period, the FDA monitored 21 recalls involving 12 spice types contaminated with bacterial pathogens; in all but one instance, the recalled spices contained Salmonella. Paprika was the spice most often involved in the recalls. A wide variety of countries were the source of the recalled spices. Using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Salmonella Surveillance System, we were unable to discern any increases in the reported incidence of laboratory-confirmed salmonellosis in states that received spices contaminated with selected rare Salmonella serotypes. A variety of effective methods exist to disinfect spices, procedures that have attained increased importance given the frequent use of spices in ready-to-eat foods and the potential for contaminated spices to cause widespread outbreaks.

  16. Bacterial community dynamics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation during bioremediation of heavily creosote-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñas, Marc; Sabaté, Jordi; Espuny, María José; Solanas, Anna M

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial community dynamics and biodegradation processes were examined in a highly creosote-contaminated soil undergoing a range of laboratory-based bioremediation treatments. The dynamics of the eubacterial community, the number of heterotrophs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degraders, and the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) and PAH concentrations were monitored during the bioremediation process. TPH and PAHs were significantly degraded in all treatments (72 to 79% and 83 to 87%, respectively), and the biodegradation values were higher when nutrients were not added, especially for benzo(a)anthracene and chrysene. The moisture content and aeration were determined to be the key factors associated with PAH bioremediation. Neither biosurfactant addition, bioaugmentation, nor ferric octate addition led to differences in PAH or TPH biodegradation compared to biodegradation with nutrient treatment. All treatments resulted in a high first-order degradation rate during the first 45 days, which was markedly reduced after 90 days. A sharp increase in the size of the heterotrophic and PAH-degrading microbial populations was observed, which coincided with the highest rates of TPH and PAH biodegradation. At the end of the incubation period, PAH degraders were more prevalent in samples to which nutrients had not been added. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis and principal-component analysis confirmed that there was a remarkable shift in the composition of the bacterial community due to both the biodegradation process and the addition of nutrients. At early stages of biodegradation, the alpha-Proteobacteria group (genera Sphingomonas and Azospirillum) was the dominant group in all treatments. At later stages, the gamma-Proteobacteria group (genus Xanthomonas), the alpha-Proteobacteria group (genus Sphingomonas), and the Cytophaga-Flexibacter-Bacteroides group (Bacteroidetes) were the dominant groups in the nonnutrient treatment, while the gamma

  17. Analysis of raw meat for heavy metals and bacterial contamination and comparison of antibiotic susceptibility of isolated bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, F.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the study was to analyze the commercially available meat for its heavy metal contents and bacterial contamination. The meat samples were collected from four commercial markets of Lahore, i.e., as Wafaqi Colony (Site I),Township (Site II), G-1 Market (Site III) and Zenith (Site IV), and analyzed for heavy metal [i.e., manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu)] contents and bacterial contaminants (E. coli, Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp. and Salmonella sp.) Atomic absorption spectrophotometery was employed for the detection of the heavy metals and plate count method was used for the detection of bacterial contaminants. The Ni concentration in the Site II sample only and Cd concentration in all meat samples were found above the standard value and the concentration of other metals (Cu, Cr, and Mn) was less than the standard concentrations. Bacterial (E. coli, Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp., Salmonella sp. and Staphylococcus sp.) contamination was found in all meat samples; however, the number was a little lower in the Site IV samples. Statistical analysis was done, by one-way ANOVA using SPSS, to compare heavy metal contamination in the meat samples. The results showed distribution of heavy metals in all meat samples there was significant difference of Ni concentration in the meat samples. The measure of antibiotic susceptibility showed that isolated species of bacteria were resistant to lincomycin, streptomycin, tertracyclin, ampicillin, amoxicillin and doxycyclin, but did not survive in the medium containing ofloxacin. (author)

  18. Control of bacterial contamination of washbasin taps and output water using Ecasol: a one-year study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, M A

    2012-04-01

    Contaminated washbasin taps and output water are an important source of bacteria that may cause nosocomial infection. A five-week pretreatment study of hot and cold water from 15 washbasin taps at Dublin Dental Hospital showed consistently heavy contamination by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria: mean bacterial counts of 482.5 [standard deviation (SD) 293] colony-forming units (cfu)\\/mL and 5022 (SD 4322) cfu\\/mL, respectively.

  19. Influence of hang time and location on bacterial contamination of intravenous bags in a veterinary emergency and critical care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaumin, Julien; Olp, Nichole M; Magnusson, Karissa D; Butler, Amy L; Daniels, Joshua B

    2017-09-01

    To assess the rate of bacterial contamination of fluid and ports in intravenous bags in a veterinary emergency room (ER) and intensive care unit (ICU). Experimental model. Ninety intravenous fluid bags of lactated balanced-electrolytes solution (1 L) hung in a university hospital. Bags were hung in 2 different locations in the ER (sink and bins) and one location in the ICU (sink) for 11 days. Bags were punctured 3 times daily with a sterile needle to simulate clinical use. Injection ports were swabbed and 50 mL of fluid were collected in duplicates on days 0, 2, 4, 7, and 10. Aerobic bacterial cultures were performed on the fluid and injection port. Contamination was defined as bacterial growth of a similar phenotype across 2 consecutive times. Increase in the fluid contamination rate from day 0 was tested using an exact binomial test. Port contamination rate between locations was tested using Fisher's exact test. Combined bacterial growth on injection ports reached a mean (95% confidence interval) of 8.1 (0.005-16.2) cfu/port on day 10. The combined port contamination was 3.3%, 11.1%, 17.8%, and 31.1% on days 0, 2, 4, and 7, respectively. Port contamination was similar between ER and ICU. However, port contamination was higher in the sink versus the bins area (38.3% vs 16.7%, P = 0.032). No fluid bag was contaminated at days 0 and 2. The contamination rate of fluid bag was 1.1% and 4.4% on days 4 and 7, respectively. All bags with contaminated fluid were in the ER (6.7%, 95% exact binomial confidence interval 1.9-16.2%). Injection port contamination reached 31.1% on day 7. Contamination was more likely when the bags were hung next to a sink. In our model of bag puncture, fluid contamination occurred between days 2 and 4. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  20. Biogeochemical and engineered barriers for preventing spread of contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrėnaitė, Edita; Lietuvninkas, Arvydas; Baltrėnas, Pranas

    2018-02-01

    The intensive industrial development and urbanization, as well as the negligible return of hazardous components to the deeper layers of the Earth, increases the contamination load on the noosphere (i.e., the new status of the biosphere, the development of which is mainly controlled by the conscious activity of a human being). The need for reducing the spread and mobility of contaminants is growing. The insights into the role of the tree in the reduction of contaminant mobility through its life cycle are presented to show an important function performed by the living matter and its products in reducing contamination. For maintaining the sustainable development, natural materials are often used as the media in the environmental protection technologies. However, due to increasing contamination intensity, the capacity of natural materials is not sufficiently high. Therefore, the popularity of engineered materials, such as biochar which is the thermochemically modified lignocellulosic product, is growing. The new approaches, based on using the contaminant footprint, as well as natural (biogeochemical) and engineered barriers for reducing contaminant migration and their application, are described in the paper.

  1. Molecular characterization and potential sources of aqueous humor bacterial contamination during phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Luciana C C; de Souza-Pollo, Andressa; Padua, Ivan Ricardo M; Conceição, Luciano F; da Silveira, Camila P Balthazar; Silva, Germana A; Maluta, Renato P; Laus, José L

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of the anterior chamber during cataract surgery is one of the main responsible for endophthalmitis postoperative. Phacoemulsification is a less invasive technique for cataract treatment, although it does not exclude the possibility of contamination. In this study, bacterial contaminants of aqueous humor collected pre- and post-phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation (IOL) of twenty dogs were identified. As the conjunctival microbiota constitute a significant source of anterior chamber contamination, bacterial isolates from aqueous humor were genetically compared with those present in the conjunctival surface of the patients. Three dogs presented bacterial growth in both aqueous humor and conjunctival surface samples. Bacterial isolates from these samples were grouped according to their genetic profiles by repetitive-element PCR (rep-PCR) and their representatives were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Isolates from conjunctival surface were identified as Enterobacter spp., Staphylococcus spp. and S. aureus; and from aqueous humor samples as Enterobacter spp., Pantoea spp., Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp., respectively in decreasing order of prevalence. According to the rep-PCR analysis, 16.6% of Enterobacter spp. isolates from conjunctival surface were genetically similar to those from aqueous humor. The rest of isolates encountered in aqueous humor were genetically distinct from those of conjunctival surface. The significant genetic diversity of bacterial isolates found in the aqueous humor samples after surgery denoted the possibility of anterior chamber contamination during phacoemulsification by bacteria not only from conjunctival surface but also from different sources related to surgical environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Communicating Environmental Risks: Local Newspaper Coverage of Shellfish Bacterial Contamination in Maine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianne Suldovsky

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Coastal resources play a vital role in Maine’s cultural and economic wellbeing, contributing an estimated 168 billion dollars to the Maine economy. There are numerous risks to the sustainability of Maine’s shellfishing industry and working waterfront, including pathogenic bacterial pollution. In this study, we ask a broad fundamental question central to science and environmental journalism: how do newspapers cover localized environmental risks and what are the implications of those approaches? Utilizing the northeastern US state of Maine’s shellfishing industry as an exemplar environmental issue, this study examines how Maine’s two most read newspapers, the Bangor Daily News and the Portland Press Herald, report on bacterial contamination and shellfish. This study examines the themes that are present in the newspaper articles published about shellfish between 2003 and 2014 and analyses the types of sources journalists used within their coverage of these issues. Overall, we identified seven key themes: economic concerns, environmental impacts, political and regulatory issues, issues of public health and safety, reference to cultural values, technical and infrastructural issues, and aesthetic concerns. The most commonly cited individuals in the articles were government officials and scientists. The least cited groups were clammers and shellfishermen, general citizens, advocacy groups, and worm diggers. Implications for local coverage of environmental risks in Maine, science communication, and sustainability science are discussed.

  3. Peptidoglycans in cutting fluids – a good indicator of bacterial contamination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Cyprowski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available objective. The aim of this study was to estimate the content of peptidoglycans in cutting fluids (CFs and to assess the possibility of using them as a marker of bacterial contamination in this type of occupational environment. materials and methods. A total of 11 samples of CFs were collected: 8 were taken from the working machine systems and 3 were unused CF samples. The peptidoglycans were determinated with the kinetic version of the Silkworm Larvae Plasma (SLP test. results. The average concentration of bacteria was 5.58×10 5 CFU/mL, and peptidoglycans – 28.2 ng/mL. The variability for peptidoglycans concentration was less pronounced than that for bacteria (GSD 6 and 13.3, respectively. Taking into consideration the National Research and Safety Institute (INRS –[i] Institut National de Recherche et de Sécurité[/i] limit value the concentrations of bacteria and peptidoglycans, as well as the usage of the fluids, the analysis showed that peptidoglycans reflect the differences between the studied factors much more accurately than bacteria. The correlation analysis, however, showed that the levels of peptidoglycans in the examined CFs strongly correlated with the concentrations of viable bacteria (R 2 = 0.50, p<0.05. conclusions. The study confirmed that the CFs may contain immunologically active substances of bacterial origin even though they did not show any bacterial growth. Moreover, it showed that the concentrations of peptidoglycans in CFs precisely reflect the exposure to bacteria, and as a structural component of the cell wall can be treated as their marker.

  4. Agricultural and Management Practices and Bacterial Contamination in Greenhouse versus Open Field Lettuce Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holvoet, Kevin; Sampers, Imca; Seynnaeve, Marleen; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into potential differences in risk factors for microbial contamination in greenhouse versus open field lettuce production. Information was collected on sources, testing, and monitoring and if applicable, treatment of irrigation and harvest rinsing water. These data were combined with results of analysis on the levels of Escherichia coli as a fecal indicator organism and the presence of enteric bacterial pathogens on both lettuce crops and environmental samples. Enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC) PCR signals (vt1 or vt2 positive and eae positive), Campylobacter spp., and Salmonella spp. isolates were more often obtained from irrigation water sampled from open field farms (21/45, 46.7%) versus from greenhouse production (9/75, 12.0%). The open field production was shown to be more prone to fecal contamination as the number of lettuce samples and irrigation water with elevated E. coli was significantly higher. Farmers comply with generic guidelines on good agricultural practices available at the national level, but monitoring of microbial quality, and if applicable appropriateness of water treatment, or water used for irrigation or at harvest is restricted. These results indicate the need for further elaboration of specific guidelines and control measures for leafy greens with regard to microbial hazards. PMID:25546272

  5. Agricultural and Management Practices and Bacterial Contamination in Greenhouse versus Open Field Lettuce Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Holvoet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to gain insight into potential differences in risk factors for microbial contamination in greenhouse versus open field lettuce production. Information was collected on sources, testing, and monitoring and if applicable, treatment of irrigation and harvest rinsing water. These data were combined with results of analysis on the levels of Escherichia coli as a fecal indicator organism and the presence of enteric bacterial pathogens on both lettuce crops and environmental samples. Enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC PCR signals (vt1 or vt2 positive and eae positive, Campylobacter spp., and Salmonella spp. isolates were more often obtained from irrigation water sampled from open field farms (21/45, 46.7% versus from greenhouse production (9/75, 12.0%. The open field production was shown to be more prone to fecal contamination as the number of lettuce samples and irrigation water with elevated E. coli was significantly higher. Farmers comply with generic guidelines on good agricultural practices available at the national level, but monitoring of microbial quality, and if applicable appropriateness of water treatment, or water used for irrigation or at harvest is restricted. These results indicate the need for further elaboration of specific guidelines and control measures for leafy greens with regard to microbial hazards.

  6. Bacterial community shift and hydrocarbon transformation during bioremediation of short-term petroleum-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Manli; Ye, Xiqiong; Chen, Kaili; Li, Wei; Yuan, Jing; Jiang, Xin

    2017-04-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the impact of bioaugmentation plus biostimulation (BR, added both nutrients and bacterial consortia), and natural attenuation (NA) on hydrocarbon degradation efficiency and microflora characterization during remediation of a freshly contaminated soil. After 112 days of remediation, the initial level of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) (61,000 mg/kg soil) was reduced by 4.5% and 5.0% in the NA and BR treatments, respectively. Bioremediation did not significantly enhance TPH biodegradation compared to natural attenuation. The degradation of the aliphatic fraction was the most active with the degradation rate of 30.3 and 28.7 mg/kg/day by the NA and BR treatments, respectively. Soil microbial activities and counts in soil were generally greater for bioremediation than for natural attenuation. MiSeq sequencing indicated that the diversity and structure of microbial communities were affected greatly by bioremediation. In response to bioremediation treatment, Promicromonospora, Pseudomonas, Microcella, Mycobacterium, Alkanibacter, and Altererythrobacter became dominant genera in the soil. The result indicated that combining bioaugmentation with biostimulation did not improve TPH degradation, but soil microbial activities and structure of microbial communities are sensitive to bioremediation in short-term and heavily oil-contaminated soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Control of bacterial contamination in microfiltered water dispensers (MWDs) by disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Franca; De Luca, Giovanna; Sacchetti, Rossella

    2009-01-15

    Three microfiltered water dispensers (MWDs) for domestic use were bacteriologically monitored over a period of 1 year to evaluate their hygienic status and to compare the ability of two disinfectants (peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide) to ensure adequate bacteriological quality of the dispensed water. To this end, two dispensers were purposely contaminated with a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa of environmental origin. A total of 324 samples of input and output water were analyzed. Heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria at 22 degrees C and 36 degrees C, total coliforms (CT), Escherichia coli (EC), enterococci (ENT), P. aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were enumerated. Throughout the study period, the supply water was always of excellent bacteriological quality. All water samples taken from the MWDs complied with the legal requirements for drinking water: CT, EC, ENT and S. aureus were all consistently absent. P. aeruginosa was never isolated from the uncontaminated dispenser. However, an increase in HPCs up to levels of 10(3)-10(4) cfu/mL was found in the dispensed water. Under the present operative conditions, hydrogen peroxide was seen to be more effective than peracetic acid in controlling bacterial contamination in the water circuits. Periodic disinfection with hydrogen peroxide made it possible to obtain water with HPC levels conforming to Italian regulations for drinking water (American Dental Association (ADA) (contaminated circuits, H(2)O(2) disinfection led to a reduction in the concentrations of P. aeruginosa to only a few colony forming units/100 mL or to a complete, albeit temporary, disappearance of the microorganism. In conclusion, hydrogen peroxide at 3% can be proposed as a suitable product for periodic disinfection of domestic MWDs, taking into consideration also its low cost and easy availability.

  8. Maize (Zea mays L.) genetic factors for preventing fumonisin contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrón, Ana; Santiago, Rogelio; Mansilla, Pedro; Pintos-Varela, Cristina; Ordas, Amando; Malvar, Rosa Ana

    2006-08-09

    Fusarium moniliforme and Fusarium proliferatum are the most frequently isolated fungi from maize (Zea mays L.) in Spain. Both Fusarium species produce toxins potentially dangerous for animals and humans, the fumonisins being the most significant of those toxins. White maize is preferred for human consumption, and extra care should be taken to avoid kernel mycotoxin contamination. The objectives of this study were to identify and quantify kernel infection by Fusarium spp. and contamination by fumonisin on white maize hybrids, to search for white maize sources of resistance to infection by Fusarium spp. and mycotoxin contamination, and to preliminarily study the genetics involved in such resistances. Ten F(1) single crosses derived from a diallel mating design among five white maize inbreds were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with three replications in 2002 at two locations. Fusarium verticilloides and F. proliferatum were detected on kernels of white maize hybrids cultivated in northwestern Spain. No differences in fungal infection were found among maize genotypes, but differences in fumonisin contamination were significant and could be related, in part, to differences in husk tightness. Among the genotypes studied, general combining ability (GCA) effects were the most important for resistance to fumonisin contamination. Inbreds EP10 and EC22 showed the most favorable GCA effects for husk tightness and fumonisin content, and the cross between them, EP10 x EC22, had the most favorable specific combining ability (SCA) effect for husk tightness. Inbreds EP10 and EC22 showed favorable GCA effects for fumonisin contamination and husk tightness, and the cross EP10 x EC22 was the only one with an average fumonisin level below 1 mug/g. Although this should be confirmed with more extensive studies, white maize inbreds developed from white maize landraces could be sources of resistance to fumonisin contamination.

  9. Investigating incidence of bacterial and fungal contamination in shared cosmetic kits available in the women beauty salons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Dadashi

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Shared cosmetics in beauty salons are almost contaminated by bacteria and fungus.Therefore, it is suggested to avoid sharing cosmetics by women and prevent use of public cosmetics in toilet saloons.

  10. Bacterial communities of surface and deep hydrocarbon-contaminated waters of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Nigro, L. M.; McKay, L.; Ziervogel, K.; Gutierrez, T.; Teske, A.

    2010-12-01

    We performed a 16S rRNA gene sequencing survey of bacterial communities within oil-contaminated surface water, deep hydrocarbon plume water, and deep water samples above and below the plume to determine spatial and temporal patterns of oil-degrading bacteria growing in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil leak. In addition, we are reporting 16S rRNA sequencing results from time series incubation, enrichment and cultivation experiments. Surface oil slick samples were collected 3 nautical miles from ground zero, (5/6/10, RV Pelican) and were added to uncontaminated surface water (collected within a 30 nautical mile radius of ground zero, 5/6/10 - 5/9/10, RV Pelican). This mixture was incubated for 20 days in a rolling bottle at 25°C. 16S rRNA clone libraries from marine snow-like microbial flocs that had formed during the incubation yielded a highly diverse bacterial community, predominately composed of the Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, and a smaller number of Planktomycetes and other bacterial lineages. The most frequently recovered proteobacterial sequences were closely related to cultured species of the genus Cycloclasticus, specialists in aerobic oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. These time series incubation results will be compared to the microbial community structure of contaminated surface water, sampled on the same cruise with RV Pelican (5/6/10-5/9/10) and frozen immediately. Stable isotope probing (SIP) experiments with C13-labelled alkanes and polycyclic aromatic substrates and gulf water samples have yielded different enrichments. With naphthalene, predominantly Alteromonas-related clones and a smaller share of Cycloclasticus clones were recovered; phenanthrene yielded predominantly clones related to Cycloclasticus, and diverse other Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria. Analyses of SIP experiments with hexadecane are in progress. The microbial community composition of the deep hydrocarbon plume was characterized using water column profile samples taken

  11. National Enforcement Initiative: Preventing Animal Waste from Contaminating Surface and Ground Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page describes EPA's goal in preventing animal waste from contaminating surface and ground Water. It is an EPA National Enforcement Initiative. Both enforcement cases, and a map of enforcement actions are provided.

  12. Implementation and planning of preventive and multi-layered contaminated water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takeshi; Arai, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    In Fukushima Daiichi D and D activities, one of the most challenging issues is contaminated water management. In order to control ground water inflow into the buildings so that amount of contaminated water does not increase and prevent contaminated water spread out to the environment including into the ocean, TEPCO are taking various measures: In order to remove contamination sources, the removal of the highly contaminated water in the seaside trenches are being implemented. And also, the acceleration of water purification is planned by contaminated water clean-up facility. For the purpose of Isolating water from contaminated sources, construction of the frozen-soil land-side wall started in order to prevent the groundwater from flowing in the area and contaminated water from flowing out from the area. In order to prevent leakage of contaminated water into the ocean, soil improvement with sodium silicate (liquid glass) and Installation of the sea-side impermeable walls are implemented. Furthermore, replacement of the flange-type tanks with welded-joint tanks to mitigate leakage risks is underway. (author)

  13. The Effect of Handwashing with Water or Soap on Bacterial Contamination of Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf-Peter Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Handwashing is thought to be effective for the prevention of transmission of diarrhoea pathogens. However it is not conclusive that handwashing with soap is more effective at reducing contamination with bacteria associated with diarrhoea than using water only. In this study 20 volunteers contaminated their hands deliberately by touching door handles and railings in public spaces. They were then allocated at random to (1 handwashing with water, (2 handwashing with non-antibacterial soap and (3 no handwashing. Each volunteer underwent this procedure 24 times, yielding 480 samples overall. Bacteria of potential faecal origin (mostly Enterococcus and Enterobacter spp. were found after no handwashing in 44% of samples. Handwashing with water alone reduced the presence of bacteria to 23% (p < 0.001. Handwashing with plain soap and water reduced the presence of bacteria to 8% (comparison of both handwashing arms: p < 0.001. The effect did not appear to depend on the bacteria species. Handwashing with non-antibacterial soap and water is more effective for the removal of bacteria of potential faecal origin from hands than handwashing with water alone and should therefore be more useful for the prevention of transmission of diarrhoeal diseases.

  14. The Effect of Handwashing with Water or Soap on Bacterial Contamination of Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Maxine; Cobb, Emma; Donachie, Peter; Judah, Gaby; Curtis, Val; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Handwashing is thought to be effective for the prevention of transmission of diarrhoea pathogens. However it is not conclusive that handwashing with soap is more effective at reducing contamination with bacteria associated with diarrhoea than using water only. In this study 20 volunteers contaminated their hands deliberately by touching door handles and railings in public spaces. They were then allocated at random to (1) handwashing with water, (2) handwashing with non-antibacterial soap and (3) no handwashing. Each volunteer underwent this procedure 24 times, yielding 480 samples overall. Bacteria of potential faecal origin (mostly Enterococcus and Enterobacter spp.) were found after no handwashing in 44% of samples. Handwashing with water alone reduced the presence of bacteria to 23% (p soap and water reduced the presence of bacteria to 8% (comparison of both handwashing arms: p soap and water is more effective for the removal of bacteria of potential faecal origin from hands than handwashing with water alone and should therefore be more useful for the prevention of transmission of diarrhoeal diseases. PMID:21318017

  15. Detection of bacterial contaminants and hybrid sequences in the genome of the kelp Saccharina japonica using Taxoblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon M. Dittami

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern genome sequencing strategies are highly sensitive to contamination making the detection of foreign DNA sequences an important part of analysis pipelines. Here we use Taxoblast, a simple pipeline with a graphical user interface, for the post-assembly detection of contaminating sequences in the published genome of the kelp Saccharina japonica. Analyses were based on multiple blastn searches with short sequence fragments. They revealed a number of probable bacterial contaminations as well as hybrid scaffolds that contain both bacterial and algal sequences. This or similar types of analysis, in combination with manual curation, may thus constitute a useful complement to standard bioinformatics analyses prior to submission of genomic data to public repositories. Our analysis pipeline is open-source and freely available at http://sdittami.altervista.org/taxoblast and via SourceForge (https://sourceforge.net/projects/taxoblast.

  16. Vancomycin added to the wash solution of the cell-saver. Effect on bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Ferrer, A; Gredilla-Díaz, E; de Vicente-Sánchez, J; Navarro-Suay, R; Gilsanz-Rodríguez, F

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to test whether the addition of a low-dose of antibiotic (vancomycin) to the wash solution (saline) of the cell-saver reduces the incidence of bacterial contamination of the autologous red blood cell (RBCs) concentrate recovered. Experimental, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study performed on 20 consecutive patients scheduled for posterior spinal fusion surgery. Intraoperative bleeding was processed through a cell-saver: HaemoLite ® 2+, in which the RBCs were washed according to randomization group, with saline (control group) or saline+10μg/ml -1 vancomycin (vanco group). Data regarding age, weight, processed and recovered volume, blood count, blood culture, and vancomycin concentration in RBCs concentrates obtained and incidence of fever after reinfusion were collected. Processed volume was 843±403ml and recovered volume 121±29ml, with haemoglobin concentration 10.4±5.0g/dl -1 and haematocrit 29.1±15.9% (mean±SD). Recovered RBC concentrate cultures were positive for coagulase-negative Staphylococcus in 5 cases (50%) of the control group while all cultures were negative in the vanco group (P=.016). The difference between the theoretical concentration of vancomycin administered and the concentration determined in the recovered RBC concentrate was 1.31μg/ml -1 (95% CI 1.19 to 1.43; P=.074). The addition of vancomycin at a concentration of 10ug/ml -1 to the wash solution of the cell-saver achieved similar concentrations in the autologous blood concentrate recovered allowing for bacterial removal, with negative blood cultures in all cases. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacterial, fungal and parasitic contamination of cockroaches in public hospitals of Hamadan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh, A; Tavacol, P; Mahjub, H

    2007-06-01

    To determine the possible role of cockroaches in dissemination of medically important microorganisms, a study was carried out in public hospitals and residential areas of Hamadan city, west of Iran. Bacteria, fungi and parasites of medical importance were isolated and identified. The total number of Blattella germanica collected from hospitals were 133 as the case group. The cockroaches collected from residential areas were 45 as the control group. A total of 178 cockroaches were collected, over a period of two years (133 from hospitals; and 45 from residential areas) in Hamadan. Medically important microorganisms were isolated from external and internal surfaces using standard methods. In the case group, 130 out of 133 (98%) Blattella germanica showed contamination with high bacterial load (more than 1 x 10(3)) whereas only 2 out of 45 (4.45%) cockroaches of the control group were carrying medically important bacteria with high bacterial load. Bacteriological examinations revealed that almost all test cockroaches had at least one of the following microorganisms either in their body surface or digestive tract. Enterobacter (22.6%), Klebsiela (21%), Enterococcus (17.3%), Staphylococcus (16.5%), Esherichia coli and Streptococcus (8.3%), Pseudomonas (3%), and also Shigella, Haemophilus and group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus each less than 1%. In addition the results showed (74.4.%) of test cockroaches harboured fungi-Candida (48.9%), Mucor (10.5%), Aspergillus niger (7.5%), Rhizopus (4.5) and also Penicillium and Aspergillus fumigans each 1.5%. Some parasitic worms of medical importance were also isolated from the test cockroaches, but carriage rates were low. The data from this study emphasise the importance of cockroaches as potential vectors of medically important microorganisms such as pathogenic bacteria and fungi in hospital environments.

  18. Low-waste technology of prevention, decontamination and localization of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizhnerov, L. V.; Konstantinov, Ye. A.; Prokopenko, V. A.; Sorokin, N. M.

    1997-01-01

    The report presents the results of research in developing a low-waste technology of prevention, decontamination and localization of radioactive contamination founded on the of easily removed protective polymeric coating based on water and alcohol latexes and dispersion of polymers with special activating additives. The developed technology provides for the reduction of weakly fixed radioactive contamination of non-painted and painted surfaces to admissible levels (as a rule), it securely prevents and localizes contamination and does not generate secondary liquid radioactive wastes

  19. Critical sources of bacterial contamination and adoption of standard sanitary protocol during semen collection and processing in Semen Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrahas Sannat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present investigation was conducted to locate the critical sources of bacterial contamination and to evaluate the standard sanitation protocol so as to improve the hygienic conditions during collection, evaluation, and processing of bull semen in the Semen Station. Materials and Methods: The study compared two different hygienic procedures during the collection, evaluation and processing of semen in Central Semen Station, Anjora, Durg. Routinely used materials including artificial vagina (AV inner liner, cone, semen collection tube, buffer, extender/diluter, straws; and the laboratory environment like processing lab, pass box and laminar air flow (LAF cabinet of extender preparation lab, processing lab, sealing filling machine, and bacteriological lab were subjected to bacteriological examination in two phases of study using two different sanitary protocols. Bacterial load in above items/environment was measured using standard plate count method and expressed as colony forming unit (CFU. Results: Bacterial load in a laboratory environment and AV equipments during two different sanitary protocol in present investigation differed highly significantly (p<0.001. Potential sources of bacterial contamination during semen collection and processing included laboratory environment like processing lab, pass box, and LAF cabinets; AV equipments, including AV Liner and cone. Bacterial load was reduced highly significantly (p<0.001 in AV liner (from 2.33±0.67 to 0.50±0.52, cone (from 4.16±1.20 to 1.91±0.55, and extender (from 1.33±0.38 to 0 after application of improved practices of packaging, handling, and sterilization in Phase II of study. Glasswares, buffers, and straws showed nil bacterial contamination in both the phases of study. With slight modification in fumigation protocol (formalin @600 ml/1000 ft3, bacterial load was significantly decreased (p<0.001 up to 0-6 CFU in processing lab (from 6.43±1.34 to 2.86±0.59, pass box (from 12

  20. Are Russian propolis ethanol extracts the future for the prevention of medical and biomedical implant contaminations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambi, Ashwin; Bryan, Julia; Borbon, Katherine; Centeno, Daniel; Liu, Tianchi; Chen, Tung Po; Cattabiani, Thomas; Traba, Christian

    2017-07-01

    Most studies reveal that the mechanism of action of propolis against bacteria is functional rather than structural and is attributed to a synergism between the compounds in the extracts. Propolis is said to inhibit bacterial adherence, division, inhibition of water-insoluble glucan formation, and protein synthesis. However, it has been shown that the mechanism of action of Russian propolis ethanol extracts is structural rather than functional and may be attributed to the metals found in propolis. If the metals found in propolis are removed, cell lysis still occurs and these modified extracts may be used in the prevention of medical and biomedical implant contaminations. The antibacterial activity of metal-free Russian propolis ethanol extracts (MFRPEE) on two biofilm forming bacteria: penicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was evaluated using MTT and a Live/Dead staining technique. Toxicity studies were conducted on mouse osteoblast (MC-3T3) cells using the same viability assays. In the MTT assay, biofilms were incubated with MTT at 37°C for 30min. After washing, the purple formazan formed inside the bacterial cells was dissolved by SDS and then measured using a microplate reader by setting the detecting and reference wavelengths at 570nm and 630nm, respectively. Live and dead distributions of cells were studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Complete biofilm inactivation was observed when biofilms were treated for 40h with 2µg/ml of MFRPEE. Results indicate that the metals present in propolis possess antibacterial activity, but do not have an essential role in the antibacterial mechanism of action. Additionally, the same concentration of metals found in propolis samples, were toxic to tissue cells. Comparable to samples with metals, metal free samples caused damage to the cell membrane structures of both bacterial species, resulting in cell lysis. Results suggest that the structural mechanism of action of Russian propolis ethanol

  1. Transient bacterial contamination of the dual-porosity aquifer at Walkerton, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Stephen R. H.; Smart, C. Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Contamination of the Paleozoic carbonate aquifer at Walkerton (Ontario, Canada) by pathogenic bacteria following heavy rain in May 2000 resulted in 2,300 illnesses and seven deaths. Subsequent tracer testing showed that there was rapid groundwater flow in the aquifer, and also rapid exchange between the aquifer and the ground surface. Electrical conductivity (EC) profiling during a 3-day pumping test showed that most flow was through bedding-plane fractures spaced about 10 m apart, that there were substantial contrasts in EC in the major fracture flows, and that there were rapid changes over time. Total coliform sampling revealed transient groundwater contamination, particularly after heavy rain and lasting up to a few days. These characteristics can be understood in terms of the dual-porosity nature of the aquifer. Most of the storage is in the matrix, but this can be considered to be static in the short term. Almost all transport is through the fracture network, which has rapid groundwater flow (˜100 m/day) and rapid transmission of pressure pulses due to the high hydraulic diffusivity. Rapid recharge can occur through thin and/or fractured overburden and at spring sites where flow is reversed by pumping during episodes of surface flooding. These characteristics facilitated the ingress of surface-derived bacteria into the aquifer, and their rapid transport within the aquifer to pumping wells. Bacterial presence is common in carbonate aquifers, and this can be explained by the well-connected, large-aperture fracture networks in these dual-porosity aquifers, even though many, such as at Walkerton, lack karst landforms.

  2. Comparison of PCR with Standard Method (MPN for detection of bacterial contamination in drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Dehghan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Detection of bacterial contamination in drinking water by culture method is a time and cost consuming method and spends a few days depending on contamination degree. However, the people use the tap water during that time. Molecular methods are rapid and sensitive. In this study a rapid Multiplex PCR method was used for rapid analysis both coliform bacteria and E.coli, and probable detection of VBNC bacteria in drinking water, the experiments were performed in bacteriological lab of water and Wastewater Corporation in Markazi province. Material and Methods:Amplification of a fragment from each of lacZ and uidA genes in a Multiplex PCR was used for detection of coliforms. Eight samples was taken from Arak drinking water system including 36 samples of wells, 41 samples of water distribution network and 3 samples from water storages were examined by amplification of lacZ and uidA genes in a Multiplex PCR. Equivalently, the MPN test was applied as a standard method for all samples for comparison of results. Standard bacteria, pure bacteria isolated from positive MPN and CRM were examined by PCR and MPN method. Results: The result of most samples water network, water storages, and water well were same in both MPN and PCR method .The results of standard bacteria and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from positive MPN and CRM confirmed the PCR method. Five samples were positive in PCR but negative in MPN method. Duration time of PCR was decreased about 105 min by changing the PCR program and electrophoreses factors. Conclusion: The Multiplex PCR can detect coliform bacteria and E.coli synchronous in drinking water.

  3. PREVALENCE AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE OF FOOD BORNE BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION IN SOME EGYPTIAN FOOD food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Selim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of food borne bacterial contamination in some Egyptian food. Total viable bacteria and total coliform bacteriawere isolated from different sources of food; carbohydrates (bread, flour and basbousa, vegetables (outer and inner tissues of potato and outer and inner tissues of cucumber and proteins (mincedmeat, cheese and milk. The study resulted in maximum value of total viable bacteria found in outer tissue of potato 68X104±1.0, while the minimum value found in inner tissues of potato andcucumber. The study resulted in total coliform was maximum value in minced meat 6.4X103±0.3. Basbousa and inner tissue of potato and cucumber were free from coliforms. The ability of isolatesto producing proteolytic enzymes was tested, we found that 326 isolate (63.92% from all isolates had this ability, thus we selected most 2 potent proteolytic isolates. The two isolates were identifiedas Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. The identification confirmed by microlog 34.20 system and 16SrRNA for two isolates and the same result was founded. Sensitivity tested for the most potentproteolytic species to 12 of the most commonly used antibiotics in the Egyptian pharmacy. The results showed that all species were sensitive to most of antibiotics, except B. cereus which was strongly susceptible to azteronam and ceftazidim. The data showed that raw meat, cooked food products, and raw milk were most commonly contaminated with foodborne pathogens and many pathogens were resistant to different antibiotics. The study provided useful information for assessment of the possible risk posed to consumers, which has significant public health impact.

  4. Residual viral and bacterial contamination of surfaces after cleaning and disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.; Hazeleger, W.C.; Koopmans, M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Beumer, R.R.; Duizer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental surfaces contaminated with pathogens can be sources of indirect transmission, and cleaning and disinfection are common interventions focused on reducing contamination levels. We determined the efficacy of cleaning and disinfection procedures for reducing contamination by noroviruses,

  5. Calibration of optimal use parameters for an ultraviolet light-emitting diode in eliminating bacterial contamination on needleless connectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, M P; Drennan, S L; Cambronne, E D

    2015-06-01

    Needleless connectors may develop bacterial contamination and cause central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) despite rigorous application of best-practice. Ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LED) are an emerging, increasingly affordable disinfection technology. We tested the hypothesis that a low-power UV LED could reliably eliminate bacteria on needleless central-line ports in a laboratory model of central-line contamination. Needleless central-line connectors were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus. A 285 nm UV LED was used in calibrated fashion to expose contaminated connectors. Ports were directly applied to agar plates and flushed with sterile saline, allowing assessment of bacterial survival on the port surface and in simulated usage flow-through fluid. UV applied to needleless central-line connectors was highly lethal at 0·5 cm distance at all tested exposure times. At distances >1·5 cm both simulated flow-through and port surface cultures demonstrated significant bacterial growth following UV exposure. Logarithmic-phase S. aureus subcultures were highly susceptible to UV induction/maintenance dosing. Low-power UV LED doses at fixed time and distance from needleless central-line connector ports reduced cultivable S. aureus from >10(6) CFU to below detectable levels in this laboratory simulation of central-line port contamination. Low-power UV LEDs may represent a feasible alternative to current best-practice in connector decontamination. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Calibration of optimal use parameters for an ultraviolet light-emitting diode in eliminating bacterial contamination on needleless connectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, M.P.; Drennan, S.L.; Cambronne, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Needleless connectors may develop bacterial contamination and cause central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) despite rigorous application of best-practice. Ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LED) are an emerging, increasingly affordable disinfection technology. We tested the hypothesis that a low-power UV LED could reliably eliminate bacteria on needleless central-line ports in a laboratory model of central-line contamination. Methods and Results Needleless central-line connectors were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus. A 285 nm UV LED was used in calibrated fashion to expose contaminated connectors. Ports were directly applied to agar plates and flushed with sterile saline, allowing assessment of bacterial survival on the port surface and in simulated usage flow-through fluid. UV applied to needleless central-line connectors was highly lethal at 0·5 cm distance at all tested exposure times. At distances >1·5 cm both simulated flow-through and port surface cultures demonstrated significant bacterial growth following UV exposure. Logarithmic-phase S. aureus subcultures were highly susceptible to UV induction/maintenance dosing. Conclusions Low-power UV LED doses at fixed time and distance from needleless central-line connector ports reduced cultivable S. aureus from >106 CFU to below detectable levels in this laboratory simulation of central-line port contamination. Significance and Impact of the study Low-power UV LEDs may represent a feasible alternative to current best-practice in connector decontamination. PMID:25801979

  7. Fermented whey as poultry feed additive to prevent fungal contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londero, Alejandra; León Peláez, María A; Diosma, Gabriela; De Antoni, Graciela L; Abraham, Analía G; Garrote, Graciela L

    2014-12-01

    Fungal contamination of poultry feed causes economic losses to industry and represents a potential risk to animal health. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effectiveness of whey fermented with kefir grains as additive to reduce fungal incidence, thus improving feed safety. Whey fermented for 24 h at 20 °C with kefir grains (100 g L(-1) ) reduced conidial germination of Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium crustosum, Trichoderma longibrachiatum and Rhizopus sp. Poultry feed supplemented with fermented whey (1 L kg(-1) ) was two to four times more resistant to fungal contamination than control feed depending on the fungal species. Additionally, it contained kefir microorganisms at levels of 1 × 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) kg(-1) of lactic acid bacteria and 6 × 10(7) CFU kg(-1) of yeasts even after 30 days of storage. Fermented whey added to poultry feed acted as a biopreservative, improving its resistance to fungal contamination and increasing its shelf life. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Sources and Pathways of Bacterial Contamination in Urban Streams and Ocean Beaches, Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. D.; Mendez, G. O.; La, J. X.; Izbicki, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Streams and ocean beaches in Santa Barbara, California, occasionally have concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria that exceed public health standards for recreational water, forcing temporary beach closures. Possible sources of fecal bacteria contamination include transient human populations, animal populations, and leaking sewer lines. The purpose of this three-year study is to identify important sources of fecal bacteria affecting the urban streams and beaches and to identify important pathways of transport. Contamination may enter streams and beaches directly by surface runoff, but also may be transmitted short distances through shallow ground water. Our analysis of existing historical data shows that fecal indicator bacteria concentrations are higher in near-shore ocean water following extreme high tides. The possible role of near shore ground water in supplying contaminants to the sea will be investigated by sampling water from an array of shallow wells installed for this study between an older city sewer line and the ocean. The ground water flux to the ocean will be inferred from water levels in these wells, and further tested by radium isotope values in near shore ocean samples. Two additional well arrays will be installed to test for leakage from residential sewage hookups and measure associated exchanges between ground water, streams, and ocean. Preliminary data collected by this study show fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in urban reaches of Mission Creek and its tributaries, the principle drainage through the city, are higher during low flow periods than during periods of higher flow. Analysis of preliminary data also shows short-term temporal variations in bacterial concentrations during twenty-four hour periods. Human enterovirus has been detected in our sample from one urban-drain tributary to Mission Creek. In order to identify the origins of fecal indicator bacteria water samples from Mission Creek, its tributaries, urban drains, and

  9. Bacterial contamination of automotive fuels in a tropical region: the case of Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E Rodríguez-Rodríguez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial contamination of fuel has been the cause of several problems in transportation and storage of these products. Due to the lack of previous studies related to these problems in Costa Rica, bacterial quality was evaluated biannually in automotive fuels stored in the four oil distribution facilities of the Costa Rican Petroleum Refinery (RECOPE. In 12 oil storage tanks, for a total of 96 samples, mesophilic, heterotrophic aerobic/facultative counts (ASTM D6974-04 and identification of bacteria presented in regular gas, premium gas and diesel from the bottom and superior part of the tanks were done; in the samples containing an aqueous phase, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB were also quantified by the most probable number technique (MPN, according to the ASTM D4412-84 standard. The higher contamination was shown at the bottom of the tanks (populations up to 10(4 UFC/l, especially if there was accumulated water, in which case populations reached 10(8 UFC/l. The most contaminated fuel was diesel (counts up to 10(4 UFC/l, whereas the less contaminated was premium gas. The less contaminated fuels were from the facilities of La Garita and Barranca, whereas the most contaminated were from Ochomogo. Nevertheless, the quantified populations did not cause significant alteration in quality physicochemical parameters in the samples analyzed. A total of 149 bacterial strains were isolated, 136 (91.3% Gram positive and 13 (8.7% Gram negative. The most frequent genera were Staphylococcus (24.0%, Micrococcus (21.9%, Bacillus (18.8% and Kocuria (11.5% among Gram positive bacteria and Pseudomonas (7.3% among Gram negative bacteria. The majority of these genera have been found as fuel contaminants or even as degraders of this kind of products; nevertheless, some species for which their appearance or growth in hydrocarbons have not been described were found with low frequencies. SRB were present in counts up to 10(5 MPN/l in 42.9% of water containing samples

  10. Application of air ions for bacterial de-colonization in air filters contaminated by aerosolized bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yang Seon; Yoon, Ki Young; Park, Jae Hong; Hwang, Jungho

    2011-01-01

    We aerosolized the Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) bacteria and collected them on membrane filters. Then we generated air ions by applying a high voltage to a carbon fiber tip and applied them to the contaminated filters. The antibacterial efficiency was not significantly affected by the bacteria being Gram-positive or Gram-negative, however, negative ions showed a lower antibacterial efficiency than positive ions to both E. coli and S. epidermidis, even though the concentration of negative air ions was much higher than that of positive air ions. With a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) images and fluorescence microscopy images using a LIVE/DEAD BacLight Bacterial Viability Kit, electrostatic disruption of the bacteria was found to be the dominant antibacterial effect. - Research Highlights: →This study examined the effects of air ions generated by a carbon fiber ionizer on the inactivation of bioaerosols. →When the ion exposure time and the ion generation concentration were increased, the antibacterial efficiency increased. →The bioaerosols carried a significant number of negative electrical charges. →Negative ions showed lower antibacterial efficiency than positive ions to both E. coli and S. epidermidis, even though the concentration of negative air ions was much higher than that of positive air ions.

  11. Early postsurgical bacterial contamination of the airways: a study on 28 open-heart patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villota, E D; Avello, F; Granados, M A; Arcas, M; Moles, B

    1978-01-01

    One pre- and two postoperative cultures of tracheo-bronchial secretions were obtained from 28 cardiac patients, subjected to open-heart surgery. Four patients received preoperative antibiotics, and all but one received postoperative prophylactic antibiotics. Preoperatively, only one patient had potential pathogens; after surgery (mean intubation time 4.2 h), four patients (14.3%) had organisms; and after 19 h of intubation, 28% of the patients had potential pathogens in their tracheo-bronchial secretions. Only three of the seven organisms recovered from the last sample were clearly sensitive to the antibiotics given prophylactically; and two of these organisms were Group A beta-haemolytic streptococci. The early presence of organisms in the airways after intubation, the high incidence of colonization, and the ineffectiveness of prophylactic antibiotics in preventing this contamination are pointed out. The factors that may possibly influence colonization of airways among these patients are commented on.

  12. Generation of Nanobodies against SlyD and development of tools to eliminate this bacterial contaminant from recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaozhong; Romão, Ema; Vertommen, Didier; Vincke, Cécile; Morales-Yánez, Francisco; Gutiérrez, Carlos; Liu, Changxiao; Muyldermans, Serge

    2017-09-01

    The gene for a protein domain, derived from a tumor marker, fused to His tag codons and under control of a T7 promotor was expressed in E. coli strain BL21 (DE3). The recombinant protein was purified from cell lysates through immobilized metal affinity chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography. A contaminating bacterial protein was consistently co-purified, even using stringent washing solutions containing 50 or 100 mM imidazole. Immunization of a dromedary with this contaminated protein preparation, and the subsequent generation and panning of the immune Nanobody library yielded several Nanobodies of which 2/3 were directed against the bacterial contaminant, reflecting the immunodominance of this protein to steer the dromedary immune response. Affinity adsorption of this contaminant using one of our specific Nanobodies followed by mass spectrometry identified the bacterial contaminant as FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (SlyD) from E. coli. This SlyD protein contains in its C-terminal region 14 histidines in a stretch of 31 amino acids, which explains its co-purification on Ni-NTA resin. This protein is most likely present to varying extents in all recombinant protein preparations after immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Using our SlyD-specific Nb 5 we generated an immune-complex that could be removed either by immunocapturing or by size exclusion chromatography. Both methods allow us to prepare a recombinant protein sample where the SlyD contaminant was quantitatively eliminated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Survey on the Bacterial Contamination of Traditional & Pasteurized ice Cream Produced in Arak City (summer and fall 2011)

    OpenAIRE

    M Rezaei; M Parviz; MR Javanmard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Ice-cream, being full of nutrients and enjoying favorable conditions may cause poisoning and intestinal diseases for the consumers in case of not considering rules of hygiene in the stages of production, maintenance and delivery.It is in fact considered as one of the dairy products providing a suitable environment for the development of different kinds of microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to investigate bacterial contamination found in traditional (unpasteurized) and...

  14. Parasitic and bacterial contamination in collards using effluent from treated domestic wastewater in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keawvichit, R; Wongworapat, K; Putsyainant, P; Silprasert, A; Karnchanawong, S

    2001-01-01

    Thailand often has inadequate water supply for agriculture during the dry season. The reuse of treated wastewater treatment plants could solve this problem. Treatment of domestic wastewater of Chiang Mai municipality by the aerated lagoon system (AL) releases more than 25,000 m3 of treated water everyday. The reuse of wastewater in agriculture is an efficient use of water, especially in tropical countries or in drought zones. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the possibility of using treated wastewater in growing edible vegetables, ie collards (kale), without pathogenic parasite and bacterial contamination. Collards (Brassica oleracea var acephala) were grown using either the treated wastewater from the aerated lagoon system (AL) or ground water (GW). Three cropping times were scheduled in February, May and July, 2000. Samples of water from AL system and GW were taken two times per month (the consecutive weeks) from February to July and examined for bacteria and parasites. Irrigation water (IW) that was normally used in agriculture was also collected, at the same time of the AL and GW collection, for bacteria and parasite investigation. A soil sample was taken before and after each crop for parasite examination. Collards were also collected at the end of the crop for parasite investigation. The results showed that GW seems to be a clean water since no pathogenic bacteria were found although small amount of Escherichia coli was noted in May. For AL and IW, similar number and types of bacteria were found. They were Aeromonas sobria, A. hydrophila, E. coli, Citrobacter freundii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, non-pathogenic type of Vibrio cholerae. The small number of Salmonella enteritidis gr E was found in AL in April. After investigating 12 samples in 6 months of each kind of water, ie GW, Al, and IW, no parasite was found. Only unidentified free living nematodes were found in IW but those parasites are non pathogenic. A small number of unidentified free

  15. Effects of bacterial contamination of media on the diagnosis of Tritrichomonas foetus by culture and real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothier, Kristin A; Villanueva, Michelle; Torain, Andrea; Hult, Cynthia; Wallace, Rachel

    2015-03-15

    The venereal pathogen Tritrichomonas foetus causes early embryonic death and abortion in cattle. With no approved treatment, control involves detection of infected animals and their removal from the herd. Culture is the traditional diagnostic method; standard media are formulated to support protozoal growth while suppressing competing organisms which may prevent microscopic recognition of T. foetus. Real-time PCR increases diagnostic sensitivity and specificity over culture but requires intact T. foetus DNA for detection. The purposes of this study were 1) to evaluate the effects of resident preputial bacteria that are not suppressed by antimicrobials in a commercial culture medium (InPouch™) on T. foetus detection by culture and PCR, and 2) to determine the performance of a laboratory-prepared culture medium on T. foetus detection by culture and PCR in samples with and without this bacterial contamination. A known concentration of one of three different strains of T. foetus inoculated into InPouch™ (IP) or modified Diamonds-Plastridge media (DPM) were co-incubated with a smegma culture media (CONTAM) for 24h and examined microscopically for the presence of identifiable T. foetus. PCR was performed on IP samples to determine if CONTAM also affected T. foetus DNA detection. A PCR protocol was then validated in DPM that performed similarly to the established IP PCR method. IP and DPM with CONTAM were spiked with serial dilutions that mimic field infections of one of four T. foetus strains and evaluated by real-time PCR; cycles to threshold (Ct) values and "positive" classification were compared between media. T. foetus motility and morphology as well as media pH were severely altered in IP samples with CONTAM compared to those without as well as to DPM medium with and without CONTAM (Pmedia interfere with T. foetus identification by culture and PCR and adversely affect diagnostic sensitivity for this fastidious pathogen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  16. Effects of mercury contamination on the culturable heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Sørensen, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of mercury contamination on the culturable heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in soil. The changes in diversity were monitored in soil microcosms, enriched with 25 mug Hg(II) g(-1) soil, over a period of 3 months...... by purification of total soil DNA and amplification of bacterial 16S rDNA fragments by polymerase chain reaction. Concentrations of bioavailable and total mercury were measured throughout the experiment. The effect on the culturable heterotrophic and genetic diversity was very similar, showing an immediate...... analysed by Shannon-Weaver indices, functional diversity was found to increase almost immediately after mercury addition and to remain at a level higher than the control soil for the rest of the experiment. The fraction of culturable heterotrophic bacteria increased from 1% to 10% of the total bacterial...

  17. Bacterial Contamination of DifferentTypes of Paper Currency in Iran During 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Taher

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Backgrand and Aims: Paper currencies are widely exchanged for receiving goods and servicesthroughout our country as well as rest of the world. Money bills are used everywhere and in allcapacities, and are being exchanged among a lot of people during the period of their circulation.If some of these bills are infected with pathogenic bacteria, there will be a potential hazard for thewell-being and health of those who handle them. Contaminated money bills are potentially verydangerous to the health of humans. The aim of this research is to specify the bacterial load ofvarious types of collected bills from different regions in Iran.Method:This research is a descriptive, cross- sectional study. At first, 400 different papercurrencies from various provinces in Iran were collected. Banknotes were put into the bottlescontaining sterile water and then heated for 12-24 hours at the temperature of 37°C. Afterwards,the banknotes were removed by a sterile forceps and the remaining solution was incubated. Theseparated microbes were identified by using microbiologic methods.Results: Data analysis revealed that 46% of different types of paper currency were contaminatedwith Gram positive and 54% with Gram negative bacteria. Klebsiella pneumoniae and Grampositive cocci in particular Staphylococcus aureus were the most separated bacteria, which areknown as pathogens in various diseases in human body.Conclusion: These bacteria cause serious illnesses particularly in elder people, children andspecifically immuno-deficient patients. We concluded that paper money in this study wascontaminated. Replacement of money bills with credit/ debit cards may reduce the potentialhazards substantially.

  18. Preventing intentional food contamination: a survey to assess restaurant preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Kanwat, C P; Qu, Haiyan; Smith, Lillian U; Patterson, Nathaniel J; Shewchuk, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    In the age of preparedness, public health agencies are concerned with intentional acts of food contamination in restaurants, in addition to food safety. Food safety consists of applying standard norms of practice and infrastructure, which, if violated, cause food-borne illness. In contrast, food defense requires an institutionalized mindset of informed alertness to unusual variations from the norms, combined with preemptive practices best suited to each restaurant. Therefore, while food safety lends itself to regulation to ensure standard practices, food defense is best served by advisory guidelines for autonomous application, preserving the restaurant industry's core values of hospitality and customer service. To address this challenge, public health agencies need survey tools that can yield action-relevant data on the knowledge and practice gaps in food defense preparedness and on educational messages and support services to be developed for maximum impact potential. This article presents a mail survey instrument, developed using qualitative research to ensure content and face validity. Instrument development involved drafting the survey on the basis of expert consultations, validating its content by using focus groups (representing all restaurant categories and geographic regions), and ensuring face validity through cognitive interviews. The resulting survey remains sensitive to the hospitality industry while encompassing all vulnerable points.

  19. Prevention of radioactive contamination in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero G, E.T.

    1995-01-01

    In this work was studied the separation of uranium from the phosphate rock to decrease the level of radioactivity in the phosphate fertilizers, this prevents the redistribution of uranium in the environment. The uranium leaching conditions from phosphate rock were estimated using alkaline solutions. The changes in the natural phosphate rock after leaching were studied. The amenability to separate the uranium from phosphate rock with ammonium carbonate / bicarbonate solution was determined. The uranium extraction was approximately 40%. The leaching conditions showed high selectivity for uranium without changes in the ore structure. The bulk ore was not dissolved. (Author)

  20. Resolving Bacterial Contamination of Fuel Ethanol Fermentations with Beneficial Bacteria – an Alternative to Antibiotic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel ethanol fermentations are not performed under aseptic conditions and microbial contamination reduces yields and can lead to costly “stuck fermentations.” Antibiotics are commonly used to combat contaminants, but these may persist in the distillers grains co-product. Among contaminants, it is kn...

  1. Bacterial Contamination of Hands Increases Risk of Cross-Contamination among Low-Income Puerto Rican Meal Preparers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharod, Jigna Morarji; Paciello, Stefania; Bermudez-Millan, Angela; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar; Damio, Grace; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association of microbial contamination of the meal preparer's hands with microbial status of food and kitchen/utensil surfaces during home preparation of a "Chicken and Salad" meal. Design and Setting: Observational home food safety assessment. Before starting meal preparation, participants' hands were tested to…

  2. Distribution of bacterial contamination in non-sterile pharmaceutical materials and assessment of its risk to the health of the final consumers quantitatively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Essam Eissa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial contamination control in pharmaceutical products is a critical aspect in the field of drug manufacturing industry due to the encountered risk to the patients' health and possibly their life. The application of commercial bacterial identification system is crucial to identify the type of contamination and its source to anticipate the impact of bioburden on the products and setting corrective and preventive actions. During the period of one year, random samples from raw materials and final products were tested according to United States Pharmacopeia, and those that showed suspect results for specified microorganisms and/or out-of-specification limits or showed out-of-trend results were subjected to further identification by using miniaturized biochemical identification system after performing Gram stain. From the total bacterial isolates of the investigated products, more than 60% were primarily belonging to Micrococcaceae 16.98% (empty hard gelatin capsules, Enterobacteriaceae 18.86% (vaginal cream applicator, plastic caps for bottles, Sorbitol solution, finished hard gelatin capsule product, topical cream and oral suspension and Bacillaceae 24.53% (Talc powder, liquid oral preparation and finished hard gelatin capsule product. Gram Positive and Negative samples were 56.60% and 41.51% respectively from the total investigated sample products and materials. Finished pharmaceutical products constituted 53.33% and 68.18% from Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms respectively. An approach to quantitative risk assessment for pharmaceutical products was conducted on selected medicinal items and showed that Enterobacteriaceae followed by Burkholderiaceae contributed by more than 80% to the major hazard that could be delivered to patients through drugs. The applied risk can be used as a milestone for setting goals by pharmaceutical companies to improve the safety of medicinal products microbiologically and to identify the major sources

  3. Surface zwitterionization: Effective method for preventing oral bacterial biofilm formation on hydroxyapatite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoungjin; Kim, Heejin; Seo, Jiae; Kang, Minji; Kang, Sunah; Jang, Joomyung; Lee, Yan; Seo, Ji-Hun

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we conducted surface zwitterionization of hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces by immersing them in the zwitterionic polymer solutions to provide anti-bacterial properties to the HA surface. Three different monomers containing various zwitterionic groups, i.e., phosphorylcholine (PC), sulfobetaine (SB), and carboxybetaine (CB), were copolymerized with the methacrylic monomer containing a Ca2+-binding moiety, using the free radical polymerization method. As a control, functionalization of the copolymer containing the Ca2+-binding moiety was synthesized using a hydroxy group. The stable immobilization of the zwitterionic functional groups was confirmed by water contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement conducted after the sonication process. The zwitterionized HA surface showed significantly decreased protein adsorption, whereas the hydroxyl group-coated HA surface showed limited efficacy. The anti-bacterial adhesion property was confirmed by conducting Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) adhesion tests for 6 h and 24 h. When furanone C-30, a representative anti-quorum sensing molecule for S. mutans, was used, only a small amount of bacteria adhered after 6 h and the population did not increase after 24 h. In contrast, zwitterionized HA surfaces showed almost no bacterial adhesion after 6 h and the effect was retained for 24 h, resulting in the lowest level of oral bacterial adhesion. These results confirm that surface zwitterionization is a promising method to effectively prevent oral bacterial adhesion on HA-based materials.

  4. CRISPR interference can prevent natural transformation and virulence acquisition during in vivo bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikard, David; Hatoum-Aslan, Asma; Mucida, Daniel; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2012-08-16

    Pathogenic bacterial strains emerge largely due to transfer of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes between bacteria, a process known as horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci of bacteria and archaea encode a sequence-specific defense mechanism against bacteriophages and constitute a programmable barrier to HGT. However, the impact of CRISPRs on the emergence of virulence is unknown. We programmed the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae with CRISPR sequences that target capsule genes, an essential pneumococcal virulence factor, and show that CRISPR interference can prevent transformation of nonencapsulated, avirulent pneumococci into capsulated, virulent strains during infection in mice. Further, at low frequencies bacteria can lose CRISPR function, acquire capsule genes, and mount a successful infection. These results demonstrate that CRISPR interference can prevent the emergence of virulence in vivo and that strong selective pressure for virulence or antibiotic resistance can lead to CRISPR loss in bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Three common metal contaminants of urban runoff (Zn, Cu and Pb) accumulate in freshwater biofilm and modify embedded bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancion, Pierre-Yves; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian D.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the absorption rates of zinc, copper and lead in freshwater biofilm and assessed whether biofilm bacterial populations are affected by exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of these metals in flow chamber microcosms. Metals were rapidly accumulated by the biofilm and then retained for at least 14 days after transfer to uncontaminated water. Changes in bacterial populations were assessed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Significant differences in bacterial community structure occurred within only three days of exposure to metals and remained detectable at least 14 days after transfer to uncontaminated water. The rapid uptake of stormwater-associated metals and their retention in the biofilm highlight the potential role of biofilms in the transfer of metals to organisms at higher trophic levels. The sensitivity of stream biofilm bacterial populations to metal exposure supports their use as an indicator of stream ecological health. - The rapid accumulation of metals in biofilms and their impact on bacterial communities provide new insights into how these contaminants affect freshwater ecosystems.

  6. Bioremediation of PCB-contaminated shallow river sediments: The efficacy of biodegradation using individual bacterial strains and their consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváthová, Hana; Lászlová, Katarína; Dercová, Katarína

    2018-02-01

    Elimination of dangerous toxic and hydrophobic chlorinated aromatic compounds, mainly PCBs from the environment, is one of the most important aims of the environmental biotechnologies. In this work, biodegradation of an industrial mixture of PCBs (Delor 103, equivalent to Aroclor 1242) was performed using bacterial consortia composed of four bacterial strains isolated from the historically PCB-contaminated sediments and characterized as Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Ochrobactrum anthropi and Rhodococcus ruber. The objective of this research was to determine the biodegradation ability of the individual strains and artificially prepared consortia composed of two or three bacterial strains mentioned above. Based on the growth parameters, six consortia were constructed and inoculated into the historically contaminated sediment samples collected in the efflux canal of Chemko Strážske plant - the former producer of the industrial mixtures of PCBs. The efficacy of the biotreatment, namely bioaugmentation, was evaluated by determination of ecotoxicity of treated and non-treated sediments. The most effective consortia were those containing the strain R. ruber. In the combination with A. xylosoxidans, the biodegradation of the sum of the indicator congeners was 85% and in the combination with S. maltophilia nearly 80%, with inocula applied in the ratio 1:1 in both cases. Consortium containing the strain R. ruber and S. maltophilia showed pronounced degradation of the highly chlorinated PCB congeners. Among the consortia composed of three bacterial strains, only that consisting of O. anthropi, R. ruber and A. xylosoxidans showed higher biodegradation (73%). All created consortia significally reduced the toxicity of the contaminated sediment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Predictive value of cerebrospinal fluid lactate for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis in patients post-neurosurgical operation with blood-contaminated cerebrospinal fluid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yufang; Wang, Lingyan; Li, Jingchao; Shi, Lei; Yao, Mingli; Guan, Xiangdong; Ouyang, Bin

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of cerebrospinal lactate for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis in patients post-neurosurgical operation (PNBM) with blood-contaminated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A prospective observational study was conducted. 101 patients underwent neurosurgical operation and clinically suspected PNBM admitted to neurosurgical intensive care unit (NSICU) of the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University from October 2015 to December 2016 were enrolled. Based on red blood cell quantitative test in CSF, the patients were divided into blood-contaminated and non blood-contaminated CSF groups. According to the PNBM diagnostic criteria of 2008 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC/NHSN), all patients were divided into PNBM group and non-PNBM group. The biochemical indexes levels in CSF were compared among the groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic power of CSF lactate for PNBM in blood-contaminated patients. A total of 101 suspected PNBM patients were enrolled. In 77 blood-contaminated CSF patients, 39 patients were diagnosed as PNBM (account for 50.6%); in 24 non-blood-contaminated patients, 12 patients were diagnosed as PNBM (account for 50.0%). (1) In non-PNBM patients, the lactate level in blood-contaminated CSF was significantly higher than that of non-blood-contaminated CSF (mmol/L: 3.5±1.3 vs. 2.3±1.1, P 0.05). (2) In both blood-contaminated and non blood-contaminated CSF, white blood cell (WBC), protein and lactate levels in PNBM group were significantly higher than those in non-PNBM group [WBC (×10 6 /L): 660.0 (67.5, 1 105.0) vs. 41.0 (15.0, 142.5) in blood-contaminated CSF, 168.0 (86.5, 269.5) vs. 34.5 (7.0, 83.5) in non-blood-contaminated CSF; protein (mg/L): 4 757.8 (2 995.2, 10 219.8) vs. 1 292.8 (924.2, 1 936.2) in blood-contaminated CSF, 39 247.3 (14 900.6, 62 552.2) vs. 1 441.6 (977.3, 2 963.9) in non blood-contaminated

  8. Pro-inflammatory Effects of Bacterial Recombinant Human C-Reactive Protein are Caused by Contamination with Bacterial Products not by C-Reactive Protein Itself

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepys, Mark B.; Hawkins, Philip N.; Kahan, Melvyn C.; Tennent, Glenys A.; Gallimore, J. Ruth; Graham, David; Sabin, Caroline A.; Zychlinsky, Arturo; de Diego, Juana

    2006-01-01

    Intravenous administration to human volunteers of a commercial preparation of recombinant human C-reactive protein (CRP) produced in E. coli was recently reported in this journal to induce an acute phase response of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) and of CRP itself, and to activate the coagulation system. The authors concluded that CRP is probably a mediator of atherothrombotic disease. Here we confirm that this recombinant CRP preparation was pro-inflammatory both for mouse macrophages in vitro and for mice in vivo, but show that pure natural human CRP had no such activity. Furthermore mice transgenic for human CRP, and expressing it throughout their lives, maintained normal concentrations of their most sensitive endogenous acute phase reactants, SAA and serum amyloid P component (SAP). The patterns of in vitro cytokine induction and of in vivo acute phase stimulation by the recombinant CRP preparation were consistent with contamination by bacterial products, and there was 46.6 EU of apparent endotoxin activity per mg of CRP in the bacterial product, compared to 0.9 EU per mg of our isolated natural human CRP preparation. The absence of any pro-inflammatory activity in natural CRP for macrophages or healthy mice strongly suggests that the in vivo effects of the recombinant preparation observed in humans were due to pro-inflammatory bacterial products and not human CRP. PMID:16254214

  9. Oil and Gas Production Wastewater: Soil Contamination and Pollution Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Pichtel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During oil and natural gas production, so-called “produced water” comprises the largest byproduct stream. In addition, many oil and gas operations are augmented via injection of hydraulic fracturing (HF fluids into the formation. Both produced water and HF fluids may contain hundreds of individual chemicals, some known to be detrimental to public health and the environment. Oil and gas production wastewater may serve a range of beneficial purposes, particularly in arid regions, if managed correctly. Numerous treatment technologies have been developed that allow for injection, discharge to the land surface, or beneficial reuse. Although many papers have addressed the effects of oil and gas production wastewater (OGPW on groundwater and surface water quality, significantly less information is available on the effects of these fluids on the soil resource. This review paper compiles fundamental information on numerous chemicals used and produced during oil and gas development and their effects on the soil environment. Additionally, pollution prevention technologies relating to OGPW are presented. An understanding of the effects of OGPW on soil chemical, physical, and biological properties can provide a foundation for effective remediation of OGPW-affected soils; additionally, sustainable reuse of oil and gas water for irrigation and industrial purposes may be enhanced.

  10. Denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter dominate bacterial communities in the highly contaminated subsurface of a nuclear legacy waste site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Stefan [Florida State University; Prakash, Om [Florida State University; Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University; Overholt, Will [Florida State University; Cardenas, Erick [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University; Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Watson, David B [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University

    2011-01-01

    The effect of long-term mixed-waste contamination, particularly uranium and nitrate, on the microbial community in the terrestrial subsurface was investigated at the field scale at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site in Oak Ridge, TN. The abundance, community composition, and distribution of groundwater microorganisms were examined across the site during two seasonal sampling events. At representative locations, subsurface sediment was also examined from two boreholes, one sampled from the most heavily contaminated area of the site and another from an area with low contamination. A suite of DNA- and RNA-based molecular tools were employed for community characterization, including quantitative PCR of ribosomal RNA and nitrite reductase genes, community composition fingerprinting analysis, and high-throughput pyrotag sequencing of rRNA genes. The results demonstrate that pH is a major driver of the subsurface microbial community structure, and denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter (class Gammaproteobacteria) dominate at low pH. The relative abundance of bacteria from this genus was positively correlated with lower pH conditions, and these bacteria were abundant and active in the most highly contaminated areas. Other factors, such as concentration of nitrogen species, oxygen and sampling season did not appear to strongly influence the distribution of Rhodanobacter. Results indicate that these organisms are acid-tolerant denitrifiers, well suited to the acidic, nitrate-rich subsurface conditions, and pH is confirmed as a dominant driver of bacterial community structure in this contaminated subsurface environment.

  11. Bacterial Diversity and Bioremediation Potential of the Highly Contaminated Marine Sediments at El-Max District (Egypt, Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Ranya A.; El Gendi, Hamada M.; Goda, Doaa A.; Corsini, Anna; Cavalca, Lucia; Fusi, Marco; Daffonchio, Daniele; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R.

    2015-01-01

    Coastal environments worldwide are threatened by the effects of pollution, a risk particularly high in semienclosed basins like the Mediterranean Sea that is poorly studied from bioremediation potential perspective especially in the Southern coast. Here, we investigated the physical, chemical, and microbiological features of hydrocarbon and heavy metals contaminated sediments collected at El-Max bay (Egypt). Molecular and statistical approaches assessing the structure of the sediment-dwelling bacterial communities showed correlations between the composition of bacterial assemblages and the associated environmental parameters. Fifty strains were isolated on mineral media supplemented by 1% crude oil and identified as a diverse range of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria involved in different successional stages of biodegradation. We screened the collection for biotechnological potential studying biosurfactant production, biofilm formation, and the capability to utilize different hydrocarbons. Some strains were able to grow on multiple hydrocarbons as unique carbon source and presented biosurfactant-like activities and/or capacity to form biofilm and owned genes involved in different detoxification/degradation processes. El-Max sediments represent a promising reservoir of novel bacterial strains adapted to high hydrocarbon contamination loads. The potential of the strains for exploitation for in situ intervention to combat pollution in coastal areas is discussed. PMID:26273661

  12. Bacterial Diversity and Bioremediation Potential of the Highly Contaminated Marine Sediments at El-Max District (Egypt, Mediterranean Sea)

    KAUST Repository

    Amer, Ranya A.

    2015-02-01

    Coastal environments worldwide are threatened by the effects of pollution, a risk particularly high in semienclosed basins like the Mediterranean Sea that is poorly studied from bioremediation potential perspective especially in the Southern coast. Here, we investigated the physical, chemical, and microbiological features of hydrocarbon and heavy metals contaminated sediments collected at El-Max bay (Egypt). Molecular and statistical approaches assessing the structure of the sediment-dwelling bacterial communities showed correlations between the composition of bacterial assemblages and the associated environmental parameters. Fifty strains were isolated on mineral media supplemented by 1% crude oil and identified as a diverse range of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria involved in different successional stages of biodegradation. We screened the collection for biotechnological potential studying biosurfactant production, biofilm formation, and the capability to utilize different hydrocarbons. Some strains were able to grow on multiple hydrocarbons as unique carbon source and presented biosurfactant-like activities and/or capacity to form biofilm and owned genes involved in different detoxification/degradation processes. El-Max sediments represent a promising reservoir of novel bacterial strains adapted to high hydrocarbon contamination loads. The potential of the strains for exploitation for in situ intervention to combat pollution in coastal areas is discussed.

  13. Bacterial Diversity and Bioremediation Potential of the Highly Contaminated Marine Sediments at El-Max District (Egypt, Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranya A. Amer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coastal environments worldwide are threatened by the effects of pollution, a risk particularly high in semienclosed basins like the Mediterranean Sea that is poorly studied from bioremediation potential perspective especially in the Southern coast. Here, we investigated the physical, chemical, and microbiological features of hydrocarbon and heavy metals contaminated sediments collected at El-Max bay (Egypt. Molecular and statistical approaches assessing the structure of the sediment-dwelling bacterial communities showed correlations between the composition of bacterial assemblages and the associated environmental parameters. Fifty strains were isolated on mineral media supplemented by 1% crude oil and identified as a diverse range of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria involved in different successional stages of biodegradation. We screened the collection for biotechnological potential studying biosurfactant production, biofilm formation, and the capability to utilize different hydrocarbons. Some strains were able to grow on multiple hydrocarbons as unique carbon source and presented biosurfactant-like activities and/or capacity to form biofilm and owned genes involved in different detoxification/degradation processes. El-Max sediments represent a promising reservoir of novel bacterial strains adapted to high hydrocarbon contamination loads. The potential of the strains for exploitation for in situ intervention to combat pollution in coastal areas is discussed.

  14. Assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in contaminated sediments and soils using green fluorescent protein-based bacterial biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, V.H.-C.; Chien, M.-T.; Tseng, Y.-Y.; Ou, K.-L.

    2006-01-01

    A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based bacterial biosensor Escherichia coli DH5α (pVLCD1) was developed based on the expression of gfp under the control of the cad promoter and the cadC gene of Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258. DH5α (pVLCD1) mainly responded to Cd(II), Pb(II), and Sb(III), the lowest detectable concentrations being 0.1 nmol L -1 , 10 nmol L -1 , and 0.1 nmol L -1 , respectively, with 2 h exposure. The biosensor was field-tested to measure the relative bioavailability of the heavy metals in contaminated sediments and soil samples. The results showed that the majority of heavy metals remained adsorbed to soil particles: Cd(II)/Pb(II) was only partially available to the biosensor in soil-water extracts. Our results demonstrate that the GFP-based bacterial biosensor is useful and applicable in determining the bioavailability of heavy metals with high sensitivity in contaminated sediment and soil samples and suggests a potential for its inexpensive application in environmentally relevant sample tests. - Nonpathogenic GFP-based bacterial biosensor is applicable in determining the bioavailability of heavy metals in environmental samples

  15. Health risk assessment of heavy metals and bacterial contamination in drinking water sources: a case study of Malakand Agency, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawab, Javed; Khan, Sardar; Ali, Sharafat; Sher, Hassan; Rahman, Ziaur; Khan, Kifayatullah; Tang, Jianfeng; Ahmad, Aziz

    2016-05-01

    Human beings are frequently exposed to pathogens and heavy metals through ingestion of contaminated drinking water throughout the world particularly in developing countries. The present study aimed to assess the quality of water used for drinking purposes in Malakand Agency, Pakistan. Water samples were collected from different sources (dug wells, bore wells, tube wells, springs, and hand pumps) and analyzed for different physico-chemical parameters and bacterial pathogens (fecal coliform bacteria) using standard methods, while heavy metals were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS-PEA-700). In the study area, 70 % of water sources were contaminated with F. coliform representing high bacterial contamination. The heavy metals, such as Cd (29 and 8 %), Ni (16 and 78 %), and Cr (7 %), exceeded their respective safe limits of WHO (2006) and Pak-EPA (2008), respectively, in water sources, while Pb (9 %) only exceeded from WHO safe limit. The risk assessment tools such as daily intake of metals (DIMs) and health risk indexes (HRIs) were used for health risk estimation and were observed in the order of Ni > Cr > Mn > Pb > Cd and Cd > Ni > Pb > Mn > Cr, respectively. The HRI values of heavy metals for both children and adults were <1, showing lack of potential health risk to the local inhabitants of the study area.

  16. Green and brown propolis: efficient natural biocides for the control of bacterial contamination of alcoholic fermentation of distilled beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Justino Rossini Mutton

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of natural biocides, brown and green propolis, for the control of bacterial contamination in the production of sugarcane spirit. The treatments consisted of brown and green propolis extracts, ampicillin, and a control and were assessed at the beginning and end of harvest season in ten fermentation cycles. In the microbiological analyses, the lactic acid bacteria were quantified in the inoculum before and after the treatment with biocides, and the viability of yeast cells during fermentation was evaluated. The levels of acids, glycerol, total residual reducing sugars, and ethanol were analyzed for the wine resulting from each fermentation cycle. A reduction in the number of bacterial contaminants in the inoculum in the treatments with the natural biocides was observed, but it did not affect the viability of yeast cells. The control of the contaminants led to the production of higher levels of ethanol and reduced acidity in the wine produced. The results of the use of brown and green propolis to control the growth microorganisms in the fermentation of sugarcane spirit can be of great importance for using alternative strategies to synthetic antibacterials in fermentation processes including other distilled beverage or spirits.

  17. Sphingosine Prevents Bacterial Adherence to Endotracheal Tubes: A Novel Mechanism to Prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    rinsed in 100 mL HEPES/saline (H/S) (132 mM NaCl [sodium chloride], 20 mM HEPES [ pH 7.4], 5 mM KCl [potassium chloride], 1 mM CaCl2 [calcium chloride...kinase reaction was initiated by addition of 0.004 units sphingosine kinase in 50 mM HEPES ( pH 7.4), 250 mM NaCl, 30 mM MgCl2, 1 µM adenosine...adhere to the surface prior to biofilm formation. The source of the bacterial inoculant (i.e., oral secretions, gastric reflux, inhaled droplets, etc

  18. Effects of mercury contamination on the culturable heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Sørensen, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of mercury contamination on the culturable heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in soil. The changes in diversity were monitored in soil microcosms, enriched with 25 mug Hg(II) g(-1) soil, over a period of 3 months...... by purification of total soil DNA and amplification of bacterial 16S rDNA fragments by polymerase chain reaction. Concentrations of bioavailable and total mercury were measured throughout the experiment. The effect on the culturable heterotrophic and genetic diversity was very similar, showing an immediate...... decrease after mercury addition but then slowly increasing throughout the entire experimental period. Pre-exposure levels were not reached within the time span of this investigation. The DGGE band pattern indicated that a shift in the community structure was responsible for recovered diversity. When...

  19. Contamination of knives and graters by bacterial foodborne pathogens during slicing and grating of produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Liao, Jean; Cannon, Jennifer L; Ortega, Ynes R

    2015-12-01

    Poor hygiene and improper food preparation practices in consumers' homes have previously been demonstrated as contributing to foodborne diseases. To address potential cross-contamination by kitchen utensils in the home, a series of studies was conducted to determine the extent to which the use of a knife or grater on fresh produce would lead to the utensil's contamination with Escherichia coli O157:H7 or Salmonella enterica. When shredding inoculated carrots (ca. 5.3 log CFU/carrot), all graters became contaminated and the number of E. coli O157:H7 present on the utensil was significantly greater than Salmonella (p Contamination of knives after slicing inoculated produce (4.9-5.4 log CFU/produce item) could only be detected by enrichment culture. After slicing tomatoes, honeydew melons, strawberries, cucumbers, and cantaloupes, the average prevalence of knife contamination by the two pathogens was 43%, 17%, 15%, 7%, and 3%, respectively. No significant increase in the incidence or level of contamination occurred on the utensils when residues were present (p > 0.05); however, subsequent contamination of 7 produce items processed with the contaminated utensils did occur. These results highlight the necessity of proper sanitization of these utensils when used in preparation of raw produce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of structural injure in the bile bacterial contamination after balloon transduodenal sphincteroplasty (papillary dilation in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zavadinack Netto Martin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate, in dogs, the biliary sphincter subjected to dilation by hydrostatic balloon by the point of view of structural alterations of the papilla and the biochemestry and bacterial contamination of the bile. METHODS: Twenty dogs were submitted to laparotomy, duodenotomy, and enlargement of the major duodenal papilla- GA(n=10 - with balloon of 8mm inflated with pressure of 0,5atm, during 2 minutes or to the sham procedure - GB(n=10. Blood samples collected on times t(0day, t(7days and t(28days were subjected to dosages of alkaline phosphatase (ALP and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT for cholestasis evaluation. The collected material from the gall bladder at the same times were registered and numbered to be submitted to culture in BHI, blood agar (rich, non-selective element and Mac Conkey (selective element for Gram-negative bacillus. On the 28th day three fragments of the papilla were tranversally cut by the choledoc axis 3mm from the duodenal papilla and the cuts, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's tricome, were evaluated according to their inflammatory reaction. RESULTS: The GGT and ALP averages on the three periods in the groups A and B did not show significant differences, not being characterizes the cholestasis. The bacterian contamination was significantly higher in GA (2,19 than in GB (1,96; the contamination was lower in the initial time compared with 7 and 28 days (t0bacterial contamination of the gall bladder, not associated with cholestasis. The morphologic lesions are more intense in the late phase, not associated with an eventual papilla esthenosis.

  1. Effects of structural injure in the bile bacterial contamination after balloon transduodenal sphincteroplasty (papillary dilation) in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadinack Netto, Martin; Fagundes, Djalma José; Bandeira, César Orlando Peralta

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate, in dogs, the biliary sphincter subjected to dilation by hydrostatic balloon by the point of view of structural alterations of the papilla and the biochemestry and bacterial contamination of the bile. Twenty dogs were submitted to laparotomy, duodenotomy, and enlargement of the major duodenal papilla- GA(n=10) - with balloon of 8mm inflated with pressure of 0,5 atm, during 2 minutes or to the sham procedure - GB(n=10). Blood samples collected on times t(0 day), t(7 days) and t(28 days) were subjected to dosages of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) for cholestasis evaluation. The collected material from the gall bladder at the same times were registered and numbered to be submitted to culture in BHI, blood agar (rich, non-selective element) and Mac Conkey (selective element for Gram-negative bacillus. On the 28th day three fragments of the papilla were tranversally cut by the choledoc axis 3mm from the duodenal papilla and the cuts, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's tricome, were evaluated according to their inflammatory reaction. The GGT and ALP averages on the three periods in the groups A and B did not show significant differences, not being characterizes the cholestasis. The bacterian contamination was significantly higher in GA (2,19) than in GB (1,96); the contamination was lower in the initial time compared with 7 and 28 days (t0bacterial contamination of the gall bladder, not associated with cholestasis. The morphologic lesions are more intense in the late phase, not associated with an eventual papilla esthenosis.

  2. Preventive measures for radioactive contamination in iron and steel used as construction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsi Huo-Wang; Wu Ching-Hwa; Chou Kei-Den; Yeh Chin-Shiun

    2000-01-01

    At the end of July 1992, Atomic Energy Council (AEC) received tips-off from Taipei local residents, saying some buildings in Taipei had their rebar been contaminated by radioactive materials. Regarding causes and sources of those radioactively contaminated rebar, views from every aspects were pointing toward that scraps mixed with radioactive source smelting in the steel mill as the most possible reason. After investigating houses and constructors, AEC found that most contaminated buildings were constructed during the period of 1982 and 1984. For protection of public rights, AEC then actively undertook nation-wide survey of more than forty thousand buildings constructed between 1982 and 1984. Thermal Luminescent Dosimeters (TLD) and house by house surveying were major methods to investigate houses contamination. Finally, it was found that radiation contaminated houses are concentrated in Taipei City, Taipei County, Tauoyen County, Keelung County. According to data collected up to December 31, 1999, there were 180 cases, with a total of 1601 contaminated housing units. Based on information data of dose assessment, distribution of annual dose are as the following: higher than 15 mSv -143 housing units (9.21%), 5-15 mSv -117 housing units (7.53%), less than 5 mSv -1293 housing units (83.26%). Except actively conducting remodeling of contaminated houses and granting compensation to house owners, AEC has established following measures to prevent rebars from being radioactively contaminated. (1) Radiation detection training of iron and steel detectors (2) Strengthening controls over radioactive sources (3) Enforcing examination of radioactive levels for imported rebars (4) Requesting domestic steel companies establish radiation detection capability (5) Promoting installation of portal type radiation detectors for steel companies having smelting furnace (6) Enforcing no-radioactive contamination certificate system. The radiation detection training of iron and steel

  3. Bacterial diversity and reductive dehalogenase redundancy in a 1,2-dichloroethane-degrading bacterial consortium enriched from a contaminated aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittebolle Lieven

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria possess a reservoir of metabolic functionalities ready to be exploited for multiple purposes. The use of microorganisms to clean up xenobiotics from polluted ecosystems (e.g. soil and water represents an eco-sustainable and powerful alternative to traditional remediation processes. Recent developments in molecular-biology-based techniques have led to rapid and accurate strategies for monitoring and identification of bacteria and catabolic genes involved in the degradation of xenobiotics, key processes to follow up the activities in situ. Results We report the characterization of the response of an enriched bacterial community of a 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA contaminated aquifer to the spiking with 5 mM lactate as electron donor in microcosm studies. After 15 days of incubation, the microbial community structure was analyzed. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library showed that the most represented phylogenetic group within the consortium was affiliated with the phylum Firmicutes. Among them, known degraders of chlorinated compounds were identified. A reductive dehalogenase genes clone library showed that the community held four phylogenetically-distinct catalytic enzymes, all conserving signature residues previously shown to be linked to 1,2-DCA dehalogenation. Conclusions The overall data indicate that the enriched bacterial consortium shares the metabolic functionality between different members of the microbial community and is characterized by a high functional redundancy. These are fundamental features for the maintenance of the community's functionality, especially under stress conditions and suggest the feasibility of a bioremediation treatment with a potential prompt dehalogenation and a process stability over time.

  4. Bacterial contamination of surgeons' gloves during shunt insertion; a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Preben; Ejlertsen, Tove; Aaen, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    antibiotics and double gloving, by surgeons experienced in shunt surgery. Surgical incision, dissection and tunnelling were done. Then the surgeon, the scrub-nurse and, in three cases, the assistant made an imprint of their outer gloves on agar plates. Hereafter, they changed the outer pair of gloves before...... handling the shunt and completing the operation. The plates were cultured for 6 days in both aerobic and anaerobic environment. In all cases the surgeons gloves were contaminated, and in six cases also the nurses' gloves were contaminated, as well as all three assistants. Propionebacterium acnes were...... nurse and assistant were contaminated with micro-organisms less than 15 min after surgery has been commenced and before the shunts were handled. This study offers a feasible, simple and logical explanation of how shunts may become contaminated and infected. A simple measure would be to change the outer...

  5. Successional and spatial patterns of bacterial communities in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and Populus rhizosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Shinjini

    2014-01-01

    Ever-increasing urbanization and industrialization have led to contamination of a vast numbers of terrestrial sites with petroleum hydrocarbons. Petroleum hydrocarbon pollution has a deleterious impact on biotic and abiotic properties of ecosystem and can thereby affect some valuable ecosystem services. Microbes have the ability to metabolize various components of these harmful contaminants; this unique ability has been harnessed for decades in form of bioremediation and rhizoremediation, wit...

  6. How nanotechnology-enabled concepts could contribute to the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Inge K

    2015-05-29

    This viewpoint summarizes a selection of nanotechnology-based key concepts relevant to critical care medicine. It focuses on novel approaches for a trigger-dependent release of antimicrobial substances from degradable nano-sized carriers, the ultra-sensitive detection of analytes in body fluid samples by plasmonic and fluorescent nanoparticles, and the rapid removal of pathogens from whole blood using magnetic nanoparticles. The concepts presented here could significantly contribute to the prevention, diagnosis and therapy of bacterial infections in future and it is now our turn to bring them from the bench to the bedside.

  7. Stainless steel modified with poly(ethylene glycol) can prevent protein adsorption but not bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Jiang; Bagge, Dorthe; Gram, Lone

    2003-01-01

    The surface of AISI 316 grade stainless steel (SS) was modified with a layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) (molecular weight 5000) with the aim of preventing protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion. Model SS substrates were first modified to introduce a very high density of reactive amine groups....... The chemical composition and uniformity of the surfaces were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight static secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SSIMS) in the imaging mode. The effects of PEI concentration and different substrate pre-cleaning methods on the structure...

  8. Denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter dominate bacterial communities in the highly contaminated subsurface of a nuclear legacy waste site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Stefan J; Prakash, Om; Jasrotia, Puja; Overholt, Will A; Cardenas, Erick; Hubbard, Daniela; Tiedje, James M; Watson, David B; Schadt, Christopher W; Brooks, Scott C; Kostka, Joel E

    2012-02-01

    The effect of long-term mixed-waste contamination, particularly uranium and nitrate, on the microbial community in the terrestrial subsurface was investigated at the field scale at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site in Oak Ridge, TN. The abundance, community composition, and distribution of groundwater microorganisms were examined across the site during two seasonal sampling events. At representative locations, subsurface sediment was also examined from two boreholes, one sampled from the most heavily contaminated area of the site and another from an area with low contamination. A suite of DNA- and RNA-based molecular tools were employed for community characterization, including quantitative PCR of rRNA and nitrite reductase genes, community composition fingerprinting analysis, and high-throughput pyrotag sequencing of rRNA genes. The results demonstrate that pH is a major driver of the subsurface microbial community structure and that denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter (class Gammaproteobacteria) dominate at low pH. The relative abundance of bacteria from this genus was positively correlated with lower-pH conditions, and these bacteria were abundant and active in the most highly contaminated areas. Other factors, such as the concentration of nitrogen species, oxygen level, and sampling season, did not appear to strongly influence the distribution of Rhodanobacter bacteria. The results indicate that these organisms are acid-tolerant denitrifiers, well suited to the acidic, nitrate-rich subsurface conditions, and pH is confirmed as a dominant driver of bacterial community structure in this contaminated subsurface environment.

  9. MASS SPECTROMETRY PROTEOMICS METHOD AS A RAPID SCREENING TOOL FOR BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION OF FOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    for 18–24 h. A second culture passage to SBA for each bacterial stock was incubated overnight at 37 ± 2 °C for 18–24 h to ensure purity and typical...colonial morphology. Subcultures were incubated overnight at 37 °C for 18–24 h. Viable cell density (cfu/mL) for each culture was verified using a...Scientific) followed by application of an in-house proteomic algorithm for bacterial identification. 2.5 Protein Database and Database Search Engine

  10. Evaluation of one-way valves used in medical devices for prevention of cross-contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Poulomi; Young, Megan; Haugen, Shanil P; Katzenmeyer-Pleuss, Kristy; Gordon, Edward A; Retta, Stephen M; Wood, Steven C; Lucas, Anne D

    2017-07-01

    One-way valves used in day use devices (used on multiple patients throughout a day without reprocessing between patients) are intended to reduce the potential for cross-contamination between patients resulting from the backflow of patient fluids. One-way valves are typically designed to withstand high levels of back pressure before failure; however, they may not be explicitly designed as a means of infection control as used in medical device applications. Five different medical grade one-way valves were placed in low pressure configurations. After flushing in the intended direction of flow, bacteriophage, bacteria, or dye was placed patient side for 24 hours. The upstream device side of the valve was then evaluated for microbial growth or presence of visible dye. Leakage (ie, backflow) of the microorganisms occurred with a variety of one-way valve designs across a range of fluid properties tested. This study describes testing of the one-way valves (component-level testing) for the potential of cross-contamination. Although day use medical device systems may use numerous other factors to prevent patient cross-contamination, this work demonstrates that one-way valves themselves may not prevent leakage of contaminated fluid if the fluid is able to reach the upstream side of the one-way valve. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Effect of Disinfectants on Preventing the Cross-Contamination of Pathogens in Fresh Produce Washing Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Banach

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The potential cross-contamination of pathogens between clean and contaminated produce in the washing tank is highly dependent on the water quality. Process wash water disinfectants are applied to maintain the water quality during processing. The review examines the efficacy of process wash water disinfectants during produce processing with the aim to prevent cross-contamination of pathogens. Process wash water disinfection requires short contact times so microorganisms are rapidly inactivated. Free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and peracetic acid were considered suitable disinfectants. A disinfectant’s reactivity with the organic matter will determine the disinfectant residual, which is of paramount importance for microbial inactivation and should be monitored in situ. Furthermore, the chemical and worker safety, and the legislative framework will determine the suitability of a disinfection technique. Current research often focuses on produce decontamination and to a lesser extent on preventing cross-contamination. Further research on a sanitizer’s efficacy in the washing water is recommended at the laboratory scale, in particular with experimental designs reflecting industrial conditions. Validation on the industrial scale is warranted to better understand the overall effects of a sanitizer.

  12. Effect of Disinfectants on Preventing the Cross-Contamination of Pathogens in Fresh Produce Washing Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach, Jennifer L.; Sampers, Imca; Van Haute, Sam; van der Fels-Klerx, H.J. (Ine)

    2015-01-01

    The potential cross-contamination of pathogens between clean and contaminated produce in the washing tank is highly dependent on the water quality. Process wash water disinfectants are applied to maintain the water quality during processing. The review examines the efficacy of process wash water disinfectants during produce processing with the aim to prevent cross-contamination of pathogens. Process wash water disinfection requires short contact times so microorganisms are rapidly inactivated. Free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and peracetic acid were considered suitable disinfectants. A disinfectant’s reactivity with the organic matter will determine the disinfectant residual, which is of paramount importance for microbial inactivation and should be monitored in situ. Furthermore, the chemical and worker safety, and the legislative framework will determine the suitability of a disinfection technique. Current research often focuses on produce decontamination and to a lesser extent on preventing cross-contamination. Further research on a sanitizer’s efficacy in the washing water is recommended at the laboratory scale, in particular with experimental designs reflecting industrial conditions. Validation on the industrial scale is warranted to better understand the overall effects of a sanitizer. PMID:26213953

  13. An Internal Reference Control Duplex Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Detecting Bacterial Contamination in Blood Products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ju Zhang

    Full Text Available Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR enables effective and sensitive screening for infectious risk in the field of blood safety. However, when using RT-PCR to detect bacterial contamination, several intractable points must be considered, one of which is the lack of appropriate quality control. In this study, we developed a simplified RT-PCR assay in which the same primer set and two distinct probes were used to detect both, an internal reference control and the target in a reaction. The copy number of the internal reference control represents the positive detection limit of the assay; therefore, when the threshold-cycle value of the target is less than or equal to that of the internal reference control, the result obtained for the target can be considered to be a true positive. When human gDNA was spiked with Escherichia coli gDNA and the detection limit for the internal reference control was set to five copies, the measured detection limit for E. coli gDNA was two copies. The internal reference control duplex RT-PCR assay showed high efficiency (0.91-1.02, high linearity (R2 > 0.99, and good reproducibility in intra- and inter-assay comparisons. Lastly, when human platelet-rich plasma samples were spiked with E. coli or other bacterial species, all species were detected efficiently, and the results of a two-sample pooled t test showed that the limit of detection for E. coli was 1 cfu/mL. Here, we present a synthetic internal reference control molecule and a new statistical method for improving the reliability of RT-PCR assays when screening for bacterial contamination in blood products.

  14. Bioremediation of gasoline contaminated soil by a bacterial consortium amended with poultry litter, coir pith and rhamnolipid biosurfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, K.S.M.; Banat, I.M.; Thahira, J.; Thayumanavan, T.; Lakshmanaperumalsamy, P.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to find methods for enhancing rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation in gasoline contaminated soil by ex situ bioremediation. Red soil (RS) was treated with gasoline-spilled soil (GS) from a gasoline station and different combinations of amendments were prepared using (i) mixed bacterial consortium (MC), (ii) poultry litter (PL), (iii) coir pith (CP) and (iv) rhamnolipid biosurfactant (BS) produced by Pseudomonas sp. DS10-129. The study was conducted for a period of 90 days during which bacterial growth, hydrocarbon degradation and growth parameters of Phaseolus aureus RoxB including seed germination, chlorophyll content, shoot and root length were measured. Approximately 67% and 78% of the hydrocarbons were effectively degraded within 60 days in soil samples amended with RS + GS + MC + PL + CP + BS at 0.1% and 1%. Maximum percentage of seed germination, shoot length, root length and chlorophyll content in P. aureus were recorded after 60 days in the above amendments. Further incubation to 90 days did not exhibit significant improvements. Statistical analysis using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's multiple range test (DMRT) revealed that the level of amendments, incubation time and combination of amendments significantly influenced bacterial growth, hydrocarbon degradation, seed germination and chlorophyll content at a 1% probability level. All tested additives MC, PL, CP and rhamnolipid BS had significant positive effects on the bioremediation of GS. (author)

  15. Optical Brighteners in Laundry Detergents Help Us Determine the Source of Bacterial Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickstein, Neil

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial loading in water from anthropogenic sources is of common interest in both student research projects and to regulatory agencies. The presence of fecal coliform bacteria in natural waters can be the deciding indicator for how the bodies of water are classified for use. Since current tests are not specific, it is difficult to determine…

  16. Plant secondary metabolite-induced shifts in bacterial community structure and degradative ability in contaminated soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlík, O.; Musilová, L.; Rídl, Jakub; Hroudová, Miluše; Vlček, Čestmír; Koubek, J.; Holečková, M.; Mackova, M.; Macek, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 20 (2013), s. 9245-9256 ISSN 0175-7598 Grant - others:EK(XE) 265946; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10041 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : plant secondary metabolites (PSM) * bacterial community * metabolic activity * bioremediation * pyrosequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.811, year: 2013

  17. Bacterial Mercury Methylation At The Sediment-Water Interface Of Mercury Contaminated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bench scale experiments were conducted to improve our understanding of bacterial mediation of mercury transformation (methylation), specifically those factors which govern the production of methyl mercury (MeHg) at the sediment-water interface. The greatest cause for concern re...

  18. Bacterial contamination in a special care baby unit of a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nosocomial infections pose a great challenge on healthcare systems. Although surfaces in neonatal wards, umbilical stump wounds and catheter are responsible for a high number of nosocomial infections due to bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the bacterial profile of air and surface ...

  19. Bacterial Production and Contamination Mineralization in Sediments of the Ala Wai Canal, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-29

    sediments near the middle of Pearl Harbor (Montgomery and Osburn 2004) but lower than those taken near creosote -treated pilings (Boyd et al. 2008...marine sediments. Bioremediation 12(2):1-13. Montgomery, M.T., S.E. Walker, T.J. Boyd, L.J. Hamdan, and C.L. Osburn. 2008. Bacterial degradation

  20. Capacity building: benchmark for production of meat with low levels of bacterial contamination in local slaughterhouses in Somaliland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamalwa, Kinyanjui; Castiello, Massimo; Ombui, Jackson Nyarangi; Gathuma, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate and assess the impact of trainings on the levels of meat contamination produced from local livestock slaughter facilities in the North-West region of Somalia (Somaliland). The investigation considered slaughter facilities where workers had been trained or not. The survey was carried out in four local slaughter facilities. A pre-tested questionnaire on abattoir hygiene and food safety standards was administered to International Aid Organizations, government officials, abattoir workers and supervisors. In addition, a total of 320 surface meat swab samples were collected from randomly selected small ruminant carcasses slaughtered from four purposefully selected local slaughter facilities. The samples were analyzed at Analabs laboratories in Nairobi, Kenya, for total viable counts, total coliforms count and presence of Salmonella species. Meat contamination risk factors associated with hygiene practices based on training offered or not was identified. It was noted that slaughter facilities where abattoir workers had not received trainings on minimum meat hygiene standards and quality assurance systems of good hygiene practices and sanitary standard operating procedures produced carcasses with high levels of bacterial contamination in comparison with those where workers had received the said trainings. The laboratory results were in agreement with poor hygiene meat handling practices and lack of compliance with minimum meat hygiene and food safety standards in Berbera and Burao local livestock slaughter facilities where personnel had not been trained.

  1. A new improved protocol for in vitro intratubular dentinal bacterial contamination for antimicrobial endodontic tests: standardization and validation by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviana Bombarda de ANDRADE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To compare three methods of intratubular contamination that simulate endodontic infections using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Material and Methods Two pre-existing models of dentinal contamination were used to induce intratubular infection (groups A and B. These methods were modified in an attempt to improve the model (group C. Among the modifications it may be included: specimen contamination for five days, ultrasonic bath with BHI broth after specimen sterilization, use of E. faecalis during the exponential growth phase, greater concentration of inoculum, and two cycles of centrifugation on alternate days with changes of culture media. All specimens were longitudinally sectioned and stained with of LIVE/DEAD® for 20 min. Specimens were assessed using CLSM, which provided images of the depth of viable bacterial proliferation inside the dentinal tubules. Additionally, three examiners used scores to classify the CLSM images according to the following parameters: homogeneity, density, and depth of the bacterial contamination inside the dentinal tubules. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s tests were used to evaluate the live and dead cells rates, and the scores obtained. Results The contamination scores revealed higher contamination levels in group C when compared with groups A and B (p0.05. The volume of live cells in group C was higher than in groups A and B (p<0.05. Conclusion The new protocol for intratubular infection resulted in high and uniform patterns of bacterial contamination and higher cell viability in all specimens when compared with the current methods.

  2. A new improved protocol for in vitro intratubular dentinal bacterial contamination for antimicrobial endodontic tests: standardization and validation by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Flaviana Bombarda de; Arias, Marcela Paola Castro; Maliza, Amanda Garcia Alves; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Graeff, Márcia Sirlene Zardin; Amoroso-Silva, Pablo Andrés; Midena, Raquel Zanin; Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes de

    2015-01-01

    To compare three methods of intratubular contamination that simulate endodontic infections using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Two pre-existing models of dentinal contamination were used to induce intratubular infection (groups A and B). These methods were modified in an attempt to improve the model (group C). Among the modifications it may be included: specimen contamination for five days, ultrasonic bath with BHI broth after specimen sterilization, use of E. faecalisduring the exponential growth phase, greater concentration of inoculum, and two cycles of centrifugation on alternate days with changes of culture media. All specimens were longitudinally sectioned and stained with of LIVE/DEAD for 20 min. Specimens were assessed using CLSM, which provided images of the depth of viable bacterial proliferation inside the dentinal tubules. Additionally, three examiners used scores to classify the CLSM images according to the following parameters: homogeneity, density, and depth of the bacterial contamination inside the dentinal tubules. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests were used to evaluate the live and dead cells rates, and the scores obtained. The contamination scores revealed higher contamination levels in group C when compared with groups A and B (p0.05). The volume of live cells in group C was higher than in groups A and B (p<0.05). The new protocol for intratubular infection resulted in high and uniform patterns of bacterial contamination and higher cell viability in all specimens when compared with the current methods.

  3. Impact of Educational Intervention for Hand Hygiene on Dental Students' Knowledge, Attitude, and Bacterial Contamination Level on Hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingawi, Hanadi; Maher, Yahia; Afifi, Ibtesam

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the impact of the educational intervention for hand hygiene (HH) on knowledge, attitude, and mean colony-forming bacterial counts and type of bacteria on hands of undergraduate dental students. A total of 86 dental students from different clinical grades were included in the study. They were divided into two groups, group I (55 students) received onetime educational session for HH at the start of the academic year and group II (31 students) received an extra reenforce-ment session 6 months later. After 2 weeks of reenforcement session, a self-administrated questionnaire was directed to all participants assessing their knowledge and attitude about HH. Fingertip prints of the five fingers of the dominant hand from every participant were pressed onto blood agar plates in triplets at the same clinical session, before and after HH. Bacterial colony-forming units (CFUs) on each plate were recorded and identified microbiologically. The overall scores of knowledge and attitude showed higher levels in group II than in group I with nonsignificant differences between both groups as regards knowledge and significant differences (p < 0.05) as regards attitude. Mean CFUs showed extremely significant differences (p < 0.000) between 2nd and 3rd counts and between 1st and 2nd counts except for students of group I where the difference was only significant (p < 0.05). Normal bacterial flora was identified in 94.9% of the plates (92.2% coagulase-negative Staphylococci and 2.7% Micrococcus). Potentially pathogenic bacteria isolated from the other plates were Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas spp., and spore-forming aerobic nonhemolytic Bacilli. Reenforcement session had a positive impact on HH knowledge, attitude, and reduction of bacterial CFUs. Continuous education with frequent training sessions is recommended to reinforce HH compliance and reduce cross-contamination.

  4. Evaluation of measures to decrease intra-operative bacterial contamination in orthopaedic implant surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, BAS; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether behavioural and systemic measures wilt decrease intra-operative contamination during total hip or knee replacements. The influence of these measures on subsequent prolonged wound discharge, superficial surgical site infection and deep periprosthetic

  5. Development of a multistrain bacterial bioreporter platform for the monitoring of hydrocarbon contaminants in marine environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tecon, R.; Beggah, S.; Czechowska, K.; Sentchilo, V.; Chronopoulou, P.M.; McGenity, T.J.; van der Meer, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are common contaminants in marine and freshwater aquatic habitats, often occurring as a result of oil spillage. Rapid and reliable on-site tools for measuring the bioavailable hydrocarbon fractions, i.e., those that are most likely to cause toxic effects or are available for

  6. Food safety in raw milk production: risk factors associated to bacterial DNA contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, Cristine; Bremm, Carolina; Reis, Emily Marques dos; Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Loiko, Márcia Regina; Cruz, Cláudio Estêvão Farias da; Cenci, Alexander; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2014-06-01

    While human illness from milkborne pathogens may be linked to contamination of the product after pasteurization or improper pasteurization, such diseases are usually associated with consumption of raw milk or its by-products. Molecular biology tools were applied to investigate contamination by Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., some pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter jejuni in 548 raw milk samples from 125 dairy farms established in two regions from southern Brazil. Moreover, 15 variables were evaluated for their association with raw milk contamination levels, and the risk factors were determined by multiple regression analysis. Salmonella spp. were more frequently detected, followed by pathogenic E. coli. There was difference in contamination index between the regions, in which risk factors such as temporary cattle confinement, low milk production, low milking machine cleaning frequency, and milk storage area without tile walls were identified. The risk factors were specific to each region studied. Nevertheless, the data can be used to improve milk quality of dairy farms/herds with similar management practices.

  7. Potential contaminants in the food chain: identification, prevention and issue management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Francis P

    2007-01-01

    Contaminants are a vast subject area of food safety and quality. They are generally divided into chemical, microbiological and physical classes and are present in our food chain from raw materials to finished products. They are the subject of international and national legislation that has widened to cover more and more contaminant classes and food categories. In addition, consumers have become increasingly aware of and alarmed by their risks, whether rightly or not. What is the food industry doing to ensure the safety and quality of the products we feed our children? This is a valid question which this article attempts to address from an industrial viewpoint. Chemical food safety is considered a complex field where the risk perception of consumers is often the highest. The effects of chronic or acute exposure to chemical carcinogens may cause disease conditions long after exposure that can be permanently debilitating or even fatal. It is also a moving target, as knowledge about the toxicity and occurrence data of new chemical contaminants continues to be generated. Their identification, prevention and management are challenges to the food industry as a whole. A reminder of the known chemical hazards in the food chain will be presented with an emphasis on the use of early warning to identify potential new contaminants. Early warning is also a means of prevention, anticipating food safety concerns before they become issues to manage. Current best management practices including Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points relating to the supply chain of baby foods and infant formulae will be developed. Finally, key lessons from a case study on recent contamination issues in baby food products will be presented.

  8. Bacterial contaminants from frozen puff pastry production process and their growth inhibition by antimicrobial substances from lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumjuankiat, Kittaporn; Keawsompong, Suttipun; Nitisinprasert, Sunee

    2017-05-01

    Seventy-five bacterial contaminants which still persisted to cleaning system from three puff pastry production lines (dough forming, layer and filling forming, and shock freezing) were identified using 16S rDNA as seven genera of Bacillus , Corynebacterium , Dermacoccus , Enterobacter , Klebsiella, Pseudomonas , and Staphylococcus with detection frequencies of 24.00, 2.66, 1.33, 37.33, 1.33, 2.66, and 30.66, respectively. Seventeen species were discovered while only 11 species Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, B. pumilus, Corynebacterium striatum , Dermacoccus barathri , Enterobacter asburiae, Staphylococcus kloosii, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. warneri , and S. aureus were detected at the end of production. Based on their abundance, the highest abundance of E. asburiae could be used as a biomarker for product quality. While a low abundance of the mesophile pathogen C. striatum , which causes respiratory and nervous infection and appeared only at the shock freezing step was firstly reported for its detection in bakery product. Six antimicrobial substances (AMSs) from lactic acid bacteria, FF1-4, FF1-7, PFUR-242, PFUR-255, PP-174, and nisin A were tested for their inhibition activities against the contaminants. The three most effective were FF1-7, PP-174, and nisin A exhibiting wide inhibition spectra of 88.00%, 85.33%, and 86.66%, respectively. The potential of a disinfectant solution containing 800 AU/ml of PP-174 and nisin A against the most resistant strains of Enterobacter , Staphylococcus , Bacillus and Klebsiella was determined on artificially contaminated conveyor belt coupons at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 hr. The survival levels of the test strains were below 1 log CFU/coupon at 0 hr. The results suggested that a combined solution of PP-174 and nisin A may be beneficial as a sanitizer to inhibit bacterial contaminants in the frozen puff pastry industry.

  9. Mobile phones in clinical practice: reducing the risk of bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, D; Leonard, C; Breen, H; Graydon, R; O'Gorman, C; Kirk, S

    2014-09-01

    Mobile smart phones have become increasingly integrated into the practice of doctors and allied medical professionals. Recent studies suggest them to represent reservoirs for pathogens with potential to cause nosocomial infections. This study aimed to investigate the level of contamination on phones used on surgical wards and identify strategies for their safe use within clinical areas. Fifty mobile phones were taken from members of the multidisciplinary team working in a surgical unit. Phones were swabbed by two trained investigators using a standardised technique and samples streaked out using an automated specimen inoculator onto two types of culture media (Columbia blood agar and MacConkey agar). Colonies were identified and counted by a single trained investigator in a blinded fashion. Simultaneously a questionnaire investigating usage levels of phones was given to 150 healthcare workers. Sixty per cent of phones sampled had some form of contaminant isolated from their phone. Thirty-one (62%) of phones had only three colonies or less isolated on medium. No pathogenic or drug resistant strains of bacteria were identified. A total of 88% of individuals sampled by questionnaire used their phone within the workplace of which 55% used it for clinical purposes. Sixty-three per cent expected there to be some form of contaminant on their phone with only 37% admitting to cleaning it regularly. Seventy-five per cent of people did not view a ban on phones as a practical solution was they found to be an infection risk. Touch screen smart phones may be used safely in a clinical environment, with a low risk of cross-contamination of nosocomial bacteria to patients, in the setting of effective adherence to hand hygiene policies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Real-time qPCR improves meningitis pathogen detection in invasive bacterial-vaccine preventable disease surveillance in Fiji

    OpenAIRE

    Dunne, Eileen M.; Mantanitobua, Silivia; Singh, Shalini P.; Reyburn, Rita; Tuivaga, Evelyn; Rafai, Eric; Tikoduadua, Lisi; Porter, Barbara; Satzke, Catherine; Strachan, Janet E.; Fox, Kimberly K.; Jenkins, Kylie M.; Jenney, Adam; Baro, Silo; Mulholland, E. Kim

    2016-01-01

    As part of the World Health Organization Invasive Bacterial-Vaccine Preventable Diseases (IB-VPD) surveillance in Suva, Fiji, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from suspected meningitis patients of all ages were examined by traditional methods (culture, Gram stain, and latex agglutination for bacterial antigen) and qPCR for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. Of 266 samples tested, pathogens were identified in 47 (17.7%). S. pneumoniae was the most co...

  11. Enteropathogenic bacterial contamination of a latosol following application of organic fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alexandre Escosteguy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Poultry manure is used as fertilizer in natura, but little is known about whether it contaminates the soil with pathogenic organisms. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of organic, organomineral and mineral fertilizers on soil contamination by enteric pathogens, using poultry manure as the organic fertilizer. Manure was applied in field experiments at rates of 7.0 ton. ha-1 (maize crop, 2008/2009, 8.0 ton. ha-1 (wheat crop, 2009 and 14 ton. ha-1 (maize crop, 2010/2011. Organomineral fertilizer was applied at the same rates but was comprised of 50% manure and 50% mineral fertilizer. At 30 and 70 days after fertilization, the organic fertilizer and the upper 0-5 cm layer of the soil were tested for the presence of helminth eggs and larvae and enteropathogenic bacteria. Fecal and non-fecal coliforms (Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringes were found in the organic fertilizer, but neither Salmonella spp. nor enteroparasites were detected. The population of enteropathogenic bacteria in the soil was similar among the treatments for all crops at both evaluation times. The population of thermotolerant coliforms in the organic fertilizer was larger than the maximum level allowed in Brazil, but neither the organic or nor the organomineral fertilizer contaminated the soil.

  12. Bacterial contamination of Saudi Arabian paper currency: A report from Al-Kharj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Muqtader Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currency is a public support tool for exchange of commodity and services. It’s prevalent practice for acquiring bread to broast and bath to bed has connected all human being together irrespective of race and occupation. Currency notes along with their denomination values also carry pathogens if contaminated and will act as an agent for infection transference. Therefore the objective of this cross-sectional study was to assess the load microbial pathogens of paper currency collected in selected public places of Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia. Methods: Currency notes under study were assessed through microbiological culture, microscopic and biochemical visualization techniques. Results: The results from this cross-sectional study suggested that lower the currency denominations higher was the microbial contaminations, frequency percentage was lower with higher isolations. Small eateries were the biggest source of contaminated currency from the ten selected centres. Percentage microorganism occurrence for Bacillus spp, Staphylococcus spp, Klebsiella spp and E. coli was 56.84%, 25.03%, 13.40% and 04.71% respectively in all currency notes under study. Conclusions: The outcomes of this study revealed that currency notes can be a source for microbe transmission causing infectious diseases represent public health hazards to the community and individuals.

  13. Role of preprocedural rinse and high volume evacuator in reducing bacterial contamination in bioaerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, TV; Mohanty, Leeky; Sreenath, G; Vidhyadhari, Pavani

    2016-01-01

    Context: Microbial contamination, which occurs during dental procedures, has been a potential threat to dental professionals and individuals. There has been a growing concern over the role of bioaerosols in spread of various airborne infections and also to reduce the risk of bioaerosol contamination. Aims: This study was to analyze the number of colony forming units (CFUs) in bioaerosols generated during ultrasonic scaling procedure as well as to evaluate the efficacy of chlorhexidine 0.12% (CHX) preprocedural mouth rinse and high volume evacuator (HVE) in minimizing the bioaerosol contamination. Methods: About 45 individuals were divided into three Groups A, B and C. These groups underwent ultrasonic scaling before and after the use of CHX (0.12%), HVE and combination of CHX (0.12%) and HVE. Bioaerosols were collected on blood agar plates which were incubated at 37°C for 48 h, and the CFUs were counted with manual colony counting device. A comparison was also done between A versus B, B versus C and A versus C groups. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test. Results: We found a significant reduction in the CFUs when CHX (0.12%) preprocedural rinse (P bioaerosols; however, combination of both CHX (0.12%) and HVE is more efficient to reduce dental bioaerosols than individual method. PMID:27194863

  14. Prevalence of bacterial contamination with antibiotic-resistant and enterotoxigenic fecal coliforms in treated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, S P; Gopal, K

    2008-01-01

    Pollution indicator bacteria such as coliforms, fecal coliforms, and fecal streptococci were enumerated using a multiple-tube fermentation method in 100 treated drinking-water samples from 20 locations in residential, commercial, and industrial areas of a tropical city during summer. Thirty-four percent of the samples were bacteriologically nonpotable. Maximum coliform-contaminated (27%) samples were derived from industrial areas, while samples contaminated with fecal coliform (23%) and fecal streptococci (20%) originated from commercial areas. Coliforms identified as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., Enterobacter sp., and Citrobacter sp. were present in 29%, 26%, 24%, and 15% of samples, respectively. Fecal coliforms were examined for antibiotic susceptibility with disc diffusion method. All test isolates exhibited multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) for kanamycin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, and trimethoprim. Escherichia coli isolates were examined for enterotoxigenicity using the suckling mice bioassay and 60% of the isolates displayed enterotoxigenicity. Data indicate that drinking water contaminated with antibiotic-resistant enterotoxigenic fecal bacteria may be responsible for presence of waterborne diarrheal diseases attributed to therapeutic agents used by urban populations in the tropics.

  15. Assessment of carbon nanotubes and silver nanoparticles loaded clays as adsorbents for removal of bacterial contaminants from water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassouna, M E M; ElBably, M A; Mohammed, Asmaa N; Nasser, M A G

    2017-02-01

    This work evaluated the antimicrobial efficacy of kaolin clay and its loaded forms with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against bacterial isolates from different water supplies (tap, underground and surface water) in addition to wastewater. A total of 160 water samples were collected from different water sources in the investigated districts. Samples were cultured for isolation and serological identification of pathogenic bacteria. AgNPs were synthesized by a typical one-step synthesis protocol, where CNTs were carried out in a reactor employing the double bias-assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. Both were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, infrared and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. The antimicrobial efficacy of each of natural kaolin clay, AgNPs- and CNTs-loaded clays were evaluated by their application in four concentrations (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.1 ppm) at different contact times (5 min, 15 min, 30 min and 2 h). AgNPs-loaded clays at concentrations of 0.05 and 0.1 mg/l for 2 h contact time exhibited a higher bactericidal efficacy on Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. (70, 70, 80 and 90%, respectively) compared to CNTs-loaded clay. Concluding, the application of AgNPs-loaded clay for removal of water bacterial contaminants at a concentration of 0.1 ppm for 2 h contact times resulted in highly effective removals.

  16. Bacterial adhesion to suture material in a contaminated wound model: Comparison of monofilament, braided, and barbed sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhom, Jonas; Bloes, Dominik A; Peschel, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulf K

    2017-04-01

    Contaminated suture material plays an important role in the physiopathology of surgical site infections. Recently, suture material has been developed characterized by barbs projecting from a monofilament base. Claimed advantages for barbed sutures are a shortened wound closure time and reduced maximum wound tension. It has also been suggested that these sutures would be advantageous microbiologically. The aim of this study was to test the microbiological characteristics of the barbed Quill in comparison to the monofilament Ethilon II and the braided sutures Vicryl and triclosan-coated Vicryl Plus. In our study, sutures were cultivated on color-change agar with Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the halo size was measured. In a second study arm with longer cultivation bacterial growth was followed by antibiotic treatment. Ethilon II and Quill showed good comparable results, whereas large halos were found around Vicryl. Vicryl Plus results depended on triclosan sensitivity. After longer bacterial cultivation and antibiotic treatment, halos were up to 3.6 times smaller on Quill than on Vicryl (p barbs on Quill. From a microbiological perspective, barbed sutures can be recommended in aseptic surgery, but should only be used carefully in septic surgery. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:925-933, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Synergistic Processing of Biphenyl and Benzoate: Carbon Flow Through the Bacterial Community in Polychlorinated-Biphenyl-Contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leewis, Mary-Cathrine; Uhlik, Ondrej; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2016-02-26

    Aerobic mineralization of PCBs, which are toxic and persistent organic pollutants, involves the upper (biphenyl, BP) and lower (benzoate, BZ) degradation pathways. The activity of different members of the soil microbial community in performing one or both pathways, and their synergistic interactions during PCB biodegradation, are not well understood. This study investigates BP and BZ biodegradation and subsequent carbon flow through the microbial community in PCB-contaminated soil. DNA stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify the bacterial guilds involved in utilizing (13)C-biphenyl (unchlorinated analogue of PCBs) and/or (13)C-benzoate (product/intermediate of BP degradation and analogue of chlorobenzoates). By performing SIP with two substrates in parallel, we reveal microbes performing the upper (BP) and/or lower (BZ) degradation pathways, and heterotrophic bacteria involved indirectly in processing carbon derived from these substrates (i.e. through crossfeeding). Substrate mineralization rates and shifts in relative abundance of labeled taxa suggest that BP and BZ biotransformations were performed by microorganisms with different growth strategies: BZ-associated bacteria were fast growing, potentially copiotrophic organisms, while microbes that transform BP were oligotrophic, slower growing, organisms. Our findings provide novel insight into the functional interactions of soil bacteria active in processing biphenyl and related aromatic compounds in soil, revealing how carbon flows through a bacterial community.

  18. The Role of Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Reducing Bacterial Contamination of Autologous Bone Graft Collected from Implant Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Mauceri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate if antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the bacterial contamination of bone particles collected directly from the burs used for implant site preparation. Thirty-four patients underwent the surgical procedures for a total of 34 implant sites. One 1 gr. tablet of amoxicillin + clavulanic acid was given to the test group 12 hours and 1 hour before the surgery. The control group did not take antibiotic prophylaxis. Bone particles were collected and centrifuged. The suspensions were subjected to serial dilutions and each dilution was examined twice using a spatulation technique in Trypticase Soy Agar (TSA, in Sabouraud Dextrose Agar, and in Mitis Salivarius Agar (MSA. The number of colonies was calculated and the identification of various microorganisms was made. The most represented species, in both groups of patients, belonged to the “oral Streptococci.” For TSA, the test and control groups differed significantly (p = 0.018. Conversely, there was no significant difference for MSA (p = 0.201 and for the number of bacterial species isolated in the samples of the two groups of patients (p = 0.898. The antibiotic prophylaxis reduced, but did not cancel, the risk of infection of the autogenous particulate bone graft. This trial is registered with IRCT2017102537002N1.

  19. The Role of Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Reducing Bacterial Contamination of Autologous Bone Graft Collected from Implant Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauceri, Rodolfo; Campisi, Giuseppina; Matranga, Domenica; Mauceri, Nicola; Pizzo, Giuseppe; Melilli, Dario

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the bacterial contamination of bone particles collected directly from the burs used for implant site preparation. Thirty-four patients underwent the surgical procedures for a total of 34 implant sites. One 1 gr. tablet of amoxicillin + clavulanic acid was given to the test group 12 hours and 1 hour before the surgery. The control group did not take antibiotic prophylaxis. Bone particles were collected and centrifuged. The suspensions were subjected to serial dilutions and each dilution was examined twice using a spatulation technique in Trypticase Soy Agar (TSA), in Sabouraud Dextrose Agar, and in Mitis Salivarius Agar (MSA). The number of colonies was calculated and the identification of various microorganisms was made. The most represented species, in both groups of patients, belonged to the "oral Streptococci." For TSA, the test and control groups differed significantly ( p = 0.018). Conversely, there was no significant difference for MSA ( p = 0.201) and for the number of bacterial species isolated in the samples of the two groups of patients ( p = 0.898). The antibiotic prophylaxis reduced, but did not cancel, the risk of infection of the autogenous particulate bone graft. This trial is registered with IRCT2017102537002N1.

  20. Prevention of intravenous bacterial injection from health care provider hands: the importance of catheter design and handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Randy W; Patel, Hetal M; Huysman, Bridget C; Kispert, David P; Koff, Matthew D; Gallagher, John D; Jensen, Jens T; Rowlands, John; Reddy, Sundara; Dodds, Thomas M; Yeager, Mark P; Ruoff, Kathryn L; Surgenor, Stephen D; Brown, Jeremiah R

    2012-11-01

    Device-related bloodstream infections are associated with a significant increase in patient morbidity and mortality in multiple health care settings. Recently, intraoperative bacterial contamination of conventional open-lumen 3-way stopcock sets has been shown to be associated with increased patient mortality. Intraoperative use of disinfectable, needleless closed catheter devices (DNCCs) may reduce the risk of bacterial injection as compared to conventional open-lumen devices due to an intrinsic barrier to bacterial entry associated with valve design and/or the capacity for surface disinfection. However, the relative benefit of DNCC valve design (intrinsic barrier capacity) as compared to surface disinfection in attenuation of bacterial injection in the clinical environment is untested and entirely unknown. The primary aim of the current study was to investigate the relative efficacy of a novel disinfectable stopcock, the Ultraport zero, with and without disinfection in attenuating intraoperative injection of potential bacterial pathogens as compared to a conventional open-lumen stopcock intravascular device. The secondary aims were to identify risk factors for bacterial injection and to estimate the quantity of bacterial organisms injected during catheter handling. Four hundred sixty-eight operating room environments were randomized by a computer generated list to 1 of 3 device-injection schemes: (1) injection of the Ultraport zero stopcock with hub disinfection before injection, (2) injection of the Ultraport zero stopcock without prior hub disinfection, and (3) injection of the conventional open-lumen stopcock closed with sterile caps according to usual practice. After induction of general anesthesia, the primary anesthesia provider caring for patients in each operating room environment was asked to perform a series of 5 injections of sterile saline through the assigned device into an ex vivo catheter system. The primary outcome was the incidence of bacterial

  1. Replacing Natural Gas by Biogas — Determining the Bacterial Contamination of Biogas by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiřina Čermáková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A promising way of using biogas is to upgrade it to natural gas, which is referred to as Substitute Natural Gas (SNG or biomethane. Biomethane, or biogas, is produced by biological processes of harnessing the ability of microorganisms to degrade organic material to methane. Some of the microorganisms are aerosolized from the digester into the biogas; afterwards a bio-film is formed that attaches to the surfaces of the distribution pipes, and can find it was to the place where the end use of biogas takes place. This paper deals with the detection of microbial species in biogas, their influenceon corrosion and the potential risk that diseases can be spread via biogas using molecular techniques. Using molecular methods, we found that raw biogas contains about 8 million microorganisms per m3, which is most likely the result of microbial transmission from the anaerobic digestion process. Some bacterial species may contribute to the corrosion of pipelines and equipment; others are opportunistic pathogens that can cause toxic reactions. However, most bacterial species, more than 40 % in biogas, are still unknown, as is their influence on the digestion process and on human health. Further studies are needed to better understand the behavior of microorganisms in anaerobic digestion and to preventmicrobial-influenced corrosion and microbial dissemination.

  2. Intrinsic bacterial biodegradation of petroleum contamination demonstrated in situ using natural abundance, molecular-level 14C analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, G.F.; Nelson, R.K.; Kile, B.M.; Reddy, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Natural abundance, molecular-level C 14 analysis was combined with comprehensive gas chromatography (GC x GC) to investigate, in situ, the role of intrinsic biodegradation in the loss of petroleum hydrocarbons from the rocky, inter-tidal zone impacted by the Bouchard 120 oil spill. GC x GC analysis indicated accelerated losses of n-alkane components of the residual petroleum hydrocarbons between day 40 and day 50 after the spill. 14 C analysis of bacterial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) from the impacted zone on day 44 showed that the polyunsaturated fatty acids attributed to the photoautotrophic component of the microbial community had the same ( 14 C as the local dissolved inorganic carbon (DIG), indicating that this DIG was their carbon source. In contrast there was significant (C depletion in the saturated and mono-unsaturated PLFA indicating incorporation of petroleum carbon. This correlation between the observed accelerated n-alkane losses and microbial incorporation of (C-depleted carbon directly demonstrated, in situ, that intrinsic biodegradation was affecting the petroleum. Since the majority of organic contaminants originate from petroleum feed-stocks, in situ molecular-level 14 C analysis of microbial PLFA can provide insights into the occurrence and pathways of biodegradation of a wide range of organic contaminants. (Author)

  3. Degradation pathways of 1-methylphenanthrene in bacterial Sphingobium sp. MP9-4 isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianan; Luo, Lijuan; Chen, Baowei; Sha, Sha; Qing, Qing; Tam, Nora F Y; Zhang, Yong; Luan, Tiangang

    2017-01-30

    Alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are abundant in petroleum, and alkylated phenanthrenes are considered as the primary PAHs during some oil spill events. Bacterial strain of Sphingobium sp. MP9-4, isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil, was efficient to degrade 1-methylphenanthrene (1-MP). A detailed metabolism map of 1-MP in this strain was delineated based on analysis of metabolites with gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). 1-MP was initially oxidized via two different biochemical strategies, including benzene ring and methyl-group attacks. Benzene ring attack was initiated with dioxygenation of the non-methylated aromatic ring via similar degradation pathways of phenanthrene (PHE) by bacteria. For methyl-group attack, mono oxygenase system was involved and more diverse enzymes were needed than that of PHE degradation. This study enhances the understanding of the metabolic pathways of alkylated PAHs and shows the significant potential of Sphingobium sp. MP9-4 for the bioremediation of alkylated PAHs contaminated environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Diesel biodegradation capacities of indigenous bacterial species isolated from diesel contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Nandhini; Ramya, Jayaprakash; Kumar, Srilakshman; Vasanthi, Ns; Chandran, Preethy; Khan, Sudheer

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum based products are the major source of energy for industries and daily life. Leaks and accidental spills occur regularly during the exploration, production, refining, transport, and storage of petroleum and petroleum products. In the present study we isolated the bacteria from diesel contaminated soil and screened them for diesel biodegradation capacity. One monoculture isolate identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis to be Acinetobacter baumannii was further studied for diesel oil biodegradation. The effects of various culture parameters (pH, temperature, NaCl concentrations, initial hydrocarbon concentration, initial inoculum size, role of chemical surfactant, and role of carbon and nitrogen sources) on biodegradation of diesel oil were evaluated. Optimal diesel oil biodegradation by A. baumanii occurred at initial pH 7, 35°C and initial hydrocarbon concentration at 4%. The biodegradation products under optimal cultural conditions were analyzed by GC-MS. The present study suggests that A. baumannii can be used for effective degradation of diesel oil from industrial effluents contaminated with diesel oil.

  5. Bacterial and Aspergillus spp. Contamination of Domestic Kitchens in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwakeel, Suaad S.

    2007-01-01

    A randomized sampling of 50 households in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia was conducted to determine microbial and Aspergillus spp contaminants in domestic kitchens between May and June 2006. Samples were taken from open air in the kitchen and from used kitchen sponges. Inoculation procedures were varied from direct inoculation of the sponge into the medium to dilution of a cut portion of the sponge. A total of 200 samples were taken from which, 700 culture plates were done (BAP and Nutrient agar). Identification by the API system of identification (Analytical Profile Index, BioMerieux) revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterobacter cloacae, Diphtheroids and Bacillus cereus, Aspergillus spp. was isolated and identified microscopically. Among the isolates, Staphylococcus epidermidis , Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 90% of the plates followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (83%) , Klebsiella pneumonia ; Bacillus cereus (63%).and Aspergillus spp (15%) These opportunistic pathogens may be harmful especially in immunocompromised hosts. In this setting, there is a constant risk of contamination and transfer to willing hosts, thus appropriate measures should be implemented such as the use of disposable sponges. (author)

  6. Guidelines used in Japan to prevent the contamination of feed products with undesirable substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Sugiura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As Japan depends on imports for most ingredients used to manufacture feed products, close co-operation is indispensable between importers and manufacturers of feed and feed ingredients to effectively mitigate the risk associated with feed safety. Guidelines were issued by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF in March 2008 to prevent feed products from being contaminated with undesirable substances. These guidelines identify the responsibilities of feed ingredient importers, feed manufacturers and distributors, as well as the roles of the MAFF and the Food and Agricultural Materials Inspection Centre.

  7. Indoor Fungal and Bacterial Contaminations on Household Environment in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwakeel, Suaad S

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the microbial and inhabitant of household environment in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Overall, a total of 180 samples were collected and analyzed for fungal growth, 160 house samples were obtained on BAP medium and PDA medium. The Eastern Riyadh region turned out with the highest fungal isolates with 15/61 (24.6%). Among the most common fungal isolates from bedroom carpets were Aspergillus niger (21.6%), Alternaria sp. (15.7%), Aspergillus flavus (15.7%) Candida sp. (11.8%), Cladosporium sp. (9.8%) and Rhizopus sp. (9.8%). Other fungal isolates from bedroom carpets included Penicillium sp (5.9%)., Cunninghamella sp.(3.9%), Rhodotorula sp.(3.9%) and Aspergillus terreus (1.9%) Overall relative densities from all specimens obtained from household carpets, bedroom walls and carpet stores showed Alternaria spp. as the most common fungal isolate (55.3%) followed by Aspergillus niger (29%), Aspergillus flavus (19.3%), Rhizopus spp. (9.7%) and Penicillium spp. (7.0%). Other fungal isolates such as Candida spp., Cladosporium spp., Cunninghamella spp., Rhodotorula spp. and Aspergillus terreus had less than 6% overall relative density. From 40 carpet specimens collected for microbial analysis, 20 (50%) showed bacterial growth. Bacillus spp. was the most common isolated organism (35%) followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (10%), Epiococcus spp. (10%), Corynebacterium spp. (10%) and Bacillus polymyxa (10%). Other bacterial isolates included Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and Staphylococcus aureus .The presence of these fungal and microbial pathogens poses risk for individuals. When possible, floor carpeting in homes should be minimized or avoided since this serves as habitats for opportunistic fungi and infectious agents that pose harm to one's health. (author)

  8. New wash aid T-128 improves efficacy of chlorine against cross contamination by bacterial pathogens in fresh-cut lettuce processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorinated water is widely used as the primary anti-microbial intervention during fresh-cut produce processing. Free chlorine in chlorinated water can provide effective reduction of potential contaminations by microbial pathogens, and, more importantly, effectively prevent cross contamination of p...

  9. Bacterial and parasitic contaminants of salad vegetables sold in markets in Fako Division, Cameroon and evaluation of hygiene and handling practices of vendors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoachere, Jane-Francis Tatah Kihla; Tatsinkou, Bertrand Fossi; Nkengfack, Joseph Mbapngong

    2018-02-06

    Increase in awareness of the health benefits of vegetables has resulted in an increase in consumption. Many vegetables are consumed raw to retain the natural taste and heat labile nutrients. The safety of raw vegetables is a great concern. We investigated the bacteriological and parasitological quality of salad vegetables sold in three major markets in Fako Division Cameroon, the hygiene and preservation practices of vendors and determined the antimicrobial sensitivity of bacterial isolates, to provide data that could be used to improve food safety and safeguard public health. Bacterial contamination was high. Mean aerobic bacteria counts ranged from 2.5 × 10 6 to 15 × 10 6  cfu/g, total coliform counts from 4 to >  2400/g and fecal coliforms practices of vendors were poor and could aggravate contamination. Contamination of fresh salad vegetables with pathogenic bacteria and parasites could be a food safety concern in study area.

  10. EFFECT OF FEED DEPRIVATION TIME ON BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION OF SKIN AND CARCASS IN MEAT GOATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vanguru

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that diet and feed deprivation time prior to slaughter can influence the fecal shedding of bacteria in goats. This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of feed deprivation time (FDT on skin and carcass bacterial counts. Thirty-two Boer × Spanish goats (BW = 18.8 ± 0.82 kg were randomly assigned to one of 4 FDT (0, 9, 18, or 27 h before slaughter. Immediately after slaughter and evisceration, the pH values of rumen liquor and cecal digesta were determined. Rumen and rectal content samples were collected and transported to the laboratory for culture and determination of microbial load. Initial pH of Longissimus muscle (LM was determined at 15 min postmortem on each carcass. Swab samples were collected from skin (leg; 25 cm2 area and carcass (flank, brisket and leg; 75 cm2 area of each animal to assess the bacterial load. The 27-h FDT group had higher (P 0.05 by FDT.  The microbial counts of rumen and fecal contents were not influenced by FDT.  The E. coli, total coliform (TCC, and total plate counts of rumen content were 2.93, 3.14, and 6.08 log10CFU/g, respectively, and those of fecal contents were 3.56, 7.25 and 6.81 log10CFU/g, respectively. The FDT had no effect on the initial (pH = 6.87 of LM. The E. coli, TCC, and aerobic plate counts on skin were 1.13, 1.49, and 3.78 log10CFU/cm2, respectively, and those on carcasses were 1.51, 1.65, and 3.11 log10CFU/cm2, respectively. Both skin and carcass microbial counts were not affected (P > 0.05 by FDT. The results indicate that feed deprivation time alone up to 27 h may not significantly influence gut, skin, or carcass microbial loads.

  11. Environmental Education in Brazil: Preventive Measures to Avoid Contamination with U and Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Pastura, Valeria Fonseca da; Wieland, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Aiming at increasing awareness of radiation health effects, environmental issues and preventive measures, the Nuclear Energy National Commission (CNEN) launched in 2004 an education and public outreach programme for mine workers, students, teachers, governmental leaders, labor representatives and members of communities nearby small mining sites at the North and Northeast regions. Many Brazilian conventional mines present a significant risk of exposure to radiation due to Uranium and Thorium. CNEN inspects the mines but there are several small mining sites dedicated to open pit short term mineral extraction, called 'garimpagem', that are of difficult control. Therefore, information at large about preventive measures to avoid contamination during exploration, transportation and storage is necessary. CNEN developed an educational campaign which includes a series of open seminars, talks, folders, booklets and posters. The objective of this paper is to present the Brazilian educational campaign to avoid contamination risks at those small mineral exploration sites and its results. This campaign is a joint task that receives collaboration of other organizations such as federal police, schools and universities

  12. Bacterial contamination of eggs and behaviour of poultry flocks in the free range environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Talia; Drake, Kelly; Gole, Vaibhav; Chousalkar, Kapil; Hazel, Susan

    2016-12-01

    The free range production system is becoming more common in Australia and is expected to increase. Free range hens are exposed to more stressors in comparison to hens from barn and cage systems and it is suggested that stress can increase bacterial shedding on eggs. The aims of this study were to examine the level of total bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae populations, as well as the presence of Salmonella and Campylobacter, in eggs collected from two free range flocks on two different farms and to conduct longitudinal observations of the behaviour and welfare of hens in the free range production system. Hen age (weeks) was shown to have a significant effect (increase) on the level of total bacteria on the egg shell surface and in shell pores, as well as having an effect on feather condition score. As the hens aged, the frequency of external visual egg characteristics increased, as did feather condition score (where feather condition was poorer). These observations indicate areas which should be investigated further to improve the food safety of eggs and optimise the welfare of free range hens. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Contaminant dispersion and bacterial declination studies ate the bay of Chimbote - Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, C.; Maghella, G.; Mamani, E.

    2000-02-01

    A review of both, the dispersion studies and preliminary determination of T-90 performed at the bay of Chimbote - Peru, has been made. As for the dispersion studies, a fundamental partial differential equation and its solution for three-dimensional case is presented. The shape and characteristics of the tracer plume is determined as well as the decrease rate of peak concentrations. The method considers a point injection with Rhodamine B and Iodine-131 as tracers, in order to determine the longitudinal, lateral and vertical dispersion coefficients that govern the dispersion rates of industrial and waste waters to be discharged through a submarine outfall that will be installed at the sea of Chimbote. The method presented herein allows the estimation of the dispersion coefficients and predicts the influence of the future diffuser as well, regardless of the nature of the body of water in which the tests were conducted. With regard to T-90 determinations, they were better performed by the use of a combined tracer technique, using I-131 for dilution measurement and Rhodamine B as a visual aid. Dilution and decrease in bacterial concentrations were taken into consideration as well as continuous radiotracer injection. The values of T-90 estimated from experiments should be reconfirmed in future experiments under different oceanographic conditions. (authors)

  14. Studies on the Use of Plant Extracts for the Prevention of Bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The various extracts and standard drugs reduced bacterial attachment on the catheters in the order: ciprofloxacin > Psidium guajava > Aloe vera > gentamicin > Gongronema latifolium > untreated sections. Carica papaya, Ocimum gratisimum and Vernonia amygdalina potentiated bacterial attachment. Furthermore, the ...

  15. Assessment of Meat and Poultry Product Recalls Due to Salmonella Contamination: Product Recovery and Illness Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seys, Scott A; Sampedro, Fernando; Hedberg, Craig W

    2017-08-01

    Data from the recalls of meat and poultry products from 2000 through 2012 due to Salmonella contamination were used to assess the factors associated with the recovery of the recalled product and to develop quantitative models to estimate the number of illnesses prevented by recalls. The percentage of product recovered following a recall action was not dependent on establishment size, recall expansions, complexity of the distribution chain, type of distribution, amount of time between the production and recall dates, or number of pounds of product recalled. However, illness-related recalls were associated with larger amounts of recalled product, smaller percentages of recalled product recovered, a greater number of days between the production date and recall date, and nationwide distribution than were recalls that were not illness related. In addition, the detection of recall-associated illnesses appeared to be enhanced in states with strong foodborne illness investigation systems. The number of Salmonella illnesses prevented by recalls was based on the number of illnesses occurring relative to the number of pounds consumed, which was then extrapolated to the number of pounds of recalled product recovered. A simulation using a program evaluation and review technique probability distribution with illness-related recalls from 2003 through 2012 estimated that there were 19,000 prevented Salmonella illnesses, after adjusting for underdiagnosis. Recalls not associated with illnesses from 2000 through 2012 prevented an estimated additional 8,300 Salmonella illnesses, after adjusting for underdiagnosis. Although further improvements to ensure accurate and complete reporting should be undertaken, our study demonstrates that recalls are an important tool for preventing additional Salmonella illnesses. Moreover, additional training resources dedicated to public health agencies for enhancing foodborne illness detection, investigations, and rapid response and reporting would

  16. Monitoring bacterial contamination of piped water supply in rural coastal Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Md Sabbir; Akber, Md Ali; Islam, Md Atikul; Kabir, Md Pervez; Hoque, Md Ikramul

    2017-10-31

    Safe drinking water is scarce in southwest coastal Bangladesh because of unavailability of fresh water. Given the high salinity of both groundwater and surface water in this area, harvested rainwater and rain-fed pond water became the main sources of drinking water. Both the government and non-government organizations have recently introduced pipe water supply in the rural coastal areas to ensure safe drinking water. We assessed the bacteriological quality of water at different points along the piped water distribution system (i.e., the source, treatment plant, household taps, street hydrants, and household storage containers) of Mongla municipality under Mongla Upazila in Bagerhat district. Water samples were collected at 2-month interval from May 2014 to March 2015. Median E. coli and total coliform counts at source, treatment plant, household taps, street hydrants, and household storage containers were respectively 225, 4, 7, 7, and 15 cfu/100 ml and 42,000, 545, 5000, 6150, and 18,800 cfu/100 ml. Concentrations of both of the indicator bacteria reduced after treatment, although it did not satisfy the WHO drinking water standards. However, re-contamination in distribution systems and household storage containers indicate improper maintenance of distribution system and lack of personal hygiene.

  17. Bacterial Contamination of Expressed Breast Milk in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Karimi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The milks expressed from the mothers’ breast might be infected during squeeze, storage and/or transmission. The infection level has been reported as different in various studies up to 97 percent. The main purpose of this study is to determine the infection level and its relevant organisms as well as to specify drug allergy of the expressed milks from the mothers with their infant admitted to NICU ward. Materials and Methods: In this study, among the expressed milks from 80 mothers, were cultured each in an amount of 0.5-1cc and antibiotic discs selected for every strain was placed.Results: The results indicate that 85 percent of samples were infected and dominant microorganisms were firstly Klebsiella (13.7% and then S. epidermidis (12.5%. In addition, 95% of Gram negative bacteria strains were susceptible to imipenem. The most effective antibiotic on isolated staphylococci was ceftizoxime (46.6% resistance. The colony count in 32.4% gram negative bacteria and in 66.7% gram positive bacteria was between 104 to 105 CFU/ml and the remaining was above 105 CFU/ml (p=0.02. Furthermore, there was no significant relationship between bacterial infection of the expressed milks with the site of milk expressing (house or hospital, mode of expressing (by pump or hand, storage duration and the mother’s demographic characteristics including age and/or literacy.Conclusion: The studies show that infection prevalence in the milk samples was 85%; the most common infection factor was Klebsiella and then S. epidermidis that is indicative of high prevalence of hospital infection (nosocomial infection in the infants ward.

  18. A study regarding measurements of bacterial contamination levels in radiology room equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Jin [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University Graduate School, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hyeon Je [Dept. of Clinical Pathology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae; Kim, Chang Bok [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae Kwang [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Reported some level of bacteria in areas that are well made contact in Radiology imaging room evaluate the importance of cleanliness in the hospital management of equipment to check for the presence of pathogenic bacteria. Gwang-ju and Jeol-la city and medium-sized hospitals in the material with a cotton swab and rub evenly Radiology selection cassette, a handle, Apron of the imaging apparatus having the most contact with patients from July 2016 to August 2016 as a target in place and special studios 6, and saline solution will placed in a test tube containing. The swab sample was diluted 1,000 times, you can see the bacteria and the intestinal bacterial selective medium Trypticase Soy Agar (TSA), Muller-Hinton Agar (MHA), EosinMethylene Blue (EMB), ENDO (BD, NJ, USA) then incubated smear to. In the incubator (incubator, SANYO, Japan) was observed after incubation of bacteria and counting the total number of bacteria also Colonies (colony) suspected intestinal bacteria were isolated and cultured on KIA medium (BD, NJ, USA). As a result, it was found that this came Gram positive Coccus A hospital handle the F hospital, from the C Gram positive Coccus cassette and handle the F hospital. The striking yellow coloring Staphylococcus aureus 110 agar (STA 110) in the medium sample, but it is suspected staphylococcal Coccus to the final identifcation in the laboratory is not a single specimen of the two samples from Gram positive Coccus biochemical identifcation. Identifcation Kit is an API could not, it was thought to be non-Staphylococcus aureus was cultured on blood agar suggesting that (BAP) blood of dance. Dynamic tests were conducted biochemical API kit of the two samples were identifed from Gram positive Coccus bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) is F hospital cassette was confrmed Eenterobacter cloaca in A hospital possession. Did not aggregate O-26, O-111, O-157 and the serum test was conducted in the laboratory from the E. coli F cassette hospital.

  19. Wedding rings are not a significant source of bacterial contamination following surgical scrubbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Allak, A; Sarasin, S; Key, S; Morris-Stiff, G

    2008-03-01

    Despite some evidence that the wearing of rings may increase the microbial load, there is currently nothing to suggest that viable bacteria remain following a standard surgical scrub. The aim of the study was to examine the distribution and type of microbial flora seen on the hands of doctors following a standard surgical scrub. Ten surgeons and 10 anaesthetists, all of whom wore wedding rings on the fourth finger of their left hand, participated in the study. Each individual was asked to 'scrub-up' as for their normal first scrub of the day. Following completion of washing, the wedding ring was removed, its internal circumference swabbed and the swab placed in a culture medium. Volunteers placed each hand palm-down on separate agar plates. The plates were incubated and the number of colonies counted and classified. The culture plates of one of the anaesthetists were damaged in transit leaving a total of 19 subjects for analysis. In all the palm imprint plates, coagulase-negative staphylococci were grown. One surgeon grew coagulase-negative staphylococci from the ring swab. A Candida spp. from the right hand of one surgeon was grown. There was no statistically significant difference between the number of colony-forming units (CFUs) cultured from the right and left (ring-wearing) hands of the surgeons (P = 0.260) and anaesthetists ( P = 0.345). There was no statistical difference in CFUs when surgeons were compared with anaesthetists (P = 0.383 for right hand and P = 0.234 for left). This preliminary study would suggest that a traditional band wedding ring is not a source of a bacterial load following a standard surgical scrub procedure and, as such, there is no requirement for their removal pre-operatively.

  20. Effect of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Contamination on Gutta Percha- versus Resilon-Induced Human Monocyte Cell Line Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Hadjati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic effects of obturation materials were tested in presence and absence of endotoxin on human monocytes in vitro.Human monocytes from THP-1 cell line were cultured. Three millimeters from the tip of each Resilon and gutta percha points were cut and directly placed at the bottom of the culture wells. Cultured cells were exposed to gutta percha (groups G1 and G2 and Resilon (R1 and R2. Ten μg/ml bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS was added to the culture wells in groups G1 and R1. Positive control included the bacterial LPS without the root canal filling material and the negative control contained the cells in culture medium only. Viability of cells was tested in all groups after 24, 48, and 72 hours using the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay for at least 3 times to obtain reproducible results. Optical density values were read and the data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and post hoc statistical test.The results showed that cells in G2 had the lowest rate of viability at 24 hours, but the lowest rate of viable cells was recorded in G1 at 48 and 72 hours. The effect of LPS treatment was not statistically significant. Resilon groups showed cell viability values higher than those of gutta percha groups, although statistically non-significant (P=0.105. Cell viability values were lower in gutta percha than Resilon groups when LPS-treated and LPS-untreated groups were compared independently at each time point.It could be concluded that none of the tested root canal filling materials had toxic effects on cultured human monocyte cells whether in presence or absence of LPS contamination.

  1. Salix purpurea Stimulates the Expression of Specific Bacterial Xenobiotic Degradation Genes in a Soil Contaminated with Hydrocarbons.

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    Antoine P Pagé

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to uncover Salix purpurea-microbe xenobiotic degradation systems that could be harnessed in rhizoremediation, and to identify microorganisms that are likely involved in these partnerships. To do so, we tested S. purpurea's ability to stimulate the expression of 10 marker microbial oxygenase genes in a soil contaminated with hydrocarbons. In what appeared to be a detoxification rhizosphere effect, transcripts encoding for alkane 1-monooxygenases, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, laccase/polyphenol oxidases, and biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase small subunits were significantly more abundant in the vicinity of the plant's roots than in bulk soil. This gene expression induction is consistent with willows' known rhizoremediation capabilities, and suggests the existence of S. purpurea-microbe systems that target many organic contaminants of interest (i.e. C4-C16 alkanes, fluoranthene, anthracene, benzo(apyrene, biphenyl, polychlorinated biphenyls. An enhanced expression of the 4 genes was also observed within the bacterial orders Actinomycetales, Rhodospirillales, Burkholderiales, Alteromonadales, Solirubrobacterales, Caulobacterales, and Rhizobiales, which suggest that members of these taxa are active participants in the exposed partnerships. Although the expression of the other 6 marker genes did not appear to be stimulated by the plant at the community level, signs of additional systems that rest on their expression by members of the orders Solirubrobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Actinomycetales, and Sphingobacteriales were observed. Our study presents the first transcriptomics-based identification of microbes whose xenobiotic degradation activity in soil appears stimulated by a plant. It paints a portrait that contrasts with the current views on these consortia's composition, and opens the door for the development of laboratory test models geared towards the identification of root exudate characteristics that limit the

  2. BACTERIAL COMMUNITY DYNAMICS AND ECOTOXICOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT DURING BIOREMEDIATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED BY BIODIESEL AND DIESEL/BIODIESEL BLENDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, G I; Junior, C S; Oliva, T C; Subtil, D F; Matsushita, L Y; Chaves, A L; Lutterbach, M T; Sérvulo, E F; Agathos, S N; Stenuit, B

    2015-01-01

    The gradual introduction of biodiesel in the Brazilian energy landscape has primarily occurred through its blending with conventional petroleum diesel (e.g., B20 (20% biodiesel) and B5 (5% biodiesel) formulations). Because B20 and lower-level blends generally do not require engine modifications, their use as transportation fuel is increasing in the Brazilian distribution networks. However, the environmental fate of low-level biodiesel blends and pure biodiesel (B100) is poorly understood and the ecotoxicological-safety endpoints of biodiesel-contaminated environments are unknown. Using laboratory microcosms consisting of closed reactor columns filled with clay loam soil contaminated with pure biodiesel (EXPB100) and a low-level blend (EXPB5) (10% w/v), this study presents soil ecotoxicity assessement and dynamics of culturable heterotrophic bacteria. Most-probable-number (MPN) procedures for enumeration of bacteria, dehydrogenase assays and soil ecotoxicological tests using Eisenia fetida have been performed at different column depths over the course of incubation. After 60 days of incubation, the ecotoxicity of EXPB100-derived samples showed a decrease from 63% of mortality to 0% while EXPB5-derived samples exhibited a reduction from 100% to 53% and 90% on the top and at the bottom of the reactor column, respectively. The dehydrogenase activity of samples from EXPB100 and EXPB5 increased significantly compared to pristine soil after 60 days of incubation. Growth of aerobic bacterial biomass was only observed on the top of the reactor column while the anaerobic bacteria exhibited significant growth at different column depths in EXPB100 and EXPB5. These preliminary results suggest the involvement of soil indigenous microbiota in the biodegradation of biodiesel and blends. However, GC-FID analyses for quantification of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and aliphatic hydrocarbons and targeted sequencing of 16S rRNA tags using illumina platforms will provide important

  3. Influence of Soap Characteristics and Food Service Facility Type on the Degree of Bacterial Contamination of Open, Refillable Bulk Soaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Donald W; Jensen, Dane; Gerba, Charles P; Shumaker, David; Arbogast, James W

    2018-02-01

    Concern has been raised regarding the public health risks from refillable bulk-soap dispensers because they provide an environment for potentially pathogenic bacteria to grow. This study surveyed the microbial quality of open refillable bulk soap in four different food establishment types in three states. Two hundred ninety-six samples of bulk soap were collected from food service establishments in Arizona, New Jersey, and Ohio. Samples were tested for total heterotrophic viable bacteria, Pseudomonas, coliforms and Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. Bacteria were screened for antibiotic resistance. The pH, solids content, and water activity of all soap samples were measured. Samples were assayed for the presence of the common antibacterial agents triclosan and parachlorometaxylenol. More than 85% of the soap samples tested contained no detectable microorganisms, but when a sample contained any detectable microorganisms, it was most likely contaminated at a very high level (∼7 log CFU/mL). Microorganisms detected in contaminated soap included Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia liquefaciens, Shigella sonnei, Enterobacter gergoviae, Serratia odorifera, and Enterobacter cloacae. Twenty-three samples contained antibiotic-resistant organisms, some of which were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Every sample containing less than 4% solids had some detectable level of bacteria, whereas no samples with greater than 14% solids had detectable bacteria. This finding suggests the use of dilution and/or low-cost formulations as a cause of bacterial growth. There was a statistically significant difference ( P = 0.0035) between the fraction of bacteria-positive samples with no detected antimicrobial agent (17%) and those containing an antimicrobial agent (7%). Fast food operations and grocery stores were more likely to have detectable bacteria in bulk-soap samples compared with convenience stores ( P soap dispensers in food service establishments.

  4. Investigating Bacterial Contamination of Nurses’ Hands in ICU regarding their Using of Jewellery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zandi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nosocomial infection is a major challenge in health care system. In fact, it is regarded as one of the risk factors in hospitalized patients which results in a significant increase in mortality,morbidity and financial burden. Noscomial infection transmission via the hands of hospital personnel to patients is known as a primary method of transmission, however, revealing such effect to the healthcare workers in order to follow the proper behavior is somehow hard .Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the microbial contamination of nurses' hands regarding jewelry. Methods: This is a descriptive analytic study. The random sampling was applied which consisted of 50 nurses working in hospitals of Shahid Sadoughi Medical University of Yazd .Samples were collected at the beginning of the shift. In fact, a culture was taken using a cotton swab soaked with sterile water on the surface of the jewelry and the area under it immediately after the withdrawal. Moreover, the samples were gleaned as many as the number of jewelries from the other Hand or an area close to the position. The samples were analyzed utilizing SPSS software version 12. Results: As the study findings indicate, most jewelries involved gold rings and gold Bracelets. Culture results were reported as 45.8% positive and 54.2% negative. Thus, there was no significant difference (p=0.33. For the below surface of jewelries, culture results were 64.6 % positive and 35.4% negative (P=0.000. Jewelry culture results for the opposite hand involved 64.6% positive and 35.4% negative (P=0.000. In general, the three comparisons showed a significant difference (P=0.000 Conclusion: The findings reveal that using jewelries increases pollution. In other words, this will increase the probabaility of nosocomial infections and pathogens transmission. Therefore, it is recommended to remove jewelry during patient care.

  5. Survey on Heterotrophic Bacterial Contamination in Bottled Mineral Water by Culture Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essmaeel Ghorbanalinezhad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: This project focuses on the level of heterotrophic baceria in bottled mineral water which could be a health concern for the elderly, infants, pregnant women and immuno-compromised patients. Materials and Methods: Different brands of bottled water samples were selected randomly and evaluated for their bacteriological quality, using different specific culture media and biochemical tests. Water samples were analyzed within 24 hours of their purchase/collection. Samples were filtered with 0.45 micron and filters were plated in different media. Then media were incubated at 37˚C for 24-48 hours. Results: Morphological study and biochemical tests revealed a number of bacteria in different   brands of  bottled water. Heterotrophic bacteria(Gram positive cocci, Spore forming gram positive bacilli, non spore forming gram positive bacilli, gram negative bacilli, and gram negative coccobacilli; Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas counted in 70% of bottled water samples. There were no cases of fecal contamination or the presence of E.coli. Conclusions: Bottled water is not sterile and contains trace amounts of bacteria naturally present or introduced during processing. Testing drinking water for all possible pathogens is complex, time-consuming, and expensive. If only total coliform bacteria are detected in drinking water, the source is probably environmental. Since the significance of non-pathogenic heterotrophic bacteria in relation to health and diseases is not understood, there is an urgent need to establish a maximum limit for the heterotrophic count in the bottled mineral water. Growth conditions play a critical role in the recovery of heterotrophic bacteria in bottled drinking water.

  6. Characterization of the methanotrophic bacterial community present in a trichloroethylene-contaminated subsurface groundwater site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, J P; Jiménez, L; Rosario, I; Hazen, T C; Sayler, G S

    1993-08-01

    Groundwater, contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), was collected from 13 monitoring wells at Area M on the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site near Aiken, S.C. Filtered groundwater samples were enriched with methane, leading to the isolation of 25 methanotrophic isolates. The phospholipid fatty acid profiles of all the isolates were dominated by 18:1 omega 8c (60 to 80%), a signature lipid for group II methanotrophs. Subsequent phenotypic testing showed that most of the strains were members of the genus Methylosinus and one isolate was a member of the genus Methylocystis. Most of the methanotroph isolates exhibited soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) activity. This was presumptively indicated by the naphthalene oxidation assay and confirmed by hybridization with a gene probe encoding the mmoB gene and by cell extract assays. TCE was degraded at various rates by most of the sMMO-producing isolates, whereas PCE was not degraded. Savannah River Area M and other groundwaters, pristine and polluted, were found to support sMMO activity when supplemented with nutrients and then inoculated with Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. The maximal sMMO-specific activity obtained in the various groundwaters ranged from 41 to 67% compared with maximal rates obtained in copper-free nitrate mineral salts media. This study partially supports the hypothesis that stimulation of indigenous methanotrophic communities can be efficacious for removal of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons from subsurface sites and that the removal can be mediated by sMMO.

  7. Monitoring bacterial contamination in equine platelet concentrates obtained by the tube method in a clean laboratory environment under three different technical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, M E; Giraldo, C E; Carmona, J U

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of autologous platelet concentrates (PCs) as treatment for chronic musculoskeletal diseases in horses. However, there is no information on the risk of bacterial contamination during their preparation. To: 1) assess the risk of bacterial contamination in equine PCs obtained by the tube method under 3 technical conditions: a) in a laminar flow cabinet, in a clean laboratory environment both with (b) and without (c) Bunsen burner; 2) identify the critical points of the process of PCs preparation with risk of bacterial contamination; and 3) identify the potential bacterial contaminants in the process and their antibiotic susceptibility. Bacteriological samples were taken from: the skin (shaved or unshaved) of the venipuncture site in 15 horses, both before and after being disinfected; hands and throat of the operator; caps of the tubes where the blood was processed; environment where the equine blood samples were collected; laboratory environment; laminar flow cabinet; bacteriological stove; and PCs obtained under 3 technical conditions. Bacteria were isolated from nonaseptically prepared equine skin, hands and throat of the operator, and the place where the blood samples were taken. Bacteria were not isolated from tube caps, laboratory environment, laminar flow cabinet or PCs. The isolated bacteria were normal biota from equine skin, human skin and throat, and environmental contaminants. Of the isolated bacteria, 23% were resistant to penicillin, 19% to ampicillin, 2.12% to ceftiofur, 3.2% to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim and 1.1% to enrofloxacin. Resistance to amikacin and gentamicin was not seen. Uncontaminated PCs can be obtained by the tube method in a clean laboratory environment without the need for either a laminar flow cabinet or a Bunsen burner. It is mandatory to perform the procedure following strict aseptic technique.

  8. [Bacterial contamination of mobile phones shared in hospital wards and the consciousness and behavior of nurses about biological cleanliness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Ikuharu; Tabuchi, Yuna; Takahashi, Yuko; Oda, Yuriko; Nakai, Masami; Yanase, Aki; Watazu, Chiyoko

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the contamination of mobile phones shared in hospital wards and its relationship with the consciousness and behavior of nurses about biological cleanliness. Samples from mobile phones were cultured to detect viable bacteria (n=110) and Staphylococcus aureus (n=54). A questionnaire survey was conducted on 110 nurses carrying mobile phones on the day of sampling. Viable bacteria were detected on 79.1% of the mobile phones, whereas S. aureus was detected on 68.6%. All the nurses were aware of hand washing with water or alcohol after regular work, but 33.6% of the nurses were not conscious of hand washing with water or alcohol after using a mobile phone. There was a significant positive relationship between the frequency of using mobile phones and the number of hand washings with water or alcohol. A significant negative relationship was found between the detection of viable bacteria and the number of hand washings with alcohol. The results of logistic regression analysis showed that the detection of viable bacteria was related significantly with the number of hand washings with alcohol (Odds ratio, 0.350; 95%CI, 0.143-0.857) and that the detection of S. aureus was related significantly with the frequency of using mobile phones (Odds ratio, 0.183; 95%CI, 0.036-0.933). It is important to be conscious of the fact that mobile phones shared in hospital wards are easily contaminated. Because hand washing with water or alcohol prevents the contamination of the mobile phones, nurses should take standard precautions after using mobile phones.

  9. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of bacterial populations isolated from diesel-contaminated soil and treated by two bioremediation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrieta R, Olga M; Rivera R, Angela P; Rojano, Benjamin; Ruiz, Orlando; Correa, Margarita M; Cienfuegos Gallet, Astrid V; Arias, Lida; Cardona G, Santiago A

    2012-01-01

    In this study bioremediation is presented as an alternative for the recovery of contaminated ecosystems. In this work an experimental diesel spill on pasture land was remediated using two bioremediation technologies: natural attenuation, which is the natural capability of indigenous microorganisms to degrade a xenobiotic component in a determined time, and biostimulation, which consist in the acceleration of the degradation process through the stimulation of the metabolism of indigenous microorganisms by the addition of nutrients (P and N) to the media. Results of respirometry assays indicated that both treatments produced significant levels of hydrocarbon removal but the biostimulation treatment stranded out with 98.17% degradation. Seven bacterial isolates were obtained from these treatments which according to their molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis belong to the genus: Enterobacter, Bacillus, Arthrobacter, Sanguibacter, Staphylococcus and Flavobacterium. All isolates were able to metabolize diesel as a carbon and energy source; for this reason and taking into account that for some of these microorganisms their role in bioremediation have not been extensively studied, it is recommended to continue with their evaluation to know their real potential for the solution of environmental problems.

  10. Impact of donor arm cleaning with different aseptic solutions for prevention of contamination in blood bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tanvi G; Shukla, Rinku V; Gupte, Snehalata C

    2013-03-01

    Transfusion associated sepsis cases are encountered occasionally and bacterial transmission remains the major cause. The goal of our study was to compare the efficacy of disinfectants in phlebotomy site preparation. After selection of donor the antecubital fossa area of the arm was disinfected with different types of disinfectants namely sprit (70% isopropyl alcohol), povidone iodine (0.5% w/v available iodine in distilled water), savlon (1.5% v/v chlorhexidine gluconate solution and 3.0% cetrimide solution) and combination of sprit and povidone iodine. Swabs were collected from 20 donors using a sterile forceps, after cleaning with different antiseptic solutions. Swab was streaked on blood agar plate aseptically and the plate was incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Colonies were counted and a single colony was re-cultured by growing on nutrient and Mac-Conkey agar. The biochemical characteristics were determined by performing Gram staining, Motility, Catalase and Oxidase tests. The mean values of colonies were significantly higher with savlon compared to other three solutions. The difference was statistically significant by "t" test (t values 1.7-3.0; P bag were aseptically inoculated in aerobic and anaerobic culture bottles to be tested on BacT/Alert system. The bag containing donor's blood did not show any contamination when three cleanings were carried out using sprit, povidone iodine and spirit respectively.

  11. Granulation, control of bacterial contamination, and enhanced lipid accumulation by driving nutrient starvation in coupled wastewater treatment and Chlorella regularis cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dandan; Li, Yunbao; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Chaofan; Wang, Di

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial contamination and biomass harvesting are still challenges associated with coupling of microalgae and wastewater treatment technology. This study investigated aggregation, bacterial growth, lipid production, and pollutant removal during bacteria contaminated Chlorella regularis cultivation under nutrient starvation stress, by supposing the C/N/P ratios of the medium to 14/1.4/1 (MB₂.₅) and 44/1.4/1 (MB₄.₀), respectively. Granules of 500-650 μm were formed in the bacteria contaminated inoculum; however, purified C. regularis were generally suspended freely in the medium, indicating that bacterial presence was a prerequisite for granulation. Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) analysis showed that polysaccharides were dominant in granules, while protein mainly distributed in the outer layer. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) results revealed Sphingobacteriales bacterium and Sphingobacterium sp. are vital organisms involved in the flocculation of microalgae, and nitrifiers (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia) could co-exist in the granular. Both EPS and DGGE results further supported that bacteria played key roles in granulation. C. regularis was always dominant and determined the total biomass concentration during co-cultivation, but bacterial growth was limited owing to nutrient deficiency. Starvation strategy also contributed to enhancement of lipid accumulation, as lipid content in MB₄.₀ with a greater C/N/P led to the greatest increase in the starvation period, and the maximum lipid productivity reached 0.057 g/(L·day). Chemical oxygen demand and nitrogen removal in MB₄.₀ reached 92 and 96%, respectively, after 3 days of cultivation. Thus, cultivation of microalgae in high C/N/P wastewater enabled simultaneous realization of biomass granulation, bacterial overgrowth limitation, enhanced lipid accumulation, and wastewater purification.

  12. Surveillance study of bacterial contamination of the parent's cell phone in the NICU and the effectiveness of an anti-microbial gel in reducing transmission to the hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstrom, A C; Cleman, P E; Cassis-Ghavami, F L; Kamitsuka, M D

    2013-12-01

    To determine the bacterial contamination rate of the parent's cell phone and the effectiveness of anti-microbial gel in reducing transmission of bacteria from cell phone to hands. Cross-sectional study of cultures from the cell phone and hands before and after applying anti-microbial gel (n=50). All cell phones demonstrated bacterial contamination. Ninety percent had the same bacteria on the cell phone and their cleaned hands. Twenty two percent had no growth on their hands after applying anti-microbial gel after they had the same bacteria on the cell phone and hands. Ninety-two percent of parents were aware that cell phones carried bacteria, but only 38% cleaned their cell phones at least weekly. Bacterial contamination of cell phones may serve as vectors for nosocomial infection in the neonatal intensive care unit. Bacteria transmitted from cell phone to hands may not be eliminated using anti-microbial gel. Development of hand hygiene and cell phone cleaning guidelines are needed regarding bedside cell phone use.

  13. A survey on bacterial contamination of lavage water in electric warm-water lavage toilet seats and of the gluteal cleft after lavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katano, Hideki; Yokoyama, Kumi; Takei, Yasushi; Tazume, Seiki; Tsukiji, Mami; Matsuki, Hideaki

    2014-06-01

    Electric warm-water lavage toilet seats are in wide use as an appliance beneficial for the maintenance of hygiene and the prophylaxis and improvement of conditions such as constipation and hemorrhoids. In this study, we surveyed the bacterial content in the lavage water of warm-water lavage toilet seats, and fecal bacterial contamination of the gluteal and genital regions due to droplet infection from post-defecation lavage, to examine the problems inherent to the use of such lavage units. The presence of viable bacteria in lavage water was confirmed in this survey. Viable bacterial counts in lavage water were 3-times higher in household units compared to units in public facilities, suggesting a correlation with the replenishment of lavage tank water with fresh water containing residual free chlorine.

  14. [Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in liver cirrhosis: optimization issues of prevention and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnitskaia, E V; Drozdov, V N; Petyrakov, A V; Sil'vestrova, S Iu; Brezgin, A G

    2012-01-01

    Research of features of a current of a spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) allows to allocate close interrelation between SBP, system inflammatory reaction and a sepsis to consider SBP, as one of stages in evolution of the difficult infectious process caused, as a rule, by resident flora, developing at patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC), which demands timely preventive maintenance and adequate antibacterial therapy. In the present work therapy and preventive maintenance SBP questions are considered. In article the extensive review of the data of the literature and own supervision by efficiency of treatment SBP also is presented. For the purpose of optimization of pharmacotherapy of the sick LC, the complicated ascites, had been conducted pharmacokinetics research ciprofloxacin (CPF) according to dynamics of its maintenance in blood serum (BS) and ascitic fluid (AF) depending on presence and ascites size. Materials and methods. Researches are spent 18 sick decompensated liver cirrhosis (a class B and C on Ch-P), without signs SBP after unitary reception of 500 mg CPF per os on an empty stomach. All patients have been divided on two groups: I gr. (n = 10) with the expressed, intense ascites (> 10 1) and II gr. (n = 8) with the moderate, small ascites. Definition CPF in BS also was already carried out by a method of a highly effective liquid chromatography. On the basis of the received data for each patient counted the semidelucing period (T1/2), the area under pharmacokinetic curve (curve concentration - time) - (AUC), volume of distribution of a preparation (Avd), factor AUC(AF)\\MIC (size of the relation of the area under pharmacokinetic curve to its minimum inhibitive concentration). Results of research have shown that concentration levels (C) (CPF in BS and AF for the given concrete patient are at one level, showing thus distinctions in dynamic behavior. Average value AUC(AF)\\MIC (MIC - minimum inhibitive concentration) at patients II gr. has

  15. Is intravesical instillation of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate useful in preventing recurrent bacterial cystitis? A multicenter case control analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgio Gugliotta; Gloria Calagna; Giorgio Adile; Salvatore Polito; Salvatore Saitta; Patrizia Speciale; Stefano Palomba; Antonino Perino; Roberta Granese; Biagio Adile

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in the female population and, over a lifetime, about half of women have at least one episode of UTI requiring antibiotic therapy. The aim of the current study was to compare two different strategies for preventing recurrent bacterial cystitis: intravesical instillation of hyaluronic acid (HA) plus chondroitin sulfate (CS), and antibiotic prophylaxis with sulfamethoxazole plus trimethoprim. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective...

  16. Bioremediation of petroleum based contaminants with biosurfactant produced by a newly isolated petroleum oil degrading bacterial strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debajit Borah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum based hydrocarbon degrading and biosurfactant producing bacterial strain was isolated from an automobile engine. The strain was identified as Bacillus cereus DRDU1 on the basis of 16S rDNA sequencing analysis. The strain was found to be efficiently degrading 96% of kerosene making it a potential tool for bioremediation of petroleum based contaminants. Production and optimization of the biosurfactant produced by the isolate were also carried out. Surface hydrophobicity trait of isolate was found to be 60.67 ± 1.53% and foaming percentage of the crude biosurfactant was found to be 31.33 ± 0.58%. The presence of amino acids and sugar moieties in the biosurfactant was confirmed by biochemical tests and were further validated by FTIR (the Fourier transform infrared spectrometric analysis revealing the presence of υOH, υCOO, υCOOH, υCH (stretching, υNH, υCH2, υCH3, and υCH (bending, and υCO (ester in the surfactant. The decrease in contact angle of hydrocarbon oil from (30.67 ± 1.15° to (21.3 ± 1.53° respectively after 3 and 6 days of incubation reveals its potential to emulsify petroleum oil. Further, emulsification index (E24 of biosurfactant against kerosene, crude oil, and used engine oil were determined to be 55.33 ± 1.53%, 29.67 ± 1.53%, and 20 ± 1% respectively which attracts its future application in MEOR (microbial enhanced oil recovery process.

  17. Bioremediation of high molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons co-contaminated with metals in liquid and soil slurries by metal tolerant PAHs degrading bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2012-11-01

    Bioremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) contaminated soils in the presence of heavy metals have proved to be difficult and often challenging due to the ability of toxic metals to inhibit PAH degradation by bacteria. In this study, a mixed bacterial culture designated as consortium-5 was isolated from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. The ability of this consortium to utilise HMW PAHs such as pyrene and BaP as a sole carbon source in the presence of toxic metal Cd was demonstrated. Furthermore, this consortium has proven to be effective in degradation of HMW PAHs even from the real long term contaminated MGP soil. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate the great potential of this consortium for field scale bioremediation of PAHs in long term mix contaminated soils such as MGP sites. To our knowledge this is the first study to isolate and characterize metal tolerant HMW PAH degrading bacterial consortium which shows great potential in bioremediation of mixed contaminated soils such as MGP.

  18. Reliability and Validity of a Questionnaire to Measure Consumer Knowledge regarding Safe Practices to Prevent Microbiological Contamination in Restaurants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uggioni, Paula Lazzarin; Salay, Elisabette

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to develop a validated and reliable questionnaire to measure consumer knowledge regarding safe practices to prevent microbiological contamination in restaurants and commercial kitchens. Methods: Non-probabilistic samples of individuals were interviewed in the city of Campinas, Brazil. Questionnaire items…

  19. Emerging contaminants and nutrients synergistically affect the spread of class 1 integron-integrase (intI1) and sul1 genes within stable streambed bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirats, Jèssica; Timoner, Xisca; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Balcázar, José Luis; Acuña, Vicenç; Sabater, Sergi; Borrego, Carles M

    2018-03-10

    Wastewater effluents increase the nutrient load of receiving streams while introducing a myriad of anthropogenic chemical pollutants that challenge the resident aquatic (micro)biota. Disentangling the effects of both kind of stressors and their potential interaction on the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial communities requires highly controlled manipulative experiments. In this work, we investigated the effects of a combined regime of nutrients (at low, medium and high concentrations) and a mixture of emerging contaminants (ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, sulfamethoxazole, diclofenac, and methylparaben) on the bacterial composition, abundance and antibiotic resistance profile of biofilms grown in artificial streams. In particular, we investigated the effect of this combined stress on genes encoding resistance to ciprofloxacin (qnrS), erythromycin (ermB), sulfamethoxazole (sul1 and sul2) as well as the class 1 integron-integrase gene (intI1). Only genes conferring resistance to sulfonamides (sul1 and sul2) and intI1 gene were detected in all treatments during the study period. Besides, bacterial communities exposed to emerging contaminants showed higher copy numbers of sul1 and intI1 genes than those not exposed, whereas nutrient amendments did not affect their abundance. However, bacterial communities exposed to both emerging contaminants and a high nutrient concentration (1, 25 and 1 mg L -1 of phosphate, nitrate and ammonium, respectively) showed the highest increase on the abundance of sul1 and intI1 genes thus suggesting a factors synergistic effect of both stressors. Since none of the treatments caused a significant change on the composition of bacterial communities, the enrichment of sul1 and intI1 genes within the community was caused by their dissemination under the combined pressure exerted by nutrients and emerging contaminants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the contribution of nutrients on

  20. Bacterial biodiversity analysis of a contaminated soil from the Chernobyl exclusion zone and characterization of the committed interaction of a Microbacterium strain with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear power plants accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima demonstrate the importance of the understanding of the transfer of the radioactive contamination in the environment and its ecological consequences. Although certain studies have been realized on superior organisms of the food chain, studies on telluric bacterial communities are scarce. The latter play nevertheless an essential role in the mobility of contaminants in soils by decreasing or improving their transfer towards other compartments (water, vegetables and animals). Moreover radionuclides (RNs) can have toxic effects on bacteria, leading to an inhibition of their participation in such transfer. The objectives of this study were (1) to estimate the impact of the radioactive contamination on bacterial communities belonging to a soil of the Chernobyl exclusion zone (trench T22) and (2) to study the uranium-bacteria interactions of a resistant strain, isolated from this soil. The various techniques used to characterize the bacterial diversity (culture of bacteria, DGGE, 454 pyro-sequencing) all testified of the multiplicity and the abundance of the bacterial communities in spite of the contamination. An impact on the community structure was difficult to assess by DGGE or cultural approach, but was nevertheless highlighted by the use of pyro-sequencing, suggesting the presence of species more adapted to the contaminated soil conditions. A specific molecular tool dedicated to the search of bacteria affiliated to the known radiation resistant Deinococcus-Thermus phylum (for example the Deinococcus radiodurans specie survives after an irradiation of several kGy) was developed. However it did not reveal the presence of bacteria affiliated to such a phylum in the studied soil. In parallel to the study of the bacterial biodiversity, about fifty culturable bacteria were isolated from this site and were used as a support to select a species (Microbacterium) capable to survive strong U(VI) concentrations. The

  1. Preventing bacterial growth on implanted device with an interfacial metallic film and penetrating X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jincui; Sun, An; Qiao, Yong; Zhang, Peipei; Su, Ming

    2015-02-01

    Device-related infections have been a big problem for a long time. This paper describes a new method to inhibit bacterial growth on implanted device with tissue-penetrating X-ray radiation, where a thin metallic film deposited on the device is used as a radio-sensitizing film for bacterial inhibition. At a given dose of X-ray, the bacterial viability decreases as the thickness of metal film (bismuth) increases. The bacterial viability decreases with X-ray dose increases. At X-ray dose of 2.5 Gy, 98% of bacteria on 10 nm thick bismuth film are killed; while it is only 25% of bacteria are killed on the bare petri dish. The same dose of X-ray kills 8% fibroblast cells that are within a short distance from bismuth film (4 mm). These results suggest that penetrating X-rays can kill bacteria on bismuth thin film deposited on surface of implant device efficiently.

  2. USDA and university researchers work to prevent U.S. cotton contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. cotton is considered to have some of the lowest levels of contamination in the world. However, that reputation is in jeopardy as complaints of contamination from domestic and foreign mills are on the rise. Cotton contamination is classified by the International Textile Manufacturers Federation ...

  3. Integrated metagenomics and molecular ecological network analysis of bacterial community composition during the phytoremediation of cadmium-contaminated soils by bioenergy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaojin; Zheng, Yuan; Ding, Chuanyu; Ren, Xuemin; Yuan, Jian; Sun, Feng; Li, Yuying

    2017-11-01

    Two energy crops (maize and soybean) were used in the remediation of cadmium-contaminated soils. These crops were used because they are fast growing, have a large biomass and are good sources for bioenergy production. The total accumulation of cadmium in maize and soybean plants was 393.01 and 263.24μg pot -1 , respectively. The rhizosphere bacterial community composition was studied by MiSeq sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using 16S rRNA gene sequences. The rhizosphere bacteria were divided into 33 major phylogenetic groups according to phyla. The dominant phylogenetic groups included Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, and Bacteroidetes. Based on principal component analysis (PCA) and unweighted pair group with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) analysis, we found that the bacterial community was influenced by cadmium addition and bioenergy cropping. Three molecular ecological networks were constructed for the unplanted, soybean- and maize-planted bacterial communities grown in 50mgkg -1 cadmium-contaminated soils. The results indicated that bioenergy cropping increased the complexity of the bacterial community network as evidenced by a higher total number of nodes, the average geodesic distance (GD), the modularity and a shorter geodesic distance. Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were the keystone bacteria connecting different co-expressed operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The results showed that bioenergy cropping altered the topological roles of individual OTUs and keystone populations. This is the first study to reveal the effects of bioenergy cropping on microbial interactions in the phytoremediation of cadmium-contaminated soils by network reconstruction. This method can greatly enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of plant-microbe-metal interactions in metal-polluted ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Degree of bacterial contamination and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates from housekeeping surfaces in operating rooms and surgical wards at Jimma University Specialized Hospital, south west Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Chalachew; Kibru, Gebre; Hemalatha, Kannan

    2012-01-01

    The role of the hospital environment as a reservoir of potential pathogens has received increasing attention. There are several reports demonstrating contamination of a wide variety of environmental sites in operating rooms (ORs) and surgical wards (SWs) which lead to nosocomial spread. To determine the degree of bacterial contamination and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates from floor and tabletop surfaces in ORs and SWs at Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH). A cross sectional study was conducted on 144 floor and tabletop surfaces from October to January 2009/2010. Samples were investigated for identification of bacterial species following standard procedures and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed using disc diffusion technique. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 and compared with the proposed standard value. The mean aerobic colony counts (ACCs) for tabletop surfaces (34 CFU/cm2) and floors (19CFU/cm2) in SWs were significantly higher than the set ACC standard for hand contact surfaces (< 5 CFU/cm2) P < 0.00. The ACCs obtained from tabletop surfaces (6.2 CFU/cm2) and floors (10.1CFU/cm2) in ORs were also exceeding the standard. Over 55% of gram negative bacteria were identified from Critical Zone of ORs. Staphylococcus aureus was the must frequently isolated bacterium accounting 33.3% followed by Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp each with 11.1%. Moreover, S. aureus showed 100% resistance to methicillin and multidrug resistant Enterobacteriaceae were also seen in more than 90 % of isolates. An increased bacterial contamination was measured in both ORs and SWs of the JUSH and the isolated bacteria were also resistant for most of the antibiotics used as a treatment options in the study area. Therefore, appropriate infection control measures needs to be taken to keep the contamination level within the proposed standard.

  5. Drug resistance of bacterial dental biofilm and the potential use of natural compounds as alternative for prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouidhi, Bochra; Al Qurashi, Yasir Mohammed A; Chaieb, Kamel

    2015-03-01

    Oral diseases, such as dental caries and periodontal disease are directly linked with the ability of bacteria to form biofilm. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria colonizing the supragingival biofilm (Streptococcus, Lactobacillus and Actinomycetes). Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria forming a subgingival plaque (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium). Cells embedded in biofilm are up to 1000-fold more resistant to antibiotics compared to their planctonic ones. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain biofilms drug resistance. Given the increased bacterial resistance to antibiotics currently used in dentistry, a great importance is given to natural compounds for the prevention of oral bacterial growth, adhesion and colonization. Over the past decade, interest in drugs derived from medicinal plants has markedly increased. It has been well documented that medicinal plants and natural compounds confer considerable antibacterial activity against various microorganisms including cariogenic and periodontal pathogens. This paper provides a review of the literature focusing on the studies on (i) biofilm in the oral cavity, (ii) drug resistance of bacterial biofilm and (iii) the potential use of plant extracts, essential oils and natural compounds as biofilm preventive agents in dentistry, involving their origin and their mechanism of biofilm inhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Is intravesical instillation of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate useful in preventing recurrent bacterial cystitis? A multicenter case control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliotta, Giorgio; Calagna, Gloria; Adile, Giorgio; Polito, Salvatore; Saitta, Salvatore; Speciale, Patrizia; Palomba, Stefano; Perino, Antonino; Granese, Roberta; Adile, Biagio

    2015-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in the female population and, over a lifetime, about half of women have at least one episode of UTI requiring antibiotic therapy. The aim of the current study was to compare two different strategies for preventing recurrent bacterial cystitis: intravesical instillation of hyaluronic acid (HA) plus chondroitin sulfate (CS), and antibiotic prophylaxis with sulfamethoxazole plus trimethoprim. This was a retrospective review of two different cohorts of women affected by recurrent bacterial cystitis. Cases (experimental group) were women who received intravesical instillations of a sterile solution of high concentration of HA + CS in 50 mL water with calcium chloride every week during the 1(st) month and then once monthly for 4 months. The control group included women who received traditional therapy for recurrent cystitis based on daily antibiotic prophylaxis using sulfamethoxazole 200 mg plus trimethoprim 40 mg for 6 weeks. Ninety-eight and 76 patients were treated with experimental and control treatments, respectively. At 12 months after treatment, 69 and 109 UTIs were detected in the experimental and control groups, respectively. The proportion of patients free from UTIs was significantly higher in the experimental than in the control group (36.7% vs. 21.0%; p = 0.03). Experimental treatment was well tolerated and none of the patients stopped it. The intravesical instillation of HA + CS is more effective than long-term antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing recurrent bacterial cystitis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. An experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of beach ashtrays in preventing marine contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Martin Widmer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, hypotheses concerning the use of beach ashtrays were experimentally tested. Results indicated that the mean rate of abandonment of this equipment was low (1.5%. The mean amount of cigarette stubs (3.4 items/ashtray was greater than mean amounts of other types of litter. People with different socioeconomic profiles had different perceptions regarding the issues associated with beach debris. These results indicated that beach ashtrays could be useful to prevent the contamination of these environments and that differences in socioeconomic characteristics of beachgoers could partially explain the differences in perceptions regarding the presence of waste on the beaches. This information could now be used by coastal managers to plan strategies to reduce the marine contamination.A presença de resíduos sólidos no ambiente marinho é extensa. Praias são tipicamente contaminadas com esses materiais, que podem causar impactos ecológicos. Resíduos sólidos nas praias podem causar ferimentos nas pessoas e podem prejudicar a atividade turística. Neste estudo, hipóteses relativas ao uso de cinzeiros de praia foram testadas. Os resultados indicam que a taxa de abandono desse equipamento é pequena (1,5% e que a quantidade média de pontas de cigarro (3,4 itens/cinzeiro é maior do que as quantidades médias de outros tipos de lixo. Também se observou que pessoas com diferentes perfis socioeconômicos apresentaram percepções diferentes relativas à presença de resíduos sólidos nas praias. Estes resultados sugerem que cinzeiros portáteis podem ser um equipamento importante na redução da contaminação das praias e que diferenças socioeconômicas dos freqüentadores das praias podem explicar parcialmente as diferentes percepções relativas à presença de resíduos no ambiente praial. Sugere-se que os gerentes costeiros usem esse tipo de informação para planejar estratégias de redução desse problema.

  8. Prevention of oral bacterial flora transmission by using mouth-to-mask ventilation during CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cydulka, R K; Connor, P J; Myers, T F; Pavza, G; Parker, M

    1991-01-01

    The Emergency Cardiac Care Committee of the American Heart Association has recently recommended utilizing protective barrier precautions during CPR (1,2). We assessed 17 mask and faceshield resuscitation devices for adequacy of barrier protection. Eight of the devices were faceshields (CPR Microshield, Hygenic, MedCare Mask, Resusci, Samaritan, Sealeasy, Portex); 8 were mask devices (Laerdal, Dyna Med, MTM Emergency Lung Ventilator, MTM Emergency Resuscitator, Res-Q-Flo, Rightway Mouth-to-Mask Resuscitation, Trufit), and one of the devices did not meet the criteria for either faceshield or mask (Lifesaver). All masks were disinfected, applied to the investigator's face as directed by the manufacturers' instructions, and then cultured for oral aerobic bacterial flora on the rescuer side. No mask devices cultured positive for oral aerobic bacterial flora, while 6 of 8 faceshield devices cultured positive for oral aerobic bacterial flora (P less than 0.007). The CPR Microshield and the Portex faceshield were the only devices that did not develop a positive culture. We conclude that all ventilation devices with a one-way valve, except the Sealeasy device, provide adequate barrier type protection from oral aerobic bacterial flora when simulating mouth-to-barrier type protection when performing mouth-to-mouth ventilation.

  9. Effect of Biostimulation Using Sewage Sludge, Soybean Meal, and Wheat Straw on Oil Degradation and Bacterial Community Composition in a Contaminated Desert Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kindi, Sumaiya; Abed, Raeid M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Waste materials have a strong potential in the bioremediation of oil-contaminated sites, because of their richness in nutrients and their economical feasibility. We used sewage sludge, soybean meal, and wheat straw to biostimulate oil degradation in a heavily contaminated desert soil. While oil degradation was assessed by following the produced CO2 and by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), shifts in bacterial community composition were monitored using illumina MiSeq. The addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw to the desert soil stimulated the respiration activities to reach 3.2–3.4 times higher than in the untreated soil, whereas the addition of soybean meal resulted in an insignificant change in the produced CO2, given the high respiration activities of the soybean meal alone. GC–MS analysis revealed that the addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw resulted in 1.7–1.8 fold increase in the degraded C14 to C30 alkanes, compared to only 1.3 fold increase in the case of soybean meal addition. The degradation of ≥90% of the C14 to C30 alkanes was measured in the soils treated with sewage sludge and wheat straw. MiSeq sequencing revealed that the majority (76.5–86.4% of total sequences) of acquired sequences from the untreated soil belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Multivariate analysis of operational taxonomic units placed the bacterial communities of the soils after the treatments in separate clusters (ANOSIM R = 0.66, P = 0.0001). The most remarkable shift in bacterial communities was in the wheat straw treatment, where 95–98% of the total sequences were affiliated to Bacilli. We conclude that sewage sludge and wheat straw are useful biostimulating agents for the cleanup of oil-contaminated desert soils. PMID:26973618

  10. MOLECULAR EVALUATION OF CHANGES IN PLANKTONIC BACTERIAL POPULATIONS RESULTING FROM EQUINE FECAL CONTAMINATION IN A SUB-WATERSHED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considerable emphasis has been placed on developing watershed-based strategies with the potential to reduce non-point-source fecal contamination. Molecular methods applied used 16S-ribosomal-deoxyribonucleic-acid (rDNA) to try to determine sources of fecal contamination. Objectiv...

  11. Comparison of Four Antiseptic Preparations for Skin in the Prevention of Contamination of Percutaneously Drawn Blood Cultures: a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfee, David P.; Farr, Barry M.

    2002-01-01

    A number of skin antiseptics have been used to prevent the contamination of blood cultures, but the comparative efficacies of these agents have not been extensively evaluated. We therefore sought to compare the efficacy of four skin antiseptics in preventing blood culture contamination in a randomized, crossover, investigator-blinded study conducted in an emergency department and the inpatient wards of a university hospital. The patient group included all patients from whom blood samples were obtained percutaneously for culture. Skin antisepsis was performed with 10% povidone-iodine, 70% isopropyl alcohol, tincture of iodine, or povidone-iodine with 70% ethyl alcohol (i.e., Persist). The blood culture contamination rate associated with each antiseptic was then determined. A total of 333 (2.62%) of 12,692 blood cultures were contaminated during the study period compared to 413 (3.21%) of 12,859 blood cultures obtained during the previous 12-month period (relative risk = 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 0.94; P = 0.006). During the study, the contamination rates were determined to be 2.93% with povidone-iodine, 2.58% with tincture of iodine, 2.50% with isopropyl alcohol, and 2.46% with Persist (P = 0.62). We detected no significant differences in the blood culture contamination rates among these four antiseptics, although there was some evidence suggesting greater efficacy among the alcohol-containing antiseptics. Among the evaluated antiseptics, isopropyl alcohol may be the optimal antiseptic for use prior to obtaining blood for culture, given its convenience, low cost, and tolerability. PMID:11980938

  12. Effect of Disinfectants on Preventing the Cross-Contamination of Pathogens in Fresh Produce Washing Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banach, J.L.; Sampers, I.; Haute, van S.; Fels, van der H.J.

    2015-01-01

    The potential cross-contamination of pathogens between clean and contaminated produce in the washing tank is highly dependent on the water quality. Process wash water disinfectants are applied to maintain the water quality during processing. The review examines the efficacy of process wash water

  13. Patterns of benthic bacterial diversity in coastal areas contaminated by heavy metals, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Marina eQuero

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotes in coastal sediments are fundamental players in the ecosystem functioning and regulate processes relevant in the global biogeochemical cycles. Nevertheless, knowledge on benthic microbial diversity patterns across spatial scales, or as function to anthropogenic influence, is still limited. We investigated the microbial diversity in two of the most chemically polluted sites along the coast of Italy. One site is the Po River Prodelta (Northern Adriatic Sea, which receives contaminant discharge from one of the largest rivers in Europe. The other site, the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea, is a chronically-polluted area due to steel production plants, oil refineries, and intense maritime traffic. We collected sediments from 30 stations along gradients of contamination, and studied prokaryotic diversity using Illumina sequencing of amplicons of a 16S rDNA gene fragment. The main sediment variables and the concentration of eleven metals, PCBs and PAHs were measured. Chemical analyses confirmed the high contamination in both sites, with concentrations of PCBs particularly high and often exceeding the sediment guidelines. The analysis of more than 3 millions 16S rDNA sequences showed that richness decreased with higher contamination levels. Multivariate analyses showed that contaminants significantly shaped community composition. Assemblages differed significantly between the two sites, but showed wide within-site variations related with spatial gradients in the chemical contamination, and the presence of a core set of OTUs shared by the two geographically distant sites. A larger importance of PCB-degrading taxa was observed in the Mar Piccolo, suggesting their potential selection in this historically-polluted site. Our results indicate that sediment contamination by multiple contaminants significantly alter benthic prokaryotic diversity in coastal areas, and suggests considering the potential contribution of the resident microbes to

  14. Sutures coated with antiseptic pomade to prevent bacterial colonization: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Fernando; Leite, Fabiola; Cruz, Gustavo; Cruz, Silvia; Reis, Juarez; Pierce, Matthew; Cruz, Mauro

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if an antiseptic pomade could reduce the bacterial colonization on multifilament sutures. A randomized clinical trial was conducted with 40 volunteer patients of both sexes aged 18-70, randomly separated into experimental (n = 20) and control (n = 20) groups. The experimental group received pomade-coated sutures (iodoform + calendula) and the control group uncoated sutures. Two millimeters of the suture was harvested from each patient from the 1st to the 15th postoperative day. The bacteria that had adhered to them were cultured. The number of colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) was determined and the groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney statistical test (P antiseptic pomade was effective in reducing bacterial colonization on silk braided sutures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Complete reduction of highly concentrated contaminants in piggery waste by a novel process scheme with an algal-bacterial symbiotic photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Shin; Han, Gee-Bong

    2016-07-15

    The complete reduction of highly concentrated contaminants in piggery waste was achieved with an innovative process scheme consecutively combining autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD), an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) and a microalgal-bacterial symbiotic vertical photobioreactor (VPBR), followed by biomass recycling for effluent polishing. Contaminants in piggery waste, such as high organic and inorganic matter, total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) contents, were successfully reduced in the newly implemented system. The concentrations of volatile solids (VS) and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) for organic matter in the feed were reduced by approximately 99.3% and 99.7%, respectively, in the innovative system. The overall reduction efficiencies in TN, ammoniacal nitrogen, and TP were 98.8, 98.4, and 93.5%, respectively, through ammonia gas emission, coagulated sludge disposal, and the algal-bacterial symbiotic polishing process. Fecal coliform density was decreased to <1.7 × 10(4) CFU g(-1) total solids. Biogas and CH4 in the EGSB were generated in the range of 0.36-0.79 and 0.18-0.44 L g(-1) [VS removed], respectively, and contained 245 ± 19 ppm (v/v) [H2S]. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fact Sheet for Preventing and Detecting PCB Contamination in Used Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet provides tips on how to reduce the mismanagement of used oil contaminated with PCBs, a recurring issue faced by EPA and states, commercial and municipal used oil collection centers and recyclers.

  17. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargiela, Rafael; Mapelli, Francesca; Rojo, David; Chouaia, Bessem; Tornés, Jesús; Borin, Sara; Richter, Michael; Del Pozo, Mercedes V; Cappello, Simone; Gertler, Christoph; Genovese, María; Denaro, Renata; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Amer, Ranya A; Bigazzi, David; Han, Xifang; Chen, Jianwei; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Jaouanil, Atef; Benzha, Fatima; Magagnini, Mirko; Hussein, Emad; Al-Horani, Fuad; Cherif, Ameur; Blaghen, Mohamed; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Barbas, Coral; Malkawi, Hanan I; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakimov, Michail M; Daffonchio, Daniele; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-06-29

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills.

  18. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Bargiela, Rafael

    2015-06-29

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P < 0.05) with both temperature and chemical diversity. Furthermore, we observed a link between temperature and chemical and biological diversity that was stronger in chronically polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills.

  19. When the tendon autograft is dropped accidently on the floor: A study about bacterial contamination and antiseptic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, O; Danis, J; Versier, G; Ollat, D

    2015-10-01

    Inadvertent contamination of the autograft can occur during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction if the autograft is dropped on the floor during surgery. A study was undertaken to determine the incidence of contamination when a graft is dropped on the operating room floor and the efficacy of antimicrobial solutions to decontaminate it. Samples from 25 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction with a hamstring tendon were sectioned and dropped onto the floor. Cultures were taken after immersion in antiseptic solutions (a chlorhexidine gluconate solution (group 1), a povidone-iodine solution (group 2), and a sodium hypochlorite solution (group 3)). A fourth piece (group 0) was cultured without being exposed to any solution. Cultures of a floor swab were taken at the same time. The floor swab cultures were positive in 96% of cases. The rate of contamination was 40% in group 0, 8% in group 1, 4% in group 2, and 16% in group 3. There was a significant difference between groups 1 and 2 and group 0 (p<0.05) but not between groups 3 and 0. Immersing a graft dropped on the floor during surgery in a chlorhexidine gluconate solution or povidone-iodine solution significantly reduces contamination of the graft. Soaking of the hamstring autograft in one of these solutions is recommended in the case of inadvertent contamination. Laboratory investigation (level 2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Optical Whole-Genome Restriction Mapping as a Tool for Rapidly Distinguishing and Identifying Bacterial Contaminants in Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Assay development, Bacterial detection, Genome identification , Technical evaluation, Whole genome mapping 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...detection, Genome identification , Technical evaluation, Whole genome mapping IntrOductIOn One of the primary goals of public health agencies is the early...multiple bacteria could be uniquely identified within mixtures. In the first set of experiments, three unique organisms ( Bacillus subtilis subsp. globigii

  1. Perioperative management for the prevention of bacterial infection in cardiac implantable electronic device placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Imai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs have become important in the treatment of cardiac disease and placement rates increased significantly in the last decade. However, despite the use of appropriate antimicrobial prophylaxis, CIED infection rates are increasing disproportionately to the implantation rate. CIED infection often requires explantation of all hardware, and at times results in death. Surgical site infection (SSI is the most common cause of CIED infection as a pocket infection. The best method of combating CIED infection is prevention. Prevention of CIED infections comprises three phases: before, during, and after device implantation. The most critical factors in the prevention of SSIs are detailed operative techniques including the practice of proper technique by the surgeon and surgical team.

  2. Effects of root inoculation with bacteria on the growth, Cd uptake and bacterial communities associated with rape grown in Cd-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao-jin; Sheng, Xia-fang; He, Lin-yan; Huang, Zhi; Zhang, Wen-hui

    2013-01-15

    Two metal-resistant and plant growth-promoting bacteria (Burkholderia sp. J62 and Pseudomonas thivervalensis Y-1-3-9) were evaluated for their impacts on plant growth promotion, Cd availability in soil, and Cd uptake in rape (Brassica napus) grown in different level (0, 50, and 100 mg kg(-1)) of Cd-contaminated soils. The impacts of the bacteria on the rape-associated bacterial community structures were also evaluated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of bacterial DNA extracted from the root interior and rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected at day 60 after inoculation. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was used to have a comparative analysis of DGGE profiles. Inoculation with live bacteria not only significantly increased root (ranging from 38% to 86%), stem (ranging from 27% to 65%) and leaf (ranging from 23% to 55%) dry weights and water-extractive Cd contents (ranging from 59% to 237%) in the rhizosphere soils of the rape but also significantly increased root (ranging from 10% to 61%), stem (ranging from 41% to 57%) and leaf (ranging from 46% to 68%) total Cd uptake of rape compared to the dead bacterial-inoculated controls. DGGE and sequence analyses showed that the bacteria could colonize the rhizosphere soils and root interiors of rape plants. DGGE-CCA also showed that root interior and rhizosphere and bulk soil community profiles from the live bacteria-inoculated rape were significantly different from those from the dead bacteria-inoculated rape respectively. These results suggested that the bacteria had the potential to promote the growth and Cd uptake of rape and to influence the development of the rape-associated bacterial community structures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Content Validation and Semantic Evaluation of a Check-List Elaborated for the Prevention of Gluten Cross-Contamination in Food Services

    OpenAIRE

    Farage, Priscila; Puppin Zandonadi, Renata; Cortez Ginani, Ver?nica; Gandolfi, Lenora; Pratesi, Riccardo; de Medeiros N?brega, Yanna Karla

    2017-01-01

    Conditions associated to the consumption of gluten have emerged as a major health care concern and the treatment consists on a lifelong gluten-free diet. Providing safe food for these individuals includes adapting to safety procedures within the food chain and preventing gluten cross-contamination in gluten-free food. However, a gluten cross-contamination prevention protocol or check-list has not yet been validated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform the content validation and se...

  4. Co-trimoxazole alone for prevention of bacterial infection in patients with acute leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, I D; Donnelly, P; Catovsky, D; Darrell, J; Johnson, S A; Goldman, J M; Galton, D A

    1982-01-02

    43 patients undergoing treatment for acute leukaemia were randomised to receive either co-trimoxazole alone or co-trimoxazole with framycetin and colistin as antibacterial prophylaxis during periods of neutropenia. There were no significant differences between the two treatment groups in the time before the onset of the first fever, the number of episodes of fever or of septicaemia per patient, the number of neutropenic days during which patients remained afebrile or did not require systemic antibiotics, or the number of resistant organisms acquired. Co-trimoxazole alone is cheaper and easier to take than co-trimoxazole with framycetin and colistin, and it is therefore preferable to the three-drug combination for the prophylaxis of bacterial infection.

  5. Prevention of Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Soft Contact Lenses Using Natural Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ganiny, Amira M; Shaker, Ghada H; Aboelazm, Abeer A; El-Dash, Heba A

    2017-12-01

    In eye care field, contact lenses (CL) have a great impact on improving vision, but their use can be limited by ocular infection. CL- associated infections can be reduced by good attention to CL storage case practice. CL-care solutions should be able to control microbial growth on CL. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of CL-care solutions (found in Egyptian market) with some natural compounds in removal and inhibition of bacterial biofilm formed on soft CL. Clinical isolates were recovered from patients having conjunctivitis from Benha University Hospital and identified microbiologically. Quantification of biofilm was done using microtiter plate assay. Three multipurpose CL-care solutions were examined for their ability to remove and inhibit biofilm. Also four natural extracts having antibacterial activity and are safe on eye were tested for their anti-biofilm activity. The major bacterial isolates from eye infections were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (36%) and Staphylococcus spp. (37.8%). Only 33.3% of isolates showed ability to produce weak to moderate biofilm. The tested multi-purpose CL-care solutions showed moderate ability to remove preformed biofilm. Among the tested natural compounds, Calendula officinalis and Buddleja salviifolia extracts showed an excellent efficacy in inhibition of biofilm and also removal of preformed biofilm. This study demonstrated that isolates from infected eye and CL-cases showed weak to moderate biofilm formation. Calendula officinalis and Buddleja salviifolia extracts showed excellent effect on inhibition and removal of biofilm, these extracts could be added into CL-care solutions which could markedly reduce eye-infections during CL-wear.

  6. MOLECULAR EVALUATION OF CHANGES IN PLANKTONIC BACTERIAL POPULATION RESULTING FROM EQUINE FECAL CONTAMINATION IN A SUB-WATERSHED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of watersheds by fecal bacteria is a frequent cause for surface waters to be placed on the national impaired waters list. However, since the presence of fecal bacteria does not always indicate human fecal input, it is necessary to distinguish between fecal sources. ...

  7. Treatment and prevention systems for acid mine drainage and halogenated contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Song [Fort Collins, CO; Fallgren, Paul H [Laramie, WY; Morris, Jeffrey M [Laramie, WY

    2012-01-31

    Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). Further embodiments include treatments for degradation of contaminated water environments (17) with substrates such as returned milk and the like.

  8. A national survey of interventions and practices in the prevention of blood culture contamination and associated adverse health care events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Robert A; Spitzer, Eric D; Kranz, Barbara; Barnes, Sue

    2018-01-17

    The scientific literature indicates that blood culture contamination often leads to inappropriate antimicrobial treatment, adverse patient occurrences, and potential reporting of false-positive central line-associated bloodstream infections. The findings of a national infection prevention survey of blood culture practices and related interventions in hospitals support the need for infection preventionists to expand their participation in the review of topics related to the ordering and collection of blood for culture. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Meningitis Outbreak Caused by Vaccine-Preventable Bacterial Pathogens - Northern Ghana, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aku, Fortress Y; Lessa, Fernanda C; Asiedu-Bekoe, Franklin; Balagumyetime, Phoebe; Ofosu, Winfred; Farrar, Jennifer; Ouattara, Mahamoudou; Vuong, Jeni T; Issah, Kofi; Opare, Joseph; Ohene, Sally-Ann; Okot, Charles; Kenu, Ernest; Ameme, Donne K; Opare, David; Abdul-Karim, Abass

    2017-08-04

    Bacterial meningitis is a severe, acute infection of the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord that can rapidly lead to death. Even with recommended antibiotic treatment, up to 25% of infected persons in Africa might experience neurologic sequelae (1). Three regions in northern Ghana (Upper East, Northern, and Upper West), located in the sub-Saharan "meningitis belt" that extends from Senegal to Ethiopia, experienced periodic outbreaks of meningitis before introduction of serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenAfriVac) in 2012 (2,3). During December 9, 2015-February 16, 2016, a total of 432 suspected meningitis cases were reported to health authorities in these three regions. The Ghana Ministry of Health, with assistance from CDC and other partners, tested cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 286 patients. In the first 4 weeks of the outbreak, a high percentage of cases were caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae; followed by an increase in cases caused by Neisseria meningitidis, predominantly serogroup W. These data facilitated Ghana's request to the International Coordinating Group* for meningococcal polysaccharide ACW vaccine, which was delivered to persons in the most affected districts. Rapid identification of the etiologic agent causing meningitis outbreaks is critical to inform targeted public health and clinical interventions, including vaccination, clinical management, and contact precautions.

  10. Evaluation of biochars from different stock materials as carriers of bacterial strain for remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ting; Sun, Hongwen; Ren, Xinhao; Li, Bing; Mao, Hongjun

    2017-01-01

    Two kinds of biochars, one derived from corn straw and one from pig manure, were studied as carriers of a mutant genotype from Bacillus subtilis (B38) for heavy metal contaminated soil remediation. After amendment with biochar, the heavy metal bioavailability decreased. Moreover, the heavy metal immobilization ability of the biochar was enhanced by combining it with B38. The simultaneous application of B38 and pig manure-derived biochar exhibited a superior effect on the promotion of plant gr...

  11. Screening and degrading characteristics and community structure of a high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial consortium from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Run; Jin, Jinghua; Sun, Guangdong; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhipei

    2010-01-01

    Inoculation with efficient microbes had been proved to be the most important way for the bioremediation of polluted environments. For the treatment of abandoned site of Beijing Coking Chemical Plant contaminated with high level of high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs), a bacterial consortium capable of degrading HMW-PAHs, designated 1-18-1, was enriched and screened from HMW-PAHs contaminated soil. Its degrading ability was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the community structure was investigated by construction and analyses of the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (A, B and F) at different transfers. The results indicated that 1-18-1 was able to utilize pyrene, fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene as sole carbon and energy source for growth. The degradation rate of pyrene and fluoranthene reached 82.8% and 96.2% after incubation for 8 days at 30 degrees C, respectively; while the degradation rate of benzo[a]pyrene was only 65.1% after incubation for 28 days at 30 degrees C. Totally, 108, 100 and 100 valid clones were randomly selected and sequenced from the libraries A, B, and F. Phylogenetic analyses showed that all the clones could be divided into 5 groups, Bacteroidetes, alpha-Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, beta-Proteobacteria and gamma-Proteobacteria. Sequence similarity analyses showed total 39 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the libraries. The predominant bacterial groups were alpha-Proteobacteria (19 OTUs, 48.7%), gamma-Proteobacteria (9 OTUs, 23.1%) and beta-Proteobacteria (8 OTUs, 20.5%). During the transfer process, the proportions of alpha-Proteobacteria and beta-Proteobacteria increased greatly (from 47% to 93%), while gamma-Proteobacteria decreased from 32% (library A) to 6% (library F); and Bacteroidetes group disappeared in libraries B and F.

  12. Investigation of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 3JW1 on preventing and reducing aflatoxin contaminations in peanuts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Yang

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 3JW1, which has a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, was studied to investigate whether it affects the amounts of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 produced by Aspergillus flavus. It was found that the bacterium reduced the amounts of AFB1 in potato dextrose broth (PDB and peanut medium by 97.8% and 99.4%, respectively. It also reduced AFB1 by ~183 μg/kg (55.8% when applied onto peanut kernels. This strain reduced AFB1 via three mechanisms. First, it significantly inhibited A. flavus growth; second, our data showed that strain 3JW1 inhibits aflatoxin biosynthesis by A. flavus; and third, P. fluorescens strain 3JW1 is capable of degrading AFB1 at a rate as high as 88.3% in 96 hours. This is the first report demonstrating that Pseudomonas fluorescens can reduce toxin contamination caused by A. flavus on peanut kernels. Our findings indicate that P. fluorescens strain 3JW1 had multiple effects including reducing A. flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination. And the results also highlight the potential applications of the strain 3JW1 for the biological control of aflatoxin contamination in peanuts and other susceptible crops.

  13. Streptomyces lunalinharesii 235 prevents the formation of a sulfate-reducing bacterial biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Pacheco da Rosa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Streptomyces lunalinharesii strain 235 produces an antimicrobial substance that is active against sulfate reducing bacteria, the major bacterial group responsible for biofilm formation and biocorrosion in petroleum reservoirs. The use of this antimicrobial substance for sulfate reducing bacteria control is therefore a promising alternative to chemical biocides. In this study the antimicrobial substance did not interfere with the biofilm stability, but the sulfate reducing bacteria biofilm formation was six-fold smaller in carbon steel coupons treated with the antimicrobial substance when compared to the untreated control. A reduction in the most probable number counts of planktonic cells of sulfate reducing bacteria was observed after treatments with the sub-minimal inhibitory concentration, minimal inhibitory concentration, and supra-minimal inhibitory concentration of the antimicrobial substance. Additionally, when the treated coupons were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, the biofilm formation was found to be substantially reduced when the supra-minimal inhibitory concentration of the antimicrobial substance was used. The coupons used for the biofilm formation had a small weight loss after antimicrobial substance treatment, but corrosion damage was not observed by scanning electron microscopy. The absence of the dsrA gene fragment in the scraped cell suspension after treatment with the supra-minimal inhibitory concentration of the antimicrobial substance suggests that Desulfovibrio alaskensis was not able to adhere to the coupons. This is the first report on an antimicrobial substance produced by Streptomyces active against sulfate reducing bacteria biofilm formation. The application of antimicrobial substance as a potential biocide for sulfate reducing bacteria growth control could be of great interest to the petroleum industry.

  14. Antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone, an active principle of Nigella sativa and its potency to prevent bacterial biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhrouf Amina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymoquinone is an active principle of Nigella sativa seed known as "Habbah Al-Sauda" in Arabic countries and "Sinouj" in Tunisia. Bacterial biofilms tend to exhibit significant tolerance to antimicrobials drugs during infections. Methods The antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone (TQ and its biofilm inhibition potencies were investigated on 11 human pathogenic bacteria. The growth and development of the biofilm were assessed using the crystal violet (CV and the 2, 3-bis [2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT reduction assay. Results TQ exhibited a significant bactericidal activity against the majority of the tested bacteria (MICs values ranged from 8 to 32 μg/ml especially Gram positive cocci (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510. Crystal violet assay demonstrated that the minimum biofilm inhibition concentration (BIC50 was reached with 22 and 60 μg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510 respectively. In addition our data revealed that cells oxidative activity was influenced by TQ supplementation. In the same way, TQ prevented cell adhesion to glass slides surface. Conclusion The ability of TQ to prevent biofilm formation warrants further investigation to explore its use as bioactive substances with antibiofilm potential.

  15. Involvement of cell shape and flagella in the bacterial retention during percolation of contaminated water through soil columns in tropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nola, Moise; Ewoti, Olive V Noah; Nougang, Mireille; Moungang, Marlyse L; Chihib, Nour-Eddine; Krier, Francois; Servais, Pierre; Hornez, Jean-Pierre; Njine, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Microorganisms' retention in soil contributes to the natural purification of groundwater. Bacteria found in groundwater are generally of various shapes. The aim of this study was to assess the importance of cell shape and flagella in bacterial retention during polluted water percolation through two soil columns CA and CB, in the equatorial region in Central Africa. Percolation tests were carried out using different water loads samples which were contaminated by Escherichia coli (straight rods, peritrichous flagella), Vibrio parahaemolyticus (rods bacteria, polar flagella), and Staphylococcus saprophyticus (spherical, free-flagellum). It has been noted that showed that through soil column CA, the mean values of cells retention ratios (T(R)) varied with bacteria species considered, and from one applied water load sample to another. E. coli T(R) and that of S. saprophyticus were not significantly different (P> 0.05) for the two soil columns. V. parahaemolyticus T(R) significantly differed from that of E. coli and S. saprophyticus through soil column CA (Psoil column CB (Psoil columns. S. saprophyticus in most cases was more retained than others. The physical properties of the bacterial cell must be taken into consideration when evaluating the transfer of bacteriological pollutants towards groundwater.

  16. Decolorization and degradation of azo dye--Reactive Violet 5R by an acclimatized indigenous bacterial mixed cultures-SB4 isolated from anthropogenic dye contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kunal; Shah, Varun; Chapla, Digantkumar; Madamwar, Datta

    2012-04-30

    Azo dyes an important group of synthetic compounds are recalcitrant xenobiotics. Conventional technologies are unsuccessful to efficiently remove these compounds from contaminated environment. However, consorted metabolic functioning of innate microbial communities is a promising approach for bioremediation of polluted environment. Bacterial mixed cultures SB4 proficient in complete decolorization of azo dye - Reactive Violet 5R was developed through culture enrichment technique. Bacterial community composition based on 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that mixed cultures SB4 composed of six bacterial strains namely Bacillus sp. V1DMK, Lysinibacillus sp. V3DMK, Bacillus sp. V5DMK, Bacillus sp. V7DMK, Ochrobacterium sp. V10DMK, Bacillus sp. V12DMK. SB4 grew well in minimal medium containing low amount of glucose and yeast extract (YE) (1 g/L) and decolorized 200mg/L of RV5 within 18 h under static condition. Mixed cultures SB4 decolorized wide range of azo dyes and maximum rate of decolorization was observed at 37 °C and pH 7.0. Decolorization efficiency was found to be unaltered under high RV5 and salt concentration where 1500 mg/L of RV5 was decolorized in presence of 20 g/L NaCl. We propose the asymmetric cleavage of RV5 and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), NMR and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) confirmed the formation of four intermediatory compounds 1-diazo-2-naphthol, 4-hydroxybenzenesulphonic acid, 2-naphthol and benzenesulphonic acid. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacterial contamination of tile drainage water and shallow groundwater under different application methods of liquid swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, A D; Glasauer, S M; Lauzon, J D; O'Halloran, I P; Parkin, Gary W; Dunfield, K E

    2012-05-01

    A 2 year field experiment evaluated liquid manure application methods on the movement of manure-borne pathogens (Salmonella sp.) and indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens) to subsurface water. A combination of application methods including surface application, pre-application tillage, and post-application incorporation were applied in a randomized complete block design on an instrumented field site in spring 2007 and 2008. Tile and shallow groundwater were sampled immediately after manure application and after rainfall events. Bacterial enumeration from water samples showed that the surface-applied manure resulted in the highest concentration of E. coli in tile drainage water. Pre-tillage significantly (p tile water and to shallow groundwater within 3 days after manure application (DAM) in 2008 and within 10 DAM in 2007. Pre-tillage also decreased the occurrence of Salmonella sp. in tile water samples. Indicator bacteria and pathogens reached nondetectable levels within 50 DAM. The results suggest that tillage before application of liquid swine manure can minimize the movement of bacteria to tile and groundwater, but is effective only for the drainage events immediately after manure application or initial rainfall-associated drainage flows. Furthermore, the study highlights the strong association between bacterial concentrations in subsurface waters and rainfall timing and volume after manure application.

  18. Fingerprinting and diversity of bacterial copA genes in response to soil types, soil organic status and copper contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejon, David P H; Nowak, Virginie; Bouko, Sabrina; Pascault, Noémie; Mougel, Christophe; Martins, Jean M F; Ranjard, Lionel

    2007-09-01

    A molecular fingerprinting assay was developed to assess the diversity of copA genes, one of the genetic determinants involved in bacterial resistance to copper. Consensus primers of the copA genes were deduced from an alignment of sequences from proteobacterial strains. A PCR detection procedure was optimized for bacterial strains and allowed the description of a novel copA genetic determinant in Pseudomonas fluorescens. The copA DNA fingerprinting procedure was optimized for DNA directly extracted from soils differing in their physico-chemical characteristics and in their organic status (SOS). Particular copA genetic structures were obtained for each studied soil and a coinertia analysis with soil physico-chemical characteristics revealed the strong influence of pH, soil texture and the quality of soil organic matter. The molecular phylogeny of copA gene confirmed that specific copA genes clusters are specific for each SOS. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that this approach was sensitive to short-term responses of copA gene diversity to copper additions to soil samples, suggesting that community adaptation is preferentially controlled by the diversity of the innate copA genes rather than by the bioavailability of the metal.

  19. Skin preparation with alcohol versus alcohol followed by any antiseptic for preventing bacteraemia or contamination of blood for transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Bell-Syer, Sally E M; Foxlee, Ruth

    2015-02-12

    Blood for transfusion may become contaminated at any point between collection and transfusion and may result in bacteraemia (the presence of bacteria in the blood), severe illness or even death for the blood recipient. Donor arm skin is one potential source of blood contamination, so it is usual to cleanse the skin with an antiseptic before blood donation. One-step and two-step alcohol based antiseptic regimens are both commonly advocated but there is uncertainty as to which is most effective. To assess the effects of cleansing the skin of blood donors with alcohol in a one-step compared with alcohol in a two-step procedure to prevent contamination of collected blood or bacteraemia in the recipient. In December 2014, for this third update, we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), The Cochrane Library; Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL. All randomised trials (RCTs) comparing alcohol based donor skin cleansing in a one-step versus a two-step process that includes alcohol and any other antiseptic for pre-venepuncture skin cleansing were considered. Quasi randomised trials were to have been considered in the absence of RCTs. Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion. No studies (RCTs or quasi RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. We did not identify any eligible studies for inclusion in this review. It is therefore unclear whether a two-step, alcohol followed by antiseptic skin cleansing process prior to blood donation confers any reduction in the risk of blood contamination or bacteraemia in blood recipients, or conversely whether a one-step process increases risk above that associated with a two-step process.

  20. Application of a bacterial whole cell biosensor for the rapid detection of cytotoxicity in heavy metal contaminated seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhisong; Luan, Xiao; Jiang, Huichao; Li, Qian; Xu, Guangfei; Sun, Chengjun; Zheng, Li; Song, Yizhi; Davison, Paul A; Huang, Wei E

    2018-06-01

    A toxicity biosensor Acinetobacter baylyi Tox2 was constructed with the host strain A. baylyi ADP1 harboring a new and medium-copy-number plasmid pWH1274_lux, and was applied to detect the cytotoxicity of heavy metal contaminated seawater. The gene cassette luxCDABE was controlled by constitutively expressed promoter P tet on pWH1274_lux and the bioluminescence intensity of the biosensor reduces in proportional to the concentrations of toxic compounds. A. baylyi Tox2 exhibits tolerance to salinity, hence it is applicable to seawater samples. A. baylyi Tox2 and Mugilogobius chulae were exposed to different concentrations of heavy metals (Hg 2+ , Zn 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Cd 2+ ) in artificial seawater for performance comparison and Pearson correlation analysis showed a significant correlation (p cytotoxicity detection of heavy metal contaminated seawater. Furthermore, A. baylyi Tox2 was used to evaluate cytotoxicity of field-collected seawater samples. The results indicate that there was a significant correlation between the luminescence inhibition ratio (IR) of A. baylyi Tox2 and heavy metal concentrations detected by ICP-MS in the samples. Two seawater samples, which contained a high concentration of total heavy metals, exhibited stronger cytotoxicity than the samples containing low concentrations of heavy metals. In conclusion, A. baylyi Tox2 can be used as an alternative tool to aquatic animals for the evaluation of the cytotoxicity of heavy metal contamination in the marine environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biotransformation of arsenite and bacterial aox activity in drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses: Arsenic contamination in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-01

    The potential arsenite bioteansformation activity of arsenic was investigated by examining bacterial arsenic arsenite-oxidizing gene such as aoxS, aoxR, aoxA, aoxB, aoxC, and aoxD in high arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from the surface water of floating houses. There is a biogeochemical cycle of activity involving arsenite oxidase aox system and the ars (arsenic resistance system) gene operon and aoxR leader gene activity in Alcaligenes faecalis SRR-11 and aoxS leader gene activity in Achromobacter xylosoxidans TSL-66. Batch experiments showed that SRR-11 and TSL-66 completely oxidized 1 mM of As (III) to As (V) within 35-40 h. The leaders of aoxS and aoxR are important for gene activity, and their effects in arsenic bioremediation and mobility in natural water has a significant ecological role because it allows arsenite oxidase in bacteria to control the biogeochemical cycle of arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Role of Antimicrobial Peptides in Preventing Multidrug-Resistant Bacterial Infections and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Soo Hahm

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, decreasing effectiveness of conventional antimicrobial-drugs has caused serious problems due to the rapid emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Furthermore, biofilms, which are microbial communities that cause serious chronic infections and dental plaque, form environments that enhance antimicrobial resistance. As a result, there is a continuous search to overcome or control such problems, which has resulted in antimicrobial peptides being considered as an alternative to conventional drugs. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient host defense effector molecules in living organisms. These peptides have been identified in diverse organisms and synthetically developed by using peptidomimic techniques. This review was conducted to demonstrate the mode of action by which antimicrobial peptides combat multidrug-resistant bacteria and prevent biofilm formation and to introduce clinical uses of these compounds for chronic disease, medical devices, and oral health. In addition, combinations of antimicrobial peptides and conventional drugs were considered due to their synergetic effects and low cost for therapeutic treatment.

  3. Prolonging the duration of preventing bacterial adhesion of nanosilver-containing polymer films through hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bing; Liu, Tao; Yin, Yansheng

    2012-12-11

    A superhydrophobic coating composed of silver nanoparticles was developed on copper from fluorinated multilayered polyelectrolyte films to examine its performance in preventing microbial adhesion. Antibacterial and antibiofouling experiments for this novel coating were conducted with SRB. From the disk diffusion tests (for 48 h), it was found that, compared to the traditional coating composed of nanosilver, this novel coating significantly improved antibacterial performance and long-term effectiveness. The oxidation states of the immobilized silver in polyelectrolyte multilayer films were investigated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the stability of the immobilized silver was evaluated through a leaching test. It was found that if silver was exposed to aqueous environments some ionic silver species would be produced and released. The ion release kinetics showed that the duration of sustained release of antibacterial Ag ions from the novel coatings was prolonged, which was why they had more long-term antibacterial performance.

  4. Detection of entero viruses and hepatitis A in treated wastewater and Correlation between viral and bacterial contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dridi, Soumaya

    2010-01-01

    The main human viruses likely to contaminate waste water are Non-enveloped viruses able to resist in the environment, so essentially the viruses presenting an enteric cycle of multiplication. Many of these viruses, namely entero virus, hepatitis Avirus are excreted in the saddles of patients or of carriers and meet in waste water. To fight against the viral risk it is necessary to have a methodology allowing the control and the surveillance of virological and Hydric contamination. For the revealing of enteric virus, the reference technique remains the isolation on cellular culture. However, the disadvantage of this technique is the fact that it is difficult for certain viruses. Thus, the rise of molecular biology allowed the focusing of reliable and significant methods for detection of the enteric viruses in the environmental takings. The aim of this work was to detect hepatitis A virus and entero virus in waste water. A total of 20 samples were concentrated then precipitated by Polyethylene glycol 6000 according to the method of EPA. Extraction and purification of the viral ARN are made by the Kit QIAmp Viral RNA (Qiagen). The analysis of nucleic acids extracted by RT-PCR allowed to detect Entero virus with a 15 pour cent frequency (3/20) and 10 pour cent (2/20) for the hepatitis A virus.

  5. Evaluation of biochars from different stock materials as carriers of bacterial strain for remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Sun, Hongwen; Ren, Xinhao; Li, Bing; Mao, Hongjun

    2017-09-21

    Two kinds of biochars, one derived from corn straw and one from pig manure, were studied as carriers of a mutant genotype from Bacillus subtilis (B38) for heavy metal contaminated soil remediation. After amendment with biochar, the heavy metal bioavailability decreased. Moreover, the heavy metal immobilization ability of the biochar was enhanced by combining it with B38. The simultaneous application of B38 and pig manure-derived biochar exhibited a superior effect on the promotion of plant growth and the immobilization of heavy metals in soil. The plant biomass increased by 37.9% and heavy metal concentrations in the edible part of lettuce decreased by 69.9-96.1%. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) profiles revealed that pig manure-derived biochar could enhance the proliferation of both exotic B38 and native microbes. These results suggest that B38 carried by pig manure-derived biochar may be a promising candidate for the remediation of soils contaminated by multiple heavy metals.

  6. Microdoses uses of iodine in the contamination prevention of mechanical ventilators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.D.; Trivellato, S.V.; Quintas, M.L.; Birolini, D.

    1986-01-01

    Nosocomial respiratory tract infections due to contamination of mechanical ventilators is a major problem complicating the management of intensive care unit patients. A significant source of such infection seems to be water contained in the nebulizers. Its decontamination by various means has been unsatisfactory up to date. In order to control this source of infection, the authors suggest the utilization of a small dose of a 2% iodine alcoholic solution added to the water of the nebulizers in the proportion of 0.125ml of iodine solution to 500ml of water. The results show that the procedure is safe, efficient and unexpensive. (author) [pt

  7. Avaliação da intensidade de contaminação de pontas de seringa tríplice Evaluation of the bacterial contamination of air/water syringes tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Maria Agueda RUSSO

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available O controle de infecção cruzada em consultórios odontológicos inclui cuidados especiais com as seringas tríplices. Os autores pesquisaram a intensidade de contaminação pela microbiota bucal, de pontas de seringas tríplices usadas no atendimento a pacientes de Dentística Restauradora. Cinqüenta pontas descartáveis (Riskcontrol, Injecta Prod. Odontológicos foram avaliadas: 10, imediatamente após a abertura da embalagem; 30, após o uso em pacientes; e 10, após o uso e a desinfecção com álcool etílico 70% P/V, friccionado por um minuto. Em câmara de fluxo laminar, as pontas foram "roladas" sobre a superfície de Tryptic Soy Agar, suplementado com 5% de sangue desfibrinado de carneiro. Após 96 horas de incubação anaeróbia, foi feita a avaliação da quantidade de unidades formadoras de colônias (ufc desenvolvidas. Confirmando a informação do fabricante, as pontas estavam estéreis quando retiradas da embalagem. Em todas as pontas usadas em pacientes, observou-se um número incontável de ufc (maior que 300, revelando intensa contaminação. Nas pontas usadas e desinfetadas com álcool etílico 70% P/V, verificou-se apreciável redução na contagem de colônias (1 a 100 ufc, mas incompatível com a segurança biológica. Os resultados sugerem, como condição ideal, o uso de pontas descartáveis nas seringas tríplices.Effective infection control procedures to prevent cross-contamination in the dental office include care with air/water syringes. The authors had the purpose to verify the bacterial contamination of air/water syringes used in patients seen at the Restorative Dental Clinic, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Brazil. Fifty disposable tips (Riskcontrol, Injecta Prod. Odontológicos were analysed: 10, immediately after the package was opened; 10, after a single use followed by disinfection with 70% alcohol for one minute; 30, after a single use without any posterior disinfection. The samples were

  8. The application of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) in food testing for bacterial pathogens and fungal contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Ludwig; Luo, Jie; Denschlag, Carla; Vogel, Rudi F

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial pathogens and toxicants, parasites as well as mycotoxin producing fungi are the major biotic factors influencing the safety of food. Moreover, viral infections and prions may be present as quasi biotic challenging factors. A vast array of culture dependent analytical methods and protocols for food safety testing has been developed during the past decades. Presently, protocols involving molecular biological techniques such as PCR-based nucleic acid amplification and hybridization have become available for many of the known pathogens with their major advantages being rapidness, high sensitivity and specificity. However, this type of assays is still quite labor- and cost intensive and mostly cannot be operated directly in the field. Recently, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of DNA has emerged as an alternative to the use of PCR-based methods not only in food safety testing but also in a wide array of application. Its advantages over PCR-based techniques are even shorter reaction time, no need for specific equipment, high sensitivity and specificity as well as comparably low susceptibility to inhibitors present in sample materials which enables detection of the pathogens in sample materials even without time consuming sample preparation. The present article presents a critical review of the application of LAMP-based methods and their usefulness in detecting and identifying food borne bacterial pathogens and toxicants as well as mycotoxin producing food borne fungi as compared to other methods. Moreover does it elaborate on new developments in the design and automation of LAMP-based assays and their implications for the future developments of food testing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Results of a national survey on the antibiotic therapy of neonatal bacterial infection due to materno-fetal contamination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourrillon, A; Laik, P

    1986-03-01

    The aim of the study was to overview the antibiotic treatments usually prescribed in the different neonatal units and NICU's for neonatal primary bacterial infections. Maternal or neonatal fever, shock, respiratory distress, leuconeutropenia, hyperfibrinemia as well as an increased level in C-Reactive Protein appeared to be the best clinical diagnosis criteria. Before isolation of the bacteria, the most frequently prescribed treatment was a combination of ampicillin and gentamicin. When no bacteria grew up, the treatment was usually discontinued after a few days. When a presumably pathogenic bacteria was found either in blood, or CSF or urine or peripheral cultures, the treatment lasted around 10 days. However, in proved meningitis, the treatment lasted around 20 days. In case of Streptococcus type B and Listeria monocytogenes, ampicillin (100-200 mg/kg/day) was often used in combination with gentamicin (3-4 mg/kg/day), in spite of the recent availability of new aminoglycosides. When the isolated E. coli was ampicillin-resistant, Cefotaxime was frequently used in combination.

  10. Corrosive inorganic contamination on wafer surfaces after nickel-iron electroplating formation mechanisms and prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritzer, P. [Freudenberg Nonwovens KG, Technical Nonwovens Div., Weinheim (Germany); Diel, W.; Barber, P.H. [IBM Speichersysteme Deutschland GmbH, Mainz (Germany); Romankiw, L.T. [IBM Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States)

    2001-11-01

    Electroplating of Nickel-Iron alloys is widely used in the production of magnetic heads for storage systems. Usually, the plating process is performed in acidic, salt-containing solutions. After the plating step, a complete removal of the plating salts is necessary to receive a clean surface. In disadvantageous cases, a precipitation of sticky particles is observed that cannot be removed from the plated surface without damaging the surface. Some of these substances (esp. nickel sulfates) might lead to severe local corrosion and thus might act as ''time-bomb'' in the later product. Non-corrosive precipitations (i.e. nickel hydroxides) strongly hinder or even prevent the following production steps. In the present paper, the mechanisms of the origin of the different kinds of precipitation are described and the principle actions for their prevention are given. An outlook is given for other possible technical applications. (orig.)

  11. Disinfection with sodium hypochlorite in hospital environmental surfaces in the reduction of contamination and infection prevention: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Storer Pesani Pereira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVETo search for evidence of the efficiency of sodium hypochlorite on environmental surfaces in reducing contamination and prevention of healthcare-associated infection HAIs.METHODSystematic review in accordance with the Cochrane Collaboration.RESULTSWe analyzed 14 studies, all controlled trials, published between 1989-2013. Most studies resulted in inhibition of microorganism growth. Some decreased infection, microorganism resistance and colonization, loss of efficiency in the presence of dirty and surface-dried viruses.CONCLUSIONThe hypochlorite is an effective disinfectant, however, the issue of the direct relation with the reduction of HAIs remains. The absence of control for confounding variables in the analyzed studies made the meta-analysis performance inadequate. The evaluation of internal validity using CONSORT and TREND was not possible because its contents were not appropriate to laboratory and microbiological studies. As a result, there is an urgent need for developing specific protocol for evaluating such studies.

  12. How to prevent contamination with Candida albicans during the fabrication of transplantable oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Takagi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have utilized patients' own oral mucosa as a cell source for the fabrication of transplantable epithelial cell sheets to treat limbal stem cell deficiency and mucosal defects after endoscopic submucosal dissection of esophageal cancer. Because there are abundant microbiotas in the human oral cavity, the oral mucosa was sterilized and 40 μg/mL gentamicin and 0.27 μg/mL amphotericin B were added to the culture medium in our protocol. Although an oral surgeon carefully checked each patient's oral cavity and although candidiasis was not observed before taking the biopsy, contamination with Candida albicans (C. albicans was detected in the conditioned medium during cell sheet fabrication. After adding 1 μg/mL amphotericin B to the transportation medium during transport from Nagasaki University Hospital to Tokyo Women's Medical University, which are 1200 km apart, no proliferation of C. albicans was observed. These results indicated that the supplementation of transportation medium with antimycotics would be useful for preventing contamination with C. albicans derived from the oral mucosa without hampering cell proliferation.

  13. A large outbreak of salmonellosis associated with sandwiches contaminated with multiple bacterial pathogens purchased via an online shopping service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Sung-Hsi; Huang, Angela S; Liao, Ying-Shu; Liu, Yu-Lun; Chiou, Chien-Shun

    2014-03-01

    Food sold over the internet is an emerging business that also presents a concern with regard to food safety. A nationwide foodborne disease outbreak associated with sandwiches purchased from an online shop in July 2010 is reported. Consumers were telephone interviewed with a structured questionnaire and specimens were collected for etiological examination. A total of 886 consumers were successfully contacted and completed the questionnaires; 36.6% had become ill, with a median incubation period of 18 h (range, 6-66 h). The major symptoms included diarrhea (89.2%), abdominal pain (69.8%), fever (47.5%), headache (32.7%), and vomiting (17.3%). Microbiological laboratories isolated Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, Salmonella Virchow, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli from the contaminated sandwiches, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Virchow from the patients, and Salmonella Enteritidis and Staphylococcus aureus from food handlers. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotyping suggested a common origin of Salmonella bacteria recovered from the patients, food, and a food handler. Among the pathogens detected, the symptoms and incubation period indicated that Salmonella, likely of egg origin, was the probable causative agent of the outbreak. This outbreak illustrates the importance of meticulous hygiene practices during food preparation and temperature control during food shipment and the food safety challenges posed by online food-shopping services.

  14. Prevention of the wind migration of Semipalatinsk test site contaminated topsoil by inter-polymer complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudaibergenov, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: It is well known that Semipalatinsk Test Site has been contaminated by radionuclides mainly as a result of atmospheric, aboveground and underground intensive nuclear tests during more than 40 years. Survey of residual radioactivity in the soil at ten Semipalatinsk Test Site areas showed that a great number of Plutonium-239, 240, Strontium-90 and Cesium-137 are concentrated in the depth of soil layer 0-8 cm. The residual radioactivity within the Semipalatinsk Test Site is tightly bound to the topsoil as a result of extreme heating and melting of the soils during the tests. The maximal amount of radionuclides is accumulated on the fine soil particles having 0.1-1.0 mm size. Wind erosion is responsible for suspension of contaminated soil particles in the air and further spreading of contamination far away. For instance, dust particles of diameter 0,05-0,1 mm are dropped within a couple of kilometers of the erosion site, while particles of about 0.005-0.01 mm diameter can move hundreds and thousands of kilometers. According to the results of the Institute of Radiation Safety and Ecology, Kazakhstan, in “Degelen” massive, where the intensive nuclear tests were carried out, the concentration of radionuclides in air increases for Sr-90 up to 5 times, for Pu-239,240 up to 100-250 times during the elevation of thin dust from the ground surface. In this connection agglomeration of thin dust containing radionuclides is of primary importance to protect the population from inhalation of re-suspended dust. Inter-polymer complexes are water-insoluble, moisture and gas permeable substances that form a “cobweb” on the surface of soil particles and consequently leading to formation of protective crust. Inter-polymer complexes enhance the intrusion of water into the soil, resulting in increased soil moisture to promote seed germination and plant growth. Inter-polymer complexes are also able to accumulate radionuclides via inclusion of metal ions into the Inter

  15. Prevention of Bacterial Contamination of a Silica Matrix Containing Entrapped β-Galactosidase through the Action of Covalently Bound Lysozymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available β-galactosidase was successfully encapsulated within an amino-functionalised silica matrix using a “fish-in-net” approach and molecular imprinting technique followed by covalent binding of lysozyme via a glutaraldehyde-based method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used to characterise the silica matrix hosting the two enzymes. Both encapsulated β-galactosidase and bound lysozyme exhibited high enzymatic activities and outstanding operational stability in model reactions. Moreover, enzyme activities of the co-immobilised enzymes did not obviously change relative to enzymes immobilised separately. In antibacterial tests, bound lysozyme exhibited 95.5% and 89.6% growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC (American type culture collection 653 and Escherichia coli ATCC 1122, respectively. In milk treated with co-immobilised enzymes, favourable results were obtained regarding reduction of cell viability and high lactose hydrolysis rate. In addition, when both co-immobilised enzymes were employed to treat milk, high operational and storage stabilities were observed. The results demonstrate that the use of co-immobilised enzymes holds promise as an industrial strategy for producing low lactose milk to benefit people with lactose intolerance.

  16. Prevention and Control of Fungi Contaminated Stored Pistachio Nuts Imported to Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawar, Lubna Saleh

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the contamination risk of the improper storage of pistachio nuts was studied in the major location of Saudi Arabia by studying the fungi associated with non and salted pistachio nuts. The infection with Aspergillus flavus and A. niger and treatment of this infection with some abiotic factors , salting and fumigation with acetic acid on the invasion and colonization were also stu ded. High percentage infection (100%) were found in salted pistachio of Maidenhead , while low infection (68.75%) was found in non salted pistachio of Jihad. Referring to the total fungal counts (9845.5 and 5681.8 CFU/g nuts) were detected on malt extract yeast agar and rose bengal agar media respectively. Aspergillus niger and A. flavus were found common in all pistachio samples collected from the three locations on the two media used. The both fungi were grew at temperatures between 20 and 35 degree C, also as the relative humidity increased the fungal growth increased reached its maximum at 100% RH. Sodium chloride at 20 and 25 % completely stopped the linear of the both fungi on malt yeast extract agar medium. Application of nuts with sodium chloride was found to increased the resistance of pistachio nut to invasion and colonization by the fungi during storage. Also, the resistance to invasion was increased by increasing the doses of fumigation with acetic acid applied to the pistachio nuts reached 0% infection at the higher dose of acetic acid (60%). (author)

  17. A GIS-based approach to prevent contamination of groundwater at regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderacchi, M.; Vischetti, C.; di Guardo, A.; Trevisan, M.

    2009-04-01

    Sustainable development is a fundamental objective of the European Union. Since 1991, the use of numerical models has been used to assess the environmental fate of pesticides (directive 91/414 EC). Since then, new approaches to assess pesticide contamination have been developed. This is an ongoing process, with approaches getting increasingly close to reality. Actually, there is a new challenge to integrate the most advanced and cost-effective monitoring strategies with simulation models so that reliable indicators of unsaturated flow and transport can be suitably mapped and coupled with other indicators related to productivity and sustainability. The most relevant role of GIS in the analysis of pesticide fate in soil is its application to process together input data and the results of distribution model based simulations of pesticide transport. FitoMarche is a GIS-based software tool that estimates pesticide movement in the unsaturated zone using MACRO 5 and it is able to simulate complex and real crop rotations at the regional scale. Crop rotation involves the sequential production of different plant species on the same land, every crop is characterized by different agricultural practices that involve the use of different pesticides at different doses. FitoMarche extracts MACRO input data from a series of geographic data sets (shapefiles) and an internal database, writes input files for MACRO, executes the simulation and extracts solute and water fluxes from MACRO output files. The study has been performed in the Marche region, located in central Italy along the Adriatic coast. Soil, climate, land use shapefiles were provided from public authorities, crop rotation schemes were estimated from ISTAT (the national statistics institute) 5th agricultural census database using a municipality detail and agricultural practices following the local customs. Two herbicides have been tested: "A" is employed on maize crop, and "B" on maize, sunflower and sugarbeet. In the

  18. UVC fluencies for preventative treatment of pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated polymer tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Ladefoged, Søren D.; Begovic, Tanja

    2010-01-01

    tubes. Light propagation enhancement in tubes can be obtained if the refractive index of the intra-luminal saline solution is higher than that of the polymer. This condition is achieved by using Teflon tubes with a low refractive index (1.34) instead of the polymers with a high refractive index (1...... is demonstrated to be a preventative disinfection treatment on tubes made of Teflon, which enhances the UVC light propagation, and on tubes made of a softer material, ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), which is suitable for catheters but much less suitable for UVC light propagation. Simulating an aseptic breach (∼103...... mJ cm-2 killed the bacteria present in the tubes and kept them disinfected for a period of 3-4 days....

  19. UVC fluencies for preventative treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated polymer tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Ladefoged, Søren D; Begovic, Tanja

    2010-01-01

    tubes. Light propagation enhancement in tubes can be obtained if the refractive index of the intra-luminal saline solution is higher than that of the polymer. This condition is achieved by using Teflon tubes with a low refractive index (1.34) instead of the polymers with a high refractive index (1...... is demonstrated to be a preventative disinfection treatment on tubes made of Teflon, which enhances the UVC light propagation, and on tubes made of a softer material, ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), which is suitable for catheters but much less suitable for UVC light propagation. Simulating an aseptic breach (~10......, that a fluence of 21 mJ cm(-2) killed the bacteria present in the tubes and kept them disinfected for a period of 3-4 days....

  20. Anti-bacterial activity of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: comparative in vitro study of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, and azithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mombo-Ngoma Ghyslain

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is recommended for the prevention of malaria in pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa. Increasing drug resistance necessitates the urgent evaluation of alternative drugs. Currently, the most promising candidates in clinical development are mefloquine and azithromycin. Besides the anti-malarial activity, SP is also a potent antibiotic and incurs significant anti-microbial activity when given as IPTp - though systematic clinical evaluation of this action is still lacking. Methods In this study, the intrinsic anti-bacterial activity of mefloquine and azithromycin was assessed in comparison to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine against bacterial pathogens with clinical importance in pregnancy in a standard microdilution assay. Results SP was highly active against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. All tested Gram-positive bacteria, except Enterococcus faecalis, were sensitive to azithromycin. Additionally, azithromycin was active against Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Mefloquine showed good activity against pneumococci but lower in vitro action against all other tested pathogens. Conclusion These data indicate important differences in the spectrum of anti-bacterial activity for the evaluated anti-malarial drugs. Given the large scale use of IPTp in Africa, the need for prospective clinical trials evaluating the impact of antibiotic activity of anti-malarials on maternal and foetal health and on the risk of promoting specific drug resistance of bacterial pathogens is discussed.

  1. Multicenter randomized controlled trial of bacterial interference for prevention of urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darouiche, Rabih O; Green, Bruce G; Donovan, William H; Chen, David; Schwartz, Michael; Merritt, John; Mendez, Michelle; Hull, Richard A

    2011-08-01

    To compare the effectiveness of bacterial interference versus placebo in preventing urinary tract infection (UTI). The main outcome measure was the numbers of episodes of UTI/patient-year. Randomization was computer generated, with allocation concealment by visibly indistinguishable products distributed from a core facility. The healthcare providers and those assessing the outcomes were unaware of the group allocation. Adult patients (n = 65) with neurogenic bladder after spinal cord injury and a history of recurrent UTI were randomized in a 3:1 ratio to receive either Escherichia coli HU2117 or sterile saline. Urine cultures were obtained weekly during the first month and then monthly for 1 year. The patients were evaluable if they remained colonized with E. coli HU2117 for >4 weeks (experimental group). The trial is closed to follow-up. Of the 59 patients who received bladder inoculations, 27 were evaluable (17 in the experimental group and 10 in the placebo group). The 2 study groups had comparable clinical characteristics. Of 17 patients colonized with E. coli HU2117 and the 10 control patients, 5 (29%, 95% confidence interval 0.11-0.56) and 7 (70%, 95% confidence interval 0.35-0.92) developed >1 episode of UTI (P = .049; 1-sided Fisher's exact test), respectively. The average number of episodes of UTI/patient-year was also lower (P = .02, Wilcoxon rank sum test) in the experimental (0.50) than in the control group (1.68). E. coli HU2117 did not cause symptomatic UTI. Bladder colonization with E. coli HU2117 safely reduces the risk of symptomatic UTI in patients with spinal cord injury. Effective, but less complex, methods for achieving bladder colonization with E. coli HU2117 are under investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Effect of Manuka honey gel on the transforming growth factor β1 and β3 concentrations, bacterial counts and histomorphology of contaminated full-thickness skin wounds in equine distal limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischofberger, A S; Dart, C M; Horadagoda, N; Perkins, N R; Jeffcott, L B; Little, C B; Dart, A J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of 66% Manuka honey gel on the concentrations of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and TGF-β3, bacterial counts and histomorphology during healing of contaminated equine distal limb wounds. In this experimental study of 10 Standardbred horses, five full-thickness skin wounds (2 × 1.5 cm) were created on one metacarpus and six similar wounds were created on the contralateral metacarpus. Wounds were assigned to three groups: non-contaminated control wounds; contaminated control wounds; contaminated wounds treated daily with 1 mL Manuka honey gel topically for 10 days. For the contaminated wounds, faeces were applied for 24 h after wound creation. In five horses wounds were bandaged and in the other five horses wounds were left without a bandage. Biopsies were taken on days 1, 2, 7 and 10 after wounding to evaluate the effects of Manuka honey gel, wound contamination and bandaging on TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 concentrations, aerobic and anaerobic bacterial counts, and histomorphology. Manuka honey gel had no significant effect on TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 concentrations or wound bacterial counts. Manuka honey gel decreased wound inflammation (days 7, 10), increased angiogenesis (days 2, 7, 10), increased fibrosis and collagen organisation (day 7) and increased epithelial hyperplasia (days 7, 10). Treatment with Manuka honey gel resulted in a more organised granulation tissue bed early in wound repair, which may contribute to enhanced healing of equine distal limb wounds. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  3. Valproic acid mitigates the inflammatory response and prevents acute respiratory distress syndrome in a murine model of Escherichia coli pneumonia at the expense of bacterial clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasotakis, George; Galvan, Manuel; King, Elizabeth; Sarkar, Beda; Stucchi, Arthur; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Burke, Peter A; Remick, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI) are members of a family of epigenetic modifying agents with broad anti-inflammatory properties. These anti-inflammatory properties may have important therapeutic implications in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, administration of HDACI may create an immunosuppressive environment conducive to bacterial growth. Accordingly, the aim of the current study is to investigate the effect of HDACI valproic acid (VPA) on host inflammatory response and bacterial burden in a murine model of Escherichia coli pneumonia-induced ARDS. ARDS was induced in male C57BL6 mice (n = 24) by endotracheal instillation of 3 × 10 E. coli. VPA (250 mg/kg) was administered 30 minutes after E. coli instillation in the intervention group. Blood samples were collected at 3 and 6 hours, and animals were sacrificed at 6 hours. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed, and tissue specimens were harvested. Cytokine levels were measured in blood and BAL, and so was transalveolar protein transit. Cell counts and colony forming units were quantified in BAL fluid. VPA reduced neutrophil influx into the lungs and local tissue destruction through decreased myeloperoxidase activity. It also ameliorated the pulmonary and systemic inflammatory response. This led to greater bacterial proliferation in the pulmonary parenchyma. Administration of VPA in a clinically relevant bacterial model of murine ARDS mitigates the host inflammatory response, essentially preventing ARDS, but creates an immunosuppressive environment that favors bacterial overgrowth.

  4. The prevention of colorectal anastomotic leakage with tissue adhesives in a contaminated environment is associated with the presence of anti-inflammatory macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Wu (Zhouqiao); K.A. Vakalopoulos (Konstantinos); G.S.A. ter Hoeve-Boersema (Simone); L.F. Kroese (Leonard); K.H. Lam (King); P.H. van der Horst (Paul); I.M. Mulder (Irene); Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); J. Jeekel (Johannes); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Colorectal anastomoses created in a contaminated environment result in a high leakage rate. This study investigated whether using anastomotic sealants (TissuCol®, Histoacryl® Flex, and Duraseal®) prevents leakage in a rat peritonitis model. Study design: Sixty-seven Wistar

  5. Determination of Optimum Sanitizer Levels for Prevention of Salmonella Cross-Contamination of Mature Round Tomatoes in a Laboratory Model Flume System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, Aswathy; Li, You; De, Jaysankar; Gutierrez, Alan; Silverberg, Rachael; Schneider, Keith R

    2017-09-01

    Salmonella has been reported to be involved in several foodborne illness outbreaks, many of which resulted from consumption of raw tomatoes. This research aimed to optimize and evaluate the concentration of free chlorine (hypochlorous acid [HOCl]) used as a sanitizer to prevent cross-contamination of tomatoes inoculated with a cocktail of five rifampin-resistant Salmonella enterica serovars in a laboratory-based model flume system. Organic load, prepared using sterilized Scotts Premium Topsoil, was added in different quantities to the flume wash water to simulate real-world packinghouse conditions. In a typical packinghouse operation utilizing a recirculating flume system, the organic matter washed from tomato surfaces accumulates over time. In this study, different concentrations (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm) of HOCl were used as sanitizers under three organic load conditions (0, 650, and 1,000 mg/L chemical oxygen demand). Results showed that 100 ppm of HOCl was necessary to prevent Salmonella cross-contamination of uninoculated tomatoes in the model flume system in the presence of organic loading. Also, when treated with 100 ppm of HOCl, Salmonella levels were reduced by >4.5 log CFU per tomato from inoculated tomatoes in the presence of organic load. At 75 ppm of HOCl, Salmonella cross-contamination was prevented, but only in the absence of organic loading. In studies in which plate counts were negative, whole tomato enrichment studies were performed. No cross-contamination of uninoculated tomatoes was recorded when 100 ppm of HOCl was used, even in the presence of high organic load (1,000 mg/L chemical oxygen demand). Although sanitizer application reduces contamination on tomato surfaces, the primary function of sanitizers in the wash water is to prevent cross-contamination.

  6. Identification of bacterial contaminants in polyherbal medicines used for the treatment of tuberculosis in Amatole District of the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa, using rapid 16S rRNA technique

    OpenAIRE

    Famewo, Elizabeth Bosede; Clarke, Anna Maria; Afolayan, Anthony Jide

    2016-01-01

    Background Polyherbal medicines are used for the treatment of many diseases in many African and Asian communities. With the increasing use of these remedies, several investigations have shown that they are associated with a broad variety of residues and contaminants. This study investigates the presence of bacteria in the polyherbal medicines used for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. Methods Bacterial DNA was extracted from the polyherbal medici...

  7. Removal of bacterial contaminants and antibiotic resistance genes by conventional wastewater treatment processes in Saudi Arabia: Is the treated wastewater safe to reuse for agricultural irrigation?

    KAUST Repository

    Aljassim, Nada I.

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to assess the removal efficiency of microbial contaminants in a local wastewater treatment plant over the duration of one year, and to assess the microbial risk associated with reusing treated wastewater in agricultural irrigation. The treatment process achieved 3.5 logs removal of heterotrophic bacteria and up to 3.5 logs removal of fecal coliforms. The final chlorinated effluent had 1.8×102 MPN/100mL of fecal coliforms and fulfils the required quality for restricted irrigation. 16S rRNA gene-based high-throughput sequencing showed that several genera associated with opportunistic pathogens (e.g. Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Arcobacter, Legionella, Mycobacterium, Neisseria, Pseudomonas and Streptococcus) were detected at relative abundance ranging from 0.014 to 21 % of the total microbial community in the influent. Among them, Pseudomonas spp. had the highest approximated cell number in the influent but decreased to less than 30 cells/100mL in both types of effluent. A culture-based approach further revealed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa was mainly found in the influent and non-chlorinated effluent but was replaced by other Pseudomonas spp. in the chlorinated effluent. Aeromonas hydrophila could still be recovered in the chlorinated effluent. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) determined that only chlorinated effluent should be permitted for use in agricultural irrigation as it achieved an acceptable annual microbial risk lower than 10-4 arising from both P. aeruginosa and A. hydrophila. However, the proportion of bacterial isolates resistant to 6 types of antibiotics increased from 3.8% in the influent to 6.9% in the chlorinated effluent. Examples of these antibiotic-resistant isolates in the chlorinated effluent include Enterococcus and Enterobacter spp. Besides the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial isolates, tetracycline resistance genes tetO, tetQ, tetW, tetH, tetZ were also present at an average 2.5×102, 1.6×102, 4.4×102, 1

  8. Evaluating and improving terminal hygiene practices on broiler farms to prevent Campylobacter cross-contamination between flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battersby, Tara; Walsh, D; Whyte, P; Bolton, D

    2017-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate current cleaning practices in broiler houses by testing a range of sites after cleaning and disinfection and to test the efficacy of the most commonly used methods in a commercial broiler house after flock harvesting. Cleaning procedures on 20 broiler houses (10 separate farms) were examined by testing a range of sampling points (feeders, drinkers, walls, etc.) for total viable count (TVC), total Enterobacteriaceae count (TEC) and Campylobacter spp. after cleaning and disinfection, using culture based methods. In a second experiment, the six most commonly used commercially available disinfectants and/or detergent products were evaluated. The results of the first study demonstrated that critical areas in 12 of the 20 broiler houses were not effectively cleaned and disinfected between flocks as the tarmac apron, ante-room, house door, feeders, drinkers, walls, columns, barriers and/or bird weighs were Campylobacter positive. Thermal fogging with the combination of potassium peroxymonosulfate, sulfamic acid and sodium chloride (5%, v/v) or the glutaraldehyde and quaternary ammonium complex (0.3%, v/v) were the most effective treatments while other disinfectant treatments were considerably less effective. It was therefore concluded that farmers should review their broiler house cleaning and disinfection procedures if Campylobacter cross-contamination between successive flocks is to be prevented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of metal and bacterial contamination in cultivated fish and impact on human health for residents living in the Mekong Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanpiwat, Penradee; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong; Widmer, Kenneth; Himeno, Seiichiro; Miyataka, Hideki; Vu, Ngoc-Ut; Tran, Van-Viet; Pham, Thi-Tuyet-Ngan

    2016-11-01

    Fish is the main source of animal protein and micronutrients for inhabitants in the lower Mekong River basin. Consumption of fish in the basin ranges from 41 to 51 kg capita(-1) year(-1). Thus, concerns of human health impacts caused by daily intake of metals contained in fish, and the incidence of bacterial contamination from Listeria and Escherichia coli have been raised. This study was conducted to 1) determine concentrations of metals, fecal indicator organisms, and Listeria spp. in cultivated common diet fish, and 2) assess human health risks as results of fish consumption on a daily basis. The results showed significant impacts of metal accumulation in fish especially from the intensive aquaculture. Chemical use to promote the rapid allometric growth of fish was expected to be the explanation for this finding. Concentrations of metals contained in different fish species were not statistically different with the exceptions of Na, Mn, and Zn. This might be due to the mobility of elements in aquaculture farms. Listeria and E. coli log CFU/g were 1.36 ± 0.11 (standard error) and 1.57 ± 0.1 s.e., respectively with higher counts observed in samples collected in market sites. Lastly, for human health risk assessment via fish consumption, it was found that hazard quotients of consuming As, Cu, and Zn contained in all fish species could contribute adverse health effects to the local residents (hazard quotients higher than 1). Therefore, risk management measures must be promoted and implemented in all study areas to reduce potential risks to local Vietnamese residents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radioactive contamination monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Toru; Hashimoto, Tadao; Hashimoto, Manabu

    2007-01-01

    In order to prevent radioactive materials from spreading contamination from nuclear power plants outside the radiation control area, the surface contamination of all material transferred outside from the control area is monitored. This paper presents an overview and describes features of: (1) personnel surface contamination monitoring assemblies for measuring the surface contamination on workers, (2) article surface contamination monitoring assemblies for measuring the surface contamination on articles, (3) laundry monitors for measuring the surface contamination on worker clothes worn inside the control area, and (4) hand-foot-clothing contamination monitors for measuring the surface contamination on hands, feet and clothing. (author)

  11. In vitro study of transmission of bacteria from contaminated metal models to stone models via impressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofou, A.; Larsen, T.; Öwall, B.

    2002-01-01

    Dental impression, stone model, bacterial contamination, cross-infection, dental clinic, dental laboratory......Dental impression, stone model, bacterial contamination, cross-infection, dental clinic, dental laboratory...

  12. Avaliação da contaminação bacteriana em desinfetantes de uso domiciliar Evaluation of bacterial contamination in disinfectants for domestic use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumie Miyagi

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar desinfetantes de uso domiciliar, identificando a presença de bactérias contaminantes, e conhecer o nível de tolerância dessas bactérias ao cloreto de benzalcônio. MÉTODOS: Foram adquiridas aleatoriamente no comércio da região metropolitana de São Paulo, SP, Brasil, 52 amostras de desinfetantes de uso domiciliar para análise quanto à presença de bactérias contaminantes. O nível de tolerância dessas bactérias ao cloreto de benzalcônio foi determinado pelo método da macrodiluição em caldo. RESULTADOS: De 52 amostras, 16 (30,77% estavam contaminadas por bactérias Gram negativas, com contagens variando entre 10(4 e 10(6 UFC/ml. Esses contaminantes foram identificados como Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, Burkholderia cepacia e Serratia marcescens. As Concentrações Inibitórias Mínimas (CIM: mg/ml do cloreto de benzalcônio para S. marcescens, A. xylosoxidans e B. cepacia foram: 2,48, 1,23 e 0,30, respectivamente. CONCLUSÕES Os desinfetantes de uso domiciliar à base de compostos de amônio quaternário são passíveis de contaminação por bactérias. As CIM do cloreto de benzalcônio para as bactérias contaminantes estavam abaixo das concentrações do princípio ativo presente nos desinfetantes, indicando que a tolerância ao biocida não é estável, podendo ser perdida com o cultivo das bactérias em meios de cultura sem o biocida.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate disinfectants for domestic use for the presence of bacteria, identify them, and determine their tolerance level to benzalkonium chloride. METHODS: Fifty-two samples of commercially available disinfectants for domestic use were acquired at random in the metropolitan area of São Paulo, Brazil, and analyzed to detect the presence of bacterial contaminants. The isolated organisms were identified and their tolerance level to benzalkonium chloride was determined by broth macrodilution method. RESULTS: Sixteen (30.77% of fifty-two disinfectants sampled were

  13. BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons like benzen e, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, together known as BTEX, has almost the same chemical structure. These aromatic hydrocarbons are released as pollutants in th e environment. This work was taken up to develop a solvent tolerant bacterial cons ortium that could degrade BTEX compounds as they all share a common chemical structure. We have isolated almost 60 different types of bacterial strains from different petroleum contaminated sites. Of these 60 bacterial strains almost 20 microorganisms were screene d on the basis of capability to tolerate high concentration of BTEX. Ten differe nt consortia were prepared and the compatibility of the bacterial strains within the consortia was checked by gram staining and BTEX tolerance level. Four successful mi crobial consortia were selected in which all the bacterial strains concomitantly grew in presence of high concentration of BTEX (10% of toluene, 10% of benzene 5% ethyl benzene and 1% xylene. Consortium #2 showed the highest growth rate in pr esence of BTEX. Degradation of BTEX by consortium #2 was monitored for 5 days by gradual decrease in the volume of the solvents. The maximum reduction observed wa s 85% in 5 days. Gas chromatography results also reveal that could completely degrade benzene and ethyl benzene within 48 hours. Almost 90% degradation of toluene and xylene in 48 hours was exhibited by consortium #2. It could also tolerate and degrade many industrial solvents such as chloroform, DMSO, acetonitrile having a wide range of log P values (0.03–3.1. Degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon like BTEX by a solvent tolerant bacterial consortium is greatly significant as it could degrade high concentration of pollutants compared to a bacterium and also reduces the time span of degradation.

  14. The efficacy of different anti-microbial metals at preventing the formation of, and eradicating bacterial biofilms of pathogenic indicator strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugala, Natalie; Lemire, Joe A; Turner, Raymond J

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens and the prevalence of biofilm-related infections have generated a demand for alternative anti-microbial therapies. Metals have not been explored in adequate detail for their capacity to combat infectious disease. Metal compounds can now be found in textiles, medical devices and disinfectants-yet, we know little about their efficacy against specific pathogens. To help fill this knowledge gap, we report on the anti-microbial and antibiofilm activity of seven metals: silver, copper, titanium, gallium, nickel, aluminum and zinc against three bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. To evaluate the capacity of metal ions to prevent the growth of, and eradicate biofilms and planktonic cells, bacterial cultures were inoculated in the Calgary Biofilm Device (minimal biofilm eradication concentration) in the presence of the metal salts. Copper, gallium and titanium were capable of preventing planktonic and biofilm growth, and eradicating established biofilms of all tested strains. Further, we observed that the efficacies of the other tested metal salts displayed variable efficacy against the tested strains. Further, contrary to the enhanced resistance anticipated from bacterial biofilms, particular metal salts were observed to be more effective against biofilm communities versus planktonic cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that the identity of the bacterial strain must be considered before treatment with a particular metal ion. Consequent to the use of metal ions as anti-microbial agents to fight multidrug-resistant and biofilm-related infections increases, we must aim for more selective deployment in a given infectious setting.

  15. Research on establishment of emergency transportation of heavy-injured and radiation-exposed and contaminated patients. Toward rapid, contamination-preventive and safe land and air transportion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haraguchi, Yoshikura; Tomoyasu, Y.; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Ishihara, Toru

    2004-01-01

    The authors has continued researches on countermeasures against various disasters including nuclear or radiation accident. Present paper deals with the following items; (1) Significance of preparation of a manual on countermeasures against disasters in relation to medical drills, (2) Status and prospects of disaster simulations and disaster drills, (3) Promotion and education on medical knowledge when nuclear disasters occur, (4) Network system study of broad area medicines throughout the country. (5) Study on how to approach mental an psychological cares, (6) Specialities of radioactive contamination in the general contamination of NBC (Nuclear, Biological and Chemical) disasters, (7) New concept and preparation of triage tags, and (8) Queueing theory application to many patients in a hospital. (H. Yokoo)

  16. Microbial contamination of hematopoietic progenitor cell products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdaroğlu, Sinem; Tekgündüz, Emre; Bozdağ, Sinem Civriz; Durgun, Gamze; Sarıca, Abdurrahman; Demiriz, Itır Şirinoğlu; Koçubaba, Serife; Iskender, Gülşen; Kayıkçı, Omür; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2013-06-01

    Microbial screening for contamination is a part of hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) collection and infusion procedure. We aimed to find out our microbial contamination rates during collection, processing and infusion steps of HPC products. We also evaluated the clinical course of patients who received contaminated HPC products. We retrospectively analyzed microbial contamination records of HPC grafts between 2010 and 2012. HPC products of autologous donors were evaluated for contamination at three steps: at the end of mobilization, following processing with DMSO and just before stem cell infusion. Grafts of allogeneic donors were assessed only before HPC transplantation (HCT). Microbiological analysis of HPC samples were performed with an automated system (BacT/Alert®). During the study period a total of 492 mobilization procedures were performed on 329 (214 autologous and 115 allogeneic) donors. Bacterial contamination has been detected in 103 of 1630 samples (6%). Ninety-seven out of 1162 blood samples (8%) from 265 patients who were treated with HCT were contaminated. Forty-six patients (41 autologous and 5 allogeneic) were transplanted with contaminated HPC products. During HCT 42 patients experienced febrile neutropenic attack and 34 of them had positive blood culture results. In none of these 34 patients the isolated pathogens were the same organisms with those found in the final contaminated stem cell product before stem cell infusion. None of the patients who received contaminated products died because of sepsis within the posttransplant 30days. There was no significant difference between patients who received contaminated and non-contaminated products in terms of the first day of fever, duration of fever, engraftment kinetics and duration of hospitalization. Our results suggest that microbial contamination of HPC products is an issue to be prevented, although it may not have a major impact on the general success of HCT. Copyright © 2013. Published by

  17. Distribution and dynamics of soil contamination with Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati eggs in Poland and prevention measures proposed after 20 years of study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizgajska-Wiktor, Hanna; Jarosz, Wojciech; Fogt-Wyrwas, Renata; Drzewiecka, Agnieszka

    2017-01-30

    The studies conducted in the years 1994-2013 allowed to determine the distribution of Toxocara spp. eggs in the soil of different types of urban and rural areas in Poland and to establish seasonal and multi-year dynamics of soil contamination with T. cati and T. canis eggs. Out of 3309 soil samples examined, 14.9% contained the eggs and the average density was 3.43 eggs/100g of soil. The level of soil contamination was the highest in cities, lower in villages, and lowest in small towns. In urban areas eggs of T. cati were found more frequently than of T. canis, while in rural areas the opposite was true. Both, in urban and rural areas, the sites most heavily contaminated with Toxocara spp. eggs were household surroundings (backyards). Recreation areas (parks, playgrounds, lake beaches) were significantly less contaminated. In older parts of Poznań, in backyards, soil contamination with the eggs was generally high each month, being lowest in July and highest in December and the prevalence of T. cati eggs was much higher than of T. canis. The prevention policy introduced in the city thus far - paying great attention to dog faeces but not to cats was unsatisfactory. After 18 years of such policy, the number of Toxocara spp. eggs dropped significantly but it was not a linear phenomenon - the intensity of soil contamination fluctuated. To be more effective, preventive measures should be preceded with discrimination of T. canis and T. cati eggs recovered in the soil and for this purpose the new molecular techniques should be applied. A survey conducted in the population in 2010 showed that people's awareness on the significance of pets in the transmission of dangerous zoonoses to humans was unsatisfactory. We recommend to expand the knowledge of the subject among the populace. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. False-positive results and contamination in nucleic acid amplification assays : Suggestions for a prevent and destroy strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, A; Box, ATA; Fluit, AC

    Contamination of samples with DNA is still a major problem in microbiology laboratories, despite the wide acceptance of PCR and other amplification techniques for the detection of frequently low amounts of target DNA. This review focuses on the implications of contamination in the diagnosis and

  19. Evaluation of the effects of ultraviolet light on bacterial contaminants inoculated into whole milk and colostrum, and on colostrum immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, R V; Bicalho, M L; Machado, V S; Lima, S; Teixeira, A G; Warnick, L D; Bicalho, R C

    2014-05-01

    Staph. aureus (0.4 ± 0.2 log cfu/mL reduction). The UVC treatment of colostrum significantly decreased the IgG concentration, with an observed final mean IgG reduction of approximately 50%. Development of new methods to reduce bacterial contaminants in colostrum must take into consideration the barriers imposed by its opacity and organic components, and account for the incidental damage to IgG caused by manipulating colostrum. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A study on contamination and disinfection of film cassette

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Chung, Kyung Mo; Choi, Ji Won

    2000-01-01

    In July 2000, a bacteria infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient to prevent from nosocomial infection. The study showed that the laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the four different cassette size of the contact surface. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. Also the education of nosocomial infection for radiographer will be required

  1. A study on contamination and disinfection of film cassette

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Chung, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ji Won [University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2000-04-15

    In July 2000, a bacteria infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient to prevent from nosocomial infection. The study showed that the laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the four different cassette size of the contact surface. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. Also the education of nosocomial infection for radiographer will be required.

  2. Content Validation and Semantic Evaluation of a Check-List Elaborated for the Prevention of Gluten Cross-Contamination in Food Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farage, Priscila; Puppin Zandonadi, Renata; Cortez Ginani, Verônica; Gandolfi, Lenora; Pratesi, Riccardo; de Medeiros Nóbrega, Yanna Karla

    2017-01-06

    Conditions associated to the consumption of gluten have emerged as a major health care concern and the treatment consists on a lifelong gluten-free diet. Providing safe food for these individuals includes adapting to safety procedures within the food chain and preventing gluten cross-contamination in gluten-free food. However, a gluten cross-contamination prevention protocol or check-list has not yet been validated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform the content validation and semantic evaluation of a check-list elaborated for the prevention of gluten cross-contamination in food services. The preliminary version of the check-list was elaborated based on the Brazilian resolution for food safety Collegiate Board Resolution 216 (RDC 216) and Collegiate Board Resolution 275 (RDC 275), the standard 22000 from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 22000) and the Canadian Celiac Association Gluten-Free Certification Program documents. Seven experts with experience in the area participated in the check-list validation and semantic evaluation. The criteria used for the approval of the items, as to their importance for the prevention of gluten cross-contamination and clarity of the wording, was the achievement of a minimal of 80% of agreement between the experts (W-values ≥ 0.8). Moreover, items should have a mean ≥4 in the evaluation of importance (Likert scale from 1 to 5) and clarity (Likert scale from 0 to 5) in order to be maintained in the instrument. The final version of the check-list was composed of 84 items, divided into 12 sections. After being redesigned and re-evaluated, the items were considered important and comprehensive by the experts (both with W-values ≥ 0.89). The check-list developed was validated with respect to content and approved in the semantic evaluation.

  3. Content Validation and Semantic Evaluation of a Check-List Elaborated for the Prevention of Gluten Cross-Contamination in Food Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Farage

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conditions associated to the consumption of gluten have emerged as a major health care concern and the treatment consists on a lifelong gluten-free diet. Providing safe food for these individuals includes adapting to safety procedures within the food chain and preventing gluten cross-contamination in gluten-free food. However, a gluten cross-contamination prevention protocol or check-list has not yet been validated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform the content validation and semantic evaluation of a check-list elaborated for the prevention of gluten cross-contamination in food services. The preliminary version of the check-list was elaborated based on the Brazilian resolution for food safety Collegiate Board Resolution 216 (RDC 216 and Collegiate Board Resolution 275 (RDC 275, the standard 22000 from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 22000 and the Canadian Celiac Association Gluten-Free Certification Program documents. Seven experts with experience in the area participated in the check-list validation and semantic evaluation. The criteria used for the approval of the items, as to their importance for the prevention of gluten cross-contamination and clarity of the wording, was the achievement of a minimal of 80% of agreement between the experts (W-values ≥ 0.8. Moreover, items should have a mean ≥4 in the evaluation of importance (Likert scale from 1 to 5 and clarity (Likert scale from 0 to 5 in order to be maintained in the instrument. The final version of the check-list was composed of 84 items, divided into 12 sections. After being redesigned and re-evaluated, the items were considered important and comprehensive by the experts (both with W-values ≥ 0.89. The check-list developed was validated with respect to content and approved in the semantic evaluation.

  4. [Epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy, prevention and management of uncomplicated bacterial outpatient acquired urinary tract infections in adult patients : Update 2017 of the interdisciplinary AWMF S3 guideline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, J; Schmidt, S; Lebert, C; Schneidewind, L; Vahlensieck, W; Sester, U; Fünfstück, R; Helbig, S; Hofmann, W; Hummers, E; Kunze, M; Kniehl, E; Naber, K; Mandraka, F; Mündner-Hensen, B; Schmiemann, G; Wagenlehner, F M E

    2017-06-01

    Update of the 2010 published evidence-based S3 guideline on epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy and management of uncomplicated, bacterial, outpatient-acquired urinary tract infections in adult patients. The guideline contains current evidence for the rational use of antimicrobial substances, avoidance of inappropriate use of certain antibiotic classes and development of resistance. The update was created under the leadership of the German Association of Urology (DGU). A systematic literature search was conducted for the period 01 January 2008 to 31 December 2015. International guidelines have also been taken into account. Evidence level and risk of bias were used for quality review. Updated information on bacterial susceptibility, success, collateral damage and safety of first- and second-line antibiotics was given. For the treatment of uncomplicated cystitis the first line antibiotics are fosfomycin trometamol, nitrofurantoin, nitroxoline, pivmecillinam, trimethoprim (with consideration of the local resistance rates). Fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins should not be used as first choice antibiotics. In the case of uncomplicated pyelonephritis of mild to moderate forms, preferably cefpodoxime, ceftibuten, ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin should be used as oral antibiotics. The updated German S3 guideline provides comprehensive evidence- and consensus-based recommendations on epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy, prevention and management of uncomplicated bacterial outpatient acquired urinary tract infections in adult patients. Antibiotic stewardship aspects have significantly influenced the therapeutic recommendations. A broad implementation in all clinical practice settings is necessary to ensure a foresighted antibiotic policy and thus t improve clinical care.

  5. Prevention of bacterial and fungal infections in acute leukemia patients: a new and potent combination of oral norfloxacin and amphotericin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, T; Dan, K; Nomura, T

    1993-09-01

    The effect of a combination regimen using norfloxacin (NFLX) and amphotericin B (AMPH-B) for prevention of infections in patients with acute leukemia being treated by remission-induction chemotherapy in a randomized, controlled trial was studied. One hundred and six consecutive, evaluable patients were randomly assigned to receive orally 200 mg of norfloxacin two or four times daily and 200 mg of amphotericin B four times daily, or amphotericin B only. A smaller percentage of patients with bacteriologically-documented infections was observed in the study group compared with the control group (34.6% vs 56.9%; P combination antimicrobial regimen is safe and effective for prevention of gram-negative bacterial as well as fungal infections in patients with acute leukemia being treated with cytotoxic remission-induction chemotherapy.

  6. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  7. Maternal and early onset neonatal bacterial sepsis: burden and strategies for prevention in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Anna C; Mwaniki, Michael; Newton, Charles R J C; Berkley, James A

    2009-07-01

    Maternal and child health are high priorities for international development. Through a Review of published work, we show substantial gaps in current knowledge on incidence (cases per live births), aetiology, and risk factors for both maternal and early onset neonatal bacterial sepsis in sub-Saharan Africa. Although existing published data suggest that sepsis causes about 10% of all maternal deaths and 26% of neonatal deaths, these are likely to be considerable underestimates because of methodological limitations. Successful intervention strategies in resource-rich settings and early studies in sub-Saharan Africa suggest that the burden of maternal and early onset neonatal bacterial sepsis could be reduced through simple interventions, including antiseptic and antibiotic treatment. An effective way to expedite evidence to guide interventions and determine the incidence, aetiology, and risk factors for sepsis in sub-Saharan Africa would be through a multiarmed factorial intervention trial aimed at reducing both maternal and early onset neonatal bacterial sepsis in sub-Saharan Africa.

  8. Prevention of bacterial infections in the newborn by pre-delivery administration of azithromycin: Study protocol of a randomized efficacy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Anna; Oluwalana, Claire; Camara, Bully; Bojang, Abdoulie; Burr, Sarah; Davis, Timothy M E; Bailey, Robin; Kampmann, Beate; Mueller, Jenny; Bottomley, Christian; D'Alessandro, Umberto

    2015-11-19

    Neonatal deaths, estimated at approximately 4 million annually, now account for almost 40% of global mortality in children aged under-five. Bacterial sepsis is a leading cause of neonatal mortality. Assuming the mother is the main source for bacterial transmission to newborns, the primary objective of the trial is to determine the impact of one oral dose of azithromycin, given to women in labour, on the newborn's bacterial carriage in the nasopharynx. Secondary objectives include the impact of the intervention on bacterial colonization in the baby and the mother during the first month of life. This is a Phase III, double -blind, placebo controlled randomized clinical trial in which 830 women in labour were randomized to either a single dose of 2 g oral azithromycin or placebo (ratio 1:1). The trial included pregnant women in labour aged 18 to 45 years attending study health centres in the Western Gambia. A post-natal check of the mother and baby was conducted at the health centre by study clinicians before discharge and 8-10 days after delivery. Home follow up visits were conducted daily during the first week and then weekly until week 8 after delivery. Vaginal swabs and breast milk samples were collected from the mothers, and the pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Group B Streptococcus (GBS) and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from the study samples. For bacterial isolates, susceptibility pattern to azithromycin was determined using disk diffusion and E-test. Eye swabs were collected from newborns with eye discharge during the follow up period, and Chlamydial infection was assessed using molecular methods. This is a proof-of-concept study to assess the impact of antibiotic preventive treatment of women during labour on bacterial infections in the newborn. If the trial confirms this hypothesis, the next step will be to assess the impact of this intervention on neonatal sepsis. The proposed intervention should be easily implementable in developing countries

  9. Impact of sampling depth and plant species on local environmental conditions, microbiological parameters and bacterial composition in a mercury contaminated salt marsh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, D.F.R.; Oliveira, V.; Gomes, N.C.M.; Pereira, A.; Henriques, I.; Marques, B.; Almeida, A.; Cunha, A.; Correia, A.; Lillebø, A.I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Vegetated habitat contained distinct bacterial communities. ► Variation in bacterial composition with depth differed between plant species. ► There is evidence of an effect of mercury concentration on bacterial composition. ► Depth and sampling depth explained almost 70% of the variation in bacterial composition. - Abstract: We compare the environmental characteristics and bacterial communities associated with two rushes, Juncus maritimus and Bolboschoenus maritimus, and adjacent unvegetated habitat in a salt marsh subjected to historical mercury pollution. Mercury content was higher in vegetated than unvegetated habitat and increased with sampling depth. There was also a significant relationship between mercury concentration and bacterial composition. Habitat (Juncus, Bolboschoenus or unvegetated), sample depth, and the interaction between both, however, explained most of the variation in composition (∼70%). Variation in composition with depth was most prominent for the unvegetated habitat, followed by Juncus, but more constrained for Bolboschoenus habitat. This constraint may be indicative of a strong plant–microbe ecophysiological adaptation. Vegetated habitat contained distinct bacterial communities associated with higher potential activity of aminopeptidase, β-glucosidase and arylsulphatase and incorporation rates of 14 C-glucose and 14 C-acetate. Communities in unvegetated habitat were, in contrast, associated with both higher pH and proportion of sulphate reducing bacteria.

  10. Comparison of the efficacy of chlorhexidine gluconate versus povidone iodine as preoperative skin preparation for the prevention of surgical site infections in clean-contaminated upper abdominal surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Anirudh; Kaman, Lileswar; Raj, Prithivi; Gautam, Vikas; Dahiya, Divya; Singh, Gurpreet; Singh, Rajinder; Medhi, Bikash

    2015-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of chlorhexidine-gluconate versus povidone iodine in preoperative skin preparation in the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs) in clean-contaminated upper abdominal surgeries. This was a prospective randomized controlled trial conducted on patients undergoing clean-contaminated upper abdominal surgeries. A total of 351 patients 18-70 years old were randomized into two groups; chlorhexidine and povidone iodine skin preparation before surgery. The incidence of SSIs in the chlorhexidine group was 10.8 %, in comparison to 17.9 % in the povidone iodine group. The odds ratio was 0.6 in favor of chlorhexidine use, but the results were not statistically significant (P = 0.06). In the first postoperative week, SSIs developed in 7 % of patients in the chlorhexidine group and 14.1 % in the povidone iodine group (P = 0.03), and in the second postoperative week, SSIs were present in 4.1 % of the patients in the chlorhexidine group and 4.4 % in the povidone iodine group, which was not statistically significant (P = 0.88). The incidence of SSIs after clean-contaminated upper abdominal surgeries was lower with the use of chlorhexidine skin preparation than with povidone iodine preparation, although the results were not statistically significant. However, the odds ratio between the two groups favored the use of chlorhexidine over povidone iodine for preventing SSIs.

  11. Recommendations for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense. On analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations. 2. ed.; Empfehlungen fuer die Probenahme zur Gefahrenabwehr im Bevoelkerungsschutz. Zur Analytik von chemischen, biologischen und radioaktiven Kontaminationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Udo; Derakshani, Nahid; Drobig, Matthias; Koenig, Mario; Mentfewitz, Joachim; Prast, Hartmut; Uelpenich, Gerhard; Vidmayer, Marc; Wilbert, Stefan; Wolf, Manfred

    2016-07-01

    The recommendations for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense (analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations) cover the following topics: Requirements for sampling, description of the materials (chemical, biological and radioactive contaminated materials), decontamination, sample transport and protocol documents.

  12. Vacuum plasma sprayed coatings using ionic silver doped hydroxyapatite powder to prevent bacterial infection of bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimond-Lischer, Stefanie; Ren, Qun; Braissant, Olivier; Gruner, Philipp; Wampfler, Bruno; Maniura-Weber, Katharina

    2016-03-10

    Fast and efficient osseointegration of implants into bone is of crucial importance for their clinical success; a process that can be enhanced by coating the implant surface with hydroxyapatite (HA) using the vacuum plasma spray technology (VPS). However, bacterial infections, especially the biofilm formation on implant surfaces after a surgery, represent a serious complication. With ever-increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, there is great interest in silver (Ag) as an alternative to classical antibiotics due to its broad activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. In the present study, silver ions were introduced into HA spray powder by ion exchange and the HA-Ag powder was applied onto titanium samples by VPS. The Ag-containing surfaces were evaluated for the kinetics of the silver release, its antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus as well as Escherichia coli, and possible cytotoxicity against human bone cells. The HA-Ag coatings with different concentrations of Ag displayed mechanical and compositional properties that fulfill the regulatory requirements. Evaluation of the Ag release kinetic showed a high release rate in the first 24 h followed by a decreasing release rate over the four subsequent days. The HA-Ag coatings showed no cytotoxicity to primary human bone cells while exhibiting antibacterial activity to E. coli and S. aureus.

  13. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis in human adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology, etiology, clinical characteristics, treatment, outcome, and prevention of zoonotic bacterial meningitis in human adults. We identified 16 zoonotic bacteria causing meningitis in adults. Zoonotic bacterial meningitis is uncommon compared to bacterial meningitis caused by

  14. Real-time, in-situ detection of volatile profiles for the prevention of aflatoxin fungal contamination in pistachios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Tiziana C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center of Micro and Nano Technology, Material Engineering Division; Chang, Allan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center of Micro and Nano Technology, Material Engineering Division; Zhou, Jenny [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center of Micro and Nano Technology, Material Engineering Division

    2017-10-18

    The objective in this project is to provide a proof of concept will demonstrate the feasibility of a Raman, in-situ warning system for detecting and removing developing fungal hot spots from pistachio stockpiles and transit containers, thus decreasing human health risks and product loss as a result of contamination. The proposed project has the following goals: to calibrate the Raman fingerprinting of biomarkers, standalone and in premixed samples, to build a database with the vibrational profiles distinctive to the signatures of the bouquet emitted by the contaminated pistachios; to test the improvement in the detection of the detectable markers with enhanced Raman on a small probe.

  15. The design, effectiveness and acceptability of the arm sleeve for the prevention of body fluid contamination during obstetric procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabukoba, J J; Pearce, J M

    1993-08-01

    1. To design a device that would reduce contamination of staff during obstetric procedures. 2. To undertake clinical trials to assess the effectiveness and acceptability of such a device. A prospective study. The arm sleeve is made of a nonwoven material laminated on polyethylene film making it waterproof. It has an elastomeric cuff with adhesive that ensures a watertight seal between it and the glove. Delivery suite in a teaching hospital. Doctors and midwives were requested to wear the sleeve on top of the standard gown and gloves. Each user was assessed for blood contamination at the end of the procedure and a questionnaire detailing the extent of contamination and the views of the user was completed. Eighty questionnaires were completed. The contamination of arms and hands was 3.8% and 5%, respectively. Eighty-nine percent thought the sleeve had served its purpose and 76% said they would use it regularly. The sleeve is an effective protective device which complements the glove and gown. We recommend that it should be used during all obstetric procedures.

  16. Awareness of need and actual use of prophylaxis: lack of patient compliance in the prevention of bacterial endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, J. T.; van Wijk, W.; Thompson, J.; Valkenburg, H. A.; Michel, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    Antibiotics are given before some medical and dental procedures to patients with congenital or acquired heart disease to prevent endocarditis. The majority of practitioners and patients are aware of the need for this prophylaxis, although in practice prophylaxis is administered infrequently. It is

  17. Activated soil filters for removal of biocides from contaminated run-off and waste-waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bester, Kai; Banzhaf, Stefan; Burkhardt, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Building facades can be equipped with biocides to prevent formation of algal, fungal and bacterial films. Thus run-off waters may contain these highly active compounds. In this study, the removal of several groups of biocides from contaminated waters by means of an activated soil filter was studied...

  18. Generation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa aerosols during handwashing from contaminated sink drains, transmission to hands of hospital personnel, and its prevention by use of a new heating device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, G; Ulrich, M; Müller, W; Bitzer, J; Schmidt-Koenig, L; Münst, L; Grupp, H; Wolz, C; Stern, M; Botzenhart, K

    1991-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from sinks of washing basins, showers, toilets and bathtubs, from the personnel and patients of a mixed infectious disease ward in a German children's hospital during a prospective 4-week epidemiological study. 81% of all sinks were contaminated with P. aeruginosa strains. Upon entering the hospital, all personnel hand cultures were P. aeruginosa-negative. However, during duty, 42.5% of the personnel members carried different P. aeruginosa strains on their hands. Detection of P. aeruginosa strains in sinks preceding the isolation of identical genotypes from personnel hands suggested a transmission route from sinks to hands. Opening of water taps generated aerosols containing P. aeruginosa sink organisms which contaminated hands during hand washing. Survival times of various P. aeruginosa strains in aerosols was dependent on strain characteristics, light and humidity, and t 1/2 differed between 3-76 min. Heating of washing basin sinks to 70 degrees C with a new, safe and inexpensive device inhibited bacterial growth in sinks, generation of P. aeruginosa aerosols, and resulted in hand cultures negative for P. aeruginosa after washing.

  19. Intraoperative contamination influences wound discharge and periprosthetic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, Bas A. S.; Engelsma, Yde; Neut, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    Intraoperative bacterial contamination increases risk for postoperative wound-healing problems and periprosthetic infection, but to what extent remains unclear. We asked whether bacterial contamination of the instruments and bone during primary prosthesis insertion was associated with prolonged

  20. A Novel Wound Retractor Combining Continuous Irrigation and Barrier Protection Reduces Incisional Contamination in Colorectal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaconstantinou, Harry T; Ricciardi, Rocco; Margolin, David A; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Moesinger, Robert C; Lichliter, Warren E; Birnbaum, Elisa H

    2018-03-09

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains a persistent and morbid problem in colorectal surgery. Key to its pathogenesis is the degree of intraoperative bacterial contamination at the surgical site. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel wound retractor at reducing bacterial contamination. A prospective multicenter pilot study utilizing a novel wound retractor combining continuous irrigation and barrier protection was conducted in patients undergoing elective colorectal resections. Culture swabs were collected from the incision edge prior to device placement and from the exposed and protected incision edge prior to device removal. The primary and secondary endpoints were the rate of enteric and overall bacterial contamination on the exposed incision edge as compared to the protected incision edge, respectively. The safety endpoint was the absence of serious device-related adverse events. A total of 86 patients were eligible for analysis. The novel wound retractor was associated with a 66% reduction in overall bacterial contamination at the protected incision edge compared to the exposed incision edge (11.9 vs. 34.5%, P contamination (9.5% vs. 33.3%, P contamination. Improved methods to counteract wound contamination represent a promising strategy for SSI prevention (NCT 02413879).

  1. Novel insights in preventing Gram-negative bacterial infection in cirrhotic patients: review on the effects of GM-CSF in maintaining homeostasis of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Zhao, Manzhi; Song, Yuhu; Song, Jianxin; Huang, Yuancheng; Wang, Junshuai

    2015-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients with dysfunctional and/or low numbers of leukocytes are often infected with bacteria, especially Gram-negative bacteria, which is characterized by producing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that influences the production, maturation, function, and survival of various immune cells. In this paper, we reviewed not only Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway and its immunological effect, but also the specific stimulating function and autocrine performance of GM-CSF on hematopoietic cells, as well as the recent discovery of innate response activator-B cells in protection against microbial sepsis and the direct LPS-TLR4 signaling on hematopoiesis. Thus we concluded that GM-CSF might play important roles in preventing Gram-negative bacterial infections in cirrhotic patients through maintaining immune system functions and homeostasis.

  2. Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... Prevention Hearing Loss Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Nutrition Osteoporosis Shingles Skin Cancer Related News Quitting Smoking, ...

  3. Characterization of bacterial diversity in contaminated groundwater using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Misty S; Santos, Inês C; Carlton, Doug D; Stigler-Granados, Paula; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Schug, Kevin A

    2018-05-01

    Groundwater is a major source for drinking water in the United States, and therefore, its quality and quantity is of extreme importance. One major concern that has emerged is the possible contamination of groundwater due to the unconventional oil and gas extraction activities. As such, the impacts of exogenous contaminants on microbial ecology is an area to be explored to understand what are the chemical and physical conditions that allow the proliferation of pathogenic bacteria and to find alternatives for water treatment by identifying organic-degrading bacteria. In this work, we assess the interplay between groundwater quality and the microbiome in contaminated groundwaters rich in hydrocarbon gases, volatile organic and inorganic compounds, and various metals. Opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, were identified, increasing the risk for consumption of and exposure to these contaminated groundwaters. Additionally, antimicrobial tests revealed that many of the identified bacteria were resistant to different antibiotics. The MALDI-TOF MS results were successfully confirmed with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, proving the accuracy of this high-throughput method. Collectively, these data provide a seminal understanding of the microbial populations in contaminated groundwater overlying anthropogenic activities like unconventional oil and gas development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Implementation of immunomagnetic separation (IMS) for the enrichment and automated detection of bacterial contaminants in flow through lab on the chip technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Shakil

    Due to an increased public concern for food safety and quality, food processing industries have an urgent need for fast and reliable contaminant detection technologies. Conventional pathogen detection methods are time consuming, cost intensive, require skilled laboratory workers and are inappropr...... and detect pathogens in food, feed or beverage industries in real-time and has the potential to offer significant advantages compared to conventional systems.......Due to an increased public concern for food safety and quality, food processing industries have an urgent need for fast and reliable contaminant detection technologies. Conventional pathogen detection methods are time consuming, cost intensive, require skilled laboratory workers...

  5. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  6. A descriptive study on prevalence of bacterial pathogens in diabetic ulcer and Interventional component for the prevention of foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerlin Priya, Rajamanickam Rajkumar, Bakthasingh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is considered to have reached epidemic proportions worldwide. The most distressing complication of diabetes is foot ulcer and is the major cause of lower limb amputation. Hence, they require a prolonged hospital stay to combat more serious complications like gangrene and lower limb amputation. Early detection and prompt treatment help in alleviating the ulceration. Methods: The present study was conducted among 50 diabetes patients. Study subjects were selected using non probability purposive sampling technique. Pus samples were collected by using sterile swabs in a sterile manner from the ulcerated area. The wounds are washed vigorously with normal saline solution before collection of specimen. The specimens were transported immediately to the laboratory for culture. The clinical specimens were first screened microscopically by Gram’s stain, and then cultured on blood agar (aerobically and an aerobically, MacConkey agar and Robertson cooked meat broth for 48 hours at 37°C in 5-10 percent CO2 and bacteria’s were isolated. Results: The socio demographic profile of the present study reveals that males were predominant among the study population. Type II diabetes was more common, majority of study subjects are suffering from diabetes for more than 5 years and are treated with oral hypoglycemic drugs. The wound size was ≤ 2cms in majority of study subjects. The bacteriological profile of diabetic ulcer reveals that a majority of 23 (46% had growth of Staphylococcus aureus and 19 (38% had growth of klebsiella and a minimum of 6 (12% and 2 (4% had grown of Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus albus. Conclusion: Early detection of these bacterial pathogens helps to minimize the disease progress.

  7. A New, Potent, and Placenta-Permeable Macrolide Antibiotic, Solithromycin, for the Prevention and Treatment of Bacterial Infections in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelan, Jeffrey A; Payne, Matthew S; Kemp, Matthew W; Ireland, Demelza J; Newnham, John P

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine infection-inflammation is a major cause of early preterm birth and subsequent neonatal mortality and acute or long-term morbidity. Antibiotics can be administered in pregnancy to prevent preterm birth either prophylactically to women at high risk for preterm delivery, or to women with diagnosed intrauterine infection, prelabor rupture of membranes, or in suspected preterm labor. The therapeutic goals of each of these scenarios are different, with different pharmacological considerations, although effective antimicrobial therapy is an essential requirement. An ideal antibiotic for these clinical indications would be (a) one that is easily administered and orally bioactive, (b) has a favorable adverse effect profile (devoid of reproductive toxicity or teratogenicity), (c) is effective against the wide range of microorganisms known to be commonly associated with intra-amniotic infection, (d) provides effective antimicrobial protection within both the fetal and amniotic compartments after maternal delivery, (e) has anti-inflammatory properties, and (f) is effective against antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. Here, we review the evidence from clinical, animal, and ex vivo/in vitro studies that demonstrate that a new macrolide-derived antibiotic - solithromycin - has all of these properties and, hence, may be an ideal antibiotic for the treatment and prevention of intrauterine infection--related pregnancy complications. While this evidence is extremely encouraging, it is still preliminary. A number of key studies need to be completed before solithromycin's true potential for use in pregnancy can be ascertained.

  8. A new, potent and placenta-permeable macrolide antibiotic, solithromycin, for the prevention and treatment of bacterial infections in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Keelan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine infection-inflammation is a major cause of early preterm birth and subsequent neonatal morbidity and acute or long-term mortality. Antibiotics can be administered in pregnancy to prevent preterm birth either prophylactically to women at high risk for preterm delivery, or to women with diagnosed intrauterine infection, prelabour rupture of membranes, or in suspected preterm labour. The therapeutic goals of each of these scenarios are different, with different pharmacological considerations, although effective antimicrobial therapy is an essential requirement. An ideal antibiotic for these clinical indications would be a one that is easily administered and orally bioactive, b has a favourable adverse effect profile (devoid of reproductive toxicity or teratogenicity, c is effective against the wide range of microorganisms known to be commonly associated with intra-amniotic infection, d provides effective antimicrobial protection within both the fetal and amniotic compartments after maternal delivery, e has anti-inflammatory properties, and f is effective against antibiotic resistant microorganisms. Here we review the evidence from clinical, animal and ex-vivo/in-vitro studies that demonstrates that a new macrolide-derived antibiotic - solithromycin - has all of these properties and hence may be an ideal antibiotic for the treatment and prevention of intrauterine infection-related pregnancy complications. While this evidence is extremely encouraging, it is still preliminary. A number of key studies need to be completed before solithromycin’s true potential for use in pregnancy can be ascertained.

  9. Bacterial biofilms and antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Caldas-Arias

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms give to bacteria micro-environmental benefits; confers protection against antimicrobials. Bacteria have antibiotic resistance by conventional and unusual mechanisms leading to delayed wound healing, to increase recurrent chronic infections and nosocomial contamination of medical devices. Objective: This narrative review aims to introduce the characteristics of Bacteria-biofilms, antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and potential alternatives for prevention and control of its formation. Methods: Search strategy was performed on records: PubMed / Medline, Lilacs, Redalyc; with suppliers such as EBSCO and thesaurus MeSH and DeCS. Conclusions: Knowledge and research performance of biofilm bacteria are relevant in the search of technology for detection and measuring sensitivity to antibiotics. The identification of Bacterial-biofilms needs no-traditional microbiological diagnosis.

  10. Environmental monitoring of bacterial contamination and antibiotic resistance patterns of the fecal coliforms isolated from Cauvery River, a major drinking water source in Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Mahajanakatti, Arpitha Badarinath; Grandhi, Nisha Jayaprakash; Prasanna, Akshatha; Sen, Ballari; Sharma, Narasimha; Vasist, Kiran S; Narayanappa, Rajeswari

    2015-05-01

    The present study focuses prudent elucidation of microbial pollution and antibiotic sensitivity profiling of the fecal coliforms isolated from River Cauvery, a major drinking water source in Karnataka, India. Water samples were collected from ten hotspots during the year 2011-2012. The physiochemical characteristics and microbial count of water samples collected from most of the hotspots exhibited greater biological oxygen demand and bacterial count especially coliforms in comparison with control samples (p ≤ 0.01). The antibiotic sensitivity testing was performed using 48 antibiotics against the bacterial isolates by disk-diffusion assay. The current study showed that out of 848 bacterial isolates, 93.51% (n = 793) of the isolates were found to be multidrug-resistant to most of the current generation antibiotics. Among the major isolates, 96.46% (n = 273) of the isolates were found to be multidrug-resistant to 30 antibiotics and they were identified to be Escherichia coli by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Similarly, 93.85% (n = 107), 94.49% (n = 103), and 90.22% (n = 157) of the isolates exhibited multiple drug resistance to 32, 40, and 37 antibiotics, and they were identified to be Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas trivialis, and Shigella sonnei, respectively. The molecular studies suggested the prevalence of bla TEM genes in all the four isolates and dhfr gene in Escherichia coli and Sh. sonnei. Analogously, most of the other Gram-negative bacteria were found to be multidrug-resistant and the Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus spp. isolated from the water samples were found to be methicillin and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This is probably the first study elucidating the bacterial pollution and antibiotic sensitivity profiling of fecal coliforms isolated from River Cauvery, Karnataka, India.

  11. Effects of altered groundwater chemistry upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial attachment during transport within an organically contaminated sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ronald W.; Metge, David W.; Barber, Larry B.; Aiken, George R.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a dilute (ionic strength = 5 ?? 10-3 M) plume of treated sewage, with elevated levels (3.9 mg/L) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial transport through an iron-laden, quartz sand aquifer (Cape Cod, MA) were evaluated using sets of replicate, static minicolumns. Compared with uncontaminated groundwater, the plume chemistry diminished bacterial attachment under mildly acidic (pH 5.0-6.5) in-situ conditions, in spite of the 5-fold increase in ionic strength and substantively enhanced attachment under more alkaline conditions. The effects of the hydrophobic neutral and total fractions of the plume DOC; modest concentrations of fulvic and humic acids (1.5 mg/L); linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) (25 mg/L); Imbentin (200 ??g/L), a model nonionic surfactant; sulfate (28 mg/L); and calcium (20 mg/L) varied sharply in response to relatively small changes in pH, although the plume constituents collectively decreased the pH-dependency of bacterial attachment. LAS and other hydrophobic neutrals (collectively representing only ???3% of the plume DOC) had a disproportionately large effect upon bacterial attachment, as did the elevated concentrations of sulfate within the plume. The findings further suggest that the roles of organic plume constituents in transport or bacteria through acidic aquifer sediments can be very different than would be predicted from column studies performed at circumneutral pH and that the inorganic constituents within the plume cannot be ignored.

  12. Comparison of two methods of bacterial DNA extraction from human fecal samples contaminated with Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Jun; Kurosaki, Morito; Kawakami, Yuta; Kashimoto, Takashi; Tsunomori, Yoshie; Sato, Koji; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Keiji; Watahiki, Masanori; Shima, Tomoko; Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Etoh, Yoshiki; Horikawa, Kazumi; Fukushima, Hiroshi; Goto, Ryoichi; Shirabe, Komei

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 2 methods of DNA extraction were evaluated for use in conjunction with the screening system Rapid Foodborne Bacterial Screening 24 (RFBS24), which employs multiplex real-time SYBR Green polymerase chain reaction (SG-PCR) and can simultaneously detect 24 target genes of foodborne pathogens in fecal DNA samples. The QIAamp DNA Stool mini kit (Qkit) and Ultra Clean Fecal DNA Isolation Kit (Ukit) were used for bacterial DNA extraction from fecal samples artificially inoculated with Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Campylobacter jejuni. SG-PCR and simplex real-time quantitative PCR (S-qPCR) analyses revealed higher copy numbers (8-234 times) of DNA in samples obtained using Ukit compared with those obtained using Qkit, resulting in lower cycle threshold values for the Ukit samples of the 4 bacteria on SG-PCR analysis. Fecal DNA samples from patients infected during foodborne outbreaks of Salmonella and Campylobacter were also prepared by Qkit and Ukit methods and subjected to RFBS24 analyses. Higher numbers of RFBS24 bacterial target genes were detected in DNA samples obtained using Ukit compared with those obtained using Qkit. Thus, the higher DNA extraction efficiency of the Ukit method compared with Qkit renders the former more useful in achieving improved detection rates of these 4 bacteria in fecal samples using SG-PCR.

  13. Bacterial Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bacterial Keratitis Sections What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ... Lens Care Bacterial Keratitis Treatment What Is Bacterial Keratitis? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es la Queratitis Bacteriana? ...

  14. Isolation and characterization of the environmental bacterial and fungi contamination in a pharmaceutical unit of mesenchymal stem cell for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Patricia Gálvez; González, María Bermejo; Martínez, Adolfina Ruiz; Lara, Visitación Gallardo; Naveros, Beatriz Clares

    2012-09-01

    Design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program is vital to assure the maintenance of acceptable quality conditions in a pharmaceutical manufacturing unit of human mesenchymal stem cells. Since sterility testing methods require 14 days and these cells are only viable for several hours, they are currently administered without the result of this test. Consequently environmental monitoring is a key element in stem cell banks for assuring low levels of potential introduction of contaminants into the cell products. The aim of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the environmental microbiological quality in a pharmaceutical manufacturing unit of human mesenchymal stem cells production for use in advanced therapies. Two hundred and sixty one points were tested monthly during one year, 156 from air and 105 from surfaces. Among the 6264 samples tested, 231 showed contamination, 76.6% for bacteria and 23.4% for fungi. Microbial genuses isolated were Staphylococcus (89.7%), Microccocus (4.5%), Kocuria (3.2%) and Bacillus (2.6%). In the identification of fungi, three genuses were detected: Aspergillus (56%), Penicillium (26%) and Cladosporium (18%). The origin of the contamination was found to be due to personnel manipulation and air microbiota. For all sampling methods, alert limits were set and corrective measures suggested. Copyright © 2012 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Interventions to Impede Date Palm Sap Contamination by Bats to Prevent Nipah Virus Transmission in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Salah Uddin; Gurley, Emily S.; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Nahar, Nazmun; Sharker, M. A. Yushuf; Luby, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Drinking raw date palm sap is a risk factor for human Nipah virus (NiV) infection. Fruit bats, the natural reservoir of NiV, commonly contaminate raw sap with saliva by licking date palm’s sap producing surface. We evaluated four types of physical barriers that may prevent bats from contacting sap. Methods During 2009, we used a crossover design and randomly selected 20 date palm sap producing trees and observed each tree for 2 nights: one night with a bamboo skirt intervention applied and one night without the intervention. During 2010, we selected 120 trees and randomly assigned four types of interventions to 15 trees each: bamboo, dhoincha (local plant), jute stick and polythene skirts covering the shaved part, sap stream, tap and collection pot. We enrolled the remaining 60 trees as controls. We used motion sensor activated infrared cameras to examine bat contact with sap. Results During 2009 bats contacted date palm sap in 85% of observation nights when no intervention was used compared with 35% of nights when the intervention was used [psap when the skirt did not entirely cover the sap producing surface. Therefore, in 2010 we requested the sap harvesters to use larger skirts. During 2010 bats contacted date palm sap [2% vs. 83%, psap in trees with bamboo (psap during one night (7%) with the jute stick skirt (psap producing areas of a tree effectively prevented bat-sap contact. Community interventions should promote applying these skirts to prevent occasional Nipah spillovers to human. PMID:22905160

  16. Silver nanoparticle-doped zirconia capillaries for enhanced bacterial filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehling, Julia; Köser, Jan; Lindner, Patrick; Lüder, Christian; Beutel, Sascha; Kroll, Stephen; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-03-01

    Membrane clogging and biofilm formation are the most serious problems during water filtration. Silver nanoparticle (Agnano) coatings on filtration membranes can prevent bacterial adhesion and the initiation of biofilm formation. In this study, Agnano are immobilized via direct reduction on porous zirconia capillary membranes to generate a nanocomposite material combining the advantages of ceramics being chemically, thermally and mechanically stable with nanosilver, an efficient broadband bactericide for water decontamination. The filtration of bacterial suspensions of the fecal contaminant Escherichia coli reveals highly efficient bacterial retention capacities of the capillaries of 8 log reduction values, fulfilling the requirements on safe drinking water according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Maximum bacterial loading capacities of the capillary membranes are determined to be 3×10(9)bacterialcells/750mm(2) capillary surface until back flushing is recommendable. The immobilized Agnano remain accessible and exhibit strong bactericidal properties by killing retained bacteria up to maximum bacterial loads of 6×10(8)bacterialcells/750mm(2) capillary surface and the regenerated membranes regain filtration efficiencies of 95-100%. Silver release is moderate as only 0.8% of the initial silver loading is leached during a three-day filtration experiment leading to average silver contaminant levels of 100μg/L. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacterial communities associated with the rhizosphere of pioneer plants (Bahia xylopoda and Viguiera linearis) growing on heavy metals-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Noya, Yendi E; Jan-Roblero, Janet; González-Chávez, Maria del Carmen; Hernández-Gama, Regina; Hernández-Rodríguez, César

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the bacterial communities associated with the rhizospheres of pioneer plants Bahia xylopoda and Viguiera linearis were explored. These plants grow on silver mine tailings with high concentration of heavy metals in Zacatecas, Mexico. Metagenomic DNAs from rhizosphere and bulk soil were extracted to perform a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis (DGGE) and to construct 16S rRNA gene libraries. A moderate bacterial diversity and twelve major phylogenetic groups including Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Gemmatimonadetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Nitrospirae and Actinobacteria phyla, and divisions TM7, OP10 and OD1 were recognized in the rhizospheres. Only 25.5% from the phylotypes were common in the rhizosphere libraries and the most abundant groups were members of the phyla Acidobacteria and Betaproteobacteria (Thiobacillus spp., Nitrosomonadaceae). The most abundant groups in bulk soil library were Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria, and no common phylotypes were shared with the rhizosphere libraries. Many of the clones detected were related with chemolithotrophic and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, characteristic of an environment with a high concentration of heavy metal-sulfur complexes, and lacking carbon and organic energy sources.

  18. A review of the risk of contamination of semen and embryos during cryopreservation and measures to limit cross-contamination during banking to prevent disease transmission in ET practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielanski, A

    2012-02-01

    This review summarizes pertinent data and opinions regarding the potential hazard of disease transmission through cryopreserved and banked embryos in liquid nitrogen (LN). Special attention is given to the survival of pathogens in LN, new vitrification methods, sterility of LN, risks associated with the use of straws and cryovials, and LN dewars including dry shippers. It was experimentally demonstrated that cross-contamination between LN and embryos may occur, when infectious agents are present in LN and embryos are not protected by a sealed container. It is important, therefore, to prevent direct contact of embryos with LN during cryopreservation and their banking. This includes the usage of hermetically sealed, high-quality, shatter-proof freezing containers and/or the application of a secondary enclosure such as "double bagging or straw in straw." A periodic disinfection of cryo-dewars should be considered as an additional precaution to diminish the potential for inadvertent cross-contamination. It might be advisable to use separate LN dewars to quarantine embryos derived from infected donors of valuable genotype or from unknown health status, extinction-threatened species. Nevertheless, in summary, it has been concluded that over 25 yr with no direct evidence of disease transmission by transferred cryopreserved human and animal embryos, that the present cryopreservation technology is sanitary sound, with the stipulation that biocontainment measures recommended by the International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS) and the World Organization for Animal Health - Office International des Epizooties (OIE), are strictly followed. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of bacterial contamination of dental unit waterlines and use of a newly designed measurement device to assess retraction of a dental chair unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xue-Yue; Fei, Chun-Nan; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Jun; Dong, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Dental unit waterline (DUWL) output water is delivered through instruments of a dental chair unit (DCU) to irrigate and cool teeth. However, these waterlines can be heavily contaminated with bacteria. The purpose of the present study was to assess retraction and investigate the contamination level and prevalence of bacteria in DUWL output water. Fifty-eight DCUs were randomly selected from 30 hospitals in 10 districts of Tianjin, one of the four special municipalities of China. A unique sampling connector was used in place of the dental handpiece to collect water samples. Evaluation of retraction was accomplished using a retraction measurement device designed in accordance with the International Standard ISO 7494-2:2015(E). A total of 263 water samples were collected, and the highest concentration of bacteria [1.8 × 10(6) colony-forming units (CFU)/mL] was found in the handpiece group. Thirty (51.72%) water samples in the handpiece group and 21 (36.21%) in the air/water syringe groups were cultured, yielding colony counts of > 500 CFU/mL. Potential infectious agents, such as Bacillus cereus, Kocuria kristinae and Pseudomonas fluorescens, were isolated from the water samples. Thirty (51.72%) DCUs failed the retraction evaluation. There was a significant, positive correlation (P dental treatment. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  20. Recent Advances and Understanding of Using Probiotic-Based Interventions to Restore Homeostasis of the Microbiome for the Prevention/Therapy of Bacterial Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchodolski, Jan S; Jergens, Albert E

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the microbiome in health and disease has galvanized interest in using manipulations of the gastrointestinal ecosystem to prevent and/or combat gut bacterial infections and to restore mucosal homeostasis in patients with generalized microbial imbalances (i.e., dysbiosis), including the human inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. Probiotics, prebiotics, or their combination use (i.e., synbiotics) are one mechanism for modifying the microbiota and exerting direct and indirect effects on the host immune responses and metabolomics profiles. These beneficial effects are transferred through various pathways, including the production of antimicrobial peptides, promoting the growth of beneficial microbes and enhancing immunomodulatory functions via various metabolites. While probiotic therapy has been used empirically for decades with mixed success, the recent advances in molecular and mass spectrophotometric techniques for the characterization of the complexity and diversity of the intestinal microbiome has aided in better understanding of host-microbe interactions. It is important to better understand the functional properties of the microbiome, because it is now clear that the microbiota secretes many metabolites that have a direct impact on host immune responses. This information will improve selection of the most appropriate probiotic strains that selectively target intestinal disease processes.

  1. Occurrence of Arcobacter spp. and correlation with the bacterial indicator of faecal contamination Escherichia coli in bivalve molluscs from the Central Adriatic, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Francesca; Chierichetti, Serena; Santarelli, Sabrina; Talevi, Giulia; Masini, Laura; Bartolini, Chiara; Rocchegiani, Elena; Naceur Haouet, M; Ottaviani, Donatella

    2017-03-20

    A total of 162 samples of bivalve molluscs (45 mussels and 117 clams) collected between December 2012 and 2014 from harvesting areas of the Central Adriatic were analysed by a culturing method for the presence of Arcobacter spp. Species identification was performed by PCR and sequencing analysis of a fragment of the rpoB gene. Overall, Arcobacter species were detected in 30% of samples, specifically 33% clams and 22% mussels. A. butzleri was the most common species (20% of the samples), followed by A. cryaerophilus (9%) and A. skirrowii (1%). A seasonal association of A. butzleri contamination was detected. A. butzleri was significantly more commonly recovered from samples collected during the winter-spring period (29%) than from those of the summer-autumn (8%). A. cryaerophilus was cultured from 6% to 11% of the samples collected in summer-autumn and winter-spring, respectively, but these differences were not statistically significant. A. skirrowii was recovered from a sample of mussels harvested in May 2014. To identify associations between the occurrence of Arcobacter spp. and E. coli levels, samples were divided into groups generating results with E. coli at >230MPN/100g and E. coli at ≤230MPN/100g, the latter corresponding to EU microbiological criteria allowed for live bivalve molluscs at retail level. A. butzleri was significantly more commonly detected in samples with higher E. coli levels (48%) than in those with lower levels of E. coli (10%), providing evidence for considering E. coli as an index organism for A. butzleri contamination in bivalve molluscs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. L-arginine supplementation prevents increases in intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation in male Swiss mice subjected to physical exercise under environmental heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Kátia Anunciação; Soares, Anne Danieli Nascimento; Wanner, Samuel Penna; Santos, Rosana das Graças Carvalho dos; Fernandes, Simone Odília Antunes; Martins, Flaviano dos Santos; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; Coimbra, Cândido Celso; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento

    2014-02-01

    Dietary supplementation with l-arginine has been shown to improve the intestinal barrier in many experimental models. This study investigated the effects of arginine supplementation on the intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation (BT) induced by prolonged physical exercise under heat stress. Under anesthesia, male Swiss mice (5-wk-old) were implanted with an abdominal sensor to record their core body temperature (T(core)). After recovering from surgery, the mice were divided into 3 groups: a non-supplemented group that was fed the standard diet formulated by the American Institute of Nutrition (AIN-93G; control), a non-supplemented group that was fed the AIN-93G diet and subjected to exertional hyperthermia (H-NS), and a group supplemented with l-arginine at 2% and subjected to exertional hyperthermia (H-Arg). After 7 d of treatment, the H-NS and H-Arg mice were forced to run on a treadmill (60 min, 8 m/min) in a warm environment (34°C). The control mice remained at 24°C. Thirty min before the exercise or control trials, the mice received a diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) solution labeled with technetium-99m ((99m)Tc-DTPA) or (99m)Tc-Escherichia coli by gavage to assess intestinal permeability and BT, respectively. The H-NS mice terminated the exercise with T(core) values of ∼40°C, and, 4 h later, presented a 12-fold increase in the blood uptake of (99m)Tc-DTPA and higher bacterial contents in the blood and liver than the control mice. Although supplementation with arginine did not change the exercise-induced increase in T(core), it prevented the increases in intestinal permeability and BT caused by exertional hyperthermia. Our results indicate that dietary l-arginine supplementation preserves the integrity of the intestinal epithelium during exercise under heat stress, acting through mechanisms that are independent of T(core) regulation.

  3. Expansion of syndromic vaccine preventable disease surveillance to include bacterial meningitis and Japanese encephalitis: evaluation of adapting polio and measles laboratory networks in Bangladesh, China and India, 2007-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, Kathleen F; Sandhu, Hardeep S; Hyde, Terri B; Johnson, Barbara W; Fischer, Marc; Mayer, Leonard W; Clark, Thomas A; Pallansch, Mark A; Yin, Zundong; Zuo, Shuyan; Hadler, Stephen C; Diorditsa, Serguey; Hasan, A S M Mainul; Bose, Anindya S; Dietz, Vance

    2015-02-25

    Surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis with laboratory confirmation has been a key strategy in the global polio eradication initiative, and the laboratory platform established for polio testing has been expanded in many countries to include surveillance for cases of febrile rash illness to identify measles and rubella cases. Vaccine-preventable disease surveillance is essential to detect outbreaks, define disease burden, guide vaccination strategies and assess immunization impact. Vaccines now exist to prevent Japanese encephalitis (JE) and some etiologies of bacterial meningitis. We evaluated the feasibility of expanding polio-measles surveillance and laboratory networks to detect bacterial meningitis and JE, using surveillance for acute meningitis-encephalitis syndrome in Bangladesh and China and acute encephalitis syndrome in India. We developed nine syndromic surveillance performance indicators based on international surveillance guidelines and calculated scores using supervisory visit reports, annual reports, and case-based surveillance data. Scores, variable by country and targeted disease, were highest for the presence of national guidelines, sustainability, training, availability of JE laboratory resources, and effectiveness of using polio-measles networks for JE surveillance. Scores for effectiveness of building on polio-measles networks for bacterial meningitis surveillance and specimen referral were the lowest, because of differences in specimens and techniques. Polio-measles surveillance and laboratory networks provided useful infrastructure for establishing syndromic surveillance and building capacity for JE diagnosis, but were less applicable for bacterial meningitis. Laboratory-supported surveillance for vaccine-preventable bacterial diseases will require substantial technical and financial support to enhance local diagnostic capacity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Metagenomic and functional analyses of the consequences of reduction of bacterial diversity on soil functions and bioremediation in diesel-contaminated microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaejoon; Philippot, Laurent; Park, Woojun

    2016-03-14

    The relationship between microbial biodiversity and soil function is an important issue in ecology, yet most studies have been performed in pristine ecosystems. Here, we assess the role of microbial diversity in ecological function and remediation strategies in diesel-contaminated soils. Soil microbial diversity was manipulated using a removal by dilution approach and microbial functions were determined using both metagenomic analyses and enzymatic assays. A shift from Proteobacteria- to Actinobacteria-dominant communities was observed when species diversity was reduced. Metagenomic analysis showed that a large proportion of functional gene categories were significantly altered by the reduction in biodiversity. The abundance of genes related to the nitrogen cycle was significantly reduced in the low-diversity community, impairing denitrification. In contrast, the efficiency of diesel biodegradation was increased in the low-diversity community and was further enhanced by addition of red clay as a stimulating agent. Our results suggest that the relationship between microbial diversity and ecological function involves trade-offs among ecological processes, and should not be generalized as a positive, neutral, or negative relationship.

  5. Role of surface energy and nano-roughness in the removal efficiency of bacterial contamination by nonwoven wipes from frequently touched surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicholas W M; Best, Emma L; Connell, Simon D; Goswami, Parikshit; Carr, Chris M; Wilcox, Mark H; Russell, Stephen J

    2017-01-01

    Healthcare associated infections (HCAIs) are responsible for substantial patient morbidity, mortality and economic cost. Infection control strategies for reducing rates of transmission include the use of nonwoven wipes to remove pathogenic bacteria from frequently touched surfaces. Wiping is a dynamic process that involves physicochemical mechanisms to detach and transfer bacteria to fibre surfaces within the wipe. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which systematic changes in fibre surface energy and nano-roughness influence removal of bacteria from an abiotic polymer surface in dry wiping conditions, without liquid detergents or disinfectants. Nonwoven wipe substrates composed of two commonly used fibre types, lyocell (cellulosic) and polypropylene, with different surface energies and nano-roughnesses, were manufactured using pilot-scale nonwoven facilities to produce samples of comparable structure and dimensional properties. The surface energy and nano-roughness of some lyocell substrates were further adjusted by either oxygen (O 2 ) or hexafluoroethane (C 2 F 6 ) gas plasma treatment. Static adpression wiping of an inoculated surface under dry conditions produced removal efficiencies of between 9.4% and 15.7%, with no significant difference ( p  nonwoven wipe substrates with a surface energy closest to that of the contaminated surface produced the highest E. coli removal efficiency, while the associated increase in fibre nano-roughness abrogated this trend with S. aureus and E. faecalis .

  6. Two Pilot Plant Reactors Designed for the In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorobenzene-contaminated Ground Water: Hydrogeological and Chemical Characteristics and Bacterial Consortia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, Carsten; Alfreider, Albin; Lorbeer, Helmut; Ahlheim, Joerg; Feist, Bernd; Boehme, Olaf; Weiss, Holger; Babel, Wolfgang; Wuensche, Lothar

    2002-01-01

    The SAFIRA in situ pilot plant in Bitterfeld, Saxonia-Anhalt, Germany, currently serves as the test site for eight different in situ approaches to remediate anoxic chlorobenzene (CB)-contaminated ground water. Two reactors, both filled with original lignite-containing aquifer material, are designed for the microbiological in situ remediation of the ground water by the indigenous microbial consortia. In this study, the hydrogeological, chemical and microbiological conditions of the in flowing ground water and reactor filling material are presented,in order to establish the scientific basis for the start of the bioremediation process itself. The reactors were put into operation in June 1999. In the following, inflow CB concentrations in the ground water varied between 22 and 33 mg L -1 ; a chemical steady state for CB in both reactors was reached after 210 till 260 days operation time. The sediments were colonized by high numbers of aerobic, iron-reducing and denitrifying bacteria, as determined after 244 and 285 days of operation time. Furthermore, aerobic CB-degrading bacteria were detected in all reactor zones. Comparative sequence analysis of16S rDNA gene clone libraries suggest the dominance of Proteobacteria (Comamonadaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Gallionella group, Acidithiobacillus) and members of the class of low G+C gram-positive bacteria in the reactor sediments. In the inflowing ground water, sequences with phylogenetic affiliation to sulfate-reducing bacteria and sequences not affiliated with the known phyla of Bacteria, were found

  7. Bacterial Degradation of Pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Berith Elkær

    This PhD project was carried out as part of the Microbial Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Water Resources (MIRESOWA) project, funded by the Danish Council for Strategic Research (grant number 2104-08-0012). The environment is contaminated with various xenobiotic compounds e.g. pesticides......D student, to construct fungal-bacterial consortia in order to potentially stimulate pesticide degradation thereby increasing the chance of successful bioaugmentation. The results of the project are reported in three article manuscripts, included in this thesis. In manuscript I, the mineralization of 2...

  8. Influence of heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the expression of nitrogen fixation and ammonium transporter genes during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouser, P.J.; N' Guessan, A.L.; Elifantz, H.; Holmes, D.E.; Williams, K.H.; Wilkins, M.J.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2009-04-01

    The impact of ammonium availability on microbial community structure and the physiological status and activity of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by as much as two orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 {micro}M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that ammonium influenced the composition of the microbial community prior to acetate addition with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species at the site with the highest ammonium, and Dechloromonas species dominating at sites with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added, and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to the concentration of acetate that was delivered to each location rather than the amount of ammonium available in the groundwater. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium importer gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during in situ uranium reduction, and that the abundance of amtB transcripts was inversely correlated to ammonium levels across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression by subsurface Geobacter species are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of Geobacter species in subsurface environments during bioremediation. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical/physiological interactions at the field scale, in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes.

  9. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Karen L.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency. Empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy should be initiated as soon as a single set of blood cultures has been obtained. Clinical signs suggestive of bacterial meningitis include fever, headache, meningismus, vomiting, photophobia, and an

  10. Disinfection efficacy of an ultraviolet light on film cassettes for preventive of the nosocomial infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol [Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Yong Woong; Cho, Am [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    The bacterial infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient prevention from nosocomial infection and for improvement of the hospital environment. The laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the five different cassette size of the contact surface. Film cassettes were exposed to ultraviolet light for 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Ultraviolet light disinfection is proven suitable for bacterial. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. In addition education of nosocomial infection for radiographers will be required. In conclusion, ultraviolet is considered effective to irradiate bacterial. Additionally, two minutes are required to sterilize film cassettes.

  11. Disinfection efficacy of an ultraviolet light on film cassettes for preventive of the nosocomial infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Jeon, Yong Woong; Cho, Am

    2001-01-01

    The bacterial infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient prevention from nosocomial infection and for improvement of the hospital environment. The laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the five different cassette size of the contact surface. Film cassettes were exposed to ultraviolet light for 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Ultraviolet light disinfection is proven suitable for bacterial. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. In addition education of nosocomial infection for radiographers will be required. In conclusion, ultraviolet is considered effective to irradiate bacterial. Additionally, two minutes are required to sterilize film cassettes

  12. Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and bacterial vaginosis among women in sub-Saharan Africa: An individual participant data meta-analysis of 18 HIV prevention studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Charles S.; Chen, Pai-Lien; Kwok, Cynthia; McCormack, Sheena; McGrath, Nuala; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Gottlieb, Sami L.

    2018-01-01

    Background Estimates of sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevalence are essential for efforts to prevent and control STIs. Few large STI prevalence studies exist, especially for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Our primary objective was to estimate the prevalence of chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomoniasis, syphilis, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and bacterial vaginosis (BV) among women in sub-Saharan Africa by age, region, and population type. Methods and findings We analyzed individual-level data from 18 HIV prevention studies (cohort studies and randomized controlled trials; conducted during 1993–2011), representing >37,000 women, that tested participants for ≥1 selected STIs or BV at baseline. We used a 2-stage meta-analysis to combine data. After calculating the proportion of participants with each infection and standard error by study, we used a random-effects model to obtain a summary mean prevalence of each infection and 95% confidence interval (CI) across ages, regions, and population types. Despite substantial study heterogeneity for some STIs/populations, several patterns emerged. Across the three primary region/population groups (South Africa community-based, Southern/Eastern Africa community-based, and Eastern Africa higher-risk), prevalence was higher among 15–24-year-old than 25–49-year-old women for all STIs except HSV-2. In general, higher-risk populations had greater prevalence of gonorrhea and syphilis than clinic/community-based populations. For chlamydia, prevalence among 15–24-year-olds was 10.3% (95% CI: 7.4%, 14.1%; I2 = 75.7%) among women specifically recruited from higher-risk settings for HIV in Eastern Africa and was 15.1% (95% CI: 12.7%, 17.8%; I2 = 82.3%) in South African clinic/community-based populations. Among clinic/community-based populations, prevalence was generally greater in South Africa than in Southern/Eastern Africa for most STIs; for gonorrhea, prevalence among 15–24-year-olds was 4.6% (95% CI

  13. Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and bacterial vaginosis among women in sub-Saharan Africa: An individual participant data meta-analysis of 18 HIV prevention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrone, Elizabeth A; Morrison, Charles S; Chen, Pai-Lien; Kwok, Cynthia; Francis, Suzanna C; Hayes, Richard J; Looker, Katharine J; McCormack, Sheena; McGrath, Nuala; van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Low, Nicola; Gottlieb, Sami L

    2018-02-01

    Estimates of sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevalence are essential for efforts to prevent and control STIs. Few large STI prevalence studies exist, especially for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Our primary objective was to estimate the prevalence of chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomoniasis, syphilis, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and bacterial vaginosis (BV) among women in sub-Saharan Africa by age, region, and population type. We analyzed individual-level data from 18 HIV prevention studies (cohort studies and randomized controlled trials; conducted during 1993-2011), representing >37,000 women, that tested participants for ≥1 selected STIs or BV at baseline. We used a 2-stage meta-analysis to combine data. After calculating the proportion of participants with each infection and standard error by study, we used a random-effects model to obtain a summary mean prevalence of each infection and 95% confidence interval (CI) across ages, regions, and population types. Despite substantial study heterogeneity for some STIs/populations, several patterns emerged. Across the three primary region/population groups (South Africa community-based, Southern/Eastern Africa community-based, and Eastern Africa higher-risk), prevalence was higher among 15-24-year-old than 25-49-year-old women for all STIs except HSV-2. In general, higher-risk populations had greater prevalence of gonorrhea and syphilis than clinic/community-based populations. For chlamydia, prevalence among 15-24-year-olds was 10.3% (95% CI: 7.4%, 14.1%; I2 = 75.7%) among women specifically recruited from higher-risk settings for HIV in Eastern Africa and was 15.1% (95% CI: 12.7%, 17.8%; I2 = 82.3%) in South African clinic/community-based populations. Among clinic/community-based populations, prevalence was generally greater in South Africa than in Southern/Eastern Africa for most STIs; for gonorrhea, prevalence among 15-24-year-olds was 4.6% (95% CI: 3.3%, 6.4%; I2 = 82.8%) in South Africa

  14. Atmospheric contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruetter, Juerg

    1997-01-01

    It is about the levels of contamination in center America, the population's perception on the problem, effects of the atmospheric contamination, effects in the environment, causes of the atmospheric contamination, possibilities to reduce the atmospheric contamination and list of Roeco Swisscontac in atmospheric contamination

  15. [Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Edna; Caly, Wanda Regina

    2003-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis occurs in 30% of patients with ascites due to cirrhosis leading to high morbidity and mortality rates. The pathogenesis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is related to altered host defenses observed in end-stage liver disease, overgrowth of microorganisms, and bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to mesenteric lymph nodes. Clinical manifestations vary from severe to slight or absent, demanding analysis of the ascitic fluid. The diagnosis is confirmed by a number of neutrophils over 250/mm3 associated or not to bacterial growth in culture of an ascites sample. Enterobacteriae prevail and Escherichia coli has been the most frequent bacterium reported. Mortality rates decreased markedly in the last two decades due to early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic treatment. Third generation intravenous cephalosporins are effective in 70% to 95% of the cases. Recurrence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is common and can be prevented by the continuous use of oral norfloxacin. The development of bacterial resistance demands the search for new options in the prophylaxis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis; probiotics are a promising new approach, but deserve further evaluation. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for patients with cirrhosis and ascites shortly after an acute episode of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  16. Bacterial Proteasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrab, Jordan B; Darwin, K Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology.

  17. Effectiveness of silver dressing in preventing surgical site infections in contaminated wounds = Efectividad de los apósitos de plata en la prevención de la infección del sitio operatorio en heridas contaminadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrales, Rodolfo Adrián

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Silver gauzes are designed to treat infected wounds, but there is controversial evidence about their effectiveness in preventing surgical site infections in contaminated wounds. Objective: To evaluate the effect of silver gauzes in patients undergoing surgery with contaminated wounds at a university-based tertiary referral center. Methods: This was a prospective, controlled trial comparing a silver gauze dressing with saline gauze dressings in patients undergoing abdominal surgeries with contaminated wounds. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either silver gauze (SG dressing or saline gauze dressings (SD. The primary end point was surgical site infection occurring within 30 days of surgery. Results: 65 patients were enrolled in the review. The incidence of surgical site infection was 14% (9/65. No differences were observed among groups (15.2% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.75. Multivariate analysis revealed no relationship between the type of dressing and surgical site infection. Conclusion: Silver gauzes are safe and effective in preventing surgical site infections in surgeries with contaminated wounds. Further trials are required to find out if they have advantages over standard dressings.

  18. Bacterial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosdrecht, van M.C.M.

    1988-01-01

    As mentioned in the introduction of this thesis bacterial adhesion has been studied from a variety of (mostly practice oriented) starting points. This has resulted in a range of widely divergent approaches. In order to elucidate general principles in bacterial adhesion phenomena, we felt it

  19. Retrospective observational study to investigate Sinerga, a multifactorial nutritional product, and bacterial extracts in the prevention of recurrent respiratory infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, A; Nicastro, A; Trodella, R

    2014-01-01

    In this retrospective observational clinical study, 167 children, aged 3 to 7 years, of both sexes, with a clinical history of recurrent respiratory infections, administered with bacterial extracts of first and second generation or Sinerga a nutritional product containing palmitoylethanolamide, bovine colostrum, phenylethylamine and the new generation of probiotic kluyveromyces FM B0399, were observed. The goal of the study was to compare the supplementation with Sinerga with the supplementation with bacterial extracts, for the effect on the frequency of episodes of respiratory infection that had resulted in a prescription for antibiotics. The study focused retrospectively on the months from March 2013 to November 2012. The results showed a greater reduction in the frequency of respiratory infections with antibiotic therapy in the group of children supplemented with Sinerga than in the group treated with bacterial extracts. In particular, it was observed that 49.3% of the children supplemented with Sinerga, against 5% of those supplemented with extracts, had no infectious episodes requiring the administration of an antibiotic. 100% of subjects supplemented with Sinerga have had no more than two episodes of respiratory infection, while this condition, in the cohort treated with bacterial extracts, was observed in only 51% of cases.

  20. Bacterial meningitis in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Lawrence C; Boggess, Kim A; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal bacterial meningitis is uncommon but devastating. Morbidity among survivors remains high. The types and distribution of pathogens are related to gestational age, postnatal age, and geographic region. Confirming the diagnosis is difficult. Clinical signs are often subtle, lumbar punctures are frequently deferred, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures can be compromised by prior antibiotic exposure. Infants with bacterial meningitis can have negative blood cultures and normal CSF parameters. Promising tests such as the polymerase chain reaction require further study. Prompt treatment with antibiotics is essential. Clinical trials investigating a vaccine for preventing neonatal Group B Streptococcus infections are ongoing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Prevalence of bacterial contamination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-07-11

    Jul 11, 2007 ... nutrition model regarding the introduction of ready-to-use (RTU) infant feeds in place of powdered infant feeds (PIPs) as

  2. Bacterial Degradation of Aromatic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing X. Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are among the most prevalent and persistent pollutants in the environment. Petroleum-contaminated soil and sediment commonly contain a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and heterocyclic aromatics. Aromatics derived from industrial activities often have functional groups such as alkyls, halogens and nitro groups. Biodegradation is a major mechanism of removal of organic pollutants from a contaminated site. This review focuses on bacterial degradation pathways of selected aromatic compounds. Catabolic pathways of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene are described in detail. Bacterial catabolism of the heterocycles dibenzofuran, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and dibenzodioxin is discussed. Bacterial catabolism of alkylated PAHs is summarized, followed by a brief discussion of proteomics and metabolomics as powerful tools for elucidation of biodegradation mechanisms.

  3. Microbial Contamination of Ice Machines Is Mediated by Activated Charcoal Filtration Systems in a City Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorioka, Katsuhiro; Oie, Shigeharu; Hayashi, Koji; Kimoto, Hiroo; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Although microbial contamination of ice machines has been reported, no previous study has addressed microbial contamination of ice produced by machines equipped with activated charcoal (AC) filters in hospitals. The aim of this study was to provide clinical data for evaluating AC filters to prevent microbial contamination of ice. We compared microbial contamination in ice samples produced by machines with (n = 20) and without an AC filter (n = 40) in Shunan City Shinnanyo Municipal Hospital. All samples from the ice machine equipped with an AC filter contained 10-116 CFUs/g of glucose nonfermenting gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Chryseobacterium meningosepticum. No microorganisms were detected in samples from ice machines without AC filters. After the AC filter was removed from the ice machine that tested positive for Gram-negative bacteria, the ice was resampled (n = 20). Analysis found no contaminants. Ice machines equipped with AC filters pose a serious risk factor for ice contamination. New filter-use guidelines and regulations on bacterial detection limits to prevent contamination of ice in healthcare facilities are necessary.

  4. Adsorption and desorption of contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palumbo, A.V.; Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; DeFlaun, M.; Ensley, B.

    1994-01-01

    The microbial remediation of sites Contaminated with organics is well documented, however, there are some significant problems that remain to be solved in the areas of contaminants sorbed to soils and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination. Methods of in situ bioremediation techniques employ either the stimulation of indigenous populations by nutrient addition, or the addition of prepared bacterial cultures to the subsurface environment. Problems of contaminant sorption and NAPL's are related in that both encompass reduced contaminant bioavailability. Non-aqueous phase liquids have been identified as a priority area for research in the In situ Program due to their presence at DOE sites and the lack of adequate technology to effectively treat this contamination. Bioremediation technologies developed as a result of this project are easily transferred to industry

  5. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Archive STDs Home Page Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) Chlamydia Gonorrhea Genital Herpes Hepatitis HIV/AIDS & STDs Human Papillomavirus ( ... of getting other STDs, such as chlamydia and gonorrhea . These bacteria can sometimes cause pelvic inflammatory disease ( ...

  6. Diversidad bacteriana en un biorreactor de lecho fluidificado durante el tratamiento de agua contaminada con nafta Bacterial diversity in a fluidized bed bioreactor (FBR treating gasoline-contaminated groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Ara-Rojas

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo principal de esta investigación fue determinar la diversidad bacteriana del proceso de biorremediación de agua contaminada con nafta en un biorreactor de lecho fluidificado en el Recinto Universitario de Mayagüez, de la Universidad de Puerto Rico. El aislamiento y la caracterización de las colonias bacterianas del sistema de biorremediación fueron realizados en medio R2A. Las pruebas morfológicas incluyeron la determinación de la morfología celular y de las colonias, y la reacción frente a la coloración de Gram. Las propiedades fisiológicas se determinaron usando el sistema Biolog® y sobre la base de la habilidad para desarrollar en medio mínimo con nafta como única fuente de carbono. La caracterización molecular se llevó a cabo por BOX-PCR y por análisis de secuencia del ADNr 16S mediante la técnica de ARDRA (amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. De los 162 morfotipos de colonias aislados, 75% fueron bacilos gram-negativos, 19% bacilos gram-positivos, 5% cocos gram-negativos y 1% cocos gram-positivos. Según el análisis ARDRA, estos morfotipos se distribuyeron en 90 grupos genéticos, de los cuales 53% incluyeron cepas con crecimiento en nafta. Las 86 cepas que crecieron en nafta presentaron 52 patrones de amplificación, los que a través de BOX-PCR se agruparon en 50 grupos metabólicamente no relacionados. El alto nivel de diversidad microbiana observado en el reactor permitió la remoción del contaminante y, al parecer, fue importante para la operación estable y eficiente del sistema.The main objective of this research project was to determine the bacterial diversity during the process of bioremediation of water contaminated with gasoline in a fluidized bed reactor at Mayagüez, PR. Isolation and characterization of bacterial populations from the bioremediation system was performed on R2A medium. Morphological tests included cellular and colonial shape and reaction to Gram coloration. Physiological

  7. Prevent Pneumonia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-06

    CDC’s Matthew Westercamp explains what pneumonia is, its symptoms, and how to prevent it.  Created: 8/6/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Respiratory Diseases Branch (RDB).   Date Released: 8/6/2015.

  8. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poisoning. It often occurs after eating at picnics, school cafeterias, large social gatherings, or restaurants. The germs may get into your food (called contamination) in many ways: Meat or poultry ...

  9. Evaluation of antibiotic pressurized pulse lavage for contaminated retromuscular abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Arnab; Miller, Heidi J; Patel, Parita; Wu, Yuhsin V; Elliott, Heidi L; Novitsky, Yuri W

    2017-07-01

    Despite patient risk factors such as diabetes and obesity, contamination during surgery remains a significant cause of infections and subsequent wound morbidity. Pressurized pulse lavage (PPL) has been utilized as a method to reduce bacterial bioburden with promising results in many fields. Although existing methods of lavage have been utilized during abdominal operations, no studies have examined the use of PPL during complex hernia repair. Patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) in clean-contaminated or contaminated fields with antibiotic PPL, from January 2012 to May 2013, were prospectively evaluated. Primary outcome measures studied were conversion of retrorectus space culture from positive to negative after PPL and 30-day surgical site infection (SSI) rate. A total of 56 patients underwent AWR, with 44 patients (78.6 %) having clean-contaminated fields and 12 patients (21.4 %) having contaminated ones. Twenty-two patients (39.3 %) had positive pre-PPL cultures, 18 of which (81.8 %) converted to negative cultures after PPL. Eleven patients (19.6 %) developed SSIs. Those with persistently positive cultures after PPL had the highest rate of SSI, where two out of four patients (50.0 %) developed an SSI. Contrastingly, only 5 of 18 patients (27.8 %) who converted from a positive to negative culture after PPL developed an SSI. Our findings demonstrate that antibiotic PPL is an effective method to reduce bacterial bioburden during AWR in clean-contaminated and contaminated fields. While complete conversion and eradication of SSI were not achieved, we believe that PPL may be a useful adjunct to standard operative asepsis in preventing prosthetic contamination during contaminated AWR.

  10. Human Contamination in Public Genome Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, Kirill; Imanishi, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Contamination in genome assembly can lead to wrong or confusing results when using such genome as reference in sequence comparison. Although bacterial contamination is well known, the problem of human-originated contamination received little attention. In this study we surveyed 45,735 available genome assemblies for evidence of human contamination. We used lineage specificity to distinguish between contamination and conservation. We found that 154 genome assemblies contain fragments that with high confidence originate as contamination from human DNA. Majority of contaminating human sequences were present in the reference human genome assembly for over a decade. We recommend that existing contaminated genomes should be revised to remove contaminated sequence, and that new assemblies should be thoroughly checked for presence of human DNA before submitting them to public databases.

  11. Bacterial burden of worn therapeutic silver textiles for neurodermitis patients and evaluation of efficacy of washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeschlein, G; Assadian, O; Arnold, A; Haase, H; Kramer, A; Jünger, M

    2010-01-01

    To reduce pruritus and colonization with Staphylococcus aureus, textiles containing silver are increasingly used as therapeutic option for patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). While wearing such textiles, the contained silver is in close contact with the patient's skin. The silver serves two purposes: to reduce bacterial colonization of the skin, and to prevent contamination of the textile with ensuing growth of microorganisms. It is unknown whether the silver impregnation is able to reduce bacterial contamination of the textile during wearing and to prevent bacterial growth within the textile. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial contamination in textiles containing silver versus placebo worn by patients with AD and to determine the efficacy of processing worn textiles by manual and machine-based washing. Additionally, the effect of silver textiles on S. aureus and total bacterial counts colonizing the skin of AD patients was analyzed. The reduction factor of silver textile compared to placebo was 0.5 log steps against S. aureus and 0.4 log steps against total bacteria. Silver textiles exhibited significantly less S. aureus as well as total bacterial colonization after 2 days of wearing without washing, as compared with a placebo textile. On placebo textiles 385.6 +/- 63.5 CFU total bacteria and 236.5 +/- 49.9 CFU S. aureus, and on silver textiles 279.9 +/- 78.7 CFU total bacteria and 119.3 +/- 39.4 CFU S. aureus were found on the inner side of the textiles facing the neurodermitis lesions. However, the unexpectedly high residual contamination despite the silver exposure represents a potential risk as recontamination source of S. aureus that could maintain the proinflammatory process in AD. This contamination is nearly completely eliminated by machine-based washing at 60 degrees C using conventional washing powder. AD patients wearing silver textiles should change their used clothes at least daily and wash them in a washing machine at 60 degrees

  12. Contamination of herbal medicinal products marketed in Kaduna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed to evaluate the bacterial contamination of powdered herbal medicinal preparations sourced from identified herbal retail outlets in different parts of Kaduna metropolis. The assessments of the contamination of the herbal products were carried out using standard procedures: total aerobic bacterial plate count, ...

  13. Measures for radiation prevention and remediation of islightly radioactive contaminated sites by phytoremediation and subsequent utilization of the loaded plant residues (PHYTOREST). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willscher, Sabine; Werner, Peter; Jablonski, Lukasz; Wittig, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    In the presented scientific research project, the radiation protection of soil surfaces impacted by former industrial utilization or mining was investigated. This radiation protection of the contaminated soil surfaces was carried out by bioremediation techniques. The soil surfaces include larger agricultural or forestry areas useful for the production of sustainable plant-based raw materials and renewable energies. The contaminated areas show a positive climatic water balance with a subsequent impact of SM/R contaminants onto the adjacent ground water. During this scientific research project, the introduction of sustainable, biosphere conserving methods for a long-term remediation of slightly to moderately HM/R- contaminated areas was investigated; these areas are characterized by a radiotoxic amplifying potential due to a continued occurrence of radionuclides and heavy metals/ metalloids. The insights into transfer processes from the soil substrate over the mediating soil water phase and by microbes into the plant roots, into the shoots and the leaves of the plants represent necessary requirements for the control of SM/R transfer into the plants and its optimization. In this research project, considerable investigations were carried out for the understanding of binding of HM/R in the different plant compartments, also depending on different soil additives. The obtained first scientific results and their practical applicability were transformed onto experimental soil areas under natural field conditions. The transfer processes could be optimized and finally bioremediation efficiency could be enhanced due to the accompanying modifications (different soil additives of the field experiments). This new remediation method, further developed to a field application, represents a new tool for the stabilization / and extraction of HM/R on the field site and improves the efficiency of bioremediation processes. A pacification of the large areas with slightly to medium

  14. Cleanup of contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beone, G.; Carbone, A.I.; Zagaroli, M.

    1989-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of contaminated areas cleanup, in order to eliminate every possible damage for man safety and environment and to site recovery for some utilization, The first step of cleanup operation is site characterization, that is followed by a pianificazion activity for a better definition of staff qualification, technology to be used, protection and prevention instruments for the risks due to contaminants handling. The second section describes the different remedial technologies for contaminated sites. Remedial technologies may be divided into on-site/off-site and in-situ treatments, according to whether materials (waste, soil, water) are moved to another location or not, respectively. Finally, it is outlined that contaminated areas cleanup is a typical multidisciplinary activity because very different competences are required. (author)

  15. Neglected bacterial zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikeka, I; Dumler, J S

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial zoonoses comprise a group of diseases in humans or animals acquired by direct contact with or by oral consumption of contaminated animal materials, or via arthropod vectors. Among neglected infections, bacterial zoonoses are among the most neglected given emerging data on incidence and prevalence as causes of acute febrile illness, even in areas where recognized neglected tropical diseases occur frequently. Although many other bacterial infections could also be considered in this neglected category, five distinct infections stand out because they are globally distributed, are acute febrile diseases, have high rates of morbidity and case fatality, and are reported as commonly as malaria, typhoid or dengue virus infections in carefully designed studies in which broad-spectrum diagnoses are actively sought. This review will focus attention on leptospirosis, relapsing fever borreliosis and rickettsioses, including scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiosis. Of greatest interest is the lack of distinguishing clinical features among these infections when in humans, which confounds diagnosis where laboratory confirmation is lacking, and in regions where clinical diagnosis is often attributed to one of several perceived more common threats. As diseases such as malaria come under improved control, the real impact of these common and under-recognized infections will become evident, as will the requirement for the strategies and allocation of resources for their control. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial ecology is concerned with the interactions between bacteria and their biological and nonbiological environments and with the role of bacteria in biogeochemical element cycling. Many fundamental properties of bacteria are consequences of their small size. Thus, they can efficiently exploit...

  17. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G. B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency. Vaccination against common pathogens has decreased the burden of disease. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy are vital. Therapy should be initiated as soon as blood cultures have been obtained,

  18. Bacterial lipases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation,

  19. Bacterial Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    , the production and oxidation of methane, nitrate reduction and fixation of atmospheric nitrogen are exclusively carried out by different groups of bacteria. Some bacterial species – ‘extremophiles’ – thrive in extreme environments in which no eukaryotic organisms can survive with respect to temperature, salinity...

  20. Bacterial Vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that coats the walls of the vagina Vaginal discharge with an unpleasant or fishlike odor Vaginal pain or itching Burning during urination Doctors are unsure of the incubation period for bacterial vaginosis. How Is the Diagnosis Made? Your child’s pediatrician can make the diagnosis ...

  1. Bacterial stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Bacterial stress. Physicochemical and chemical parameters: temperature, pressure, pH, salt concentration, oxygen, irradiation. Nutritional depravation: nutrient starvation, water shortage. Toxic compounds: Antibiotics, heavy metals, toxins, mutagens. Interactions with other cells: ...

  2. Bacterial Adhesion & Blocking Bacterial Adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk

    2008-01-01

    reduce or delay bacterial biofilm formation of a range of urinary tract infectious E.coli and Klebsiella isolates. Several other proteinaceous coatings were also found to display anti-adhesive properties, possibly providing a measure for controlling the colonization of implant materials. Several other...... components. These substances may both mediate and stabilize the bacterial biofilm. Finally, several adhesive structures were examined, and a novel physiological biofilm phenotype in E.coli biofilms was characterized, namely cell chain formation. The autotransporter protein, antigen 43, was implicated...

  3. Can I Hang? Ideal Time to Replace Isotonic Crystalloid Intravenous Fluids and Sets to Prevent Fluid Contamination and Blood Stream Infection: a Knowledge Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Davis Fausak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical bottom lineBased on very poor veterinary and human evidence, fluid bags and IV sets should be changed every 96 hours whether on one or multiple patients. Additionally, supportive evidence suggests that creating a routine of wiping ports with alcohol prior to injection or withdrawal may significantly decrease the likelihood of fluid contamination. This certainly seems to be an area that needs more research. 

  4. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Antimicrobial Treatment of Acute Bacterial Meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Tunkel, Allan R.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has changed as a result of the widespread use of conjugate vaccines and preventive antimicrobial treatment of pregnant women. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with bacterial meningitis, accurate information is necessary regarding the

  5. Avaliação do risco de contaminação por bactérias, no paciente submetido à broncoscopia, após o reprocessamento do broncoscópio Evaluation of the risk of bacterial contamination in the patient submitted to bronchoscopy, after reprocessing the bronchoscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NANCY SPEKLA GRANDE

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: A broncoscopia é um procedimento diagnóstico e terapêutico realizado com a introdução nas vias aéreas de um tubo flexível que permite visualizar até as menores delas. Para evitar ou reduzir o risco de infecções, o broncoscópio deve ser adequadamente desinfetado com, pelo menos, desinfecção de alto nível. Objetivo: Verificar se há risco de contaminação bacteriana para os pacientes submetidos à broncoscopia do Hospital São Paulo da Unifesp, Estado de São Paulo. Métodos: No período de 1997 a 1998, o reprocessamento do broncoscópio incluiu limpeza e enxágüe com água estéril ou potável, seguida de rinsagem com glutaraldeído a 2% por 20 minutos, novo enxágüe com água estéril ou potável e rinsagem com álcool etílico a 70% e secagem com ar forçado pelo canal de sucção. Foram colhidas amostras de 65 pacientes para exames microbiológicos, instalando-se soro fisiológico estéril pelo canal de sucção do broncoscópio. Resultados: Após o reprocessamento foram encontrados nas amostras Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterobacter sp, Acinetobacter baumanni, Streptococcus viridans, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus beta hemoliticus A, Staphylococcus coagulase negativa e em cinco amostras houve crescimento de microbactéria na cultura. Conclusões: A desinfecç ão do broncoscópio com glutaraldeído a 2% não foi suficiente para garantir a desinfecção do aparelho e a presença de Staphylococcus epidermidis indica que houve contaminação do broncoscópio pela manipulação após a desinfecção.Introduction: Bronchoscopic is a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure performed by introducing a flexible tube in the airways that allows for the visualization even of the smallest airways. In order to prevent or reduce the risk of infection, the bronchoscope must be adequately disinfected with at least high level disinfection. Purpose: Check for the risk of bacterial contamination for patients submitted to

  6. Use of a pH meter for bacterial screening of whole blood platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazer, Mark H; Triulzi, Darrell J

    2005-07-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood products is a leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. Transfusion services are now compelled to employ methods of detecting bacteria in platelet (PLT) components. The use of pH screening of whole-blood PLTs (WBPs) was evaluated with a pH meter at the time of issue as a surrogate test for bacterial contamination. All WBPs selected for transfusion in May through September 2004 were tested individually for pH at time of issue. Those with a pH value of less than 7.0 were cultured in an automated culture system for 5 days. The white blood cell (WBC) and PLT counts in 56 representative WBP units that failed pH screening were compared to WBP units with acceptable pH values. Of the 37,060 WBP units that underwent pH screening, 405 had a pH value of less than 7.0 (1.1%). Four of those units were culture positive (1.0%) for Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, diphtheroids, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. Only one cocomponent red blood cell (RBC) unit was culture-positive and grew the same bacteria (S. aureus) as the WBP unit. The rate of pH failure increased with WBP storage length with the greatest rate of pH failures occurring in 5-day-old WBPs. The units that failed pH screening had significantly more WBCs and PLTs than units with acceptable pH values. pH screening of WBPs at issue prevented transfusion of bacterially contaminated WBPs and RBCs. This method, however, results in significant PLT wastage. Higher WBC and PLT content likely explains pH failures not due to bacterial contamination.

  7. Bacterial lipases

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Colson, Charles; Heuvel, Margreet van; Misset, Onno

    1994-01-01

    Many different bacterial species produce lipases which hydrolyze esters of glycerol with preferably long-chain fatty acids. They act at the interface generated by a hydrophobic lipid substrate in a hydrophilic aqueous medium. A characteristic property of lipases is called interfacial activation, meaning a sharp increase in lipase activity observed when the substrate starts to form an emulsion, thereby presenting to the enzyme an interfacial area. As a consequence, the kinetics of a lipase rea...

  8. Bacteriological research for the contamination of equipment in chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Gu; Song, Woon Heung; Kweon, Dae Cheol [Shinhan University, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The purpose is to determine the degree of contamination of the equipment for infection control in chest radiography of the radiology department. We confirmed by chemical and bacterial identification of bacteria of the equipment and established a preventive maintenance plan. Chest X-ray radiography contact area on the instrument patients shoulder, hand, chin, chest lateral radiography patient contact areas with a 70% isopropyl alcohol cotton swab were compared to identify the bacteria before and after sterilization on the patient contact area in the chest radiography equipment of the department. The gram positive Staphylococcus was isolated from side shoots handle before disinfection in the chest radiography equipment. For the final identification of antibiotic tested that it was determined by performing the nobobiocin to the sensitive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Chest radiography equipment before disinfecting the handle side of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria were detected using a disinfectant should be to prevent hospital infections.

  9. Light contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepeda Pena, William Enrique

    1998-01-01

    The article tries on the wrong use of the artificial light, of the main problems of the light contamination, dispersion of the light, noxious effects of the light contamination, ecological effects, effects on the man's biological rhythm, economic effects and effects about the civic and vial security, among other topics

  10. Blockade of NMDA receptor subtype NR2B prevents seizures but not apoptosis of dentate gyrus neurons in bacterial meningitis in infant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Täuber Martin G

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excitotoxic neuronal injury by action of the glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA subtype have been implicated in the pathogenesis of brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis. The most potent and selective blocker of NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit is (R,S-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl-beta-methyl-4-(phenylmethyl-1-piperid inepropanol (RO 25-6981. Here we evaluated the effect of RO 25-6981 on hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in an infant rat model of meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Animals were randomized for treatment with RO 25-6981 at a dosage of either 0.375 mg (15 mg/kg; n = 28 or 3.75 mg (150 mg/kg; n = 15 every 3 h or an equal volume of sterile saline (250 μl; n = 40 starting at 12 h after infection. Eighteen hours after infection, animals were assessed clinically and seizures were observed for a period of 2 h. At 24 h after infection animals were sacrificed and brains were examined for apoptotic injury to the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus. Results Treatment with RO 25-6981 had no effect on clinical scores, but the incidence of seizures was reduced (P Conclusions Treatment with a highly selective blocker of NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit failed to protect hippocampal neurons from injury in this model of pneumococcal meningitis, while it had some beneficial effect on the incidence of seizures.

  11. The sensitivity of approved Ninhydrin and Biuret tests in the assessment of protein contamination on surgical steel as an aid to prevent iatrogenic prion transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, I P; Pinchin, H E; Collin, R; Harris, K; Keevil, C W

    2006-11-01

    Regulations recommend the routine application of biochemical tests, such as the Ninhydrin or Biuret tests, to confirm the efficacy of hospital sterile service department (SSD) washer-disinfector cycles in removing proteinaceous material, particularly with respect to prions. The effectiveness of these methods relies on both the effective sampling of the instruments and the sensitivity of the tests employed. Two commercially available contamination assessment tests were evaluated for their sensitivity to ME7 brain homogenate on surgical-grade stainless steel surfaces. Controls were visualized by the application of episcopic differential interference contrast/Epi-fluorecence microscopy (EDIC/EF) combined with the sensitive fluorescent reagent, SYPRO Ruby, which has been shown previously to rapidly visualize and assess low levels of contamination on medical devices. The Ninhydrin test displayed a minimum level of detection observed by 75% of volunteers (MLD(75)) of 9.25 microg [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 8.6-10.0 microg]. The Biuret test provided better sensitivity, with a MLD(75) of 6.7 microg (95% CI 5.4-8.2 microg). However, much lower concentrations of proteinaceous soiling (pg) were visualized using the EDIC/EF microscopy method. From these findings, it is clear that these approved colorimetric tests of cleaning are relatively insensitive. This investigation demonstrates how large amounts (up to 6.5 microg) of proteinaceous brain contamination could remain undetected and the instruments deemed clean using such methods. The application of more sensitive cleanliness evaluation methods should be applied to reduce the risk of iatrogenic transmission of prion disease in 'high-risk' instruments such as neurosurgical devices.

  12. Associated microbial contaminants in in-vitro micropropagation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were carried out to determine the microbial contaminants associated with in-vitro micropropagation of Ipomea batatas (sweet potato). The contaminants were found to be mostly fungal organisms, Aspergillus Spp (62%), Penicillum Spp. (31%), Fusarium Spp. (5%) and Alternaria Spp. (2%). Bacterial contamination ...

  13. Bioremediation of crude oil contaminated tea plantation soil using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crude oil contamination of soil is a major concern for tea industry in Assam, India. Crude oil is a persistent organic contaminant which alters soil physical and biochemical characteristics and makes tea plants more susceptible against crude oil contamination. Therefore, two native bacterial strains designated as AS 03 and ...

  14. Evaluation of two methods in controlling dental treatment water contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ritu; Puttaiah, Raghunath; Harris, Robert; Reddy, Anil

    2011-03-01

    Dental unit water systems are contaminated with biofilms that amplify bacterial counts in dental treatment water in excess of a million colony forming units per milliliter (cfu/ml). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Dental Association have agreed that the maximum allowable contamination of dental treatment water not exceed 500 cfu/ml. This study was conducted to evaluate two protocols in controlling contamination of dental unit water systems and dental treatment water. Both methods used an antimicrobial self-dissolving chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) tablet at a high concentration (50 ppm) to shock the dental unit water system biofilms initially followed by periodic exposure. To treat dental treatment source water for patient care, 3 parts per million (ppm) ClO₂ in municipal/tap water was compared to use of a citrus botanical extract dissolved in municipal water. Heterotrophic microbial counts of effluent water and laser scanning confocal microscopy were performed to evaluate effects of the two treatments. Results from this study indicated that both treatments were effective in controlling biofilm contamination and reducing heterotrophic plate counts Contemp Dent Pract 2011;12(2):73-83. Source of support: Nil Conflict of interest: None declared.

  15. Prevention of Food Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Army Quartermaster School, Ft. Lee, VA.

    The programed text provides a single lesson, four-hour, correspondence subcourse on the prevention of food poisoning. It covers the following areas: a definition of food poisoning; chemical food poisoning; biological food poisoning; causes and prevention of trichinosis; six factors controlling bacteria growth; bacterial infection; prevention of…

  16. Blockade of NMDA receptor subtype NR2B prevents seizures but not apoptosis of dentate gyrus neurons in bacterial meningitis in infant rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarova, Anna; Ringer, Ralph; Täuber, Martin G; Leib, Stephen L

    2003-01-01

    Background Excitotoxic neuronal injury by action of the glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) subtype have been implicated in the pathogenesis of brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis. The most potent and selective blocker of NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit is (R,S)-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-beta-methyl-4-(phenylmethyl)-1-piperid inepropanol (RO 25-6981). Here we evaluated the effect of RO 25-6981 on hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in an infant rat model of meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Animals were randomized for treatment with RO 25-6981 at a dosage of either 0.375 mg (15 mg/kg; n = 28) or 3.75 mg (150 mg/kg; n = 15) every 3 h or an equal volume of sterile saline (250 μl; n = 40) starting at 12 h after infection. Eighteen hours after infection, animals were assessed clinically and seizures were observed for a period of 2 h. At 24 h after infection animals were sacrificed and brains were examined for apoptotic injury to the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus. Results Treatment with RO 25-6981 had no effect on clinical scores, but the incidence of seizures was reduced (P < 0.05 for all RO 25-6981 treated animals combined). The extent of apoptosis was not affected by low or high doses of RO 25-6981. Number of apoptotic cells (median [range]) was 12.76 [3.16–25.3] in animals treated with low dose RO 25-6981 (control animals 13.8 [2.60–31.8]; (P = NS) and 9.8 [1.7–27.3] (controls: 10.5 [2.4–21.75]) in animals treated with high dose RO 25-6981 (P = NS). Conclusions Treatment with a highly selective blocker of NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit failed to protect hippocampal neurons from injury in this model of pneumococcal meningitis, while it had some beneficial effect on the incidence of seizures. PMID:13129439

  17. Alternative primer sets for PCR detection of genotypes involved in bacterial aerobic BTEX degradation : Distribution of the genes in BTEX degrading isolates and in subsurface soils of a BTEX contaminated industrial site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, B; Junca, H; Vosahlova, J; Lindner, A; Ruegg, [No Value; Bucheli-Witschel, M; Faber, F; Egli, T; Mau, M; Schlomann, M; Brennerova, M; Brenner, [No Value; Pieper, DH; Top, EM; Dejonghe, W; Bastiaens, L; Springael, D

    Eight new primer sets were designed for PCR detection of (i) mono-oxygenase and dioxygenase gene sequences involved in initial attack of bacterial aerobic BTEX degradation and of (ii) catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene sequences responsible for metacleavage of the aromatic ring. The new primer sets

  18. Biocide activity of microfiber mops with and without silver after contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia De Lorenzi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present research was to compare the residual microbial load in Solo System microfiber mops with silver and in normal microfiber mops without silver to see whether those with the silver prevent bacterial proliferation and spread more effectively during normal cleaning operations. METHODS: Mops with and without silver were experimentally contaminated with suspension of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538. The bioburden was evaluated by a filtering procedure according to UNI EN 1174 after contamination, after washing and after different times of impregnation in an alcohol-base detergent. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The results obtained lead to the conclusion that silver microfiber mop was significantly more effective in reducing bacterial load despite initial high level contamination (10(6-10(7 CFU/50 cm². Indeed, after low temperature washing, the bacterial load was already completely eliminated while the mop without silver still presented relatively high levels of the microorganism (approximately 10² CFU/50 cm² even after being soaked for 8 hours in a detergent/disinfectant.

  19. Microbial contamination of haemodialysis catheter connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorke, A

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial contamination and colonisation of the haemodialysis catheter is a reason for infection in dialysis patients. One reason for contamination may be frequent routine connections at the beginning, during and end of dialysis. Higher infection rates observed with double lumen catheters may be due to the absence of the sterile, disposable device that is fitted between the blood tubing and the catheter hubs with single lumen catheters. A sterile, disposable extension was implemented at the author's unit for use in dialysis with double lumen catheters. The proximal and distal ends of the extension were assessed for microbial contamination after standard dialysis. Results show microbial contamination in almost 30% of the samples retrieved from the extensions. Experiences in PD and the behaviour of skin bacteria on polymers, suggest that disposable extensions might have the potential to serve as a barrier or absorber for bacterial contamination.

  20. Effects of skin disinfection method, deviation bag, and bacterial screening on clinical safety of platelet transfusions in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korte, Dirk; Curvers, Joyce; de Kort, Wim L A M; Hoekstra, Tiny; van der Poel, Cees L; Beckers, Erik A M; Marcelis, Jan H

    2006-03-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood products is a great hazard for development of fatal transfusion reactions. Bacterial screening of platelet concentrates (PC) by aerobic and anaerobic culturing (BacT/ALERT, bioMérieux) was introduced in the Netherlands in October 2001. In November 2002, a nationwide, uniform skin cleansing method was introduced with a double-swab disinfection with 70 percent isopropyl alcohol. One location routinely used an integrated diversion bag to collect the first 20 to 30 mL. Over the calendar years 2002 and 2003, in total 113,093 PCs derived from pooled buffy coats were screened. After introduction of the new disinfection method, 0.85 percent were initially positive. This was a small reduction compared to the previous disinfection methods under which 0.95 percent were initially positive. The location with use of the diversion bag showed a significantly lower frequency of bacterial contamination, with 0.50 percent before and 0.37 percent after introduction of 70 percent isopropyl alcohol. In addition 8000 apheresis PCs were also screened, showing 24 initially positive samples (0.30%). The use of the diversion bag and, to a lesser extent, the use of double swabs with 70 percent isopropyl alcohol, led to a reduction of contamination. As expected, predominant contamination with resident skin bacteria was reduced. The combination of diversion bag and new disinfection led to a frequency of initial positive results for pooled five-donor PCs, which is similar to that of single-donor apheresis PCs. Furthermore, the bacterial detection system and associated product recall procedures have been shown to be effective in preventing transfusion of contaminated PCs and/or related red cells, especially for rapidly growing bacteria.

  1. Minimizing electrode contamination in an electrochemical cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Seung; Zelenay, Piotr; Johnston, Christina

    2014-12-09

    An electrochemical cell assembly that is expected to prevent or at least minimize electrode contamination includes one or more getters that trap a component or components leached from a first electrode and prevents or at least minimizes them from contaminating a second electrode.

  2. Bacterial mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Borch, Jonas; Dam, Mette

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial DNA segregation takes place in an active and ordered fashion. In the case of Escherichia coli plasmid R1, the partitioning system (par) separates paired plasmid copies and moves them to opposite cell poles. Here we address the mechanism by which the three components of the R1 par system...... movement is powered by insertional polymerization of ParM. Consistently, we find that segregating plasmids are positioned at the ends of extending ParM filaments. Thus, the process of R1 plasmid segregation in E. coli appears to be mechanistically analogous to the actin-based motility operating...

  3. Bovine Immunoglobulin/Protein Isolate Binds Pro-Inflammatory Bacterial Compounds and Prevents Immune Activation in an Intestinal Co-Culture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detzel, Christopher J.; Horgan, Alan; Henderson, Abigail L.; Petschow, Bryon W.; Warner, Christopher D.; Maas, Kenneth J.; Weaver, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal barrier dysfunction is associated with chronic gastrointestinal tract inflammation and diseases such as IBD and IBS. Serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate (SBI) is a specially formulated protein preparation (>90%) for oral administration. The composition of SBI is greater than 60% immunoglobulin including contributions from IgG, IgA, and IgM. Immunoglobulin within the lumen of the gut has been recognized to have anti-inflammatory properties and is involved in maintaining gut homeostasis. The binding of common intestinal antigens (LPS and Lipid A) and the ligand Pam3CSK4, by IgG, IgA, and IgM in SBI was shown using a modified ELISA technique. Each of these antigens stimulated IL-8 and TNF-α cytokine production by THP-1 monocytes. Immune exclusion occurred as SBI (≤50 mg/mL) bound free antigen in a dose dependent manner that inhibited cytokine production by THP-1 monocytes in response to 10 ng/mL LPS or 200 ng/mL Lipid A. Conversely, Pam3CSK4 stimulation of THP-1 monocytes was unaffected by SBI/antigen binding. A co-culture model of the intestinal epithelium consisted of a C2BBe1 monolayer separating an apical compartment from a basal compartment containing THP-1 monocytes. The C2BBe1 monolayer was permeabilized with dimethyl palmitoyl ammonio propanesulfonate (PPS) to simulate a damaged epithelial barrier. Results indicate that Pam3CSK4 was able to translocate across the PPS-damaged C2BBe1 monolayer. However, binding of Pam3CSK4 by immunoglobulins in SBI prevented Pam3CSK4 translocation across the damaged C2BBe1 barrier. These results demonstrated steric exclusion of antigen by SBI which prevented apical to basal translocation of antigen due to changes in the physical properties of Pam3CSK4, most likely as a result of immunoglobulin binding. This study demonstrates that immunoglobulins in SBI can reduce antigen-associated inflammation through immune and steric exclusion mechanisms and furthers the mechanistic understanding of how SBI

  4. Water Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statistics Training & Education Policy & Recommendations Fast Facts Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... type=”submit” value=”Submit” /> Healthy Water Home Water Contamination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ...

  5. Early Bacterial Cultures from Open Fractures - Differences Before ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    multiruka1

    hours after injury, had antiseptic wound dressing, had received antibiotics, presented with contamination from the gastrointestinal or genitourinary injuries or were known to have diabetes, peripheral vascular disease or immunosuppression. Informed consent was obtained. Early Bacterial Cultures from Open Fractures -.

  6. Comparing a combination of penicillin G and gentamicin to a combination of clindamycin and amikacin as prophylactic antibiotic regimens in prevention of clean contaminated wound infections in cancer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mahallawy, H.A.; Hassan, S.Sh.; Khalifa, H.I.; Safa, M.M.E.; Khafagy, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim: Appropriate antibiotic selection and timing of administration for prophylaxis are crucial to reduce the likelihood of surgical site infection (SSI) after a clean contaminated cancer surgery. Our aim is to compare the use of two prophylactic antibiotic (PA) regimens as regards efficacy, timing, and cost. Patients and methods: Two hundred patients with gastric, bladder, or colorectal cancer were randomized to receive preoperative PA, group A received penicillin G sodium and gentamicin and group B received clindamycin and amikacin intravenously. The demographic data of patients were collected, and they were observed for wound infections. Results: Infected wounds occurred in 19 patients with a rate of 9.5%. Highest incidence of SSI was among bladder cancer patients (14.2%); p = 0.044. The rate of SSI was 11 % in group A, and 8% in group B, p = 0.469. The cost of PA administered in group A was significantly less than that of group B (21.96 ± 3.22 LE versus 117.05 ± 12.74 LE, respectively; p < 0.001). SSI tended to be higher among those who had longer time for antibiotic and incision (≥ 30 min) than those who had shorter time interval (<30 min), (13% vs. 6.5%, respectively). Conclusion: Both penicillin + gentamicin and clindamycin + amikacin are safe and effective for the prevention of SSI in clean contaminated operative procedures. In a resource limited hospital, a regimen including penicillin + gentamicin is a cost-effective alternative for the more expensive and broader coverage of clindamycin + amikacin. Timing of PA is effective in preventing SSIs when administered 30 min before the start of surgery

  7. Identification of Streptococcus parasanguinis DNA contamination in human buccal DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfuz, Istiak; Cheng, Wei; White, Stefan J

    2013-11-22

    The use of buccal swabs in clinical and scientific studies is a very popular method of collecting DNA, due to its non-invasive nature of collection. However, contamination of the DNA sample may interfere with analysis. Here we report the finding of Streptococcus parasanguinis bacterial DNA contamination in human buccal DNA samples, which led to preferential amplification of bacterial sequence with PCR primers designed against human sequence. Contamination of buccal-derived DNA with bacterial DNA can be significant, and may influence downstream genetic analysis. One needs to be aware of possible bacterial contamination when interpreting abnormal findings following PCR amplification of buccal swab DNA samples.

  8. Microbial contaminants in Pakistan: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maida Kanwal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide contamination of surface waters with microbial pathogens is of substantial health concern. These contaminants are usually transmitted by improper sanitation measures, unsafe waste disposal, excretions from patients, and physical contacts, i.e., sexual and nonsexual. Majority of these microbial pathogens have been categorized into three classes, i.e., bacteria, viruses and protozoa. Pakistan, being a developing country, is facing a noteworthy threat due to microbial contamination. In Pakistan, bacterial contaminants are reported extensively followed by viral and protozoa contaminants. The health issues associated with bacterial population includes dysentery, abdominal pain, headache, diarrhea etc.; and usually includes faecal and total coliforms, E. coli, Salmonella, Shigella and Campylobacter. The cases related to viral contamination are lesser but chronic and evidenced the presence of HCV, HAV, HEV viruses causing hepatitis, and other hepatic disorders. Lastly, the health impacts associated with protozoans are least reported; and a number of diseases such as giardia, cryptosporidium and toxoplasma have been linked with this class of contaminants. The current review compiles information of these biological contaminants along with their health issues in Pakistan. Moreover, potential sources and fate of microbial contaminants are also discussed.

  9. Contamination vs. Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Matters Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Contamination vs. exposure Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... contaminate their surroundings and personal property. Types of Contamination Internal Contamination Internal contamination occurs when people swallow ...

  10. Hexadecane degradation by bacterial strains isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was undertaken to detect and monitor the degradation of hexadecane by three potential degrading bacteria (Pseudomonas putida, Rhodococcus erythroplolis and Bacillus thermoleovorans) isolated from contaminated soils in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The extraction of the bacterial populations from these polluted soils ...

  11. Inactivation of bacterial contaminants in drinking water using a novel batch-process TiO2-assisted solar photocatalytic disinfection (SPC-DIS) reactor for use in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuigan, K. G.; Duffy, E. F.; Al Touati, F.; Kehoe, S. C.; McLoughlin, O. A.; Gill, L. W.; Gernjak, W.; Oller, I.; Maldonado, M. I.; Malato, S.; Reed, R. H.

    2004-07-01

    The technical feasibility and performance of photocatalytic TiO2 coatings in batch-process solar disinfection (SODIS) reactors to improve potability of drinking water in developing countries have been studied. Borosilicate glass and PET plastic SODIS reactor fitted with flexible plastic inserts coated with TiO2 powder were shown to be 20% and 25% more effective, respectively, than standard SODIS reactors for the inactivation of E. coli K12 . Approximately 550J is required per litre of water to produce each 1-long-unit reduction in bacterial population within SPC-DIS reactors of the design described in this study. (Author) 14 refs.

  12. BACTERIAL PLASMIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Dinic