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Sample records for prevent bacterial contamination

  1. Nanocomposited coatings produced by laser-assisted process to prevent silicone hydogels from protein fouling and bacterial contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Guobang; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Nanocomposited-coating was deposited on silicone hydrogel by using the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) process. The ZnO–PEG nanocomposited coating reduces over 50% protein absorption on silicone hydrogel, and can inhibit the bacterial growth efficiently. - Highlights: • We developed a nanocomposited coating to prevent silicone hydrogel from biofouling. • Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation can deposit inorganic–organic nanomaterials. • The designed nanocomposited coating reduces protein absorption by over 50%. • The designed nanocomposited coating shows significant antimicrobial efficiency. - Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles incorporating with polyethylene glycol (PEG) were deposited together on the surface of silicone hydrogel through matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). In this process, frozen nanocomposites (ZnO–PEG) in isopropanol were irradiated under a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm for 1 h. Our results indicate that the MAPLE process is able to maintain the chemical backbone of polymer and prevent the nanocomposite coating from contamination. The ZnO–PEG nanocomposited coating reduces over 50% protein absorption on silicone hydrogel. The cytotoxicity study shows that the ZnO–PEG nanocomposites deposited on silicone hydrogels do not impose the toxic effect on mouse NIH/3T3 cells. In addition, MAPLE-deposited ZnO–PEG nanocomposites can inhibit the bacterial growth significantly.

  2. Microconductometric Detection of Bacterial Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarra EL ICHI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Several approaches can be used for the electrochemical detection of bacterial contamination. Their performance can be assessed by the ability to detect bacteria at very low concentrations within a short-time response. We have already demonstrated that a conductometric biosensor based on interdigitated thin-film electrodes is adapted to detect bacteria in clinical samples like serum and compatible with microfluidic fabrication. The type of interdigitated microelectrodes influences the performance of the biosensor. This was shown by the results obtained in this work. A magnetic-nanoparticles based immunosensor was designed using gold screen-printed electrodes. The immunosensor was able to specifically detect E. coli in the range of 1-103 CFU mL-1. The new transducer offered a larger active sensing surface with a lower cost and a robust material. Accuracy of the conductance value was enhanced by differential measurements. The immunosensor is compatible with a microfluidic system.

  3. Prevention of bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Hancock, Viktoria

    2010-01-01

    . As such, adhesion represents the Achilles heel of crucial pathogenic functions. It follows that interference with adhesion can reduce bacterial virulence. Here, we illustrate this important topic with examples of techniques being developed that can inhibit bacterial adhesion. Some of these will become...

  4. Prevalence of antibacterial resistant bacterial contaminants from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mobile phones contaminated with bacteria may act as fomites. Antibiotic resistant bacterial contamination of mobile phones of inpatients was studied. One hundred and six samples were collected from mobile phones of patients admitted in various hospitals in Jazan province of Saudi Arabia. Eighty-nine (83.9%) out of 106 ...

  5. Skin contamination - prevention and decontaminating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed examination is made of the structure of human skin. Measures were drawn up to prevent skin contamination in nuclear installations as well as contaminated skin was decontaminated from the personnel. By systematically applying these measures a significant level of success was achieved in preventing contamination in nuclear installations. Cases where more far-reaching chemical methods had to be used were kept to a minimum. (R.P.)

  6. A study of bacterial contamination of rattlesnake venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Garcia-Lima

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied the bacterial contamination of rattlesnake venom isolated from snakes in captivity and wild snakes caught recently. The captive snakes showed a relatively high incidence of bacterial contamination of their venom.

  7. Modeling bacterial contamination of fuel ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Kenneth M; Liu, Siqing; Leathers, Timothy D; Worthington, Ronald E; Rich, Joseph O

    2009-05-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria may limit the effectiveness of antibiotics to treat bacterial contamination in fuel ethanol plants, and therefore, new antibacterial intervention methods and tools to test their application are needed. Using shake-flask cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on saccharified corn mash and strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from a dry-grind ethanol facility, a simple model to simulate bacterial contamination and infection was developed. Challenging the model with 10(8) CFU/mL Lactobacillus fermentum decreased ethanol yield by 27% and increased residual glucose from 6.2 to 45.5 g/L. The magnitude of the effect was proportional to the initial bacterial load, with 10(5) CFU/mL L. fermentum still producing an 8% decrease in ethanol and a 3.2-fold increase in residual glucose. Infection was also dependent on the bacterial species used to challenge the fermentation, as neither L. delbrueckii ATCC 4797 nor L. amylovorus 0315-7B produced a significant decrease in ethanol when inoculated at a density of 10(8) CFU/mL. In the shake-flask model, treatment with 2 microg/mL virginiamycin mitigated the infection when challenged with a susceptible strain of L. fermentum (MIC for virginiamycin model may find application in developing new antibacterial agents and management practices for use in controlling contamination in the fuel ethanol industry. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Bacterial contamination of intraocular lens surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Vafidis, G C; Marsh, R J; Stacey, A R

    1984-01-01

    One hundred sterile intraocular lenses were placed on the external eye of 50 patients during cataract surgery. Half of the specimens were cultured for bacteria, the other half were examined under the light microscope after fixing and staining. A bacterial contamination rate of 26% was recorded. This is significantly higher than that found in conjunctival swabs (6%) or irrigation specimens (8%) taken at the same time, and higher than that recorded in a group of control lenses (15.2%) exposed t...

  9. Hydrodebridement of wounds: effectiveness in reducing wound bacterial contamination and potential for air bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Frank L; Stickings, Daryl S; Edwards-Jones, Valerie; Armstrong, David G; Boulton, Andrew Jm

    2009-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to assess the level of air contamination with bacteria after surgical hydrodebridement and to determine the effectiveness of hydro surgery on bacterial reduction of a simulated infected wound. Four porcine samples were scored then infected with a broth culture containing a variety of organisms and incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The infected samples were then debrided with the hydro surgery tool (Versajet, Smith and Nephew, Largo, Florida, USA). Samples were taken for microbiology, histology and scanning electron microscopy pre-infection, post infection and post debridement. Air bacterial contamination was evaluated before, during and after debridement by using active and passive methods; for active sampling the SAS-Super 90 air sampler was used, for passive sampling settle plates were located at set distances around the clinic room. There was no statistically significant reduction in bacterial contamination of the porcine samples post hydrodebridement. Analysis of the passive sampling showed a significant (p air whilst using hydro surgery equipment compared with a basal count of 582 CFUs/m3. During removal of the wound dressing, a significant increase was observed relative to basal counts (p air samples was still significantly raised 1 hour post-therapy. The results suggest a significant increase in bacterial air contamination both by active sampling and passive sampling. We believe that action might be taken to mitigate fallout in the settings in which this technique is used.

  10. Survey of bacterial contamination of environment of swimming pools in Yazd city, in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jafari Mansoorian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infections are readily transmitted as a result of bacterial contamination of swimming pools. Therefore, hygiene and preventing the contamination of swimming pools is of particular importance. The objective of this study was to determine the amount of bacterial contamination in indoor pools of Yazd in 2013. Methods: In this descriptive and analytical study, all indoor swimming pools of Yazd (12 pools were evaluated during the spring and summer of 2013, in terms of bacterial contamination. In order to determine contamination, a sterile cotton swab was used for sampling. On average, 45 samples were taken from different surfaces in each pool (shower, dressing room, sitting places in sauna, platforms and around the pool. In total, about 540 samples from all pools were tested for bacterial contamination. Results: The results show that from 540 samples, bacterial contamination was observed in about 93 samples (17.22%; and was seen more in showers, edges of the pool and jacuzzis, and the slippers used in swimming pools. The most important isolated bacteria types were E. coli, Actinobacteria, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia. Conclusion: The results indicate the presence of bacterial contamination on the surface of these places. It is recommended that health authorities should pay more attention to cleaning and disinfecting surfaces around the pool, showers, dressing rooms etc, to prevent infectious disease transfer as a result of contact with contaminated swimming pool surfaces.

  11. Bacterial Hand Contamination and Transfer after Use of Contaminated Bulk-Soap-Refillable Dispensers▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Zapka, Carrie A.; Campbell, Esther J.; Maxwell, Sheri L.; Gerba, Charles P.; Dolan, Michael J.; Arbogast, James W.; Macinga, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk-soap-refillable dispensers are prone to extrinsic bacterial contamination, and recent studies demonstrated that approximately one in four dispensers in public restrooms are contaminated. The purpose of this study was to quantify bacterial hand contamination and transfer after use of contaminated soap under controlled laboratory and in-use conditions in a community setting. Under laboratory conditions using liquid soap experimentally contaminated with 7.51 log10 CFU/ml of Serratia marcesc...

  12. Contamination sources, prevention, and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination is defined as anything other than cotton in cotton lint. Worldwide, contamination is on the rise and plastic contamination has increased at a faster rate than contamination overall. In the U.S., there are many sources of plastic contaminants, such as plastic trash that collects in cott...

  13. The normal bacterial flora prevents GI disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. The normal bacterial flora prevents GI disease. Inhibits pathogenic enteric bacteria. Decrease luminal pH; Secrete bacteriocidal proteins; Colonization resistance; Block epithelial binding – induce MUC2. Improves epithelial and mucosal barrier integrity. Produce ...

  14. Algal-bacterial interactions in metal contaminated floodplain sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boivin, M.E.Y.; Greve, G.D.; Garcia-Meza, J.V.; Massieux, B.; Sprenger, W.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Breure, A.M.; Rutgers, M.; Admiraal, W.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate algal-bacterial interactions in a gradient of metal contaminated natural sediments. By means of multivariate techniques, we related the genetic structure (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, DGGE) and the physiological structure (community-level physiological profiling, CLPP) of the bacterial communities to the species composition of the algal communities and to the abiotic environmental variables, including metal contamination. The results revealed that genetic and physiological structure of the bacterial communities correlated with the species composition of the algal community, but hardly to the level of metal pollution. This must be interpreted as an indication for a strong and species-specific linkage of algal and bacterial species in floodplain sediments. Metals were, however, not proven to affect either the algal or the bacterial communities of the Dutch river floodplains. - Algal and bacterial communities in floodplain sediments are interlinked, but are not affected by metal pollution

  15. Bacterial contamination of street vending food in Kumasi, Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Street vending foods are readily available sources of meals for many people but the biological safe-ty of such food is always in doubt. The aim of this study is to ascertain bacterial isolate and deter-mine total counts of bacterial species responsible for the contamination of the street vending food in Kumasi so as to determine ...

  16. High level bacterial contamination of secondary school students' mobile phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõljalg, Siiri; Mändar, Rando; Sõber, Tiina; Rööp, Tiiu; Mändar, Reet

    2017-06-01

    While contamination of mobile phones in the hospital has been found to be common in several studies, little information about bacterial abundance on phones used in the community is available. Our aim was to quantitatively determine the bacterial contamination of secondary school students' mobile phones. Altogether 27 mobile phones were studied. The contact plate method and microbial identification using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer were used for culture studies. Quantitative PCR reaction for detection of universal 16S rRNA, Enterococcus faecalis 16S rRNA and Escherichia coli allantoin permease were performed, and the presence of tetracycline ( tet A, tet B, tet M), erythromycin ( erm B) and sulphonamide ( sul 1) resistance genes was assessed. We found a high median bacterial count on secondary school students' mobile phones (10.5 CFU/cm 2 ) and a median of 17,032 bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies per phone. Potentially pathogenic microbes ( Staphylococcus aureus , Acinetobacter spp. , Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus cereus and Neisseria flavescens ) were found among dominant microbes more often on phones with higher percentage of E. faecalis in total bacterial 16S rRNA. No differences in contamination level or dominating bacterial species between phone owner's gender and between phone types (touch screen/keypad) were found. No antibiotic resistance genes were detected on mobile phone surfaces. Quantitative study methods revealed high level bacterial contamination of secondary school students' mobile phones.

  17. Bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates: pathogen detection and inactivation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Védy

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the reduction of transfusion related viral transmission has been a priority during the last decade, bacterial infection transmitted by transfusion still remains associated to a high morbidity and mortality, and constitutes the most frequent infectious risk of transfusion. This problem especially concerns platelet concentrates because of their favorable bacterial growth conditions. This review gives an overview of platelet transfusion-related bacterial contamination as well as on the different strategies to reduce this problem by using either bacterial detection or inactivation methods.

  18. Bacterial contamination of computer touch screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerba, Charles P; Wuollet, Adam L; Raisanen, Peter; Lopez, Gerardo U

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the occurrence of opportunistic bacterial pathogens on the surfaces of computer touch screens used in hospitals and grocery stores. Opportunistic pathogenic bacteria were isolated on touch screens in hospitals; Clostridium difficile and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus and in grocery stores; methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Enteric bacteria were more common on grocery store touch screens than on hospital computer touch screens. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. A study of bacterial contamination of rattlesnake venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Garcia-Lima

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied the bacterial contamination of rattlesnake venom isolated from snakes in captivity and wild snakes caught recently. The captive snakes showed a relatively high incidence of bacterial contamination of their venom.Os autores estudaram a contaminação bacteriana do veneno dë cascavéis mantidas em cativeiro e das recentemente capturadas. Verificaram que os venenos dos animais cativos apresentaram alta incidência de contaminação e os tidos como recentemente capturados estavam com baixa contaminação aparente.

  20. Reducing bacterial contamination in an Orthopedic Theatre ventilated by natural ventilation, in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stephanie; Palmer, Rish; Phillipo, Edward; Chipungu, Geoffrey

    2016-05-31

    All surgical procedures have the potential for infection and some of the main sources are contamination from airborne particles, theatre personnel and the theatre environment.  There is strong evidence that the use of ultra-clean air flow systems in orthopedic operating theatres reduces the incidence of deep sepsis after surgery. In the developing world however, this is often an unrealistic solution. The aim of this study was to establish baseline levels of contamination in a working orthopedic theatre, at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi. To feedback results to the theatre team, promote infection prevention discussion and work with the team to implement workable and realistic goals to improve the intra-operative environment. Samples were collected from theatre equipment available at the time of surgery, from theatre water and theatre air using passive air sampling techniques. Samples were immediately transferred to the Central Microbiology Laboratory for culture on basic culture media. Bacterial contamination of theatre equipment, intra-operative theatre air and water was detected. Results were discussed with the theatre and infection prevention team who were receptive to feedback with regards to infection prevention strategies and keen to develop simple measures which could be put in place to change practice. In this setting, we suggest that implementing workable and realistic goals such as, establishing baseline rates of bacterial contamination and introduction of strict protocols for asepsis and theatre etiquette, may reduce bacterial contamination rates and subsequent intra-operative infection in the absence of expensive engineering solutions.

  1. Bacterial contamination of traditional ice creams in Kermanshah in 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Sina Emami; Alisha Akya; Anis 1Hossain Zadeh; Sodabeh Barkhordar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ice cream is a dairy product that is very popular during warm seasons. Ice cream can be contaminated with various microorganisms including pathogenic bacteria if hygienic procedures are not followed during preparation, distribution and preservation processes. This may put the health of people using ice cream at risk. Our study aimed to examine the bacterial contamination of traditional ice creams in Kermanshah city during 2008. Methods: During summer 2008, 80 samples of tradit...

  2. Glove and gown effects on intraoperative bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, William G; Cooper, Joshua M; Lippert, Dylan; Kablawi, Rawan O; Neiberg, Rebecca H; Sherertz, Robert J

    2014-03-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the risk of bacterial contamination associated with changing outer gloves and using disposable spunlace paper versus reusable cloth gowns. Despite decades of research, there remains a lack of consensus regarding certain aspects of optimal aseptic technique including outer glove exchange while double-gloving and surgical gown type selection. In an initial glove study, 102 surgical team members were randomized to exchange or retain outer gloves 1 hour into clean orthopedic procedures; cultures were obtained 15 minutes later from the palm of the surgeon's dominant gloved hand and from the surgical gown sleeve. Surgical gown type selection was recorded. A laboratory strike-through study investigating bacterial transmission through cloth and paper gowns was performed with coagulase-negative staphylococci. In a follow-up glove study, 251 surgical team members, all wearing paper gowns, were randomized as in the first glove study. Glove study 1 revealed 4-fold higher levels of baseline bacterial contamination (31% vs 7%) on the sleeve of surgical team members wearing cloth gowns than those using paper gowns [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 4.64 (1.72-12.53); P = 0.0016]. The bacterial strike-through study revealed that 26 of 27 cloth gowns allowed bacterial transmission through the material compared with 0 of 27 paper gowns (P < 0.001). In glove study 2, surgeons retaining outer gloves 1 hour into the case had a subsequent positive glove contamination rate of 23% compared with 13% among surgeons exchanging their original outer glove [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 1.97 (1.02-3.80); P = 0.0419]. Paper gowns demonstrated less bacterial transmission in the laboratory and lower rates of contamination in the operating room. Disposable paper gowns are recommended for all surgical cases, especially those involving implants, because of the heightened risk of infection. Outer glove exchange just before handling implant materials

  3. Classification of bacterial contamination using image processing and distributed computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, W M; Bayraktar, B; Bhunia, A; Hirleman, E D; Robinson, J P; Rajwa, B

    2013-01-01

    Disease outbreaks due to contaminated food are a major concern not only for the food-processing industry but also for the public at large. Techniques for automated detection and classification of microorganisms can be a great help in preventing outbreaks and maintaining the safety of the nations food supply. Identification and classification of foodborne pathogens using colony scatter patterns is a promising new label-free technique that utilizes image-analysis and machine-learning tools. However, the feature-extraction tools employed for this approach are computationally complex, and choosing the right combination of scatter-related features requires extensive testing with different feature combinations. In the presented work we used computer clusters to speed up the feature-extraction process, which enables us to analyze the contribution of different scatter-based features to the overall classification accuracy. A set of 1000 scatter patterns representing ten different bacterial strains was used. Zernike and Chebyshev moments as well as Haralick texture features were computed from the available light-scatter patterns. The most promising features were first selected using Fishers discriminant analysis, and subsequently a support-vector-machine (SVM) classifier with a linear kernel was used. With extensive testing we were able to identify a small subset of features that produced the desired results in terms of classification accuracy and execution speed. The use of distributed computing for scatter-pattern analysis, feature extraction, and selection provides a feasible mechanism for large-scale deployment of a light scatter-based approach to bacterial classification.

  4. Bacterial contamination of white coats and hands of healthcare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Transmission of hospital acquired infections (HAIs) may be associated with contamination of healthcare workers' (HCWs) hands and white coats. Objective: The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of HCWs' white coats in transmitting HAIs and to determine the association between bacterial ...

  5. Molecular analysis of cross-bacterial contamination detected in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the isolate Delftia acidovorans BP(R2) and it is also coupled to protein with molecular weight 25-26 KDa. As well as, this bacterial contamination was the reason for the false positive results observed during the detection of HCV infections. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management Vol. 9(1) 2005: 5-10.

  6. Method of inactivation of viral and bacterial blood contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackett, R.; Goodrich, R.P.; Van Borssum Waalkes, M.; Wong, V.A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for inactivating viral and/or bacterial contamination in blood cellular matter, such as erythrocytes and platelets, or protein fractions. The cells or protein fractions are mixed with chemical sensitizers and irradiated with, for example, gamma or X-ray radiation

  7. Monitoring bacterial faecal contamination in waters using multiplex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monitoring of sanitary quality or faecal pollution in water is currently based on quantifying some bacterial indicators such as Escherichia coli and faecal enterococci. Using a multiplex real-time PCR assay for faecal enterococci and Bacteroides spp., the detection of faecal contamination in non-treated water can be done in a ...

  8. A survey on Bacterial Contamination of Food Supply in the West of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tehereh Faramarzi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Transfer of food born diseases is a common problem in hygiene and public health. The bacteria are the most important factors of food contamination and intoxications. The aim of this study is to determine the bacterial contamination of food supply in the west of Tehran supermarkets. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 642 samples of foods were taken randomly from west of Tehran supermarkets. The levels of bacterial contamination of the foods were assessed in the department of food and drug microbiology of lab, affiliated to Iran University of medical science. Results: Salads were the most (50% and protein products (6.36% the least rate in terms of mesophilic bacteria contamination. Also, sweets (13.46% and protein products (1.73% in terms of Coliforms. Salads (58.33% and dairy products (9.84% with respect to Escherichia coli, sweets (4.81% and salads (0% in terms of Staphylococcus aureus, sweets (4.81% and dairy products (0.39% with respect to Bacillus cereus, were the most and least contaminated foods, respectively. Conclusion: In overall, salads had the most contamination percentage with respect to mesophilic bacteria, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus (P . According to our study, we conclude that training of dealers and food suppliers are necessary and healthy principals should be followed. Also supervision on food packing and storage should be considered to prevent food microbial contamination.

  9. Bacterial contamination of traditional ice creams in Kermanshah in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Emami

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ice cream is a dairy product that is very popular during warm seasons. Ice cream can be contaminated with various microorganisms including pathogenic bacteria if hygienic procedures are not followed during preparation, distribution and preservation processes. This may put the health of people using ice cream at risk. Our study aimed to examine the bacterial contamination of traditional ice creams in Kermanshah city during 2008. Methods: During summer 2008, 80 samples of traditional ice creams were collected. The samples were examined according to the Iranian National Standard protocols for E. coli, Coliforms,  Salmonella,  Staphylococcus aureus and complete count of microorganisms. Results: Overall, 62 (77.5% samples had microbial contaminations more than the standard limit. Results showed 59 (73.75% and 54 (67.5 % of the samples contained a high number of microorganisms and coliform, respectively. Furthermore 30 (37.5% and 23 (28.75% of the samples were contaminated with E. coli and S. aureus, respectively. However, Salmonella spp. was not found in any of the ice cream samples. Conclusion: The traditional ice creams tested in Kermanshah were heavily contaminated with bacteria. It could be due to the inappropriate preparation and preservation procedures using unpasteurized milk and other materials.  Contaminations may also be induced by personals. So it is recommended to apply the hygienic procedures for preparation and preservation of ice cream including the use of pasteurized milk and other materials.

  10. Corneal erosions, bacterial contamination of contact lenses, and microbial keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcox, Mark D P; Naduvilath, Thomas J; Vaddavalli, Pravin K; Holden, Brien A; Ozkan, Jerome; Zhu, Hua

    2010-11-01

    To estimate the rate of corneal erosion coupled with gram-negative bacterial contamination of contact lenses and compare this with the rate of microbial keratitis (MK) with contact lenses. The rate of corneal erosion and contact lens contamination by gram-negative bacteria were calculated from several prospective trials. These rates were used to calculate the theoretical rate of corneal erosion happening at the same time as wearing a contact lens contaminated with gram-negative bacteria. This theoretical rate was then compared with the rates of MK reported in various epidemiological and clinical trials. Corneal erosions were more frequent during extended wear (0.6-2.6% of visits) compared with daily wear (0.01-0.05% of visits). No corneal erosions were observed for lenses worn on a daily disposable basis. Contamination rates for lenses worn on a daily disposable basis were the lowest (2.4%), whereas they were the highest for low Dk lenses worn on an extended wear basis (7.1%). The estimated rate of corneal erosions occurring at the same time as wearing lenses contaminated with gram-negative bacteria was the lowest during daily wear of low Dk lenses (1.56/10,000 [95% CI: 0.23-10.57]) and the highest during extended wear of high Dk lenses (38.55/10,000 [95% CI: 24.77-60.04]). These rates were similar in magnitude to the rates reported for MK of different hydrogel lenses worn on differing wear schedules. The coincidence of corneal erosions during lens wear with gram-negative bacterial contamination of lenses may account for the relative incidence of MK during lens wear with different lens materials and modes of use.

  11. Bacterial hand contamination and transfer after use of contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapka, Carrie A; Campbell, Esther J; Maxwell, Sheri L; Gerba, Charles P; Dolan, Michael J; Arbogast, James W; Macinga, David R

    2011-05-01

    Bulk-soap-refillable dispensers are prone to extrinsic bacterial contamination, and recent studies demonstrated that approximately one in four dispensers in public restrooms are contaminated. The purpose of this study was to quantify bacterial hand contamination and transfer after use of contaminated soap under controlled laboratory and in-use conditions in a community setting. Under laboratory conditions using liquid soap experimentally contaminated with 7.51 log(10) CFU/ml of Serratia marcescens, an average of 5.28 log(10) CFU remained on each hand after washing, and 2.23 log(10) CFU was transferred to an agar surface. In an elementary-school-based field study, Gram-negative bacteria on the hands of students and staff increased by 1.42 log(10) CFU per hand (26-fold) after washing with soap from contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers. In contrast, washing with soap from dispensers with sealed refills significantly reduced bacteria on hands by 0.30 log(10) CFU per hand (2-fold). Additionally, the mean number of Gram-negative bacteria transferred to surfaces after washing with soap from dispensers with sealed-soap refills (0.06 log(10) CFU) was significantly lower than the mean number after washing with contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers (0.74 log(10) CFU; P soap (P soap from bulk-soap-refillable dispensers can increase the number of opportunistic pathogens on the hands and may play a role in the transmission of bacteria in public settings.

  12. Wautersia: The Contingency Water Container Bacterial Contamination Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkedi, Brienne; Labuda, Laura; Bruce, Rebekah

    2009-01-01

    The Orbiter delivers water to the International Space Station (ISS) in Contingency Water Containers (CWCs) on each flight to the ISS. These CWCs are routinely sampled during each mission to verify the quality of the delivered water. Of the 5 samples returned on STS118/ 13A.1 in August 2007, two exhibited microbial growth exceeding potable water acceptability limits and historical data by orders of magnitude . The microbe was identified as Wautersia species and an investigation was launched to find the source of the contamination. Since then, samples collected on subsequent flights indicated additional CWCs had the same bacteria, as well as several on-orbit systems. An investigation was launched to try to find and address the source of the bacterial contamination. This paper will discuss how Wautersia was found, what Wautersia is, the investigation, and resolution.

  13. MASS SPECTROMETRY PROTEOMICS METHOD AS A RAPID SCREENING TOOL FOR BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION OF FOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    MASS SPECTROMETRY PROTEOMICS METHOD AS A RAPID SCREENING TOOL FOR BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION OF FOOD ECBC-TR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Method as a Rapid Screening Tool for Bacterial Contamination of Food 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...the MSPM to correctly classify whether or not food samples were contaminated with Salmonella enterica serotype Newport in this blinded pilot study

  14. Bacterial contamination hypothesis: a new concept in endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khaleque N; Fujishita, Akira; Hiraki, Koichi; Kitajima, Michio; Nakashima, Masahiro; Fushiki, Shinji; Kitawaki, Jo

    2018-04-01

    Endometriosis is a multifactorial disease that mainly affects women of reproductive age. The exact pathogenesis of this disease is still debatable. The role of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in endometriosis were investigated and the possible source of endotoxin in the pelvic environment was examined. The limulus amoebocyte lysate test was used to measure the endotoxin levels in the menstrual fluid and peritoneal fluid and their potential role in the growth of endometriosis was investigated. Menstrual blood and endometrial samples were cultured for the presence of microbes. The effect of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) treatment on intrauterine microbial colonization (IUMC) and the occurrence of endometritis was investigated. Lipopolysaccharide regulates the pro-inflammatory response in the pelvis and growth of endometriosis via the LPS/TLR4 cascade. The menstrual blood was highly contaminated with Escherichea coli and the endometrial samples were colonized with other microbes. A cross-talk between inflammation and ovarian steroids or the stress reaction also was observed in the pelvis. Treatment with GnRHa further worsens intrauterine microbial colonization, with the consequent occurrence of endometritis in women with endometriosis. For the first time, a new concept called the "bacterial contamination hypothesis" is proposed in endometriosis. This study's findings of IUMC in women with endometriosis could hold new therapeutic potential in addition to the conventional estrogen-suppressing agent.

  15. Bacterial Hand Contamination and Transfer after Use of Contaminated Bulk-Soap-Refillable Dispensers▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapka, Carrie A.; Campbell, Esther J.; Maxwell, Sheri L.; Gerba, Charles P.; Dolan, Michael J.; Arbogast, James W.; Macinga, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk-soap-refillable dispensers are prone to extrinsic bacterial contamination, and recent studies demonstrated that approximately one in four dispensers in public restrooms are contaminated. The purpose of this study was to quantify bacterial hand contamination and transfer after use of contaminated soap under controlled laboratory and in-use conditions in a community setting. Under laboratory conditions using liquid soap experimentally contaminated with 7.51 log10 CFU/ml of Serratia marcescens, an average of 5.28 log10 CFU remained on each hand after washing, and 2.23 log10 CFU was transferred to an agar surface. In an elementary-school-based field study, Gram-negative bacteria on the hands of students and staff increased by 1.42 log10 CFU per hand (26-fold) after washing with soap from contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers. In contrast, washing with soap from dispensers with sealed refills significantly reduced bacteria on hands by 0.30 log10 CFU per hand (2-fold). Additionally, the mean number of Gram-negative bacteria transferred to surfaces after washing with soap from dispensers with sealed-soap refills (0.06 log10 CFU) was significantly lower than the mean number after washing with contaminated bulk-soap-refillable dispensers (0.74 log10 CFU; P soap (P soap from bulk-soap-refillable dispensers can increase the number of opportunistic pathogens on the hands and may play a role in the transmission of bacteria in public settings. PMID:21421792

  16. Bacterial community analysis of contaminant soils from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M.H.; Chapon, V.; Berthomieu, C.; Piette, L.; Le Marrec, C.; Coppin, F.; Fevrier, L.; Martin-Garin, A.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Shortly after the Chernobyl accident in 1986, vegetation, contaminated soil and other radioactive debris were buried in situ in trenches. The aims of this work are to analyse the structure of bacterial communities evolving in this environment since 20 years, and to evaluate the potential role of microorganisms in radionuclide migration in soils. Therefore, soil samples exhibiting contrasted radionuclides content were collected in and around the trench number 22. Bacterial communities were examined using a genetic fingerprinting method that allowed a comparative profiling of the samples (DGGE), with universal and group-specific PCR primers. Our results indicate that Chernobyl soil samples host a wide diversity of Bacteria, with stable patterns for Firmicutes and Actinobacteria and more variable for Proteobacteria. A collection of 650 aerobic and anaerobic culturable isolates was also constructed. A phylogenetic analysis of 250 heterotrophic aerobic isolates revealed that 5 phyla are represented: Beta-, Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and spore-forming Firmicutes, which is largely dominant. These collection will be screened for the presence of radionuclide-accumulating species in order to estimate the potential influence of microorganisms in radionuclides migration in soils

  17. Traditional insulin-use practices and the incidence of bacterial contamination and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, L M; Bingham, P R; Riddle, M C

    1984-01-01

    While complex procedures are usually recommended to prevent infection at insulin injection sites, adherence to these procedures is imperfect and their value incompletely established. Among 254 adult insulin users in two clinic populations, the reported prevalence of complete performance of four traditional insulin-use practices (handwashing, vial prep, skin prep, discarding of plastic syringes after one use) was 29%, and none of the individual practices considered was performed regularly by more than two-thirds of the subjects. Even so, there was no infection at 2828 injection sites, and there was no significant bacterial contamination of insulin or syringes. These findings fail to support the view that traditional practices provide protection to insulin users against infection or bacterial growth in insulin or syringes. The authors suggest that modification of traditional teaching methods would do no harm, and that benefits could include financial savings, improved client success with self-care, and enhanced health care provider credibility.

  18. [Identification of bacterial contamination in liquid soap for hospital use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Joselany Afio; Lima, Maria Alzete; Di Ciero Miranda, Maira; Serufo, José Carlos; Ponte, Paulo Roberto Lins

    2011-03-01

    This study performed a bacteriological analysis of the liquid soap in dispensers that health professionals use for hand washing. This exploratory, cross-sectional study was developed at the hospitalization units of a medium-sized hospital in Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. Data were collected between May and July 2007. Fifty-nine liquid soap dispensers were analyzed, of which 33 contained the following microorganisms: Burkholderia cepacia (14), Pseudomonas putidas (9), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3), Klebsiella pneumoniae (3), Enterobacter clocae (2), and Pseudomonas luteola (2). The units with the largest number of contaminated samples were the surgical (n=7) and the dermatological clinics (n=4). Contamination was also found in an original flask of the same lot of liquid soap used to fill up the dispensers. In conclusion, there is a need to regulate and control the quality of these products in the production lines as well as during use in hospital services, mainly because they are used to prevent hospital infection.

  19. Procedures involving lipid media for detection of bacterial contamination in breweries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vuuren, H J; Louw, H A; Loos, M A; Meisel, R

    1977-02-01

    The liquid equivalent of universal beer agar, designated universal beer liquid medium, and its beer-free equivalent, universal liquid medium (UL), were equally effective in demonstrating bacterial contamination in 120 of 200 samples from different stages of commercial brewing process. Growth of the contaminants after 3 days was consistently more luxuriant in the UL medium. A yeast-water substrate medium failed to reveal many contaminants detected with UL in 392 samples from three breweries and revealed only a few not detected with UL. The use of UL and a lactose-peptone medium, with microscope examination of the media for bacterial growth, permitted detection of 93% of the known contaminants compared to 87%, detected with UL alone; this combination or universal beer liquid medium plus lactose-peptone medium can therefore be recommended for the detection of bacterial contaminants in brewery samples. Bacterial contamination of pitching yeasts appeared to be a particular problem in the breweries investigated.

  20. Analysis of Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on Vannamei Shrimp using binary logit model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktaviana, P. P.; Fithriasari, K.

    2018-04-01

    Mostly Indonesian citizen consume vannamei shrimp as their food. Vannamei shrimp also is one of Indonesian exports comodities mainstay. Vannamei shrimp in the ponds and markets could be contaminated by Salmonella sp bacteria. This bacteria will endanger human health. Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on vannamei shrimp could be affected by many factors. This study is intended to identify what factors that supposedly influence the Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on vannamei shrimp. The researchers used the testing result of Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on vannamei shrimp as response variable. This response variable has two categories: 0 = if testing result indicate that there is no Salmonella sp on vannamei shrimp; 1 = if testing result indicate that there is Salmonella sp on vannamei shrimp. There are four factors that supposedly influence the Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on vannamei shrimp, which are the testing result of Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on farmer hand swab; the subdistrict of vannamei shrimp ponds; the fish processing unit supplied by; and the pond are in hectare. This four factors used as predictor variables. The analysis used is Binary Logit Model Approach according to the response variable that has two categories. The analysis result indicates that the factors or predictor variables which is significantly affect the Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on vannamei shrimp are the testing result of Salmonella sp bacterial contamination on farmer hand swab and the subdistrict of vannamei shrimp ponds.

  1. Bacterial contamination of table eggs and the influence of housing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reu, de K.; Messens, W.; Heyndrickx, M.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Uyttendaele, M.; Herman, L.

    2008-01-01

    With the introduction of alternative housing systems for laying hens in the EU, recent research has focussed on the bacterial contamination of table eggs, e.g. eggshell and egg content contamination. Contamination of eggshells with aerobic bacteria is generally higher for nest eggs from non-cage

  2. Platelet transfusion therapy in sub-Saharan Africa: bacterial contamination, recipient characteristics and acute transfusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Heather A.; Ddungu, Henry; Angom, Racheal; Baluku, Hannington; Kajumbula, Henry; Kyeyune-Byabazaire, Dorothy; Orem, Jackson; Ramirez-Arcos, Sandra; Tobian, Aaron A.R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Little data are available on bacterial contamination (BC) of platelet units or acute transfusion reactions to platelet transfusions (PT) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Methods This prospective observational study evaluated the rate of BC of whole blood derived platelet units (WB-PU), the utility of performing Gram stains (GS) to prevent septic reactions, characteristics of patients receiving PT and the rate of acute reactions associated with PT at the Uganda Cancer Institute in Kampala, Uganda. An aliquot of each WB-PU studied was taken to perform GS and culture using the Bactec™ 9120 instrument. Study participants were monitored for reactions. Results 337 WB-PU were evaluated for BC, of which 323 units were transfused in 151 transfusion episodes to 50 patients. The frequency of BC ranged from 0.3%–2.1% (according to criteria used to define BC). The GS had high specificity (99.1%), but low sensitivity to detect units with BC. The median platelet count prior to PT was 10,900 (IQR 6,000–18,900) cells/μL. 78% of PT were given to patients with no bleeding. Acute reactions occurred in 11 transfusion episodes, involving 13 WB-PU, for a rate of 7.3% (95%CI=3.7–12.7%) per transfusion episode. All recipients of units with positive bacterial cultures were receiving antibiotics at the time of transfusion; none experienced a reaction. Conclusions The rate of BC observed in this study is lower than previously reported in SSA, but still remains a safety issue. As GS appears to be an ineffective screening tool, alternate methods should be explored to prevent transfusing bacterially-contaminated platelets in SSA. PMID:27079627

  3. Bacterial contamination of platelet components not detected by BacT/ALERT®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, M A; Fenning, S; Maguire, K A; Morris, K G

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the possible causes for false negative results in BacT/ALERT ® 3D Signature System despite bacterial contamination of platelet units. The Northern Ireland Blood Transfusion Service (NIBTS) routinely extends platelet component shelf life to 7 days. Components are sampled and screened for bacterial contamination using an automated microbial detection system, the BacT/ALERT ® 3D Signature System. We report on three platelet components with confirmed bacterial contamination, which represent false negative BacT/ALERT ® results and near-miss serious adverse events. NIBTS protocols for risk reduction of bacterial contamination of platelet components are described. The methodology for bacterial detection using BacT/ALERT ® is outlined. Laboratory tests, relevant patient details and relevant follow-up information are analysed. In all three cases, Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the platelet residue and confirmed on terminal sub-culture using BacT/ALERT ® . In two cases, S. aureus with similar genetic makeup was isolated from the donors. Risk reduction measures for bacterial contamination of platelet components are not always effective. Automated bacterial culture detection does not eliminate the risk of bacterial contamination. Visual inspection of platelet components prior to release, issue and administration remains an important last line of defence. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  4. A Study on Foodborne Bacterial Cross-contamination During Fresh Chicken Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamma Ebrahim AlZaabi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cross-contamination of foodborne pathogens from undercooked poultry meat to ready-to-eat food has been shown to be responsible for a number of foodborne disease outbreaks. Various studies have indicated that bacterial cross-contamination occurs during food preparation where bacteria present on food contact other surfaces and cause illness. Objectives: This study evaluated the ability of bacteria to survive and cross-contaminate other foods during the preparation of fresh chicken. Salmonella spp. cross-contamination from chicken to cucumber and utensils under various food handling scenarios was determined. Methods: Two scenarios were tested: in scenario 1, cutting board and knife used for cutting chicken without washing step were sampled. In scenario 2, cutting board and knife was washed with tap water separately after cutting chicken, and subsequently used for cutting cucumber. In scenario 1, chicken, cutting board, knife, and hands were sampled, and in scenario 2, cucumber was tested. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH method, using published Salmonella specific gene probes was used for Salmonella detection in samples taken from cross-contamination scenarios. A culture-based detection by Hektoen enteric agar was used for the confirmation of Salmonella species. Results: All the samples analyzed were found to be positive for Salmonella spp. with different contamination levels. These results were further confirmed by culture based method. In scenario 1, Salmonella spp. was detected by Sal-1 and Salm-63 oligonucleotide probes in all four samples (chicken, cutting board, knife and hands. A high contamination level was observed in chicken samples in comparison to samples collected from cutting board, knife and hands. In scenario 2, Salmonella spp. was detected by Sal-1 and Salm-63 oligonucleotide probes in the cucumber with very low contamination level. Salmonella Enterica was also detected by Sal-3 and Sapath-3 in both scenarios but

  5. Isolation and screening of azo dye decolorizing bacterial isolates from dye-contaminated textile wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Mahmood

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are released into wastewater streams without any pretreatment and pollute water and soilenvironments. To prevent contamination of our vulnerable resources, removal of these dye pollutants is of greatimportance. For this purpose, wastewater samples were collected from dye-contaminated sites of Faisalabad. About200 bacterial isolates were isolated through enrichment and then tested for their potential to remove RemazolBlack-B azo dye in liquid medium. Five bacterial isolates capable of degrading Remazol Black-B azo dye efficientlywere screened through experimentation on modified mineral salt medium. Isolate SS1 (collected from wastewater ofSupreme Textile Industry was able to completely remove the Remazol Black-B dye from the liquid medium in 18 h.Further, the isolate showed the best performance at the dye concentration of 100 mg L-1 medium (pH 7 and attemperature 35oC. Similarly, yeast extract proved to be the best carbon source for decolorization purpose. Theresults imply that the isolate SS1 could be used for the removal of the reactive dyes from textile effluents.

  6. An investigation into the bacterial contamination of goniolenses in use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundon, Rachael; Scurrell, Emma; Mould, John; Hayton-Lee, Emma; Heinrich, Christine

    2017-12-18

    Objectives To report the incidence and evaluate the clinical significance of goniolens bacterial contamination in clinical use in dogs with three different usage protocols and one with an added cleaning protocol. Animals Studied and Methods Three groups of twenty dogs undergoing gonioscopy at a private practice in the UK had the goniolenses swabbed for bacteriology culture and identification prior to placement on the cornea. Three protocols of lens use, with 2 different types of goniolens, were studied. One protocol was then repeated with 21 dogs with a lens cleaning protocol prior to storage. Results Low levels of bacterial contamination were found in all 3 initial groups (10-15%). No correlation was found between usage protocol used and rate of contamination and no correlation was found between length of storage between use and contamination. All bacteria cultured were considered naturally occurring commensals for the canine eye and environment. The group with a cleaning protocol had a 4.7% contamination rate. This was not statistically different from the non-cleaning groups. Conclusions The rate of bacterial contamination of goniolenses in clinical practice is low and the bacterial contaminants consist of commensal bacteria, unlikely to be of detriment to the eye. Minimal contamination of the goniolenses was found and this did not appear to be of clinical significance. The introduction of a simple cleaning protocol did not produce a statistically significant reduction in bacterial contamination. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  7. Bacterial contaminations of informally marketed raw milk in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Milk has an outstanding nutritional quality but is also an excellent medium for bacterial growth and an important source of bacterial infection when consumed without pasteurization. Objective: To estimate the bacterial health risk of milk consumption in Accra and Kumasi, the twomajor cities in Ghana. Method: A ...

  8. The bacterial contamination rate of glucose meter test strips in the hospital setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid A.; Saeb, Amr T. M.; AlNaqeb, Dhekra M.; AlQumaidi, Hamed M.; AlMogbel, Turki A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the rate of bacterial contamination of the multi-use vial and single-use packed glucose meter strips, and to identify the type and frequency of various bacterial contamination in different hospital wards. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted by a team from the Strategic Center for Diabetes Research in 7 general hospitals in the Central region of Saudi Arabia during the period from August to September 2014 to assess the bacterial contamination rate of the unused strips. A total of 10,447 strips were cultured using proper agar media and incubated both aerobically and anaerobically. Results: The total bacterial contamination rate for the multi-use vials glucose strips was 31.7%, while single-use packed strips were not contaminated at all. Ministry of Health hospitals had the highest contamination rates compared with other hospitals. Critical, obstetric, and surgical wards had the highest bacterial isolates number, where most were in the risk group 3 according to the National Institute of Health guidelines. Staphylococcus species were the most common bacteria found. Conclusion: Glucose meter strips should be recognized as a source of bacterial contamination that could be behind serious hospital acquired infections. The hospital infection control team should adopt proper measures to implement protocols for glucose meter cleaning and glucose strips handling. PMID:27570855

  9. Perforation and bacterial contamination of microscope covers in lumbar spinal decompressive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, Georg; Spirig, José; Klasen, Jürgen; Kuster, Stefan P; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Sax, Hugo; Min, Kan

    2014-01-01

    To determine the integrity of microscope covers and bacterial contamination at the end of lumbar spinal decompressive surgery. A prospective study of 25 consecutive lumbar spinal decompressions with the use of a surgical microscope was performed. For detection of perforations, the microscope covers were filled with water at the end of surgery and the presence of water leakage in 3 zones (objective, ocular and control panel) was examined. For detection of bacterial contamination, swabs were taken from the covers at the same locations before and after surgery. Among the 25 covers, 1 (4%) perforation was observed and no association between perforation and bacterial contamination was seen; 3 (4%) of 75 smears from the 25 covers showed post-operative bacterial contamination, i.e. 2 in the ocular zone and 1 in the optical zone, without a cover perforation. The incidence of microscope cover perforation was very low and was not shown to be associated with bacterial contamination. External sources of bacterial contamination seem to outweigh the problem of contamination due to failure of cover integrity. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. High bacterial biodiversity increases degradation performance of hydrocarbons during bioremediation of contaminated harbor marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Anno, Antonio; Beolchini, Francesca; Rocchetti, Laura; Luna, Gian Marco; Danovaro, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    We investigated changes of bacterial abundance and biodiversity during bioremediation experiments carried out on oxic and anoxic marine harbor sediments contaminated with hydrocarbons. Oxic sediments, supplied with inorganic nutrients, were incubated in aerobic conditions at 20 °C and 35 °C for 30 days, whereas anoxic sediments, amended with organic substrates, were incubated in anaerobic conditions at the same temperatures for 60 days. Results reported here indicate that temperature exerted the main effect on bacterial abundance, diversity and assemblage composition. At higher temperature bacterial diversity and evenness increased significantly in aerobic conditions, whilst decreased in anaerobic conditions. In both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, biodegradation efficiencies of hydrocarbons were significantly and positively related with bacterial richness and evenness. Overall results presented here suggest that bioremediation strategies, which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity rather than the selection of specific taxa, may significantly increase the efficiency of hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated marine sediments. - Highlights: ► Bioremediation performance was investigated on hydrocarbon contaminated sediments. ► Major changes in bacterial diversity and assemblage composition were observed. ► Temperature exerted the major effect on bacterial assemblages. ► High bacterial diversity increased significantly biodegradation performance. ► This should be considered for sediment remediation by bio-treatments. - Bioremediation strategies which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity may significantly increase the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in contaminated marine sediments.

  11. MULTIPLE IMAGING TECHNIQUES DEMONSTRATE THE MANIPULATION OF SURFACES TO REDUCE BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface imaging techniques were combined to determine appropriate manipulation of technologically important surfaces for commercial applications. Stainless steel surfaces were engineered to reduce bacterial contamination, biofilm formation, and corrosion during product processing...

  12. Biofilm formation and ethanol inhibition by bacterial contaminants of biofuel fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Joseph O; Leathers, Timothy D; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Anderson, Amber M; Nunnally, Melinda S

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial contaminants can inhibit ethanol production in biofuel fermentations, and even result in stuck fermentations. Contaminants may persist in production facilities by forming recalcitrant biofilms. A two-year longitudinal study was conducted of bacterial contaminants from a Midwestern dry grind corn fuel ethanol facility. Among eight sites sampled in the facility, the combined liquefaction stream and yeast propagation tank were consistently contaminated, leading to contamination of early fermentation tanks. Among 768 contaminants isolated, 92% were identified as Lactobacillus sp., with the most abundant species being Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus mucosae, and Lactobacillus fermentum. Seven percent of total isolates showed the ability to form biofilms in pure cultures, and 22% showed the capacity to significantly inhibit ethanol production. However, these traits were not correlated. Ethanol inhibition appeared to be related to acetic acid production by contaminants, particularly by obligately heterofermentative species such as L. fermentum and L. mucosae. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Factors affecting use of ballistics gelatin in laboratory studies of bacterial contamination in projectile wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jessica J; Bost, Aaron; Muci-Küchler, Karim H; DeVeaux, Linda C

    2018-05-25

    Ballistics gelatin is a common tissue surrogate used in bacterial contamination models for projectile wounds. Although these studies have demonstrated that bacteria are transferred from the surface of the gelatin to the wound track by a projectile, quantifiable results have been inconsistent and not repeatable in successive tests. In this study, five areas of a typical contamination model in which bacterial recovery or survival are affected were identified for optimization. The first was a contaminated "skin" surrogate, where the novel use of vacuum filtration of a bacterial culture and buffer onto filter paper was employed. The other possibly problematic areas of the bacterial distribution model included the determination of bacterial survival when the contamination model is dried, survival in solid and molten gelatin, and the effect of high-intensity lights used for recording high-speed video. Vacuum filtration of bacteria and buffer resulted in a consistent bacterial distribution and recovery. The use of phosphate buffer M9 (pH 7) aided in neutralizing the ballistics gelatin and improving bacterial survival in solid gelatin. Additionally, the use of high-intensity lights to record high-speed video and the use of a 42 ° C water bath to melt the gelatin were found to be bactericidal for gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Multiple areas of a typical contamination model in which bacterial survival may be impeded were identified, and methods were proposed to improve survival in each area. These methods may be used to optimize the results of bacterial contamination models for medical applications, such as understanding the progression of infection in penetrating wounds and to identify possible sources of contamination for forensic purposes.

  14. Assessment of the bacterial contamination of hand air dryer in washrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Salmen, Saleh Hussein; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Alharbi, Naiyf S.; Zayed, M.E.; Al-Johny, Bassam O.; Wainwright, Milton

    2016-01-01

    The present study was carried out, using standard techniques, to identify and count the bacterial contamination of hand air dryers, used in washrooms. Bacteria were isolated from the air flow, outlet nozzle of warm air dryers in fifteen air dryers used in these washrooms. Bacteria were found to be relatively numerous in the air flows. Bacterially contaminated air was found to be emitted whenever a warm air dryer was running, even when not being used for hand drying. Our investigation shows th...

  15. Analysis of bacterial strains from contaminated and non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-05-02

    May 2, 2007 ... A total 18 strains were collected from non-contaminated and contaminated environments, and were purified. All purified strains were characterized for Gram reaction and biochemical analysis. Screening for bioplastic production was done by Sudan black staining. Strains isolated from non-contaminated.

  16. Overcoming bacterial contamination of fuel ethanol fermentations -- alterntives to antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel ethanol fermentations are not performed under aseptic conditions and microbial contamination reduces yields and can lead to costly "stuck fermentations". Antibiotics are commonly used to combat contaminants, but these may persist in the distillers grains co-product. Among contaminants, it is kn...

  17. Mobile laminar air flow screen for additional operating room ventilation: reduction of intraoperative bacterial contamination during total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossai, D; Dagnino, G; Sanguineti, F; Franchin, F

    2011-12-01

    Surgical site infections are important complications in orthopedic surgery. A mobile laminar air flow (LAF) screen could represent a useful addition to an operating room (OR) with conventional turbulent air ventilation (12.5 air changes/h), as it could decrease the bacterial count near the operating field. The purpose of this study was to evaluate LAF efficacy at reducing bacterial contamination in the surgical area during 34 total knee arthroplasties (TKAs). The additional unit was used in 17 operations; the LAF was positioned beside the operating table between two of the surgeons, with the air flow directed towards the surgical area (wound). The whole team wore conventional OR clothing and the correct hygiene procedures and rituals were used. Bacterial air contamination (CFU/m(3)) was evaluated in the wound area in 17 operations with the LAF unit and 17 without the LAF unit. The LAF unit reduced the mean bacterial count in the wound area from 23.5 CFU/m(3) without the LAF to 3.5 CFU/m(3) with the LAF (P contamination of the wound area significantly decreased to below the accepted level for an ultraclean OR, preventing SSI infections.

  18. Impact of oil contamination and biostimulation on the diversity of indigenous bacterial communities in soil microcosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, FF; Rosado, AS; Sebastian, GV; Casella, R; Machado, PLOA; Holmstrom, C; Kjelleberg, S; van Elsas, JD; Seldin, L

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of oil contamination and biostimulation (soil pH raise, and nitrogen, phosphate and sulphur addition) on the diversity of a bacterial community of an acidic Cambisol under Atlantic Forest. The experiment was based on the enumeration of bacterial

  19. High bacterial contamination rate of electrocautery tips during total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Hussein; Zahar, Akos; Lausmann, Christian; Gehrke, Thorsten; Fickenscher, Helmut; Suero, Eduardo M; Gebauer, Matthias; Citak, Mustafa

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the study was to quantify the bacterial contamination rate of electrocautery tips during primary total joint replacement (TJR), as well as during aseptic and septic revision TJR. A total of 150 electrocautery tips were collected between April and July 2017. TJR surgeries were divided into three groups: (1) primary, (2) aseptic and (3) septic revisions. In each group, a total of 50 electrocautery tips were collected. A monopolar electrocautery with a reusable stainless-steel blade tip was used in all cases. The rate of bacterial contamination was determined for all groups. Correlation of exposure time and type of surgery was analyzed. The overall bacterial contamination rate was 14.7% (95% CI 9.4 to 21.4%). The highest contamination rate occurred in the septic revision group (30.0%; 95% CI 17.9 to 44.6%), followed by the primary cases group (10.0%; 95% CI 3.3 to 21.8%) and the aseptic revision group (4.0%; 95% CI 0.5 to 13.7%). Exposure time did not affect the bacterial contamination rate. In 12 out of 15 (80%) contaminations identified in the septic group, we found the same causative microorganism of the prosthetic joint infection on the electrocautery tip. The bacterial contamination of the electrocautery tips is relatively high, especially during septic hip revision arthroplasty. Electrocautery tips should be changed after debridement of infected tissue.

  20. Powerful colloidal silver nanoparticles for the prevention of gastrointestinal bacterial infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Anh-Tuan; Le, Thi Tam; Nguyen, Van Quy; Tran, Huy Hoang; Dang, Duc Anh; Tran, Quang Huy; Vu, Dinh Lam

    2012-01-01

    In this work we have demonstrated a powerful disinfectant ability of colloidal silver nanoparticles (NPs) for the prevention of gastrointestinal bacterial infections. The silver NPs colloid was synthesized by a UV-enhanced chemical precipitation. Two gastrointestinal bacterial strains of Escherichia coli (ATCC 43888-O157:k-:H7) and Vibrio cholerae (O1) were used to verify the antibacterial activity of the as-prepared silver NPs colloid by means of surface disinfection assay in agar plates and turbidity assay in liquid media. Transmission electron microscopy was also employed to analyze the ultrastructural changes of bacterial cells caused by silver NPs. Noticeably, our silver NPs colloid displayed a highly effective bactericidal effect against two tested gastrointestinal bacterial strains at a silver concentration as low as ∼3 mg l −1 . More importantly, the silver NPs colloid showed an enhancement of antibacterial activity and long-lasting disinfectant effect as compared to conventional chloramin B (5%) disinfection agent. These advantages of the as-prepared colloidal silver NPs make them very promising for environmental treatments contaminated with gastrointestinal bacteria and other infectious pathogens. Moreover, the powerful disinfectant activity of silver-containing materials can also help in controlling and preventing further outbreak of diseases. (paper)

  1. Bacterial endophytes enhance phytostabilization in soils contaminated with uranium and lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Muhammad Tayyab; Najam-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Idrees, Muhammad; Ullah, Inayat; Afzal, Muhammad

    2017-10-03

    The combined use of plants and bacteria is a promising approach for the remediation of polluted soil. In the current study, the potential of bacterial endophytes in partnership with Leptochloa fusca (L.) Kunth was evaluated for the remediation of uranium (U)- and lead (Pb)-contaminated soil. L. fusca was vegetated in contaminated soil and inoculated with three different endophytic bacterial strains, Pantoea stewartii ASI11, Enterobacter sp. HU38, and Microbacterium arborescens HU33, individually as well as in combination. The results showed that the L. fusca can grow in the contaminated soil. Bacterial inoculation improved plant growth and phytoremediation capacity: this manifested in the form of a 22-51% increase in root length, 25-62% increase in shoot height, 10-21% increase in chlorophyll content, and 17-59% more plant biomass in U- and Pb-contaminated soils as compared to plants without bacterial inoculation. Although L. fusca plants showed potential to accumulate U and Pb in their root and shoot on their own, bacterial consortia further enhanced metal uptake capacity by 53-88% for U and 58-97% for Pb. Our results indicate that the combination of L. fusca and endophytic bacterial consortia can effectively be used for the phytostabilization of both U- and Pb-contaminated soils.

  2. Prevention of airborne contamination and cross-contamination in germ-free mice by laminar flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaij, D. van der; Andres, A.H.

    1971-01-01

    The efficacy of horizontal and vertical laminar flow units (equipped with high-efficiency air filters) in the prevention of cross-contamination between cages and of contamination from outside has been demonstrated. With germ-free mice and using germ-free standard techniques for sterilization and for

  3. Bacterial contamination of mussels at Mahe estuary, Malabar coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gore, P.S.; Raveendran, O.; Iyer, T.S.G.; Varma, P.R.G.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Mussel samples from the mussel bed and near-by market, beach sand, sediment and water from the Mahe Estuary, Kerala, India were analysed for the bacterial quality. Indicator bacteria such as Escherichia coli and faecal streptococci were isolated...

  4. Evaluation of bacterial contamination of 'suya' at Nsukka, Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and four (304) test samples in the course of "suya" meat processing and after display for sale were collected from seven centers for bacteria load screening. The result showed that all the samples tested were contaminated to varying degrees. The level of contamination however was highest in the fresh meat ...

  5. Bacterial contamination of water samples in Gabon, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Ehrhardt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of water is a major burden in the public health setting of developing countries. We therefore assessed the quality of water samples in Gabon in 2013. The main findings were a contamination rate with coliforms of 13.5% and the detection of a possible environmental reservoir for extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria.

  6. Distribution of bacterial contamination in a teaching hospital in Tehran - a special focus on Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaii, Mehdi; Emaneini, Mohammad; Maleknejad, Parviz; Jonaidi, Nematollah; Fooladi, Abbas Ali Imani; Aligholi, Marzieh; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Halimi, Shahnaz; Taherikalani, Morovat; Kasaeian, Amir

    2012-03-01

    There are documents that confirm the cycle of bacterial transmission between patients, staff, and the inanimate environment. The environment may have more effect on intensive care units (ICUs), because the patients who require intensive care have unstable clinical conditions and are more sensitive to infections. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of bacteria in air and inanimate surface in the ICUs and to compare the microbial levels to standard levels.Air and inanimate surface in the four ICUs of a teaching hospital underwent weekly surveillance by means of air sampler and swabs for a period of six-month. Total bacterial counts were evaluated onto trypticase soy agar and mannitol salt agar (MSA).A total of 725 samples [air (168) and inanimate surfaces (557)] were collected. The total mean ± SD CFU/m3 of airborne bacteria in all of the ICUs were 115.93 ± 48.04. The most common bacteria in air of the ICUs were Gram-positive cocci (84.2%). The total mean ± SD airborne of Staphylococcus aureus was 12.10±8.11 CFU/m3. The highest levels of S. aureus contamination were found in ventilators and bed ledges. More suitable disinfection of hospital environments and monthly rotation in utilization of the various disinfectant agents are needed for the prevention of airborne and inanimate transmission of S. aureus.

  7. High enteric bacterial contamination of drinking water in Jigjiga city ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unhcc

    Key words: Contamination, drinking water, households, enteric bacteria, Jigjiga. Introduction. Water safety ... regular sanitary checks for un-chlorinated water (9). Because of this ... 238, considering 5% non-response rate. All kebeles have.

  8. Microbial air quality and bacterial surface contamination in ambulances during patient services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Pipitsangjan, Sirikun

    2015-03-01

    We sought to assess microbial air quality and bacterial surface contamination on medical instruments and the surrounding areas among 30 ambulance runs during service. We performed a cross-sectional study of 106 air samples collected from 30 ambulances before patient services and 212 air samples collected during patient services to assess the bacterial and fungal counts at the two time points. Additionally, 226 surface swab samples were collected from medical instrument surfaces and the surrounding areas before and after ambulance runs. Groups or genus of isolated bacteria and fungi were preliminarily identified by Gram's stain and lactophenol cotton blue. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient with a p-value of less than 0.050 considered significant. The mean and standard deviation of bacterial and fungal counts at the start of ambulance runs were 318±485cfu/m(3) and 522±581cfu/m(3), respectively. Bacterial counts during patient services were 468±607cfu/m(3) and fungal counts were 656±612cfu/m(3). Mean bacterial and fungal counts during patient services were significantly higher than those at the start of ambulance runs, p=0.005 and p=0.030, respectively. For surface contamination, the overall bacterial counts before and after patient services were 0.8±0.7cfu/cm(2) and 1.3±1.1cfu/cm(2), respectively (pair samples and bacterial counts on medical instruments and allocated areas. This study revealed high microbial contamination (bacterial and fungal) in ambulance air during services and higher bacterial contamination on medical instrument surfaces and allocated areas after ambulance services compared to the start of ambulance runs. Additionally, bacterial and fungal counts in ambulance air showed a significantly positive correlation with the bacterial surface contamination on medical instruments and allocated areas. Further studies should be conducted to determine the optimal intervention to reduce

  9. Bacterial Community Dynamics in Dichloromethane-Contaminated Groundwater Undergoing Natural Attenuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Wright

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The uncontrolled release of the industrial solvent methylene chloride, also known as dichloromethane (DCM, has resulted in widespread groundwater contamination in the United States. Here we investigate the role of groundwater bacterial communities in the natural attenuation of DCM at an undisclosed manufacturing site in New Jersey. This study investigates the bacterial community structure of groundwater samples differentially contaminated with DCM to better understand the biodegradation potential of these autochthonous bacterial communities. Bacterial community analysis was completed using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of groundwater samples (n = 26 with DCM contamination ranging from 0.89 to 9,800,000 μg/L. Significant DCM concentration-driven shifts in overall bacterial community structure were identified between samples, including an increase in the abundance of Firmicutes within the most contaminated samples. Across all samples, a total of 6,134 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs were identified, with 16 taxa having strong correlations with increased DCM concentration. Putative DCM degraders such as Pseudomonas, Dehalobacterium and Desulfovibrio were present within groundwater across all levels of DCM contamination. Interestingly, each of these taxa dominated specific DCM contamination ranges respectively. Potential DCM degrading lineages yet to be cited specifically as a DCM degrading organisms, such as the Desulfosporosinus, thrived within the most heavily contaminated groundwater samples. Co-occurrence network analysis revealed aerobic and anaerobic bacterial taxa with DCM-degrading potential were present at the study site. Our 16S rRNA gene survey serves as the first in situ bacterial community assessment of contaminated groundwater harboring DCM concentrations ranging over seven orders of magnitude. Diversity analyses revealed known as well as potentially novel DCM degrading taxa within defined DCM concentration

  10. Sphingosine Prevents Bacterial Adherence to Endotracheal Tubes: A Novel Mechanism to Prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    and resists the antimicrobial properties of the host defense” [9]. Bacterial adhesion is the first step in biofilm formation [10]; thus, prevention...ETTs. Future in vitro and animal studies are necessary to establish the safety of sphingolipid coatings, and future randomized clinical trials will...SUBJECT TERMS Ventilator-associated pneumonia, VAP, Gram-negative, bacteria, endotracheal tubes, sphingosine, antimicrobial coating 16. SECURITY

  11. Bacterial contamination of ultrasound probes in different radiological institutions before and after specific hygiene training: do we have a general hygienical problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartoretti, Thomas; Sartoretti, Elisabeth; Bucher, Candid; Doert, Aleksis; Binkert, Christoph; Hergan, Klaus; Meissnitzer, Matthias; Froehlich, Johannes; Kolokythas, Orpheus; Matoori, Simon; Orasch, Christina; Kos, Sebastian; Sartoretti-Schefer, Sabine; Gutzeit, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Aim was to investigate hygienic conditions of ultrasound probes before and after hygiene training in radiology institutions in comparison to bacterial contamination in public places. In three radiology departments, bacterial contamination was evaluated using baseline agar plates for cultures taken from 36 ultrasound probes. Afterwards teams were trained by a hygiene service centre and 36 ultrasound probes were routinely disinfected with regular disinfecting wipes and then evaluated. In comparison, bacterial contamination in public places (bus poles, n = 11; toilet seats, n = 10) were analysed. Plates were routinely incubated and the number of colony forming units (CFU) analysed. Cultures taken from the probes showed a median of 53 CFU before and 0 CFU after training (p contamination of ultrasound probes prior to hygiene training proved to be high and showed higher bacterial load than toilets seats or bus poles. Radiologists should be aware that the lack of hygiene in the field of ultrasound diagnostics puts patients at risk of healthcare-associated infections. • Hospital-associated infections are a problem for patient care. • Hygiene training of staff prevents bacterial contamination of ultrasound probes. • Disinfection of ultrasound probes is an easy method to protect patients.

  12. Bacterial contamination of groundwater in urban area of Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubair, A.; Rippey, B.

    1999-01-01

    Well-water samples (in=193) were collected from urban areas of five districts of Karachi during the period 1993 to 1995 to evaluate its bacteriological quality and their impact on city environment and morbidity patterns of inhabitants. Samples were analyzed by the standard method American Public Health Association. The bacteriological contamination level suggest that the groundwater of Chaahi is mainly affected by contamination of wastewater containing high levels of coliform and faecal coliform bacteria. This study points towards serious need to control the seepage from sewerage system and use of contaminated well-water should be discouraged to reduce the incidence of water-borne diseases in order to improve the quality of life and health. (author)

  13. Physical therapy clinic therapeutic ultrasound equipment as a source for bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Henry G; Levine, David; Tillman, Larry

    2014-10-01

    A procedure commonly used in physical therapy (PT) clinics is therapeutic ultrasound (US). This equipment and associated gel comes in contact with patient skin, potentially serving as a reservoir for bacteria. In this study, we sampled US heads, gel bottle tips and gel from nine outpatient PT clinics in Southeastern Tennessee. Samples were collected using sterile swabs. At the microbiology laboratory, these swabs were used to inoculate mannitol salt agar and CHROM-MRSA agar (for Staphylococcal species) and tryptic soy broth to determine non-specific bacterial contamination. US heads, gel bottle tips and gel had variable levels of contamination. Tips of gel bottles had the highest contamination, with 52.7% positive for non-specific bacterial contamination and 3.6% positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Contamination of gel by non-specific bacteria was found in 14.5% of bottles sampled. US heads (35.5% of those sampled) had non-specific bacterial contamination, with no MRSA detected. Disinfecting US heads after initial swabbing resulted in removal of 90.9% of non-specific contamination. Gel storage at temperatures below 40 °C was found to encourage the growth of mesophilic bacteria. This study demonstrates the need for better cleaning and storage protocols for US heads and gel bottles in PT clinics.

  14. Bacterial contamination of re-usable laryngoscope blades during the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We aimed to assess the level of microbial contamination of re-usable laryngoscope blades at a public hospital in South Africa. Setting. The theatre complex of a secondary-level public hospital in Johannesburg. Methods. Blades from two different theatres were sampled twice daily, using a standardised technique, over a ...

  15. Dynamic Effects of Biochar on the Bacterial Community Structure in Soil Contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Bian, Yongrong; Wang, Fang; Xu, Min; Ni, Ni; Yang, Xinglun; Gu, Chenggang; Jiang, Xin

    2017-08-16

    Amending soil with biochar is an effective soil remediation strategy for organic contaminants. This study investigated the dynamic effects of wheat straw biochar on the bacterial community structure during remediation by high-throughput sequencing. The wheat straw biochar amended into the soil significantly reduced the bioavailability and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Biochar amendment helped to maintain the bacterial diversity in the PAH-contaminated soil. The relationship between the immobilization of PAHs and the soil bacterial diversity fit a quadratic model. Before week 12 of the incubation, the incubation time was the main factor contributing to the changes in the soil bacterial community structure. However, biochar greatly affected the bacterial community structure after 12 weeks of amendment, and the effects were dependent upon the biochar type. Amendment with biochar mainly facilitated the growth of rare bacterial genera (relative abundance of 0.01-1%) in the studied soil. Therefore, the application of wheat straw biochar into PAH-contaminated soil can reduce the environmental risks of PAHs and benefit the soil microbial ecology.

  16. Conventional and nonconventional strategies for controlling bacterial contamination in fuel ethanol fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    2018-05-25

    Ethanol bio-production in Brazil has some unique characteristics that inevitably lead to bacterial contamination, which results in the production of organic acids and biofilms and flocculation that impair the fermentation yield by affecting yeast viability and diverting sugars to metabolites other than ethanol. The ethanol-producing units commonly give an acid treatment to the cells after each fermentative cycle to decrease the bacterial number, which is not always effective. An alternative strategy must be employed to avoid bacterial multiplication but must be compatible with economic, health and environmental aspects. This review analyzes the issue of bacterial contamination in sugarcane-based fuel ethanol fermentation, and the potential strategies that may be utilized to control bacterial growth besides acid treatment and antibiotics. We have emphasized the efficiency and suitability of chemical products other than acids and those derived from natural sources in industrial conditions. In addition, we have also presented bacteriocins, bacteriophages, and beneficial bacteria as non-conventional antimicrobial agents to mitigate bacterial contamination in the bioethanol industry.

  17. Bacterial Endophytes Isolated from Plants in Natural Oil Seep Soils with Chronic Hydrocarbon Contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Lumactud, Rhea; Shen, Shu Yi; Lau, Mimas; Fulthorpe, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial endophytic communities of four plants growing abundantly in soils highly contaminated by hydrocarbons were analyzed through culturable and and culture-independent means. Given their tolerance to the high levels of petroleum contamination at our study site, we sought evidence that Achillea millefolium, Solidago canadensis, Trifolium aureum and Dactylis glomerata support high levels of hydrocarbon degrading endophytes. A total of 190 isolates were isolated from four plant species....

  18. A review of current strategies to reduce intraoperative bacterial contamination of surgical wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Surgical site infections are a mean topic in cardiac surgery, leading to a prolonged hospitalization, and substantially increased morbidity and mortality. One source of pathogens is the endogenous flora of the patient?s skin, which can contaminate the surgical site. A number of preoperative skin care strategies are performed to reduce bacterial contamination like preoperative antiseptic showering, hair removal, antisepsis of the skin, adhesive barrier drapes, and antimicrobial prophylaxis. Fu...

  19. Wound Dressing Procedure and Prevention of Contamination and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malawi Medical Journal. Wound Dressing Procedure and Prevention of Contamination and. Cross Infection. By: Chimwaza AF, MRN, MRN, Bsc (Hons) MSN Lecturer. Kachingwe-Sisya M., MRN, MRM. Bsc Nsg Edu. & Adm. MSN. Lecturer. Medical Surgical Nursing Department. Kamuzu College of Nursing. Blantyre. Malawi.

  20. Method of preventing contaminations in radioactive material handling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Shunji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the contamination on the floor surface of working places by laying polyvinyl butyral sheets over the floor surface, replacing when the sheets are contaminated, followed by burning. Method: Polyvinyl butyral sheets comprising 50 - 70 mol% of butyral component are laid in a radioactive material handling facility, radioactive materials are handled on the polyvinyl butyral sheets and the sheets are replaced when contaminated. The polyvinyl butyral sheets used contain 62 - 68 mol% of butyral component and has 0.03 - 0.2 mm thickness. The contaminated sheets are subjected to burning processing. This can surely collect radioactive materials and the sheets have favorable burnability, releasing no corrosive or deleterious gases. In addition, they are inexpensive and give no hindrance to the workers walking. (Takahashi, M.)

  1. The Evaluation of Bacterial Contamination of Active Radiography Apparatus in Dental Centers of Hamadan City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Eskandarloo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: During the most dental procedures, contamination of devices with blood, saliva and other body fluids, which is the most important factor for transmission of infectious diseases, is inevitable. Therefore principles of infection control should be carefully considered in the dentistry. The purpose of this study was the evaluation of bacterial contamination of active radiographic apparatus in dental centers of Hamadan city in year 2003. Materials & Methods : In this cross-sectional study 37 radiographic apparatus in dental centers of Hamadan were evaluated. Samples were collected from four area (25 cm2 each that are frequently touched by dentists, personnel, etc. using a swab. The swab was inserted into the carrier media containing thioglycolate, a smear was obtained from the solution and remaining solution was cultured in blood agar. Smear and blood agar cultures were transferred to microbiology lab to determine bacterial contamination level as well as bacterial typing. According to WHO criteria the area which has more than 10 microorganism/cm2 is considered as contaminated. Results: It was found that 13 of radiographic apparatus(35% were contaminated, the most frequent bacterial type detected in this study was micrococcus (75.7% and the least were enterobacter and nocardia (2.7% each. Antiseptic materials used for decontamination of the devices were as follow : Alcohol (43.2% , Deconex (32.4% , Micro10 (18.9% , Savlon (10.8% , Hypochlorid (5.4% , Glutaraldehyde (2.7%. Conclusion: Based on the results (35% bacterial contamination it can be concluded that careful performance of infection control principles, daily decontamination of devices and offering periodic instructions for dental personnel are essential.

  2. Study of correlation between viral and bacterial contamination of waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoffi, Nessrine

    2013-01-01

    Our study was developped following two main axes: the detection of fecal indicators (Escherichia coli) and the investigation of enteroviruses indicators of viral contamination in 3 Tunisian WWTP residues. The detection of enetroviruses was performed by real time PCR. Enteroviruses were detected in all samples whiles, 26 pour cent strongly positive, 53 pour cent moderately positive and 21 pour cent weakly positive. In addition, all samples were contaminated by E.coli with a decrease of concentration in effluent compared to influent. The results showed that E. coli is sensitive to biological treatment in charguia. A correlation between viral and bacterial contamination may be considered.

  3. Bacterial community profile of contaminated soils in a typical antimony mining site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ningning; Zhang, Suhuan; He, Mengchang

    2018-01-01

    The soils around the world's largest antimony mine have been contaminated by high concentrations of Sb and As, which might influence microbial diversity in the surrounding soils. The ecological effects of bioavailable Sb and As on the composition and diversity of microbial community in soils remain unknown. In this study, the relative abundance, taxonomic diversity and composition of bacterial community in soils from a typical Sb mine area, and the relationship between the bacterial community and bioavailable concentrations as well as environmental factors have been investigated comprehensively using high-throughput sequencing (HTS) and diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT). The results indicated that Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, and Cyanobacteria were the dominant bacterial populations at phylum level in all soil samples, accounting for more than 80% of the bacteria sequenced. The abundance and diversity of bacterial community vary along a metal contamination gradient. Redundancy discriminate analysis (RDA) revealed that 74.74% of bacterial community variation in the contaminated soils was explained by six environmental factors (pH, Sb DGT , As DGT , potential ecological risk index (RI), TC, TN), among which pH, Sb DGT , and As DGT were dominant factors influencing the composition and diversity of bacteria. This study contributes to our understanding of microbial diversity in a local ecosystem and introduces the option of studying bioavailable Sb and As using DGT.

  4. Gamma radiation effects on bacterial contamination and organoleptic characteristics of frozen Ponaeus Monodon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motamedi Sedeh, F.; Afsharian, R.; Zolfagarieh, H.; Nikbakht, M.; Shafaee, S. K.; Ayazi, M.; Fatolahi, H.; Moharami, A.; Babaee, M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was the application of irradiation process to decrease bacterial contamination of the penaeus monodon. The shrimp samples were obtained from Hormozgan and were sent to the microbiological laboratory. Bacterial contamination of shrimp were determined by counting the aerobic mesophil bacteria, Staphylococcus areus, Coliforms, Vibrio. parahaemolyticus and Salmonella. The shrimp samples were irradiated at different doses of gamma ray. Finally, the optimum dose of the gamma ray for bacterial decontamination of shrimp, especially of Vibrio Parahaemolyticus, was obtained to be 2 kGy. Also, the chemical factors of irradiated and non-irradiated samples such as Protein, Fat, total volatile Nitrogen, Non Protein Nitrogen, Peroxide Value and Amino Acids were measured. There were not any important difference among them. Also, there were not any significant difference between total volatile Nitrogen and Peroxide Value (P>0.05) for the irradiated and non-irradiated shrimp samples. Study of bacterial contaminations of the irradiated and non irradiated samples after 12 months showed that irradiation by 2 kGy can control the microbial contaminations. Four types of films for packaging: Pet.pe, Pp.pe, Bopp, and Pe.20 were used for storage of the irradiated and non irradiated shrimp samples in-18 d egree C during 12 months. All of the packages were studied on the aspects of color, odor, tissue and taste of shrimp samples and elasticity and pressing of packages. For the irradiated and non irradiated shrimp Pet.pe and Pp.pe were preferred, respectively.

  5. Sterile paper points as a bacterial DNA-contamination source in microbiome profiles of clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horst, J.; Buijs, M.J.; Laine, M.L.; Wismeijer, D.; Loos, B.G.; Crielaard, W.; Zaura, E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives High throughput sequencing of bacterial DNA from clinical samples provides untargeted, open-ended information on the entire microbial community. The downside of this approach is the vulnerability to DNA contamination from other sources than the clinical sample. Here we describe

  6. Role of lauric acid-potassium hydroxide concentration on bacterial contamination of spray washed broiler carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed in a spray cabinet with various concentrations of lauric acid (LA)-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions. Fifty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing line of...

  7. Preventing Bacterial Infections using Metal Oxides Nanocoatings on Bone Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceac, L. D.; Straticiuc, S.; Hanganu, E.; Stafie, L.; Calin, G.; Gavrilescu, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays bone implant removal is caused by infection that occurs around it possibly acquired after surgery or during hospitalization. The purpose of this study was to reveal some metal oxides applied as coatings on bone implant thus limiting the usual antibiotics-resistant bacteria colonization. Therefore ZnO, TiO2 and CuO were synthesized and structurally and morphologically analized in order to use them as an alternative antimicrobial agents deposited on bone implant. XRD, SEM, and FTIR characterization techniques were used to identify structure and texture of these nanoscaled metal oxides. These metal oxides nanocoatings on implant surface play a big role in preventing bacterial infection and reducing surgical complications.

  8. Contaminants in blood cultures: importance, implications, interpretation and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargère, S; Cormier, H; Verdon, R

    2018-04-03

    Despite the development of new microbiologic technologies, blood cultures (BCs) remain the first-line tool for the diagnosis of bloodstream infections. Their diagnostic value may be affected when a microorganism of questionable evidence is isolated-for example, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Bacillus spp., viridans group streptococci, Corynebacterium spp., Propionibacterium spp. and Micrococcus spp. Finally, making a correct diagnosis of pathogenicity (vs. contamination) is challenging. To review the current ways of dealing with the problem of BC contaminants (BCCs) and to provide practical suggestions to decrease BCC rates. PubMed electronic databases and existing reviews were searched up to December 2017 to retrieve relevant publications related to the topic. This review describes the burden of BCC and analyses the main current issues and controversies in interpreting the occurrence of potential BC contaminants. It focuses on the best-described approaches to decide whether BCC is present and discusses the different strategies of prevention in adults. Each institution should have an efficient policy to prevent BCC, emphasizing the importance of following guidelines for prescribing and collecting BCs. Training healthcare workers should focus on detrimental influence on patient care and highlight the work and costs due to contaminants. The accurate differentiation of a contaminant from a true pathogen relies on a multidisciplinary approach and the clinical judgement of experienced practitioners. Copyright © 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. EFFECT OF REFINED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS CONTAMINATION ON BACTERIAL POPULATION AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CULTIVATED AGRICULTURAL SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale Sogo Olalemi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation into the effect of refined petroleum products contamination on bacterial population and physicochemical characteristics of cultivated agricultural soil was carried out. The soil samples obtained from the Teaching and Research Farm, Obakekere, Federal University of Technology, Akure, Ondo State were contaminated with varying volumes of petrol, diesel and kerosene. The results revealed higher bacterial populations in uncontaminated soils than contaminated soils. The counts of bacteria ranged from 3.0 × 105 to 5.0 × 105 cfu/g in uncontaminated soils and 1.0 × 105 to 3.0 × 105 cfu/g in contaminated soils. The isolated bacteria were identified as Bacillus subtilis, Flavobacterium lutescens, Micrococcus luteus, Corynebacterium variabilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens. The contamination had no significant effect on pH, potassium, sodium, organic carbon and nitrogen content of the soils, while the moisture, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium content of the contaminated soils were significantly different (P < 0.05 compared with the uncontaminated soils. The ability of Bacillus subtilis, Flavobacterium lutescens, Micrococcus luteus, and Pseudomonas fluorescens to utilize the refined petroleum products suggest that these bacteria had potential to bioremediate petroleum contaminated soils.

  10. Broad-Range Bacterial Capture from Fluid-Samples: Implications for Amplification-Free Contamination Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika WEBER

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fluid-Screen, Inc. presents a bacterial concentration and filtration method based on dielectrophoresis and alternating current kinetics. Dielectrophoresis has been previously shown to induce particle motion; however, bacterial capture efficiency and reproducibility have consistently been low, reducing its potential for practical applications. In this study, we introduce a novel, patent-pending electrode system optimized to simultaneously capture a wide range of bacterial species from a variety of aqueous solutions. Specifically, we show that the method of dielectrophoresis used induces responses in both characteristic Gram- negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis bacteria, as well as with Bacillus subtilis and Aestuariimicrobium kwangyangense. We have adapted the electrode design to create a bacterial sample preparatio unit, termed the sample sorter, that is able to capture multiple bacterial species and release them simultaneously for bacterial concentration and exchange from complex matrices to defined buffer media. This technology can be used on its own or in conjunction with standard bacterial detection methods such as mass spectroscopy. The Fluid-Screen product will dramatically improve testing and identification of bacterial contaminants in various industrial settings by eliminating the need for amplification of samples and by reducing the time to identification.

  11. Bacterial contamination of surgeons' gloves during shunt insertion; a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Preben; Ejlertsen, Tove; Aaen, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a major cause of shunt dysfunction. It is well-known that the majority of pathogenic micro-organisms are low-virulent bacteria normally found on intact skin. Probably shunts become contaminated during surgery either by contact to the patient skin, or contact from contaminated...... gloves or instruments. This study was performed to find out to what extent gloves become contaminated during shunt surgery. Gloves used during shunt implantation were examined in 10 operations. Shunt implantation was done using recommended precautions to avoid infection, including prophylactic...... nurse and assistant were contaminated with micro-organisms less than 15 min after surgery has been commenced and before the shunts were handled. This study offers a feasible, simple and logical explanation of how shunts may become contaminated and infected. A simple measure would be to change the outer...

  12. Assessment of bacterial contamination in the sectors of Clinical Medicine and Surgery Small Animal Veterinary Hospital, UFCG, PB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Alves Dias

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Dias R.A., Souza A.P. & Garino Júnior F. [Assessment of bacterial contamination in the sectors of Clinical Medicine and Surgery Small Animal Veterinary Hospital, UFCG, PB.] Avaliação da contaminação bacteriana nos setores de Clínica e Cirurgia de Pequenos Animais do Hospital Veterinário da UFCG, PB. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(2:173-177, 2015. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Av. Universitária, s/n, Bairro Santa Cecília, Patos, PB 58708-110, Brasil. E-mail: rafa.ad@hotmail.com With this study aimed to evaluate bacterial contamination sectors Clinic and Surgery Small Animal Veterinary Hospital UFCG, in order to prevent infections in patients attending hospital. An assessment of the environmental contamination of sectors before and after disinfection, where was collected samples of air, surfaces and hands of people who deal directly with the animals. Then the test was made of the effectiveness of disinfectants used. Of the 40 samples collected, was identified in 5 of them (12.5% Enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli and Klebisiella pneumoniae and in 22 samples (55% was identified Staphylococcus coagulase negative and positive. Was seen in the quantitative analysis that the number of cfu in some sample was above the indicated. The test showed that the disinfectant solution was effective against all micro-organisms found in the environments. The results indicate that more attention to procedures performed in the disinfection of areas evaluated, and also include measures to prevent contamination at these sites.

  13. Nanosized Selenium: A Novel Platform Technology to Prevent Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi

    As an important category of bacterial infections, healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are considered an increasing threat to the safety and health of patients worldwide. HAIs lead to extended hospital stays, contribute to increased medical costs, and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In the United States, infections encountered in the hospital or a health care facility affect more than 1.7 million patients, cost 35.7 billion to 45 billion, and contribute to 88,000 deaths in hospitals annually. The most conventional and widely accepted method to fight against bacterial infections is using antibiotics. However, because of the widespread and sometimes inappropriate use of antibiotics, many strains of bacteria have rapidly developed antibiotic resistance. Those new, stronger bacteria pose serious, worldwide threats to public health and welfare. In 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported antibiotic resistance as a global serious threat that is no longer a prediction for the future but is now reality. It has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country. The most effective strategy to prevent antibiotic resistance is minimizing the use of antibiotics. In recent years, nanomaterials have been investigated as one of the potential substitutes of antibiotics. As a result of their vastly increased ratio of surface area to volume, nanomaterials will likely exert a stronger interaction with bacteria which may affect bacterial growth and propagation. A major concern of most existing antibacterial nanomaterials, like silver nanoparticles, is their potential toxicity. But selenium is a non-metallic material and a required nutrition for the human body, which is recommended by the FDA at a 53 to 60 μg daily intake. Nanosized selenium is considered to be healthier and less toxic compared with many metal-based nanomaterials due to the generation of reactive oxygen species from metals, especially heavy metals. Therefore, the objectives of

  14. Identification and elimination of bacterial contamination during in vitro propagation of Guadua angustifolia Kunth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadha, Harleen Kaur; Salwan, Richa; Kasana, Ramesh Chand; Anand, Manju; Sood, Anil

    2012-04-01

    Guadua angustifolia Kunth is a very important bamboo species with significant utility in pharmaceutical, paper, charcoal, and construction industries. Microbial contamination is a major problem encountered during establishment of in vitro cultures of Guadua. This study has been designed to analyze the identity of contaminating bacteria and to develop the strategy to eliminate them during micropropagation of Guadua. We isolated and consequently analyzed partial sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene to identify two contaminating bacteria as (1) Pantoea agglomerans and (2) Pantoea ananatis. In addition, we also- performed antibiotic sensitivity testing on these bacterial isolates. We identified kanamycin and streptomycin sulfate as potentially useful antibiotics in eliminating the contaminating bacteria. We grew shoots on multiplication medium containing BAP (2 mg/l) and adenine sulfate (10 mg/l) supplemented with kanamycin (10 μg/ml) for 10 days and transferred them to fresh medium without antibiotics and found that bacterial growth was inhibited. Moreover, we observed intensive formation of high-quality shoots. Streptomycin sulfate also inhibited bacterial growth but at higher concentration. We also demonstrated that shoots grown in streptomycin sulfate tended to be shorter and had yellow leaves. Thus, we have developed a novel strategy to identify and inhibit intriguing microbial contaminations of (1) Pantoea agglomerans and (2) Pantoea ananatis during establishment of in vitro cultures of Guadua. This would improve in vitro establishment of an important bamboo, Guadua angustifolia Kunth for large scale propagation.

  15. Bacterial Contamination of Iranian Paper Currency and Their Antibiotic Resistance Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Firoozeh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paper currency is used in exchange for services, and thisis why the circulation of paper currency from person to person expandsmicroorganisms. Objectives:: Paper banknotes would be a vector for transmission of pathogenic microorganisms through handling. This study aimed to determine bacterial contamination of Iranian paper currencies in circulation and their antibiotic resistance patterns. Materials and Methods: In this study, 337 currency notes of different value were collected from markets, shops, restaurants, bus stations and banks in Kashan, Iran during April 2015 to March 2016. The currency notes transferred to microbiology laboratory and were tested for bacterial contamination using standard microbiological methods. Antibiotic resistance patterns of isolated bacteria were determined by disk diffusion method according to CLSI standards. The results and data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Of 337 currency notes, 262 (77.7% were identified with bacterial contamination. Bacteria isolated from currency notes were as follows: Bacillus spp 113 (43.1%, coagulase-negative Staphylococci 99 (37.7%, Escherichia coli 20 (7.6%, Enterococci species 14 (5.3%, Staphylococcus aureus 8 (3.1%, Klebsiella spp 4 (1.5%, Shigella species 2 (0.8%, Pseudomonas species 2 (0.8%. The most and least contaminated currency notes were 50000 and 500 Rials, respectively. The most resistance rates in gram negative rods were against nalidixicacid, and ampicillin. Also most resistance rates in Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Enterococci species were against ampicillin, erythromycin and tetracycline. Conclusion: Our study revealed that the bacterial contamination among Iranian paper currency in circulation especially those obtained from certain sources including shops and bus stations is high and in most cases these bacterial isolates are antibiotic resistant strains.

  16. Surface nano-structured materials to control bacterial contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Petkova, Petya Stoyanova

    2016-01-01

    The spread of bacteria and infections, initially associated with an increased number of hospital-acquired infections, has now extended into the community causing severe and difficult to treat diseases. Additionally, many of those diseases are evoked by bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics. Overcoming the ability of bacteria to develop resistance will potentially reduce the burden of these infections on the healthcare systems worldwide and prevent thousands of deaths each year. ...

  17. Bacterial metal resistance genes and metal bioavailability in contaminated sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roosa, Stéphanie; Wattiez, Ruddy; Prygiel, Emilie; Lesven, Ludovic; Billon, Gabriel; Gillan, David C.

    2014-01-01

    In bacteria a metal may be defined as bioavailable if it crosses the cytoplasmic membrane to reach the cytoplasm. Once inside the cell, specific metal resistance systems may be triggered. In this research, specific metal resistance genes were used to estimate metal bioavailability in sediment microbial communities. Gene levels were measured by quantitative PCR and correlated to metals in sediments using five different protocols to estimate dissolved, particle-adsorbed and occluded metals. The best correlations were obtained with czcA (a Cd/Zn/Co efflux pump) and Cd/Zn adsorbed or occluded in particles. Only adsorbed Co was correlated to czcA levels. We concluded that the measurement of czcA gene levels by quantitative PCR is a promising tool which may complement the classical approaches used to estimate Cd/Zn/Co bioavailability in sediment compartments. - Highlights: • Metal resistance genes were used to estimate metal bioavailability in sediments. • Gene levels were correlated to metals using 5 different metal extraction protocols. • CzcA gene levels determined by quantitative PCR is a promising tool for Cd/Zn/Co. - Capsule Bacterial czcA is a potential biomarker of Cd, Zn and Co bioavailability in aquatic sediments as shown by quantitative PCR and sequential metal extraction

  18. Health Threats from Contamination of Spices Commercialized in Romania: Risks of Fungal and Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Adrian; Mare, Anca; Toma, Felicia; Curticăpean, Augustin; Santacroce, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The study of fungal contamination in food and mycotoxicoses is a priority today, both internationally and nationally. The purpose of this study is to have a general view over the quality of the most common spices that are sold in Romanian markets, by assessing the degree of fungal, bacterial and mycotoxin contamination in pepper and chili powders. We tested four types of spices: white pepper, black pepper, sweet and hot chili powders from 12 different distributing companies, summing a total of 35 sample types. The fungal and bacterial load was assessed by Standard Plate Count, while the mycotoxin content by High-performance liquid chromatography. Environmental conditions (humidity, pH) and the selling price for each product were also followed. Fungi were observed in 72.7% of black pepper samples, 33.3% in white pepper, 30% in sweet chili and 25% in hot chili products. The most common isolated fungus was Aspergillus spp., while Rhizopus, Mucor, Fusarium, Penicillium, Absidia species were found, in smaller percentage. Four producers (44.4%) presented fungal contamination of over 10^3 CFU/g and two producers (22.2%) presented no fungal contamination in their products. Bacterial contamination was found in 85.7% of the tested products, consisting mostly in Bacillus spp. Aflatoxin B1 was present in all the tested products, mostly in black pepper (mean value 126.3 ng/g); Ochratoxin A was present in sweet chili (mean value 328 ng/g) and Zearalenone in hot chili (mean value 604 ng/g) and sweet chili (mean value 382 ng/g). All spices presented either fungal contamination, mycotoxin contamination, or both. The high humidity and the high pH of spices represent favorable conditions for fungal growth. The selling price was partly related to the physic-chemical conditions and microbiological quality of the spices. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Viral and bacterial contamination in a sedimentary aquifer in Uruguay: evaluation of coliforms as regional indicators of viral contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamazo, Pablo; Colina, Rodney; Victoria, Matias; Alvareda, Elena; Burutatran, Luciana; Ramos, Julian; Olivera, María; Soler, Joan

    2015-04-01

    In many areas of Uruguay groundwater is the only source of water for human consumption and for industrial-agricultural economic activities. Traditionally considered as a safe source, groundwater is commonly used without any treatment. The Uruguayan law requires bacteriological (fecal) analysis for most water uses, but virological analyses are not mentioned in the legislation. In the Salto district, where groundwater is used for human consumption and for agricultural activities, bacterial contamination has been detected in several wells but no viruses analysis have been performed. The Republic University (UDELAR), with the support of the National Agency for Research and Innovation (ANII), is studying the incidence of virus and fecal bacteria in groundwater on an intensive agriculture area of the Salto district. An initial screening campaign of 44 wells was performed in which, besides total and fecal coliforms, rotavirus and adenovirus were detected. A subgroup of the screening wells (15) where selected for bimonthly sampling during a year. In accordance with literature results, single well data analysis shows that coliform and viral contamination can be considered as independent variables. However, when spatial data is integrated, coliform and viral contamination show linear correlation. In this work we present the survey results, we analyse the temporal incidence of variables like precipitation, temperature and chemical composition in well contamination and we discuss the value of coliforms as global indicator of viral contamination for the Salto aquifer.

  20. Innovative Capping Technology To Prevent The Migration of Toxic Chemicals From Contaminated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capping is a common strategy for decreasing the risk associated with contaminated sediments in lakes and streams. Historically, caps have been designed to physically isolate contaminated sediments and prevent the transport of contaminants from sediments into the water above them...

  1. The role indigenous bacterial isolates for bioremediation agent in the uranium contaminated aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochd Yazid

    2014-01-01

    A Research on the role of indigenous bacterial isolates for bio-remediation agent of the uranium contaminated in the aquatic environment has been conducted. The objective of the research is to study the role of Pseudomonas sp and Bacillus sp. have been isolated from low level uranium waste for bioremediation agent in their environment, such as the determination of efficiency of the uranium binding compared by the non indigenous bacterial, location of these binding and the influences of added acethyl acid stimulant. The uranium reduction studied was measured by weighting bacterial biomass and uranium concentration was measured by spectrophotometer. The acethyl acid stimulant addition has been done with the variation of concentration and volume. The efficiency of the uranium reduction by indigenous bacterial isolate such as Pseudomonas sp were 84.99 % and Bacillus sp were 52.70 %, so the reduction efficiency by non indigenous bacterial such as Pseudomonas aerogenes were 78.47 % and Bacillus subtilis were 45.22 % for 54 hours incubation time. The result of this research can be concluded that Pseudomonas sp and Bacillus sp. Indigenous bacterial have been isolates from the liquid uranium waste can contributed in bioremediation agent for uranium radionuclide in the environment for 60 ppm concentration with reduction efficiency 52.70 %-84.99 %, that is higher non indigenous bacterial for 54 hours incubation time, the stimulant addition of acethyl acid, the efficiency can be increased up to 99.8 %. (author)

  2. Evolution of bacterial community during bioremediation of PAHs in a coal tar contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lors, C.; Ryngaert, A.; Perie, F.; Diels, L.; Damidot, D. [University of Lille, Lille (France)

    2010-11-15

    The monitoring of a windrow treatment applied to soil contaminated by mostly 2, 3- and 4-ring PAHs produced by coal tar distillation was performed by following the evolution of both PAH concentration and the bacterial community. Total and PAH-degrading bacterial community structures were followed by 165 rRNA PCR-DGGE in parallel with quantification by bacterial counts and 16 PAH measurements. Six months of biological treatment led to a strong decrease in 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAH concentrations (98, 97 and 82%, respectively). This result was associated with the activity of bacterial PAH-degraders belonging mainly to the Gamma proteobacteria, in particular the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas genera which were detected over the course of the treatment. This group was considered to be a good bioindicator to determine the potential PAH biodegradation of contaminated soil. Conversely other species like the Beta proteobacteria were detected after 3 months when 2-, 3- and 4-ring PAHs were almost completely degraded. Thus presence of the Beta proteobacteria group could be considered a good candidate indicator to estimate the endpoint of biotreatment of this type of PAH contaminated soil.

  3. Effect of contaminant concentration on in situ bacterial sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in phenol-contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Kieran M.; Bottrell, Simon H.; Thornton, Steven F.; Peel, Kate E.; Spence, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The availability of dissolved O 2 can limit biodegradation of organic compounds in aquifers. Where O 2 is depleted, biodegradation proceeds via anaerobic processes, including NO 3 -, Mn(IV)-, Fe(III)- and SO 4 -reduction and fermentation/methanogenesis. The environmental controls on these anaerobic processes must be understood to support implementation of management strategies such as monitored natural attenuation (MNA). In this study stable isotope analysis is used to show that the relative significance of two key anaerobic biodegradation processes (bacterial SO 4 reduction (BSR) and methanogenesis) in a phenol-contaminated sandstone aquifer is sensitive to spatial and temporal changes in total dissolved phenols concentration (TPC) (= phenol + cresols + dimethylphenols) over a 5-a period. In general, 34 SO 4 -enrichment (characteristic of bacterial SO 4 reduction) is restricted spatially to locations where TPC −1 . In contrast, 13 C-depleted CH 4 and 13 C-enriched CO 2 isotope compositions (characteristic of methanogenesis) were measured at TPC up to 8000 mg L −1 . This is consistent with previous studies that demonstrate suppression of BSR at TPC of >500 mg L −1 , and suggests that methanogenic microorganisms may have a higher tolerance for TPC in this contaminant plume. It is concluded that isotopic enrichment trends can be used to identify conditions under which in situ biodegradation may be limited by the properties of the biodegradation substrate (in this case TPC). Such data may be used to deduce the performance of MNA for contaminated groundwater in similar settings.

  4. Diversity of bacterial communities along a petroleum contamination gradient in desert soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Raeid M M; Al-Kindi, Sumaiya; Al-Kharusi, Samiha

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities in oil-polluted desert soils have been rarely studied compared to their counterparts from freshwater and marine environments. We investigated bacterial diversity and changes therein in five desert soils exposed to different levels of oil pollution. Automated rRNA intergenic spacer (ARISA) analysis profiles showed that the bacterial communities of the five soils were profoundly different (analysis of similarities (ANOSIM), R = 0.45, P pollution levels. Multivariate analyses of ARISA profiles revealed that the microbial communities in the S soil, which contains the highest level of contamination, were different from the other soils and formed a completely separate cluster. A total of 16,657 ribosomal sequences were obtained, with 42-89 % of these sequences belonging to the phylum Proteobacteria. While sequences belonging to Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria were encountered in all soils, sequences belonging to anaerobic bacteria from the classes Deltaproteobacteria, Clostridia, and Anaerolineae were only detected in the S soil. Sequences belonging to the genus Terriglobus of the class Acidobacteria were only detected in the B3 soil with the lowest level of contamination. Redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that oil contamination level was the most determinant factor that explained variations in the microbial communities. We conclude that the exposure to different levels of oil contamination exerts a strong selective pressure on bacterial communities and that desert soils are rich in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria that could potentially contribute to the degradation of hydrocarbons.

  5. Characterization of bacterial community structure in a hydrocarbon-contaminated tropical African soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Lateef B; Ilori, Mathew O; Amund, Olukayode O; LiiMien, Yee; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2018-04-01

    The bacterial community structure in a hydrocarbon-contaminated Mechanical Engineering Workshop (MWO) soil was deciphered using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. Four hundred and thirty-seven clones cutting across 13 bacterial phyla were recovered from the soil. The representative bacterial phyla identified from MWO soil are Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes, Ignavibacteriae, Spirochaetes, Chlamydiae, Candidatus Saccharibacteria and Parcubacteria. Proteobacteria is preponderant in the contaminated soil (51.2%) with all classes except Epsilonproteobacteria duly represented. Rarefaction analysis indicates 42%, 52% and 77% of the clone library is covered at the species, genus and family/class delineations with Shannon diversity (H') and Chao1 richness indices of 5.59 and 1126, respectively. A sizeable number of bacterial phylotypes in the clone library shared high similarities with strains previously described to be involved in hydrocarbon biodegradation. Novel uncultured genera were identified that have not been previously reported from tropical African soil to be associated with natural attenuation of hydrocarbon pollutants. This study establishes the involvement of a wide array of physiologically diverse bacterial groups in natural attenuation of hydrocarbon pollutants in soil.

  6. [New container of sample: role in the reduction of bacterial contamination of standard platelet units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehri, S; Tazi, I; Loukhmass, L; Benchemsi, N

    2006-12-01

    Bacterial contamination of unstable blood products constitutes today the most frequent infectious risk transmitted by blood transfusion. Platelet concentrates are often incrimineted. As responsible germs are in general of cutaneous origin, a sample procedure with diversion of the first 20 ml during blood donation is studied. The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of this technique on bacterial contamination rate of standard platelet units prepared at the regional blood transfusion center in Casablanca. A comparative study of two types of sample pockets is made: 500 Standard Platelet concentrates (CPS) are prepared after collection using standard triple bags (Baxter) (group 1) and 560 pockets of CPS were prepared after collection using triple bags with Sample Diversion Pouch sampling system for elimination of the first 20 ml of donation (Macopharma and Terumo) (group 2). The skin was disinfected in two times with alcohol 70%. The bacteriological study was made in the two groups at the third day of conservation. Six CPS of group 1 were contaminated, of which five were staphylococci coagulase negative and one bacillus sp. Six CPS of group 2 were contaminated, of which five were staphylococci coagulase negative and one staphylococcus aureus. The bacteria isolated were those of cutaneous flora at 100%. Diversion of first 20 ml of blood donation results in a 16.6% reduction in bacterial contamination of CPS (P>0.05). The non-significant reduction in the prevalence of the bacterial infection of CP formulates the problem of the indication of the sampling devices with derivation of first 20 ml during blood collection.

  7. Evaluating the efficacy of bioremediating a diesel-contaminated soil using ecotoxicological and bacterial community indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudur, Leadin Salah; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Miranda, Ana F; Morrison, Paul D; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Ball, Andrew S

    2015-10-01

    Diesel represents a common environmental contaminant as a result of operation, storage, and transportation accidents. The bioremediation of diesel in a contaminated soil is seen as an environmentally safe approach to treat contaminated land. The effectiveness of the remediation process is usually assessed by the degradation of the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentration, without considering ecotoxicological effects. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of two bioremediation strategies in terms of reduction in TPH concentration together with ecotoxicity indices and changes in the bacterial diversity assessed using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The biostimulation strategy resulted in a 90 % reduction in the TPH concentration versus 78 % reduction from the natural attenuation strategy over 12 weeks incubation in a laboratory mesocosm-containing diesel-contaminated soil. In contrast, the reduction in the ecotoxicity resulting from the natural attenuation treatment using the Microtox and earthworm toxicity assays was more than double the reduction resulting from the biostimulation treatment (45 and 20 % reduction, respectively). The biostimulated treatment involved the addition of nitrogen and phosphorus in order to stimulate the microorganisms by creating an optimal C:N:P molar ratio. An increased concentration of ammonium and phosphate was detected in the biostimulated soil compared with the naturally attenuated samples before and after the remediation process. Furthermore, through PCR-DGGE, significant changes in the bacterial community were observed as a consequence of adding the nutrients together with the diesel (biostimulation), resulting in the formation of distinctly different bacterial communities in the soil subjected to the two strategies used in this study. These findings indicate the suitability of both bioremediation approaches in treating hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, particularly biostimulation. Although

  8. Field investigations of bacterial contaminants and their effects on extended porcine semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althouse, G C; Kuster, C E; Clark, S G; Weisiger, R M

    2000-03-15

    Field investigations (n=23) were made over a 3-yr period at North American boar studs and farms in which the primary complaint was sperm agglutination in association with decreased sperm longevity of extended semen, and increased regular returns to estrus and/or vaginal discharges across parity. Microscopic examination of extended semen from these units revealed depressed gross motility (usually semen collection and processing regardless of the semen extender used. The extended semen exhibited a high number of induced acrosome abnormalities (>20%). Sample pH was acidic (5.7 to 6.4) in 93% of the submitted samples. Aerobic culture yielded a variety of bacteria from different genera. A single bacterial contaminant was obtained from 66% of the submitted samples (n=37 doses); 34% contained 2 or more different bacterial genera. The most frequently isolated contaminant bacteria from porcine extended semen were Alcaligenes xylosoxydans (n=3), Burkholderia cepacia (n=6), Enterobacter cloacae (n=6), Escherichia coli (n=6), Serratia marcescens (n=5), and Stenotrophomonas [Xanthomonas] maltophilia (n=6); these 6 bacteria accounted for 71% of all contaminated samples, and were spermicidal when re-inoculated and incubated in fresh, high quality extended semen. All contaminant bacteria were found to be resistant to the aminoglycoside gentamicin, a common preservative antibiotic used in commercial porcine semen extenders. Eleven genera were spermicidal in conjunction with an acidic environment, while 2 strains (E. coli, S. maltophilia) were spermicidal without this characteristic acidic environment. Bacteria originated from multiple sources at the stud/farm, and were of animal and nonanimal origin. A minimum contamination technique (MCT) protocol was developed to standardize hygiene and sanitation. This protocol focused on MCT's during boar preparation, semen collection, semen processing and laboratory sanitation. Implementation of the MCT, in addition to specific recommendations

  9. Inoculum pretreatment affects bacterial survival, activity and catabolic gene expression during phytoremediation of diesel contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sumia; Afzal, Muhammad; Iqbal, Samina; Mirza, Muhammad Sajjad; Khan, Qaiser M

    2013-04-01

    Plant-bacteria partnership is a promising approach for remediating soil contaminated with organic pollutants. The colonization and metabolic activity of an inoculated microorganism depend not only on environmental conditions but also on the physiological condition of the applied microorganisms. This study assessed the influence of different inoculum pretreatments on survival, gene abundance and catabolic gene expression of an applied strain (Pantoea sp. strain BTRH79) in the rhizosphere of ryegrass vegetated in diesel contaminated soil. Maximum bacterium survival, gene abundance and expression were observed in the soil inoculated with bacterial cells that had been pregrown on complex medium, and hydrocarbon degradation and genotoxicity reduction were also high in this soil. These findings propose that use of complex media for growing plant inocula may enhance bacterial survival and colonization and subsequently the efficiency of pollutant degradation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacterial Endophytes Isolated from Plants in Natural Oil Seep Soils with Chronic Hydrocarbon Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumactud, Rhea; Shen, Shu Yi; Lau, Mimas; Fulthorpe, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial endophytic communities of four plants growing abundantly in soils highly contaminated by hydrocarbons were analyzed through culturable and culture-independent means. Given their tolerance to the high levels of petroleum contamination at our study site, we sought evidence that Achillea millefolium, Solidago canadensis, Trifolium aureum, and Dactylis glomerata support high levels of hydrocarbon degrading endophytes. A total of 190 isolates were isolated from four plant species. The isolates were identified by partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis, with class Actinobacteria as the dominant group in all species except S. canadensis, which was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria. Microbacterium foliorum and Plantibacter flavus were present in all the plants, with M. foliorum showing predominance in D. glomerata and both endophytic bacterial species dominated T. aureum. More than 50% of the isolates demonstrated degradative capabilities for octanol, toluene, naphthalene, kerosene, or motor oil based on sole carbon source growth screens involving the reduction of tetrazolium dye. P. flavus isolates from all the sampled plants showed growth on all the petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) substrates tested. Mineralization of toluene and naphthalene was confirmed using gas-chromatography. 16S based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed significant differences between the endophytic bacterial communities showing them to be plant host specific at this site. To our knowledge, this is the first account of the degradation potential of bacterial endophytes in these commonly occurring pioneer plants that were not previously known as phytoremediating plants.

  11. Bacterial endophytes isolated from plants in natural oil seep soils with chronic hydrocarbon contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhea eLumactud

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial endophytic communities of four plants growing abundantly in soils highly contaminated by hydrocarbons were analyzed through culturable and and culture-independent means. Given their tolerance to the high levels of petroleum contamination at our study site, we sought evidence that Achillea millefolium, Solidago canadensis, Trifolium aureum and Dactylis glomerata support high levels of hydrocarbon degrading endophytes. A total of 190 isolates were isolated from four plant species. The isolates were identified by partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis, with class Actinobacteria as the dominant group in all species except Solidago canadensis, which was dominated by Gammaproteobacteria. Microbacterium foliorum and Plantibacter flavus were present in all the plants, with M. foliorum showing predominance in D. glomerata and both endophytic bacterial species dominated T. aureum. More than 50% of the isolates demonstrated degradative capabilities for octanol, toluene, naphthalene, kerosene or motor oil based on sole carbon source growth screens involving the reduction of tetrazolium dye. P. flavus isolates from all the sampled plants showed growth on all the petroleum hydrocarbons substrates tested. Mineralization of toluene and naphthalene was confirmed using gas-chromatography. 16S based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed significant differences between the endophytic bacterial communities showing them to be plant host specific at this site. To our knowledge, this is the first account of the degradation potential of bacterial endophytes in these commonly occurring pioneer plants that were not previously known as phytoremediating plants.

  12. Disposal sheet for preventing scattering of radioactive contaminated material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Shun-ichi; Kurioka, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Kenjiro.

    1990-01-01

    Upon disposal of vinyl sheets at the final stage of dismantling operation for nuclear buildings, etc., radioactive contaminated materials caused by cutting concretes, etc. remain on the sheets. In view of the above, members capable of restoring original shape due to the temperature difference are attached to the sheet main body so that the sheet main body may be folded into a bag-like shape. Since the members as described above are bent upon temperature elevation in the sheets, the sheet main body is pulled by the members and then spontaneously folded into a bag-like shape. As a result, the radioactive contaminated materials remaining on the sheets are wrapped into the sheet main body free from touch to operator's hands or without scattering to the surrounding. This can prevent operator's external and internal exposure. (T.M.)

  13. Determination of Contamination Profiles of Human Bacterial Pathogens in Shrimp Obtained from Java, Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewanti-Hariyadi, R. [Center for Assessment of Traditional Foods, Department of Food Technology and Human Nutrition, Bogor Agricultural University (Indonesia); Suliantari,; Nuraida, L. [Department of Food Technology and Human Nutrition, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Bogor Agricultural University (Indonesia); Fardiaz, S. [Inter University for Food and Nutrition, Bogor Agricultural University, Bogor (Indonesia)

    2005-01-15

    Shrimp continues to be an important export commodity for Indonesia and contributed significantly to the country’s revenue. However, shrimp exports have been frequently rejected by importing countries due to filth, Salmonella and insanitary conditions. This study was conducted to evaluate the profiles of bacterial contamination of ocean and aquaculture shrimp obtained from the area of West, Central and East Java; frozen shrimp and shrimp during industry production of frozen shrimp. The study indicated that both ocean and aquaculture shrimp obtained from the study area were heavily contaminated. On the average, shrimp obtained from West Java were more contaminated than those obtained from East and Central Java. The total bacterial counts were generally higher in ocean shrimp than those of aquaculture ones. Salmonella was present in two of 32 samples of ocean shrimp and in four of 32 samples of aquaculture shrimp obtained from the study area. Vibrio cholerae was not detected in shrimp from West Java, but was found in three out of 16 samples obtained from East and Central Java. V. parahaemolyticus was frequently identified in aquaculture shrimp but absent in fresh ocean shrimp. Studies on shrimp collected from six sampling points during frozen shrimp production revealed that processing will reduce the number of total bacterial, E. coli, and Staphylococal counts. However, the processing did not effectively reduce the incidence of Salmonella or V. parahaemolyticus when the raw material has been contaminated with the pathogens. Sizing and grading as well as arrangement of shrimp before freezing were considered as the critical points where bacteria should be controlled to inhibit growth and cross contamination with bacteria such as Listeria. Implementation of Good Agricultural Practices in production of raw shrimp as well as Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point at the line processing are expected to improve the quality of fresh and frozen shrimp. (author)

  14. Survey of Bacterial and Fungal Contaminations in Iranian Alginate, Foreign Alginate and Speedex Used for Impression in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Falah Tafti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Since impression materials usually contact with saliva, blood, and oral soft tissues, their microbial contamination are harmful in immunocompromised patients. The aim of the present study was to determine the bacterial and fungal contamination in common impression materials. Materials and Methods: In current lab trial study, 5 different samples from each 4 impression materials were homogenized in 1 ml Tween 80 and then 100µl of each sample were cultured onto blood agar, EMB, or sabouraud dextrose agar. Bacterial and fungal cultures were incubated at 37º C and 30º C, respectively. The isolated bacterial and fungal colonies were enumerated and identified using specific diagnostic media and tests. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Totally 75% of samples had one or several bacterial contaminations. Iranian alginate and Speedex (putty were the most contaminated samples. On the other hand, Speedex (light body and foreign alginate showed lower contamination. Species of Micrococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacilluses, Corynebacteria, gram negative Citrobacter, Actinomycetes and Neisseria were isolated from the analyzed impression materials. Aspergillus, Penicillium, Alternaria, Cladosporium and Sepdonium were the fungi isolated from impression materials. Statistical significant difference was shown between bacterial contamination of Iranian and foreign alginates (P=0.001. There was no statistical significant differences between the bacterial and fungal isolated colonies (CFU/gr of 4 tested impression materials (P=0.21. Conclusion: Several opportunistic bacteria and fungi were isolated from impression materials especially from Iranian alginate and Speedex putty which indicated their contamination.

  15. Field-based evidence for consistent responses of bacterial communities to copper contamination in two contrasting agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eLi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper contamination on China’s arable land could pose severe economic, ecological and healthy consequences in the coming decades. As the drivers in maintaining ecosystem functioning, the responses of soil microorganisms to long-term copper contamination in different soil ecosystems are still debated. This study investigated the impacts of copper gradients on soil bacterial communities in two agricultural fields with contrasting soil properties. Our results revealed consistent reduction in soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC with increasing copper levels in both soils, coupled by significant declines in bacterial abundance in most cases. Despite of contrasting bacterial community structures between the two soils, the bacterial diversity in the copper-contaminated soils showed considerably decreasing patterns when copper levels elevated. High-throughput sequencing revealed copper selection for major bacterial guilds, in particular, Actinobacteria showed tolerance, while Acidobacteria and Chloroflexi were highly sensitive to copper. The thresholds that bacterial communities changed sharply were 800 and 200 added copper mg kg-1 in the fluvo-aquic soil and red soil, respectively, which were similar to the toxicity thresholds (EC50 values characterized by SMBC. Structural equation model (SEM analysis ascertained that the shifts of bacterial community composition and diversity were closely related with the changes of SMBC in both soils. Our results provide field-based evidence that copper contamination exhibits consistently negative impacts on soil bacterial communities, and the shifts of bacterial communities could have largely determined the variations of the microbial biomass.

  16. Bacterial microflora characteristics of plant samples from contaminated by radionuclides Chernobyl area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelena, Pavlina; Shevchenko, Julia; Molozhava, Olha; Berezhna, Valentina; Shylina, Julia; Guscha, Mykola

    2015-01-01

    Two serious nuclear accidents during the last quarter century (Chernobyl, 1986 and Fukushima, 2011) contaminated large agricultural areas with radioactivity. In radioactive areas all components of ecosystems, including microorganisms, exposed to ionizing radiation. The aim of this study was isolation and identification of dominant bacteria from plant samples, which were collected from the area of radioactive contamination and to compare it with bacteria isolated from plant collected in a non-radioactive area by their qualitative composition, physiological, biochemical and pathogenic characteristics. Bacteria were isolated from plant samples grown in a radioactive field located 5 km from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP). Physiological, biochemical and pathogenic properties were characterized from nine pure bacterial isolates. The common features of bacteria from radionuclide contaminated plant samples were increased synthesis of mucus and capsule creation. It was found that all selected isolates produce catalase, therefore, bacteria were resistant to oxidative stress. The increased pathogenicity of most bacteria isolated from the plant grown in radioactive Chernobyl area compare to the isolates from the plant without radioactive contamination was established from the phytopathogenic tests. Consequently, bacterial isolates from the plants grown in the radioactive environment tends to dominate enterobacteria similar to agents of opportunistic infections. (author)

  17. Prevalence of antibacterial resistant bacterial contaminants from mobile phones of hospital inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinod Kumar, B; Hobani, Yahya Hasan; Abdulhaq, Ahmed; Jerah, Ahmed Ali; Hakami, Othman M; Eltigani, Magdeldin; Bidwai, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    Mobile phones contaminated with bacteria may act as fomites. Antibiotic resistant bacterial contamination of mobile phones of inpatients was studied. One hundred and six samples were collected from mobile phones of patients admitted in various hospitals in Jazan province of Saudi Arabia. Eighty-nine (83.9%) out of 106 mobile phones were found to be contaminated with bacteria. Fifty-two (49.0%) coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 12 (11.3%) Staphylococcus aureus, 7 (6.6%) Enterobacter cloacae, 3 (2.83%) Pseudomonas stutzeri, 3 (2.83%) Sphingomonas paucimobilis, 2 (1.8%) Enterococcus faecalis and 10 (9.4%) aerobic spore bearers were isolated. All the isolated bacteria were found to be resistant to various antibiotics. Hence, regular disinfection of mobile phones of hospital inpatients is advised.

  18. Bacterial contamination of ready-to-use 1-L feeding bottles and administration sets in severely compromised intensive care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathus-Vliegen, L. M.; Binnekade, J. M.; de Haan, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In intensive care patients, enteral feeding requires sterile feedings because of infectious complications and adequate supplements to meet nutritional needs. Heretofore, prepacked, large-volume formula containers were developed, but bacterial contamination occurred in 4% to 15%. Our

  19. Bacterial contamination of amniotic membrane in a tissue bank from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Goodarzi, Parisa; Baradaran-Rafii, Alireza; Larijani, Bagher; Moradabadi, Leila; Rahim, Fakher; Arjmand, Babak

    2013-09-01

    Human Amniotic Membrane (AM) transplantation can promote tissue healing and reduce inflammation, tissue scarring and neovascularization. Homa Peyvand Tamin (HPT) tissue bank has focused on manufacturing human cell and tissue based products including AM. The purpose of this study is to evaluate and identify bacterial contamination of AMs that is produced by HPT for several ophthalmic applications. From July 2006 to April 2011, 122 placentas from cesarean sections were retrieved by HPT after obtaining informed consent from the donors. Besides testing donor's blood sample for viral markers, microbiological evaluation was performed pre and post processing. During tissue processing, decontamination was performed by an antibiotic cocktail including; Gentamicin, Ceftriaxone and Cloxacillin. Of 271 cesarean section AM donors who were screened as potential donors, 122 were accepted for processing and assessed for microbiological contamination. Donors' age were between 21 and 41 years (Mean = 27.61 ± 0.24). More than 92% of mothers were in their first or second gravidity with full term pregnancies. The most prevalent organisms were Staphylococci species (72.53%). After processing, contamination rates markedly decreased by 84.62% (p value = 0.013). According to our results, most of bacterial contaminations were related to donation process and the contamination pattern suggests procurement team as a source. Therefore we recommend that regular training programs should be implemented by tissue banks for procurement staff. These programs should focus on improved donor screening and proper aseptic technique for tissue retrieval. We also suggest that tissue banks should periodically check the rate and types of tissue contaminations. These data help them to find system faults and to update processing methods.

  20. Bioaugmentation of thiabendazole-contaminated soils from a wastewater disposal site: Factors driving the efficacy of this strategy and the diversity of the indigenous soil bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Evangelia S; Genitsaris, Savvas; Omirou, Michalis; Perruchon, Chiara; Stamatopoulou, Anastasia; Ioannides, Ioannis; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G

    2018-02-01

    The application of the fungicide thiabendazole (TBZ) in fruit packaging plants (FPP) results in the production of effluents which are often disposed in adjacent field sites. These require remediation to prevent further environmental dispersal of TBZ. We assessed the bioaugmentation potential of a newly isolated TBZ-degrading bacterial consortium in a naturally contaminated soil (NCS) exhibiting a natural gradient of TBZ levels (12000, 400, 250 and 12 mg kg -1 ). The effect of aging on bioaugmentation efficacy was comparatively tested in a soil with similar physicochemical properties and soil microbiota, which was artificially, contaminated with the same TBZ levels (ACS). The impact of bioaugmentation and TBZ on the bacterial diversity in the NCS was explored via amplicon sequencing. Bioaugmentation effectively removed TBZ from both soils at levels up to 400 mg kg -1 but failed at the highest contamination level (12000 mg kg -1 ). Dissipation of TBZ in bioaugmented samples showed a concentration-dependent pattern, while aging of TBZ had a slight effect on bioaugmentation efficiency. Bioaugmentation had no impact on the soil bacterial diversity, in contrast to TBZ contamination. Soils from the hotspots of TBZ contamination (12000 mg kg -1 ) showed a drastically lower α-diversity driven by the dominance of β- and γ-proteobacteria at the expense of all other bacterial phyla, especially Actinobacteria. Overall, bioaugmentation with specialized microbial inocula could be an effective solution for the recovery of disposal sites contaminated with persistent chemicals like TBZ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of an Efficient Bacterial Consortium for the Potential Remediation of Hydrocarbons from Contaminated Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Patowary, Rupshikha; Kalita, Mohan C; Deka, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia toward total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples five isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1, and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1, and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and B. cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing) has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of TPH after 5 weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer) analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons.

  2. Development of an efficient bacterial consortium for the potential remediation of hydrocarbons from contaminated sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustuvmani Patowary

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic biodegradability of hydrocarbons and the distribution of proficient degrading microorganisms in the environment are very crucial for the implementation of bioremediation practices. Among others, one of the most favorable methods that can enhance the effectiveness of bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environment is the application of biosurfactant producing microbes. In the present study, the biodegradation capacities of native bacterial consortia towards total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH with special emphasis to poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were determined. The purpose of the study was to isolate TPH degrading bacterial strains from various petroleum contaminated soil of Assam, India and develop a robust bacterial consortium for bioremediation of crude oil of this native land. From a total of 23 bacterial isolates obtained from three different hydrocarbons contaminated samples 5 isolates, namely KS2, PG1, PG5, R1 and R2 were selected as efficient crude oil degraders with respect to their growth on crude oil enriched samples. Isolates KS2, PG1 and R2 are biosurfactant producers and PG5, R1 are non-producers. Fourteen different consortia were designed involving both biosurfactant producing and non-producing isolates. Consortium 10, which comprises two Bacillus strains namely, Bacillus pumilus KS2 and Bacillus cereus R2 (identified by 16s rRNA sequencing has shown the best result in the desired degradation of crude oil. The consortium showed degradation up to 84.15% of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH after five weeks of incubation, as revealed from gravimetric analysis. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared and GCMS (Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analyses were correlated with gravimetric data which reveals that the consortium has removed a wide range of petroleum hydrocarbons in comparison with abiotic control including different aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons.

  3. Changes in the Bacterial Community Structure of Remediated Anthracene-Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Balbuena, Laura; Bello-López, Juan M.; Navarro-Noya, Yendi E.; Rodríguez-Valentín, Analine; Luna-Guido, Marco L.; Dendooven, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Mixing soil or adding earthworms (Eisenia fetida (Savigny, 1826)) accelerated the removal of anthracene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, from a pasture and an arable soil, while a non-ionic surfactant (Surfynol® 485) inhibited the removal of the contaminant compared to the untreated soil. It was unclear if the treatments affected the soil bacterial community and consequently the removal of anthracene. Therefore, the bacterial community structure was monitored by means of 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in the pasture and arable soil mixed weekly, amended with Surfynol® 485, E. fetida or organic material that served as food for the earthworms for 56 days. In both soils, the removal of anthracene was in the order: mixing soil weekly (100%) > earthworms applied (92%) > organic material applied (77%) > untreated soil (57%) > surfactant applied (34%) after 56 days. There was no clear link between removal of anthracene from soil and changes in the bacterial community structure. On the one hand, application of earthworms removed most of the contaminant from the arable soil and had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of the Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and Gemmatimonadetes, and an increase in that of the Proteobacteria compared to the unamended soil. Mixing the soil weekly removed all anthracene from the arable soil, but had little or no effect on the bacterial community structure. On the other hand, application of the surfactant inhibited the removal of anthracene from the arable soil compared to the untreated soil, but had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of Cytophagia (Bacteroidetes), Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes and Planctomycetes and an increase in that of the Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes) and Proteobacteria. Additionally, the removal of anthracene was similar in the different treatments of both the arable and pasture soil, but the

  4. Changes in the Bacterial Community Structure of Remediated Anthracene-Contaminated Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Delgado-Balbuena

    Full Text Available Mixing soil or adding earthworms (Eisenia fetida (Savigny, 1826 accelerated the removal of anthracene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, from a pasture and an arable soil, while a non-ionic surfactant (Surfynol® 485 inhibited the removal of the contaminant compared to the untreated soil. It was unclear if the treatments affected the soil bacterial community and consequently the removal of anthracene. Therefore, the bacterial community structure was monitored by means of 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in the pasture and arable soil mixed weekly, amended with Surfynol® 485, E. fetida or organic material that served as food for the earthworms for 56 days. In both soils, the removal of anthracene was in the order: mixing soil weekly (100% > earthworms applied (92% > organic material applied (77% > untreated soil (57% > surfactant applied (34% after 56 days. There was no clear link between removal of anthracene from soil and changes in the bacterial community structure. On the one hand, application of earthworms removed most of the contaminant from the arable soil and had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of the Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and Gemmatimonadetes, and an increase in that of the Proteobacteria compared to the unamended soil. Mixing the soil weekly removed all anthracene from the arable soil, but had little or no effect on the bacterial community structure. On the other hand, application of the surfactant inhibited the removal of anthracene from the arable soil compared to the untreated soil, but had a strong effect on the bacterial community structure, i.e. a decrease in the relative abundance of Cytophagia (Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes and Planctomycetes and an increase in that of the Flavobacteria (Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. Additionally, the removal of anthracene was similar in the different treatments of both the arable and pasture soil

  5. Effect of negative air ions on the potential for bacterial contamination of plastic medical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Simon J; Beggs, Clive B; Smith, Caroline F; Kerr, Kevin G; Noakes, Catherine J; Sleigh, P Andrew

    2010-04-12

    In recent years there has been renewed interest in the use of air ionizers to control the spread of infection in hospitals and a number of researchers have investigated the biocidal action of ions in both air and nitrogen. By comparison, the physical action of air ions on bacterial dissemination and deposition has largely been ignored. However, there is clinical evidence that air ions might play an important role in preventing the transmission of Acinetobacter infection. Although the reasons for this are unclear, it is hypothesized that a physical effect may be responsible: the production of air ions may negatively charge items of plastic medical equipment so that they repel, rather than attract, airborne bacteria. By negatively charging both particles in the air and items of plastic equipment, the ionizers minimize electrostatic deposition on these items. In so doing they may help to interrupt the transmission of Acinetobacter infection in certain healthcare settings such as intensive care units. A study was undertaken in a mechanically ventilated room under ambient conditions to accurately measure changes in surface potential exhibited by items of plastic medical equipment in the presence of negative air ions. Plastic items were suspended on nylon threads, either in free space or in contact with a table surface, and exposed to negative ions produced by an air ionizer. The charge build-up on the specimens was measured using an electric field mill while the ion concentration in the room air was recorded using a portable ion counter. The results of the study demonstrated that common items of equipment such as ventilator tubes rapidly developed a large negative charge (i.e. generally >-100V) in the presence of a negative air ionizer. While most items of equipment tested behaved in a similar manner to this, one item, a box from a urological collection and monitoring system (the only item made from styrene acrylonitrile), did however develop a positive charge in the

  6. Effect of negative air ions on the potential for bacterial contamination of plastic medical equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerr Kevin G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years there has been renewed interest in the use of air ionizers to control the spread of infection in hospitals and a number of researchers have investigated the biocidal action of ions in both air and nitrogen. By comparison, the physical action of air ions on bacterial dissemination and deposition has largely been ignored. However, there is clinical evidence that air ions might play an important role in preventing the transmission of Acinetobacter infection. Although the reasons for this are unclear, it is hypothesized that a physical effect may be responsible: the production of air ions may negatively charge items of plastic medical equipment so that they repel, rather than attract, airborne bacteria. By negatively charging both particles in the air and items of plastic equipment, the ionizers minimize electrostatic deposition on these items. In so doing they may help to interrupt the transmission of Acinetobacter infection in certain healthcare settings such as intensive care units. Methods A study was undertaken in a mechanically ventilated room under ambient conditions to accurately measure changes in surface potential exhibited by items of plastic medical equipment in the presence of negative air ions. Plastic items were suspended on nylon threads, either in free space or in contact with a table surface, and exposed to negative ions produced by an air ionizer. The charge build-up on the specimens was measured using an electric field mill while the ion concentration in the room air was recorded using a portable ion counter. Results The results of the study demonstrated that common items of equipment such as ventilator tubes rapidly developed a large negative charge (i.e. generally >-100V in the presence of a negative air ionizer. While most items of equipment tested behaved in a similar manner to this, one item, a box from a urological collection and monitoring system (the only item made from styrene

  7. Surface tailored organobentonite enhances bacterial proliferation and phenanthrene biodegradation under cadmium co-contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Asit; Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Patra, Ashok K.; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Co-contamination of soil and water with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metals makes biodegradation of the former extremely challenging. Modified clay-modulated microbial degradation provides a novel insight in addressing this issue. This study was conducted to evaluate the growth and phenanthrene degradation performance of Mycobacterium gilvum VF1 in the presence of a palmitic acid (PA)-grafted Arquad® 2HT-75-based organobentonite in cadmium (Cd)-phenanthrene co-contaminated water. The PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) adsorbed a slightly greater quantity of Cd than bentonite at up to 30 mg L"−"1 metal concentration, but its highly negative surface charge imparted by carboxylic groups indicated the potential of being a significantly superior adsorbent of Cd at higher metal concentrations. In systems co-contained with Cd (5 and 10 mg L"−"1), the Arquad® 2HT-75-modified bentonite (AB) and PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) resulted in a significantly higher (72–78%) degradation of phenanthrene than bentonite (62%) by the bacterium. The growth and proliferation of bacteria were supported by ABP which not only eliminated Cd toxicity through adsorption but also created a congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. The macromolecules produced during ABP–bacteria interaction could form a stable clay-bacterial cluster by overcoming the electrostatic repulsion among individual components. Findings of this study provide new insights for designing clay modulated PAH bioremediation technologies in mixed-contaminated water and soil. - Highlights: • Surface tailored organobentonite synthesised and characterised • Modified clay adsorbs Cd and reduces toxicity to Mycobacterium gilvum. • It creates congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. • It enhances phenanthrene biodegradation in metal co-contaminated condition.

  8. Surface tailored organobentonite enhances bacterial proliferation and phenanthrene biodegradation under cadmium co-contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Asit [Future Industries Institute (formerly Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal (India); Biswas, Bhabananda [Future Industries Institute (formerly Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), ACT Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Sarkar, Binoy, E-mail: binoy.sarkar@unisa.edu.au [Future Industries Institute (formerly Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), ACT Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Patra, Ashok K. [Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal (India); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.naidu@newcastle.edu.au [Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), ACT Building, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    Co-contamination of soil and water with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metals makes biodegradation of the former extremely challenging. Modified clay-modulated microbial degradation provides a novel insight in addressing this issue. This study was conducted to evaluate the growth and phenanthrene degradation performance of Mycobacterium gilvum VF1 in the presence of a palmitic acid (PA)-grafted Arquad® 2HT-75-based organobentonite in cadmium (Cd)-phenanthrene co-contaminated water. The PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) adsorbed a slightly greater quantity of Cd than bentonite at up to 30 mg L{sup −1} metal concentration, but its highly negative surface charge imparted by carboxylic groups indicated the potential of being a significantly superior adsorbent of Cd at higher metal concentrations. In systems co-contained with Cd (5 and 10 mg L{sup −1}), the Arquad® 2HT-75-modified bentonite (AB) and PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) resulted in a significantly higher (72–78%) degradation of phenanthrene than bentonite (62%) by the bacterium. The growth and proliferation of bacteria were supported by ABP which not only eliminated Cd toxicity through adsorption but also created a congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. The macromolecules produced during ABP–bacteria interaction could form a stable clay-bacterial cluster by overcoming the electrostatic repulsion among individual components. Findings of this study provide new insights for designing clay modulated PAH bioremediation technologies in mixed-contaminated water and soil. - Highlights: • Surface tailored organobentonite synthesised and characterised • Modified clay adsorbs Cd and reduces toxicity to Mycobacterium gilvum. • It creates congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. • It enhances phenanthrene biodegradation in metal co-contaminated condition.

  9. Boar semen bacterial contamination in Italy and antibiotic efficacy in a modified extender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bresciani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the study were to identify microbial flora in boar semen under field conditions in northern Italy, to investigate antibiotic resistance and sensitivity of isolated bacteria, and to evaluate elimination of bacteria after storage in two types of extenders added with different antibiotics (amikacin vs gentamicin. A total of 60 boars were collected in 13 pig farms. Bacteriological and mycological investigations were performed immediately on raw semen samples, then at 48 and 120 h of storage on semen diluted randomly in a new short-term modified extender (ME-S or in a commercial one (CRONOSTM. Bacterial contamination was found in 63% of raw semen samples and different bacterial species were isolated: E.coli, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus epidermidis and aureus, Proteus spp., Streptococcus spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. E. coli was the most isolated contaminant (53%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found only in one semen sample. The analysis of variance of factors affecting contamination levels was significant for the farm of origin (P<0.05 and not significant for the breed. Antibiotic resistance of these bacteria was assessed using different antibiotics. Significant differences (P<0.05 between observed and expected frequencies of bacterial isolates resistant or not to the antibiotics contained in the extenders were found. At 48 h of storage a reduction of aerobic contamination was found after ME-S dilution by 85.3% and after CRONOSTM by 63.8%. This paper proved the presence of pathogenic bacteria in semen. We thus believe it is highly advisable to perform periodic microbiological screening of boar semen in the swine industry to avoid the use of low sperm quality.

  10. Air suctioning during colon biopsy forceps removal reduces bacterial air contamination in the endoscopy suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavricka, S R; Tutuian, R; Imhof, A; Wildi, S; Gubler, C; Fruehauf, H; Ruef, C; Schoepfer, A M; Fried, M

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial contamination of endoscopy suites is of concern; however studies evaluating bacterial aerosols are lacking. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of air suctioning during removal of biopsy forceps in reducing bacterial air contamination. This was a prospective single-blinded trial involving 50 patients who were undergoing elective nontherapeutic colonoscopy. During colonoscopy, endoscopists removed the biopsy forceps first without and then with suctioning following contact with the sigmoid mucosa. A total of 50 L of air was collected continuously for 30 seconds at 30-cm distance from the biopsy channel valve of the colonoscope, with time starting at forceps removal. Airborne bacteria were collected by an impactor air sampler (MAS-100). Standard Petri dishes with CNA blood agar were used to culture Gram-positive bacteria. Main outcome measure was the bacterial load in endoscopy room air. At the beginning and end of the daily colonoscopy program, the median (and interquartile [IQR] range) bioaerosol burden was 4 colony forming units (CFU)/m (3) (IQR 3 - 6) and 16 CFU/m (3) (IQR 13 - 18), respectively. Air suctioning during removal of the biopsy forceps reduced the bioaerosol burden from a median of 14 CFU/m (3) (IQR 11 - 29) to a median of 7 CFU/m (3) (IQR 4 - 16) ( P = 0.0001). Predominantly enterococci were identified on the agar plates. The bacterial aerosol burden during handling of biopsy forceps can be reduced by applying air suction while removing the forceps. This simple method may reduce transmission of infectious agents during gastrointestinal endoscopies. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  11. Impact of heavy metal contamination on oxidative stress of Eisenia andrei and bacterial community structure in Tunisian mine soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughattas, Iteb; Hattab, Sabrine; Boussetta, Hamadi; Banni, Mohamed; Navarro, Elisabeth

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this work were firstly to study the effect of heavy metal-polluted soils from Tunisian mine on earthworm biochemical biomarkers and on bacterial communities and therefore to analyze the interaction between earth worms and bacterial communities in these contaminated soils. For this purpose, we had introduced earthworm Eisenia andrei in six soils: one from mine spoils and five from agricultural soils, establishing a gradient of contamination. The response of worms to the presence of heavy metal was analyzed at the biochemical and transcriptional levels. In a second time, the impact of worm on bacterial community structure was investigated using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) fingerprinting. An impact of heavy metal-contaminated soils on the oxidative status of E. andrei was observed, but this effect was dependent of the level of heavy metal contamination. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the introduction of earthworms E. andrei has an impact on bacterial community; however, the major change was observed in the less contaminated site. Furthermore, a significant correlation between earthworm oxidative status biomarkers and bacterial community structure was observed, mainly in the mine spoils. Therefore, we contribute to a better understanding of the relationships between epigenic earthworms and bacterial communities in heavy metal-contaminated soils.

  12. Sanitizer efficacy in preventing cross-contamination of heads of lettuce during retail crisping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yangjin; Jang, Hyein; Guo, Mengqi; Gao, Jingwen; Matthews, Karl R

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to provide information regarding mitigation of cross-contamination through the use of sanitizer during crisping at retail outlets. Seven non-inoculated heads and one inoculated head (≈5 log CFU/g) of lettuce were placed into commercial sink filled with 76 L of tap water (TW), electrolyzed water (EW, free chlorine: 43 ± 6 ppm), lactic acid and phosphoric acid-based sanitizer (LPA, pH 2.89), or citric acid-based sanitizer (CA, pH 2.78) and soaked for 5 min. Two subsequent batches (eight non-inoculated heads per batch) were soaked in the same solution. Soaking with EW significantly reduced the population of S. enterica (2.8 ± 1.5 log CFU/g), E. coli O157:H7 (3.4 ± 1.1 log CFU/g), and L. monocytogenes (2.6 ± 0.7 log CFU/g) inoculated on Romaine lettuce compared to TW, LPA, and CA (p lettuce, EW significantly reduced populations of S. enterica and E. coli O157:H7, but not L. monocytogenes compared to other treatments. No significant difference was noted between TW, LPA, and CA in reducing foodborne pathogens (p > 0.05) or preventing cross-contamination. Soaking with EW prevented cross-contamination among lettuce heads and controlled bacterial populations in crisping water for three consecutive batches. EW may be an effective option as a sanitizer to minimizing the cross-contamination of leafy greens during the retail crisping. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of irradiation on the survival of bacterial contaminants in food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary concern about microbial safety of irradiated food is the survival of pathogenic spore forming bacteria. Clostridium sporogenes was selected as the spore forming test organism for conducting inoculated pack studies for its similarities to the most toxigenic Cl. botulinum, in radiation resistance. Minimum radiation dose applied (45 kGy under cryogenic condition, in -790C was determined to eliminate Cl. sporogenes spores and other bacterial contaminants in different kind of Indonesian chicken and beef dishes. In separate studies, irradiation doses of 3 – 7 kGy at cryogenic condition was used to improve the microbiological safety of a number chilled prepared meals. The dishes or ready to eat foods were packaged in air impermeable pouches. Irradiation process was carried out after inoculation on chicken and beef dishes with certain amounts of Cl. sporogenes spores. The evaluation of colony count differences between the irradiated and unirradiated foods revealed the effect of radiation on the survival of bacterial spores or other bacterial contaminants. It was demonstrated that a minimum dose of 45 kGy under cryogenic condition eliminated the spore of Cl. sporogenes, Bacillus spp and Staphylococcus spp. Irradiation at doses 5-7 kGy significantly reduced some potential pathogenic microorganisms in samples without affecting quality up to 3 months of storage at the refrigeration temperature.

  14. Effect of mobile laminar airflow units on airborne bacterial contamination during neurosurgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vogelsang, A-C; Förander, P; Arvidsson, M; Löwenhielm, P

    2018-03-24

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) after neurosurgery are potentially life-threatening and entail great costs. SSIs may occur from airborne bacteria in the operating room, and ultraclean air is desired during infection-prone cleaning procedures. Door openings and the number of persons present in the operating room affect the air quality. Mobile laminar airflow (MLAF) units, with horizontal laminar airflow, have previously been shown to reduce airborne bacterial contamination. To assess the effect of MLAF units on airborne bacterial contamination during neurosurgical procedures. In a quasi-experimental design, bacteria-carrying particles (colony-forming units: cfu) during neurosurgical procedures were measured with active air-sampling in operating rooms with conventional turbulent ventilation, and with additional MLAF units. The MLAF units were shifted between operating rooms monthly. Colony-forming unit count and bacterial species detection were conducted after incubation. Data was collected for a period of 18 months. A total of 233 samples were collected during 45 neurosurgical procedures. The use of MLAF units significantly reduced the numbers of cfu in the surgical site area (P neurosurgery to ultraclean air levels. MLAF units are valuable when the main operating room ventilation system is unable to produce ultraclean air in infection-prone clean neurosurgery. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Camel meat quality in the slaughterhouse of Ouargla in Algeria. II. Bacterial surface contamination of carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Benaissa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To assess the microbiological quality of camel meat in the slaughterhouse of Ouargla District in Algeria, the bacterial surface contamination of 60 camel carcasses was investigated. Within an hour after slaughter, swabs were used to collect samples on three sites (thigh, flank and shoulder, just after skinning and before postmortem inspection. Germ rates varied depending on the carcasses and sampling sites. The predominant flora was the total aerobic mesophilic flora, whose contamination level was 2.8  log CFU/cm2 (i.e. 25% of the flora count, followed by enterobacteria with 2.4 log CFU/cm2 (21%, total coliforms with 2.2 log CFU/cm2 (20%, fecal coliforms with 2.0  log CFU/cm2 (18%, and staphylococci with 1.8 log CFU/cm2 (16%. Salmonella and Escherichia coli were detected on all the sampled sites of the carcasses. The camel meat of Ouargla slaughterhouse showed a high level of contamination by pathogenic bacteria (salmonellae and staphylococci. A high fecal contamination (E. coli was also present. Good hygiene practices need to be implemented at slaughter to reduce contaminations.

  16. Evaluation of a pulsed xenon ultraviolet disinfection system to decrease bacterial contamination in operating rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haddad, Lynn; Ghantoji, Shashank S; Stibich, Mark; Fleming, Jason B; Segal, Cindy; Ware, Kathy M; Chemaly, Roy F

    2017-10-10

    Environmental cleanliness is one of the contributing factors for surgical site infections in the operating rooms (ORs). To decrease environmental contamination, pulsed xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV), an easy and safe no-touch disinfection system, is employed in several hospital environments. The positive effect of this technology on environmental decontamination has been observed in patient rooms and ORs during the end-of-day cleaning but so far, no study explored its feasibility between surgical cases in the OR. In this study, 5 high-touch surfaces in 30 ORs were sampled after manual cleaning and after PX-UV intervention mimicking between-case cleaning to avoid the disruption of the ORs' normal flow. The efficacy of a 1-min, 2-min, and 8-min cycle were tested by measuring the surfaces' contaminants by quantitative cultures using Tryptic Soy Agar contact plates. We showed that combining standard between-case manual cleaning of surfaces with a 2-min cycle of disinfection using a portable xenon pulsed ultraviolet light germicidal device eliminated at least 70% more bacterial load after manual cleaning. This study showed the proof of efficacy of a 2-min cycle of PX-UV in ORs in eliminating bacterial contaminants. This method will allow a short time for room turnover and a potential reduction of pathogen transmission to patients and possibly surgical site infections.

  17. Risk assessment of cooking utensils role of the bacterial contamination in the hospital kitchen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monireh Majlesi Nasr

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food contact surfaces are a major concern for food services facilities in controlling the spread of food borne pathogens. This study was aimed to investigate roles of food utensils in transmission of the most important bacteria associated with nosocomial infections and hospital food borne diseases in one hospital in Tehran. Materials and methods: During the three independent sampling processes, samples of common used utensils were analyzed for bacterial contamination. Through a sterile swab the samples were collected in sterile tubes and after transferring, were immediately subjected to culture on gram negative specific and general media for bacteria. Total bacterial counts of each sample were determined and their characterizations were performed by biochemical diagnostic tests according to standards methods. Results: Among the studied cooking utensils’ and food samples, the most contaminated samples were determined as samples from board and blender as 38% and 35%, respectively. The most bacteria isolated from these samples were related to species of Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Bacillus species that were similar to the isolates from studied food samples. Conclusion: Results of this study, in addition to high contamination rates of medical foods and utensils in their contact showed that there are significant weaknesses in proper cooking and utensils hygiene conditions in preparation and distribution of medical food in the studied hospital’s samples.

  18. [Bacterial contamination of the indoor air in a transplant unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoušková, Ivanka; Holý, Ondřej

    2013-12-01

    For one year (August 2010 to July 2011), microbial contamination of the indoor air in the Transplant Unit of the Haemato-Oncology Clinic, Olomouc University Hospital was monitored monthly. Twenty sampling sites were singled out and a total of 240 indoor air samples were collected. An MAS-100 air sampler (Merck, GER) was used, air flow rate of 100 liters per minute, 1 minute. The measured values of indoor air temperature were stable. The relative air humidity ranged from 17% to 68%. The highest average value of microbial air contamination was found in the "staff entry room" (1170 CFU/m3). The lowest microbial air contamination (150-250 CFU/m3) was measured in the patient isolation units. The most frequently isolated bacterial strains were coagulase-negative staphylococci (94.3%), followed by Micrococcus spp. (67%) and Bacillus subtilis (11%). It can be assumed that the -source of these airborne bacterial strains are both patients and medical staff. They are classified as -opportunistic pathogens and as such can cause hospital infections among haemato-oncology patients.

  19. Investigation of the Rate of the Bacterial Contamination of the Ice Factories in Bandar Abbas, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Moradi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pollution of drinking water and ice is one of the most serious ways of water borne diseases spread. The purpose of this study was to investigate the bacterial contamination of the ice produced by ice factories in Bandar Abbas. Methods: In this descriptive ,cross-sectional study samples were collected from seven ice factories in Bandar Abbas. Sampling was done by standard method. Amount of the Contamination of ice and water to coliforms was investigated by the Multiple Tube method to determine the MPN, isolate bacteria and identify the microorganisms using conventional bacteriological techniques and counting the total count of bacteria by the Plate Count method on a nutrient agar medium. The data was analyzed by the SPSS software. Results: In this study, a total of 84 samples were investigated. Gram-positive bacteria (65.5% and gram-negative bacteria(34.5% were separated from each other. The MPN rate in samples and total count of bacteria were 0->1100 and 2×101×104 CFU/mL, respectively. Conclusion: The results suggest that necessary precautions be taken by environmental health specialists and other public health authorities in production, transportation and distribution of the ice blocks to reduce the rate of bacterial contamination.

  20. Characterization of bacterial consortia for its use in bioremediation of gas-oil contaminated antarctic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruberto, L.; Vazquez, S.; Mestre, C.; Nogales, B.; Christie-Oleza, J.; Bosch, R.; Mac Cormack, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    Success of bio augmentation of chronically-contaminated soils is controversial, mainly because the inocula are frequently unable to establish in the matrix under bioremediation. In Antarctica, the environmental conditions and the restriction for the introduction of non-autochthonous organisms (imposed by the Antarctic Treaty) prevent inoculation with foreign bacteria. (Author)

  1. Bacterial community dynamics during bioremediation of diesel oil-contaminated Antarctic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, S; Nogales, B; Ruberto, L; Hernández, E; Christie-Oleza, J; Lo Balbo, A; Bosch, R; Lalucat, J; Mac Cormack, W

    2009-05-01

    The effect of nutrient and inocula amendment in a bioremediation field trial using a nutrient-poor Antarctic soil chronically contaminated with hydrocarbons was tested. The analysis of the effects that the treatments caused in bacterial numbers and hydrocarbon removal was combined with the elucidation of the changes occurring on the bacterial community, by 16S rDNA-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) typing, and the detection of some of the genes involved in the catabolism of hydrocarbons. All treatments caused a significant increase in the number of bacteria able to grow on hydrocarbons and a significant decrease in the soil hydrocarbon content, as compared to the control. However, there were no significant differences between treatments. Comparison of the soil T-RFLP profiles indicated that there were changes in the structure and composition of bacterial communities during the bioremediation trial, although the communities in treated plots were highly similar irrespective of the treatment applied, and they had a similar temporal dynamics. These results showed that nutrient addition was the main factor contributing to the outcome of the bioremediation experiment. This was supported by the lack of evidence of the establishment of inoculated consortia in soils, since their characteristic electrophoretic peaks were only detectable in soil profiles at the beginning of the experiment. Genetic potential for naphthalene degradation, evidenced by detection of nahAc gene, was observed in all soil plots including the control. In treated plots, an increase in the detection of catechol degradation genes (nahH and catA) and in a key gene of denitrification (nosZ) was observed as well. These results indicate that treatments favored the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons and probably stimulated denitrification, at least transiently. This mesocosm study shows that recovery of chronically contaminated Antarctic soils can be successfully accelerated

  2. Practical application of immunofluorescence for the detection of bacterial contaminants during vinification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marielle Bouix

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a rapid and specific microscopie technique for detecting and identifying populations of lactic acid bacteria in musts, wines, and inoculum starter cultures. Through the use of fluorescent antibodies, this procedure can be performed in less than two hours, and it is effective with Leuconostoc, Pediococcus and Lactobacillus concentrations as small as 102 cells/ml. Implementation of this technique will assist winemakers in controlling malolactic fermentations and in preventing lactic acid bacterial spoilage.

  3. Prevention and mitigation of groundwater contamination from radioactive releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    This document gives basic information on potential pathways and mechanisms, by which radioactive materials from releases can reach man, and on modelling considerations to predict the behaviour of radioactive materials in the ground. The main objective is to present an overview of existing techniques for preventing the offsite releases of contaminants into the groundwater systems and techniques for mitigation of effects of such releases should they occur. The recommended techniques are fully applicable to any hazardous materials, such as organic liquids, and toxic materials or otherwise dangerous materials, the presence of which in the accessible biosphere can represent health risks as well as economic losses to the general public. 11 refs, 2 figs, 8 tabs

  4. The used of formalin, borax and initial bacterial contamination on otak-otak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsojo; Kadir I

    2013-01-01

    A research has been conducted to identify the used of formalin and borax content and also study the initial bacterial contamination on otak-otak. The wrapped and unwrapped samples were irradiated with a dose of 3 kGy Further, the samples were stored at room temperature (± 30°C) and low temperature (± 4°C) up to 4 weeks. The irradiation was done at a Multipurpose Panoramic Batch Irradiator (IRPASENA) with a dose rate of 1.149 kGy/h. Those samples were stored 4 weeks at 2 different temperatures and the total bacteria were observe every week. The measured parameter were formalin and borax content in otak-otak, the amount of total aerob bacteria, total coliforms, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus spp., identification of Salmonella. The results showed all samples used formalin but borax was not detected. Initial contamination of total aerob bacteria for unwrapped and wrapped samples were 4.3 x 10"7 and 2.0 x 10"7 cfu/g, respectively. Irradiation dose up to 3 kGy showed no bacterial growth on unwrapped and wrapped samples. Combination treatment of irradiation and storage at low temperature could eliminate all aerobic bacteria at the first week. Initial contamination of coliform bacteria on unwrapped and wrapped samples were 1.9 x 10"5 and 5.7 x 10"5 cfu/g, respectively. Initial contamination of E. coli on unwrapped and wrapped samples were 1.2 x 10"5 cfu/g. The total amount of Staphylococcus spp. on unwrapped and wrapped samples were 3.3 x 10"5 and 4.8 x 10"6 cfu/g, respectively. Irradiation at a dose of 3 kGy could eliminate coliform bacteria, E. coli and Staphylococcus spp in all samples observed. No Salmonella was detected in all samples observed. (author)

  5. Effect of bacterial contamination on the incorporation of radioactive phosphate in plant r-RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koleva, S; Khanymova, T; Marinova, E; Varadinova, S

    1974-01-01

    It is ascertained that the amount of bacterial colonies in root tips of maize seedlings (Wisconsin 641 AA) constitutes approximately 4.5x10/sup 7/ per gram of fresh weight, 90% of the bacterial colonies being various pseudomonas. In the case when plant RNA is labelled with /sup 32/P, the bacteria take up a large amount of phosphate. Owing to this, the RNA isolated from the root tips and fractionated in agar gel, in addition to 25S and 18S r-RNA of the plant cell cytoplasma contains also 23S and 16S of the bacterial r-RNA. Chloramphenicol at a concentration of 50/cm/sup 3/ does not suppress the incorporation of /sup 32/P by the bacteria. The pseudomonas strains isolated are almost insensitive to chloramphenicol and a number of other antibiotics, such as penicyllin, erythromycin, neomycin and oxacylin. This results, as well as the results, obtained by other researchers, indicate that antibiotics do not suppress effectively the action of bacterial contamination if plant RNA is labelled. Furtheremore, some of them, as streptomycin, for instance, if employed at higher concentrations inhibit the growth of the plant cell. Of all asceptic agents (hypochlorite, ethanol, sulphuric acid, etc.), used for surface sterilization, best results in the elimination of bacterial infection on maize seeds have been obtained with 0.1% HgCl/sub 2/ after treatment for 2 min. In spite of the elimination of the bacterial contamination with HgCl/sub 2/,the RNA from the elongated cells, labelled with /sup 32/P for an hour, is distributed into four fractions in the agar gel conversely to the RNA isolated from dividing cells, where only the two 25S and 18S fractions of plant cytoplasmic r-RNA are observed. An assumption is made that the two more fast-moving r-RNA fractions, as compared with 25S and 18S of plant r-RNA, isolated from elongating cells, originate from subcellular organelles, since the mitochondria and the proplstids are fully differentiated during the phase of the elongation of the

  6. Elimination and molecular identification of endophytic bacterial contaminants during in vitro propagation of Bambusa balcooa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Syandan Sinha; Ali, Md Nasim; Mukherjee, Shibasis; Chatterjee, Gautam; Banerjee, Maitreyi

    2017-02-01

    Bambusa balcooa is an economically important, multipurpose bamboo species, decidedly used in construction industry. Availability of natural bamboo is depleting very rapidly due to accelerated deforestation and its unrestrained use. The large number and timely supply of saplings are the need of the hour for the restoration of bamboo stands. Micropropagation, being the potent alternative for season independent rapid regeneration, is restricted in bamboo because of endophytic contamination. An in vitro attempt has been taken to overcome the endophytic contamination by using broad spectrum antibiotics as surface sterilant as well as a media component. Ampicillin sodium salt (5 mg/ml for 30 min) as a surface sterilant was found as the best treatment for high bud breaking (80%) coupled with high branching and low contamination (20%) but it was found ineffective to control the contamination during multiplication stage. Then, two endophytes were isolated and minimum inhibitory concentration was determined through antibiotic susceptibility test for successful eradication at multiplication stage. Finally, contamination free cultures were obtained when streptocycline (100 μg/ml) and gentamicin sulphate (75 μg/ml) were added into the medium. The two isolated endophytes, BB1 and BB2, were identified through 16S rDNA techniques and NCBI-BLAST algorithm with 99% sequence similarity with those of Janibacter sp. (KX423734) and Serratia marcescens strain (KX423735). To our knowledge, this is the first report for B. balcooa where antibiotics were used as surface sterilant as well as medium component, to control endophytic bacterial contaminants, followed by their identification.

  7. Yeast Derived LysA2 Can Control Bacterial Contamination in Ethanol Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Seob Kim

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of fuel-ethanol fermentations continues to be a significant problem for the corn and sugarcane-based ethanol industries. In particular, members of the Lactobacillaceae family are the primary bacteria of concern. Currently, antibiotics and acid washing are two major means of controlling contaminants. However, antibiotic use could lead to increased antibiotic resistance, and the acid wash step stresses the fermenting yeast and has limited effectiveness. Bacteriophage endolysins such as LysA2 are lytic enzymes with the potential to contribute as antimicrobials to the fuel ethanol industries. Our goal was to evaluate the potential of yeast-derived LysA2 as a means of controlling Lactobacillaceae contamination. LysA2 intracellularly produced by Pichia pastoris showed activity comparable to Escherichia coli produced LysA2. Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB with the A4α peptidoglycan chemotype (L-Lys-D-Asp crosslinkage were the most sensitive to LysA2, though a few from that chemotype were insensitive. Pichia-expressed LysA2, both secreted and intracellularly produced, successfully improved ethanol productivity and yields in glucose (YPD60 and sucrose-based (sugarcane juice ethanol fermentations in the presence of a LysA2 susceptible LAB contaminant. LysA2 secreting Sacharomyces cerevisiae did not notably improve production in sugarcane juice, but it did control bacterial contamination during fermentation in YPD60. Secretion of LysA2 by the fermenting yeast, or adding it in purified form, are promising alternative tools to control LAB contamination during ethanol fermentation. Endolysins with much broader lytic spectrums than LysA2 could supplement or replace the currently used antibiotics or the acidic wash.

  8. Bacterial Contamination and Disinfection Status of Laryngoscopes Stored in Emergency Crash Carts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Won; Shin, Hee Bong; Lee, In Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To identify bacterial contamination rates of laryngoscope blades and handles stored in emergency crash carts by hospital and area according to the frequency of intubation attempts. Methods One hundred forty-eight handles and 71 blades deemed ready for patient use from two tertiary hospitals were sampled with sterile swabs using a standardized rolling technique. Samples were considered negative (not contaminated) if no colonies were present on the blood agar plate after an 18-hour incubation period. Samples were stratified by hospital and according to the frequency of intubation attempts (10 attempts per year) using the χ2-test and Fisher exact test. Results One or more species of bacteria were isolated from 4 (5.6%) handle tops, 20 (28.2%) handles with knurled surfaces, and 27 (18.2%) blades. No significant differences were found in microbial contamination levels on the handle tops and blades between the two hospitals and two areas according to the frequency of intubation attempts. However, significant differences were found between the two hospitals and two areas in the level of microbial contamination on the handles with knurled surfaces (pdisinfect laryngoscope blades and handles; handles should be re-designed to eliminate points of contact with the blade; and single-use, one-piece laryngoscopes should be introduced. PMID:28605891

  9. Bacterial contamination of fabric and metal-bead identity card lanyards: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pepper

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary: In healthcare, fabric or metal-bead lanyards are universally used for carrying identity cards. However there is little information on microbial contamination with potential pathogens that may readily re-contaminate disinfected hands. We examined 108 lanyards from hospital staff. Most grew skin flora but 7/108 (6% had potentially pathogenic bacteria: four grew methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, and four grew probable fecal flora: 3 Clostridium perfringens and 1 Clostridium bifermentans (one lanyard grew both S. aureus and C. bifermentans. Unused (control lanyards had little or no such contamination. The median duration of lanyard wear was 12 months (interquartile range 3–36 months. 17/108 (16% of the lanyards had reportedly undergone decontamination including wiping with alcohol, chlorhexidine or chlorine dioxide; and washing with soap and water or by washing machine. Metal-bead lanyards had significantly lower median bacterial counts than those from fabric lanyards (1 vs. 4 CFU/cm2; Mann–Whitney U = 300.5; P < 0.001. 12/32 (38% of the metal-bead lanyards grew no bacteria, compared with 2/76 (3% of fabric lanyards. We recommend that an effective decontamination regimen be instituted by those who use fabric lanyards, or that fabric lanyards be discarded altogether in preference for metal-bead lanyards or clip-on identity cards. Keywords: Lanyard, Contamination, Identity card, Metal, Fabric

  10. Assessment of the bacterial contamination of hand air dryer in washrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Salmen, Saleh Hussein; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Alharbi, Naiyf S; Zayed, M E; Al-Johny, Bassam O; Wainwright, Milton

    2016-03-01

    The present study was carried out, using standard techniques, to identify and count the bacterial contamination of hand air dryers, used in washrooms. Bacteria were isolated from the air flow, outlet nozzle of warm air dryers in fifteen air dryers used in these washrooms. Bacteria were found to be relatively numerous in the air flows. Bacterially contaminated air was found to be emitted whenever a warm air dryer was running, even when not being used for hand drying. Our investigation shows that Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, Bacillus cereus and Brevundimonad diminuta/vesicularis were emitted from all of the dryers sampled, with 95% showing evidence of the presence of the potential pathogen S. haemolyticus. It is concluded that hot air dryers can deposit pathogenic bacteria onto the hands and body of users. Bacteria are distributed into the general environment whenever dryers are running and could be inhaled by users and none-users alike. The results provide an evidence base for the development and enhancement of hygienic hand drying practices.

  11. Bacterial contamination of stethoscope chest pieces and the effect of daily cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, H; Hansen, B; Hanel, R

    2013-01-01

    Stethoscopes are a potential source of nosocomial infection for hospitalized humans, a phenomenon not previously studied in companion animals. To determine if daily cleaning of stethoscope chest pieces reduces bacterial contamination between cleanings. Client-owned dogs and cats. Prospective observational study. In phase 1, bacterial cultures were obtained from the chest pieces of 10 participant stethoscopes once weekly for 3 weeks. In phase 2, stethoscopes were cleaned daily and 2 culture samples were obtained once weekly, immediately before and after cleaning with 70% isopropyl alcohol, for 3 weeks. Daily cleaning eliminated bacteria immediately after each cleaning (P = .004), but did not reduce the rate of positive cultures obtained before cleaning in phase 2. Cultures were positive for 20/30 (67%) samples during phase 1 and 18/30 (60%) obtained before daily cleaning during phase 2. Recovered organisms included normal skin flora, agents of opportunistic infections, and potential pathogens. The only genus that was repeatedly recovered from the same stethoscope for 2 or more consecutive weeks was Bacillus sp. Daily cleaning was highly effective at removing bacteria, but provided no reduction in precleaning contamination. Cleaning stethoscopes after use on dogs or cats infected with pathogenic bacteria and before use on immunocompromised animals should be considered. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Controlling of bacterial flora contaminating animal diet and its components by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Fouly, M.Z.; El-Zawahry, Y.A.; Helal, G.A.; El-Hady, A.F.

    1991-01-01

    The total bacterial counts in complete diets were found to range between 10 3 -10 5 cells/g, which they ranged between 10 2 and 10 6 in the main components. One hundred and sixteen bacterial colonies were isolated from the animal diet samples and found to be gram positive belonging to three genera: Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Bacillus. The most radioresistant bacteria isolated at 7.5 KGy were identified as B. megaterium, B. licheniformis, B. pumilus, B.circulans and B.laterosporus. The D 1 0 values for the bacteria contaminated the diet samples ranged between 928 Gy and 2199 Gy. Meanwhile, the D 1 0 values of staph.aureus and Strapt.faecalis artificially contaminated the diet were 400 Gy and 1136 Gy, respectively. It could be recommended from obtained results that dose level of 10 KGy is quite sufficient to eliminate all pathogens from animal diets or their components. In addition, it decreases the microbial count to minimum counts and hence increases the diet shelf life.1 fig.,4 tab

  13. Bacterial community composition characterization of a lead-contaminated Microcoleus sp. consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giloteaux, Ludovic; Solé, Antoni; Esteve, Isabel; Duran, Robert

    2011-08-01

    A Microcoleus sp. consortium, obtained from the Ebro delta microbial mat, was maintained under different conditions including uncontaminated, lead-contaminated, and acidic conditions. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and 16S rRNA gene library analyses were performed in order to determine the effect of lead and culture conditions on the Microcoleus sp. consortium. The bacterial composition inside the consortium revealed low diversity and the presence of specific terminal-restriction fragments under lead conditions. 16S rRNA gene library analyses showed that members of the consortium were affiliated to the Alpha, Beta, and Gammaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria. Sequences closely related to Achromobacter spp., Alcaligenes faecalis, and Thiobacillus species were exclusively found under lead conditions while sequences related to Geitlerinema sp., a cyanobacterium belonging to the Oscillatoriales, were not found in presence of lead. This result showed a strong lead selection of the bacterial members present in the Microcoleus sp. consortium. Several of the 16S rRNA sequences were affiliated to nitrogen-fixing microorganisms including members of the Rhizobiaceae and the Sphingomonadaceae. Additionally, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that under lead-contaminated condition Microcoleus sp. cells were grouped and the number of electrodense intracytoplasmic inclusions was increased.

  14. Potential risk for bacterial contamination in conventional reused ventilator systems and disposable closed ventilator-suction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Chi; Lin, Hui-Ling; Liao, Fang-Chun; Wang, Sing-Siang; Chang, Hsiu-Chu; Hsu, Hung-Fu; Chen, Sue-Hsien; Wan, Gwo-Hwa

    2018-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the difference in bacterial contamination between conventional reused ventilator systems and disposable closed ventilator-suction systems. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial contamination rates of the reused and disposable ventilator systems, and the association between system disconnection and bacterial contamination of ventilator systems. The enrolled intubated and mechanically ventilated patients used a conventional reused ventilator system and a disposable closed ventilator-suction system, respectively, for a week; specimens were then collected from the ventilator circuit systems to evaluate human and environmental bacterial contamination. The sputum specimens from patients were also analyzed in this study. The detection rate of bacteria in the conventional reused ventilator system was substantially higher than that in the disposable ventilator system. The inspiratory and expiratory limbs of the disposable closed ventilator-suction system had higher bacterial concentrations than the conventional reused ventilator system. The bacterial concentration in the heated humidifier of the reused ventilator system was significantly higher than that in the disposable ventilator system. Positive associations existed among the bacterial concentrations at different locations in the reused and disposable ventilator systems, respectively. The predominant bacteria identified in the reused and disposable ventilator systems included Acinetobacter spp., Bacillus cereus, Elizabethkingia spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Stenotrophomonas (Xan) maltophilia. Both the reused and disposable ventilator systems had high bacterial contamination rates after one week of use. Disconnection of the ventilator systems should be avoided during system operation to decrease the risks of environmental pollution and human exposure, especially for the disposable ventilator system. ClinicalTrials.gov PRS / NCT03359148.

  15. Analysis of bacterial contamination on surface of general radiography equipment and CT equipment in emergency room of radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Dong Hee; KIm, Hyeong Gyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    We aim to offer basic materials about infection management through conducting bacterial contamination test about general radiography equipment and CT equipment installed in ER of three general hospitals with 100 sickbeds or more located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province, and suggest management plan. It had been conducted from 1st December 2015 to 31st December, and objects were general radiography equipment and CT equipment of emergency room located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. For general radiography equipment, sources were collected from 4 places such as upper side of control box which employees use most, upper side of exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, upper side of stand bucky's grid, and where patients put their jaws on. For CT equipment, sources were collected from 3 places such as upper side of control box which radiography room employees use most, X-ray exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, and gantry inner. Surface contamination strain found at general radiography equipment in emergency room of radiology are Providencia stuartii(25%), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(18%), Enterobacter cloacae(8%), Pseudomonas species(8%), Staphylococcus epidermidis(8%), Gram negative bacilli(8%), and ungrown bacteria at incubator after 48 hours of incubation (67%) which is the biggest. Most bacteria were found at upper side of stand bucky-grid and stand bucky of radiology's general radiography equipment, and most sources of CT equipment were focused at patient table, which means it is contaminated by patients who have various diseases, and patients who have strains with decreased immunity may get severe diseases. Thus infection prevention should be made through 70% alcohol disinfection at both before test and after test.

  16. Analysis of bacterial contamination on surface of general radiography equipment and CT equipment in emergency room of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Dong Hee; KIm, Hyeong Gyun

    2016-01-01

    We aim to offer basic materials about infection management through conducting bacterial contamination test about general radiography equipment and CT equipment installed in ER of three general hospitals with 100 sickbeds or more located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province, and suggest management plan. It had been conducted from 1st December 2015 to 31st December, and objects were general radiography equipment and CT equipment of emergency room located in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. For general radiography equipment, sources were collected from 4 places such as upper side of control box which employees use most, upper side of exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, upper side of stand bucky's grid, and where patients put their jaws on. For CT equipment, sources were collected from 3 places such as upper side of control box which radiography room employees use most, X-ray exposure button, whole upper side of table which is touching part of patient's skin, and gantry inner. Surface contamination strain found at general radiography equipment in emergency room of radiology are Providencia stuartii(25%), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(18%), Enterobacter cloacae(8%), Pseudomonas species(8%), Staphylococcus epidermidis(8%), Gram negative bacilli(8%), and ungrown bacteria at incubator after 48 hours of incubation (67%) which is the biggest. Most bacteria were found at upper side of stand bucky-grid and stand bucky of radiology's general radiography equipment, and most sources of CT equipment were focused at patient table, which means it is contaminated by patients who have various diseases, and patients who have strains with decreased immunity may get severe diseases. Thus infection prevention should be made through 70% alcohol disinfection at both before test and after test

  17. What Healthcare Workers Should Know about Environmental Bacterial Contamination in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Russotto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive care unit- (ICU- acquired infections are a major health problem worldwide. Inanimate surfaces and equipment contamination may play a role in cross-transmission of pathogens and subsequent patient colonization or infection. Bacteria contaminate inanimate surfaces and equipment of the patient zone and healthcare area, generating a reservoir of potential pathogens, including multidrug resistant species. Traditional terminal cleaning methods have limitations. Indeed patients who receive a bed from prior patient carrying bacteria are exposed to an increased risk (odds ratio 2.13, 95% confidence intervals 1.62–2.81 of being colonized and potentially infected by the same bacterial species of the previous patient. Biofilm formation, even on dry surfaces, may play a role in reducing the efficacy of terminal cleaning procedures since it enables bacteria to survive in the environment for a long period and provides increased resistance to commonly used disinfectants. No-touch methods (e.g., UV-light, hydrogen peroxide vapour are under investigation and further studies with patient-centred outcomes are needed, before considering them the standard of terminal cleaning in ICUs. Healthcare workers should be aware of the role of environmental contamination in the ICU and consider it in the broader perspective of infection control measures and stewardship initiatives.

  18. What Healthcare Workers Should Know about Environmental Bacterial Contamination in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russotto, Vincenzo; Cortegiani, Andrea; Fasciana, Teresa; Iozzo, Pasquale; Raineri, Santi Maurizio; Gregoretti, Cesare; Giammanco, Anna; Giarratano, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    Intensive care unit- (ICU-) acquired infections are a major health problem worldwide. Inanimate surfaces and equipment contamination may play a role in cross-transmission of pathogens and subsequent patient colonization or infection. Bacteria contaminate inanimate surfaces and equipment of the patient zone and healthcare area, generating a reservoir of potential pathogens, including multidrug resistant species. Traditional terminal cleaning methods have limitations. Indeed patients who receive a bed from prior patient carrying bacteria are exposed to an increased risk (odds ratio 2.13, 95% confidence intervals 1.62-2.81) of being colonized and potentially infected by the same bacterial species of the previous patient. Biofilm formation, even on dry surfaces, may play a role in reducing the efficacy of terminal cleaning procedures since it enables bacteria to survive in the environment for a long period and provides increased resistance to commonly used disinfectants. No-touch methods (e.g., UV-light, hydrogen peroxide vapour) are under investigation and further studies with patient-centred outcomes are needed, before considering them the standard of terminal cleaning in ICUs. Healthcare workers should be aware of the role of environmental contamination in the ICU and consider it in the broader perspective of infection control measures and stewardship initiatives.

  19. Bacterial contamination on household toys and association with water, sanitation and hygiene conditions in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, Christine E; Walters, Adam; Fabiszewski de Aceituno, Anna M; Sobsey, Mark D

    2013-04-18

    There is growing evidence that household water treatment interventions improve microbiological water quality and reduce diarrheal disease risk. Few studies have examined, however, the impact of water treatment interventions on household-level hygiene and sanitation. This study examined the association of four water and sanitation conditions (access to latrines, improved sanitation, improved water and the plastic biosand filter) on the levels of total coliforms and E. coli on existing and introduced toys during an on-going randomized controlled trial of the plastic biosand filter (plastic BSF). The following conditions were associated with decreased bacterial contamination on children's toys: access to a latrine, access to improved sanitation and access to the plastic BSF. Overall, compared to existing toys, introduced toys had significantly lower levels of both E. coli and total coliforms. Results suggest that levels of fecal indicator bacteria contamination on children's toys may be associated with access to improved water and sanitation conditions in the home. In addition, the fecal indicator bacteria levels on toys probably vary with duration in the household. Additional information on how these toys become contaminated is needed to determine the usefulness of toys as indicators or sentinels of water, sanitation and hygiene conditions, behaviors and risks.

  20. Assessment of levels of bacterial contamination of large wild game meat in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membré, Jeanne-Marie; Laroche, Michel; Magras, Catherine

    2011-08-01

    The variations in prevalence and levels of pathogens and fecal contamination indicators in large wild game meat were studied to assess their potential impact on consumers. This analysis was based on hazard analysis, data generation and statistical analysis. A total of 2919 meat samples from three species (red deer, roe deer, wild boar) were collected at French game meat traders' facilities using two sampling protocols. Information was gathered on the types of meat cuts (forequarter or haunch; first sampling protocol) or type of retail-ready meat (stewing meat or roasting meat; second protocol), and also on the meat storage conditions (frozen or chilled), country of origin (eight countries) and shooting season (autumn, winter, spring). The samples were analyzed in both protocols for detection and enumeration of Escherichia coli, coagulase+staphylococci and Clostridium perfringens. In addition, detection and enumeration of thermotolerant coliforms and Listeria monocytogenes were performed for samples collected in the first and second protocols, respectively. The levels of bacterial contamination of the raw meat were determined by performing statistical analysis involving probabilistic techniques and Bayesian inference. C. perfringens was found in the highest numbers for the three indicators of microbial quality, hygiene and good handling, and L. monocytogenes in the lowest. Differences in contamination levels between game species and between meats distributed as chilled or frozen products were not significant. These results might be included in quantitative exposure assessments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of raw meat for heavy metals and bacterial contamination and comparison of antibiotic susceptibility of isolated bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, F.

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the study was to analyze the commercially available meat for its heavy metal contents and bacterial contamination. The meat samples were collected from four commercial markets of Lahore, i.e., as Wafaqi Colony (Site I),Township (Site II), G-1 Market (Site III) and Zenith (Site IV), and analyzed for heavy metal [i.e., manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu)] contents and bacterial contaminants (E. coli, Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp. and Salmonella sp.) Atomic absorption spectrophotometery was employed for the detection of the heavy metals and plate count method was used for the detection of bacterial contaminants. The Ni concentration in the Site II sample only and Cd concentration in all meat samples were found above the standard value and the concentration of other metals (Cu, Cr, and Mn) was less than the standard concentrations. Bacterial (E. coli, Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp., Salmonella sp. and Staphylococcus sp.) contamination was found in all meat samples; however, the number was a little lower in the Site IV samples. Statistical analysis was done, by one-way ANOVA using SPSS, to compare heavy metal contamination in the meat samples. The results showed distribution of heavy metals in all meat samples there was significant difference of Ni concentration in the meat samples. The measure of antibiotic susceptibility showed that isolated species of bacteria were resistant to lincomycin, streptomycin, tertracyclin, ampicillin, amoxicillin and doxycyclin, but did not survive in the medium containing ofloxacin. (author)

  2. Linkage between bacterial and fungal rhizosphere communities in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is related to plant phylogeny

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Terrence H; El-Din Hassan, Saad; Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Al-Otaibi, Fahad; Hijri, Mohamed; Yergeau, Etienne; St-Arnaud, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Phytoremediation is an attractive alternative to excavating and chemically treating contaminated soils. Certain plants can directly bioremediate by sequestering and/or transforming pollutants, but plants may also enhance bioremediation by promoting contaminant-degrading microorganisms in soils. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region to compare the community composition of 66 soil samples from the rh...

  3. Control of bacterial contamination of washbasin taps and output water using Ecasol: a one-year study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, M A

    2012-04-01

    Contaminated washbasin taps and output water are an important source of bacteria that may cause nosocomial infection. A five-week pretreatment study of hot and cold water from 15 washbasin taps at Dublin Dental Hospital showed consistently heavy contamination by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria: mean bacterial counts of 482.5 [standard deviation (SD) 293] colony-forming units (cfu)\\/mL and 5022 (SD 4322) cfu\\/mL, respectively.

  4. Presence of a highly efficient binding to bacterial contamination can distort data from binding studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcar, V.J.

    1990-01-01

    3 HGABA at low concentrations (5-10 nM) was bound by what appeared to be a GABA receptor binding site in bacterial contamination originating from a batch of distilled water. Under experimental conditions similar to those usually employed in 3 HGABA binding studies, the apparent binding displayed a very high specific component and a high efficiency in terms of 3 HGABA bound per mg of protein. The binding was blocked by muscimol but not by isoguvacine, SR95531 and nipecotic acid. These characteristics suggest that the presence of such spurious binding in the experiments using 3H-labeled ligands in brain homogenates may not always be very obvious and, moreover, it can result in subtle, but serious, distortions of data from such studies, which may not be immediately recognized

  5. Using lytic bacteriophages to eliminate or significantly reduce contamination of food by foodborne bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulakvelidze, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Bacteriophages (also called 'phages') are viruses that kill bacteria. They are arguably the oldest (3 billion years old, by some estimates) and most ubiquitous (total number estimated to be 10(30) -10(32) ) known organisms on Earth. Phages play a key role in maintaining microbial balance in every ecosystem where bacteria exist, and they are part of the normal microflora of all fresh, unprocessed foods. Interest in various practical applications of bacteriophages has been gaining momentum recently, with perhaps the most attention focused on using them to improve food safety. That approach, called 'phage biocontrol', typically includes three main types of applications: (i) using phages to treat domesticated livestock in order to reduce their intestinal colonization with, and shedding of, specific bacterial pathogens; (ii) treatments for decontaminating inanimate surfaces in food-processing facilities and other food establishments, so that foods processed on those surfaces are not cross-contaminated with the targeted pathogens; and (iii) post-harvest treatments involving direct applications of phages onto the harvested foods. This mini-review primarily focuses on the last type of intervention, which has been gaining the most momentum recently. Indeed, the results of recent studies dealing with improving food safety, and several recent regulatory approvals of various commercial phage preparations developed for post-harvest food safety applications, strongly support the idea that lytic phages may provide a safe, environmentally-friendly, and effective approach for significantly reducing contamination of various foods with foodborne bacterial pathogens. However, some important technical and nontechnical problems may need to be addressed before phage biocontrol protocols can become an integral part of routine food safety intervention strategies implemented by food industries in the USA. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Influence of hang time and location on bacterial contamination of intravenous bags in a veterinary emergency and critical care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaumin, Julien; Olp, Nichole M; Magnusson, Karissa D; Butler, Amy L; Daniels, Joshua B

    2017-09-01

    To assess the rate of bacterial contamination of fluid and ports in intravenous bags in a veterinary emergency room (ER) and intensive care unit (ICU). Experimental model. Ninety intravenous fluid bags of lactated balanced-electrolytes solution (1 L) hung in a university hospital. Bags were hung in 2 different locations in the ER (sink and bins) and one location in the ICU (sink) for 11 days. Bags were punctured 3 times daily with a sterile needle to simulate clinical use. Injection ports were swabbed and 50 mL of fluid were collected in duplicates on days 0, 2, 4, 7, and 10. Aerobic bacterial cultures were performed on the fluid and injection port. Contamination was defined as bacterial growth of a similar phenotype across 2 consecutive times. Increase in the fluid contamination rate from day 0 was tested using an exact binomial test. Port contamination rate between locations was tested using Fisher's exact test. Combined bacterial growth on injection ports reached a mean (95% confidence interval) of 8.1 (0.005-16.2) cfu/port on day 10. The combined port contamination was 3.3%, 11.1%, 17.8%, and 31.1% on days 0, 2, 4, and 7, respectively. Port contamination was similar between ER and ICU. However, port contamination was higher in the sink versus the bins area (38.3% vs 16.7%, P = 0.032). No fluid bag was contaminated at days 0 and 2. The contamination rate of fluid bag was 1.1% and 4.4% on days 4 and 7, respectively. All bags with contaminated fluid were in the ER (6.7%, 95% exact binomial confidence interval 1.9-16.2%). Injection port contamination reached 31.1% on day 7. Contamination was more likely when the bags were hung next to a sink. In our model of bag puncture, fluid contamination occurred between days 2 and 4. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017.

  7. Molecular characterization and potential sources of aqueous humor bacterial contamination during phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Luciana C C; de Souza-Pollo, Andressa; Padua, Ivan Ricardo M; Conceição, Luciano F; da Silveira, Camila P Balthazar; Silva, Germana A; Maluta, Renato P; Laus, José L

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of the anterior chamber during cataract surgery is one of the main responsible for endophthalmitis postoperative. Phacoemulsification is a less invasive technique for cataract treatment, although it does not exclude the possibility of contamination. In this study, bacterial contaminants of aqueous humor collected pre- and post-phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation (IOL) of twenty dogs were identified. As the conjunctival microbiota constitute a significant source of anterior chamber contamination, bacterial isolates from aqueous humor were genetically compared with those present in the conjunctival surface of the patients. Three dogs presented bacterial growth in both aqueous humor and conjunctival surface samples. Bacterial isolates from these samples were grouped according to their genetic profiles by repetitive-element PCR (rep-PCR) and their representatives were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Isolates from conjunctival surface were identified as Enterobacter spp., Staphylococcus spp. and S. aureus; and from aqueous humor samples as Enterobacter spp., Pantoea spp., Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp., respectively in decreasing order of prevalence. According to the rep-PCR analysis, 16.6% of Enterobacter spp. isolates from conjunctival surface were genetically similar to those from aqueous humor. The rest of isolates encountered in aqueous humor were genetically distinct from those of conjunctival surface. The significant genetic diversity of bacterial isolates found in the aqueous humor samples after surgery denoted the possibility of anterior chamber contamination during phacoemulsification by bacteria not only from conjunctival surface but also from different sources related to surgical environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Communicating Environmental Risks: Local Newspaper Coverage of Shellfish Bacterial Contamination in Maine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianne Suldovsky

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Coastal resources play a vital role in Maine’s cultural and economic wellbeing, contributing an estimated 168 billion dollars to the Maine economy. There are numerous risks to the sustainability of Maine’s shellfishing industry and working waterfront, including pathogenic bacterial pollution. In this study, we ask a broad fundamental question central to science and environmental journalism: how do newspapers cover localized environmental risks and what are the implications of those approaches? Utilizing the northeastern US state of Maine’s shellfishing industry as an exemplar environmental issue, this study examines how Maine’s two most read newspapers, the Bangor Daily News and the Portland Press Herald, report on bacterial contamination and shellfish. This study examines the themes that are present in the newspaper articles published about shellfish between 2003 and 2014 and analyses the types of sources journalists used within their coverage of these issues. Overall, we identified seven key themes: economic concerns, environmental impacts, political and regulatory issues, issues of public health and safety, reference to cultural values, technical and infrastructural issues, and aesthetic concerns. The most commonly cited individuals in the articles were government officials and scientists. The least cited groups were clammers and shellfishermen, general citizens, advocacy groups, and worm diggers. Implications for local coverage of environmental risks in Maine, science communication, and sustainability science are discussed.

  9. Addressing the risk of bacterial contamination in platelets: a hospital economic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Justin W; Brecher, Mark E; Jacobson, Jessica L; Harm, Sarah K; Chen, Dorothy; El-Gamil, Audrey; Dobson, Al; Mintz, Paul D

    2017-10-01

    Bacterially contaminated platelets (PLTs) remain a serious risk. The Food and Drug Administration has issued draft guidance recommending hospitals implement secondary testing or transfuse PLTs that have been treated with pathogen reduction technology (PRT). The cost implications of these approaches are not well understood. We modeled incurred costs when hospitals acquire, process, and transfuse PLTs that are PRT treated with INTERCEPT (Cerus Corp.) or secondary tested with the PLT PGD Test (Verax Biomedical). Hospitals will spend $221.27 (30.0%) more per PRT-treated apheresis PLT unit administered compared to a Zika-tested apheresis PLT unit that is irradiated and PGD tested in hospital. This difference is reflected in PRT PLT units having: 1) a higher hospital purchase price ($100.00 additional charge compared to an untreated PLT); 2) lower therapeutic effectiveness than untreated PLTs among hematologic-oncologic patients, which contributes to additional transfusions ($96.05); or 3) fewer PLT storage days, which contributes to higher outdating cost from expired PLTs ($67.87). Only a small portion of the incremental costs for PRT-treated PLTs are offset by costs that may be avoided, including primary bacterial culture, secondary bacterial testing ($26.65), hospital irradiation ($8.50), Zika testing ($4.47), and other costs ($3.03). The significantly higher cost of PRT-treated PLTs over PGD-tested PLTs should interest stakeholders. For hospitals that outdate PLTs, savings associated with expiration extension to 7 days by adding PGD testing will likely be substantially greater than the cost of implementing PGD-testing. Our findings might usefully inform a hospital's decision to select a particular blood safety approach. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  10. Agricultural and Management Practices and Bacterial Contamination in Greenhouse versus Open Field Lettuce Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holvoet, Kevin; Sampers, Imca; Seynnaeve, Marleen; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight into potential differences in risk factors for microbial contamination in greenhouse versus open field lettuce production. Information was collected on sources, testing, and monitoring and if applicable, treatment of irrigation and harvest rinsing water. These data were combined with results of analysis on the levels of Escherichia coli as a fecal indicator organism and the presence of enteric bacterial pathogens on both lettuce crops and environmental samples. Enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC) PCR signals (vt1 or vt2 positive and eae positive), Campylobacter spp., and Salmonella spp. isolates were more often obtained from irrigation water sampled from open field farms (21/45, 46.7%) versus from greenhouse production (9/75, 12.0%). The open field production was shown to be more prone to fecal contamination as the number of lettuce samples and irrigation water with elevated E. coli was significantly higher. Farmers comply with generic guidelines on good agricultural practices available at the national level, but monitoring of microbial quality, and if applicable appropriateness of water treatment, or water used for irrigation or at harvest is restricted. These results indicate the need for further elaboration of specific guidelines and control measures for leafy greens with regard to microbial hazards. PMID:25546272

  11. Detection of hepatitis A virus and bacterial contamination in raw oysters in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittigul, Leera; Pombubpa, Kannika; Sukonthalux, Suntharee; Rattanatham, Tippawan; Utrarachkij, Fuangfa; Diraphat, Pornphan

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the presence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in raw oysters (Crassostrea belcheri) using a virus concentration method and reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR). A total of 220 oyster samples were collected from oyster farms and local markets in Thailand. HAV was found in three oyster samples. Nested PCR products of HAV detected in oysters were characterized further by DNA sequencing of the VP1/2A region and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. All HAV sequences (168 basepairs) were associated with human HAV subgenotype IB (GIB). Fecal coliforms and Escherichia coli were determined using the multiple tube fermentation method, to assess the microbiological quality of collected oysters. Among oyster samples tested, 65% had fecal coliforms higher than the standard level for raw shellfish [oyster samples (85%) were contaminated with E. coli in the range of 3.0-4.6 x 10(4) MPN/g. One oyster sample with an acceptable level of fecal coliforms contained HAV GIB. E. coli was found in all HAV-positive oyster samples. The results suggest a significant presence of HAV and bacterial indicators of fecal contamination in raw oysters, which are a health risk for consumers and a source of gastrointestinal illness. Enteric viruses should also be tested to assess the microbiological quality of oysters.

  12. Bacterial community shift and hydrocarbon transformation during bioremediation of short-term petroleum-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Manli; Ye, Xiqiong; Chen, Kaili; Li, Wei; Yuan, Jing; Jiang, Xin

    2017-04-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the impact of bioaugmentation plus biostimulation (BR, added both nutrients and bacterial consortia), and natural attenuation (NA) on hydrocarbon degradation efficiency and microflora characterization during remediation of a freshly contaminated soil. After 112 days of remediation, the initial level of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) (61,000 mg/kg soil) was reduced by 4.5% and 5.0% in the NA and BR treatments, respectively. Bioremediation did not significantly enhance TPH biodegradation compared to natural attenuation. The degradation of the aliphatic fraction was the most active with the degradation rate of 30.3 and 28.7 mg/kg/day by the NA and BR treatments, respectively. Soil microbial activities and counts in soil were generally greater for bioremediation than for natural attenuation. MiSeq sequencing indicated that the diversity and structure of microbial communities were affected greatly by bioremediation. In response to bioremediation treatment, Promicromonospora, Pseudomonas, Microcella, Mycobacterium, Alkanibacter, and Altererythrobacter became dominant genera in the soil. The result indicated that combining bioaugmentation with biostimulation did not improve TPH degradation, but soil microbial activities and structure of microbial communities are sensitive to bioremediation in short-term and heavily oil-contaminated soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of bacterial superficial contamination in classical or ritually slaughtered cattle using metagenetics and microbiological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsak, N; Taminiau, B; Hupperts, C; Delhalle, L; Nezer, C; Delcenserie, V; Daube, G

    2017-04-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the slaughter technique (Halal vs Classical slaughter) on the superficial contamination of cattle carcasses, by using traditional microbiological procedures and 16S rDNA metagenetics. The purpose was also to investigate the neck area to identify bacteria originating from the digestive or the respiratory tract. Twenty bovine carcasses (10 from each group) were swabbed at the slaughterhouse, where both slaughtering methods are practiced. Two swabbing areas were chosen: one "legal" zone of 1600cm 2 (composed of zones from rump, flank, brisket and forelimb) and locally on the neck area (200cm 2 ). Samples were submitted to classical microbiology for aerobic Total Viable Counts (TVC) at 30°C and Enterobacteriaceae counts, while metagenetic analysis was performed on the same samples. The classical microbiological results revealed no significant differences between both slaughtering practices; with values between 3.95 and 4.87log CFU/100cm 2 and 0.49 and 1.94log CFU/100cm 2 , for TVC and Enterobacteriaceae respectively. Analysis of pyrosequencing data showed that differences in the bacterial population abundance between slaughtering methods were mainly observed in the "legal" swabbing zone compared to the neck area. Bacterial genera belonging to the Actinobacteria phylum were more abundant in the "legal" swabbing zone in "Halal" samples, while Brevibacterium and Corynebacterium were encountered more in "Halal" samples, in all swabbing areas. This was also the case for Firmicutes bacterial populations (families of Aerococcaceae, Planococcaceae). Except for Planococcoceae, the analysis of Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) abundances of bacteria from the digestive or respiratory tract revealed no differences between groups. In conclusion, the slaughtering method does not influence the superficial microbiological pattern in terms of specific microbiological markers of the digestive or respiratory tract. However

  14. Bioremediation and reclamation of soil contaminated with petroleum oil hydrocarbons by exogenously seeded bacterial consortium: a pilot-scale study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Ashis K; Bordoloi, Naba K

    2011-03-01

    Spillage of petroleum hydrocarbons causes significant environmental pollution. Bioremediation is an effective process to remediate petroleum oil contaminant from the ecosystem. The aim of the present study was to reclaim a petroleum oil-contaminated soil which was unsuitable for the cultivation of crop plants by using petroleum oil hydrocarbon-degrading microbial consortium. Bacterial consortium consisting of Bacillus subtilis DM-04 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa M and NM strains were seeded to 20% (v/w) petroleum oil-contaminated soil, and bioremediation experiment was carried out for 180 days under laboratory condition. The kinetics of hydrocarbon degradation was analyzed using biochemical and gas chromatographic (GC) techniques. The ecotoxicity of the elutriates obtained from petroleum oil-contaminated soil before and post-treatment with microbial consortium was tested on germination and growth of Bengal gram (Cicer aretinum) and green gram (Phaseolus mungo) seeds. Bacterial consortium showed a significant reduction in total petroleum hydrocarbon level in contaminated soil (76% degradation) as compared to the control soil (3.6% degradation) 180 days post-inoculation. The GC analysis confirmed that bacterial consortium was more effective in degrading the alkane fraction compared to aromatic fraction of crude petroleum oil hydrocarbons in soil. The nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen compounds fraction was least degraded. The reclaimed soil supported the germination and growth of crop plants (C. aretinum and P. mungo). In contrast, seeds could not be germinated in petroleum oil-contaminated soil. The present study reinforces the application of bacterial consortium rather than individual bacterium for the effective bioremediation and reclamation of soil contaminated with petroleum oil.

  15. Bacterial Community Diversity of Oil-Contaminated Soils Assessed by High Throughput Sequencing of 16S rRNA Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Peng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil bacteria play a major role in ecological and biodegradable function processes in oil-contaminated soils. Here, we assessed the bacterial diversity and changes therein in oil-contaminated soils exposed to different periods of oil pollution using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. No less than 24,953 valid reads and 6246 operational taxonomic units (OTUs were obtained from all five studied samples. OTU richness was relatively higher in contaminated soils than clean samples. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla among all the soil samples. The heatmap plot depicted the relative percentage of each bacterial family within each sample and clustered five samples into two groups. For the samples, bacteria in the soils varied at different periods of oil exposure. The oil pollution exerted strong selective pressure to propagate many potentially petroleum degrading bacteria. Redundancy analysis (RDA indicated that organic matter was the highest determinant factor for explaining the variations in community compositions. This suggests that compared to clean soils, oil-polluted soils support more diverse bacterial communities and soil bacterial community shifts were mainly controlled by organic matter and exposure time. These results provide some useful information for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil in the future.

  16. Bacterial Community Diversity of Oil-Contaminated Soils Assessed by High Throughput Sequencing of 16S rRNA Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mu; Zi, Xiaoxue; Wang, Qiuyu

    2015-09-24

    Soil bacteria play a major role in ecological and biodegradable function processes in oil-contaminated soils. Here, we assessed the bacterial diversity and changes therein in oil-contaminated soils exposed to different periods of oil pollution using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. No less than 24,953 valid reads and 6246 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from all five studied samples. OTU richness was relatively higher in contaminated soils than clean samples. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Proteobacteria were the dominant phyla among all the soil samples. The heatmap plot depicted the relative percentage of each bacterial family within each sample and clustered five samples into two groups. For the samples, bacteria in the soils varied at different periods of oil exposure. The oil pollution exerted strong selective pressure to propagate many potentially petroleum degrading bacteria. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that organic matter was the highest determinant factor for explaining the variations in community compositions. This suggests that compared to clean soils, oil-polluted soils support more diverse bacterial communities and soil bacterial community shifts were mainly controlled by organic matter and exposure time. These results provide some useful information for bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil in the future.

  17. Dynamic changes of bacterial community under bioremediation with Sphingobium sp. LY-6 in buprofezin-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Hou, Qianqian; Liu, Wanru; Meng, Yawen; Wang, Guangli

    2015-08-01

    Buprofezin is a commonly used chemical with satisfactory biological activity against sucking insect pests, but its disposal can cause serious environmental problems. To study the feasibility of remedying contamination by buprofezin, microcosm experiments were carried out to study the effects of various concentrations of buprofezin and Sphingobium sp. LY-6 on soil bacterial communities in soils collected from vegetable fields. In this experiment, the results showed that buprofezin was effectively degraded by Sphingobium sp. LY-6 in incubation soils. Comparing to non-incubated soils, the cumulative degradation ratio of buprofezin was significantly increased, up to the extent of 85 and 51%, in the initial concentration of 10 and 100 mg kg(-1). The abundance and community structure of the bacterial communities were analysed by real-time PCR (qPCR) and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The findings suggest that buprofezin had a negative effect on soil bacterial community, and decreases in bacterial abundance were observed in the later part of the incubation period. The bacterial community structure and diversity shifted significantly at each sampling time. In conclusion, the buprofezin-degrading strain LY-6 played a major role in the bioremediation of the buprofezin-contaminated soil and influenced the dynamics and structure of the bacterial community, demonstrating the great potential of exogenous microorganisms for soil remediation.

  18. Detection of bacterial contaminants and hybrid sequences in the genome of the kelp Saccharina japonica using Taxoblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon M. Dittami

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Modern genome sequencing strategies are highly sensitive to contamination making the detection of foreign DNA sequences an important part of analysis pipelines. Here we use Taxoblast, a simple pipeline with a graphical user interface, for the post-assembly detection of contaminating sequences in the published genome of the kelp Saccharina japonica. Analyses were based on multiple blastn searches with short sequence fragments. They revealed a number of probable bacterial contaminations as well as hybrid scaffolds that contain both bacterial and algal sequences. This or similar types of analysis, in combination with manual curation, may thus constitute a useful complement to standard bioinformatics analyses prior to submission of genomic data to public repositories. Our analysis pipeline is open-source and freely available at http://sdittami.altervista.org/taxoblast and via SourceForge (https://sourceforge.net/projects/taxoblast.

  19. Biogeochemical and engineered barriers for preventing spread of contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrėnaitė, Edita; Lietuvninkas, Arvydas; Baltrėnas, Pranas

    2018-02-01

    The intensive industrial development and urbanization, as well as the negligible return of hazardous components to the deeper layers of the Earth, increases the contamination load on the noosphere (i.e., the new status of the biosphere, the development of which is mainly controlled by the conscious activity of a human being). The need for reducing the spread and mobility of contaminants is growing. The insights into the role of the tree in the reduction of contaminant mobility through its life cycle are presented to show an important function performed by the living matter and its products in reducing contamination. For maintaining the sustainable development, natural materials are often used as the media in the environmental protection technologies. However, due to increasing contamination intensity, the capacity of natural materials is not sufficiently high. Therefore, the popularity of engineered materials, such as biochar which is the thermochemically modified lignocellulosic product, is growing. The new approaches, based on using the contaminant footprint, as well as natural (biogeochemical) and engineered barriers for reducing contaminant migration and their application, are described in the paper.

  20. The Effect of Handwashing with Water or Soap on Bacterial Contamination of Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Maxine; Cobb, Emma; Donachie, Peter; Judah, Gaby; Curtis, Val; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Handwashing is thought to be effective for the prevention of transmission of diarrhoea pathogens. However it is not conclusive that handwashing with soap is more effective at reducing contamination with bacteria associated with diarrhoea than using water only. In this study 20 volunteers contaminated their hands deliberately by touching door handles and railings in public spaces. They were then allocated at random to (1) handwashing with water, (2) handwashing with non-antibacterial soap and (3) no handwashing. Each volunteer underwent this procedure 24 times, yielding 480 samples overall. Bacteria of potential faecal origin (mostly Enterococcus and Enterobacter spp.) were found after no handwashing in 44% of samples. Handwashing with water alone reduced the presence of bacteria to 23% (p soap and water reduced the presence of bacteria to 8% (comparison of both handwashing arms: p soap and water is more effective for the removal of bacteria of potential faecal origin from hands than handwashing with water alone and should therefore be more useful for the prevention of transmission of diarrhoeal diseases. PMID:21318017

  1. The Effect of Handwashing with Water or Soap on Bacterial Contamination of Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf-Peter Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Handwashing is thought to be effective for the prevention of transmission of diarrhoea pathogens. However it is not conclusive that handwashing with soap is more effective at reducing contamination with bacteria associated with diarrhoea than using water only. In this study 20 volunteers contaminated their hands deliberately by touching door handles and railings in public spaces. They were then allocated at random to (1 handwashing with water, (2 handwashing with non-antibacterial soap and (3 no handwashing. Each volunteer underwent this procedure 24 times, yielding 480 samples overall. Bacteria of potential faecal origin (mostly Enterococcus and Enterobacter spp. were found after no handwashing in 44% of samples. Handwashing with water alone reduced the presence of bacteria to 23% (p < 0.001. Handwashing with plain soap and water reduced the presence of bacteria to 8% (comparison of both handwashing arms: p < 0.001. The effect did not appear to depend on the bacteria species. Handwashing with non-antibacterial soap and water is more effective for the removal of bacteria of potential faecal origin from hands than handwashing with water alone and should therefore be more useful for the prevention of transmission of diarrhoeal diseases.

  2. Vancomycin added to the wash solution of the cell-saver. Effect on bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Ferrer, A; Gredilla-Díaz, E; de Vicente-Sánchez, J; Navarro-Suay, R; Gilsanz-Rodríguez, F

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to test whether the addition of a low-dose of antibiotic (vancomycin) to the wash solution (saline) of the cell-saver reduces the incidence of bacterial contamination of the autologous red blood cell (RBCs) concentrate recovered. Experimental, randomized, double-blind, parallel group study performed on 20 consecutive patients scheduled for posterior spinal fusion surgery. Intraoperative bleeding was processed through a cell-saver: HaemoLite ® 2+, in which the RBCs were washed according to randomization group, with saline (control group) or saline+10μg/ml -1 vancomycin (vanco group). Data regarding age, weight, processed and recovered volume, blood count, blood culture, and vancomycin concentration in RBCs concentrates obtained and incidence of fever after reinfusion were collected. Processed volume was 843±403ml and recovered volume 121±29ml, with haemoglobin concentration 10.4±5.0g/dl -1 and haematocrit 29.1±15.9% (mean±SD). Recovered RBC concentrate cultures were positive for coagulase-negative Staphylococcus in 5 cases (50%) of the control group while all cultures were negative in the vanco group (P=.016). The difference between the theoretical concentration of vancomycin administered and the concentration determined in the recovered RBC concentrate was 1.31μg/ml -1 (95% CI 1.19 to 1.43; P=.074). The addition of vancomycin at a concentration of 10ug/ml -1 to the wash solution of the cell-saver achieved similar concentrations in the autologous blood concentrate recovered allowing for bacterial removal, with negative blood cultures in all cases. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Residual risk of bacterial contamination of platelets: six years of experience with sterility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Arcos, Sandra; DiFranco, Caesar; McIntyre, Terri; Goldman, Mindy

    2017-09-01

    Canadian Blood Services screens 100% of platelet concentrates (PCs) for bacterial contamination with the BacT/ALERT system. Quality-control sterility testing of 1% (≥10 units) of outdated PCs is performed monthly. Data from routine screening, quality-control testing, and septic reactions obtained from 2010 to 2016 are presented herein. In total, 601,988 buffy coat PC pools and 186,737 apheresis PCs were routinely screened with aerobic cultures over 6 years. Outdate quality-control testing of 8535 buffy coat and 8498 apheresis PCs was performed using aerobic and anaerobic cultures during the same period. Results were classified as "true-positives" when the same bacterium was isolated in initial and confirmatory cultures or "false-negatives" when bacteria were missed in early screening and were captured during quality-control sterility testing or through investigation of sepsis cases. During routine screening, the true-positive rates between buffy coat (0.94 per 10,000) and apheresis (0.96 per 10,000) PCs were similar (p = 0.9473). Seventy-five bacteria isolated during PC screening included Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. Six false-negative septic reactions were reported that implicated coagulase-negative staphylococci (n = 3) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 3) for approximate rates of 1 per 100,000 transfusion reactions and 1 per 500,000 fatalities. During quality-control testing, the false-negative rates between buffy coat (8 per 10,000) and apheresis (9 per 10,000) PCs were similar (p = 0.7897). All 15 quality-control isolates were Gram-positive bacteria. The current bacterial screening protocol is efficacious for identifying Gram-negative bacteria. However, the high proportion of Gram-positive organisms detected on outdate quality-control testing and septic transfusion events demonstrates a residual safety risk that merits further intervention. © 2017 AABB.

  4. Comparison of PCR with Standard Method (MPN for detection of bacterial contamination in drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Dehghan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Detection of bacterial contamination in drinking water by culture method is a time and cost consuming method and spends a few days depending on contamination degree. However, the people use the tap water during that time. Molecular methods are rapid and sensitive. In this study a rapid Multiplex PCR method was used for rapid analysis both coliform bacteria and E.coli, and probable detection of VBNC bacteria in drinking water, the experiments were performed in bacteriological lab of water and Wastewater Corporation in Markazi province. Material and Methods:Amplification of a fragment from each of lacZ and uidA genes in a Multiplex PCR was used for detection of coliforms. Eight samples was taken from Arak drinking water system including 36 samples of wells, 41 samples of water distribution network and 3 samples from water storages were examined by amplification of lacZ and uidA genes in a Multiplex PCR. Equivalently, the MPN test was applied as a standard method for all samples for comparison of results. Standard bacteria, pure bacteria isolated from positive MPN and CRM were examined by PCR and MPN method. Results: The result of most samples water network, water storages, and water well were same in both MPN and PCR method .The results of standard bacteria and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from positive MPN and CRM confirmed the PCR method. Five samples were positive in PCR but negative in MPN method. Duration time of PCR was decreased about 105 min by changing the PCR program and electrophoreses factors. Conclusion: The Multiplex PCR can detect coliform bacteria and E.coli synchronous in drinking water.

  5. PREVALENCE AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE OF FOOD BORNE BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION IN SOME EGYPTIAN FOOD food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Selim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of food borne bacterial contamination in some Egyptian food. Total viable bacteria and total coliform bacteriawere isolated from different sources of food; carbohydrates (bread, flour and basbousa, vegetables (outer and inner tissues of potato and outer and inner tissues of cucumber and proteins (mincedmeat, cheese and milk. The study resulted in maximum value of total viable bacteria found in outer tissue of potato 68X104±1.0, while the minimum value found in inner tissues of potato andcucumber. The study resulted in total coliform was maximum value in minced meat 6.4X103±0.3. Basbousa and inner tissue of potato and cucumber were free from coliforms. The ability of isolatesto producing proteolytic enzymes was tested, we found that 326 isolate (63.92% from all isolates had this ability, thus we selected most 2 potent proteolytic isolates. The two isolates were identifiedas Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. The identification confirmed by microlog 34.20 system and 16SrRNA for two isolates and the same result was founded. Sensitivity tested for the most potentproteolytic species to 12 of the most commonly used antibiotics in the Egyptian pharmacy. The results showed that all species were sensitive to most of antibiotics, except B. cereus which was strongly susceptible to azteronam and ceftazidim. The data showed that raw meat, cooked food products, and raw milk were most commonly contaminated with foodborne pathogens and many pathogens were resistant to different antibiotics. The study provided useful information for assessment of the possible risk posed to consumers, which has significant public health impact.

  6. National Enforcement Initiative: Preventing Animal Waste from Contaminating Surface and Ground Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page describes EPA's goal in preventing animal waste from contaminating surface and ground Water. It is an EPA National Enforcement Initiative. Both enforcement cases, and a map of enforcement actions are provided.

  7. EDTA addition enhances bacterial respiration activities and hydrocarbon degradation in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented oil-contaminated desert soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kharusi, Samiha; Abed, Raeid M M; Dobretsov, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    The low number and activity of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and the low solubility and availability of hydrocarbons hamper bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils in arid deserts, thus bioremediation treatments that circumvent these limitations are required. We tested the effect of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) addition, at different concentrations (i.e. 0.1, 1 and 10 mM), on bacterial respiration and biodegradation of Arabian light oil in bioaugmented (i.e. with the addition of exogenous alkane-degrading consortium) and non-bioaugmented oil-contaminated desert soils. Post-treatment shifts in the soils' bacterial community structure were monitored using MiSeq sequencing. Bacterial respiration, indicated by the amount of evolved CO2, was highest at 10 mM EDTA in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented soils, reaching an amount of 2.2 ± 0.08 and 1.6 ± 0.02 mg-CO2 g(-1) after 14 days of incubation, respectively. GC-MS revealed that 91.5% of the C14-C30 alkanes were degraded after 42 days when 10 mM EDTA and the bacterial consortium were added together. MiSeq sequencing showed that 78-91% of retrieved sequences in the original soil belonged to Deinococci, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteia and Bacilli. The same bacterial classes were detected in the 10 mM EDTA-treated soils, however with slight differences in their relative abundances. In the bioaugmented soils, only Alcanivorax sp. MH3 and Parvibaculum sp. MH21 from the exogenous bacterial consortium could survive until the end of the experiment. We conclude that the addition of EDTA at appropriate concentrations could facilitate biodegradation processes by increasing hydrocarbon availability to microbes. The addition of exogenous oil-degrading bacteria along with EDTA could serve as an ideal solution for the decontamination of oil-contaminated desert soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Implementation and planning of preventive and multi-layered contaminated water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takeshi; Arai, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    In Fukushima Daiichi D and D activities, one of the most challenging issues is contaminated water management. In order to control ground water inflow into the buildings so that amount of contaminated water does not increase and prevent contaminated water spread out to the environment including into the ocean, TEPCO are taking various measures: In order to remove contamination sources, the removal of the highly contaminated water in the seaside trenches are being implemented. And also, the acceleration of water purification is planned by contaminated water clean-up facility. For the purpose of Isolating water from contaminated sources, construction of the frozen-soil land-side wall started in order to prevent the groundwater from flowing in the area and contaminated water from flowing out from the area. In order to prevent leakage of contaminated water into the ocean, soil improvement with sodium silicate (liquid glass) and Installation of the sea-side impermeable walls are implemented. Furthermore, replacement of the flange-type tanks with welded-joint tanks to mitigate leakage risks is underway. (author)

  9. Residual viral and bacterial contamination of surfaces after cleaning and disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.; Hazeleger, W.C.; Koopmans, M.; Zwietering, M.H.; Beumer, R.R.; Duizer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental surfaces contaminated with pathogens can be sources of indirect transmission, and cleaning and disinfection are common interventions focused on reducing contamination levels. We determined the efficacy of cleaning and disinfection procedures for reducing contamination by noroviruses,

  10. Successful phytoremediation of crude-oil contaminated soil at an oil exploration and production company by plants-bacterial synergism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Kaneez; Imran, Asma; Amin, Imran; Khan, Qaiser M; Afzal, Muhammad

    2018-06-07

    Phytoremediation is a promising approach for the cleanup of soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. This study aimed to develop plant-bacterial synergism for the successful remediation of crude oil-contaminated soil. A consortia of three endophytic bacteria was augmented to two grasses, Leptochloa fusca and Brachiaria mutica, grown in oil-contaminated soil (46.8 g oil kg -1 soil) in the vicinity of an oil exploration and production company. Endophytes augmentation improved plant growth, crude oil degradation, and soil health. Maximum oil degradation (80%) was achieved with B. mutica plants augmented with the endophytes and it was significantly (P oil reduction indicates that catabolic gene expression is important for hydrocarbon mineralization. This investigation showed that the use of endophytes with appropriate plant is an effective strategy for the cleanup of oil-contaminated soil under field conditions.

  11. Application of air ions for bacterial de-colonization in air filters contaminated by aerosolized bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yang Seon; Yoon, Ki Young; Park, Jae Hong; Hwang, Jungho

    2011-01-01

    We aerosolized the Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) bacteria and collected them on membrane filters. Then we generated air ions by applying a high voltage to a carbon fiber tip and applied them to the contaminated filters. The antibacterial efficiency was not significantly affected by the bacteria being Gram-positive or Gram-negative, however, negative ions showed a lower antibacterial efficiency than positive ions to both E. coli and S. epidermidis, even though the concentration of negative air ions was much higher than that of positive air ions. With a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) images and fluorescence microscopy images using a LIVE/DEAD BacLight Bacterial Viability Kit, electrostatic disruption of the bacteria was found to be the dominant antibacterial effect. - Research Highlights: →This study examined the effects of air ions generated by a carbon fiber ionizer on the inactivation of bioaerosols. →When the ion exposure time and the ion generation concentration were increased, the antibacterial efficiency increased. →The bioaerosols carried a significant number of negative electrical charges. →Negative ions showed lower antibacterial efficiency than positive ions to both E. coli and S. epidermidis, even though the concentration of negative air ions was much higher than that of positive air ions.

  12. Bacterial contamination of automotive fuels in a tropical region: the case of Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E Rodríguez-Rodríguez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial contamination of fuel has been the cause of several problems in transportation and storage of these products. Due to the lack of previous studies related to these problems in Costa Rica, bacterial quality was evaluated biannually in automotive fuels stored in the four oil distribution facilities of the Costa Rican Petroleum Refinery (RECOPE. In 12 oil storage tanks, for a total of 96 samples, mesophilic, heterotrophic aerobic/facultative counts (ASTM D6974-04 and identification of bacteria presented in regular gas, premium gas and diesel from the bottom and superior part of the tanks were done; in the samples containing an aqueous phase, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB were also quantified by the most probable number technique (MPN, according to the ASTM D4412-84 standard. The higher contamination was shown at the bottom of the tanks (populations up to 10(4 UFC/l, especially if there was accumulated water, in which case populations reached 10(8 UFC/l. The most contaminated fuel was diesel (counts up to 10(4 UFC/l, whereas the less contaminated was premium gas. The less contaminated fuels were from the facilities of La Garita and Barranca, whereas the most contaminated were from Ochomogo. Nevertheless, the quantified populations did not cause significant alteration in quality physicochemical parameters in the samples analyzed. A total of 149 bacterial strains were isolated, 136 (91.3% Gram positive and 13 (8.7% Gram negative. The most frequent genera were Staphylococcus (24.0%, Micrococcus (21.9%, Bacillus (18.8% and Kocuria (11.5% among Gram positive bacteria and Pseudomonas (7.3% among Gram negative bacteria. The majority of these genera have been found as fuel contaminants or even as degraders of this kind of products; nevertheless, some species for which their appearance or growth in hydrocarbons have not been described were found with low frequencies. SRB were present in counts up to 10(5 MPN/l in 42.9% of water containing samples

  13. Impact of bacterial and fungal processes on {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation in weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adetutu, Eric M.; Ball, Andy S. [School of Biological Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, 5001 (Australia); Weber, John; Aleer, Samuel; Dandie, Catherine E. [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, South Australia, 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, South Australia, 5095 (Australia); Juhasz, Albert L., E-mail: Albert.Juhasz@unisa.edu.au [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Adelaide, South Australia, 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, South Australia, 5095 (Australia)

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the impact of bacterial and fungal processes on {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation was investigated in weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The extent of {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation varied depending on the bioremediation strategy employed. Under enhanced natural attenuation conditions, {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation after 98 days was 8.5 {+-} 3.7% compared to < 1.2% without nitrogen and phosphorus additions. {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation was further enhanced through Tween 80 amendments (28.9 {+-} 2.4%) which also promoted the growth of a Phanerochaete chyrsosporium fungal mat. Although fungal growth in weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soil could be promoted through supplementing additional carbon sources (Tween 80, sawdust, compost, pea straw), fungal {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation was negligible when sodium azide was added to soil microcosms to inhibit bacterial activity. In contrast, when fungal activity was inhibited through nystatin additions, {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation ranged from 6.5 {+-} 0.2 to 35.8 {+-} 3.8% after 98 days depending on the supplied amendment. Bacteria inhibition with sodium azide resulted in a reduction in bacterial diversity (33-37%) compared to microcosms supplemented with nystatin or microcosms without inhibitory supplements. However, alkB bacterial groups were undetected in sodium azide supplemented microcosms, highlighting the important role of this bacterial group in {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The roles of different microbial groups in hydrocarbon mineralisation was assessed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibiting fungal growth did not affect {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibiting bacterial growth resulted in negligible {sup 14}C-hexadecane mineralisation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer alkB bacterial groups were undetected in sodium azide supplemented microcosms. Black

  14. Impact of bacterial and fungal processes on 14C-hexadecane mineralisation in weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adetutu, Eric M.; Ball, Andy S.; Weber, John; Aleer, Samuel; Dandie, Catherine E.; Juhasz, Albert L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the impact of bacterial and fungal processes on 14 C-hexadecane mineralisation was investigated in weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The extent of 14 C-hexadecane mineralisation varied depending on the bioremediation strategy employed. Under enhanced natural attenuation conditions, 14 C-hexadecane mineralisation after 98 days was 8.5 ± 3.7% compared to 14 C-hexadecane mineralisation was further enhanced through Tween 80 amendments (28.9 ± 2.4%) which also promoted the growth of a Phanerochaete chyrsosporium fungal mat. Although fungal growth in weathered hydrocarbon contaminated soil could be promoted through supplementing additional carbon sources (Tween 80, sawdust, compost, pea straw), fungal 14 C-hexadecane mineralisation was negligible when sodium azide was added to soil microcosms to inhibit bacterial activity. In contrast, when fungal activity was inhibited through nystatin additions, 14 C-hexadecane mineralisation ranged from 6.5 ± 0.2 to 35.8 ± 3.8% after 98 days depending on the supplied amendment. Bacteria inhibition with sodium azide resulted in a reduction in bacterial diversity (33–37%) compared to microcosms supplemented with nystatin or microcosms without inhibitory supplements. However, alkB bacterial groups were undetected in sodium azide supplemented microcosms, highlighting the important role of this bacterial group in 14 C-hexadecane mineralisation. - Highlights: ► The roles of different microbial groups in hydrocarbon mineralisation was assessed. ► Inhibiting fungal growth did not affect 14 C-hexadecane mineralisation. ► Inhibiting bacterial growth resulted in negligible 14 C-hexadecane mineralisation. ► alkB bacterial groups were undetected in sodium azide supplemented microcosms. ► The importance of alkB groups in 14 C-hexadecane mineralisation was highlighted.

  15. Generation of Nanobodies against SlyD and development of tools to eliminate this bacterial contaminant from recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaozhong; Romão, Ema; Vertommen, Didier; Vincke, Cécile; Morales-Yánez, Francisco; Gutiérrez, Carlos; Liu, Changxiao; Muyldermans, Serge

    2017-09-01

    The gene for a protein domain, derived from a tumor marker, fused to His tag codons and under control of a T7 promotor was expressed in E. coli strain BL21 (DE3). The recombinant protein was purified from cell lysates through immobilized metal affinity chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography. A contaminating bacterial protein was consistently co-purified, even using stringent washing solutions containing 50 or 100 mM imidazole. Immunization of a dromedary with this contaminated protein preparation, and the subsequent generation and panning of the immune Nanobody library yielded several Nanobodies of which 2/3 were directed against the bacterial contaminant, reflecting the immunodominance of this protein to steer the dromedary immune response. Affinity adsorption of this contaminant using one of our specific Nanobodies followed by mass spectrometry identified the bacterial contaminant as FKBP-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (SlyD) from E. coli. This SlyD protein contains in its C-terminal region 14 histidines in a stretch of 31 amino acids, which explains its co-purification on Ni-NTA resin. This protein is most likely present to varying extents in all recombinant protein preparations after immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Using our SlyD-specific Nb 5 we generated an immune-complex that could be removed either by immunocapturing or by size exclusion chromatography. Both methods allow us to prepare a recombinant protein sample where the SlyD contaminant was quantitatively eliminated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Early postsurgical bacterial contamination of the airways: a study on 28 open-heart patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villota, E D; Avello, F; Granados, M A; Arcas, M; Moles, B

    1978-01-01

    One pre- and two postoperative cultures of tracheo-bronchial secretions were obtained from 28 cardiac patients, subjected to open-heart surgery. Four patients received preoperative antibiotics, and all but one received postoperative prophylactic antibiotics. Preoperatively, only one patient had potential pathogens; after surgery (mean intubation time 4.2 h), four patients (14.3%) had organisms; and after 19 h of intubation, 28% of the patients had potential pathogens in their tracheo-bronchial secretions. Only three of the seven organisms recovered from the last sample were clearly sensitive to the antibiotics given prophylactically; and two of these organisms were Group A beta-haemolytic streptococci. The early presence of organisms in the airways after intubation, the high incidence of colonization, and the ineffectiveness of prophylactic antibiotics in preventing this contamination are pointed out. The factors that may possibly influence colonization of airways among these patients are commented on.

  17. Low-waste technology of prevention, decontamination and localization of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizhnerov, L. V.; Konstantinov, Ye. A.; Prokopenko, V. A.; Sorokin, N. M.

    1997-01-01

    The report presents the results of research in developing a low-waste technology of prevention, decontamination and localization of radioactive contamination founded on the of easily removed protective polymeric coating based on water and alcohol latexes and dispersion of polymers with special activating additives. The developed technology provides for the reduction of weakly fixed radioactive contamination of non-painted and painted surfaces to admissible levels (as a rule), it securely prevents and localizes contamination and does not generate secondary liquid radioactive wastes

  18. Differential impacts of willow and mineral fertilizer on bacterial communities and biodegradation in diesel fuel oil-contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Cathrine C.E. Leewis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research there is limited understanding of how vegetation impacts the ability of microbial communities to process organic contaminants in soil. Using a combination of traditional and molecular assays, we examined how phytoremediation with willow and/or fertilization affected the microbial community present and active in the transformation of diesel contaminants. In a pot study, willow had a significant role in structuring the total bacterial community and resulted in significant decreases in diesel range organics (DRO. However, stable isotope probing (SIP indicated that fertilizer drove the differences seen in community structure and function. Finally, analysis of the total variance in both pot and SIP experiments indicated an interactive effect between willow and fertilizer on the bacterial communities. This study clearly demonstrates that a willow native to Alaska accelerates DRO degradation, and together with fertilizer, increased aromatic degradation by shifting microbial community structure and the identity of active naphthalene degraders.

  19. [An experimental study on the prevention of enteral bacterial translocation in scalded rats by smectite powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hai-tao; Li, Yi-shu; Lu, Shu-liang; Sun, Man; Qing, Chun; Li, Zong-yu; Shao, Tie-bing; Huang, Li-bing; Qu, Bing; Yang, Xin-bo

    2005-04-01

    To explore the preventive and treatment effects of smectite powder on enteral bacterial translocation in scalded rats. Fifty-four Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups, i.e. normal control (A, n = 6), burn control (B, n = 24), and burn treatment (T, n = 24) groups. The rats in B and T groups were fed with tracing bacteria JM109, which was transfected with PUC19 plasmid in advance. The rats were subjected to 30% TBSA scald injury after the plasmid was shown to have colonized in the intestine. Smectite powder (0.6 g/day/kg) was fed to rats of T group immediately after the scalding, while those in B group received no smectite powder. Bacterial translocation in blood and mesenteric lymph nodes in all groups was observed and identified by enzyme digestion at 12 post scald hour (PSH) and on 1, 3 and 5 post-scald days (PSD). The contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were determined in rat intestinal tissue. And the degree of injury to the entire small intestine was observed pathologically. The villus height of intestinal mucosa was measured, and the rate of epithelial nuclear splitting of mucosal crypts was calculated. The number of rats with positive blood bacterial culture in B group was obviously higher than that in A and T groups (P Smectite powder is beneficial to the protection of the intestinal mucosa in scalded rats, and can effectively prevent postburn intestinal bacterial translocation in rats.

  20. Surface zwitterionization: Effective method for preventing oral bacterial biofilm formation on hydroxyapatite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoungjin; Kim, Heejin; Seo, Jiae; Kang, Minji; Kang, Sunah; Jang, Joomyung; Lee, Yan; Seo, Ji-Hun

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we conducted surface zwitterionization of hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces by immersing them in the zwitterionic polymer solutions to provide anti-bacterial properties to the HA surface. Three different monomers containing various zwitterionic groups, i.e., phosphorylcholine (PC), sulfobetaine (SB), and carboxybetaine (CB), were copolymerized with the methacrylic monomer containing a Ca2+-binding moiety, using the free radical polymerization method. As a control, functionalization of the copolymer containing the Ca2+-binding moiety was synthesized using a hydroxy group. The stable immobilization of the zwitterionic functional groups was confirmed by water contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement conducted after the sonication process. The zwitterionized HA surface showed significantly decreased protein adsorption, whereas the hydroxyl group-coated HA surface showed limited efficacy. The anti-bacterial adhesion property was confirmed by conducting Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) adhesion tests for 6 h and 24 h. When furanone C-30, a representative anti-quorum sensing molecule for S. mutans, was used, only a small amount of bacteria adhered after 6 h and the population did not increase after 24 h. In contrast, zwitterionized HA surfaces showed almost no bacterial adhesion after 6 h and the effect was retained for 24 h, resulting in the lowest level of oral bacterial adhesion. These results confirm that surface zwitterionization is a promising method to effectively prevent oral bacterial adhesion on HA-based materials.

  1. Bacterial Contamination of Boar Semen and its Relationship to Sperm Quality Preserved in Commercial Extender Containing Gentamicin Sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gączarzewicz, D; Udała, J; Piasecka, M; Błaszczyk, B; Stankiewicz, T

    2016-09-01

    This study was designed to determine the degree and type of bacterial contamination in boar semen (79 ejaculates from Large White and Landrace boars) and its consequences for sperm quality during storage (27 extended semen samples, 16°C for five days) under practical conditions of artificial insemination (AI). The results revealed the presence of aerobic bacteria in 99% of the ejaculates (from 80 to 370 ×106 colony-forming units/mL). Most of the ejaculates contained two or three bacterial contaminants, while the Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Pseudomonas bacterial genera were most frequently isolated. Also detected were Enterobacter spp., Bacillus spp., Proteus spp., Escherichia coli, P. fluorescens, and P. aeruginosa. In general, the growth of certain bacterial types isolated prior to semen processing (Enterobacter spp., E. coli, P. fluorescens, and P. aeruginosa) was not discovered on different days of storage, but fluctuations (with a tendency towards increases) were found in the frequencies of Bacillus spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Staphylococcus spp. isolates up to the end of storage. Semen preserved for five days exhibited decreases in sperm motility and increases in the average number of total aerobic bacteria; this was associated with sperm agglutination, plasma membrane disruption, and acrosome damage. We inferred that, due to the different degrees and types of bacterial contaminants in the boar ejaculates, the inhibitory activity of some antimicrobial agents used in swine extenders (such as gentamicin sulfate) may be limited. Because such agents can contribute to the overgrowth of certain aerobic bacteria and a reduction in the quality of stored semen, procedures with high standards of hygiene and microbiological control should be used when processing boar semen.

  2. The Survey on the Bacterial Contamination of Traditional & Pasteurized ice Cream Produced in Arak City (summer and fall 2011)

    OpenAIRE

    M Rezaei; M Parviz; MR Javanmard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Ice-cream, being full of nutrients and enjoying favorable conditions may cause poisoning and intestinal diseases for the consumers in case of not considering rules of hygiene in the stages of production, maintenance and delivery.It is in fact considered as one of the dairy products providing a suitable environment for the development of different kinds of microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to investigate bacterial contamination found in traditional (unpasteurized) and...

  3. CRISPR interference can prevent natural transformation and virulence acquisition during in vivo bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikard, David; Hatoum-Aslan, Asma; Mucida, Daniel; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2012-08-16

    Pathogenic bacterial strains emerge largely due to transfer of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes between bacteria, a process known as horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci of bacteria and archaea encode a sequence-specific defense mechanism against bacteriophages and constitute a programmable barrier to HGT. However, the impact of CRISPRs on the emergence of virulence is unknown. We programmed the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae with CRISPR sequences that target capsule genes, an essential pneumococcal virulence factor, and show that CRISPR interference can prevent transformation of nonencapsulated, avirulent pneumococci into capsulated, virulent strains during infection in mice. Further, at low frequencies bacteria can lose CRISPR function, acquire capsule genes, and mount a successful infection. These results demonstrate that CRISPR interference can prevent the emergence of virulence in vivo and that strong selective pressure for virulence or antibiotic resistance can lead to CRISPR loss in bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fermented whey as poultry feed additive to prevent fungal contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londero, Alejandra; León Peláez, María A; Diosma, Gabriela; De Antoni, Graciela L; Abraham, Analía G; Garrote, Graciela L

    2014-12-01

    Fungal contamination of poultry feed causes economic losses to industry and represents a potential risk to animal health. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effectiveness of whey fermented with kefir grains as additive to reduce fungal incidence, thus improving feed safety. Whey fermented for 24 h at 20 °C with kefir grains (100 g L(-1) ) reduced conidial germination of Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium crustosum, Trichoderma longibrachiatum and Rhizopus sp. Poultry feed supplemented with fermented whey (1 L kg(-1) ) was two to four times more resistant to fungal contamination than control feed depending on the fungal species. Additionally, it contained kefir microorganisms at levels of 1 × 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) kg(-1) of lactic acid bacteria and 6 × 10(7) CFU kg(-1) of yeasts even after 30 days of storage. Fermented whey added to poultry feed acted as a biopreservative, improving its resistance to fungal contamination and increasing its shelf life. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Bleeding Sap and Old Wood Are the Two Main Sources of Contamination of Merging Organs of Vine Plants by Xylophilus ampelinus, the Causal Agent of Bacterial Necrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Grall, S.; Roulland, C.; Guillaumès, J.; Manceau, C.

    2005-01-01

    The spatial distribution of vine plants contaminated by Xylophilus ampelinus, the agent responsible for bacterial necrosis, was studied over a 5-year period within two vineyards in the Cognac area. Both vineyards were planted with Vitis vinifera cv. Ugni blanc but were different in age and agronomic location. The emission of X. ampelinus in contaminated bleeding sap was observed during vine sprouting. Contaminated bleeding sap is an important source of inoculum for external contamination due ...

  6. Bacterial spores as possible contaminants of biomedical materials and devices. [Bacillus anthracis, clostridium botulinum, C. perfringens, C. tetani

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grecz, N; Kang, T

    1973-01-01

    Destruction of spores on biomedical devices in drugs, and biologicals is essential for prevention of infection of patients with pathogenic sporeformers. Of particular concern are Clostridium tetani, C. perfringens, C. botulinum, Bacillus anthracis and other sporeforming pathogens. Spores are ubiquitous in nature and contamination of biomedical devices varies depending on manufacturing process, handling, raw materials and other variables. In the last 20 years the number of cases per year of specific notifiable diseases in the United States was as follows: tetanus, 120 to 500 cases, botulism, 7 to 47 cases, and anthrax, 2 to 10 cases. Gas gangrene is caused by a mixed flora consisting predominantly of sporeformers. C botulinum, which usually acts as saprophytic agent of food poisoning, may also initiate pathogenic processes; there are nine cases on record in the United States of botulism wound infections almost half of which ended in death. The spores of these organisms are distinguished by high radiation resistance and their erradication often requires severe radiation treatments. Representative bacterial spores in various suspending media show D/sub 10/ values (dose necessary to destroy 90 percent of a given population) ranging from approximately 0.1 to 0.4 Mrad. Some viruses show D/sub 10/ values up to greater than 1 Mrad. The D/sub 10/-values of spores vary depending on physical, chemical and biological factors. This variability is important in evaluation and selection of biological indicator organisms. Radiation sterilization of biomedical devices and biomedical materials must provide safety from infectious microorganisms including radiation resistant spores and viruses.

  7. Effects of bacterial contamination of media on the diagnosis of Tritrichomonas foetus by culture and real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothier, Kristin A; Villanueva, Michelle; Torain, Andrea; Hult, Cynthia; Wallace, Rachel

    2015-03-15

    The venereal pathogen Tritrichomonas foetus causes early embryonic death and abortion in cattle. With no approved treatment, control involves detection of infected animals and their removal from the herd. Culture is the traditional diagnostic method; standard media are formulated to support protozoal growth while suppressing competing organisms which may prevent microscopic recognition of T. foetus. Real-time PCR increases diagnostic sensitivity and specificity over culture but requires intact T. foetus DNA for detection. The purposes of this study were 1) to evaluate the effects of resident preputial bacteria that are not suppressed by antimicrobials in a commercial culture medium (InPouch™) on T. foetus detection by culture and PCR, and 2) to determine the performance of a laboratory-prepared culture medium on T. foetus detection by culture and PCR in samples with and without this bacterial contamination. A known concentration of one of three different strains of T. foetus inoculated into InPouch™ (IP) or modified Diamonds-Plastridge media (DPM) were co-incubated with a smegma culture media (CONTAM) for 24h and examined microscopically for the presence of identifiable T. foetus. PCR was performed on IP samples to determine if CONTAM also affected T. foetus DNA detection. A PCR protocol was then validated in DPM that performed similarly to the established IP PCR method. IP and DPM with CONTAM were spiked with serial dilutions that mimic field infections of one of four T. foetus strains and evaluated by real-time PCR; cycles to threshold (Ct) values and "positive" classification were compared between media. T. foetus motility and morphology as well as media pH were severely altered in IP samples with CONTAM compared to those without as well as to DPM medium with and without CONTAM (Pmedia interfere with T. foetus identification by culture and PCR and adversely affect diagnostic sensitivity for this fastidious pathogen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  8. Linkage between bacterial and fungal rhizosphere communities in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is related to plant phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Terrence H; El-Din Hassan, Saad; Lauron-Moreau, Aurélien; Al-Otaibi, Fahad; Hijri, Mohamed; Yergeau, Etienne; St-Arnaud, Marc

    2014-02-01

    Phytoremediation is an attractive alternative to excavating and chemically treating contaminated soils. Certain plants can directly bioremediate by sequestering and/or transforming pollutants, but plants may also enhance bioremediation by promoting contaminant-degrading microorganisms in soils. In this study, we used high-throughput sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region to compare the community composition of 66 soil samples from the rhizosphere of planted willows (Salix spp.) and six unplanted control samples at the site of a former petrochemical plant. The Bray-Curtis distance between bacterial communities across willow cultivars was significantly correlated with the distance between fungal communities in uncontaminated and moderately contaminated soils but not in highly contaminated (HC) soils (>2000 mg kg(-1) hydrocarbons). The mean dissimilarity between fungal, but not bacterial, communities from the rhizosphere of different cultivars increased substantially in the HC blocks. This divergence was partly related to high fungal sensitivity to hydrocarbon contaminants, as demonstrated by reduced Shannon diversity, but also to a stronger influence of willows on fungal communities. Abundance of the fungal class Pezizomycetes in HC soils was directly related to willow phylogeny, with Pezizomycetes dominating the rhizosphere of a monophyletic cluster of cultivars, while remaining in low relative abundance in other soils. This has implications for plant selection in phytoremediation, as fungal associations may affect the health of introduced plants and the success of co-inoculated microbial strains. An integrated understanding of the relationships between fungi, bacteria and plants will enable the design of treatments that specifically promote effective bioremediating communities.

  9. Bacterial Contamination of DifferentTypes of Paper Currency in Iran During 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Taher

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Backgrand and Aims: Paper currencies are widely exchanged for receiving goods and servicesthroughout our country as well as rest of the world. Money bills are used everywhere and in allcapacities, and are being exchanged among a lot of people during the period of their circulation.If some of these bills are infected with pathogenic bacteria, there will be a potential hazard for thewell-being and health of those who handle them. Contaminated money bills are potentially verydangerous to the health of humans. The aim of this research is to specify the bacterial load ofvarious types of collected bills from different regions in Iran.Method:This research is a descriptive, cross- sectional study. At first, 400 different papercurrencies from various provinces in Iran were collected. Banknotes were put into the bottlescontaining sterile water and then heated for 12-24 hours at the temperature of 37°C. Afterwards,the banknotes were removed by a sterile forceps and the remaining solution was incubated. Theseparated microbes were identified by using microbiologic methods.Results: Data analysis revealed that 46% of different types of paper currency were contaminatedwith Gram positive and 54% with Gram negative bacteria. Klebsiella pneumoniae and Grampositive cocci in particular Staphylococcus aureus were the most separated bacteria, which areknown as pathogens in various diseases in human body.Conclusion: These bacteria cause serious illnesses particularly in elder people, children andspecifically immuno-deficient patients. We concluded that paper money in this study wascontaminated. Replacement of money bills with credit/ debit cards may reduce the potentialhazards substantially.

  10. Distribution of bacterial contamination in non-sterile pharmaceutical materials and assessment of its risk to the health of the final consumers quantitatively

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Essam Eissa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial contamination control in pharmaceutical products is a critical aspect in the field of drug manufacturing industry due to the encountered risk to the patients' health and possibly their life. The application of commercial bacterial identification system is crucial to identify the type of contamination and its source to anticipate the impact of bioburden on the products and setting corrective and preventive actions. During the period of one year, random samples from raw materials and final products were tested according to United States Pharmacopeia, and those that showed suspect results for specified microorganisms and/or out-of-specification limits or showed out-of-trend results were subjected to further identification by using miniaturized biochemical identification system after performing Gram stain. From the total bacterial isolates of the investigated products, more than 60% were primarily belonging to Micrococcaceae 16.98% (empty hard gelatin capsules, Enterobacteriaceae 18.86% (vaginal cream applicator, plastic caps for bottles, Sorbitol solution, finished hard gelatin capsule product, topical cream and oral suspension and Bacillaceae 24.53% (Talc powder, liquid oral preparation and finished hard gelatin capsule product. Gram Positive and Negative samples were 56.60% and 41.51% respectively from the total investigated sample products and materials. Finished pharmaceutical products constituted 53.33% and 68.18% from Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms respectively. An approach to quantitative risk assessment for pharmaceutical products was conducted on selected medicinal items and showed that Enterobacteriaceae followed by Burkholderiaceae contributed by more than 80% to the major hazard that could be delivered to patients through drugs. The applied risk can be used as a milestone for setting goals by pharmaceutical companies to improve the safety of medicinal products microbiologically and to identify the major sources

  11. Three common metal contaminants of urban runoff (Zn, Cu and Pb) accumulate in freshwater biofilm and modify embedded bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancion, Pierre-Yves; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian D.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the absorption rates of zinc, copper and lead in freshwater biofilm and assessed whether biofilm bacterial populations are affected by exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of these metals in flow chamber microcosms. Metals were rapidly accumulated by the biofilm and then retained for at least 14 days after transfer to uncontaminated water. Changes in bacterial populations were assessed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Significant differences in bacterial community structure occurred within only three days of exposure to metals and remained detectable at least 14 days after transfer to uncontaminated water. The rapid uptake of stormwater-associated metals and their retention in the biofilm highlight the potential role of biofilms in the transfer of metals to organisms at higher trophic levels. The sensitivity of stream biofilm bacterial populations to metal exposure supports their use as an indicator of stream ecological health. - The rapid accumulation of metals in biofilms and their impact on bacterial communities provide new insights into how these contaminants affect freshwater ecosystems.

  12. Resolving Bacterial Contamination of Fuel Ethanol Fermentations with Beneficial Bacteria – an Alternative to Antibiotic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel ethanol fermentations are not performed under aseptic conditions and microbial contamination reduces yields and can lead to costly “stuck fermentations.” Antibiotics are commonly used to combat contaminants, but these may persist in the distillers grains co-product. Among contaminants, it is kn...

  13. Forensic Luminol Blood Test for Preventing Cross-contamination in Dentistry: An Evaluation of a Dental School Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Carlos Bortoluzzi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: We suggest that the luminol method is suitable for identifying contamination with invisible blood traces and this method may be a useful tool to prevent cross-contamination in the dental care setting.

  14. Bacterial Contamination of Hands Increases Risk of Cross-Contamination among Low-Income Puerto Rican Meal Preparers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharod, Jigna Morarji; Paciello, Stefania; Bermudez-Millan, Angela; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar; Damio, Grace; Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association of microbial contamination of the meal preparer's hands with microbial status of food and kitchen/utensil surfaces during home preparation of a "Chicken and Salad" meal. Design and Setting: Observational home food safety assessment. Before starting meal preparation, participants' hands were tested to…

  15. Reactive arthritis induced by bacterial vaginosis: Prevention with an effective treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Aminzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 42-year-old woman with reactive arthritis induced by bacterial vaginosis who presented with oligoarthritis with an additive form, arthralgia, and enthesitis. She hasn′t had a history of diarrhea or dysuria or vaginal secretion, or sexually transmitted infections (STIs. The laboratory tests were normal except for a high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR. Her pelvic examination revealed homogeneous white grey and malodorous vaginal discharge on the vaginal wall and Pap smear and Gram-stained smear of vaginal swab was consistent with bacterial vaginosis. She responded to metronidazole therapy and her six-month follow up hasn′t shown recurrence of arthritis. As reactive arthritis (ReA is a paradigm of a rheumatic disease in which the initiating infectious cause is known, so early use of antimicrobial drugs may prevent the development of musculoskeletal symptoms which are triggered by infections.

  16. Assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in contaminated sediments and soils using green fluorescent protein-based bacterial biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, V.H.-C.; Chien, M.-T.; Tseng, Y.-Y.; Ou, K.-L.

    2006-01-01

    A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based bacterial biosensor Escherichia coli DH5α (pVLCD1) was developed based on the expression of gfp under the control of the cad promoter and the cadC gene of Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258. DH5α (pVLCD1) mainly responded to Cd(II), Pb(II), and Sb(III), the lowest detectable concentrations being 0.1 nmol L -1 , 10 nmol L -1 , and 0.1 nmol L -1 , respectively, with 2 h exposure. The biosensor was field-tested to measure the relative bioavailability of the heavy metals in contaminated sediments and soil samples. The results showed that the majority of heavy metals remained adsorbed to soil particles: Cd(II)/Pb(II) was only partially available to the biosensor in soil-water extracts. Our results demonstrate that the GFP-based bacterial biosensor is useful and applicable in determining the bioavailability of heavy metals with high sensitivity in contaminated sediment and soil samples and suggests a potential for its inexpensive application in environmentally relevant sample tests. - Nonpathogenic GFP-based bacterial biosensor is applicable in determining the bioavailability of heavy metals in environmental samples

  17. Bacterial Diversity and Bioremediation Potential of the Highly Contaminated Marine Sediments at El-Max District (Egypt, Mediterranean Sea)

    KAUST Repository

    Amer, Ranya A.

    2015-02-01

    Coastal environments worldwide are threatened by the effects of pollution, a risk particularly high in semienclosed basins like the Mediterranean Sea that is poorly studied from bioremediation potential perspective especially in the Southern coast. Here, we investigated the physical, chemical, and microbiological features of hydrocarbon and heavy metals contaminated sediments collected at El-Max bay (Egypt). Molecular and statistical approaches assessing the structure of the sediment-dwelling bacterial communities showed correlations between the composition of bacterial assemblages and the associated environmental parameters. Fifty strains were isolated on mineral media supplemented by 1% crude oil and identified as a diverse range of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria involved in different successional stages of biodegradation. We screened the collection for biotechnological potential studying biosurfactant production, biofilm formation, and the capability to utilize different hydrocarbons. Some strains were able to grow on multiple hydrocarbons as unique carbon source and presented biosurfactant-like activities and/or capacity to form biofilm and owned genes involved in different detoxification/degradation processes. El-Max sediments represent a promising reservoir of novel bacterial strains adapted to high hydrocarbon contamination loads. The potential of the strains for exploitation for in situ intervention to combat pollution in coastal areas is discussed.

  18. Bacterial Diversity and Bioremediation Potential of the Highly Contaminated Marine Sediments at El-Max District (Egypt, Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranya A. Amer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coastal environments worldwide are threatened by the effects of pollution, a risk particularly high in semienclosed basins like the Mediterranean Sea that is poorly studied from bioremediation potential perspective especially in the Southern coast. Here, we investigated the physical, chemical, and microbiological features of hydrocarbon and heavy metals contaminated sediments collected at El-Max bay (Egypt. Molecular and statistical approaches assessing the structure of the sediment-dwelling bacterial communities showed correlations between the composition of bacterial assemblages and the associated environmental parameters. Fifty strains were isolated on mineral media supplemented by 1% crude oil and identified as a diverse range of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria involved in different successional stages of biodegradation. We screened the collection for biotechnological potential studying biosurfactant production, biofilm formation, and the capability to utilize different hydrocarbons. Some strains were able to grow on multiple hydrocarbons as unique carbon source and presented biosurfactant-like activities and/or capacity to form biofilm and owned genes involved in different detoxification/degradation processes. El-Max sediments represent a promising reservoir of novel bacterial strains adapted to high hydrocarbon contamination loads. The potential of the strains for exploitation for in situ intervention to combat pollution in coastal areas is discussed.

  19. Bacterial Diversity and Bioremediation Potential of the Highly Contaminated Marine Sediments at El-Max District (Egypt, Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Ranya A.; El Gendi, Hamada M.; Goda, Doaa A.; Corsini, Anna; Cavalca, Lucia; Fusi, Marco; Daffonchio, Daniele; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R.

    2015-01-01

    Coastal environments worldwide are threatened by the effects of pollution, a risk particularly high in semienclosed basins like the Mediterranean Sea that is poorly studied from bioremediation potential perspective especially in the Southern coast. Here, we investigated the physical, chemical, and microbiological features of hydrocarbon and heavy metals contaminated sediments collected at El-Max bay (Egypt). Molecular and statistical approaches assessing the structure of the sediment-dwelling bacterial communities showed correlations between the composition of bacterial assemblages and the associated environmental parameters. Fifty strains were isolated on mineral media supplemented by 1% crude oil and identified as a diverse range of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria involved in different successional stages of biodegradation. We screened the collection for biotechnological potential studying biosurfactant production, biofilm formation, and the capability to utilize different hydrocarbons. Some strains were able to grow on multiple hydrocarbons as unique carbon source and presented biosurfactant-like activities and/or capacity to form biofilm and owned genes involved in different detoxification/degradation processes. El-Max sediments represent a promising reservoir of novel bacterial strains adapted to high hydrocarbon contamination loads. The potential of the strains for exploitation for in situ intervention to combat pollution in coastal areas is discussed. PMID:26273661

  20. Denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter dominate bacterial communities in the highly contaminated subsurface of a nuclear legacy waste site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Stefan [Florida State University; Prakash, Om [Florida State University; Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University; Overholt, Will [Florida State University; Cardenas, Erick [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University; Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Watson, David B [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University

    2011-01-01

    The effect of long-term mixed-waste contamination, particularly uranium and nitrate, on the microbial community in the terrestrial subsurface was investigated at the field scale at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site in Oak Ridge, TN. The abundance, community composition, and distribution of groundwater microorganisms were examined across the site during two seasonal sampling events. At representative locations, subsurface sediment was also examined from two boreholes, one sampled from the most heavily contaminated area of the site and another from an area with low contamination. A suite of DNA- and RNA-based molecular tools were employed for community characterization, including quantitative PCR of ribosomal RNA and nitrite reductase genes, community composition fingerprinting analysis, and high-throughput pyrotag sequencing of rRNA genes. The results demonstrate that pH is a major driver of the subsurface microbial community structure, and denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter (class Gammaproteobacteria) dominate at low pH. The relative abundance of bacteria from this genus was positively correlated with lower pH conditions, and these bacteria were abundant and active in the most highly contaminated areas. Other factors, such as concentration of nitrogen species, oxygen and sampling season did not appear to strongly influence the distribution of Rhodanobacter. Results indicate that these organisms are acid-tolerant denitrifiers, well suited to the acidic, nitrate-rich subsurface conditions, and pH is confirmed as a dominant driver of bacterial community structure in this contaminated subsurface environment.

  1. Prevention of radioactive contamination in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero G, E.T.

    1995-01-01

    In this work was studied the separation of uranium from the phosphate rock to decrease the level of radioactivity in the phosphate fertilizers, this prevents the redistribution of uranium in the environment. The uranium leaching conditions from phosphate rock were estimated using alkaline solutions. The changes in the natural phosphate rock after leaching were studied. The amenability to separate the uranium from phosphate rock with ammonium carbonate / bicarbonate solution was determined. The uranium extraction was approximately 40%. The leaching conditions showed high selectivity for uranium without changes in the ore structure. The bulk ore was not dissolved. (Author)

  2. Preventing intentional food contamination: a survey to assess restaurant preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Kanwat, C P; Qu, Haiyan; Smith, Lillian U; Patterson, Nathaniel J; Shewchuk, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    In the age of preparedness, public health agencies are concerned with intentional acts of food contamination in restaurants, in addition to food safety. Food safety consists of applying standard norms of practice and infrastructure, which, if violated, cause food-borne illness. In contrast, food defense requires an institutionalized mindset of informed alertness to unusual variations from the norms, combined with preemptive practices best suited to each restaurant. Therefore, while food safety lends itself to regulation to ensure standard practices, food defense is best served by advisory guidelines for autonomous application, preserving the restaurant industry's core values of hospitality and customer service. To address this challenge, public health agencies need survey tools that can yield action-relevant data on the knowledge and practice gaps in food defense preparedness and on educational messages and support services to be developed for maximum impact potential. This article presents a mail survey instrument, developed using qualitative research to ensure content and face validity. Instrument development involved drafting the survey on the basis of expert consultations, validating its content by using focus groups (representing all restaurant categories and geographic regions), and ensuring face validity through cognitive interviews. The resulting survey remains sensitive to the hospitality industry while encompassing all vulnerable points.

  3. Green and brown propolis: efficient natural biocides for the control of bacterial contamination of alcoholic fermentation of distilled beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Justino Rossini Mutton

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of natural biocides, brown and green propolis, for the control of bacterial contamination in the production of sugarcane spirit. The treatments consisted of brown and green propolis extracts, ampicillin, and a control and were assessed at the beginning and end of harvest season in ten fermentation cycles. In the microbiological analyses, the lactic acid bacteria were quantified in the inoculum before and after the treatment with biocides, and the viability of yeast cells during fermentation was evaluated. The levels of acids, glycerol, total residual reducing sugars, and ethanol were analyzed for the wine resulting from each fermentation cycle. A reduction in the number of bacterial contaminants in the inoculum in the treatments with the natural biocides was observed, but it did not affect the viability of yeast cells. The control of the contaminants led to the production of higher levels of ethanol and reduced acidity in the wine produced. The results of the use of brown and green propolis to control the growth microorganisms in the fermentation of sugarcane spirit can be of great importance for using alternative strategies to synthetic antibacterials in fermentation processes including other distilled beverage or spirits.

  4. Effects of mercury contamination on the culturable heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Sørensen, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of mercury contamination on the culturable heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in soil. The changes in diversity were monitored in soil microcosms, enriched with 25 mug Hg(II) g(-1) soil, over a period of 3 months...... by purification of total soil DNA and amplification of bacterial 16S rDNA fragments by polymerase chain reaction. Concentrations of bioavailable and total mercury were measured throughout the experiment. The effect on the culturable heterotrophic and genetic diversity was very similar, showing an immediate...... decrease after mercury addition but then slowly increasing throughout the entire experimental period. Pre-exposure levels were not reached within the time span of this investigation. The DGGE band pattern indicated that a shift in the community structure was responsible for recovered diversity. When...

  5. Contamination of wines and spirits by phthalates: types of contaminants present, contamination sources and means of prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatonnet, P; Boutou, S; Plana, A

    2014-01-01

    This research determines the concentrations of various phthalates in French wines and grape spirits marketed in Europe or intended for export. Dibutyl phthalate (DBP), diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) were the most frequently detected compounds in the wines analysed. While only 15% of the samples examined contained quantifiable concentrations (> 0.010 mg kg(-1)) of DEHP and BBP, 59% of the wines contained significant quantities of DBP, with a median value as high as 0.0587 mg kg(-1). Only 17% of the samples did not contain any detectable quantity of at least one of the phthalates and 19% contained only non-quantifiable traces. In the spirits analysed, DBP (median = 0.105 mg kg(-1)) and DEHP (median = 0.353 mg kg(-1)) were the substances measured at the highest concentrations, as well as the most frequently detected (90% of samples). BBP was present in 40% of the samples at an average concentration of 0.026 mg kg(-1). Di-isobutyl phthalate (DiBP), which is not permitted in contact with food, was found in 25% of the spirits tested. According to the specific migration limits (SML) for materials in contact with food, slightly more than 11% of the wines analysed were non-compliant, as they exceeded the SML for DBP (0.3 mg kg(-1)); just under 4% were close to the SML for DEHP. Concerning spirits, 19% of the samples analysed were considered non-compliant to the SML for DBP and nearly 7% were close to the SML for DEHP. The aged grape spirits analysed were often excessively contaminated with DiBP, which is not permitted to be used in contact with food (> 0.01 mg kg(-1)). A study of various materials frequently present in wineries revealed that a relatively large number of polymers sometimes contained high concentrations of phthalates. However, the epoxy resin coatings used on vats represented the major source of contamination.

  6. Contamination of knives and graters by bacterial foodborne pathogens during slicing and grating of produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Liao, Jean; Cannon, Jennifer L; Ortega, Ynes R

    2015-12-01

    Poor hygiene and improper food preparation practices in consumers' homes have previously been demonstrated as contributing to foodborne diseases. To address potential cross-contamination by kitchen utensils in the home, a series of studies was conducted to determine the extent to which the use of a knife or grater on fresh produce would lead to the utensil's contamination with Escherichia coli O157:H7 or Salmonella enterica. When shredding inoculated carrots (ca. 5.3 log CFU/carrot), all graters became contaminated and the number of E. coli O157:H7 present on the utensil was significantly greater than Salmonella (p Contamination of knives after slicing inoculated produce (4.9-5.4 log CFU/produce item) could only be detected by enrichment culture. After slicing tomatoes, honeydew melons, strawberries, cucumbers, and cantaloupes, the average prevalence of knife contamination by the two pathogens was 43%, 17%, 15%, 7%, and 3%, respectively. No significant increase in the incidence or level of contamination occurred on the utensils when residues were present (p > 0.05); however, subsequent contamination of 7 produce items processed with the contaminated utensils did occur. These results highlight the necessity of proper sanitization of these utensils when used in preparation of raw produce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of structural injure in the bile bacterial contamination after balloon transduodenal sphincteroplasty (papillary dilation in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zavadinack Netto Martin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate, in dogs, the biliary sphincter subjected to dilation by hydrostatic balloon by the point of view of structural alterations of the papilla and the biochemestry and bacterial contamination of the bile. METHODS: Twenty dogs were submitted to laparotomy, duodenotomy, and enlargement of the major duodenal papilla- GA(n=10 - with balloon of 8mm inflated with pressure of 0,5atm, during 2 minutes or to the sham procedure - GB(n=10. Blood samples collected on times t(0day, t(7days and t(28days were subjected to dosages of alkaline phosphatase (ALP and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT for cholestasis evaluation. The collected material from the gall bladder at the same times were registered and numbered to be submitted to culture in BHI, blood agar (rich, non-selective element and Mac Conkey (selective element for Gram-negative bacillus. On the 28th day three fragments of the papilla were tranversally cut by the choledoc axis 3mm from the duodenal papilla and the cuts, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's tricome, were evaluated according to their inflammatory reaction. RESULTS: The GGT and ALP averages on the three periods in the groups A and B did not show significant differences, not being characterizes the cholestasis. The bacterian contamination was significantly higher in GA (2,19 than in GB (1,96; the contamination was lower in the initial time compared with 7 and 28 days (t0bacterial contamination of the gall bladder, not associated with cholestasis. The morphologic lesions are more intense in the late phase, not associated with an eventual papilla esthenosis.

  8. Bacterial diversity and reductive dehalogenase redundancy in a 1,2-dichloroethane-degrading bacterial consortium enriched from a contaminated aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittebolle Lieven

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria possess a reservoir of metabolic functionalities ready to be exploited for multiple purposes. The use of microorganisms to clean up xenobiotics from polluted ecosystems (e.g. soil and water represents an eco-sustainable and powerful alternative to traditional remediation processes. Recent developments in molecular-biology-based techniques have led to rapid and accurate strategies for monitoring and identification of bacteria and catabolic genes involved in the degradation of xenobiotics, key processes to follow up the activities in situ. Results We report the characterization of the response of an enriched bacterial community of a 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA contaminated aquifer to the spiking with 5 mM lactate as electron donor in microcosm studies. After 15 days of incubation, the microbial community structure was analyzed. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library showed that the most represented phylogenetic group within the consortium was affiliated with the phylum Firmicutes. Among them, known degraders of chlorinated compounds were identified. A reductive dehalogenase genes clone library showed that the community held four phylogenetically-distinct catalytic enzymes, all conserving signature residues previously shown to be linked to 1,2-DCA dehalogenation. Conclusions The overall data indicate that the enriched bacterial consortium shares the metabolic functionality between different members of the microbial community and is characterized by a high functional redundancy. These are fundamental features for the maintenance of the community's functionality, especially under stress conditions and suggest the feasibility of a bioremediation treatment with a potential prompt dehalogenation and a process stability over time.

  9. 21 CFR 111.365 - What precautions must you take to prevent contamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What precautions must you take to prevent contamination? 111.365 Section 111.365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN...

  10. Bacterial contamination on touch surfaces in the public transport system and in public areas of a hospital in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, J A; French, G L

    2009-12-01

    To investigate bacterial contamination on hand-touch surfaces in the public transport system and in public areas of a hospital in central London. Dipslides were used to sample 118 hand-touch surfaces in buses, trains, stations, hotels and public areas of a hospital in central London. Total aerobic counts were determined, and Staphylococcus aureus isolates were identified and characterized. Bacteria were cultured from 112 (95%) of sites at a median concentration of 12 CFU cm(-2). Methicillin-susceptible Staph. aureus (MSSA) was cultured from nine (8%) of sites; no sites grew methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA). Hand-touch sites in London are frequently contaminated with bacteria and can harbour MSSA, but none of the sites tested were contaminated with MRSA. Hand-touch sites can become contaminated with staphylococci and may be fomites for the transmission of bacteria between humans. Such sites could provide a reservoir for community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) in high prevalence areas but were not present in London, a geographical area with a low incidence of CA-MRSA.

  11. Effects of lead and zinc mining contamination on bacterial community diversity and enzyme activities of vicinal cropland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Juanjuan; Ren, Guangming; Chen, Bao; Fan, Jinghua; E, Yong

    2011-11-01

    In the process of mining activity, many kinds of heavy metals enter into soils with dust, causing serious contamination to the environment. In this study, six soils were sampled from cropland at different distances from a lead/zinc mine in Heilongjiang Province, China. The total contents of lead and zinc in the vicinal cropland exceeded the third level of environmental quality standard for soil in China, which indicated that soils in this area were moderately contaminated. Bacterial community diversity and population were greatly decreased when the concentrations of lead and zinc were beyond 1,500 and 995 mg kg(-1), respectively, as analyzed by plate counting and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The bands of DGGE patterns varied with the degree of contamination. The activities of soil urease, phosphatase, and dehydrogenase were negatively correlated with the concentrations of lead and zinc. The highest inhibitory effect of heavy metals on soil enzyme activities was observed in urease. It was noted that PCR-DGGE patterns combined with soil enzyme activity analysis can be indices for the soil quality assessment by heavy metal contamination.

  12. Effect of Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1 inoculation on bacterial community dynamics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation in aged and freshly PAH-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunliffe, Michael; Kertesz, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1 is able to degrade a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and as a sphingomonad belongs to one of the dominant genera found in PAH-contaminated soils. We examined the ecological effect that soil inoculation with S. yanoikuyae B1 has on the native bacterial community in three different soils: aged PAH-contaminated soil from an industrial site, compost freshly contaminated with PAHs and un-contaminated compost. Survival of S. yanoikuyae B1 was dependent on the presence of PAHs, and the strain was unable to colonize un-contaminated compost. Inoculation with S. yanoikuyae B1 did not cause extensive changes in the native bacterial community of either soil, as assessed by denaturing gel electrophoresis, but its presence led to an increase in the population level of two other species in the aged contaminated soil community and appeared to have an antagonistic affect on several members of the contaminated compost community, indicating niche competition. - Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1 does not cause major changes in the native bacterial community while colonizing PAH-contaminated soils, but some niche competition is evident

  13. Bacterial contamination of surgeons' gloves during shunt insertion; a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Preben; Ejlertsen, Tove; Aaen, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    antibiotics and double gloving, by surgeons experienced in shunt surgery. Surgical incision, dissection and tunnelling were done. Then the surgeon, the scrub-nurse and, in three cases, the assistant made an imprint of their outer gloves on agar plates. Hereafter, they changed the outer pair of gloves before...... handling the shunt and completing the operation. The plates were cultured for 6 days in both aerobic and anaerobic environment. In all cases the surgeons gloves were contaminated, and in six cases also the nurses' gloves were contaminated, as well as all three assistants. Propionebacterium acnes were...... nurse and assistant were contaminated with micro-organisms less than 15 min after surgery has been commenced and before the shunts were handled. This study offers a feasible, simple and logical explanation of how shunts may become contaminated and infected. A simple measure would be to change the outer...

  14. Bacterial Contamination in Tips of Electrocautery Devices During Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Alisina; Chen, Antonia F; McKenna, Paul B; Roberts, Amity L; Manrique, Jorge; Belden, Katherine A; Austin, Matthew S

    2015-08-01

    Surgical equipment can become contaminated during surgery. It is unknown if electrocautery tips can become contaminated in clean orthopedic procedures despite the produced heat. Therefore, we conducted a prospective study to address this concern. The tips from 25 primary and 25 aseptic revision THAs were collected and an additional 5 sterile tips served as negative controls. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures were incubated for a minimum of 3 days. There were 3 positive cultures (6%); one in primary THA (4%) with Lactobacillus and Enterococcus faecalis; two among revisions (8%), one with E. faecalis and another one with alpha hemolytic streptococci and coagulase negative Staphylococcus. The mean exposure time of the contaminated tips was 132.3 minutes. Patients were followed for 90 days postoperatively and none of them developed surgical site infection. This is the first study to demonstrate that electrosurgical devices can become contaminated during THA in laminar flow equipped operating rooms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bioremediation of gasoline contaminated soil by a bacterial consortium amended with poultry litter, coir pith and rhamnolipid biosurfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, K.S.M.; Banat, I.M.; Thahira, J.; Thayumanavan, T.; Lakshmanaperumalsamy, P.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to find methods for enhancing rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation in gasoline contaminated soil by ex situ bioremediation. Red soil (RS) was treated with gasoline-spilled soil (GS) from a gasoline station and different combinations of amendments were prepared using (i) mixed bacterial consortium (MC), (ii) poultry litter (PL), (iii) coir pith (CP) and (iv) rhamnolipid biosurfactant (BS) produced by Pseudomonas sp. DS10-129. The study was conducted for a period of 90 days during which bacterial growth, hydrocarbon degradation and growth parameters of Phaseolus aureus RoxB including seed germination, chlorophyll content, shoot and root length were measured. Approximately 67% and 78% of the hydrocarbons were effectively degraded within 60 days in soil samples amended with RS + GS + MC + PL + CP + BS at 0.1% and 1%. Maximum percentage of seed germination, shoot length, root length and chlorophyll content in P. aureus were recorded after 60 days in the above amendments. Further incubation to 90 days did not exhibit significant improvements. Statistical analysis using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's multiple range test (DMRT) revealed that the level of amendments, incubation time and combination of amendments significantly influenced bacterial growth, hydrocarbon degradation, seed germination and chlorophyll content at a 1% probability level. All tested additives MC, PL, CP and rhamnolipid BS had significant positive effects on the bioremediation of GS. (author)

  16. Denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter dominate bacterial communities in the highly contaminated subsurface of a nuclear legacy waste site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Stefan J; Prakash, Om; Jasrotia, Puja; Overholt, Will A; Cardenas, Erick; Hubbard, Daniela; Tiedje, James M; Watson, David B; Schadt, Christopher W; Brooks, Scott C; Kostka, Joel E

    2012-02-01

    The effect of long-term mixed-waste contamination, particularly uranium and nitrate, on the microbial community in the terrestrial subsurface was investigated at the field scale at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site in Oak Ridge, TN. The abundance, community composition, and distribution of groundwater microorganisms were examined across the site during two seasonal sampling events. At representative locations, subsurface sediment was also examined from two boreholes, one sampled from the most heavily contaminated area of the site and another from an area with low contamination. A suite of DNA- and RNA-based molecular tools were employed for community characterization, including quantitative PCR of rRNA and nitrite reductase genes, community composition fingerprinting analysis, and high-throughput pyrotag sequencing of rRNA genes. The results demonstrate that pH is a major driver of the subsurface microbial community structure and that denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter (class Gammaproteobacteria) dominate at low pH. The relative abundance of bacteria from this genus was positively correlated with lower-pH conditions, and these bacteria were abundant and active in the most highly contaminated areas. Other factors, such as the concentration of nitrogen species, oxygen level, and sampling season, did not appear to strongly influence the distribution of Rhodanobacter bacteria. The results indicate that these organisms are acid-tolerant denitrifiers, well suited to the acidic, nitrate-rich subsurface conditions, and pH is confirmed as a dominant driver of bacterial community structure in this contaminated subsurface environment.

  17. Contamination of chlorhexidine cream used to prevent ascending urinary tract infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salveson, A.; Bergan, T.

    1981-06-01

    Chlorhexidine-containing cream is often used as an antimicrobial barrier to ascending urinary tract infection in patients with indwelling urethral catheters. The cream is dispensed in small tubes for personal use but repeated use of a tube still entails a potential infection hazard. The extent of cream contamination was analysed by emulsifying it in 1% peptone broth with 1% Tween-80 added as a wetting agent, and culturing quantitatively for bacteria and fungi by membrane filtration. Twenty-three per cent of cream samples and 35% of swabs taken from outside the tube beneath the screw cap demonstrated microbial contamination. Isolates included potential pathogens such as enterococci, staphylococci, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, opportunists like Moraxella spp. and diphtheroids, and contaminants such as Bacillus spp., micrococci, and a mould of the genus Cladosporium. Contamination of cream with a particular bacterial strain was found to precede urinary tract infection with the same microbe. We recommend that chlorhexidine cream for this use be dispensed in single dose units to ensure sterility.

  18. Residual viral and bacterial contamination of surfaces after cleaning and disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuladhar, Era; Hazeleger, Wilma C; Koopmans, Marion; Zwietering, Marcel H; Beumer, Rijkelt R; Duizer, Erwin

    2012-11-01

    Environmental surfaces contaminated with pathogens can be sources of indirect transmission, and cleaning and disinfection are common interventions focused on reducing contamination levels. We determined the efficacy of cleaning and disinfection procedures for reducing contamination by noroviruses, rotavirus, poliovirus, parechovirus, adenovirus, influenza virus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella enterica from artificially contaminated stainless steel surfaces. After a single wipe with water, liquid soap, or 250-ppm free chlorine solution, the numbers of infective viruses and bacteria were reduced by 1 log(10) for poliovirus and close to 4 log(10) for influenza virus. There was no significant difference in residual contamination levels after wiping with water, liquid soap, or 250-ppm chlorine solution. When a single wipe with liquid soap was followed by a second wipe using 250- or 1,000-ppm chlorine, an extra 1- to 3-log(10) reduction was achieved, and except for rotavirus and norovirus genogroup I, no significant additional effect of 1,000 ppm compared to 250 ppm was found. A reduced correlation between reduction in PCR units (PCRU) and reduction in infectious particles suggests that at least part of the reduction achieved in the second step is due to inactivation instead of removal alone. We used data on infectious doses and transfer efficiencies to estimate a target level to which the residual contamination should be reduced and found that a single wipe with liquid soap followed by a wipe with 250-ppm free chlorine solution was sufficient to reduce the residual contamination to below the target level for most of the pathogens tested.

  19. Biodegradation of free cyanide by bacterial species isolated from cyanide-contaminated artisanal gold mining catchment area in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razanamahandry, Lovasoa Christine; Andrianisa, Harinaivo Anderson; Karoui, Hela; Kouakou, Koffi Marcelin; Yacouba, Hamma

    2016-08-01

    Soil and water samples were collected from a watershed in Burkina Faso where illegal artisanal gold extraction using cyanidation occurs. The samples were used to evaluate cyanide contamination and the presence of cyanide degrading bacteria (CDB). Free cyanide (F-CN) was detected in all samples, with concentrations varying from 0.023 to 0.9 mg kg(-1), and 0.7-23 μg L(-1) in the soil and water samples, respectively. Potential CDB also were present in the samples. To test the effective F-CN degradation capacity of the isolated CDB species, the species were cultivated in growth media containing 40, 60 or 80 mg F-CN L(-1), with or without nutrients, at pH 9.5 and at room temperature. More than 95% of F-CN was degraded within 25 h, and F-CN degradation was associated with bacterial growth and ammonium production. However, initial concentrations of F-CN higher than 100 mg L(-1) inhibited bacterial growth and cyanide degradation. Abiotic tests showed that less than 3% of F-CN was removed by volatilization. Thus, the degradation of F-CN occurred predominately by biological mechanisms, and such mechanisms are recommended for remediation of contaminated soil and water. The bacteria consortium used in the experiment described above exist in a Sahelian climate, which is characterized by a long hot and dry season. Because the bacteria are already adapted to the local climate conditions and show the potential for cyanide biodegradation, further applicability to other contaminated areas in West Africa, where illegal gold cyanidation is widespread, should be explored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biochemical parameters and bacterial species richness in soils contaminated by sludge-borne metals and remediated with inorganic soil amendments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mench, Michel; Renella, Giancarlo; Gelsomino, Antonio; Landi, Loretta; Nannipieri, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of two amendments for the in situ remediation of a Cd- and Ni-contaminated soil in the Louis Fargue long-term field experiment was assessed. In April 1995, one replicate plot (S1) was amended with 5% w/w of beringite (B), a coal fly ash (treatment S1 + B), and a second plot with 1% w/w zerovalent-Fe iron grit (SS) (treatment S1+SS), with the aim of increasing metal sorption and attenuating metal impacts. Long-term responses of daily respiration rates, microbial biomass, bacterial species richness and the activities of key soil enzymes (acid and alkaline phosphatase, arylsulfatase, β-glucosidase, urease and protease activities) were studied in relation to soil metal extractability. Seven years after initial amendments, the labile fractions of Cd and Ni in both the S1 + B and S1 + SS soils were reduced to various extents depending on the metal and fractions considered. The soil microbial biomass and respiration rate were not affected by metal contamination and amendments in the S1 + B and S1 + SS soils, whereas the activity of different soil enzymes was restored. The SS treatment was more effective in reducing labile pools of Cd and Ni and led to a greater recovery of soil enzyme activities than the B treatment. Bacterial species richness in the S1 soil did not alter with either treatment. It was concluded that monitoring of the composition and activity of the soil microbial community is important in evaluating the effectiveness of soil remediation practices. - Amendments (coal fly ash, zerovalent-Fe iron grit), reduced labile fractions of Cd and Ni in contaminated soils and restored the activity of key soil hydrolases

  1. Bacterial contamination in a special care baby unit of a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nosocomial infections pose a great challenge on healthcare systems. Although surfaces in neonatal wards, umbilical stump wounds and catheter are responsible for a high number of nosocomial infections due to bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the bacterial profile of air and surface ...

  2. Plant secondary metabolite-induced shifts in bacterial community structure and degradative ability in contaminated soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlík, O.; Musilová, L.; Rídl, Jakub; Hroudová, Miluše; Vlček, Čestmír; Koubek, J.; Holečková, M.; Mackova, M.; Macek, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 20 (2013), s. 9245-9256 ISSN 0175-7598 Grant - others:EK(XE) 265946; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10041 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : plant secondary metabolites (PSM) * bacterial community * metabolic activity * bioremediation * pyrosequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.811, year: 2013

  3. A new improved protocol for in vitro intratubular dentinal bacterial contamination for antimicrobial endodontic tests: standardization and validation by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviana Bombarda de ANDRADE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To compare three methods of intratubular contamination that simulate endodontic infections using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Material and Methods Two pre-existing models of dentinal contamination were used to induce intratubular infection (groups A and B. These methods were modified in an attempt to improve the model (group C. Among the modifications it may be included: specimen contamination for five days, ultrasonic bath with BHI broth after specimen sterilization, use of E. faecalis during the exponential growth phase, greater concentration of inoculum, and two cycles of centrifugation on alternate days with changes of culture media. All specimens were longitudinally sectioned and stained with of LIVE/DEAD® for 20 min. Specimens were assessed using CLSM, which provided images of the depth of viable bacterial proliferation inside the dentinal tubules. Additionally, three examiners used scores to classify the CLSM images according to the following parameters: homogeneity, density, and depth of the bacterial contamination inside the dentinal tubules. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s tests were used to evaluate the live and dead cells rates, and the scores obtained. Results The contamination scores revealed higher contamination levels in group C when compared with groups A and B (p0.05. The volume of live cells in group C was higher than in groups A and B (p<0.05. Conclusion The new protocol for intratubular infection resulted in high and uniform patterns of bacterial contamination and higher cell viability in all specimens when compared with the current methods.

  4. BACTERIAL LYSATES FOR TOPICAL APPLICATION IN PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF CHRONIC TONSILLITIS AMONG CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.I. Garashchenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors have carried on the research of the influence Imudon exerts (during topical application on the run of chronic tonsillitis among 48 children aged between 5 and 10 years old, being dispensary registrants. The sublingual application of a medicine 6 pills daily within 20 days demonstrated the frequency reduction of chronic tonsillitis acerbations by 2.9 times, as well as the reduction of total need in systemic antibacterial treatment by 10 times. Apart from that, the frequency of S. pyogenes group a exposure reduced by 3 times. The researchers noticed the tendency to normalization of pharynx biocenosis. Thus, Imudon may be recommended for the daily courses of treatment to the people, suffering from chronic tonsillitis, palatine tonsil auxesis and recurrent tonsillo-pharyngites.Key words: chronic tonsillitis, children, prevention, bacterial lysates.

  5. Evaluating robustness of a diesel-degrading bacterial consortium isolated from contaminated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydow, Mateusz; Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Szczepaniak, Zuzanna

    2016-01-01

    It is not known whether diesel-degrading bacterial communities are structurally and functionally robust when exposed to different hydrocarbon types. Here, we exposed a diesel-degrading consortium to model either alkanes, cycloalkanes or aromatic hydrocarbons as carbon sources to study its...... structural resistance. The structural resistance was low, with changes in relative abundances of up to four orders of magnitude, depending on hydrocarbon type and bacterial taxon. This low resistance is explained by the presence of hydrocarbon-degrading specialists in the consortium and differences in growth...... kinetics on individual hydrocarbons. However, despite this low resistance, structural and functional resilience were high, as verified by re-exposing the hydrocarbon-perturbed consortium to diesel fuel. The high resilience is either due to the short exposure time, insufficient for permanent changes...

  6. Bacterial Contaminants of Salad Vegetables in Abuja Municipal Area Council, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itohan, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Salad vegetables are essential part of people’s diet all around the world. They are usually consumed raw and often without heat treatment or thorough washing; hence have been known to serve as vehicles for the transmission of pathogenic microorganism associated with human diseases. Fresh samples of lettuce, carrot and cucumber collected from different markets and vendors in Abuja Municipal Area Council, Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria were evaluated for bacterial loads using spread plate agar dilution method. Bacterial loads ranged from 1.6 x 106 to 2.9 x 108 cfu/g. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella and Enterobacter were amongst the coliforms (lactose fermenters, while Proteus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella and Shigella were non-lactose fermenters associated with the samples. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from majority of the samples.

  7. Application of chlorine dioxide to lessen bacterial contamination during broiler defeathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to escape of contaminated gut contents, the number of Campylobacter spp. recovered from broiler carcasses increases during feather removal. Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is approved for use as an antimicrobial treatment during poultry processing. A study was designed to test if application of 50 ppm...

  8. Food safety in raw milk production: risk factors associated to bacterial DNA contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, Cristine; Bremm, Carolina; Reis, Emily Marques dos; Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Loiko, Márcia Regina; Cruz, Cláudio Estêvão Farias da; Cenci, Alexander; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2014-06-01

    While human illness from milkborne pathogens may be linked to contamination of the product after pasteurization or improper pasteurization, such diseases are usually associated with consumption of raw milk or its by-products. Molecular biology tools were applied to investigate contamination by Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., some pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli, and Campylobacter jejuni in 548 raw milk samples from 125 dairy farms established in two regions from southern Brazil. Moreover, 15 variables were evaluated for their association with raw milk contamination levels, and the risk factors were determined by multiple regression analysis. Salmonella spp. were more frequently detected, followed by pathogenic E. coli. There was difference in contamination index between the regions, in which risk factors such as temporary cattle confinement, low milk production, low milking machine cleaning frequency, and milk storage area without tile walls were identified. The risk factors were specific to each region studied. Nevertheless, the data can be used to improve milk quality of dairy farms/herds with similar management practices.

  9. Erwinia carotovora contamination of Finnish seed potatoes and the prevalence of bacterial subspecies and serogroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirkko Harju

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available Symptomless contamination with the rot-inducing bacterium Erwinia carotovora was detectable by the tuber incubation method in 82% of the commercial seed potato stocks surveyed. E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca was more common than E. carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc among the tuber contaminants. In a four-year survey of ten meristem-based seed stocks, recontamination with both Eca and Ecc occurred typically during the second field generation, but three stocks remained free of detectable contamination throughout the survey period. The first blackleg symptoms occurred typically during the third field generation. The serogroup distribution of Finnish Eca isolates was different from that reported from other countries. The predominant serogroup, I, constituted only 74% of all Eca isolates, since serogroups XXXV and XLI occurred relatively frequently. Serogroup I was more common among isolates from diseased stems than among those from latently contaminated tubers. The results also suggest that serogroup I is more dominant in the southern than in the northern parts of the country.

  10. Development of a multistrain bacterial bioreporter platform for the monitoring of hydrocarbon contaminants in marine environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tecon, R.; Beggah, S.; Czechowska, K.; Sentchilo, V.; Chronopoulou, P.M.; McGenity, T.J.; van der Meer, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are common contaminants in marine and freshwater aquatic habitats, often occurring as a result of oil spillage. Rapid and reliable on-site tools for measuring the bioavailable hydrocarbon fractions, i.e., those that are most likely to cause toxic effects or are available for

  11. Evaluation of measures to decrease intra-operative bacterial contamination in orthopaedic implant surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, BAS; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether behavioural and systemic measures wilt decrease intra-operative contamination during total hip or knee replacements. The influence of these measures on subsequent prolonged wound discharge, superficial surgical site infection and deep periprosthetic

  12. Air, water, and surface bacterial contamination in a university-hospital autopsy room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maujean, Géraldine; Malicier, Daniel; Fanton, Laurent

    2012-03-01

    Today, little is known about the bacteriological environment of the autopsy room and its potential interest for medico-legal practices. Seven hundred fifty microbiological samples were taken from surface (n = 660), air (n = 48), and water (n = 42) to evaluate it in a French University Forensic Department. Median bacterial counts were compared before and during autopsy for air samples, and before and after autopsy for surface samples, using Wilcoxon matched pairs signed ranks test. Bacterial identification relied on traditional phenotypic methods. Bacterial counts in the air were low before autopsy, increased significantly during procedure, and seemed more linked to the number of people in the room than to an important production of aerosol-containing bacteria. Despite cleaning, human fecal flora was omnipresent on surfaces, which revealed insufficient disinfection. Bacteriological sampling is an easy way to monitor cleaning practices in postmortem rooms, but chiefly a way to improve the reliability of medico-legal proofs of infectious deaths. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Effect of Disinfectants on Preventing the Cross-Contamination of Pathogens in Fresh Produce Washing Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach, Jennifer L.; Sampers, Imca; Van Haute, Sam; van der Fels-Klerx, H.J. (Ine)

    2015-01-01

    The potential cross-contamination of pathogens between clean and contaminated produce in the washing tank is highly dependent on the water quality. Process wash water disinfectants are applied to maintain the water quality during processing. The review examines the efficacy of process wash water disinfectants during produce processing with the aim to prevent cross-contamination of pathogens. Process wash water disinfection requires short contact times so microorganisms are rapidly inactivated. Free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and peracetic acid were considered suitable disinfectants. A disinfectant’s reactivity with the organic matter will determine the disinfectant residual, which is of paramount importance for microbial inactivation and should be monitored in situ. Furthermore, the chemical and worker safety, and the legislative framework will determine the suitability of a disinfection technique. Current research often focuses on produce decontamination and to a lesser extent on preventing cross-contamination. Further research on a sanitizer’s efficacy in the washing water is recommended at the laboratory scale, in particular with experimental designs reflecting industrial conditions. Validation on the industrial scale is warranted to better understand the overall effects of a sanitizer. PMID:26213953

  14. Development of Radioactive Substance Contamination Diffusion Preventive Equipment for a Hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Yong Sun; Kim, Do Sik; Baik, Seung Je; Yoo, Byung Ok; Kim, Ki Ha; Lee, Eun Pyo; Ahn, Sang Bok; Ryu, Woo Seok

    2009-01-01

    The hot cell of irradiated materials examination facility (IMEF), which has been operating since 1996, is generally contaminated by the radioactive nuclides of irradiated nuclear fuels and structural steels like Cs-137, Co-60, Co-134 and Ru-106. Especially Cs-137 is a main contaminated radioactive isotope which is easily moved here and there due to air flow in the hot cell, water-soluble, extremely toxic, and has a half-life of 30.23 years. To repair or fix the abnormal function of test apparatus installed in the hot cell, the maintenance door, so called a rear door and located at an intervention area, is opened to enter the hot cell inside. In a moment of opening the maintenance door, dirty air diffusion from the hot cell to an intervention area could be occurred in spite of increasing the rpm of exhaust fan to maintain much low under pressure, but an adjacent area to a maintenance door, i.e. intervention area, is very severely contaminated due to the unpredictable air flow. In this paper, the development of the radioactive substance contamination diffusion preventive equipment for a hot cell is studied to prevent dirty and toxic gaseous radioactive nuclides diffusion from a hot cell and installed at an intervention area of IMEF

  15. Effect of Disinfectants on Preventing the Cross-Contamination of Pathogens in Fresh Produce Washing Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Banach

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The potential cross-contamination of pathogens between clean and contaminated produce in the washing tank is highly dependent on the water quality. Process wash water disinfectants are applied to maintain the water quality during processing. The review examines the efficacy of process wash water disinfectants during produce processing with the aim to prevent cross-contamination of pathogens. Process wash water disinfection requires short contact times so microorganisms are rapidly inactivated. Free chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, and peracetic acid were considered suitable disinfectants. A disinfectant’s reactivity with the organic matter will determine the disinfectant residual, which is of paramount importance for microbial inactivation and should be monitored in situ. Furthermore, the chemical and worker safety, and the legislative framework will determine the suitability of a disinfection technique. Current research often focuses on produce decontamination and to a lesser extent on preventing cross-contamination. Further research on a sanitizer’s efficacy in the washing water is recommended at the laboratory scale, in particular with experimental designs reflecting industrial conditions. Validation on the industrial scale is warranted to better understand the overall effects of a sanitizer.

  16. Bacterial contaminants from frozen puff pastry production process and their growth inhibition by antimicrobial substances from lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumjuankiat, Kittaporn; Keawsompong, Suttipun; Nitisinprasert, Sunee

    2017-05-01

    Seventy-five bacterial contaminants which still persisted to cleaning system from three puff pastry production lines (dough forming, layer and filling forming, and shock freezing) were identified using 16S rDNA as seven genera of Bacillus , Corynebacterium , Dermacoccus , Enterobacter , Klebsiella, Pseudomonas , and Staphylococcus with detection frequencies of 24.00, 2.66, 1.33, 37.33, 1.33, 2.66, and 30.66, respectively. Seventeen species were discovered while only 11 species Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, B. pumilus, Corynebacterium striatum , Dermacoccus barathri , Enterobacter asburiae, Staphylococcus kloosii, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis, S. warneri , and S. aureus were detected at the end of production. Based on their abundance, the highest abundance of E. asburiae could be used as a biomarker for product quality. While a low abundance of the mesophile pathogen C. striatum , which causes respiratory and nervous infection and appeared only at the shock freezing step was firstly reported for its detection in bakery product. Six antimicrobial substances (AMSs) from lactic acid bacteria, FF1-4, FF1-7, PFUR-242, PFUR-255, PP-174, and nisin A were tested for their inhibition activities against the contaminants. The three most effective were FF1-7, PP-174, and nisin A exhibiting wide inhibition spectra of 88.00%, 85.33%, and 86.66%, respectively. The potential of a disinfectant solution containing 800 AU/ml of PP-174 and nisin A against the most resistant strains of Enterobacter , Staphylococcus , Bacillus and Klebsiella was determined on artificially contaminated conveyor belt coupons at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 hr. The survival levels of the test strains were below 1 log CFU/coupon at 0 hr. The results suggested that a combined solution of PP-174 and nisin A may be beneficial as a sanitizer to inhibit bacterial contaminants in the frozen puff pastry industry.

  17. Assessment of the bacterial community of soils contaminated with used lubricating oil by PCR-DGGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruemon Meeboon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of indigenous bacteria in three soils contaminated with used lubricating oil (ULO was determined and compared using molecular analysis of bacteria cultured during the enrichment process. Sequencing analyses demonstrated that the majority of the DGGE bands in enrichment cultures were affiliated with four phyla of the domain, Bacteria: α, β, γ- Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Soil C had a higher ULO contamination level than soil A and B, which may explain why enrichment culture C had the greatest diversity of bacteria, but further studies would be needed to determine whether ULO concentration results in higher diversity of ULO-degraders in soils. The diversity of ULO-degraders detected in these three different soils suggests that biostimulation methods for increasing the activity of indigenous microorganisms may be a viable approach to bioremediation, and that future studies to determine how to increase their activity in situ are warranted.

  18. Mobile phones in clinical practice: reducing the risk of bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, D; Leonard, C; Breen, H; Graydon, R; O'Gorman, C; Kirk, S

    2014-09-01

    Mobile smart phones have become increasingly integrated into the practice of doctors and allied medical professionals. Recent studies suggest them to represent reservoirs for pathogens with potential to cause nosocomial infections. This study aimed to investigate the level of contamination on phones used on surgical wards and identify strategies for their safe use within clinical areas. Fifty mobile phones were taken from members of the multidisciplinary team working in a surgical unit. Phones were swabbed by two trained investigators using a standardised technique and samples streaked out using an automated specimen inoculator onto two types of culture media (Columbia blood agar and MacConkey agar). Colonies were identified and counted by a single trained investigator in a blinded fashion. Simultaneously a questionnaire investigating usage levels of phones was given to 150 healthcare workers. Sixty per cent of phones sampled had some form of contaminant isolated from their phone. Thirty-one (62%) of phones had only three colonies or less isolated on medium. No pathogenic or drug resistant strains of bacteria were identified. A total of 88% of individuals sampled by questionnaire used their phone within the workplace of which 55% used it for clinical purposes. Sixty-three per cent expected there to be some form of contaminant on their phone with only 37% admitting to cleaning it regularly. Seventy-five per cent of people did not view a ban on phones as a practical solution was they found to be an infection risk. Touch screen smart phones may be used safely in a clinical environment, with a low risk of cross-contamination of nosocomial bacteria to patients, in the setting of effective adherence to hand hygiene policies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effect of milk sample delivery methods and arrival conditions on bacterial contamination rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsmore, R P; English, P B; Matthews, J C; Sears, P M

    1990-07-01

    A cross sectional study was performed of factors believed to contribute to the contamination of bovine milk sample cultures submitted to the Ithaca Regional Laboratory of the Quality Milk Promotion Services/New York State Mastitis Control. Of 871 samples entered in the study, 137 (15.7%) were contaminated. There were interactions between the sample source (veterinarian vs dairyman), delivery method, and time between sample collection and arrival at the laboratory. If only those samples collected and hand delivered by the dairyman within 1 day of collection were compared to a like subset of samples collected and hand delivered by veterinarians, no statistically significant differences in milk sample contamination rate (MSCR) were found. Samples were delivered to the laboratory by hand, US Postal Service, United Parcel Service, via the New York State College of Veterinary Medicine Diagnostic Laboratory, or Northeast Dairy Herd Improvement Association Courier. The MSCR was only 7.6% for hand delivered samples, while 26% of Postal Service samples were contaminated. These rates differed significantly from other delivery methods (P less than 0.0001). The USPS samples arrived a longer time after sampling than did samples sent by other routes, and time had a significant effect on MSCR (0 to 1 day, 8.9%; greater than 1 day, 25.9%; P less than 0.01). Samples packaged with ice packs sent by routes other than the Postal Service had a lower MSCR than those not packaged with ice packs, but ice packs did not reduce the MSCR for samples sent by the Postal Service.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Bacterial contamination of Saudi Arabian paper currency: A report from Al-Kharj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Muqtader Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currency is a public support tool for exchange of commodity and services. It’s prevalent practice for acquiring bread to broast and bath to bed has connected all human being together irrespective of race and occupation. Currency notes along with their denomination values also carry pathogens if contaminated and will act as an agent for infection transference. Therefore the objective of this cross-sectional study was to assess the load microbial pathogens of paper currency collected in selected public places of Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia. Methods: Currency notes under study were assessed through microbiological culture, microscopic and biochemical visualization techniques. Results: The results from this cross-sectional study suggested that lower the currency denominations higher was the microbial contaminations, frequency percentage was lower with higher isolations. Small eateries were the biggest source of contaminated currency from the ten selected centres. Percentage microorganism occurrence for Bacillus spp, Staphylococcus spp, Klebsiella spp and E. coli was 56.84%, 25.03%, 13.40% and 04.71% respectively in all currency notes under study. Conclusions: The outcomes of this study revealed that currency notes can be a source for microbe transmission causing infectious diseases represent public health hazards to the community and individuals.

  1. Enteropathogenic bacterial contamination of a latosol following application of organic fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alexandre Escosteguy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Poultry manure is used as fertilizer in natura, but little is known about whether it contaminates the soil with pathogenic organisms. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of organic, organomineral and mineral fertilizers on soil contamination by enteric pathogens, using poultry manure as the organic fertilizer. Manure was applied in field experiments at rates of 7.0 ton. ha-1 (maize crop, 2008/2009, 8.0 ton. ha-1 (wheat crop, 2009 and 14 ton. ha-1 (maize crop, 2010/2011. Organomineral fertilizer was applied at the same rates but was comprised of 50% manure and 50% mineral fertilizer. At 30 and 70 days after fertilization, the organic fertilizer and the upper 0-5 cm layer of the soil were tested for the presence of helminth eggs and larvae and enteropathogenic bacteria. Fecal and non-fecal coliforms (Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringes were found in the organic fertilizer, but neither Salmonella spp. nor enteroparasites were detected. The population of enteropathogenic bacteria in the soil was similar among the treatments for all crops at both evaluation times. The population of thermotolerant coliforms in the organic fertilizer was larger than the maximum level allowed in Brazil, but neither the organic or nor the organomineral fertilizer contaminated the soil.

  2. Pregnant women's attitudes about topical microbicides for the prevention and treatment of bacterial vaginosis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catallozzi, Marina; Fraiz, Lauren Dapena; Hargreaves, Katharine M; Zimet, Gregory D; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Ratner, Adam J; Gelber, Shari E; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2017-08-01

    We sought to understand pregnant women's product preference and likelihood of use of topical microbicides for bacterial vaginosis (BV) prevention and treatment. Pregnant women (N = 196) in a obstetrics clinic completed a survey between June 2014 and January 2015 about vaginal product use for BV. This cross-sectional study explored product preferences, likelihood of product use for BV management and father of the baby (FOB) involvement. Most participants were under 30 (68%) and underrepresented minorities (47% Hispanic, 21% African-American). Most women preferred the gel (69%). Only 30% were likely to use either product for prevention of BV; 76% if high risk for BV; 83% treatment of BV. Anticipated FOB involvement in decision-making included that 46% would ask his opinion, 38% would inform him of the decision and 7% would need approval. Most (87%) would ask the FOB for reminders and 66% for insertion help. Those under 30 were more likely to agree to ask the FOB for reminders (p Product preferences may be less critical than risk perception. Involvement of the FOB in decision-making may be vital.

  3. Review on prevention of bacterial adhesion on contact lens using plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, N. A. H.; Zaaba, S. K.; Mustaffa, M. T.; Zakaria, A.; Shahriman A., B.

    2017-03-01

    Many researches had been conducted to enhance the properties of contact lens. Most of the research conducted discussed on the factors that affect the adhesion process to contact lenses, rate of contact lens contamination, and type of microbe that adhere on the contact lens surface and contact lens casing. Studies on the proposed strategies or technology that can be used to slower down the formation of bacteria on contact lens are being explored. New technologies or strategies to prevent or slow down the adhesion of bacteria on contact lens have become a priority in this area. This review paper covers two main aspects, namely factor that affect the bacteria adhesion on contact lens and also the introduction of plasma treatment as a potential method for contact lens treatment.

  4. Synergistic Processing of Biphenyl and Benzoate: Carbon Flow Through the Bacterial Community in Polychlorinated-Biphenyl-Contaminated Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leewis, Mary-Cathrine; Uhlik, Ondrej; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2016-02-01

    Aerobic mineralization of PCBs, which are toxic and persistent organic pollutants, involves the upper (biphenyl, BP) and lower (benzoate, BZ) degradation pathways. The activity of different members of the soil microbial community in performing one or both pathways, and their synergistic interactions during PCB biodegradation, are not well understood. This study investigates BP and BZ biodegradation and subsequent carbon flow through the microbial community in PCB-contaminated soil. DNA stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to identify the bacterial guilds involved in utilizing 13C-biphenyl (unchlorinated analogue of PCBs) and/or 13C-benzoate (product/intermediate of BP degradation and analogue of chlorobenzoates). By performing SIP with two substrates in parallel, we reveal microbes performing the upper (BP) and/or lower (BZ) degradation pathways, and heterotrophic bacteria involved indirectly in processing carbon derived from these substrates (i.e. through crossfeeding). Substrate mineralization rates and shifts in relative abundance of labeled taxa suggest that BP and BZ biotransformations were performed by microorganisms with different growth strategies: BZ-associated bacteria were fast growing, potentially copiotrophic organisms, while microbes that transform BP were oligotrophic, slower growing, organisms. Our findings provide novel insight into the functional interactions of soil bacteria active in processing biphenyl and related aromatic compounds in soil, revealing how carbon flows through a bacterial community.

  5. Bacterial adhesion to suture material in a contaminated wound model: Comparison of monofilament, braided, and barbed sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhom, Jonas; Bloes, Dominik A; Peschel, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulf K

    2017-04-01

    Contaminated suture material plays an important role in the physiopathology of surgical site infections. Recently, suture material has been developed characterized by barbs projecting from a monofilament base. Claimed advantages for barbed sutures are a shortened wound closure time and reduced maximum wound tension. It has also been suggested that these sutures would be advantageous microbiologically. The aim of this study was to test the microbiological characteristics of the barbed Quill in comparison to the monofilament Ethilon II and the braided sutures Vicryl and triclosan-coated Vicryl Plus. In our study, sutures were cultivated on color-change agar with Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the halo size was measured. In a second study arm with longer cultivation bacterial growth was followed by antibiotic treatment. Ethilon II and Quill showed good comparable results, whereas large halos were found around Vicryl. Vicryl Plus results depended on triclosan sensitivity. After longer bacterial cultivation and antibiotic treatment, halos were up to 3.6 times smaller on Quill than on Vicryl (p barbs on Quill. From a microbiological perspective, barbed sutures can be recommended in aseptic surgery, but should only be used carefully in septic surgery. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:925-933, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Extraction of bismuth, cadmium, lead, and uranyl ions from contaminated soil and the influence of bacterial on the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, K.W.; Dugan, P.R.; Pfister, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Among the various environmental concerns, soil and sediment remediation has received considerable attention in recent years because soils and sediments are the ultimate repositories for many metals that cycle in the environment as a result of activities such as mining, electroplating, and various manufacturing and industrial processes. There is considerable interest in the remediation of contaminated soils and sediments by so-called soil-cleaning techniques and in the prevention of future contamination via removal of hazardous metals from processing streams prior to deposition into receiving waters. Bioremediation also appears to have value because of its potential economic advantage. This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of the amino acid cysteine, either alone or in combination with the activity of microorganisms, for the removal of several hazardous metals from soil

  7. Replacing Natural Gas by Biogas — Determining the Bacterial Contamination of Biogas by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiřina Čermáková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A promising way of using biogas is to upgrade it to natural gas, which is referred to as Substitute Natural Gas (SNG or biomethane. Biomethane, or biogas, is produced by biological processes of harnessing the ability of microorganisms to degrade organic material to methane. Some of the microorganisms are aerosolized from the digester into the biogas; afterwards a bio-film is formed that attaches to the surfaces of the distribution pipes, and can find it was to the place where the end use of biogas takes place. This paper deals with the detection of microbial species in biogas, their influenceon corrosion and the potential risk that diseases can be spread via biogas using molecular techniques. Using molecular methods, we found that raw biogas contains about 8 million microorganisms per m3, which is most likely the result of microbial transmission from the anaerobic digestion process. Some bacterial species may contribute to the corrosion of pipelines and equipment; others are opportunistic pathogens that can cause toxic reactions. However, most bacterial species, more than 40 % in biogas, are still unknown, as is their influence on the digestion process and on human health. Further studies are needed to better understand the behavior of microorganisms in anaerobic digestion and to preventmicrobial-influenced corrosion and microbial dissemination.

  8. ALTERNATIVE FOR PHENOL BIODEGRADATION IN OIL CONTAMINATED WASTEWATERS USING AN ADAPTED BACTERIAL BIOFILM LAYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kopytko

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The project studied the biodegradation potential of phenols in an industrial wastewater from an oil field in the province of Santander, Colombia. An elevated potential was established, according to three important factors: the great abundance of microorganisms found in the wastewater and sludge samples collected, the bacterial adaptation to high phenol concentrations (10 mg/l and the elevated elimination efficiencies (up to 86% obtained in the laboratory tests. The laboratory scale treatment system, which consisted of fixed-bed bioreactors with adapted bacterial biofilm, was optimized using a 22 factorial experimental design. The selected variables, studied in their maximum and minimum level were: HRT (hydraulic retention time and the presence or absence of GAC (granular activated carbon layer. The response variable was phenol concentration. The optimum treatment conditions for low and high phenol concentrations (2.14 y 9.30 mg/l, were obtained with the presence of GAC and 18 hours of HRT. The best result for the intermediate phenol concentration (6.13 mg/l was obtained with a 24 hour HRT and the presence of GAC. Nevertheless, the presence of the GAC layer was not significantly important in terms of phenol removal. Moreover, the increase of HRT from 18 to 24 hours, showed no significant improvement in phenol removal.

  9. Potential contaminants in the food chain: identification, prevention and issue management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Francis P

    2007-01-01

    Contaminants are a vast subject area of food safety and quality. They are generally divided into chemical, microbiological and physical classes and are present in our food chain from raw materials to finished products. They are the subject of international and national legislation that has widened to cover more and more contaminant classes and food categories. In addition, consumers have become increasingly aware of and alarmed by their risks, whether rightly or not. What is the food industry doing to ensure the safety and quality of the products we feed our children? This is a valid question which this article attempts to address from an industrial viewpoint. Chemical food safety is considered a complex field where the risk perception of consumers is often the highest. The effects of chronic or acute exposure to chemical carcinogens may cause disease conditions long after exposure that can be permanently debilitating or even fatal. It is also a moving target, as knowledge about the toxicity and occurrence data of new chemical contaminants continues to be generated. Their identification, prevention and management are challenges to the food industry as a whole. A reminder of the known chemical hazards in the food chain will be presented with an emphasis on the use of early warning to identify potential new contaminants. Early warning is also a means of prevention, anticipating food safety concerns before they become issues to manage. Current best management practices including Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points relating to the supply chain of baby foods and infant formulae will be developed. Finally, key lessons from a case study on recent contamination issues in baby food products will be presented.

  10. Lentinus (Panus) tigrinus augmentation of a historically contaminated soil: matrix decontamination and structure and function of the resident bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, E; Giubilei, M A; Cajthaml, T; Petruccioli, M; D'Annibale, A

    2011-02-28

    The ability of Lentinus tigrinus to grow and to degrade persistent aromatic hydrocarbons in aged contaminated soil was assessed in this study. L. tigrinus extensively colonized the soil; its degradation activity after 60 d incubation at 28°C, however, was mostly limited to dichloroaniline isomers, polychlorinated benzenes and diphenyl ether while the fungus was unable to deplete 9,10-anthracenedione and 7-H-benz[DE]anthracene-7-one which were the major soil contaminants. Although clean-up levels were limited, both density of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria and richness of the resident bacterial community in L. tigrinus microcosms (LtM) increased over time to a significantly larger extent than the respective amended incubation controls (1.9×10(9) CFU g(-1) vs. 1.0×10(9) CFU g(-1) and 37 vs. 16, respectively). Naphthalene- and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene copy numbers, however, decreased over time at a higher rate in LtM than in incubation controls likely due to a higher stimulation on heterotrophs than xenobiotics-degrading community members. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Degradation pathways of 1-methylphenanthrene in bacterial Sphingobium sp. MP9-4 isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianan; Luo, Lijuan; Chen, Baowei; Sha, Sha; Qing, Qing; Tam, Nora F Y; Zhang, Yong; Luan, Tiangang

    2017-01-30

    Alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are abundant in petroleum, and alkylated phenanthrenes are considered as the primary PAHs during some oil spill events. Bacterial strain of Sphingobium sp. MP9-4, isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil, was efficient to degrade 1-methylphenanthrene (1-MP). A detailed metabolism map of 1-MP in this strain was delineated based on analysis of metabolites with gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). 1-MP was initially oxidized via two different biochemical strategies, including benzene ring and methyl-group attacks. Benzene ring attack was initiated with dioxygenation of the non-methylated aromatic ring via similar degradation pathways of phenanthrene (PHE) by bacteria. For methyl-group attack, mono oxygenase system was involved and more diverse enzymes were needed than that of PHE degradation. This study enhances the understanding of the metabolic pathways of alkylated PAHs and shows the significant potential of Sphingobium sp. MP9-4 for the bioremediation of alkylated PAHs contaminated environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Intrinsic bacterial biodegradation of petroleum contamination demonstrated in situ using natural abundance, molecular-level 14C analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, G.F.; Nelson, R.K.; Kile, B.M.; Reddy, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Natural abundance, molecular-level C 14 analysis was combined with comprehensive gas chromatography (GC x GC) to investigate, in situ, the role of intrinsic biodegradation in the loss of petroleum hydrocarbons from the rocky, inter-tidal zone impacted by the Bouchard 120 oil spill. GC x GC analysis indicated accelerated losses of n-alkane components of the residual petroleum hydrocarbons between day 40 and day 50 after the spill. 14 C analysis of bacterial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) from the impacted zone on day 44 showed that the polyunsaturated fatty acids attributed to the photoautotrophic component of the microbial community had the same ( 14 C as the local dissolved inorganic carbon (DIG), indicating that this DIG was their carbon source. In contrast there was significant (C depletion in the saturated and mono-unsaturated PLFA indicating incorporation of petroleum carbon. This correlation between the observed accelerated n-alkane losses and microbial incorporation of (C-depleted carbon directly demonstrated, in situ, that intrinsic biodegradation was affecting the petroleum. Since the majority of organic contaminants originate from petroleum feed-stocks, in situ molecular-level 14 C analysis of microbial PLFA can provide insights into the occurrence and pathways of biodegradation of a wide range of organic contaminants. (Author)

  13. Bacterial rhizosphere and endosphere populations associated with grasses and trees to be used for phytoremediation of crude oil contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Kaneez; Afzal, Muhammad; Imran, Asma; Khan, Qaiser M

    2015-03-01

    Different grasses and trees were tested for their growth in a crude oil contaminated soil. Three grasses, Lolium perenne, Leptochloa fusca, Brachiaria mutica, and two trees, Lecucaena leucocephala and Acacia ampliceps, were selected to investigate the diversity of hydrocarbon-degrading rhizospheric and endophytic bacteria. We found a higher number of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria associated with grasses than trees and that the endophytic bacteria were taxonomically different from rhizosphere associated bacteria showing their spatial distribution with reference to plant compartment as well as genotype. The rhizospheric soil yielded 22 (59.45 %), root interior yielded 9 (24.32 %) and shoot interior yielded 6 (16.21 %) hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. These bacteria possessed genes encoding alkane hydroxylase and showed multiple plant growth-promoting activities. Bacillus (48.64 %) and Acinetobacter (18.91 %) were dominant genera found in this study. At 2 % crude oil concentration, all bacterial isolates exhibited 25 %-78 % oil degradation and Acinetobacter sp. strain BRSI56 degraded maximum. Our study suggests that for practical application, support of potential bacteria combined with the grasses is more effective approach than trees to remediate oil contaminated soils.

  14. Nanoscale zerovalent iron alters soil bacterial community structure and inhibits chloroaromatic biodegradation potential in Aroclor 1242-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilston, Emma L.; Collins, Chris D.; Mitchell, Geoffrey R.; Princivalle, Jessica; Shaw, Liz J.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) has potential for the remediation of organochlorine-contaminated environments. Environmental safety concerns associated with in situ deployment of nZVI include potential negative impacts on indigenous microbes whose biodegradative functions could contribute to contaminant remediation. With respect to a two-step polychlorinated biphenyl remediation scenario comprising nZVI dechlorination followed by aerobic biodegradation, we examined the effect of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-coated nZVI (mean diameter = 12.5 nm) applied at 10 g nZVI kg −1 to Aroclor-1242 contaminated and uncontaminated soil over 28 days. nZVI had a limited effect on Aroclor congener profiles, but, either directly or indirectly via changes to soil physico-chemical conditions (pH, Eh), nZVI addition caused perturbation to soil bacterial community composition, and reduced the activity of chloroaromatic mineralizing microorganisms. We conclude that nZVI addition has the potential to inhibit microbial functions that could be important for PCB remediation strategies combining nZVI treatment and biodegradation. Highlights: ► Impact of nano-sized zerovalent iron on microbes was investigated in soil microcosms. ► Zerovalent iron had short-lived effects on redox potential and Aroclor dechlorination. ► Microbial populations also showed short-lived perturbations in their size. ► The activity of chloroaromatic degrading microbes did not recover within 28 days. ► Zerovalent iron application inhibits ensuing PCB bioremediative microbial functions. - nZVI inhibits microbial functions of potential importance for remediation strategies combining nZVI treatment and biodegradation.

  15. Indoor Fungal and Bacterial Contaminations on Household Environment in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwakeel, Suaad S

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the microbial and inhabitant of household environment in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Overall, a total of 180 samples were collected and analyzed for fungal growth, 160 house samples were obtained on BAP medium and PDA medium. The Eastern Riyadh region turned out with the highest fungal isolates with 15/61 (24.6%). Among the most common fungal isolates from bedroom carpets were Aspergillus niger (21.6%), Alternaria sp. (15.7%), Aspergillus flavus (15.7%) Candida sp. (11.8%), Cladosporium sp. (9.8%) and Rhizopus sp. (9.8%). Other fungal isolates from bedroom carpets included Penicillium sp (5.9%)., Cunninghamella sp.(3.9%), Rhodotorula sp.(3.9%) and Aspergillus terreus (1.9%) Overall relative densities from all specimens obtained from household carpets, bedroom walls and carpet stores showed Alternaria spp. as the most common fungal isolate (55.3%) followed by Aspergillus niger (29%), Aspergillus flavus (19.3%), Rhizopus spp. (9.7%) and Penicillium spp. (7.0%). Other fungal isolates such as Candida spp., Cladosporium spp., Cunninghamella spp., Rhodotorula spp. and Aspergillus terreus had less than 6% overall relative density. From 40 carpet specimens collected for microbial analysis, 20 (50%) showed bacterial growth. Bacillus spp. was the most common isolated organism (35%) followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (10%), Epiococcus spp. (10%), Corynebacterium spp. (10%) and Bacillus polymyxa (10%). Other bacterial isolates included Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and Staphylococcus aureus .The presence of these fungal and microbial pathogens poses risk for individuals. When possible, floor carpeting in homes should be minimized or avoided since this serves as habitats for opportunistic fungi and infectious agents that pose harm to one's health. (author)

  16. Bacterial and Aspergillus spp. Contamination of Domestic Kitchens in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwakeel, Suaad S.

    2007-01-01

    A randomized sampling of 50 households in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia was conducted to determine microbial and Aspergillus spp contaminants in domestic kitchens between May and June 2006. Samples were taken from open air in the kitchen and from used kitchen sponges. Inoculation procedures were varied from direct inoculation of the sponge into the medium to dilution of a cut portion of the sponge. A total of 200 samples were taken from which, 700 culture plates were done (BAP and Nutrient agar). Identification by the API system of identification (Analytical Profile Index, BioMerieux) revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterobacter cloacae, Diphtheroids and Bacillus cereus, Aspergillus spp. was isolated and identified microscopically. Among the isolates, Staphylococcus epidermidis , Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 90% of the plates followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (83%) , Klebsiella pneumonia ; Bacillus cereus (63%).and Aspergillus spp (15%) These opportunistic pathogens may be harmful especially in immunocompromised hosts. In this setting, there is a constant risk of contamination and transfer to willing hosts, thus appropriate measures should be implemented such as the use of disposable sponges. (author)

  17. Rapid detection of bacterial contamination in cell or tissue cultures based on Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolwien, Carsten; Sulz, Gerd; Becker, Sebastian; Thielecke, Hagen; Mertsching, Heike; Koch, Steffen

    2008-02-01

    Monitoring the sterility of cell or tissue cultures is an essential task, particularly in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering when implanting cells into the human body. We present a system based on a commercially available microscope equipped with a microfluidic cell that prepares the particles found in the solution for analysis, a Raman-spectrometer attachment optimized for non-destructive, rapid recording of Raman spectra, and a data acquisition and analysis tool for identification of the particles. In contrast to conventional sterility testing in which samples are incubated over weeks, our system is able to analyze milliliters of supernatant or cell suspension within hours by filtering relevant particles and placing them on a Raman-friendly substrate in the microfluidic cell. Identification of critical particles via microscopic imaging and subsequent image analysis is carried out before micro-Raman analysis of those particles is then carried out with an excitation wavelength of 785 nm. The potential of this setup is demonstrated by results of artificial contamination of samples with a pool of bacteria, fungi, and spores: single-channel spectra of the critical particles are automatically baseline-corrected without using background data and classified via hierarchical cluster analysis, showing great promise for accurate and rapid detection and identification of contaminants.

  18. A system for the rapid detection of bacterial contamination in cell-based therapeutica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolwien, Carsten; Erhardt, Christian; Sulz, Gerd; Thielecke, Hagen; Johann, Robert; Pudlas, Marieke; Mertsching, Heike; Koch, Steffen

    2010-02-01

    Monitoring the sterility of cell or tissue cultures is of major concern, particularly in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering when implanting cells into the human body. Our sterility-control system is based on a Raman micro-spectrometer and is able to perform fast sterility testing on microliters of liquid samples. In conventional sterility control, samples are incubated for weeks to proliferate the contaminants to concentrations above the detection limit of conventional analysis. By contrast, our system filters particles from the liquid sample. The filter chip fabricated in microsystem technology comprises a silicon nitride membrane with millions of sub-micrometer holes to retain particles of critical sizes and is embedded in a microfluidic cell specially suited for concomitant microscopic observation. After filtration, identification is carried out on the single particle level: image processing detects possible contaminants and prepares them for Raman spectroscopic analysis. A custom-built Raman-spectrometer-attachment coupled to the commercial microscope uses 532nm or 785nm Raman excitation and records spectra up to 3400cm-1. In the final step, the recorded spectrum of a single particle is compared to an extensive library of GMP-relevant organisms, and classification is carried out based on a support vector machine.

  19. Trial of a novel plasma gas disinfection system (Radica) to reduce mattress residual bacterial contamination in the acute hospital setting: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiely, F; Fallon, D; Casey, C; Kerins, D M; Eustace, J A

    2017-02-01

    In routine clinical practice, mattresses are manually cleaned using specialised cleaning and high-level disinfecting fluids. While effective against a wide range of organisms, the success of this approach is dependent on a thorough and complete application and is likely to be susceptible to human error and thus variable. The efficacy of available infection control measures to reduce such mattress contamination is unknown as it is not subject to quality control measures. There is a pressing need to identify more effective methods to prevent cross contamination within the medical environment, given the lack of available treatment strategies. The purpose of this study is to investigate the ability of a new technology, gaseous technology, to reduce colonization levels, compared to standard cleaning, and so attenuate superficial nosocomial infections. We conducted a prospective, single-centre, open-label, non-randomized trial with blinded outcome assessments, comparing the standard cleaning of hospital mattresses with a novel plasma based disinfection system Radica™, followed by a standard post-cleaning culturing protocol (five swabs/mattress). The median (interquartile range) maximal colony count per mattress for the 20 Radica versus 7 routinely cleaned mattresses was 1 (1-2.7) versus Too-Numerous-to-Count (TNTC) (32-TNTC), respectively, p = 0.002. Of the 20 Radica™ treated mattresses, 12 (60 %) had no positive culture result while all of the standard cleaned mattresses had at least two positive cultures. The plasma based Radica disinfection system reduces mattress bacterial colonization levels as compared to routine cleaning. This is a potentially important technology in the health care system to reduce surface colonisation and hence nosocomial infections.

  20. New wash aid T-128 improves efficacy of chlorine against cross contamination by bacterial pathogens in fresh-cut lettuce processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorinated water is widely used as the primary anti-microbial intervention during fresh-cut produce processing. Free chlorine in chlorinated water can provide effective reduction of potential contaminations by microbial pathogens, and, more importantly, effectively prevent cross contamination of p...

  1. EFFECT OF FEED DEPRIVATION TIME ON BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION OF SKIN AND CARCASS IN MEAT GOATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vanguru

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that diet and feed deprivation time prior to slaughter can influence the fecal shedding of bacteria in goats. This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of feed deprivation time (FDT on skin and carcass bacterial counts. Thirty-two Boer × Spanish goats (BW = 18.8 ± 0.82 kg were randomly assigned to one of 4 FDT (0, 9, 18, or 27 h before slaughter. Immediately after slaughter and evisceration, the pH values of rumen liquor and cecal digesta were determined. Rumen and rectal content samples were collected and transported to the laboratory for culture and determination of microbial load. Initial pH of Longissimus muscle (LM was determined at 15 min postmortem on each carcass. Swab samples were collected from skin (leg; 25 cm2 area and carcass (flank, brisket and leg; 75 cm2 area of each animal to assess the bacterial load. The 27-h FDT group had higher (P 0.05 by FDT.  The microbial counts of rumen and fecal contents were not influenced by FDT.  The E. coli, total coliform (TCC, and total plate counts of rumen content were 2.93, 3.14, and 6.08 log10CFU/g, respectively, and those of fecal contents were 3.56, 7.25 and 6.81 log10CFU/g, respectively. The FDT had no effect on the initial (pH = 6.87 of LM. The E. coli, TCC, and aerobic plate counts on skin were 1.13, 1.49, and 3.78 log10CFU/cm2, respectively, and those on carcasses were 1.51, 1.65, and 3.11 log10CFU/cm2, respectively. Both skin and carcass microbial counts were not affected (P > 0.05 by FDT. The results indicate that feed deprivation time alone up to 27 h may not significantly influence gut, skin, or carcass microbial loads.

  2. Bleeding sap and old wood are the two main sources of contamination of merging organs of vine plants by Xylophilus ampelinus, the causal agent of bacterial necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grall, S; Roulland, C; Guillaumès, J; Manceau, C

    2005-12-01

    The spatial distribution of vine plants contaminated by Xylophilus ampelinus, the agent responsible for bacterial necrosis, was studied over a 5-year period within two vineyards in the Cognac area. Both vineyards were planted with Vitis vinifera cv. Ugni blanc but were different in age and agronomic location. The emission of X. ampelinus in contaminated bleeding sap was observed during vine sprouting. Contaminated bleeding sap is an important source of inoculum for external contamination due to the high susceptibility of young merging shoots to the pathogen. X. ampelinus emission by bleeding sap was not affected by the age of the plants or the location of the vineyards. However, its emission was irregular with time, and it varied between two fruit canes from individual plants and between plants as well as between years. Moreover, the two vineyards appeared to be entirely contaminated. Consequently, the behavior of the pathogen is not predictable. The distribution of the pathogen inside vine plant organs was analyzed through the four growing seasons. The old wood was contaminated throughout the year and constituted a stock inoculum for endophytic contamination of crude sap during the winter and the spring. Despite the fact that most of the young green shoots were contaminated in May, X.ampelinus was not found in green shoots in June and September, refuting the hypothesis of an epiphytic life of the pathogen under natural conditions. Although all plants were entirely contaminated in both vineyards, symptoms were rare and were observed on different plants each year.

  3. Contaminant dispersion and bacterial declination studies ate the bay of Chimbote - Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, C.; Maghella, G.; Mamani, E.

    2000-02-01

    A review of both, the dispersion studies and preliminary determination of T-90 performed at the bay of Chimbote - Peru, has been made. As for the dispersion studies, a fundamental partial differential equation and its solution for three-dimensional case is presented. The shape and characteristics of the tracer plume is determined as well as the decrease rate of peak concentrations. The method considers a point injection with Rhodamine B and Iodine-131 as tracers, in order to determine the longitudinal, lateral and vertical dispersion coefficients that govern the dispersion rates of industrial and waste waters to be discharged through a submarine outfall that will be installed at the sea of Chimbote. The method presented herein allows the estimation of the dispersion coefficients and predicts the influence of the future diffuser as well, regardless of the nature of the body of water in which the tests were conducted. With regard to T-90 determinations, they were better performed by the use of a combined tracer technique, using I-131 for dilution measurement and Rhodamine B as a visual aid. Dilution and decrease in bacterial concentrations were taken into consideration as well as continuous radiotracer injection. The values of T-90 estimated from experiments should be reconfirmed in future experiments under different oceanographic conditions. (authors)

  4. Bacterial community changes during bioremediation of aliphatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militon, Cécile; Boucher, Delphine; Vachelard, Cédric; Perchet, Geoffrey; Barra, Vincent; Troquet, Julien; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre

    2010-12-01

    The microbial community response during the oxygen biostimulation process of aged oil-polluted soils is poorly documented and there is no reference for the long-term monitoring of the unsaturated zone. To assess the potential effect of air supply on hydrocarbon fate and microbial community structure, two treatments (0 and 0.056 mol h⁻¹ molar flow rate of oxygen) were performed in fixed bed reactors containing oil-polluted soil. Microbial activity was monitored continuously over 2 years throughout the oxygen biostimulation process. Microbial community structure before and after treatment for 12 and 24 months was determined using a dual rRNA/rRNA gene approach, allowing us to characterize bacteria that were presumably metabolically active and therefore responsible for the functionality of the community in this polluted soil. Clone library analysis revealed that the microbial community contained many rare phylotypes. These have never been observed in other studied ecosystems. The bacterial community shifted from Gammaproteobacteria to Actinobacteria during the treatment. Without aeration, the samples were dominated by a phylotype linked to the Streptomyces. Members belonging to eight dominant phylotypes were well adapted to the aeration process. Aeration stimulated an Actinobacteria phylotype that might be involved in restoring the ecosystem studied. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that this phylotype is a novel, deep-branching member of the Actinobacteria related to the well-studied genus Acidimicrobium. FEMS Microbiology Ecology © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original French government works.

  5. Bacterial contamination of eggs and behaviour of poultry flocks in the free range environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Talia; Drake, Kelly; Gole, Vaibhav; Chousalkar, Kapil; Hazel, Susan

    2016-12-01

    The free range production system is becoming more common in Australia and is expected to increase. Free range hens are exposed to more stressors in comparison to hens from barn and cage systems and it is suggested that stress can increase bacterial shedding on eggs. The aims of this study were to examine the level of total bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae populations, as well as the presence of Salmonella and Campylobacter, in eggs collected from two free range flocks on two different farms and to conduct longitudinal observations of the behaviour and welfare of hens in the free range production system. Hen age (weeks) was shown to have a significant effect (increase) on the level of total bacteria on the egg shell surface and in shell pores, as well as having an effect on feather condition score. As the hens aged, the frequency of external visual egg characteristics increased, as did feather condition score (where feather condition was poorer). These observations indicate areas which should be investigated further to improve the food safety of eggs and optimise the welfare of free range hens. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The survey on Bacterial and fungi contamination of herbaceous distillates that distributed in Birjand city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khodadadi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: In order to best use from traditional medicine, world health organization suggested hygiene in making products and traditional healing method. Considering the great importance of different types of drug distillates and different uses of traditional & industrial, the amount of fungal and bacteria pollution in sweat chicory, Tp and forty traditional essences was studied in Birjand shops. Materials and Methods: In this method 30 sample of traditional and industrial sweat chicory, Tp and forty traditional was selected from Birjand city for bacterial (total coli form, fecal coli forms and fungal pollution and was transferred to laboratory and were analyzed according 7725-1 and 997 number standard of Iran. Results: Based on the results, in 1 case of TP and forty traditional essences fungus penicillium and sweat chicory aspergillus and penicillium fungi were isolated. In 80% TP and forty traditional essences & sweat chicory samples microbial pollution were detected and from these samples 20% sweat chicory and TP had coli form pollution & 20% TP and sweat chicory & forty traditional essences had fecal coli form pollution. 80% industrial samples of sweat chicory had microbial pollution and from these 100% had coli form pollution. Conclusion: According to the results, surveillance should be done more in various stages of preparation and distribution of these essences.

  7. A study regarding measurements of bacterial contamination levels in radiology room equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Jin [Dept. of Public Health and Medicine, Dongshin University Graduate School, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hyeon Je [Dept. of Clinical Pathology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae; Kim, Chang Bok [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae Kwang [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Reported some level of bacteria in areas that are well made contact in Radiology imaging room evaluate the importance of cleanliness in the hospital management of equipment to check for the presence of pathogenic bacteria. Gwang-ju and Jeol-la city and medium-sized hospitals in the material with a cotton swab and rub evenly Radiology selection cassette, a handle, Apron of the imaging apparatus having the most contact with patients from July 2016 to August 2016 as a target in place and special studios 6, and saline solution will placed in a test tube containing. The swab sample was diluted 1,000 times, you can see the bacteria and the intestinal bacterial selective medium Trypticase Soy Agar (TSA), Muller-Hinton Agar (MHA), EosinMethylene Blue (EMB), ENDO (BD, NJ, USA) then incubated smear to. In the incubator (incubator, SANYO, Japan) was observed after incubation of bacteria and counting the total number of bacteria also Colonies (colony) suspected intestinal bacteria were isolated and cultured on KIA medium (BD, NJ, USA). As a result, it was found that this came Gram positive Coccus A hospital handle the F hospital, from the C Gram positive Coccus cassette and handle the F hospital. The striking yellow coloring Staphylococcus aureus 110 agar (STA 110) in the medium sample, but it is suspected staphylococcal Coccus to the final identifcation in the laboratory is not a single specimen of the two samples from Gram positive Coccus biochemical identifcation. Identifcation Kit is an API could not, it was thought to be non-Staphylococcus aureus was cultured on blood agar suggesting that (BAP) blood of dance. Dynamic tests were conducted biochemical API kit of the two samples were identifed from Gram positive Coccus bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) is F hospital cassette was confrmed Eenterobacter cloaca in A hospital possession. Did not aggregate O-26, O-111, O-157 and the serum test was conducted in the laboratory from the E. coli F cassette hospital.

  8. A study regarding measurements of bacterial contamination levels in radiology room equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Jin; Song, Hyeon Je; Dong, Kyung Rae; Kim, Chang Bok; Ryu, Jae Kwang

    2017-01-01

    Reported some level of bacteria in areas that are well made contact in Radiology imaging room evaluate the importance of cleanliness in the hospital management of equipment to check for the presence of pathogenic bacteria. Gwang-ju and Jeol-la city and medium-sized hospitals in the material with a cotton swab and rub evenly Radiology selection cassette, a handle, Apron of the imaging apparatus having the most contact with patients from July 2016 to August 2016 as a target in place and special studios 6, and saline solution will placed in a test tube containing. The swab sample was diluted 1,000 times, you can see the bacteria and the intestinal bacterial selective medium Trypticase Soy Agar (TSA), Muller-Hinton Agar (MHA), EosinMethylene Blue (EMB), ENDO (BD, NJ, USA) then incubated smear to. In the incubator (incubator, SANYO, Japan) was observed after incubation of bacteria and counting the total number of bacteria also Colonies (colony) suspected intestinal bacteria were isolated and cultured on KIA medium (BD, NJ, USA). As a result, it was found that this came Gram positive Coccus A hospital handle the F hospital, from the C Gram positive Coccus cassette and handle the F hospital. The striking yellow coloring Staphylococcus aureus 110 agar (STA 110) in the medium sample, but it is suspected staphylococcal Coccus to the final identifcation in the laboratory is not a single specimen of the two samples from Gram positive Coccus biochemical identifcation. Identifcation Kit is an API could not, it was thought to be non-Staphylococcus aureus was cultured on blood agar suggesting that (BAP) blood of dance. Dynamic tests were conducted biochemical API kit of the two samples were identifed from Gram positive Coccus bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) is F hospital cassette was confrmed Eenterobacter cloaca in A hospital possession. Did not aggregate O-26, O-111, O-157 and the serum test was conducted in the laboratory from the E. coli F cassette hospital

  9. Bacterial Contamination of Expressed Breast Milk in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Karimi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The milks expressed from the mothers’ breast might be infected during squeeze, storage and/or transmission. The infection level has been reported as different in various studies up to 97 percent. The main purpose of this study is to determine the infection level and its relevant organisms as well as to specify drug allergy of the expressed milks from the mothers with their infant admitted to NICU ward. Materials and Methods: In this study, among the expressed milks from 80 mothers, were cultured each in an amount of 0.5-1cc and antibiotic discs selected for every strain was placed.Results: The results indicate that 85 percent of samples were infected and dominant microorganisms were firstly Klebsiella (13.7% and then S. epidermidis (12.5%. In addition, 95% of Gram negative bacteria strains were susceptible to imipenem. The most effective antibiotic on isolated staphylococci was ceftizoxime (46.6% resistance. The colony count in 32.4% gram negative bacteria and in 66.7% gram positive bacteria was between 104 to 105 CFU/ml and the remaining was above 105 CFU/ml (p=0.02. Furthermore, there was no significant relationship between bacterial infection of the expressed milks with the site of milk expressing (house or hospital, mode of expressing (by pump or hand, storage duration and the mother’s demographic characteristics including age and/or literacy.Conclusion: The studies show that infection prevalence in the milk samples was 85%; the most common infection factor was Klebsiella and then S. epidermidis that is indicative of high prevalence of hospital infection (nosocomial infection in the infants ward.

  10. Influence of Soap Characteristics and Food Service Facility Type on the Degree of Bacterial Contamination of Open, Refillable Bulk Soaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Donald W; Jensen, Dane; Gerba, Charles P; Shumaker, David; Arbogast, James W

    2018-02-01

    Concern has been raised regarding the public health risks from refillable bulk-soap dispensers because they provide an environment for potentially pathogenic bacteria to grow. This study surveyed the microbial quality of open refillable bulk soap in four different food establishment types in three states. Two hundred ninety-six samples of bulk soap were collected from food service establishments in Arizona, New Jersey, and Ohio. Samples were tested for total heterotrophic viable bacteria, Pseudomonas, coliforms and Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. Bacteria were screened for antibiotic resistance. The pH, solids content, and water activity of all soap samples were measured. Samples were assayed for the presence of the common antibacterial agents triclosan and parachlorometaxylenol. More than 85% of the soap samples tested contained no detectable microorganisms, but when a sample contained any detectable microorganisms, it was most likely contaminated at a very high level (∼7 log CFU/mL). Microorganisms detected in contaminated soap included Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia liquefaciens, Shigella sonnei, Enterobacter gergoviae, Serratia odorifera, and Enterobacter cloacae. Twenty-three samples contained antibiotic-resistant organisms, some of which were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Every sample containing less than 4% solids had some detectable level of bacteria, whereas no samples with greater than 14% solids had detectable bacteria. This finding suggests the use of dilution and/or low-cost formulations as a cause of bacterial growth. There was a statistically significant difference ( P = 0.0035) between the fraction of bacteria-positive samples with no detected antimicrobial agent (17%) and those containing an antimicrobial agent (7%). Fast food operations and grocery stores were more likely to have detectable bacteria in bulk-soap samples compared with convenience stores ( P food service establishments.

  11. Salix purpurea Stimulates the Expression of Specific Bacterial Xenobiotic Degradation Genes in a Soil Contaminated with Hydrocarbons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine P Pagé

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to uncover Salix purpurea-microbe xenobiotic degradation systems that could be harnessed in rhizoremediation, and to identify microorganisms that are likely involved in these partnerships. To do so, we tested S. purpurea's ability to stimulate the expression of 10 marker microbial oxygenase genes in a soil contaminated with hydrocarbons. In what appeared to be a detoxification rhizosphere effect, transcripts encoding for alkane 1-monooxygenases, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, laccase/polyphenol oxidases, and biphenyl 2,3-dioxygenase small subunits were significantly more abundant in the vicinity of the plant's roots than in bulk soil. This gene expression induction is consistent with willows' known rhizoremediation capabilities, and suggests the existence of S. purpurea-microbe systems that target many organic contaminants of interest (i.e. C4-C16 alkanes, fluoranthene, anthracene, benzo(apyrene, biphenyl, polychlorinated biphenyls. An enhanced expression of the 4 genes was also observed within the bacterial orders Actinomycetales, Rhodospirillales, Burkholderiales, Alteromonadales, Solirubrobacterales, Caulobacterales, and Rhizobiales, which suggest that members of these taxa are active participants in the exposed partnerships. Although the expression of the other 6 marker genes did not appear to be stimulated by the plant at the community level, signs of additional systems that rest on their expression by members of the orders Solirubrobacterales, Sphingomonadales, Actinomycetales, and Sphingobacteriales were observed. Our study presents the first transcriptomics-based identification of microbes whose xenobiotic degradation activity in soil appears stimulated by a plant. It paints a portrait that contrasts with the current views on these consortia's composition, and opens the door for the development of laboratory test models geared towards the identification of root exudate characteristics that limit the

  12. BACTERIAL COMMUNITY DYNAMICS AND ECOTOXICOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT DURING BIOREMEDIATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED BY BIODIESEL AND DIESEL/BIODIESEL BLENDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, G I; Junior, C S; Oliva, T C; Subtil, D F; Matsushita, L Y; Chaves, A L; Lutterbach, M T; Sérvulo, E F; Agathos, S N; Stenuit, B

    2015-01-01

    The gradual introduction of biodiesel in the Brazilian energy landscape has primarily occurred through its blending with conventional petroleum diesel (e.g., B20 (20% biodiesel) and B5 (5% biodiesel) formulations). Because B20 and lower-level blends generally do not require engine modifications, their use as transportation fuel is increasing in the Brazilian distribution networks. However, the environmental fate of low-level biodiesel blends and pure biodiesel (B100) is poorly understood and the ecotoxicological-safety endpoints of biodiesel-contaminated environments are unknown. Using laboratory microcosms consisting of closed reactor columns filled with clay loam soil contaminated with pure biodiesel (EXPB100) and a low-level blend (EXPB5) (10% w/v), this study presents soil ecotoxicity assessement and dynamics of culturable heterotrophic bacteria. Most-probable-number (MPN) procedures for enumeration of bacteria, dehydrogenase assays and soil ecotoxicological tests using Eisenia fetida have been performed at different column depths over the course of incubation. After 60 days of incubation, the ecotoxicity of EXPB100-derived samples showed a decrease from 63% of mortality to 0% while EXPB5-derived samples exhibited a reduction from 100% to 53% and 90% on the top and at the bottom of the reactor column, respectively. The dehydrogenase activity of samples from EXPB100 and EXPB5 increased significantly compared to pristine soil after 60 days of incubation. Growth of aerobic bacterial biomass was only observed on the top of the reactor column while the anaerobic bacteria exhibited significant growth at different column depths in EXPB100 and EXPB5. These preliminary results suggest the involvement of soil indigenous microbiota in the biodegradation of biodiesel and blends. However, GC-FID analyses for quantification of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and aliphatic hydrocarbons and targeted sequencing of 16S rRNA tags using illumina platforms will provide important

  13. Bacterial contamination of kale (Brassica oleracea Acephala) along the supply chain in Nairobi and its environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutto, E K; Ngigi, M W; Karanja, N; Kange'the, E; Bebora, L C; Lagerkvist, C J; Mbuthia, P G; Njagi, L W; Okello, J J

    2011-02-01

    To assess the microbiological safety of kale (Brassica oleracea Acephala) produced from farms and those sold at the markets with special focus on coliforms, E.coli and Salmonella. A cross sectional study. Peri-Urban farms (in Athi River, Ngong and Wangige), wet markets (in Kawangware, Kangemi and Githurai), supermarkets and high-end specialty store both within Nairobi city. Mean coliform count on vegetables from farms were 2.6 x 10(5) +/- 5.0 x 10(5) cfu/g while those from the wet markets were 4.6 x 10(6) +/- 9.1 x 10(6) cfu/g, supermarkets, 2.6 x 10(6) +/- 2.7 x 10(6) and high-end specialty store 4.7 x 10(5) +/- 8.9 x 10 (5). Coliform numbers obtained on kales from the wet markets and supermarkets were significantly higher (p kale samples purchased from high-end specialty store had similar levels of coliform loads as those from the farms. E. coli prevalence in the wet markets, supermarkets and high-end specialty store were: 40, 20 and 20%, respectively. Salmonella was detected on 4.5 and 6.3% of samples collected from the farms in Wangige and wet market in Kawangware, respectively. Fecal coliforms in water used on farms (for irrigation) and in the markets (for washing the vegetables) exceeded levels recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) of 10(3) organisms per 100 milliliter while Salmonella was detected in 12.5% of washing water samples collected from Kangemi market. Poor cultivation practices and poor handling of vegetables along the supply chain could increase the risk of pathogen contamination thus puting the health of the public at risk, therefore good agricultural and handling practices should be observed.

  14. Survey on Heterotrophic Bacterial Contamination in Bottled Mineral Water by Culture Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essmaeel Ghorbanalinezhad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: This project focuses on the level of heterotrophic baceria in bottled mineral water which could be a health concern for the elderly, infants, pregnant women and immuno-compromised patients. Materials and Methods: Different brands of bottled water samples were selected randomly and evaluated for their bacteriological quality, using different specific culture media and biochemical tests. Water samples were analyzed within 24 hours of their purchase/collection. Samples were filtered with 0.45 micron and filters were plated in different media. Then media were incubated at 37˚C for 24-48 hours. Results: Morphological study and biochemical tests revealed a number of bacteria in different   brands of  bottled water. Heterotrophic bacteria(Gram positive cocci, Spore forming gram positive bacilli, non spore forming gram positive bacilli, gram negative bacilli, and gram negative coccobacilli; Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas counted in 70% of bottled water samples. There were no cases of fecal contamination or the presence of E.coli. Conclusions: Bottled water is not sterile and contains trace amounts of bacteria naturally present or introduced during processing. Testing drinking water for all possible pathogens is complex, time-consuming, and expensive. If only total coliform bacteria are detected in drinking water, the source is probably environmental. Since the significance of non-pathogenic heterotrophic bacteria in relation to health and diseases is not understood, there is an urgent need to establish a maximum limit for the heterotrophic count in the bottled mineral water. Growth conditions play a critical role in the recovery of heterotrophic bacteria in bottled drinking water.

  15. The circulating air barrier: Effective prevention of liquid contaminant movement through soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, R.; Towers, T.; Johnson, H.; Overbey, W.

    1995-01-01

    The environmental cleanup task facing the United States Department of Energy (DOE) presents enormous technical, planning and institutional challenges, including the need to develop new technologies that are faster, better, safer, and cheaper, in order to expedite site cleanup. Characterization of contaminated sediments resulting from past tank leaks, continued safe operations of the tanks, total confinement of leaking materials, secondary waste minimization, and final closure of the single shell tanks are five of the many facets of the storage tank issue at Hanford and elsewhere in the nation. Each of these issues are considered in the development of the Circulating Air Barrier (CAB). The Circulating Air Barrier system is a desiccant-type barrier designed to prevent the movement of liquid contaminants toward the groundwater by using an air circulation and processing system to lower the water saturation in a targeted subsurface zone below the saturation level required for liquid flow. Vertical or horizontal wells can be installed to create a matrix of air injection and production so that air flows across the target barrier zone to the production wells. In the event of a tank leak, the system serves as a tool for early detection and provides a means to withdraw volatile contaminants to the surface for treatment. Demonstration and full-scale CAB systems have been designed for the Hanford Site. This includes chemical and geological characterization; model development, sensitivity analysis and performance optimization; subsurface configuration and surface processing equipment design; and development of a test program with associated cost estimates

  16. Environmental Education in Brazil: Preventive Measures to Avoid Contamination with U and Th

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Pastura, Valéria Fonseca; Wieland, Patricia

    2008-08-01

    Aiming at increasing awareness of radiation health effects, environmental issues and preventive measures, the Nuclear Energy National Commission (CNEN) launched in 2004 an education and public outreach programme for mine workers, students, teachers, governmental leaders, labor representatives and members of communities nearby small mining sites at the North and Northeast regions. Many Brazilian conventional mines present a significant risk of exposure to radiation due to Uranium and Thorium. CNEN inspects the mines but there are several small mining sites dedicated to open pit short term mineral extraction, called "garimpagem", that are of difficult control. Therefore, information at large about preventive measures to avoid contamination during exploration, transportation and storage is necessary. CNEN developed an educational campaign which includes a series of open seminars, talks, folders, booklets and posters. The objective of this paper is to present the Brazilian educational campaign to avoid contamination risks at those small mineral exploration sites and its results. This campaign is a joint task that receives collaboration of other organizations such as federal police, schools and universities.

  17. Environmental Education in Brazil: Preventive Measures to Avoid Contamination with U and Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Pastura, Valeria Fonseca da; Wieland, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Aiming at increasing awareness of radiation health effects, environmental issues and preventive measures, the Nuclear Energy National Commission (CNEN) launched in 2004 an education and public outreach programme for mine workers, students, teachers, governmental leaders, labor representatives and members of communities nearby small mining sites at the North and Northeast regions. Many Brazilian conventional mines present a significant risk of exposure to radiation due to Uranium and Thorium. CNEN inspects the mines but there are several small mining sites dedicated to open pit short term mineral extraction, called 'garimpagem', that are of difficult control. Therefore, information at large about preventive measures to avoid contamination during exploration, transportation and storage is necessary. CNEN developed an educational campaign which includes a series of open seminars, talks, folders, booklets and posters. The objective of this paper is to present the Brazilian educational campaign to avoid contamination risks at those small mineral exploration sites and its results. This campaign is a joint task that receives collaboration of other organizations such as federal police, schools and universities

  18. Betaproteobacteria dominance and diversity shifts in the bacterial community of a PAH-contaminated soil exposed to phenanthrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Florence; Torelli, Stéphane; Le Paslier, Denis; Barbance, Agnès; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Bru, David; Geremia, Roberto; Blake, Gérard; Jouanneau, Yves

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the PAH-degrading bacteria of a constructed wetland collecting road runoff has been studied through DNA stable isotope probing. Microcosms were spiked with 13 C-phenanthrene at 34 or 337 ppm, and bacterial diversity was monitored over a 14-day period. At 337 ppm, PAH degraders became dominated after 5 days by Betaproteobacteria, including novel Acidovorax, Rhodoferax and Hydrogenophaga members, and unknown bacteria related to Rhodocyclaceae. The prevalence of Betaproteobacteria was further demonstrated by phylum-specific quantitative PCR, and was correlated with a burst of phenanthrene mineralization. Striking shifts in the population of degraders were observed after most of the phenanthrene had been removed. Soil exposed to 34 ppm phenanthrene showed a similar population of degraders, albeit only after 14 days. Results demonstrate that specific Betaproteobacteria are involved in the main response to soil PAH contamination, and illustrate the potential of SIP approaches to investigate PAH biodegradation in soil. - Highlights: ► We explored PAH-degrading bacteria on a chronically polluted site by stable isotope probing. ► Betaproteobacteria appeared as the main phenanthrene degraders in soil. ► Most soil PAH degraders were poorly related to bacteria isolated so far. ► Diversity shifts occurred in the community of degraders when the PAH became less available. - On a site collecting road runoff, implementation of stable isotope probing to identify soil bacteria responsible for phenanthrene degradation, led to the discovery of new Betaproteobacteria distantly related to known PAH degraders.

  19. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of bacterial populations isolated from diesel-contaminated soil and treated by two bioremediation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrieta R, Olga M; Rivera R, Angela P; Rojano, Benjamin; Ruiz, Orlando; Correa, Margarita M; Cienfuegos Gallet, Astrid V; Arias, Lida; Cardona G, Santiago A

    2012-01-01

    In this study bioremediation is presented as an alternative for the recovery of contaminated ecosystems. In this work an experimental diesel spill on pasture land was remediated using two bioremediation technologies: natural attenuation, which is the natural capability of indigenous microorganisms to degrade a xenobiotic component in a determined time, and biostimulation, which consist in the acceleration of the degradation process through the stimulation of the metabolism of indigenous microorganisms by the addition of nutrients (P and N) to the media. Results of respirometry assays indicated that both treatments produced significant levels of hydrocarbon removal but the biostimulation treatment stranded out with 98.17% degradation. Seven bacterial isolates were obtained from these treatments which according to their molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis belong to the genus: Enterobacter, Bacillus, Arthrobacter, Sanguibacter, Staphylococcus and Flavobacterium. All isolates were able to metabolize diesel as a carbon and energy source; for this reason and taking into account that for some of these microorganisms their role in bioremediation have not been extensively studied, it is recommended to continue with their evaluation to know their real potential for the solution of environmental problems.

  20. The inoculation method affects colonization and performance of bacterial inoculant strains in the phytoremediation of soil contaminated with diesel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Yousaf, Sohail; Reichenauer, Thomas G; Sessitsch, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Plants in combination with microorganisms can remediate soils, which are contaminated with organic pollutants such as petroleum hydrocarbons. Inoculation of plants with degrading bacteria is one approach to improve remediation processes, but is often not successful due to the competition with resident microorganisms. It is therefore of high importance to address the persistence and colonization behavior of inoculant strains. The objective of this study was to determine whether the inoculation method (seed imbibement and soil inoculation) influences bacterial colonization, plant growth promotion and hydrocarbon degradation. Italian ryegrass was grown in non-sterilized soil polluted with diesel and inoculated with different alkane-degrading strains Pantoea sp. ITSI10, Pantoea sp. BTRH79 and Pseudomonas sp. MixRI75 individually as well as in combination. Inoculation generally had a beneficial effect on plant biomass production and hydrocarbon degradation, however, strains inoculated in soil performed better than applied by seed imbibement. Performance correlated with the colonization efficiency of the inoculated strains. The highest hydrocarbon degradation was observed in the treatment, in which all three strains were inoculated in combination into soil. Our study revealed that besides the degradation potential and competitive ability of inoculant strains the inoculation method plays an important role in determining the success of microbial inoculation.

  1. Assessment of Meat and Poultry Product Recalls Due to Salmonella Contamination: Product Recovery and Illness Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seys, Scott A; Sampedro, Fernando; Hedberg, Craig W

    2017-08-01

    Data from the recalls of meat and poultry products from 2000 through 2012 due to Salmonella contamination were used to assess the factors associated with the recovery of the recalled product and to develop quantitative models to estimate the number of illnesses prevented by recalls. The percentage of product recovered following a recall action was not dependent on establishment size, recall expansions, complexity of the distribution chain, type of distribution, amount of time between the production and recall dates, or number of pounds of product recalled. However, illness-related recalls were associated with larger amounts of recalled product, smaller percentages of recalled product recovered, a greater number of days between the production date and recall date, and nationwide distribution than were recalls that were not illness related. In addition, the detection of recall-associated illnesses appeared to be enhanced in states with strong foodborne illness investigation systems. The number of Salmonella illnesses prevented by recalls was based on the number of illnesses occurring relative to the number of pounds consumed, which was then extrapolated to the number of pounds of recalled product recovered. A simulation using a program evaluation and review technique probability distribution with illness-related recalls from 2003 through 2012 estimated that there were 19,000 prevented Salmonella illnesses, after adjusting for underdiagnosis. Recalls not associated with illnesses from 2000 through 2012 prevented an estimated additional 8,300 Salmonella illnesses, after adjusting for underdiagnosis. Although further improvements to ensure accurate and complete reporting should be undertaken, our study demonstrates that recalls are an important tool for preventing additional Salmonella illnesses. Moreover, additional training resources dedicated to public health agencies for enhancing foodborne illness detection, investigations, and rapid response and reporting would

  2. Efficacy of silver coated surgical sutures on bacterial contamination, cellular response and wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, Anna Lucia; Paladini, Federica; Romano, Alessandro; Verri, Tiziano; Quattrini, Angelo; Sannino, Alessandro; Pollini, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    The resistance demonstrated by many microorganisms towards conventional antibiotics has stimulated the interest in alternative antimicrobial agents and in novel approaches for prevention of infections. Silver, a natural braod-spectrum antimicrobial agent known since antiquity, has been widely employed in biomedical field due to its recognized antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. In this work, antibacterial silver coatings were deposited on absorbable surgical sutures through the in situ photo-chemical deposition of silver clusters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed in order to investigate the presence and distribution of the silver clusters on the substrate. The amounts of silver deposited and released by the silver treated sutures were calculated through Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and the results were related to the biodegradation of the material. The microbiological properties and the potential cytotoxicity of the silver-treated sutures were investigated in relation with hydrolysis experiments, in order to determine the effect of the degradation on antibacterial properties and biocompatibility. - Highlights: • The in situ photo-deposition of silver nano-coatings was used to develop silver treated PGLA sutures. • The silver particles deposited had good distribution and strong adhesion to the substrate. • The silver treated sutures demonstrated good biocompatibility and antibacterial capability. • The presence of silver promoted cell migration and proliferation in the wound area.

  3. Efficacy of silver coated surgical sutures on bacterial contamination, cellular response and wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, Anna Lucia [Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Paladini, Federica, E-mail: federica.paladini@unisalento.it [Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Romano, Alessandro [Neuropathology Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology and Division of Neuroscience, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Verri, Tiziano [Di.S.Te.B.A., University of Salento, Via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Quattrini, Angelo [Neuropathology Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology and Division of Neuroscience, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Sannino, Alessandro; Pollini, Mauro [Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2016-12-01

    The resistance demonstrated by many microorganisms towards conventional antibiotics has stimulated the interest in alternative antimicrobial agents and in novel approaches for prevention of infections. Silver, a natural braod-spectrum antimicrobial agent known since antiquity, has been widely employed in biomedical field due to its recognized antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. In this work, antibacterial silver coatings were deposited on absorbable surgical sutures through the in situ photo-chemical deposition of silver clusters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed in order to investigate the presence and distribution of the silver clusters on the substrate. The amounts of silver deposited and released by the silver treated sutures were calculated through Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and the results were related to the biodegradation of the material. The microbiological properties and the potential cytotoxicity of the silver-treated sutures were investigated in relation with hydrolysis experiments, in order to determine the effect of the degradation on antibacterial properties and biocompatibility. - Highlights: • The in situ photo-deposition of silver nano-coatings was used to develop silver treated PGLA sutures. • The silver particles deposited had good distribution and strong adhesion to the substrate. • The silver treated sutures demonstrated good biocompatibility and antibacterial capability. • The presence of silver promoted cell migration and proliferation in the wound area.

  4. [Bacterial contamination of mobile phones shared in hospital wards and the consciousness and behavior of nurses about biological cleanliness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Ikuharu; Tabuchi, Yuna; Takahashi, Yuko; Oda, Yuriko; Nakai, Masami; Yanase, Aki; Watazu, Chiyoko

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the contamination of mobile phones shared in hospital wards and its relationship with the consciousness and behavior of nurses about biological cleanliness. Samples from mobile phones were cultured to detect viable bacteria (n=110) and Staphylococcus aureus (n=54). A questionnaire survey was conducted on 110 nurses carrying mobile phones on the day of sampling. Viable bacteria were detected on 79.1% of the mobile phones, whereas S. aureus was detected on 68.6%. All the nurses were aware of hand washing with water or alcohol after regular work, but 33.6% of the nurses were not conscious of hand washing with water or alcohol after using a mobile phone. There was a significant positive relationship between the frequency of using mobile phones and the number of hand washings with water or alcohol. A significant negative relationship was found between the detection of viable bacteria and the number of hand washings with alcohol. The results of logistic regression analysis showed that the detection of viable bacteria was related significantly with the number of hand washings with alcohol (Odds ratio, 0.350; 95%CI, 0.143-0.857) and that the detection of S. aureus was related significantly with the frequency of using mobile phones (Odds ratio, 0.183; 95%CI, 0.036-0.933). It is important to be conscious of the fact that mobile phones shared in hospital wards are easily contaminated. Because hand washing with water or alcohol prevents the contamination of the mobile phones, nurses should take standard precautions after using mobile phones.

  5. Is intravesical instillation of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate useful in preventing recurrent bacterial cystitis? A multicenter case control analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgio Gugliotta; Gloria Calagna; Giorgio Adile; Salvatore Polito; Salvatore Saitta; Patrizia Speciale; Stefano Palomba; Antonino Perino; Roberta Granese; Biagio Adile

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in the female population and, over a lifetime, about half of women have at least one episode of UTI requiring antibiotic therapy. The aim of the current study was to compare two different strategies for preventing recurrent bacterial cystitis: intravesical instillation of hyaluronic acid (HA) plus chondroitin sulfate (CS), and antibiotic prophylaxis with sulfamethoxazole plus trimethoprim. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective...

  6. Development of maintenance procedure for plate type heat exchanger taking into account preventing radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terai, Kensuke; Someki, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yuya

    2017-01-01

    In Japanese pressurized water reactors (PWR), heat loads of spent fuel pools (SFP) is increasing due to rising spent fuels and use of mixed oxide (MOX) fuels. Therefore, SFP cooling capacities are necessary to be enhanced, and replacement of SFP coolers or installation of additional coolers is needed. On the other hand, installation spaces of SFP coolers are limited in existing buildings. Therefore, plate type heat exchangers which can be designed to be compact because of the high heat efficiency have often been adopted for SFP coolers instead of shell and tube type heat exchangers in general use. Plate type heat exchangers have to be overhauled periodically for inspection and gasket replacement. However, in plate type SFP coolers, radioactive SFP water and non-radioactive component cooling water (CCW) alternately run through between each plate. Thus there is a concern that the CCW system may be contaminated by radioactive materials from the SFP water during overhaul of the SFP cooler. In order to solve this problem, we have developed the maintenance procedure of the plate type SFP coolers to prevent CCW side contamination by coating the contaminated surfaces with strippable paint prior to disassembly. Before applying this developed maintenance procedure to actual equipment, we have performed the following verification tests. (1) Confirmation of fundamental characteristics for strippable paint. Firstly, we selected both water-based and solvent-based strippable paints. Secondly, we tested and confirmed the detachability and the drying time of the selected strippable paints respectively. Moreover we also confirmed that the selected strippable paints are appropriate materials from the viewpoint of chemical composition restriction of consumable materials used in nuclear power plant. (2) Confirmation of workability for paint filling, drying and peeling off. The strippable paints need to be peeled off after filling into plate type heat exchanger and draining

  7. Preventing bacterial growth on implanted device with an interfacial metallic film and penetrating X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jincui; Sun, An; Qiao, Yong; Zhang, Peipei; Su, Ming

    2015-02-01

    Device-related infections have been a big problem for a long time. This paper describes a new method to inhibit bacterial growth on implanted device with tissue-penetrating X-ray radiation, where a thin metallic film deposited on the device is used as a radio-sensitizing film for bacterial inhibition. At a given dose of X-ray, the bacterial viability decreases as the thickness of metal film (bismuth) increases. The bacterial viability decreases with X-ray dose increases. At X-ray dose of 2.5 Gy, 98% of bacteria on 10 nm thick bismuth film are killed; while it is only 25% of bacteria are killed on the bare petri dish. The same dose of X-ray kills 8% fibroblast cells that are within a short distance from bismuth film (4 mm). These results suggest that penetrating X-rays can kill bacteria on bismuth thin film deposited on surface of implant device efficiently.

  8. [Disinfectants and main sanitary and preventive measures for protection of ventilation and air-conditioning systems from Legionella contamination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, V N; Golov, E A; Khramov, M V; Diatlov, I A

    2008-01-01

    The study was devoted to selection and assessment of disinfecting preparations for prevention of contamination by Legionella. Using system of criteria for quality assessment of disinfectants, seven newdomestic ones belonging to quaternary ammonium compounds class or to oxygen-containing preparations and designed for disinfecting of air-conditioning and ventilation systems were selected. Antibacterial and disinfecting activities of working solutions of disinfectants were tested in laboratory on the test-surfaces and test-objects of premises' air-conditioning and ventilation systems contaminated with Legionella. High antimicrobial and disinfecting activity of new preparations "Dezactiv-M", "ExtraDez", "Emital-Garant", "Aquasept Plus", "Samarovka", "Freesept", and "Ecobreeze Oxy" during their exposure on objects and materials contaminated with Legionella was shown. Main sanitary and preventive measures for defending of air-conditioning and ventilation systems from contamination by Legionella species were presented.

  9. Prevention of bacterial colonization of contact lenses with covalently attached selenium and effects on the rabbit cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Steven M; Spallholz, Julian E; Grimson, Mark J; Dubielzig, Richard R; Gray, Tracy; Reid, Ted W

    2006-08-01

    Although silicone hydrogel materials have produced many corneal health benefits to patients wearing contact lenses, bacteria that cause acute red eye or corneal ulcers are still a concern. A coating that inhibits bacterial colonization while not adversely affecting the cornea should improve the safety of contact lens wear. A covalent selenium (Se) coating on contact lenses was evaluated for safety using rabbits and prevention of bacterial colonization of the contact lenses in vitro. Contact lenses coated with Se were worn on an extended-wear schedule for up to 2 months by 10 New Zealand White rabbits. Corneal health was evaluated with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, pachymetry, electron microscopy, and histology. Lenses worn by the rabbits were analyzed for protein and lipid deposits. In addition, the ability of Se to block bacterial colonization was tested in vitro by incubating lenses in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa broth followed by scanning electron microscopy of the contact lens surface. The covalent Se coating decreased bacterial colonization in vitro while not adversely affecting the corneal health of rabbits in vivo. The Se coating produced no noticeable negative effects as observed with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, pachymetry, electron microscopy, and histology. The Se coating did not affect protein or lipid deposition on the contact lenses. The data from this pilot study suggest that a Se coating on contact lenses might reduce acute red eye and bacterial ulceration because of an inhibition of bacterial colonization. In addition, our safety tests suggest that this positive effect can be produced without an adverse effect on corneal health.

  10. Impact of donor arm cleaning with different aseptic solutions for prevention of contamination in blood bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tanvi G; Shukla, Rinku V; Gupte, Snehalata C

    2013-03-01

    Transfusion associated sepsis cases are encountered occasionally and bacterial transmission remains the major cause. The goal of our study was to compare the efficacy of disinfectants in phlebotomy site preparation. After selection of donor the antecubital fossa area of the arm was disinfected with different types of disinfectants namely sprit (70% isopropyl alcohol), povidone iodine (0.5% w/v available iodine in distilled water), savlon (1.5% v/v chlorhexidine gluconate solution and 3.0% cetrimide solution) and combination of sprit and povidone iodine. Swabs were collected from 20 donors using a sterile forceps, after cleaning with different antiseptic solutions. Swab was streaked on blood agar plate aseptically and the plate was incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Colonies were counted and a single colony was re-cultured by growing on nutrient and Mac-Conkey agar. The biochemical characteristics were determined by performing Gram staining, Motility, Catalase and Oxidase tests. The mean values of colonies were significantly higher with savlon compared to other three solutions. The difference was statistically significant by "t" test (t values 1.7-3.0; P bag were aseptically inoculated in aerobic and anaerobic culture bottles to be tested on BacT/Alert system. The bag containing donor's blood did not show any contamination when three cleanings were carried out using sprit, povidone iodine and spirit respectively.

  11. Surveillance study of bacterial contamination of the parent's cell phone in the NICU and the effectiveness of an anti-microbial gel in reducing transmission to the hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstrom, A C; Cleman, P E; Cassis-Ghavami, F L; Kamitsuka, M D

    2013-12-01

    To determine the bacterial contamination rate of the parent's cell phone and the effectiveness of anti-microbial gel in reducing transmission of bacteria from cell phone to hands. Cross-sectional study of cultures from the cell phone and hands before and after applying anti-microbial gel (n=50). All cell phones demonstrated bacterial contamination. Ninety percent had the same bacteria on the cell phone and their cleaned hands. Twenty two percent had no growth on their hands after applying anti-microbial gel after they had the same bacteria on the cell phone and hands. Ninety-two percent of parents were aware that cell phones carried bacteria, but only 38% cleaned their cell phones at least weekly. Bacterial contamination of cell phones may serve as vectors for nosocomial infection in the neonatal intensive care unit. Bacteria transmitted from cell phone to hands may not be eliminated using anti-microbial gel. Development of hand hygiene and cell phone cleaning guidelines are needed regarding bedside cell phone use.

  12. Significance of treated agrowaste residue and autochthonous inoculates (Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Bacillus cereus) on bacterial community structure and phytoextraction to remediate soils contaminated with heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcón, Rosario; Medina, Almudena; Roldán, Antonio; Biró, Borbála; Vivas, Astrid

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we analyzed the impact of treatments such as Aspergillus niger-treated sugar beet waste (SB), PO4(3-) fertilization and autochthonous inoculants [arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and Bacillus cereus], on the bacterial community structure in a soils contaminated with heavy metals as well as, the effectiveness on plant growth (Trifolium repens). The inoculation with AM fungi in SB amended soil, increased plant growth similarly to PO4(3-) addition, and both treatments matched in P acquisition but bacterial biodiversity estimated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of amplified 16S rDNA sequences, was more stimulated by the presence of the AM fungus than by PO4(3-) fertilization. The SB amendment plus AM inoculation increased the microbial diversity by 233% and also changed (by 215%) the structure of the bacterial community. The microbial inoculants and amendment used favoured plant growth and the phytoextraction process and concomitantly modified bacterial community in the rhizosphere; thus they can be used for remediation. Therefore, the understanding of such microbial ecological aspects is important for phytoremediation and the recovery of contaminated soils.

  13. Automated processing of forensic casework samples using robotic workstations equipped with nondisposable tips: contamination prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, Chantal J; Lett, C Marc; Elliott, Jim; Yensen, Craig; Fourney, Ron M

    2008-05-01

    An automated process has been developed for the analysis of forensic casework samples using TECAN Genesis RSP 150/8 or Freedom EVO liquid handling workstations equipped exclusively with nondisposable tips. Robot tip cleaning routines have been incorporated strategically within the DNA extraction process as well as at the end of each session. Alternative options were examined for cleaning the tips and different strategies were employed to verify cross-contamination. A 2% sodium hypochlorite wash (1/5th dilution of the 10.8% commercial bleach stock) proved to be the best overall approach for preventing cross-contamination of samples processed using our automated protocol. The bleach wash steps do not adversely impact the short tandem repeat (STR) profiles developed from DNA extracted robotically and allow for major cost savings through the implementation of fixed tips. We have demonstrated that robotic workstations equipped with fixed pipette tips can be used with confidence with properly designed tip washing routines to process casework samples using an adapted magnetic bead extraction protocol.

  14. Is intravesical instillation of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate useful in preventing recurrent bacterial cystitis? A multicenter case control analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliotta, Giorgio; Calagna, Gloria; Adile, Giorgio; Polito, Salvatore; Saitta, Salvatore; Speciale, Patrizia; Palomba, Stefano; Perino, Antonino; Granese, Roberta; Adile, Biagio

    2015-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in the female population and, over a lifetime, about half of women have at least one episode of UTI requiring antibiotic therapy. The aim of the current study was to compare two different strategies for preventing recurrent bacterial cystitis: intravesical instillation of hyaluronic acid (HA) plus chondroitin sulfate (CS), and antibiotic prophylaxis with sulfamethoxazole plus trimethoprim. This was a retrospective review of two different cohorts of women affected by recurrent bacterial cystitis. Cases (experimental group) were women who received intravesical instillations of a sterile solution of high concentration of HA + CS in 50 mL water with calcium chloride every week during the 1(st) month and then once monthly for 4 months. The control group included women who received traditional therapy for recurrent cystitis based on daily antibiotic prophylaxis using sulfamethoxazole 200 mg plus trimethoprim 40 mg for 6 weeks. Ninety-eight and 76 patients were treated with experimental and control treatments, respectively. At 12 months after treatment, 69 and 109 UTIs were detected in the experimental and control groups, respectively. The proportion of patients free from UTIs was significantly higher in the experimental than in the control group (36.7% vs. 21.0%; p = 0.03). Experimental treatment was well tolerated and none of the patients stopped it. The intravesical instillation of HA + CS is more effective than long-term antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing recurrent bacterial cystitis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Bioremediation of high molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons co-contaminated with metals in liquid and soil slurries by metal tolerant PAHs degrading bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavamani, Palanisami; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2012-11-01

    Bioremediation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) contaminated soils in the presence of heavy metals have proved to be difficult and often challenging due to the ability of toxic metals to inhibit PAH degradation by bacteria. In this study, a mixed bacterial culture designated as consortium-5 was isolated from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. The ability of this consortium to utilise HMW PAHs such as pyrene and BaP as a sole carbon source in the presence of toxic metal Cd was demonstrated. Furthermore, this consortium has proven to be effective in degradation of HMW PAHs even from the real long term contaminated MGP soil. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate the great potential of this consortium for field scale bioremediation of PAHs in long term mix contaminated soils such as MGP sites. To our knowledge this is the first study to isolate and characterize metal tolerant HMW PAH degrading bacterial consortium which shows great potential in bioremediation of mixed contaminated soils such as MGP.

  16. Emerging contaminants and nutrients synergistically affect the spread of class 1 integron-integrase (intI1) and sul1 genes within stable streambed bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirats, Jèssica; Timoner, Xisca; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Balcázar, José Luis; Acuña, Vicenç; Sabater, Sergi; Borrego, Carles M

    2018-07-01

    Wastewater effluents increase the nutrient load of receiving streams while introducing a myriad of anthropogenic chemical pollutants that challenge the resident aquatic (micro)biota. Disentangling the effects of both kind of stressors and their potential interaction on the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial communities requires highly controlled manipulative experiments. In this work, we investigated the effects of a combined regime of nutrients (at low, medium and high concentrations) and a mixture of emerging contaminants (ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, sulfamethoxazole, diclofenac, and methylparaben) on the bacterial composition, abundance and antibiotic resistance profile of biofilms grown in artificial streams. In particular, we investigated the effect of this combined stress on genes encoding resistance to ciprofloxacin (qnrS), erythromycin (ermB), sulfamethoxazole (sul1 and sul2) as well as the class 1 integron-integrase gene (intI1). Only genes conferring resistance to sulfonamides (sul1 and sul2) and intI1 gene were detected in all treatments during the study period. Besides, bacterial communities exposed to emerging contaminants showed higher copy numbers of sul1 and intI1 genes than those not exposed, whereas nutrient amendments did not affect their abundance. However, bacterial communities exposed to both emerging contaminants and a high nutrient concentration (1, 25 and 1 mg L -1 of phosphate, nitrate and ammonium, respectively) showed the highest increase on the abundance of sul1 and intI1 genes thus suggesting a factors synergistic effect of both stressors. Since none of the treatments caused a significant change on the composition of bacterial communities, the enrichment of sul1 and intI1 genes within the community was caused by their dissemination under the combined pressure exerted by nutrients and emerging contaminants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the contribution of nutrients on

  17. Bacterial biodiversity analysis of a contaminated soil from the Chernobyl exclusion zone and characterization of the committed interaction of a Microbacterium strain with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear power plants accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima demonstrate the importance of the understanding of the transfer of the radioactive contamination in the environment and its ecological consequences. Although certain studies have been realized on superior organisms of the food chain, studies on telluric bacterial communities are scarce. The latter play nevertheless an essential role in the mobility of contaminants in soils by decreasing or improving their transfer towards other compartments (water, vegetables and animals). Moreover radionuclides (RNs) can have toxic effects on bacteria, leading to an inhibition of their participation in such transfer. The objectives of this study were (1) to estimate the impact of the radioactive contamination on bacterial communities belonging to a soil of the Chernobyl exclusion zone (trench T22) and (2) to study the uranium-bacteria interactions of a resistant strain, isolated from this soil. The various techniques used to characterize the bacterial diversity (culture of bacteria, DGGE, 454 pyro-sequencing) all testified of the multiplicity and the abundance of the bacterial communities in spite of the contamination. An impact on the community structure was difficult to assess by DGGE or cultural approach, but was nevertheless highlighted by the use of pyro-sequencing, suggesting the presence of species more adapted to the contaminated soil conditions. A specific molecular tool dedicated to the search of bacteria affiliated to the known radiation resistant Deinococcus-Thermus phylum (for example the Deinococcus radiodurans specie survives after an irradiation of several kGy) was developed. However it did not reveal the presence of bacteria affiliated to such a phylum in the studied soil. In parallel to the study of the bacterial biodiversity, about fifty culturable bacteria were isolated from this site and were used as a support to select a species (Microbacterium) capable to survive strong U(VI) concentrations. The

  18. Nano and Microscale Topographies for the Prevention of Bacterial Surface Fouling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary V. Graham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial surface fouling is problematic for a wide range of applications and industries, including, but not limited to medical devices (implants, replacement joints, stents, pacemakers, municipal infrastructure (pipes, wastewater treatment, food production (food processing surfaces, processing equipment, and transportation (ship hulls, aircraft fuel tanks. One method to combat bacterial biofouling is to modify the topographical structure of the surface in question, thereby limiting the ability of individual cells to attach to the surface, colonize, and form biofilms. Multiple research groups have demonstrated that micro and nanoscale topographies significantly reduce bacterial biofouling, for both individual cells and bacterial biofilms. Antifouling strategies that utilize engineered topographical surface features with well-defined dimensions and shapes have demonstrated a greater degree of controllable inhibition over initial cell attachment, in comparison to undefined, texturized, or porous surfaces. This review article will explore the various approaches and techniques used by researches, including work from our own group, and the underlying physical properties of these highly structured, engineered micro/nanoscale topographies that significantly impact bacterial surface attachment.

  19. Frequency of inadequate chicken cross-contamination prevention and cooking practices in restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Brown, Laura; Khargonekar, Shivangi; Bushnell, Lisa

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted by the Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The purpose was to examine restaurant chicken preparation and cooking practices and kitchen managers' food safety knowledge concerning chicken. EHS-Net members interviewed managers about chicken preparation practices in 448 restaurants. The study revealed that many restaurants were not following U.S. Food and Drug Administration Food Code guidance concerning cross-contamination prevention and proper cooking and that managers lacked basic food safety knowledge about chicken. Forty percent of managers said that they never, rarely, or only sometimes designated certain cutting boards for raw meat (including chicken). One-third of managers said that they did not wash and rinse surfaces before sanitizing them. Over half of managers said that thermometers were not used to determine the final cook temperature of chicken. Only 43% of managers knew the temperature to which raw chicken needed to be cooked for it to be safe to eat. These findings indicate that restaurant chicken preparation and cooking practices and manager food safety knowledge need improvement. Findings from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts to improve chicken preparation and cooking practices and knowledge concerning safe chicken preparation.

  20. Integrated metagenomics and molecular ecological network analysis of bacterial community composition during the phytoremediation of cadmium-contaminated soils by bioenergy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaojin; Zheng, Yuan; Ding, Chuanyu; Ren, Xuemin; Yuan, Jian; Sun, Feng; Li, Yuying

    2017-11-01

    Two energy crops (maize and soybean) were used in the remediation of cadmium-contaminated soils. These crops were used because they are fast growing, have a large biomass and are good sources for bioenergy production. The total accumulation of cadmium in maize and soybean plants was 393.01 and 263.24μg pot -1 , respectively. The rhizosphere bacterial community composition was studied by MiSeq sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using 16S rRNA gene sequences. The rhizosphere bacteria were divided into 33 major phylogenetic groups according to phyla. The dominant phylogenetic groups included Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, and Bacteroidetes. Based on principal component analysis (PCA) and unweighted pair group with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) analysis, we found that the bacterial community was influenced by cadmium addition and bioenergy cropping. Three molecular ecological networks were constructed for the unplanted, soybean- and maize-planted bacterial communities grown in 50mgkg -1 cadmium-contaminated soils. The results indicated that bioenergy cropping increased the complexity of the bacterial community network as evidenced by a higher total number of nodes, the average geodesic distance (GD), the modularity and a shorter geodesic distance. Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria were the keystone bacteria connecting different co-expressed operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The results showed that bioenergy cropping altered the topological roles of individual OTUs and keystone populations. This is the first study to reveal the effects of bioenergy cropping on microbial interactions in the phytoremediation of cadmium-contaminated soils by network reconstruction. This method can greatly enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of plant-microbe-metal interactions in metal-polluted ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevention of oral bacterial flora transmission by using mouth-to-mask ventilation during CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cydulka, R K; Connor, P J; Myers, T F; Pavza, G; Parker, M

    1991-01-01

    The Emergency Cardiac Care Committee of the American Heart Association has recently recommended utilizing protective barrier precautions during CPR (1,2). We assessed 17 mask and faceshield resuscitation devices for adequacy of barrier protection. Eight of the devices were faceshields (CPR Microshield, Hygenic, MedCare Mask, Resusci, Samaritan, Sealeasy, Portex); 8 were mask devices (Laerdal, Dyna Med, MTM Emergency Lung Ventilator, MTM Emergency Resuscitator, Res-Q-Flo, Rightway Mouth-to-Mask Resuscitation, Trufit), and one of the devices did not meet the criteria for either faceshield or mask (Lifesaver). All masks were disinfected, applied to the investigator's face as directed by the manufacturers' instructions, and then cultured for oral aerobic bacterial flora on the rescuer side. No mask devices cultured positive for oral aerobic bacterial flora, while 6 of 8 faceshield devices cultured positive for oral aerobic bacterial flora (P less than 0.007). The CPR Microshield and the Portex faceshield were the only devices that did not develop a positive culture. We conclude that all ventilation devices with a one-way valve, except the Sealeasy device, provide adequate barrier type protection from oral aerobic bacterial flora when simulating mouth-to-barrier type protection when performing mouth-to-mouth ventilation.

  2. Polyphasic analysis of an Azoarcus-Leptothrix-dominated bacterial biofilm developed on stainless steel surface in a gasoline-contaminated hypoxic groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Tibor; Táncsics, András; Szabó, István; Farkas, Milán; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Fábián, Krisztina; Maróti, Gergely; Kriszt, Balázs

    2016-05-01

    Pump and treat systems are widely used for hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater remediation. Although biofouling (formation of clogging biofilms on pump surfaces) is a common problem in these systems, scarce information is available regarding the phylogenetic and functional complexity of such biofilms. Extensive information about the taxa and species as well as metabolic potential of a bacterial biofilm developed on the stainless steel surface of a pump submerged in a gasoline-contaminated hypoxic groundwater is presented. Results shed light on a complex network of interconnected hydrocarbon-degrading chemoorganotrophic and chemolitotrophic bacteria. It was found that besides the well-known hydrocarbon-degrading aerobic/facultative anaerobic biofilm-forming organisms (e.g., Azoarcus, Leptothrix, Acidovorax, Thauera, Pseudomonas, etc.), representatives of Fe(2+)-and Mn(2+)-oxidizing (Thiobacillus, Sideroxydans, Gallionella, Rhodopseudomonas, etc.) as well as of Fe(3+)- and Mn(4+)-respiring (Rhodoferax, Geobacter, Magnetospirillum, Sulfurimonas, etc.) bacteria were present in the biofilm. The predominance of β-Proteobacteria within the biofilm bacterial community in phylogenetic and functional point of view was revealed. Investigation of meta-cleavage dioxygenase and benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) genes indicated that within the biofilm, Azoarcus, Leptothrix, Zoogloea, and Thauera species are most probably involved in intrinsic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Polyphasic analysis of the biofilm shed light on the fact that subsurface microbial accretions might be reservoirs of novel putatively hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species. Moreover, clogging biofilms besides their detrimental effects might supplement the efficiency of pump and treat systems.

  3. Reliability and Validity of a Questionnaire to Measure Consumer Knowledge regarding Safe Practices to Prevent Microbiological Contamination in Restaurants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uggioni, Paula Lazzarin; Salay, Elisabette

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to develop a validated and reliable questionnaire to measure consumer knowledge regarding safe practices to prevent microbiological contamination in restaurants and commercial kitchens. Methods: Non-probabilistic samples of individuals were interviewed in the city of Campinas, Brazil. Questionnaire items…

  4. Bacterial recolonization of the skin and wound contamination during cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial of the use of plastic adhesive drape compared with bare skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk-Brynhildsen, K; Söderquist, B; Friberg, O; Nilsson, U G

    2013-06-01

    Sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery is a serious complication. Various perioperative strategies, including plastic adhesive drapes, are used to reduce bacterial contamination of surgical wounds. To compare plastic adhesive drape to bare skin regarding bacterial growth in wound and time to recolonization of the adjacent skin intraoperatively, in cardiac surgery patients. This single-blinded randomized controlled trial (May 2010 to May 2011) included 140 patients scheduled for cardiac surgery via median sternotomy. The patients were randomly allocated to the adhesive drape (chest covered with plastic adhesive drape) or bare skin group. Bacterial samples were taken preoperatively and intraoperatively every hour during surgery until skin closure. Disinfection with 0.5% chlorhexidine solution in 70% alcohol decreased coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), while the proportion colonized with Propionibacterium acnes was not significantly reduced and was still present in more than 50% of skin samples. P. acnes was significantly more common in men than in women. Progressive bacterial recolonization of the skin occurred within 2-3 h. At 120 min there were significantly more positive cultures in the adhesive drape group versus bare skin group for P. acnes (63% vs 44%; P = 0.034) and for CoNS (45% vs 24%; P = 0.013). The only statistically significant difference in bacterial growth in the surgical wound was higher proportion of CoNS at the end of surgery in the adhesive drape group (14.7% vs 4.4%; P = 0.044). Plastic adhesive drape does not reduce bacterial recolonization. P. acnes colonized men more frequently, and was not decreased by disinfection with chlorhexidine solution in alcohol. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sutures coated with antiseptic pomade to prevent bacterial colonization: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Fernando; Leite, Fabiola; Cruz, Gustavo; Cruz, Silvia; Reis, Juarez; Pierce, Matthew; Cruz, Mauro

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if an antiseptic pomade could reduce the bacterial colonization on multifilament sutures. A randomized clinical trial was conducted with 40 volunteer patients of both sexes aged 18-70, randomly separated into experimental (n = 20) and control (n = 20) groups. The experimental group received pomade-coated sutures (iodoform + calendula) and the control group uncoated sutures. Two millimeters of the suture was harvested from each patient from the 1st to the 15th postoperative day. The bacteria that had adhered to them were cultured. The number of colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) was determined and the groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney statistical test (P antiseptic pomade was effective in reducing bacterial colonization on silk braided sutures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stainless steel modified with poly(ethylene glycol) can prevent protein adsorption but not bacterial adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Jiang; Bagge, Dorthe; Gram, Lone

    2003-01-01

    and stability of the final PEG layer was examined. Piranha solution proved to be the most effective method for removing adventitious hydrocarbon contamination, compared to cleaning with ultrasonication in organic solvents, and was the SS substrate that produced the most stable and thickest PEI layer...

  7. USDA and university researchers work to prevent U.S. cotton contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. cotton is considered to have some of the lowest levels of contamination in the world. However, that reputation is in jeopardy as complaints of contamination from domestic and foreign mills are on the rise. Cotton contamination is classified by the International Textile Manufacturers Federation ...

  8. Effect of biostimulation using sewage sludge, soybean meal and wheat straw on oil degradation and bacterial community composition in a contaminated desert soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaiya eAl-Kindi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Waste materials have a strong potential in the bioremediation of oil-contaminated sites, because of their richness in nutrients and their economical feasibility. We used sewage sludge, soybean meal and wheat straw to biostimulate oil degradation in a heavily contaminated desert soil. While oil degradation was assessed by following the produced CO2 and by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS, shifts in bacterial community composition were monitored using illumina MiSeq. The addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw to the desert soil stimulated the respiration activities more than the addition of soybean meal. GC-MS analysis revealed that the addition of addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw resulted in 1.7 to 1.8 fold increase in the degraded C14 to C30 alkanes, compared to only 1.3 fold increase in the case of soybean meal addition. The degradation of ≥ 90% of the C14 to C30 alkanes were measured in the soils treated with sewage sludge and wheat straw. MiSeq sequencing revealed that the majority (76.5-86.4% of total sequences of acquired sequences from the original soil belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Multivariate analysis of operational taxonomic units (OTUs placed the bacterial communities of the soils after the treatments in separate clusters (ANOSIM R=0.66, P=0.0001. The most remarkable shift in bacterial communities was in the wheat straw treatment, where 95-98% of the total sequences belonging to Bacilli. We conclude that sewage sludge and wheat straw are useful biostimulating agents for the cleanup of oil-contaminated desert soils.

  9. Effect of Biostimulation Using Sewage Sludge, Soybean Meal, and Wheat Straw on Oil Degradation and Bacterial Community Composition in a Contaminated Desert Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kindi, Sumaiya; Abed, Raeid M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Waste materials have a strong potential in the bioremediation of oil-contaminated sites, because of their richness in nutrients and their economical feasibility. We used sewage sludge, soybean meal, and wheat straw to biostimulate oil degradation in a heavily contaminated desert soil. While oil degradation was assessed by following the produced CO2 and by using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), shifts in bacterial community composition were monitored using illumina MiSeq. The addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw to the desert soil stimulated the respiration activities to reach 3.2–3.4 times higher than in the untreated soil, whereas the addition of soybean meal resulted in an insignificant change in the produced CO2, given the high respiration activities of the soybean meal alone. GC–MS analysis revealed that the addition of sewage sludge and wheat straw resulted in 1.7–1.8 fold increase in the degraded C14 to C30 alkanes, compared to only 1.3 fold increase in the case of soybean meal addition. The degradation of ≥90% of the C14 to C30 alkanes was measured in the soils treated with sewage sludge and wheat straw. MiSeq sequencing revealed that the majority (76.5–86.4% of total sequences) of acquired sequences from the untreated soil belonged to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Multivariate analysis of operational taxonomic units placed the bacterial communities of the soils after the treatments in separate clusters (ANOSIM R = 0.66, P = 0.0001). The most remarkable shift in bacterial communities was in the wheat straw treatment, where 95–98% of the total sequences were affiliated to Bacilli. We conclude that sewage sludge and wheat straw are useful biostimulating agents for the cleanup of oil-contaminated desert soils. PMID:26973618

  10. Bacterial Contamination of Adult House Flies (Musca domestica) and Sensitivity of these Bacteria to Various Antibiotics, Captured from Hamadan City, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Mansour; Mehrabi, Tahereh; Hosseini, Seyed Mostafa; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef

    2017-04-01

    House flies ( Musca domestica ) have been known as a mechanical vector in spreading infectious diseases such as cholera, shigellosis, salmonellosis and skin infections. To investigate the bacterial contaminations of house flies and determine the resistance of these bacteria against various antibiotics. An analytical descriptive cross- sectional study was conducted. The study was performed from July to September 2015 in Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. A total number of 300 house flies were collected from four places, 75 flies from each place, including two educational hospitals belonging to Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, a fruit and vegetables center, and a livestock slaughter. The body surface of house flies was washed using the physiological sterile serum and the obtained solution was centrifuged at 2000 rpm for five minutes. The identification of bacteria was carried out using the phenotypic methods. The resistance of bacteria against various antibiotics was determined using the disk diffusion approach. Data were analysed by the employment of SPSS software package version 20.0. A total number of 394 bacterial strains were isolated from 275 house flies. The most prevalent type of bacteria was Bacillus spp which was detected in 31.1% of house flies. Moreover, Staphylococcus s pp. (22.9%), Escherichia coli (11.6%) were other prevalent species, whereas, Enterococcus s pp. was the least prevalent type of bacteria in the collected house flies. In terms of resistance to antibiotics, it was identified that bacteria extracted from house flies which were collected from hospital environments were more resistant to antibiotics compared with the resistance of bacteria extracted from house flies which were collected from non hospital environments. The maximum bacterial isolation was found in houseflies from hospital No.1 environment from around the accumulation of garbage. It is a well-known fact that house flies are a source of bacterial

  11. Organization of work for prevention of propagation of radioactive contamination, for decontamination of the premise surfaces and individual protective means in case of radiation accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klochkov, V.N.; Vas'kin, A.G.; Filatova, V.M.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation accident results in radioactive contamination of the surface, clothes and other property. If proper measures are taken, it will prevent propagation of contamination. Decontamination of surfaces - is a complicated and tedious process. The paper has examined the measures of organization and technical aspects of prevention of propagation of radioactive contamination. Methods of decontamination of internal surfaces of premises are demonstrated, organization of the individual protective means is determined. 9 refs

  12. Implementation of immunomagnetic separation (IMS) for the enrichment and automated detection of bacterial contaminants in flow through lab on the chip technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Shakil

    Due to an increased public concern for food safety and quality, food processing industries have an urgent need for fast and reliable contaminant detection technologies. Conventional pathogen detection methods are time consuming, cost intensive, require skilled laboratory workers and are inappropr...... and detect pathogens in food, feed or beverage industries in real-time and has the potential to offer significant advantages compared to conventional systems.......Due to an increased public concern for food safety and quality, food processing industries have an urgent need for fast and reliable contaminant detection technologies. Conventional pathogen detection methods are time consuming, cost intensive, require skilled laboratory workers...... diacetate (CFDA) was used to evaluate the viability of the cell. Under final optimized condition, the developed method showed 98 % capture efficiency towards the specific antigen Salmonella Typhimurium and very low (target bacterial strains. Subsequently, IMS was implemented...

  13. MOLECULAR EVALUATION OF CHANGES IN PLANKTONIC BACTERIAL POPULATIONS RESULTING FROM EQUINE FECAL CONTAMINATION IN A SUB-WATERSHED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considerable emphasis has been placed on developing watershed-based strategies with the potential to reduce non-point-source fecal contamination. Molecular methods applied used 16S-ribosomal-deoxyribonucleic-acid (rDNA) to try to determine sources of fecal contamination. Objectiv...

  14. Antibiotic-Loaded Synthetic Calcium Sulfate Beads for Prevention of Bacterial Colonization and Biofilm Formation in Periprosthetic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, R. P.; Brayford, M. J.; Webb, J. S.; Cooper, J. J.; Aiken, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Periprosthetic infection (PI) causes significant morbidity and mortality after fixation and joint arthroplasty and has been extensively linked to the formation of bacterial biofilms. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), as a cement or as beads, is commonly used for antibiotic release to the site of infection but displays variable elution kinetics and also represents a potential nidus for infection, therefore requiring surgical removal once antibiotics have eluted. Absorbable cements have shown improved elution of a wider range of antibiotics and, crucially, complete biodegradation, but limited data exist as to their antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy. Synthetic calcium sulfate beads loaded with tobramycin, vancomycin, or vancomycin-tobramycin dual treatment (in a 1:0.24 [wt/wt] ratio) were assessed for their abilities to eradicate planktonic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis relative to that of PMMA beads. The ability of the calcium sulfate beads to prevent biofilm formation over multiple days and to eradicate preformed biofilms was studied using a combination of viable cell counts, confocal microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy of the bead surface. Biofilm bacteria displayed a greater tolerance to the antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts. Antibiotic-loaded beads were able to kill planktonic cultures of 106 CFU/ml, prevent bacterial colonization, and significantly reduce biofilm formation over multiple days. However, established biofilms were harder to eradicate. These data further demonstrate the difficulty in clearing established biofilms; therefore, early preventive measures are key to reducing the risk of PI. Synthetic calcium sulfate loaded with antibiotics has the potential to reduce or eliminate biofilm formation on adjacent periprosthetic tissue and prosthesis material and, thus, to reduce the rates of periprosthetic infection. PMID:25313221

  15. [Contamination levels to room air arising from the use of 99mTc-gas and prevention from the contamination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatani, A; Akutsu, T; Yamaguchi, K; Onodera, Y; Manaka, Y; Takahashi, K

    1996-04-01

    99mTc-gas (TECHNEGAS) is a 99mTc-labeled micro-aerosol which is considered to have different behavior from 133Xe or 81mKr gas. In order to estimate contamination levels to room air arising from the use of 99mTc-gas, filtered expired air during administration and 1, 2, 3, 5, 10 min after the administration were collected in each polyethylene bag. Radioactivities of the polyethylene bags, used filter and the lung were measured with 3-head scintillation camera. The activity of the expired air diminished within 6-10 min and about 5% of whole discharged 99mTc-gas was released to room air. The activity of the used filter was two times of the lung. According to these results, it is recommended that the 99mTc-gas may be administrated in a exclusive room. The administrated patient and used filter must be remain in the exclusive room.

  16. Patterns of benthic bacterial diversity in coastal areas contaminated by heavy metals, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Marina eQuero

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotes in coastal sediments are fundamental players in the ecosystem functioning and regulate processes relevant in the global biogeochemical cycles. Nevertheless, knowledge on benthic microbial diversity patterns across spatial scales, or as function to anthropogenic influence, is still limited. We investigated the microbial diversity in two of the most chemically polluted sites along the coast of Italy. One site is the Po River Prodelta (Northern Adriatic Sea, which receives contaminant discharge from one of the largest rivers in Europe. The other site, the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea, is a chronically-polluted area due to steel production plants, oil refineries, and intense maritime traffic. We collected sediments from 30 stations along gradients of contamination, and studied prokaryotic diversity using Illumina sequencing of amplicons of a 16S rDNA gene fragment. The main sediment variables and the concentration of eleven metals, PCBs and PAHs were measured. Chemical analyses confirmed the high contamination in both sites, with concentrations of PCBs particularly high and often exceeding the sediment guidelines. The analysis of more than 3 millions 16S rDNA sequences showed that richness decreased with higher contamination levels. Multivariate analyses showed that contaminants significantly shaped community composition. Assemblages differed significantly between the two sites, but showed wide within-site variations related with spatial gradients in the chemical contamination, and the presence of a core set of OTUs shared by the two geographically distant sites. A larger importance of PCB-degrading taxa was observed in the Mar Piccolo, suggesting their potential selection in this historically-polluted site. Our results indicate that sediment contamination by multiple contaminants significantly alter benthic prokaryotic diversity in coastal areas, and suggests considering the potential contribution of the resident microbes to

  17. Contamination prevention of superheaters and reheaters during initial startup and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielli, F.; Sylvester, W.R.; Thimot, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    The general precautions that should be taken to minimize the potential for harmful contamination or oxygen corrosion of power plant superheaters and reheaters during the period from field storage through operation are discussed and summarized. Present boiler industry start-up and operating practices intended to minimize the introduction of solids to the superheater are, as proven by experience, adequate to avoid contamination-related problems. No basic changes to general industry practice are necessary. What is needed, however, is a continuing awareness of the potential for contamination-related problems so that in the specific application of these practices all likely sources of contamination will be considered

  18. Perioperative management for the prevention of bacterial infection in cardiac implantable electronic device placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Imai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs have become important in the treatment of cardiac disease and placement rates increased significantly in the last decade. However, despite the use of appropriate antimicrobial prophylaxis, CIED infection rates are increasing disproportionately to the implantation rate. CIED infection often requires explantation of all hardware, and at times results in death. Surgical site infection (SSI is the most common cause of CIED infection as a pocket infection. The best method of combating CIED infection is prevention. Prevention of CIED infections comprises three phases: before, during, and after device implantation. The most critical factors in the prevention of SSIs are detailed operative techniques including the practice of proper technique by the surgeon and surgical team.

  19. Bacterial Diversity and Bioremediation Potential of the Highly Contaminated Marine Sediments at El-Max District (Egypt, Mediterranean Sea)

    KAUST Repository

    Amer, Ranya A.; Mapelli, Francesca; El Gendi, Hamada M.; Barbato, Marta; Goda, Doaa A.; Corsini, Anna; Cavalca, Lucia; Fusi, Marco; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R.

    2015-01-01

    . Here, we investigated the physical, chemical, and microbiological features of hydrocarbon and heavy metals contaminated sediments collected at El-Max bay (Egypt). Molecular and statistical approaches assessing the structure of the sediment

  20. Co-trimoxazole alone for prevention of bacterial infection in patients with acute leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, I D; Donnelly, P; Catovsky, D; Darrell, J; Johnson, S A; Goldman, J M; Galton, D A

    1982-01-02

    43 patients undergoing treatment for acute leukaemia were randomised to receive either co-trimoxazole alone or co-trimoxazole with framycetin and colistin as antibacterial prophylaxis during periods of neutropenia. There were no significant differences between the two treatment groups in the time before the onset of the first fever, the number of episodes of fever or of septicaemia per patient, the number of neutropenic days during which patients remained afebrile or did not require systemic antibiotics, or the number of resistant organisms acquired. Co-trimoxazole alone is cheaper and easier to take than co-trimoxazole with framycetin and colistin, and it is therefore preferable to the three-drug combination for the prophylaxis of bacterial infection.

  1. Comparison of Four Antiseptic Preparations for Skin in the Prevention of Contamination of Percutaneously Drawn Blood Cultures: a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfee, David P.; Farr, Barry M.

    2002-01-01

    A number of skin antiseptics have been used to prevent the contamination of blood cultures, but the comparative efficacies of these agents have not been extensively evaluated. We therefore sought to compare the efficacy of four skin antiseptics in preventing blood culture contamination in a randomized, crossover, investigator-blinded study conducted in an emergency department and the inpatient wards of a university hospital. The patient group included all patients from whom blood samples were obtained percutaneously for culture. Skin antisepsis was performed with 10% povidone-iodine, 70% isopropyl alcohol, tincture of iodine, or povidone-iodine with 70% ethyl alcohol (i.e., Persist). The blood culture contamination rate associated with each antiseptic was then determined. A total of 333 (2.62%) of 12,692 blood cultures were contaminated during the study period compared to 413 (3.21%) of 12,859 blood cultures obtained during the previous 12-month period (relative risk = 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.71 to 0.94; P = 0.006). During the study, the contamination rates were determined to be 2.93% with povidone-iodine, 2.58% with tincture of iodine, 2.50% with isopropyl alcohol, and 2.46% with Persist (P = 0.62). We detected no significant differences in the blood culture contamination rates among these four antiseptics, although there was some evidence suggesting greater efficacy among the alcohol-containing antiseptics. Among the evaluated antiseptics, isopropyl alcohol may be the optimal antiseptic for use prior to obtaining blood for culture, given its convenience, low cost, and tolerability. PMID:11980938

  2. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Bargiela, Rafael

    2015-06-29

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P < 0.05) with both temperature and chemical diversity. Furthermore, we observed a link between temperature and chemical and biological diversity that was stronger in chronically polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills.

  3. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Bargiela, Rafael; Mapelli, Francesca; Rojo, David; Chouaia, Bessem; Torné s, Jesú s; Borin, Sara; Richter, Michael; Del Pozo, Mercedes V.; Cappello, Simone; Gertler, Christoph; Genovese, Marí a; Denaro, Renata; Martí nez-Martí nez, Mó nica; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Amer, Ranya A.; Bigazzi, David; Han, Xifang; Chen, Jianwei; Chernikova, Tatyana N.; Golyshina, Olga V.; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Jaouanil, Atef; Benzha, Fatima; Magagnini, Mirko; Hussein, Emad; Al-Horani, Fuad; Cherif, Ameur; Blaghen, Mohamed; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R.; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Barbas, Coral; Malkawi, Hanan I.; Golyshin, Peter N.; Yakimov, Michail M.; Daffonchio, Daniele; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P < 0.05) with both temperature and chemical diversity. Furthermore, we observed a link between temperature and chemical and biological diversity that was stronger in chronically polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills.

  4. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargiela, Rafael; Mapelli, Francesca; Rojo, David; Chouaia, Bessem; Tornés, Jesús; Borin, Sara; Richter, Michael; Del Pozo, Mercedes V; Cappello, Simone; Gertler, Christoph; Genovese, María; Denaro, Renata; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Fodelianakis, Stilianos; Amer, Ranya A; Bigazzi, David; Han, Xifang; Chen, Jianwei; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Jaouanil, Atef; Benzha, Fatima; Magagnini, Mirko; Hussein, Emad; Al-Horani, Fuad; Cherif, Ameur; Blaghen, Mohamed; Abdel-Fattah, Yasser R; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Barbas, Coral; Malkawi, Hanan I; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakimov, Michail M; Daffonchio, Daniele; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-06-29

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills.

  5. Effect of Disinfectants on Preventing the Cross-Contamination of Pathogens in Fresh Produce Washing Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banach, J.L.; Sampers, I.; Haute, van S.; Fels, van der H.J.

    2015-01-01

    The potential cross-contamination of pathogens between clean and contaminated produce in the washing tank is highly dependent on the water quality. Process wash water disinfectants are applied to maintain the water quality during processing. The review examines the efficacy of process wash water

  6. Reduction in bacterial ooze formation on immature fruitlets after preventive treatments of Fosethyl-Al against fire blight Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, T; Schoofs, H; Verjans, W; De Maeyer, L

    2010-01-01

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora (Burill Winslow et al.), is a very important bacterial disease on apple and pear orchards with devastating effects in some production area and in some years. Fire blight control consists in a whole strategy of measures that should start with control measures in and around the fruit tree nurseries. Only the use of Vacciplant (Laminarin), an inducer of the self-defence mechanism, is registered in Belgium since 2009. In other European countries Fosethyl-Al has been registered for fire blight control. Recently, research trials have been done at Pcfruit research station for several years on the activity of ALiette (fosethyl-Al) against fire blight. Fosethyl-Al, also a plant defence enhancing molecule, applied preventively 3 times at a dose of 3.75 kg/ha standard orchard (3 x 3000 g a.i./ha standard orchard), showed a reduction in the host susceptibility and decreased the disease development on artificial inoculated flower clusters and shoots. Also a clear reduction in the ooze droplet formation on artificially inoculated immature fruitlets has been observed with this molecule. This reduction in the bacterial ooze formation is considered as a very important factor in the spread of the disease in the orchard.

  7. Metronidazole combined with nystatin (vagitories) in the prevention of bacterial vaginosis after initial treatment with oral metronidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, P; Saranen, M; Kaaja, R

    1993-01-01

    In a double-blind trial comprising 66 patients we assessed the effect of metronidazole-nystatin vagitories on the prevention of bacterial vaginosis (BV) in women using IUD as a contraceptive method after an initial oral single dose of 2.0 g metronidazole and 7 days of intravaginal metronidazole-nystatin or placebo treatment. The prophylactic treatment consisted of metronidazole-nystatin or placebo vagitories applied at bedtime for 3 days after menstruation over 6 consecutive menstrual periods. The patients were randomized in two study groups: a treatment group of 32 patients (group A) and a placebo group of 34 patients (group B). The overall objective cure rate after the initial treatment was 97% in group A and 91% in group B. After 6 months of follow-up, the overall cumulative objective cure rate in group A was 100%, and 76% in group B. The single-dose oral treatment was well tolerated and no notable side effects were recorded.

  8. Biotransformation of arsenite and bacterial aox activity in drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses: Arsenic contamination in Cambodia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    The potential arsenite bioteansformation activity of arsenic was investigated by examining bacterial arsenic arsenite-oxidizing gene such as aoxS, aoxR, aoxA, aoxB, aoxC, and aoxD in high arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from the surface water of floating houses. There is a biogeochemical cycle of activity involving arsenite oxidase aox system and the ars (arsenic resistance system) gene operon and aoxR leader gene activity in Alcaligenes faecalis SRR-11 and aoxS leader gene activity in Achromobacter xylosoxidans TSL-66. Batch experiments showed that SRR-11 and TSL-66 completely oxidized 1 mM of As (III) to As (V) within 35–40 h. The leaders of aoxS and aoxR are important for gene activity, and their effects in arsenic bioremediation and mobility in natural water has a significant ecological role because it allows arsenite oxidase in bacteria to control the biogeochemical cycle of arsenic-contaminated drinking water produced from surface water of floating houses. - Highlights: • The aox genotype system activity and arsenite-oxidizing bacteria was studied. • High arsenic contamination affects the detoxification activities of aoxS and aoxM. • Much Cambodian drinking water has dangerously high arsenic contamination. • Disease-causing microorganisms were found in various drinking water sources. - The importance of this study is that it responds to the high concentrations of arsenic contamination that were found in the drinking water of floating-house residents with the following proposition: The combined periplasm activity of the aoxS and aoxR genes and arsenite oxidase reflects the arsenic oxidation potential of the aoxA, aoxB, aoxC, and aoxD systems in the surface water of floating houses in Cambodia.

  9. When the tendon autograft is dropped accidently on the floor: A study about bacterial contamination and antiseptic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, O; Danis, J; Versier, G; Ollat, D

    2015-10-01

    Inadvertent contamination of the autograft can occur during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction if the autograft is dropped on the floor during surgery. A study was undertaken to determine the incidence of contamination when a graft is dropped on the operating room floor and the efficacy of antimicrobial solutions to decontaminate it. Samples from 25 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction with a hamstring tendon were sectioned and dropped onto the floor. Cultures were taken after immersion in antiseptic solutions (a chlorhexidine gluconate solution (group 1), a povidone-iodine solution (group 2), and a sodium hypochlorite solution (group 3)). A fourth piece (group 0) was cultured without being exposed to any solution. Cultures of a floor swab were taken at the same time. The floor swab cultures were positive in 96% of cases. The rate of contamination was 40% in group 0, 8% in group 1, 4% in group 2, and 16% in group 3. There was a significant difference between groups 1 and 2 and group 0 (p<0.05) but not between groups 3 and 0. Immersing a graft dropped on the floor during surgery in a chlorhexidine gluconate solution or povidone-iodine solution significantly reduces contamination of the graft. Soaking of the hamstring autograft in one of these solutions is recommended in the case of inadvertent contamination. Laboratory investigation (level 2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Potential applications for Annona squamosa leaf extract in the treatment and prevention of foodborne bacterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dholvitayakhun, Achara; Trachoo, Nathanon; Sakee, Uthai; Cushnie, T P Tim

    2013-03-01

    Foodborne disease is a major public health problem. The present study examined Annona squamosa leaves, which are traditionally used to treat diarrhea and other infections, for their potential to be used in modern food safety or medicine. Active constituents were partially purified by ethanol extraction and column chromatography. MICs of the extract were 62.5 to 125 microg/mL against Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, and 250 microg/mL against Campylobacter jejuni. In time-kill assays, 500 microg/mL of the extract reduced colony forming unit numbers of C. jejuni almost 10 000-fold within 12 hours. Similar decreases were seen against B. cereus, but over a longer time-frame. LC-MS analysis indicated the presence of reticuline and oxophoebine. Assessment of stability by MIC assay showed activity was heat-labile, with loss of activity greatest following high temperature treatments. Activity was relatively stable at refrigeration temperature. These results indicate A. squamosa has broad-spectrum but heat-labile activity against foodborne bacterial pathogens, and bactericidal activity against B. cereus and C. jejuni. This bactericidal activity is not sufficiently rapid for A. squamosa to be used as a food sanitizer, but the extract could potentially be developed as an additive for refrigerated foods, or a modern treatment for foodborne illness.

  11. Risk Mitigation in Preventing Adventitious Agent Contamination of Mammalian Cell Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiratori, Masaru; Kiss, Robert

    2017-11-14

    Industrial-scale mammalian cell culture processes have been contaminated by viruses during the culturing phase. Although the historical frequency of such events has been quite low, the impact of contamination can be significant for the manufacturing company and for the supply of the product to patients. This chapter discusses sources of adventitious agent contamination risk in a cell culture process, provides a semiquantitative assessment of such risks, and describes potential process barriers that can be used to reduce contamination risk. High-temperature, short-time (HTST) heat treatment is recommended as the process barrier of choice, when compatible with the process. A case study assessing the compatibility of HTST heat treatment with a cell culture medium is presented, and lessons learned are shared from our experiences over many years of developing and implementing virus barriers in mammalian cell culture processes. Graphical Abstract.

  12. New closed tube loop mediated isothermal amplification assay for prevention of product cross-contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Karthik, K.; Rathore, Rajesh; Thomas, Prasad; Arun, T.R.; Viswas, K.N.; Dhama, Kuldeep; Agarwal, R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, a promising diagnostic test, has been developed for detection of different pathogens of human as well as animals. Various positive points support its use as a field level test but the major problem is product cross contamination leading to false positive results. Different methods were adopted by various researchers to control this false positive amplification due to cross contamination but all have their own advantages and disadvantages. A...

  13. Streptomyces lunalinharesii 235 prevents the formation of a sulfate-reducing bacterial biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Pacheco da Rosa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Streptomyces lunalinharesii strain 235 produces an antimicrobial substance that is active against sulfate reducing bacteria, the major bacterial group responsible for biofilm formation and biocorrosion in petroleum reservoirs. The use of this antimicrobial substance for sulfate reducing bacteria control is therefore a promising alternative to chemical biocides. In this study the antimicrobial substance did not interfere with the biofilm stability, but the sulfate reducing bacteria biofilm formation was six-fold smaller in carbon steel coupons treated with the antimicrobial substance when compared to the untreated control. A reduction in the most probable number counts of planktonic cells of sulfate reducing bacteria was observed after treatments with the sub-minimal inhibitory concentration, minimal inhibitory concentration, and supra-minimal inhibitory concentration of the antimicrobial substance. Additionally, when the treated coupons were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, the biofilm formation was found to be substantially reduced when the supra-minimal inhibitory concentration of the antimicrobial substance was used. The coupons used for the biofilm formation had a small weight loss after antimicrobial substance treatment, but corrosion damage was not observed by scanning electron microscopy. The absence of the dsrA gene fragment in the scraped cell suspension after treatment with the supra-minimal inhibitory concentration of the antimicrobial substance suggests that Desulfovibrio alaskensis was not able to adhere to the coupons. This is the first report on an antimicrobial substance produced by Streptomyces active against sulfate reducing bacteria biofilm formation. The application of antimicrobial substance as a potential biocide for sulfate reducing bacteria growth control could be of great interest to the petroleum industry.

  14. The potential of lipopolysaccharide as a real-time biomarker of bacterial contamination in marine bathing water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Anas A; Jackson, Simon K; Bradley, Graham

    2014-03-01

    The use of total lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a rapid biomarker for bacterial pollution was investigated at a bathing and surfing beach during the UK bathing season. The levels of faecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli), the Gram-positive enterococci, and organisms commonly associated with faecal material, such as total coliforms and Bacteroides, were culturally monitored over four months to include a period of heavy rainfall and concomitant pollution. Endotoxin measurement was performed using a kinetic Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay and found to correlate well with all indicators. Levels of LPS in excess of 50 Endotoxin Units (EU) mL(-1) were found to correlate with water that was unsuitable for bathing under the current European regulations. Increases in total LPS, mainly from Gram-negative indicator bacteria, are thus a potential real-time, qualitative method for testing bacterial quality of bathing waters.

  15. Antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone, an active principle of Nigella sativa and its potency to prevent bacterial biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhrouf Amina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymoquinone is an active principle of Nigella sativa seed known as "Habbah Al-Sauda" in Arabic countries and "Sinouj" in Tunisia. Bacterial biofilms tend to exhibit significant tolerance to antimicrobials drugs during infections. Methods The antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone (TQ and its biofilm inhibition potencies were investigated on 11 human pathogenic bacteria. The growth and development of the biofilm were assessed using the crystal violet (CV and the 2, 3-bis [2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT reduction assay. Results TQ exhibited a significant bactericidal activity against the majority of the tested bacteria (MICs values ranged from 8 to 32 μg/ml especially Gram positive cocci (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510. Crystal violet assay demonstrated that the minimum biofilm inhibition concentration (BIC50 was reached with 22 and 60 μg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510 respectively. In addition our data revealed that cells oxidative activity was influenced by TQ supplementation. In the same way, TQ prevented cell adhesion to glass slides surface. Conclusion The ability of TQ to prevent biofilm formation warrants further investigation to explore its use as bioactive substances with antibiofilm potential.

  16. Understanding Bacterial Isolates in Blood Culture and Approaches Used to Define Bacteria as Contaminants: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Belal; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Rahman, Atiqur; Marzan, Mahfuza; Rafiqullah, Iftekhar; Connor, Nicholas E; Hasanuzzaman, Mohammad; Islam, Maksuda; Hamer, Davidson H; Hibberd, Patricia L; Saha, Samir K

    2016-05-01

    Interpretation of blood culture isolates is challenging due to a lack of standard methodologies for identifying contaminants. This problem becomes more complex when the specimens are from sick young infants, as a wide range of bacteria can cause illness among this group. We used 43 key words to find articles published between 1970 and 2011 on blood culture isolates and possible contaminants in the PubMed database. Experts were also consulted to obtain other relevant articles. Selection of articles followed systematic methods considering opinions from more than 1 reviewer. After reviewing the titles of 3869 articles extracted from the database, we found 307 relevant to our objective. Based on the abstracts, 42 articles were selected for the literature review. In addition, we included 7 more articles based on cross-references and expert advice. The most common methods for differentiating blood culture isolates were multiple blood cultures from the same subject, antibiograms and molecular testing. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Hemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and group A and B streptococcus were always considered as pathogens, whereas Bacillus sp., Diphtheroids, Propionibacterium and Micrococcus were commonly regarded as contaminants. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most frequent isolates and usually reported as contaminants unless the patient had a specific condition, such as long-term hospitalization or use of invasive devices (catheters). Inaccurate interpretation of blood culture may falsely guide treatment and also has long-term policy implications. The combination of clinical and microbiological knowledge, patient's clinical history and laboratory findings are essential for appropriate interpretation of blood culture.

  17. MOLECULAR EVALUATION OF CHANGES IN PLANKTONIC BACTERIAL POPULATION RESULTING FROM EQUINE FECAL CONTAMINATION IN A SUB-WATERSHED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of watersheds by fecal bacteria is a frequent cause for surface waters to be placed on the national impaired waters list. However, since the presence of fecal bacteria does not always indicate human fecal input, it is necessary to distinguish between fecal sources. ...

  18. Phytoremediation of abandoned crude oil contaminated drill sites of Assam with the aid of a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenn, R; Borah, M; Boruah, H P Deka; Roy, A Sarma; Baruah, R; Saikia, N; Sahu, O P; Tamuli, A K

    2014-01-01

    Environmental deterioration due to crude oil contamination and abandoned drill sites is an ecological concern in Assam. To revive such contaminated sites, afield study was conducted to phytoremediate four crude oil abandoned drill sites of Assam (Gelakey, Amguri, Lakwa, and Borholla) with the aid of two hydrocarbon-degrading Pseudomonas strains designated N3 and N4. All the drill sites were contaminated with 15.1 to 32.8% crude oil, and the soil was alkaline in nature (pH8.0-8.7) with low moisture content, low soil conductivity and low activities of the soil enzymes phosphatase, dehydrogenase and urease. In addition, N, P, K, and C contents were below threshold limits, and the soil contained high levels of heavy metals. Bio-augmentation was achieved by applying Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains N3 and N4 followed by the introduction of screened plant species Tectona grandis, Gmelina arborea, Azadirachta indica, and Michelia champaca. The findings established the feasibility of the phytoremediation of abandoned crude oil-contaminated drill sites in Assam using microbes and native plants.

  19. Comparative analysis of tannery-effluent contaminated soil and mixed culture bacterial inoculation on helianthus annuus L. growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasin, M.; Faisal, M.

    2012-01-01

    Here we reported the effect of four strains Bacillus pumilus-CrK08, Cellulosimicrobium cellulans-CrK16, Exiguobacterium-CrK19 and Bacillus cereus-CrK20 and tannery contaminated soil on Helianthus annuus L. var Hysun-33 growth parameters. Plants growing in tannery effluent contaminated soil have shown slowed leaf growth, reduced shoot length, burning of leaf margins and tips compared to plants growing in normal garden soil. The inoculated plants had shown overall increase in root length (15%), shoot length (33%) and fresh weight shoot (135%) compared to un-inoculated plants growing in stress conditions. Plants growing in tannery contaminated soil have shown increase in soluble proteins contents (9%), acid phosphatase activity (200%), peroxidase activity (203%) and decrease in chlorophyll a (39%), chlorophyll b (23%) and carotenoids contents (28%) compare to plants growing in normal control soil. Inoculated plants grown in contaminated soil have shown an increased in peroxidase activity, soluble proteins contents, acid phosphatase activity, chlorophyll a, b and carotenoid contents compare to respective un-inoculated plants. (author)

  20. Efficacy of silver/hydrophilic poly(p-xylylene) on preventing bacterial growth and biofilm formation in urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari Zare, Hamideh; Juhart, Viktorija; Vass, Attila; Franz, Gerhard; Jocham, Dieter

    2017-01-18

    Catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI), caused by several strains of bacteria, are a common complication for catheterized patients. This may eventually lead to a blockage of the catheter due to the formation of a crystalline or amorphous biofilm. Inhibiting bacteria should result in a longer application time free of complaints. This issue has been investigated using an innovative type of silver-coated catheter with a semipermeable cap layer to prevent CAUTI. In this work, two different types of silver catheters were investigated, both of which were capped with poly(p-xylylene) (PPX-N) and exhibited different surface properties that completely changed their wetting conduct with water. The contact angle of conventionally deposited PPX-N is approximately 80°. After O 2 plasma treatment, the contact angle drops to approximately 30°. These two systems, Ag/PPX-N and Ag/PPX-N-O 2 , were tested in synthetic urine at a body temperature of 37 °C. First, the optical density and the inhibition zones of both bacteria strains (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus cohnii) were examined to confirm the antibacterial effect of these silver-coated catheters. Afterward, the efficacy of silver catheters with different treatments of biofilm formed by E. coli and S. cohnii were tested with crystal violet staining assays. To estimate the life cycles of silver/PPX-catheters, the eluted amount of silver was assessed at several time intervals by anodic stripping voltammetry. The silver catheter with hydrophilic PPX-N coating limited bacterial growth in synthetic urine and prevented biofilm formation. The authors attribute the enhanced bacteriostatic effect to increased silver ion release detected under these conditions. With this extensive preparatory analytic work, the authors studied the ability of the two different cap layers (without silver), PPX-N and oxygen plasma treated PPX-N, to control the growth of a crystalline biofilm by measuring the concentrations of the Ca 2

  1. Culture-independent analysis of bacterial fuel contamination provides insight into the level of concordance with the standard industry practice of aerobis cultivation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, J.; Gilbert, J. A.; Hill, G.; Hill, E.; Huse, S. M.; Weightman, A. J.; Mahenthiralingam, E. (CLS-CI); (Organisms and Environment Division, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University); (ECHA Microbiology Ltd.); (Josephine Bay Paul Centre for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution)

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial diversity in contaminated fuels has not been systematically investigated using cultivation-independent methods. The fuel industry relies on phenotypic cultivation-based contaminant identification, which may lack accuracy and neglect difficult-to-culture taxa. By the use of industry practice aerobic cultivation, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and strain genotyping, a collection of 152 unique contaminant isolates from 54 fuel samples was assembled, and a dominance of Pseudomonas (21%), Burkholderia (7%), and Bacillus (7%) was demonstrated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 15 samples revealed Proteobacteria and Firmicutes to be the most abundant phyla. When 16S rRNA V6 gene pyrosequencing of four selected fuel samples (indicated by 'JW') was performed, Betaproteobacteria (42.8%) and Gammaproteobacteria (30.6%) formed the largest proportion of reads; the most abundant genera were Marinobacter (15.4%; JW57), Achromobacter (41.6%; JW63), Burkholderia (80.7%; JW76), and Halomonas (66.2%; JW78), all of which were also observed by DGGE. However, the Clostridia (38.5%) and Deltaproteobacteria (11.1%) identified by pyrosequencing in sample JW57 were not observed by DGGE or aerobic culture. Genotyping revealed three instances where identical strains were found: (i) a Pseudomonas sp. strain recovered from 2 different diesel fuel tanks at a single industrial site; (ii) a Mangroveibacter sp. strain isolated from 3 biodiesel tanks at a single refinery site; and (iii) a Burkholderia vietnamiensis strain present in two unrelated automotive diesel samples. Overall, aerobic cultivation of fuel contaminants recovered isolates broadly representative of the phyla and classes present but lacked accuracy by overrepresenting members of certain groups such as Pseudomonas.

  2. Global invasive bacterial vaccine-preventable diseases surveillance--2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jillian; Agócs, Mary; Serhan, Fatima; Singh, Simarjit; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; O'Brien, Katherine; Mwenda, Jason M; Mihigo, Richard; Oliveira, Lucia; Teleb, Nadia; Ahmed, Hinda; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Wijesinghe, Pushpa; Thapa, Arun Bhadra; Fox, Kimberly; Paladin, Fem Julia; Hajjeh, Rana; Schwartz, Stephanie; Van Beneden, Chris; Hyde, Terri; Broome, Claire; Cherian, Thomas

    2014-12-12

    Meningitis and pneumonia are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in children globally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae causing a large proportion of disease. Vaccines are available to prevent many of the common types of these infections. S. pneumoniae was estimated to have caused 11% of deaths in children aged Organization (WHO) has recommended inclusion of PCV in childhood immunization programs worldwide, especially in countries with high child mortality. As of November 26, 2014, a total of 112 (58%) of all 194 WHO member states and 44 (58%) of the 76 member states ever eligible for support from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance (Gavi), have introduced PCV. Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) surveillance that includes data on serotypes, along with meningitis and pneumonia syndromic surveillance, provides important data to guide decisions to introduce PCV and monitor its impact.

  3. Forensic Luminol Blood Test for Preventing Cross-contamination in Dentistry: An Evaluation of a Dental School Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Cadore, Peterson; Gallon, Andrea; Imanishi, Soraia Almeida Watanabe

    2014-10-01

    More than 200 different diseases may be transmitted from exposure to blood in the dental setting. The aim of this study is to identify possible faults in the crosscontamination chain control in a dental school clinic searching for traces of blood in the clinical contact surfaces (CCS) through forensic luminol blood test. Traces of invisible blood where randomly searched in CCS of one dental school clinic. Forty eight surfaces areas in the CCS were tested and the presence of invisible and remnant blood was identified in 28 (58.3%) items. We suggest that the luminol method is suitable for identifying contamination with invisible blood traces and this method may be a useful tool to prevent cross-contamination in the dental care setting.

  4. Evaluation of biochars from different stock materials as carriers of bacterial strain for remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ting; Sun, Hongwen; Ren, Xinhao; Li, Bing; Mao, Hongjun

    2017-01-01

    Two kinds of biochars, one derived from corn straw and one from pig manure, were studied as carriers of a mutant genotype from Bacillus subtilis (B38) for heavy metal contaminated soil remediation. After amendment with biochar, the heavy metal bioavailability decreased. Moreover, the heavy metal immobilization ability of the biochar was enhanced by combining it with B38. The simultaneous application of B38 and pig manure-derived biochar exhibited a superior effect on the promotion of plant gr...

  5. Linking specific heterotrophic bacterial populations to bioreduction of uranium and nitrate using stable isotope probing in contaminated subsurface sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akob, Denise M.; Kerkhof, Lee; Kusel, Kirsten; Watson, David B.; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Kostka, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Shifts in terminal electron-accepting processes during biostimulation of uranium-contaminated sediments were linked to the composition of stimulated microbial populations using DNA-based stable isotope probing. Nitrate reduction preceded U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction in [ 13 C]ethanol-amended microcosms. The predominant, active denitrifying microbial groups were identified as members of the Betaproteobacteria, whereas Actinobacteria dominated under metal-reducing conditions.

  6. Contamination of tooth-colored mineral trioxide aggregate used as a root-end filling material: a bacterial leakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montellano, Angela M; Schwartz, Scott A; Beeson, Thomas J

    2006-05-01

    This experiment investigated the ability of tooth-colored mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to maintain an apical seal in the presence of bacteria when contaminated with blood, saline or saliva. Ninety extracted human teeth with single canals were randomly placed into six groups of 15. Canals were prepared to size 50. The apical 3 mm of each root was removed and 3 mm root-end preparations were made with a #329 bur. Root-end preparations in groups 1 through 3 were filled with MTA after contamination with blood, saline, or saliva, respectively. In group 4, uncontaminated root-end preparations were filled with MTA. Groups 5 and 6 served as negative and positive controls. A tube/tooth assembly was utilized to suspend each root end in Trypticase Soy Broth (TSB). The access chambers were filled with Staphylococcus epidermidis. Positive growth over thirty days was demonstrated by turbidity of the TSB. Vitek analysis was used to confirm the presence of S. epidermidis in the positive samples. Data evaluation consisted of a chi(2) analysis (p < 0.05). Although all experimental groups demonstrated leakage, tooth-colored MTA contaminated with saliva (group 3) leaked significantly more than the uncontaminated tooth-colored MTA (group 4) (p = 0.028).

  7. Bacterial diversity in the active stage of a bioremediation system for mineral oil hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Nicole; Schlömann, Michael; Mau, Margit

    2006-11-01

    Soils contaminated with mineral oil hydrocarbons are often cleaned in off-site bioremediation systems. In order to find out which bacteria are active during the degradation phase in such systems, the diversity of the active microflora in a degrading soil remediation system was investigated by small-subunit (SSU) rRNA analysis. Two sequential RNA extracts from one soil sample were generated by a procedure incorporating bead beating. Both extracts were analysed separately by generating individual SSU rDNA clone libraries from cDNA of the two extracts. The sequencing results showed moderate diversity. The two clone libraries were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria, especially Pseudomonas spp. Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were two other large groups in the clone libraries. Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Epsilonproteobacteria were detected in lower numbers. The obtained sequences were predominantly related to genera for which cultivated representatives have been described, but were often clustered together in the phylogenetic tree, and the sequences that were most similar were originally obtained from soils and not from pure cultures. Most of the dominant genera in the clone libraries, e.g. Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Sphingomonas, Acidovorax and Thiobacillus, had already been detected in (mineral oil hydrocarbon) contaminated environmental samples. The occurrence of the genera Zymomonas and Rhodoferax was novel in mineral oil hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

  8. A new mask to prevent environmental contamination during radio aerosol mouth-piece inhalation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Francisco Jose Hossri Nogueira.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental contamination is frequent during labelled aerosol mouth-piece inhalation procedures. Previous personnel data showed that in 18/18 situations air background activity has increased after inhalation and this may create serious routine and economical problems. We have tested a new adherent mask made of 3 M's TEGADERM in sixty 99 m Tc-DTPA inhalation studies and the results indicates that the use of such a mask may eliminate the problem of environmental contamination. The device is useful but not entirely efficient in cases when good skin adherence cannot be obtained. 48 refs, 10 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Fate of Escherichia coli O26 in Corn Silage Experimentally Contaminated at Ensiling, at Silo Opening, or after Aerobic Exposure, and Protective Effect of Various Bacterial Inoculants▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunière, Lysiane; Gleizal, Audrey; Chaucheyras-Durand, Frédérique; Chevallier, Isabelle; Thévenot-Sergentet, Delphine

    2011-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are responsible for human illness. Ruminants are recognized as a major reservoir of STEC, and animal feeds, such as silages, have been pointed out as a possible vehicle for the spread of STEC. The present study aimed to monitor the fate of pathogenic E. coli O26 strains in corn material experimentally inoculated (105 CFU/g) during ensiling, just after silo opening, and after several days of aerobic exposure. The addition of 3 bacterial inoculants, Propionibacterium sp., Lactobacillus buchneri, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides (106 CFU/g), was evaluated for their abilities to control these pathogens. The results showed that E. coli O26 could not survive in corn silage 5 days postensiling, and the 3 inoculants tested did not modify the fate of pathogen survival during ensiling. In the case of direct contamination at silo opening, E. coli O26 could be totally eradicated from corn silage previously inoculated with Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The combination of proper ensiling techniques and the utilization of selected bacterial inoculants appears to represent a good strategy to guarantee nutritional qualities of cattle feed while at the same time limiting the entry of pathogenic E. coli into the epidemiological cycle to improve the microbial safety of the food chain. PMID:21984243

  10. Fingerprinting and diversity of bacterial copA genes in response to soil types, soil organic status and copper contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejon, David P H; Nowak, Virginie; Bouko, Sabrina; Pascault, Noémie; Mougel, Christophe; Martins, Jean M F; Ranjard, Lionel

    2007-09-01

    A molecular fingerprinting assay was developed to assess the diversity of copA genes, one of the genetic determinants involved in bacterial resistance to copper. Consensus primers of the copA genes were deduced from an alignment of sequences from proteobacterial strains. A PCR detection procedure was optimized for bacterial strains and allowed the description of a novel copA genetic determinant in Pseudomonas fluorescens. The copA DNA fingerprinting procedure was optimized for DNA directly extracted from soils differing in their physico-chemical characteristics and in their organic status (SOS). Particular copA genetic structures were obtained for each studied soil and a coinertia analysis with soil physico-chemical characteristics revealed the strong influence of pH, soil texture and the quality of soil organic matter. The molecular phylogeny of copA gene confirmed that specific copA genes clusters are specific for each SOS. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that this approach was sensitive to short-term responses of copA gene diversity to copper additions to soil samples, suggesting that community adaptation is preferentially controlled by the diversity of the innate copA genes rather than by the bioavailability of the metal.

  11. Bacterial contamination of tile drainage water and shallow groundwater under different application methods of liquid swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, A D; Glasauer, S M; Lauzon, J D; O'Halloran, I P; Parkin, Gary W; Dunfield, K E

    2012-05-01

    A 2 year field experiment evaluated liquid manure application methods on the movement of manure-borne pathogens (Salmonella sp.) and indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringens) to subsurface water. A combination of application methods including surface application, pre-application tillage, and post-application incorporation were applied in a randomized complete block design on an instrumented field site in spring 2007 and 2008. Tile and shallow groundwater were sampled immediately after manure application and after rainfall events. Bacterial enumeration from water samples showed that the surface-applied manure resulted in the highest concentration of E. coli in tile drainage water. Pre-tillage significantly (p tile water and to shallow groundwater within 3 days after manure application (DAM) in 2008 and within 10 DAM in 2007. Pre-tillage also decreased the occurrence of Salmonella sp. in tile water samples. Indicator bacteria and pathogens reached nondetectable levels within 50 DAM. The results suggest that tillage before application of liquid swine manure can minimize the movement of bacteria to tile and groundwater, but is effective only for the drainage events immediately after manure application or initial rainfall-associated drainage flows. Furthermore, the study highlights the strong association between bacterial concentrations in subsurface waters and rainfall timing and volume after manure application.

  12. Sampling bacterial biodiversity from a highly contaminated stream flowing through a densely populated urban area in Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enam, S.F.; Qureshi, H.; Qureshi, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have attempted to understand the complexity of microbial populations in Pakistan where infectious diseases are prevalent. This study was undertaken to assess bacterial biodiversity in Nehr-e-Khayyam a heavily polluted stream connected to the Arabian Gulf, which runs through a densely populated urban area in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods: Employing a universal pair of oligonucleotides capable of amplifying species-specific segments of 16S rRNA gene from all Eubacteria, we generated a library of PCR products using total DNA purified from the collected sample, cloned the amplifers into pGEM-T-Easy and sequenced each recombinant clone. The obtained DNA sequences were subjected to bio-informatic analyses. Results: A total of 71 recombinant clones were obtained from the amplified 16S rDNA products and sequenced. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that 54 (out of 71) were unique sequences from which 42 shared >97% and 12 shared <97% homology to their database counterparts. One sequence originated from the plastid DNA of eukaryote Pyramimonas disomata. From the remaining 53 sequences, 45 were Proteo-bacteria and 8 Fermicute in origin. Among 71 sequences, Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria species constituted 86% of Proteo-bacteria identified in the sample while only 13% were Fermicutes. Conclusions: The microbial niche in Nehr-e-Khayyam is occupied predominantly by heterotrophic Proteo-bacterial and Firmicute strains, some of which are known human pathogens. (author)

  13. Treatment and prevention systems for acid mine drainage and halogenated contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Song [Fort Collins, CO; Fallgren, Paul H [Laramie, WY; Morris, Jeffrey M [Laramie, WY

    2012-01-31

    Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). Further embodiments include treatments for degradation of contaminated water environments (17) with substrates such as returned milk and the like.

  14. Combination of bioleaching by gross bacterial biosurfactants and flocculation: A potential remediation for the heavy metal contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhihui; Shi, Wei; Yang, Weichun; Liang, Lifen; Yao, Wenbin; Chai, Liyuan; Gao, Shikang; Liao, Qi

    2018-09-01

    Combining bioleaching by the gross biosurfactants of Burkholderia sp. Z-90 and flocculation by poly aluminium chloride (PAC) was proposed to develop a potential environment-friendly and cost-effective technique to remediate the severely contaminated soils by heavy metals. The factors affecting soil bioleaching by the gross biosurfactants of Burkholderia sp. Z-90 were optimized. The results showed the optimal removing efficiencies of Zn, Pb, Mn, Cd, Cu, and As by the Burkholderia sp. Z-90 leachate were 44.0, 32.5, 52.2, 37.7, 24.1 and 31.6%, respectively at soil liquid ratio of 1:20 (w/v) for 5 d, which were more efficient than that by 0.1% of rhamnolipid. The amounts of the bioleached heavy metals by the Burkholderia sp. Z-90 leachate were higher than that by other biosurfactants in the previous studies, although the removal efficiencies of the metals by the leachate were relatively lower. It was suggested that more heavy metals caused more competitive to chelate with function groups of the gross biosurfactants and the metal removal efficiencies by biosurfactants in natural soils were lower than in the artificially contaminated soils. Moreover, the Burkholderia sp. Z-90 leachate facilitated the metals to be transformed to the easily migrating speciation fractions. Additional, the results showed that PAC was efficient in the following flocculation to remove heavy metals in the waste bio-leachates. Our study will provide support for developing a bioleaching technique model to remediate the soils extremely contaminated by heavy metals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of a bacterial whole cell biosensor for the rapid detection of cytotoxicity in heavy metal contaminated seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhisong; Luan, Xiao; Jiang, Huichao; Li, Qian; Xu, Guangfei; Sun, Chengjun; Zheng, Li; Song, Yizhi; Davison, Paul A; Huang, Wei E

    2018-06-01

    A toxicity biosensor Acinetobacter baylyi Tox2 was constructed with the host strain A. baylyi ADP1 harboring a new and medium-copy-number plasmid pWH1274_lux, and was applied to detect the cytotoxicity of heavy metal contaminated seawater. The gene cassette luxCDABE was controlled by constitutively expressed promoter P tet on pWH1274_lux and the bioluminescence intensity of the biosensor reduces in proportional to the concentrations of toxic compounds. A. baylyi Tox2 exhibits tolerance to salinity, hence it is applicable to seawater samples. A. baylyi Tox2 and Mugilogobius chulae were exposed to different concentrations of heavy metals (Hg 2+ , Zn 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Cd 2+ ) in artificial seawater for performance comparison and Pearson correlation analysis showed a significant correlation (p heavy metal contaminated seawater. Furthermore, A. baylyi Tox2 was used to evaluate cytotoxicity of field-collected seawater samples. The results indicate that there was a significant correlation between the luminescence inhibition ratio (IR) of A. baylyi Tox2 and heavy metal concentrations detected by ICP-MS in the samples. Two seawater samples, which contained a high concentration of total heavy metals, exhibited stronger cytotoxicity than the samples containing low concentrations of heavy metals. In conclusion, A. baylyi Tox2 can be used as an alternative tool to aquatic animals for the evaluation of the cytotoxicity of heavy metal contamination in the marine environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Avaliação da intensidade de contaminação de pontas de seringa tríplice Evaluation of the bacterial contamination of air/water syringes tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Maria Agueda RUSSO

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available O controle de infecção cruzada em consultórios odontológicos inclui cuidados especiais com as seringas tríplices. Os autores pesquisaram a intensidade de contaminação pela microbiota bucal, de pontas de seringas tríplices usadas no atendimento a pacientes de Dentística Restauradora. Cinqüenta pontas descartáveis (Riskcontrol, Injecta Prod. Odontológicos foram avaliadas: 10, imediatamente após a abertura da embalagem; 30, após o uso em pacientes; e 10, após o uso e a desinfecção com álcool etílico 70% P/V, friccionado por um minuto. Em câmara de fluxo laminar, as pontas foram "roladas" sobre a superfície de Tryptic Soy Agar, suplementado com 5% de sangue desfibrinado de carneiro. Após 96 horas de incubação anaeróbia, foi feita a avaliação da quantidade de unidades formadoras de colônias (ufc desenvolvidas. Confirmando a informação do fabricante, as pontas estavam estéreis quando retiradas da embalagem. Em todas as pontas usadas em pacientes, observou-se um número incontável de ufc (maior que 300, revelando intensa contaminação. Nas pontas usadas e desinfetadas com álcool etílico 70% P/V, verificou-se apreciável redução na contagem de colônias (1 a 100 ufc, mas incompatível com a segurança biológica. Os resultados sugerem, como condição ideal, o uso de pontas descartáveis nas seringas tríplices.Effective infection control procedures to prevent cross-contamination in the dental office include care with air/water syringes. The authors had the purpose to verify the bacterial contamination of air/water syringes used in patients seen at the Restorative Dental Clinic, School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Brazil. Fifty disposable tips (Riskcontrol, Injecta Prod. Odontológicos were analysed: 10, immediately after the package was opened; 10, after a single use followed by disinfection with 70% alcohol for one minute; 30, after a single use without any posterior disinfection. The samples were

  17. Evaluation of biochars from different stock materials as carriers of bacterial strain for remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Sun, Hongwen; Ren, Xinhao; Li, Bing; Mao, Hongjun

    2017-09-21

    Two kinds of biochars, one derived from corn straw and one from pig manure, were studied as carriers of a mutant genotype from Bacillus subtilis (B38) for heavy metal contaminated soil remediation. After amendment with biochar, the heavy metal bioavailability decreased. Moreover, the heavy metal immobilization ability of the biochar was enhanced by combining it with B38. The simultaneous application of B38 and pig manure-derived biochar exhibited a superior effect on the promotion of plant growth and the immobilization of heavy metals in soil. The plant biomass increased by 37.9% and heavy metal concentrations in the edible part of lettuce decreased by 69.9-96.1%. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) profiles revealed that pig manure-derived biochar could enhance the proliferation of both exotic B38 and native microbes. These results suggest that B38 carried by pig manure-derived biochar may be a promising candidate for the remediation of soils contaminated by multiple heavy metals.

  18. Detection of entero viruses and hepatitis A in treated wastewater and Correlation between viral and bacterial contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dridi, Soumaya

    2010-01-01

    The main human viruses likely to contaminate waste water are Non-enveloped viruses able to resist in the environment, so essentially the viruses presenting an enteric cycle of multiplication. Many of these viruses, namely entero virus, hepatitis Avirus are excreted in the saddles of patients or of carriers and meet in waste water. To fight against the viral risk it is necessary to have a methodology allowing the control and the surveillance of virological and Hydric contamination. For the revealing of enteric virus, the reference technique remains the isolation on cellular culture. However, the disadvantage of this technique is the fact that it is difficult for certain viruses. Thus, the rise of molecular biology allowed the focusing of reliable and significant methods for detection of the enteric viruses in the environmental takings. The aim of this work was to detect hepatitis A virus and entero virus in waste water. A total of 20 samples were concentrated then precipitated by Polyethylene glycol 6000 according to the method of EPA. Extraction and purification of the viral ARN are made by the Kit QIAmp Viral RNA (Qiagen). The analysis of nucleic acids extracted by RT-PCR allowed to detect Entero virus with a 15 pour cent frequency (3/20) and 10 pour cent (2/20) for the hepatitis A virus.

  19. New closed tube loop mediated isothermal amplification assay for prevention of product cross-contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthik, K; Rathore, Rajesh; Thomas, Prasad; Arun, T R; Viswas, K N; Dhama, Kuldeep; Agarwal, R K

    2014-01-01

    Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay, a promising diagnostic test, has been developed for detection of different pathogens of human as well as animals. Various positive points support its use as a field level test but the major problem is product cross contamination leading to false positive results. Different methods were adopted by various researchers to control this false positive amplification due to cross contamination but all have their own advantages and disadvantages. A new closed tube LAMP assay based on agar dye capsule was developed in the present study and this technique has some advantages over the other closed tube technique.•Agar at the concentration of 1.5% was used to sandwich SYBR green dye I with the aid of intradermal syringe. This agar dye capsule was placed over the LAMP reaction mixture before it was amplified.•To eliminate the hazardous nature of Ultra Violet (UV) light during result visualization of LAMP products, the present study demonstrates the use of Light Emitting Diode (LED) lights for result visualization.•LAMP was carried out for Brucella species detection using this modified techniques yielding good results without any cross contamination and LED showed similar fluorescence compared to UV.

  20. Bacterial contamination and stethoscope disinfection practices: a cross-sectional survey of healthcare workers in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Danish Ahmed; Aman, Aiysha; Muhammad Mubeen, Syed; Shah, Ahmed

    2017-07-01

    Stethoscopes routinely used for clinical examination of patients may potentially transfer micro-organisms and cause iatrogenic infections. This study was undertaken to detect the presence of microorganisms on stethoscopes used clinically in hospitals of Karachi, Pakistan and to ascertain the infection control practices of healthcare workers (HCWs). In a cross-sectional study, 118 samples were collected from public and private institutions. Samples were tested for the presence and sensitivity of pathogenic microorganisms. Microorganisms were found on diaphragms of 33/64 (51.6%) and 19/57 (33.3%) stethoscopes in public and private sector hospitals, respectively. Methycillin resistance was identified in all staphylococcally contaminated samples. Only 33 (18%) respondents reported cleaning their stethoscopes regularly. We highlight the need for more and better on-the-job routines for decontaminating stethoscopes among HCWs in Karachi.

  1. Monitoring bacterial population dynamics using real-time PCR during the bioremediation of crude-oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Kyung-Hwa; Yoon, Byung-Dae; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Byung-Hyuk; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Hee-Sik

    2009-04-01

    We evaluated the activity and abundance of the crude oil- degrading bacterium Nocardia sp. H17-1 during bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil, using real-time PCR. The total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) degradation rate constants (k) of the soils treated with and without H17-1 were 0.103 d-1 and 0.028 d-1, respectively. The degradation rate constant was 3.6 times higher in the soil with H17-1 than in the soil without H17-1. In order to detect and quantify the Nocardia sp. H17-1 in soil samples, we quantified the genes encoding 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA), alkane monooxygenase (alkB4), and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (23CAT) with real-time PCR using SYBR green. The amounts of H17-1 16S rRNA and alkB4 detected increased rapidly up to 1,000-folds for the first 10 days, and then continued to increase only slightly or leveled off. However, the abundance of the 23CAT gene detected in H17-1-treated soil, where H17-1 had neither the 23CAT gene for the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons nor the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity, did not differ significantly from that of the untreated soil (alpha=0.05, p>0.22). These results indicated that H17-1 is a potential candidate for the bioaugmentation of alkane-contaminated soil. Overall, we evaluated the abundance and metabolic activity of the bioremediation strain H17-1 using real-time PCR, independent of cultivation.

  2. Skin preparation with alcohol versus alcohol followed by any antiseptic for preventing bacteraemia or contamination of blood for transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Bell-Syer, Sally E M; Foxlee, Ruth

    2015-02-12

    Blood for transfusion may become contaminated at any point between collection and transfusion and may result in bacteraemia (the presence of bacteria in the blood), severe illness or even death for the blood recipient. Donor arm skin is one potential source of blood contamination, so it is usual to cleanse the skin with an antiseptic before blood donation. One-step and two-step alcohol based antiseptic regimens are both commonly advocated but there is uncertainty as to which is most effective. To assess the effects of cleansing the skin of blood donors with alcohol in a one-step compared with alcohol in a two-step procedure to prevent contamination of collected blood or bacteraemia in the recipient. In December 2014, for this third update, we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), The Cochrane Library; Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL. All randomised trials (RCTs) comparing alcohol based donor skin cleansing in a one-step versus a two-step process that includes alcohol and any other antiseptic for pre-venepuncture skin cleansing were considered. Quasi randomised trials were to have been considered in the absence of RCTs. Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion. No studies (RCTs or quasi RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. We did not identify any eligible studies for inclusion in this review. It is therefore unclear whether a two-step, alcohol followed by antiseptic skin cleansing process prior to blood donation confers any reduction in the risk of blood contamination or bacteraemia in blood recipients, or conversely whether a one-step process increases risk above that associated with a two-step process.

  3. Microdoses uses of iodine in the contamination prevention of mechanical ventilators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.D.; Trivellato, S.V.; Quintas, M.L.; Birolini, D.

    1986-01-01

    Nosocomial respiratory tract infections due to contamination of mechanical ventilators is a major problem complicating the management of intensive care unit patients. A significant source of such infection seems to be water contained in the nebulizers. Its decontamination by various means has been unsatisfactory up to date. In order to control this source of infection, the authors suggest the utilization of a small dose of a 2% iodine alcoholic solution added to the water of the nebulizers in the proportion of 0.125ml of iodine solution to 500ml of water. The results show that the procedure is safe, efficient and unexpensive. (author) [pt

  4. Anti-bacterial activity of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: comparative in vitro study of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, mefloquine, and azithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mombo-Ngoma Ghyslain

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is recommended for the prevention of malaria in pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa. Increasing drug resistance necessitates the urgent evaluation of alternative drugs. Currently, the most promising candidates in clinical development are mefloquine and azithromycin. Besides the anti-malarial activity, SP is also a potent antibiotic and incurs significant anti-microbial activity when given as IPTp - though systematic clinical evaluation of this action is still lacking. Methods In this study, the intrinsic anti-bacterial activity of mefloquine and azithromycin was assessed in comparison to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine against bacterial pathogens with clinical importance in pregnancy in a standard microdilution assay. Results SP was highly active against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. All tested Gram-positive bacteria, except Enterococcus faecalis, were sensitive to azithromycin. Additionally, azithromycin was active against Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Mefloquine showed good activity against pneumococci but lower in vitro action against all other tested pathogens. Conclusion These data indicate important differences in the spectrum of anti-bacterial activity for the evaluated anti-malarial drugs. Given the large scale use of IPTp in Africa, the need for prospective clinical trials evaluating the impact of antibiotic activity of anti-malarials on maternal and foetal health and on the risk of promoting specific drug resistance of bacterial pathogens is discussed.

  5. Chlor-alkali plant contamination of Aussa River sediments induced a large Hg-resistant bacterial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Franco; Marchetto, Davide; Gallo, Michele; Fani, Renato; Maida, Isabel; Covelli, Stefano; Fajon, Vesna; Zizek, Suzana; Hines, Mark; Horvat, Milena

    2012-11-01

    A closed chlor-alkali plant (CAP) discharged Hg for decades into the Aussa River, which flows into Marano Lagoon, resulting in the large-scale pollution of the lagoon. In order to get information on the role of bacteria as mercury detoxifying agents, analyses of anions in the superficial part (0-1 cm) of sediments were conducted at four stations in the Aussa River. In addition, measurements of biopolymeric carbon (BPC) as a sum of the carbon equivalent of proteins (PRT), lipids (LIP), and carbohydrates (CHO) were performed to correlate with bacterial biomass such as the number of aerobic heterotrophic cultivable bacteria and their percentage of Hg-resistant bacteria. All these parameters were used to assess the bioavailable Hg fraction in sediments and the potential detoxification activity of bacteria. In addition, fifteen isolates were characterized by a combination of molecular techniques, which permitted their assignment into six different genera. Four out of fifteen were Gram negative with two strains of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, one Enterobacter sp., and one strain of Brevibacterium frigoritolerans. The remaining strains (11) were Gram positive belonging to the genera Bacillus and Staphylococcus. We found merA genes in only a few isolates. Mercury volatilization from added HgCl2 and the presence of plasmids with the merA gene were also used to confirm Hg reductase activity. We found the highest number of aerobic heterotrophic Hg-resistant bacteria (one order magnitude higher) and the highest number of Hg-resistant species (11 species out of 15) at the confluence of the River Aussa and Banduzzi's channel, which transport Hg from the CAP, suggesting that Hg is strongly detoxified [reduced to Hg(0)] at this location.

  6. A large outbreak of salmonellosis associated with sandwiches contaminated with multiple bacterial pathogens purchased via an online shopping service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Sung-Hsi; Huang, Angela S; Liao, Ying-Shu; Liu, Yu-Lun; Chiou, Chien-Shun

    2014-03-01

    Food sold over the internet is an emerging business that also presents a concern with regard to food safety. A nationwide foodborne disease outbreak associated with sandwiches purchased from an online shop in July 2010 is reported. Consumers were telephone interviewed with a structured questionnaire and specimens were collected for etiological examination. A total of 886 consumers were successfully contacted and completed the questionnaires; 36.6% had become ill, with a median incubation period of 18 h (range, 6-66 h). The major symptoms included diarrhea (89.2%), abdominal pain (69.8%), fever (47.5%), headache (32.7%), and vomiting (17.3%). Microbiological laboratories isolated Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, Salmonella Virchow, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli from the contaminated sandwiches, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Virchow from the patients, and Salmonella Enteritidis and Staphylococcus aureus from food handlers. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotyping suggested a common origin of Salmonella bacteria recovered from the patients, food, and a food handler. Among the pathogens detected, the symptoms and incubation period indicated that Salmonella, likely of egg origin, was the probable causative agent of the outbreak. This outbreak illustrates the importance of meticulous hygiene practices during food preparation and temperature control during food shipment and the food safety challenges posed by online food-shopping services.

  7. Bacterial biodegradation of melamine-contaminated aged soil: influence of different pre-culture media or addition of activation material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Takashi; Takagi, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the biodegrading potential of Arthrobacter sp. MCO, Arthrobacter sp. CSP, and Nocardioides sp. ATD6 in melamine-contaminated upland soil (melamine: approx. 10.5 mg/kg dry weight) after 30 days of incubation. The soil sample used in this study had undergone annual treatment of lime nitrogen, which included melamine; it was aged for more than 10 years in field. When R2A broth was used as the pre-culture medium, Arthrobacter sp. MCO could degrade 55 % of melamine after 30 days of incubation, but the other strains could hardly degrade melamine (approximately 25 %). The addition of trimethylglycine (betaine) in soil as an activation material enhanced the degradation rate of melamine by each strain; more than 50 % of melamine was degraded by all strains after 30 days of incubation. In particular, strain MCO could degrade 72 % of melamine. When the strains were pre-cultured in R2A broth containing melamine, the degradation rate of melamine in soil increased remarkably. The highest (72 %) melamine degradation rate was noted when strain MCO was used with betaine addition.

  8. A Large Outbreak of Salmonellosis Associated with Sandwiches Contaminated with Multiple Bacterial Pathogens Purchased via an Online Shopping Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Sung-Hsi; Huang, Angela S.; Liao, Ying-Shu; Liu, Yu-Lun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Food sold over the internet is an emerging business that also presents a concern with regard to food safety. A nationwide foodborne disease outbreak associated with sandwiches purchased from an online shop in July 2010 is reported. Consumers were telephone interviewed with a structured questionnaire and specimens were collected for etiological examination. A total of 886 consumers were successfully contacted and completed the questionnaires; 36.6% had become ill, with a median incubation period of 18 h (range, 6–66 h). The major symptoms included diarrhea (89.2%), abdominal pain (69.8%), fever (47.5%), headache (32.7%), and vomiting (17.3%). Microbiological laboratories isolated Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, Salmonella Virchow, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli from the contaminated sandwiches, Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Virchow from the patients, and Salmonella Enteritidis and Staphylococcus aureus from food handlers. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotyping suggested a common origin of Salmonella bacteria recovered from the patients, food, and a food handler. Among the pathogens detected, the symptoms and incubation period indicated that Salmonella, likely of egg origin, was the probable causative agent of the outbreak. This outbreak illustrates the importance of meticulous hygiene practices during food preparation and temperature control during food shipment and the food safety challenges posed by online food–shopping services. PMID:24313786

  9. Prevention of Bacterial Contamination of a Silica Matrix Containing Entrapped β-Galactosidase through the Action of Covalently Bound Lysozymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available β-galactosidase was successfully encapsulated within an amino-functionalised silica matrix using a “fish-in-net” approach and molecular imprinting technique followed by covalent binding of lysozyme via a glutaraldehyde-based method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used to characterise the silica matrix hosting the two enzymes. Both encapsulated β-galactosidase and bound lysozyme exhibited high enzymatic activities and outstanding operational stability in model reactions. Moreover, enzyme activities of the co-immobilised enzymes did not obviously change relative to enzymes immobilised separately. In antibacterial tests, bound lysozyme exhibited 95.5% and 89.6% growth inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC (American type culture collection 653 and Escherichia coli ATCC 1122, respectively. In milk treated with co-immobilised enzymes, favourable results were obtained regarding reduction of cell viability and high lactose hydrolysis rate. In addition, when both co-immobilised enzymes were employed to treat milk, high operational and storage stabilities were observed. The results demonstrate that the use of co-immobilised enzymes holds promise as an industrial strategy for producing low lactose milk to benefit people with lactose intolerance.

  10. Reduction of bacterial surface contamination in the hospital environment by application of a new product with persistent effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, G; Rynbäck, J; Loré, B

    2010-06-01

    The benefit of routine surface disinfection in hospitals has been discussed. In this study we have investigated a new product, Appeartex. After application on surfaces a remnant effect is achieved due to the positive charge of the active molecule. We studied the persistent effect of Appeartex one day after application in both an experimental study in the laboratory and a field study in a hospital ward. Surfaces of bedside tables were investigated. In the experimental study, large inocula of >or=10(6)cfu of S. aureus or enterococci were inoculated on to well-defined areas which had been treated/not treated with Appeartex. One hour later, samples were taken with a swab rinse technique. A reduction in the number of viable bacteria in the magnitude 10-10(3) cfu was seen due to the effect of Appeartex. In the field study the effect on naturally occurring low level contamination was studied. Defined surfaces on bedside tables used by patients were treated/not treated with Appeartex. One day later, samples were taken with contact agar plates and with a new swab method using two sequential nylon flocked swabs. Significantly fewer bacteria were found on Appeartex-treated surfaces compared with untreated surfaces. The median counts on Appeartex-treated surfaces were 10 cfu/50 cm(2), and on untreated surfaces 20 cfu/50 cm(2). There was no significant difference in the number of bacteria found by culture of samples taken with the contact agar method compared with samples taken using the nylon flocked swab method. (c) 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Frequency of Inadequate Chicken Cross-Contamination Prevention and Cooking Practices in Restaurants

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Laura Green; Khargonekar, Shivangi; Bushnell, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted by the Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The purpose was to examine restaurant chicken preparation and cooking practices and kitchen managers’ food safety knowledge concerning chicken. EHS-Net members interviewed managers about chicken preparation practices in 448 restaurants. The study revealed that many restaurants were not following U.S. Food and Drug Administration Food Code guidance concerning cr...

  12. Impact of clay mineral, wood sawdust or root organic matter on the bacterial and fungal community structures in two aged PAH-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cébron, Aurélie; Beguiristain, Thierry; Bongoua-Devisme, Jeanne; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Faure, Pierre; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Ouvrard, Stéphanie; Parisot, Nicolas; Peyret, Pierre; Leyval, Corinne

    2015-09-01

    The high organic pollutant concentration of aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated wasteland soils is highly recalcitrant to biodegradation due to its very low bioavailability. In such soils, the microbial community is well adapted to the pollution, but the microbial activity is limited by nutrient availability. Management strategies could be applied to modify the soil microbial functioning as well as the PAH contamination through various amendment types. The impact of amendment with clay minerals (montmorillonite), wood sawdust and organic matter plant roots on microbial community structure was investigated on two aged PAH-contaminated soils both in laboratory and 1-year on-site pot experiments. Total PAH content (sum of 16 PAHs of the US-EPA list) and polar polycyclic aromatic compounds (pPAC) were monitored as well as the available PAH fraction using the Tenax method. The bacterial and fungal community structures were monitored using fingerprinting thermal gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) method. The abundance of bacteria (16S rRNA genes), fungi (18S rRNA genes) and PAH degraders (PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase and catechol dioxygenase genes) was followed through qPCR assays. Although the treatments did not modify the total and available PAH content, the microbial community density, structure and the PAH degradation potential changed when fresh organic matter was provided as sawdust and under rhizosphere influence, while the clay mineral only increased the percentage of catechol-1,2-dioxygenase genes. The abundance of bacteria and fungi and the percentage of fungi relative to bacteria were enhanced in soil samples supplemented with wood sawdust and in the plant rhizospheric soils. Two distinct fungal populations developed in the two soils supplemented with sawdust, i.e. fungi related to Chaetomium and Neurospora genera and Brachyconidiellopsis and Pseudallescheria genera, in H and NM soils respectively. Wood sawdust amendment favoured the

  13. A colourimetric evaluation of the effect of bacterial contamination on teeth stained with blood in vitro: Evaluation of the efficacy of two different bleaching regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Cathro, P; Heithersay, G; Briggs, N; Ratnayake, J; Zilm, P

    2018-02-27

    Tooth discolouration could occur due to bacterial contamination in traumatized teeth. Hydrogen peroxide is the commonly used bleaching agent. However, due to concerns over safety, alternative bleaching regimes such as sodium perborate (S) and thiourea-hydrogen peroxide (T) have been investigated. Apices resected and pulp extirpated 99 premolars were divided into two groups. Group 1 and 2 was injected with blood and blood/bacteria, stored anaerobically for 35 days. The two groups were treated by bleaching with water, S or T. Teeth were rebleached after 7 days. Colourimetric evaluation was assessed using digital imaging, CasMatch standardization and CIE L*a*b colour system preoperatively, 35 days of staining and 7 and 14 of bleaching. A linear mixed model with fixed effects of time, group and bleach was used to examine colour difference. Blood-stained teeth were significantly redder and darker on day 35 compared with blood/bacteria-stained teeth. After bleaching, blood-stained teeth retained significant redness compared with blood/bacteria-stained teeth using either S or T. T produced a significantly whiter shade in both the groups after 14 days. Blood-stained teeth were significantly darker and red compared with blood/bacteria-stained teeth. T bleaching regime was more effective than S. © 2018 Australian Dental Association.

  14. Subcutaneous immunization with inactivated bacterial components and purified protein of Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes prevents puerperal metritis in Holstein dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Vinícius Silva; Bicalho, Marcela Luccas de Souza; Meira Junior, Enoch Brandão de Souza; Rossi, Rodolfo; Ribeiro, Bruno Leonardo; Lima, Svetlana; Santos, Thiago; Kussler, Arieli; Foditsch, Carla; Ganda, Erika Korzune; Oikonomou, Georgios; Cheong, Soon Hon; Gilbert, Robert Owen; Bicalho, Rodrigo Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    In this study we evaluate the efficacy of five vaccine formulations containing different combinations of proteins (FimH; leukotoxin, LKT; and pyolysin, PLO) and/or inactivated whole cells (Escherichia coli, Fusobacterium necrophorum, and Trueperella pyogenes) in preventing postpartum uterine diseases. Inactivated whole cells were produced using two genetically distinct strains of each bacterial species (E. coli, F. necrophorum, and T. pyogenes). FimH and PLO subunits were produced using recombinant protein expression, and LKT was recovered from culturing a wild F. necrophorum strain. Three subcutaneous vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 1 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; Vaccine 2 was composed of proteins only; and Vaccine 3 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells only. Two intravaginal vaccines were formulated: Vaccine 4 was composed of inactivated bacterial whole cells and proteins; and Vaccine 5 was composed of PLO and LKT. To evaluate vaccine efficacy, a randomized clinical trial was conducted at a commercial dairy farm; 371 spring heifers were allocated randomly into one of six different treatments groups: control, Vaccine 1, Vaccine 2, Vaccine 3, Vaccine 4 and Vaccine 5. Late pregnant heifers assigned to one of the vaccine groups were each vaccinated twice: at 230 and 260 days of pregnancy. When vaccines were evaluated grouped as subcutaneous and intravaginal, the subcutaneous ones were found to significantly reduce the incidence of puerperal metritis. Additionally, subcutaneous vaccination significantly reduced rectal temperature at 6±1 days in milk. Reproduction was improved for cows that received subcutaneous vaccines. In general, vaccination induced a significant increase in serum IgG titers against all antigens, with subcutaneous vaccination again being more effective. In conclusion, subcutaneous vaccination with inactivated bacterial components and/or protein subunits of E. coli, F. necrophorum and T. pyogenes

  15. [Disinfection with sodium hypochlorite in hospital environmental surfaces in the reduction of contamination and infection prevention: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Samantha Storer Pesani; Oliveira, Hadelândia Milon de; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Lacerda, Rúbia Aparecida

    2015-08-01

    To search for evidence of the efficiency of sodium hypochlorite on environmental surfaces in reducing contamination and prevention of healthcare-associated infection HAIs. Systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane Collaboration. We analyzed 14 studies, all controlled trials, published between 1989-2013. Most studies resulted in inhibition of microorganism growth. Some decreased infection, microorganism resistance and colonization, loss of efficiency in the presence of dirty and surface-dried viruses. The hypochlorite is an effective disinfectant, however, the issue of the direct relation with the reduction of HAIs remains. The absence of control for confounding variables in the analyzed studies made the meta-analysis performance inadequate. The evaluation of internal validity using CONSORT and TREND was not possible because its contents were not appropriate to laboratory and microbiological studies. As a result, there is an urgent need for developing specific protocol for evaluating such studies.

  16. Disinfection with sodium hypochlorite in hospital environmental surfaces in the reduction of contamination and infection prevention: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Storer Pesani Pereira

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVETo search for evidence of the efficiency of sodium hypochlorite on environmental surfaces in reducing contamination and prevention of healthcare-associated infection HAIs.METHODSystematic review in accordance with the Cochrane Collaboration.RESULTSWe analyzed 14 studies, all controlled trials, published between 1989-2013. Most studies resulted in inhibition of microorganism growth. Some decreased infection, microorganism resistance and colonization, loss of efficiency in the presence of dirty and surface-dried viruses.CONCLUSIONThe hypochlorite is an effective disinfectant, however, the issue of the direct relation with the reduction of HAIs remains. The absence of control for confounding variables in the analyzed studies made the meta-analysis performance inadequate. The evaluation of internal validity using CONSORT and TREND was not possible because its contents were not appropriate to laboratory and microbiological studies. As a result, there is an urgent need for developing specific protocol for evaluating such studies.

  17. How to prevent contamination with Candida albicans during the fabrication of transplantable oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Takagi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have utilized patients' own oral mucosa as a cell source for the fabrication of transplantable epithelial cell sheets to treat limbal stem cell deficiency and mucosal defects after endoscopic submucosal dissection of esophageal cancer. Because there are abundant microbiotas in the human oral cavity, the oral mucosa was sterilized and 40 μg/mL gentamicin and 0.27 μg/mL amphotericin B were added to the culture medium in our protocol. Although an oral surgeon carefully checked each patient's oral cavity and although candidiasis was not observed before taking the biopsy, contamination with Candida albicans (C. albicans was detected in the conditioned medium during cell sheet fabrication. After adding 1 μg/mL amphotericin B to the transportation medium during transport from Nagasaki University Hospital to Tokyo Women's Medical University, which are 1200 km apart, no proliferation of C. albicans was observed. These results indicated that the supplementation of transportation medium with antimycotics would be useful for preventing contamination with C. albicans derived from the oral mucosa without hampering cell proliferation.

  18. Salmonella Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and in vegetable and fruit harvesting and packing operations may help prevent salmonellosis caused by contaminated foods. Better education of food industry workers in basic food safety and restaurant inspection procedures may prevent cross-contamination and other ...

  19. Prevention of the wind migration of Semipalatinsk test site contaminated topsoil by inter-polymer complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudaibergenov, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: It is well known that Semipalatinsk Test Site has been contaminated by radionuclides mainly as a result of atmospheric, aboveground and underground intensive nuclear tests during more than 40 years. Survey of residual radioactivity in the soil at ten Semipalatinsk Test Site areas showed that a great number of Plutonium-239, 240, Strontium-90 and Cesium-137 are concentrated in the depth of soil layer 0-8 cm. The residual radioactivity within the Semipalatinsk Test Site is tightly bound to the topsoil as a result of extreme heating and melting of the soils during the tests. The maximal amount of radionuclides is accumulated on the fine soil particles having 0.1-1.0 mm size. Wind erosion is responsible for suspension of contaminated soil particles in the air and further spreading of contamination far away. For instance, dust particles of diameter 0,05-0,1 mm are dropped within a couple of kilometers of the erosion site, while particles of about 0.005-0.01 mm diameter can move hundreds and thousands of kilometers. According to the results of the Institute of Radiation Safety and Ecology, Kazakhstan, in “Degelen” massive, where the intensive nuclear tests were carried out, the concentration of radionuclides in air increases for Sr-90 up to 5 times, for Pu-239,240 up to 100-250 times during the elevation of thin dust from the ground surface. In this connection agglomeration of thin dust containing radionuclides is of primary importance to protect the population from inhalation of re-suspended dust. Inter-polymer complexes are water-insoluble, moisture and gas permeable substances that form a “cobweb” on the surface of soil particles and consequently leading to formation of protective crust. Inter-polymer complexes enhance the intrusion of water into the soil, resulting in increased soil moisture to promote seed germination and plant growth. Inter-polymer complexes are also able to accumulate radionuclides via inclusion of metal ions into the Inter

  20. Effects of tiamulin, neomycin, tetracycline, fluorophenicol, penicillin G, Linco-Spectin, erythromycin and oxytetracycline on controlling bacterial contaminations of the river buffalo (Buballus bubalis) semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi-Shoushtari, S M; Ahmadi, M; Shahvarpour, S; Kolahian, S

    2007-09-15

    In order to investigate the effects of tiamulin, neomycin, tetracycline, fluorophenicol, penicillin G, Linco-Spectin (0.15 mg mL(-1) lincomycin + 0.3 mg mL(-1) spectinomycin), erythromycin and oxytetracycline on controlling bacterial contaminations of the river buffalo semen, 120 mL diluted buffalo bull semen (diluted by tris-egg yolk extender) was divided into 5 mL tubes after initial evaluation and before (control sample) and at 0, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h after adding each of the above antibiotics at the recommended dose (D) and twice the recommended dose (Dx2) to the semen samples, each sample was cultured 4 times on Muller-Hinton agar medium and the results were recorded after 18 h incubation at 37 degrees C. Tiamulin, tetracycline, neomycin and fluorophenicol were ineffective. Oxytetracycline was effective in both D and Dx2 (p < 0.001). Penicillin G in both D and Dx2 was effective (p < 0.001). Linco-Spectin was effective, though not significant, in D at 2 h and in Dx2 at 0 h only. Erythromycin in D was not significantly effective, but, in Dx2 was effective (p < 0.001). Duration of the antibiotic exposure had no significant effect on the antibiotic potentials except for Linco-Spectin at 2 h (p < 0.014). The biochemical tests identified the contaminant bacteria as being a member of Arcanobacter (Corynebacterium) sp. In the next step, the semen sample of the same bull was taken, semen quality tests were carried out and the semen was diluted with the same extender (tris-egg yolk) + 7% glycerol, containing a double dose (Dx2) of these antibiotics and semen quality tests were carried out immediately after dilution, 18 h after storage at 4 degrees C and after the semen was packed in the straws, frozen in liquid nitrogen (-196 degrees C) and later thawed in 37 degrees C water bath to investigate whether these antibiotics have any adverse effect on the spermatozoa during the process of freezing and thawing. The comparison of the results with those of the control group (the

  1. Prevention and Control of Fungi Contaminated Stored Pistachio Nuts Imported to Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawar, Lubna Saleh

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the contamination risk of the improper storage of pistachio nuts was studied in the major location of Saudi Arabia by studying the fungi associated with non and salted pistachio nuts. The infection with Aspergillus flavus and A. niger and treatment of this infection with some abiotic factors , salting and fumigation with acetic acid on the invasion and colonization were also stu ded. High percentage infection (100%) were found in salted pistachio of Maidenhead , while low infection (68.75%) was found in non salted pistachio of Jihad. Referring to the total fungal counts (9845.5 and 5681.8 CFU/g nuts) were detected on malt extract yeast agar and rose bengal agar media respectively. Aspergillus niger and A. flavus were found common in all pistachio samples collected from the three locations on the two media used. The both fungi were grew at temperatures between 20 and 35 degree C, also as the relative humidity increased the fungal growth increased reached its maximum at 100% RH. Sodium chloride at 20 and 25 % completely stopped the linear of the both fungi on malt yeast extract agar medium. Application of nuts with sodium chloride was found to increased the resistance of pistachio nut to invasion and colonization by the fungi during storage. Also, the resistance to invasion was increased by increasing the doses of fumigation with acetic acid applied to the pistachio nuts reached 0% infection at the higher dose of acetic acid (60%). (author)

  2. Prevention and Control of Fungi Contaminated Stored Pistachio Nuts Imported to Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawar, Lubna Saleh [Dept. of Biology, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the contamination risk of the improper storage of pistachio nuts was studied in the major location of Saudi Arabia by studying the fungi associated with non and salted pistachio nuts. The infection with Aspergillus flavus and A. niger and treatment of this infection with some abiotic factors , salting and fumigation with acetic acid on the invasion and colonization were also stu ded. High percentage infection (100%) were found in salted pistachio of Maidenhead , while low infection (68.75%) was found in non salted pistachio of Jihad. Referring to the total fungal counts (9845.5 and 5681.8 CFU/g nuts) were detected on malt extract yeast agar and rose bengal agar media respectively. Aspergillus niger and A. flavus were found common in all pistachio samples collected from the three locations on the two media used. The both fungi were grew at temperatures between 20 and 35 degree C, also as the relative humidity increased the fungal growth increased reached its maximum at 100% RH. Sodium chloride at 20 and 25 % completely stopped the linear of the both fungi on malt yeast extract agar medium. Application of nuts with sodium chloride was found to increased the resistance of pistachio nut to invasion and colonization by the fungi during storage. Also, the resistance to invasion was increased by increasing the doses of fumigation with acetic acid applied to the pistachio nuts reached 0% infection at the higher dose of acetic acid (60%). (author)

  3. A GIS-based approach to prevent contamination of groundwater at regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderacchi, M.; Vischetti, C.; di Guardo, A.; Trevisan, M.

    2009-04-01

    Sustainable development is a fundamental objective of the European Union. Since 1991, the use of numerical models has been used to assess the environmental fate of pesticides (directive 91/414 EC). Since then, new approaches to assess pesticide contamination have been developed. This is an ongoing process, with approaches getting increasingly close to reality. Actually, there is a new challenge to integrate the most advanced and cost-effective monitoring strategies with simulation models so that reliable indicators of unsaturated flow and transport can be suitably mapped and coupled with other indicators related to productivity and sustainability. The most relevant role of GIS in the analysis of pesticide fate in soil is its application to process together input data and the results of distribution model based simulations of pesticide transport. FitoMarche is a GIS-based software tool that estimates pesticide movement in the unsaturated zone using MACRO 5 and it is able to simulate complex and real crop rotations at the regional scale. Crop rotation involves the sequential production of different plant species on the same land, every crop is characterized by different agricultural practices that involve the use of different pesticides at different doses. FitoMarche extracts MACRO input data from a series of geographic data sets (shapefiles) and an internal database, writes input files for MACRO, executes the simulation and extracts solute and water fluxes from MACRO output files. The study has been performed in the Marche region, located in central Italy along the Adriatic coast. Soil, climate, land use shapefiles were provided from public authorities, crop rotation schemes were estimated from ISTAT (the national statistics institute) 5th agricultural census database using a municipality detail and agricultural practices following the local customs. Two herbicides have been tested: "A" is employed on maize crop, and "B" on maize, sunflower and sugarbeet. In the

  4. Prevention of clogging in a biological trickle-bed reactor removing toluene from contaminated air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, F J; Hartmans, S

    1996-04-05

    Removal of organic compounds like toluene from waste gases with a trickle-bed reactor can result in clogging of the reactor due to the formation of an excessive amount of biomass. We therefore limited the amount of nutrients available for growth, to prevent clogging of the reactor. As a consequence of this nutrient limitation a lower removal rate was observed. However, when a fungal culture was used to inoculate the reactor, the toluene removal rate under nutrient limiting conditions was higher. Over a period of 375 days, an average removal rate of 27 g C/(m(3) h) was obtained with the reactor inoculated with the fungal culture. From the carbon balance over the reactor and the nitrogen availability it was concluded that, under these nutrient-limited conditions, large amounts of carbohydrates are probably formed. We also studied the application of a NaOH wash to remove excess biomass, as a method to prevent clogging. Under these conditions an average toluene removal rate of 35 g C/(m(3) h) was obtained. After about 50 days there was no net increase in the biomass content of the reactor. The amount of biomass which was formed in the reactor equaled the amount removed by the NaOH wash.

  5. BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons like benzen e, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, together known as BTEX, has almost the same chemical structure. These aromatic hydrocarbons are released as pollutants in th e environment. This work was taken up to develop a solvent tolerant bacterial cons ortium that could degrade BTEX compounds as they all share a common chemical structure. We have isolated almost 60 different types of bacterial strains from different petroleum contaminated sites. Of these 60 bacterial strains almost 20 microorganisms were screene d on the basis of capability to tolerate high concentration of BTEX. Ten differe nt consortia were prepared and the compatibility of the bacterial strains within the consortia was checked by gram staining and BTEX tolerance level. Four successful mi crobial consortia were selected in which all the bacterial strains concomitantly grew in presence of high concentration of BTEX (10% of toluene, 10% of benzene 5% ethyl benzene and 1% xylene. Consortium #2 showed the highest growth rate in pr esence of BTEX. Degradation of BTEX by consortium #2 was monitored for 5 days by gradual decrease in the volume of the solvents. The maximum reduction observed wa s 85% in 5 days. Gas chromatography results also reveal that could completely degrade benzene and ethyl benzene within 48 hours. Almost 90% degradation of toluene and xylene in 48 hours was exhibited by consortium #2. It could also tolerate and degrade many industrial solvents such as chloroform, DMSO, acetonitrile having a wide range of log P values (0.03–3.1. Degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon like BTEX by a solvent tolerant bacterial consortium is greatly significant as it could degrade high concentration of pollutants compared to a bacterium and also reduces the time span of degradation.

  6. UVC fluencies for preventative treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated polymer tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Ladefoged, Søren D; Begovic, Tanja

    2010-01-01

    Exposing Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm grown on the inner surface of Teflon and silicone tubes to UVC light (265 nm) from light emitting diodes (LED) has previously been shown to substantially reduce biofilm growth. Smaller UVC fluencies were required to disinfect Teflon tubes compared to silicone...... tubes. Light propagation enhancement in tubes can be obtained if the refractive index of the intra-luminal saline solution is higher than that of the polymer. This condition is achieved by using Teflon tubes with a low refractive index (1.34) instead of the polymers with a high refractive index (1...... is demonstrated to be a preventative disinfection treatment on tubes made of Teflon, which enhances the UVC light propagation, and on tubes made of a softer material, ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), which is suitable for catheters but much less suitable for UVC light propagation. Simulating an aseptic breach (~10...

  7. Removal of bacterial contaminants and antibiotic resistance genes by conventional wastewater treatment processes in Saudi Arabia: Is the treated wastewater safe to reuse for agricultural irrigation?

    KAUST Repository

    Aljassim, Nada I.

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to assess the removal efficiency of microbial contaminants in a local wastewater treatment plant over the duration of one year, and to assess the microbial risk associated with reusing treated wastewater in agricultural irrigation. The treatment process achieved 3.5 logs removal of heterotrophic bacteria and up to 3.5 logs removal of fecal coliforms. The final chlorinated effluent had 1.8×102 MPN/100mL of fecal coliforms and fulfils the required quality for restricted irrigation. 16S rRNA gene-based high-throughput sequencing showed that several genera associated with opportunistic pathogens (e.g. Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Arcobacter, Legionella, Mycobacterium, Neisseria, Pseudomonas and Streptococcus) were detected at relative abundance ranging from 0.014 to 21 % of the total microbial community in the influent. Among them, Pseudomonas spp. had the highest approximated cell number in the influent but decreased to less than 30 cells/100mL in both types of effluent. A culture-based approach further revealed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa was mainly found in the influent and non-chlorinated effluent but was replaced by other Pseudomonas spp. in the chlorinated effluent. Aeromonas hydrophila could still be recovered in the chlorinated effluent. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) determined that only chlorinated effluent should be permitted for use in agricultural irrigation as it achieved an acceptable annual microbial risk lower than 10-4 arising from both P. aeruginosa and A. hydrophila. However, the proportion of bacterial isolates resistant to 6 types of antibiotics increased from 3.8% in the influent to 6.9% in the chlorinated effluent. Examples of these antibiotic-resistant isolates in the chlorinated effluent include Enterococcus and Enterobacter spp. Besides the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial isolates, tetracycline resistance genes tetO, tetQ, tetW, tetH, tetZ were also present at an average 2.5×102, 1.6×102, 4.4×102, 1

  8. Prevention of pink-pigmented methylotrophic bacteria (Methylohacterium mesophilicum) contamination of plant tissue cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanprame, S; Todd, J J; Widholm, J M

    1996-12-01

    Pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic bacteria (PPFMs) have been found on the surfaces of leaves of most plants tested. We found PPFMs on the leaf surfaces of all 40 plants (38 species) tested and on soybean pods by pressing onto AMS medium with methanol as the sole carbon source. The abundance ranged from 0.5 colony forming unit (cfu) /cm(2) to 69.4 cfu/cm(2) on the leaf surfaces. PPFMs were found in homogenized leaf tissues of only 4 of the species after surface disinfestation with 1.05% sodium hypochlorite and were rarely found in cultures initiated from surface disinfested Datura innoxia leaves or inside surface disinfested soybean pods. Of 20 antibiotics tested for PPFM growth inhibition, rifampicin was the most effective and of seven others which also inhibited PPFM growth, cefotaxime should be the most useful due to the expected low plant cell toxicity. These antibiotics could be used in concert with common surface sterilization procedures to prevent the introduction or to eliminate PPFM bacteria in tissue cultures. Thus, while PPFMs are present on the surfaces of most plant tissues, surface disinfestation alone can effectively remove them so that uncontaminated tissue cultures can be initiated in most cases.

  9. The efficacy of different anti-microbial metals at preventing the formation of, and eradicating bacterial biofilms of pathogenic indicator strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugala, Natalie; Lemire, Joe A; Turner, Raymond J

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant pathogens and the prevalence of biofilm-related infections have generated a demand for alternative anti-microbial therapies. Metals have not been explored in adequate detail for their capacity to combat infectious disease. Metal compounds can now be found in textiles, medical devices and disinfectants-yet, we know little about their efficacy against specific pathogens. To help fill this knowledge gap, we report on the anti-microbial and antibiofilm activity of seven metals: silver, copper, titanium, gallium, nickel, aluminum and zinc against three bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. To evaluate the capacity of metal ions to prevent the growth of, and eradicate biofilms and planktonic cells, bacterial cultures were inoculated in the Calgary Biofilm Device (minimal biofilm eradication concentration) in the presence of the metal salts. Copper, gallium and titanium were capable of preventing planktonic and biofilm growth, and eradicating established biofilms of all tested strains. Further, we observed that the efficacies of the other tested metal salts displayed variable efficacy against the tested strains. Further, contrary to the enhanced resistance anticipated from bacterial biofilms, particular metal salts were observed to be more effective against biofilm communities versus planktonic cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that the identity of the bacterial strain must be considered before treatment with a particular metal ion. Consequent to the use of metal ions as anti-microbial agents to fight multidrug-resistant and biofilm-related infections increases, we must aim for more selective deployment in a given infectious setting.

  10. Bacterial contamination of the hands of food handlers as indicator of hand washing efficacy in some convenient food industries in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aa, Lambrechts; Is, Human; Jh, Doughari; Jfr, Lues

    2014-07-01

    Hands of ready-to-eat food service employees have been shown to be vectors in the spread of foodborne disease, mainly because of poor personal hygiene and accounting for approximately 97% of food borne illnesses in food service establishments and homes. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of hand washing practices and sanitation before commencing work among food handlers in the convenient food industry in Gauteng, South Africa. A total of 230 samples were collected, involving 100% of the food handlers, in 8 selected convenient food outlets with their main focus on preparing ready-to-eat foods. The workers' cleaned and disinfected dominant hands were sampled for Total Plate Count (TPC), Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Bacteria were isolated and counted using standard methods. The highest bacterial count from the hand samples was 7.4 x 10(3) cfu.cm(-2) and the lowest showed no detectable growth. Although hands with a count of 0 cfu.cm(-2) were found in all of the plants, the results indicated that all the plants exceeded the legal limit for food surfaces or hands of food handlers had no bacteria detectable on their hands. One sample tested positive for E. coli and S. aureus could not be detected on the hands of any of the food handlers. The study revealed that hand hygiene is unsatisfactory and may have serious implications for public health due to contamination of food from food handlers' hands. This therefore underlined the importance of further training to improve food handlers' knowledge of good hand washing practices.

  11. The comparison of printed resources bacterial contamination in libraries of Al-Zahra Hospital and Sciences Faculty of Isfahan University and the determination of their antibiotic sensitivity pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiei, Hosein; Chadeganipour, Mostafa; Ojaghi, Rezvan; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Nouri, Rasool

    2017-01-01

    During the library loan process, the printed resources can be a carrier of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, it was tried to compare the Bacterial Contamination Rates and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern in printed resources of a hospital and a non-hospital library. This is a cross-sectional study. Returning books from the Al-Zahra hospital library and library of Sciences faculty of Isfahan University provides the research community. The sample size, 96 cases, was calculated using quota sampling. For sampling sterile swab dipped in trypticase soy broth medium and transfer trypticase soy broth medium were used. To identify different type of isolated bacteria from Gram-staining test and biochemical tests such as; TSI, IMViC and etc., were used. 76 (79.2%) and 20 (20.8%) of cultured samples were negative and positive, the respectively. Of 20 positive samples, 11 samples (55%) belong to the family Enterobacteriaceae that after detecting by Differential teste identified all 11 samples of Enterobacter that all of them were sensitive to Gentamicin and Ofloxacin. Also the most resistance to Nitrofurantoin and Amikacin was observed. 9 cases remained (45%) were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus that all of them were sensitive to the Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and Cephalexin antibiotics also the most resistance to Cefixime was observed. Considering that the Enterobacter sp and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus were separated from the books, the books as well as other hospital and medical equipment can transmit the infection to librarians, library users, patients and hospital staff, and also it can produce serious infections in patients with immune deficiency.

  12. The use of polyimide foils to prevent contamination from self-sputtering of {sup 252}Cf deposits in high-accuracy fission counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliam, David M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)], E-mail: david.gilliam@nist.gov; Yue, Andrew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Scott Dewey, M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2008-06-01

    It is demonstrated that a thin polyimide foil can be employed to prevent contamination from the self-sputtering of a {sup 252}Cf source under vacuum, with small energy loss of the emitted fission fragments, with very small effect on the efficiency of counting the fission fragments, and with a long lifetime of the plastic foils.

  13. Recommendations for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense. On analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations. Brief instruction for the CBRN (chemical, biological, radioactive, nuclear) sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, Udo; Biederbick, Walter; Derakshani, Nahid

    2010-01-01

    The recommendation for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense is describing the analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations and includes detail information on the sampling, protocol preparation and documentation procedures. The volume includes a separate brief instruction for the CBRN (chemical, biological, radioactive, nuclear) sampling.

  14. Determination of Optimum Sanitizer Levels for Prevention of Salmonella Cross-Contamination of Mature Round Tomatoes in a Laboratory Model Flume System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, Aswathy; Li, You; De, Jaysankar; Gutierrez, Alan; Silverberg, Rachael; Schneider, Keith R

    2017-09-01

    Salmonella has been reported to be involved in several foodborne illness outbreaks, many of which resulted from consumption of raw tomatoes. This research aimed to optimize and evaluate the concentration of free chlorine (hypochlorous acid [HOCl]) used as a sanitizer to prevent cross-contamination of tomatoes inoculated with a cocktail of five rifampin-resistant Salmonella enterica serovars in a laboratory-based model flume system. Organic load, prepared using sterilized Scotts Premium Topsoil, was added in different quantities to the flume wash water to simulate real-world packinghouse conditions. In a typical packinghouse operation utilizing a recirculating flume system, the organic matter washed from tomato surfaces accumulates over time. In this study, different concentrations (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm) of HOCl were used as sanitizers under three organic load conditions (0, 650, and 1,000 mg/L chemical oxygen demand). Results showed that 100 ppm of HOCl was necessary to prevent Salmonella cross-contamination of uninoculated tomatoes in the model flume system in the presence of organic loading. Also, when treated with 100 ppm of HOCl, Salmonella levels were reduced by >4.5 log CFU per tomato from inoculated tomatoes in the presence of organic load. At 75 ppm of HOCl, Salmonella cross-contamination was prevented, but only in the absence of organic loading. In studies in which plate counts were negative, whole tomato enrichment studies were performed. No cross-contamination of uninoculated tomatoes was recorded when 100 ppm of HOCl was used, even in the presence of high organic load (1,000 mg/L chemical oxygen demand). Although sanitizer application reduces contamination on tomato surfaces, the primary function of sanitizers in the wash water is to prevent cross-contamination.

  15. In vitro study of transmission of bacteria from contaminated metal models to stone models via impressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofou, A.; Larsen, T.; Öwall, B.

    2002-01-01

    Dental impression, stone model, bacterial contamination, cross-infection, dental clinic, dental laboratory......Dental impression, stone model, bacterial contamination, cross-infection, dental clinic, dental laboratory...

  16. Avaliação da contaminação bacteriana em desinfetantes de uso domiciliar Evaluation of bacterial contamination in disinfectants for domestic use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumie Miyagi

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar desinfetantes de uso domiciliar, identificando a presença de bactérias contaminantes, e conhecer o nível de tolerância dessas bactérias ao cloreto de benzalcônio. MÉTODOS: Foram adquiridas aleatoriamente no comércio da região metropolitana de São Paulo, SP, Brasil, 52 amostras de desinfetantes de uso domiciliar para análise quanto à presença de bactérias contaminantes. O nível de tolerância dessas bactérias ao cloreto de benzalcônio foi determinado pelo método da macrodiluição em caldo. RESULTADOS: De 52 amostras, 16 (30,77% estavam contaminadas por bactérias Gram negativas, com contagens variando entre 10(4 e 10(6 UFC/ml. Esses contaminantes foram identificados como Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, Burkholderia cepacia e Serratia marcescens. As Concentrações Inibitórias Mínimas (CIM: mg/ml do cloreto de benzalcônio para S. marcescens, A. xylosoxidans e B. cepacia foram: 2,48, 1,23 e 0,30, respectivamente. CONCLUSÕES Os desinfetantes de uso domiciliar à base de compostos de amônio quaternário são passíveis de contaminação por bactérias. As CIM do cloreto de benzalcônio para as bactérias contaminantes estavam abaixo das concentrações do princípio ativo presente nos desinfetantes, indicando que a tolerância ao biocida não é estável, podendo ser perdida com o cultivo das bactérias em meios de cultura sem o biocida.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate disinfectants for domestic use for the presence of bacteria, identify them, and determine their tolerance level to benzalkonium chloride. METHODS: Fifty-two samples of commercially available disinfectants for domestic use were acquired at random in the metropolitan area of São Paulo, Brazil, and analyzed to detect the presence of bacterial contaminants. The isolated organisms were identified and their tolerance level to benzalkonium chloride was determined by broth macrodilution method. RESULTS: Sixteen (30.77% of fifty-two disinfectants sampled were

  17. Bacterial contamination of motor gasoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, E.C. [ECHA Microbiology Ltd., Cardiff (United Kingdom); Koenig, J.W.J. [Koerperschaft des Oeffentlichen Rechts, Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-05-01

    Microbiological growth is found frequently in the bottom of jet fuel, distillate, heavy gasoil and crude oil tanks. Experience shows that traces of water - though theoretically enough for an outbreak of growth - rarely cause problems, because the tank is most probably drained frequently. However when a water table builds up and remains untouched for some time, the likelihood for growth, leading to later operational problems, rapidly increases. Normal paraffin hydrocarbons with c{sub 8}-c{sub 16} chain length appear to be especially vulnerable; in other words the kerosene/jet fuel boiling range is mainly at risk. Heavier hydrocarbon products (diesel, light heating oils and gasoils) however have increasingly seen problems over the last 15-20 years. Lighter products - mainly the gasoline boiling range appear to have been protected from microbial problems over many years. In a laboratory it was of course possible to degrade certain kinds of naphthas and finished gasolines, but those results did not mirror the findings in the field.

  18. Outbreaks where food workers have been implicated in the spread of foodborne disease. Part 8. Gloves as barriers to prevent contamination of food by workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Ewen C D; Michaels, Barry S; Greig, Judy D; Smith, Debra; Bartleson, Charles A

    2010-09-01

    The role played by food workers and other individuals in the contamination of food has been identified as an important contributing factor leading to foodborne outbreaks. To prevent direct bare hand contact with food and food surfaces, many jurisdictions have made glove use compulsory for food production and preparation. When properly used, gloves can substantially reduce opportunities for food contamination. However, gloves have limitations and may become a source of contamination if they are punctured or improperly used. Experiments conducted in clinical and dental settings have revealed pinhole leaks in gloves. Although such loss of glove integrity can lead to contamination of foods and surfaces, in the food industry improper use of gloves is more likely than leakage to lead to food contamination and outbreaks. Wearing jewelry (e.g., rings) and artificial nails is discouraged because these items can puncture gloves and allow accumulation of microbial populations under them. Occlusion of the skin during long-term glove use in food operations creates the warm, moist conditions necessary for microbial proliferation and can increase pathogen transfer onto foods through leaks or exposed skin or during glove removal. The most important issue is that glove use can create a false sense of security, resulting in more high-risk behaviors that can lead to cross-contamination when employees are not adequately trained.

  19. A study on contamination and disinfection of film cassette

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Chung, Kyung Mo; Choi, Ji Won

    2000-01-01

    In July 2000, a bacteria infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient to prevent from nosocomial infection. The study showed that the laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the four different cassette size of the contact surface. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. Also the education of nosocomial infection for radiographer will be required

  20. A study on contamination and disinfection of film cassette

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Chung, Kyung Mo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ji Won [University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2000-04-15

    In July 2000, a bacteria infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient to prevent from nosocomial infection. The study showed that the laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the four different cassette size of the contact surface. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. Also the education of nosocomial infection for radiographer will be required.

  1. Impact of sampling depth and plant species on local environmental conditions, microbiological parameters and bacterial composition in a mercury contaminated salt marsh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, D.F.R.; Oliveira, V.; Gomes, N.C.M.; Pereira, A.; Henriques, I.; Marques, B.; Almeida, A.; Cunha, A.; Correia, A.; Lillebø, A.I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Vegetated habitat contained distinct bacterial communities. ► Variation in bacterial composition with depth differed between plant species. ► There is evidence of an effect of mercury concentration on bacterial composition. ► Depth and sampling depth explained almost 70% of the variation in bacterial composition. - Abstract: We compare the environmental characteristics and bacterial communities associated with two rushes, Juncus maritimus and Bolboschoenus maritimus, and adjacent unvegetated habitat in a salt marsh subjected to historical mercury pollution. Mercury content was higher in vegetated than unvegetated habitat and increased with sampling depth. There was also a significant relationship between mercury concentration and bacterial composition. Habitat (Juncus, Bolboschoenus or unvegetated), sample depth, and the interaction between both, however, explained most of the variation in composition (∼70%). Variation in composition with depth was most prominent for the unvegetated habitat, followed by Juncus, but more constrained for Bolboschoenus habitat. This constraint may be indicative of a strong plant–microbe ecophysiological adaptation. Vegetated habitat contained distinct bacterial communities associated with higher potential activity of aminopeptidase, β-glucosidase and arylsulphatase and incorporation rates of 14 C-glucose and 14 C-acetate. Communities in unvegetated habitat were, in contrast, associated with both higher pH and proportion of sulphate reducing bacteria.

  2. Research on establishment of emergency transportation of heavy-injured and radiation-exposed and contaminated patients. Toward rapid, contamination-preventive and safe land and air transportion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haraguchi, Yoshikura; Tomoyasu, Y.; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Ishihara, Toru

    2004-01-01

    The authors has continued researches on countermeasures against various disasters including nuclear or radiation accident. Present paper deals with the following items; (1) Significance of preparation of a manual on countermeasures against disasters in relation to medical drills, (2) Status and prospects of disaster simulations and disaster drills, (3) Promotion and education on medical knowledge when nuclear disasters occur, (4) Network system study of broad area medicines throughout the country. (5) Study on how to approach mental an psychological cares, (6) Specialities of radioactive contamination in the general contamination of NBC (Nuclear, Biological and Chemical) disasters, (7) New concept and preparation of triage tags, and (8) Queueing theory application to many patients in a hospital. (H. Yokoo)

  3. Content Validation and Semantic Evaluation of a Check-List Elaborated for the Prevention of Gluten Cross-Contamination in Food Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farage, Priscila; Puppin Zandonadi, Renata; Cortez Ginani, Verônica; Gandolfi, Lenora; Pratesi, Riccardo; de Medeiros Nóbrega, Yanna Karla

    2017-01-06

    Conditions associated to the consumption of gluten have emerged as a major health care concern and the treatment consists on a lifelong gluten-free diet. Providing safe food for these individuals includes adapting to safety procedures within the food chain and preventing gluten cross-contamination in gluten-free food. However, a gluten cross-contamination prevention protocol or check-list has not yet been validated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform the content validation and semantic evaluation of a check-list elaborated for the prevention of gluten cross-contamination in food services. The preliminary version of the check-list was elaborated based on the Brazilian resolution for food safety Collegiate Board Resolution 216 (RDC 216) and Collegiate Board Resolution 275 (RDC 275), the standard 22000 from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 22000) and the Canadian Celiac Association Gluten-Free Certification Program documents. Seven experts with experience in the area participated in the check-list validation and semantic evaluation. The criteria used for the approval of the items, as to their importance for the prevention of gluten cross-contamination and clarity of the wording, was the achievement of a minimal of 80% of agreement between the experts (W-values ≥ 0.8). Moreover, items should have a mean ≥4 in the evaluation of importance (Likert scale from 1 to 5) and clarity (Likert scale from 0 to 5) in order to be maintained in the instrument. The final version of the check-list was composed of 84 items, divided into 12 sections. After being redesigned and re-evaluated, the items were considered important and comprehensive by the experts (both with W-values ≥ 0.89). The check-list developed was validated with respect to content and approved in the semantic evaluation.

  4. Content Validation and Semantic Evaluation of a Check-List Elaborated for the Prevention of Gluten Cross-Contamination in Food Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Farage

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conditions associated to the consumption of gluten have emerged as a major health care concern and the treatment consists on a lifelong gluten-free diet. Providing safe food for these individuals includes adapting to safety procedures within the food chain and preventing gluten cross-contamination in gluten-free food. However, a gluten cross-contamination prevention protocol or check-list has not yet been validated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform the content validation and semantic evaluation of a check-list elaborated for the prevention of gluten cross-contamination in food services. The preliminary version of the check-list was elaborated based on the Brazilian resolution for food safety Collegiate Board Resolution 216 (RDC 216 and Collegiate Board Resolution 275 (RDC 275, the standard 22000 from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 22000 and the Canadian Celiac Association Gluten-Free Certification Program documents. Seven experts with experience in the area participated in the check-list validation and semantic evaluation. The criteria used for the approval of the items, as to their importance for the prevention of gluten cross-contamination and clarity of the wording, was the achievement of a minimal of 80% of agreement between the experts (W-values ≥ 0.8. Moreover, items should have a mean ≥4 in the evaluation of importance (Likert scale from 1 to 5 and clarity (Likert scale from 0 to 5 in order to be maintained in the instrument. The final version of the check-list was composed of 84 items, divided into 12 sections. After being redesigned and re-evaluated, the items were considered important and comprehensive by the experts (both with W-values ≥ 0.89. The check-list developed was validated with respect to content and approved in the semantic evaluation.

  5. Mathematical Modelling of Bacterial Populations in Bio-remediation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliadou, Ioanna A.; Vayenas, Dimitris V.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2011-09-01

    An understanding of bacterial behaviour concerns many field applications, such as the enhancement of water, wastewater and subsurface bio-remediation, the prevention of environmental pollution and the protection of human health. Numerous microorganisms have been identified to be able to degrade chemical pollutants, thus, a variety of bacteria are known that can be used in bio-remediation processes. In this study the development of mathematical models capable of describing bacterial behaviour considered in bio-augmentation plans, such as bacterial growth, consumption of nutrients, removal of pollutants, bacterial transport and attachment in porous media, is presented. The mathematical models may be used as a guide in designing and assessing the conditions under which areas contaminated with pollutants can be better remediated.

  6. Bacterial adhesion capacity on food service contact surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Rok; Okanovič, Denis; Dražič, Goran; Abram, Anže; Oder, Martina; Jevšnik, Mojca; Bohinc, Klemen

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the adhesion of E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus on food contact materials, such as polyethylene terephthalate, silicone, aluminium, Teflon and glass. Surface roughness, streaming potential and contact angle were measured. Bacterial properties by contact angle and specific charge density were characterised. The bacterial adhesion analysis using staining method and scanning electron microscopy showed the lowest adhesion on smooth aluminium and hydrophobic Teflon for most of the bacteria. However, our study indicates that hydrophobic bacteria with high specific charge density attach to those surfaces more intensively. In food services, safety could be increased by selecting material with low adhesion to prevent cross contamination.

  7. Awareness of need and actual use of prophylaxis: lack of patient compliance in the prevention of bacterial endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, J. T.; van Wijk, W.; Thompson, J.; Valkenburg, H. A.; Michel, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    Antibiotics are given before some medical and dental procedures to patients with congenital or acquired heart disease to prevent endocarditis. The majority of practitioners and patients are aware of the need for this prophylaxis, although in practice prophylaxis is administered infrequently. It is

  8. Bacterial flora of conjunctiva after death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagili Chandrasekhara Reddy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To evaluate the frequency of bacterial flora of conjunctiva after death (cadaver eyes which will give information about the bacterial contamination of donor eyes, and the in-vitro sensitivity of isolated bacteria to the commonly used antibiotics in ophthalmic practice.METHODS: Conjunctival swabs were taken from the cadavers (motor vehicle accident deaths and patients who died in the hospital, within 6h after death, and sent for culture and sensitivity test. Conjunctival swabs, taken from the healthy conjunctiva of patients admitted for cataract surgery, were sent for culture and sensitivity as controls (eyes in those of living status. The bacterial isolates were tested against the commonly used antibiotics (chloramphenicol, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin in ophthalmology practice.RESULTS: Bacteria were isolated in 41 out of 100 conjunctival swabs (41%, taken from 50 cadavers (study group. Coagulase negative staphylococcus was the most common bacteria isolated (15%, followed by pseudomonas aeruginosa (5%. Gentamicin was effective against majority of the bacterial isolates (82%. Bacteria were isolated from 7 out of 100 conjunctival swabs taken as control group (eyes in living state. Coagulase negative staphylococcus was the most common organism (5% isolated in control group; the others were staphylococcus aureus (1% and beta hemolyticus streptococci (1%.CONCLUSION: Bacteria were isolated from 41% of the cadaver eyes. High percentage sensitivity of the bacterial isolates to gentamicin (82% supports the practice of thorough irrigation of the eyes with gentamicin solution before starting the procedure of enucleation followed by immersion of the enucleated eyeballs in gentamycin solution, to prevent the bacterial contamination.

  9. Novel insights in preventing Gram-negative bacterial infection in cirrhotic patients: review on the effects of GM-CSF in maintaining homeostasis of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Zhao, Manzhi; Song, Yuhu; Song, Jianxin; Huang, Yuancheng; Wang, Junshuai

    2015-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients with dysfunctional and/or low numbers of leukocytes are often infected with bacteria, especially Gram-negative bacteria, which is characterized by producing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that influences the production, maturation, function, and survival of various immune cells. In this paper, we reviewed not only Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway and its immunological effect, but also the specific stimulating function and autocrine performance of GM-CSF on hematopoietic cells, as well as the recent discovery of innate response activator-B cells in protection against microbial sepsis and the direct LPS-TLR4 signaling on hematopoiesis. Thus we concluded that GM-CSF might play important roles in preventing Gram-negative bacterial infections in cirrhotic patients through maintaining immune system functions and homeostasis.

  10. Patients' potential role in the transmission of health care-associated infections: prevalence of contamination with bacterial pathogens and patient attitudes toward hand hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istenes, Nancy; Bingham, James; Hazelett, Susan; Fleming, Eileen; Kirk, Jane

    2013-09-01

    Transmission of health care-associated infections (HAIs) has been primarily attributed to health care workers, and hand hygiene is considered the most important means to reduce transmission. Whereas hand hygiene research has focused on reducing health care worker hand contamination and improving hand hygiene compliance, contamination of patients' hands and their role in the transmission of HAIs remains unknown. Patients' hands were sampled by a "glove juice" recovery method and enumerated for the presence of common health care-associated pathogens. Patient demographics and other covariates were collected to determine their association with patient hand contamination. Patient attitudes and practices toward hand hygiene were also surveyed and analyzed. Of the 100 patients in the study, 39% of hands were contaminated with at least 1 pathogenic organism, and 8% were contaminated with 2 or more pathogens 48 hours after admission. Patient admission from or discharge to an outside institution and self-reported functional limitations were the only covariates that were significantly associated with hand contamination. Pathogenic organisms can be frequently detected on hands of acute care patients. Future studies are needed to better understand the relationship between patient hand contamination and the acquisition of HAIs in addition to the role patient hand hygiene can play in reducing HAIs. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Removal of bacterial contaminants and antibiotic resistance genes by conventional wastewater treatment processes in Saudi Arabia: Is the treated wastewater safe to reuse for agricultural irrigation?

    KAUST Repository

    Aljassim, Nada I.; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Harb, Moustapha; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the removal efficiency of microbial contaminants in a local wastewater treatment plant over the duration of one year, and to assess the microbial risk associated with reusing treated wastewater in agricultural irrigation

  12. Bioleaching of Zn, Ni and Fe from contaminated sediments of water reservoir Ružín I with using heterotrophic bacterial strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Jablonovská

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the bioleaching of the zinc polluted sediment from water reservoir Ružín I using heterotrophic bacterialstrains ubiquitous in sediment environment. The effect of bacterial activity, pH, iron solubilization and precipitation and bioleachingmedium were evaluated. The pH value controls the bacterial activity during the leaching process. Addition of glucose to the bioleachingmedium accelerated the bioleaching rate. The results indicates, that the leachibility of zinc depend on the geochemical formsand surface interaction between metal and sediment fraction. Sequential chemical extraction confirm, that Zn was predominantly boundto the iron-manganese oxides.

  13. A descriptive study on prevalence of bacterial pathogens in diabetic ulcer and Interventional component for the prevention of foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerlin Priya, Rajamanickam Rajkumar, Bakthasingh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is considered to have reached epidemic proportions worldwide. The most distressing complication of diabetes is foot ulcer and is the major cause of lower limb amputation. Hence, they require a prolonged hospital stay to combat more serious complications like gangrene and lower limb amputation. Early detection and prompt treatment help in alleviating the ulceration. Methods: The present study was conducted among 50 diabetes patients. Study subjects were selected using non probability purposive sampling technique. Pus samples were collected by using sterile swabs in a sterile manner from the ulcerated area. The wounds are washed vigorously with normal saline solution before collection of specimen. The specimens were transported immediately to the laboratory for culture. The clinical specimens were first screened microscopically by Gram’s stain, and then cultured on blood agar (aerobically and an aerobically, MacConkey agar and Robertson cooked meat broth for 48 hours at 37°C in 5-10 percent CO2 and bacteria’s were isolated. Results: The socio demographic profile of the present study reveals that males were predominant among the study population. Type II diabetes was more common, majority of study subjects are suffering from diabetes for more than 5 years and are treated with oral hypoglycemic drugs. The wound size was ≤ 2cms in majority of study subjects. The bacteriological profile of diabetic ulcer reveals that a majority of 23 (46% had growth of Staphylococcus aureus and 19 (38% had growth of klebsiella and a minimum of 6 (12% and 2 (4% had grown of Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus albus. Conclusion: Early detection of these bacterial pathogens helps to minimize the disease progress.

  14. Recommendations for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense. On analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations. 2. ed.; Empfehlungen fuer die Probenahme zur Gefahrenabwehr im Bevoelkerungsschutz. Zur Analytik von chemischen, biologischen und radioaktiven Kontaminationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Udo; Derakshani, Nahid; Drobig, Matthias; Koenig, Mario; Mentfewitz, Joachim; Prast, Hartmut; Uelpenich, Gerhard; Vidmayer, Marc; Wilbert, Stefan; Wolf, Manfred

    2016-07-01

    The recommendations for sampling for prevention of hazards in civil defense (analytics of chemical, biological and radioactive contaminations) cover the following topics: Requirements for sampling, description of the materials (chemical, biological and radioactive contaminated materials), decontamination, sample transport and protocol documents.

  15. Bacterial biofilms and antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Caldas-Arias

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms give to bacteria micro-environmental benefits; confers protection against antimicrobials. Bacteria have antibiotic resistance by conventional and unusual mechanisms leading to delayed wound healing, to increase recurrent chronic infections and nosocomial contamination of medical devices. Objective: This narrative review aims to introduce the characteristics of Bacteria-biofilms, antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and potential alternatives for prevention and control of its formation. Methods: Search strategy was performed on records: PubMed / Medline, Lilacs, Redalyc; with suppliers such as EBSCO and thesaurus MeSH and DeCS. Conclusions: Knowledge and research performance of biofilm bacteria are relevant in the search of technology for detection and measuring sensitivity to antibiotics. The identification of Bacterial-biofilms needs no-traditional microbiological diagnosis.

  16. Intraoperative contamination influences wound discharge and periprosthetic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, Bas A. S.; Engelsma, Yde; Neut, Danielle

    Intraoperative bacterial contamination increases risk for postoperative wound-healing problems and periprosthetic infection, but to what extent remains unclear. We asked whether bacterial contamination of the instruments and bone during primary prosthesis insertion was associated with prolonged

  17. Intraoperative contamination influences wound discharge and periprosthetic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, Bas A. S.; Engelsma, Yde; Neut, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    Intraoperative bacterial contamination increases risk for postoperative wound-healing problems and periprosthetic infection, but to what extent remains unclear. We asked whether bacterial contamination of the instruments and bone during primary prosthesis insertion was associated with prolonged

  18. Characterization of bacterial diversity in contaminated groundwater using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Misty S; Santos, Inês C; Carlton, Doug D; Stigler-Granados, Paula; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Schug, Kevin A

    2018-05-01

    Groundwater is a major source for drinking water in the United States, and therefore, its quality and quantity is of extreme importance. One major concern that has emerged is the possible contamination of groundwater due to the unconventional oil and gas extraction activities. As such, the impacts of exogenous contaminants on microbial ecology is an area to be explored to understand what are the chemical and physical conditions that allow the proliferation of pathogenic bacteria and to find alternatives for water treatment by identifying organic-degrading bacteria. In this work, we assess the interplay between groundwater quality and the microbiome in contaminated groundwaters rich in hydrocarbon gases, volatile organic and inorganic compounds, and various metals. Opportunistic pathogenic bacteria, such as Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, were identified, increasing the risk for consumption of and exposure to these contaminated groundwaters. Additionally, antimicrobial tests revealed that many of the identified bacteria were resistant to different antibiotics. The MALDI-TOF MS results were successfully confirmed with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, proving the accuracy of this high-throughput method. Collectively, these data provide a seminal understanding of the microbial populations in contaminated groundwater overlying anthropogenic activities like unconventional oil and gas development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. C. pneumoniae CdsL regulates CdsN ATPase activity, and disruption with a peptide mimetic prevents bacterial invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Blair Stone

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular pathogens that likely require type III secretion (T3S to invade cells and replicate intracellulary within a cytoplasmic vacuole called an inclusion body. C. pneumoniae possess a YscL ortholog, CdsL, that has been shown to interact with the T3S ATPase (CdsN. In this report we demonstrate that CdsL down-regulates CdsN enzymatic activity in a dose-dependent manner. Using PepScan epitope mapping we identified two separate binding domains to which CdsL binds viz. CdsN 221-229 and CdsN265-270. We confirmed the binding domains using a pull-down assay and showed that GST-CdsN221-270, which encompasses these peptides, co-purified with His-CdsL. Next, we used orthology modeling based on the crystal structure of a T3S ATPase ortholog from E. coli, EscN, to map the binding domains on the predicted three dimensional structure of CdsN. The CdsL binding domains mapped to the catalytic domain of the ATPase, one in the central channel of the ATPase hexamer and one on the outer face. Since peptide mimetics have been used to disrupt essential protein interactions of the chlamydial T3S system and inhibit T3S-mediated invasion of HeLa cells, we hypothesized that if CdsL – CdsN binding is essential for regulating T3S then a CdsN peptide mimetic could be used to potentially block T3S and Chlamydial invasion. Treatment of EBs with a CdsN peptide mimetic inhibited C. pneumoniae invasion into HeLa cells in a dose-dependent fashion. This report represents the first use of Pepscan technology to identify binding domains for specific T3S proteins viz. CdsL on the ATPase, CdsN, and demonstrates that peptide mimetics can be used as anti-virulence factors to block bacterial invasion.

  20. A Novel Wound Retractor Combining Continuous Irrigation and Barrier Protection Reduces Incisional Contamination in Colorectal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaconstantinou, Harry T; Ricciardi, Rocco; Margolin, David A; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Moesinger, Robert C; Lichliter, Warren E; Birnbaum, Elisa H

    2018-03-09

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains a persistent and morbid problem in colorectal surgery. Key to its pathogenesis is the degree of intraoperative bacterial contamination at the surgical site. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel wound retractor at reducing bacterial contamination. A prospective multicenter pilot study utilizing a novel wound retractor combining continuous irrigation and barrier protection was conducted in patients undergoing elective colorectal resections. Culture swabs were collected from the incision edge prior to device placement and from the exposed and protected incision edge prior to device removal. The primary and secondary endpoints were the rate of enteric and overall bacterial contamination on the exposed incision edge as compared to the protected incision edge, respectively. The safety endpoint was the absence of serious device-related adverse events. A total of 86 patients were eligible for analysis. The novel wound retractor was associated with a 66% reduction in overall bacterial contamination at the protected incision edge compared to the exposed incision edge (11.9 vs. 34.5%, P contamination (9.5% vs. 33.3%, P contamination. Improved methods to counteract wound contamination represent a promising strategy for SSI prevention (NCT 02413879).

  1. Cotton contamination

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Sluijs, MHJ

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This review focusses on physical forms of contaminant including the presence, prevention and/or removal of foreign bodies, stickiness and seed-coat fragments rather than the type and quantity of chemical residues that might be present in cotton...

  2. Real-time, in-situ detection of volatile profiles for the prevention of aflatoxin fungal contamination in pistachios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Tiziana C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center of Micro and Nano Technology, Material Engineering Division; Chang, Allan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center of Micro and Nano Technology, Material Engineering Division; Zhou, Jenny [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center of Micro and Nano Technology, Material Engineering Division

    2017-10-18

    The objective in this project is to provide a proof of concept will demonstrate the feasibility of a Raman, in-situ warning system for detecting and removing developing fungal hot spots from pistachio stockpiles and transit containers, thus decreasing human health risks and product loss as a result of contamination. The proposed project has the following goals: to calibrate the Raman fingerprinting of biomarkers, standalone and in premixed samples, to build a database with the vibrational profiles distinctive to the signatures of the bouquet emitted by the contaminated pistachios; to test the improvement in the detection of the detectable markers with enhanced Raman on a small probe.

  3. Radioactive surface contamination monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Kei; Minagoshi, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Toru

    1994-01-01

    To reduce radiation exposure and prevent contamination from spreading, each nuclear power plant has established a radiation controlled area. People and articles out of the controlled area are checked for the surface contamination of radioactive materials with surface contamination monitors. Fuji Electric has repeatedly improved these monitors on the basis of user's needs. This paper outlines typical of a surface contamination monitor, a personal surface contamination monitor, an article surface contamination monitor and a laundry monitor, and the whole-body counter of an internal contamination monitor. (author)

  4. The design, effectiveness and acceptability of the arm sleeve for the prevention of body fluid contamination during obstetric procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabukoba, J J; Pearce, J M

    1993-08-01

    1. To design a device that would reduce contamination of staff during obstetric procedures. 2. To undertake clinical trials to assess the effectiveness and acceptability of such a device. A prospective study. The arm sleeve is made of a nonwoven material laminated on polyethylene film making it waterproof. It has an elastomeric cuff with adhesive that ensures a watertight seal between it and the glove. Delivery suite in a teaching hospital. Doctors and midwives were requested to wear the sleeve on top of the standard gown and gloves. Each user was assessed for blood contamination at the end of the procedure and a questionnaire detailing the extent of contamination and the views of the user was completed. Eighty questionnaires were completed. The contamination of arms and hands was 3.8% and 5%, respectively. Eighty-nine percent thought the sleeve had served its purpose and 76% said they would use it regularly. The sleeve is an effective protective device which complements the glove and gown. We recommend that it should be used during all obstetric procedures.

  5. Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, S; Høst, A

    2001-01-01

    , breastfeeding should be encouraged for 4-6 months. In high-risk infants a documented extensively hydrolysed formula is recommended if exclusive breastfeeding is not possible for the first 4 months of life. There is no evidence for preventive dietary intervention neither during pregnancy nor lactation...... populations. These theories remain to be documented in proper, controlled and prospective studies. Breastfeeding and the late introduction of solid foods (>4 months) is associated with a reduced risk of food allergy, atopic dermatitis, and recurrent wheezing and asthma in early childhood. In all infants....... Preventive dietary restrictions after the age of 4-6 months are not scientifically documented....

  6. Dynamics of fecal indicator bacteria, bacterial pathogen genes, and organic wastewater contaminants in the Little Calumet River: Portage Burns Waterway, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Duris, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Little information exists on the co-occurrence of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), bacterial pathogens, and organic wastewater-associated chemicals (OWCs) within Great Lakes tributaries. Fifteen watershed sites and one beach site adjacent to the Little Calumet River–Portage Burns Waterway (LCRPBW) on Lake Michigan were tested on four dates for pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, chloride, color, ammonia- and nitrate-nitrogen, soluble phosphorus, sulfate, turbidity, and atrazine; for concentrations of FIB; and for genes indicating the presence of human-pathogenic enterococci (ENT) and of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (EC) from various animal sources. Nineteen samples were also tested for 60 OWCs. Half of the watershed samples met EC recreational water quality standards; none met ENT standards. Human-wastewater-associated OWC detections were correlated with human-influence indicators such as population/km2, chloride concentrations, and the presence of WWTP effluents, but EC and ENT concentrations were not. Bacterial pathogen genes indicated rural human and several potential animal sources. OWCs of human or ecosystem health concern (musk fragrances AHTN and HHCB, alkylphenols, carbamazepine) and 3 bacterial pathogen genes were detected at the mouth of the LCRPBW, but no such OWCs and only 1 pathogen gene were detected at the beach. The LCRPBW has significant potential to deliver FIB, potential bacterial pathogens, and OWCs of human or ecosystem health concern to the nearshore of Lake Michigan, under conditions enhancing nearshore transport of the river plume. Nearshore mixing of lake and river water, and the lack of relationship between OWCs and FIB or pathogen genes, pose numerous challenges for watershed and nearshore assessment and remediation.

  7. Effects of altered groundwater chemistry upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial attachment during transport within an organically contaminated sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ronald W.; Metge, David W.; Barber, Larry B.; Aiken, George R.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a dilute (ionic strength = 5 ?? 10-3 M) plume of treated sewage, with elevated levels (3.9 mg/L) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), upon the pH-dependency and magnitude of bacterial transport through an iron-laden, quartz sand aquifer (Cape Cod, MA) were evaluated using sets of replicate, static minicolumns. Compared with uncontaminated groundwater, the plume chemistry diminished bacterial attachment under mildly acidic (pH 5.0-6.5) in-situ conditions, in spite of the 5-fold increase in ionic strength and substantively enhanced attachment under more alkaline conditions. The effects of the hydrophobic neutral and total fractions of the plume DOC; modest concentrations of fulvic and humic acids (1.5 mg/L); linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) (25 mg/L); Imbentin (200 ??g/L), a model nonionic surfactant; sulfate (28 mg/L); and calcium (20 mg/L) varied sharply in response to relatively small changes in pH, although the plume constituents collectively decreased the pH-dependency of bacterial attachment. LAS and other hydrophobic neutrals (collectively representing only ???3% of the plume DOC) had a disproportionately large effect upon bacterial attachment, as did the elevated concentrations of sulfate within the plume. The findings further suggest that the roles of organic plume constituents in transport or bacteria through acidic aquifer sediments can be very different than would be predicted from column studies performed at circumneutral pH and that the inorganic constituents within the plume cannot be ignored.

  8. Biodegradation of Maya crude oil fractions by bacterial strains and a defined mixed culture isolated from Cyperus laxus rhizosphere soil in a contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Ramirez, I. J.; Gutierrez-Rojas, M.; Favela-Torres, E. [Autonomous Metropolitan University (UAM)- Iztapalapa, Dept. of Biotechnology, Federal District (Mexico); Ramirez-Sada, H. [Autonomous Metropolitan University (UAM)-Xochimilco, Dept. of Biological Systems, Federal District (Mexico)

    2003-12-01

    Biodegradation of aliphatic, aromatic, and polar constituents of Maya crude oil by a set of isolated bacterial strains and a defined mixed culture made up with all isolated strains, was evaluated. The bacterial strains were obtained from the rhizosphere of Cyperus laxus, a native plant on a highly hydrocarbon-polluted site. Oxygen uptake rate was used to determine the culture transfer timing during the enrichment culture. Results showed that five of the isolated strains were able to degrade 50 per cent of the aliphatic fractions of Maya crude oil. With the defined mixed culture the level of biodegradation was 47 per cent for aliphatics and 6 per cent of the aromatic-polar mixture. When grown in the presence of total hydrocarbons, the defined mixed culture was able to degrade 40 per cent of the aliphatic fraction and 26 per cent of the aromatic fraction. By combining enrichment cultures with oxygen uptake rate to determine the culture transfer timing during the enrichment cultures allowed the isolation of bacterial strains that are able to degrade specific hydrocarbon fractions at high consumption rates. 28 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig.

  9. Forensic Luminol Blood Test for Preventing Cross-contamination in Dentistry: An Evaluation of a Dental School Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Carlos Bortoluzzi; Peterson Cadore; Andrea Gallon; Soraia Almeida Watanabe Imanishi

    2014-01-01

    Background: More than 200 different diseases may be transmitted from exposure to blood in the dental setting. The aim of this study is to identify possible faults in the cross-contamination chain control in a dental school clinic searching for traces of blood in the clinical contact surfaces (CCS) through forensic luminol blood test. Methods: Traces of invisible blood where randomly searched in CCS of one dental school clinic. Results: Forty eight surfaces areas in the CCS were tes...

  10. A polycarboxylic/amino functionalized hyaluronic acid derivative for the production of pH sensible hydrogels in the prevention of bacterial adhesion on biomedical surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Fabio Salvatore; Bavuso Volpe, Antonella; Cusimano, Maria Grazia; Pitarresi, Giovanna; Giammona, Gaetano; Schillaci, Domenico

    2015-01-15

    A graft copolymer derivative of hyaluronic acid bearing pendant amino and short polymethacrylate portions (HA-EDA-BMP-MANa) has been employed for the production of a pH sensible vancomycin releasing hydrogel and studied in vitro to test its potential anti adhesive property against Staphylococcus aureus colonization. The copolymer obtained through atom transfer radical polymerization bears chargeable (carboxyl and amino groups) portions and it could be formulated as a hydrogel at a concentration of 10%w/v. The HA-EDA-BMP-MANa hydrogels, produced at three different pH values (5, 6 and 7, respectively), were formulated with or without the addition of vancomycin (2%w/v). The vancomycin release profiles were detected and related to the starting hydrogel pH values, demonstrating that the systems were able to sustain the release of drug for more than 48 h. S. aureus adhesion tests were performed on glass culture plates and hydroxyapatite doped titanium surfaces, comparing the performances of HA-EDA-BMP-MANa hydrogel formulations (obtained with and without vancomycin) with similar formulations obtained using unmodified hyaluronic acid. The non fouling property of a selected HA-EDA-BMP-MANa hydrogel (without vancomycin) was also assayed with a BSA adsorption test. We found that the HA-EDA-BMP-MANa hydrogel even without vancomycin prevented bacterial adhesion on investigated surfaces. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Metagenomic and functional analyses of the consequences of reduction of bacterial diversity on soil functions and bioremediation in diesel-contaminated microcosms

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Jaejoon; Philippot, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between microbial biodiversity and soil function is an important issue in ecology, yet most studies have been performed in pristine ecosystems. Here, we assess the role of microbial diversity in ecological function and remediation strategies in diesel-contaminated soils. Soil microbial diversity was manipulated using a removal by dilution approach and microbial functions were determined using both metagenomic analyses and enzymatic assays. A shift from Proteobacteria- to Acti...

  12. Isolation and characterization of the environmental bacterial and fungi contamination in a pharmaceutical unit of mesenchymal stem cell for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Patricia Gálvez; González, María Bermejo; Martínez, Adolfina Ruiz; Lara, Visitación Gallardo; Naveros, Beatriz Clares

    2012-09-01

    Design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program is vital to assure the maintenance of acceptable quality conditions in a pharmaceutical manufacturing unit of human mesenchymal stem cells. Since sterility testing methods require 14 days and these cells are only viable for several hours, they are currently administered without the result of this test. Consequently environmental monitoring is a key element in stem cell banks for assuring low levels of potential introduction of contaminants into the cell products. The aim of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the environmental microbiological quality in a pharmaceutical manufacturing unit of human mesenchymal stem cells production for use in advanced therapies. Two hundred and sixty one points were tested monthly during one year, 156 from air and 105 from surfaces. Among the 6264 samples tested, 231 showed contamination, 76.6% for bacteria and 23.4% for fungi. Microbial genuses isolated were Staphylococcus (89.7%), Microccocus (4.5%), Kocuria (3.2%) and Bacillus (2.6%). In the identification of fungi, three genuses were detected: Aspergillus (56%), Penicillium (26%) and Cladosporium (18%). The origin of the contamination was found to be due to personnel manipulation and air microbiota. For all sampling methods, alert limits were set and corrective measures suggested. Copyright © 2012 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Proposal of biostimulation for hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-decontamination and characterization of culturable bacterial community from high-dose point HCH-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadhwal, M; Singh, A; Prakash, O; Gupta, S K; Kumari, K; Sharma, P; Jit, S; Verma, M; Holliger, C; Lal, R

    2009-02-01

    To locate a high-dose point hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-contaminated site, to identify HCH-degrading bacteria in it and assay HCH-decontamination by biostimulation. Bacteria were isolated by serial dilution method from HCH-contaminated soil samples collected from areas near an HCH-manufacturing unit and its dumpsite in North India. After confirming the presence of indigenous HCH-degraders (seven of 24 strains), an ex situ biostimulation experiment was conducted. For this, residue levels in soil were diluted by mixing with pristine garden soil and aeration, moisture and nutrients were provided intermittently. This soil was monitored for reduction in Sigma-HCH (sum of alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-HCH) levels and stimulation of HCH-degraders. Experiments were conducted twice, in March-April (c. 75 microg Sigma-HCH g(-1) soil) and October-November 2006 (c. 280 microg Sigma-HCH g(-1) soil) at 26-30 degrees C. Sigma-HCH levels were reduced to decontamination via aeration, addition of nutrients and moisture, of the indigenous population. The study demonstrates that biostimulation of indigenous HCH-degrading microbial population can be used for decontamination of chronically HCH-contaminated sites.

  14. Bacterial infections associated with allogenic bone transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanović Željko Lj.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Bone allografts are frequently used in orthopedic reconstructive procedures carrying a high risk for recipients. To assess the nature and frequency of allograft contamination and associated surgical infection the case records from our institutional bone bank were reviewed. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the microbiology of discarded bone allografts and the surgical site of the recipients. A case series of patients who acquired surgical site infection after allogenic bone transplantation was presented. Swab culturing was conducted on 309 femoral heads from living donors who underwent partial and total hip arthroplasty between January 2007 and December 2013. To prevent potential bone allograft contamination we used saline solution of 2.0 mg/ml of amikacin during thawing. The overall infection rate was analyzed in 197 recipients. Results. Of the 309 donated femoral heads, 37 were discarded due to bacterial contamination, giving the overall contamination rate of 11.97%. The postoperative survey of 213 bone allotransplantations among 197 recipients showed the infection rate of 2.03%. The coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most commonly identified contaminant of bone allografts and recipient surgical sites. Conclusion. The allograft contamination rate and the infection rate among recipients in our institution are in accordance with the international standards. The coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most commonly identified contaminant of bone allografts and recipient surgical sites. There is no strong evidence that surgical site infections were associated with bone allograft utilization. We plan further improvements in allograft handling and decontamination with highly concentrated antibiotic solutions in order to reduce infection risk for recipients.

  15. Postviral Complications: Bacterial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasso, Jason E; Deng, Jane C

    2017-03-01

    Secondary bacterial pneumonia after viral respiratory infection remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Susceptibility is mediated by a variety of viral and bacterial factors, and complex interactions with the host immune system. Prevention and treatment strategies are limited to influenza vaccination and antibiotics/antivirals respectively. Novel approaches to identifying the individuals with influenza who are at increased risk for secondary bacterial pneumonias are urgently needed. Given the threat of further pandemics and the heightened prevalence of these viruses, more research into the immunologic mechanisms of this disease is warranted with the hope of discovering new potential therapies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Evaluation of bacterial contamination of dental unit waterlines and use of a newly designed measurement device to assess retraction of a dental chair unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xue-Yue; Fei, Chun-Nan; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Jun; Dong, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Dental unit waterline (DUWL) output water is delivered through instruments of a dental chair unit (DCU) to irrigate and cool teeth. However, these waterlines can be heavily contaminated with bacteria. The purpose of the present study was to assess retraction and investigate the contamination level and prevalence of bacteria in DUWL output water. Fifty-eight DCUs were randomly selected from 30 hospitals in 10 districts of Tianjin, one of the four special municipalities of China. A unique sampling connector was used in place of the dental handpiece to collect water samples. Evaluation of retraction was accomplished using a retraction measurement device designed in accordance with the International Standard ISO 7494-2:2015(E). A total of 263 water samples were collected, and the highest concentration of bacteria [1.8 × 10(6) colony-forming units (CFU)/mL] was found in the handpiece group. Thirty (51.72%) water samples in the handpiece group and 21 (36.21%) in the air/water syringe groups were cultured, yielding colony counts of > 500 CFU/mL. Potential infectious agents, such as Bacillus cereus, Kocuria kristinae and Pseudomonas fluorescens, were isolated from the water samples. Thirty (51.72%) DCUs failed the retraction evaluation. There was a significant, positive correlation (P < 0.05) between the concentration of bacteria in the water sample and the retracted volume. It is of paramount importance to increase compliance with the standards for controlling DUWL contamination. Routine microbial monitoring and evaluation of retraction are necessary to provide high-quality water for use in dental treatment. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  17. Prevention of DNA contamination during forensic medical examinations in a clinical forensic medical service: A best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Tasha

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of forensic specimens can have significant and detrimental effects on cases presented in court. In 2010 a wrongful conviction in Australia resulted in an inquiry with 25 recommendations to minimize the risk of DNA contamination of forensic specimens. DNA decontamination practices in a clinical forensic medical service currently attempt to comply with these recommendations. Evaluation of these practices has not been undertaken. The aim of this project was to audit the current DNA decontamination practices of forensic medical and nursing examiners in the forensic medical examination process and implement changes based on the audit findings. A re-audit following implementation would be undertaken to identify change and inform further research. The Joanna Briggs Institute's Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice were used as the audit tool in this project. A baseline audit was conducted; analysis of this audit process was then undertaken. Following education and awareness training targeted at clinicians, a re-audit was completed. There were a total of 24 audit criteria; the baseline audit reflected 20 of these criteria had 100% compliance. The remaining 4 audit criteria demonstrated compliance between 65% and 90%. Education and awareness training resulted in improved compliance in 2 of the 4 audit criteria, with the remaining 2 having unchanged compliance. The findings demonstrated that education and raising awareness can improve clinical practice; however there are also external factors outside the control of the clinicians that influence compliance with best practice.

  18. CONTAMINACIÓN BACTERIANA Y FÚNGICA EN EQUIPOS DE TELEFONÍA MÓVIL EN BARCELONA, ESTADO ANZOÁTEGUI, VENEZUELA | BACTERIAL AND FUNGAL CONTAMINATION OF MOBILE PHONE EQUIPMENT IN BARCELONA, ANZOÁTEGUI STATE, VENEZUELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duvric Lemus-Espinoza

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell phones have become a necessity, imposing significant changes in modern society. Cell phones have favorable conditions for the growth of microorganisms due to heat emission or harboring dirt and sweat. In this study 166 equipment with traditional keyboard (n = 83 and touch screen (n = 83 were evaluated microbiologically. Bacterial and fungal contamination was assessed cultivating agar plates placed in direct contact with various components of the phones. All cell phones were contaminated. The most frequently isolated bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus (29.5%, among Gram positive, and Escherichia coli (19.3% and, Proteus vulgaris (15.1%, among Gram negative. Among the 18 isolated taxa of bacteria and fungi, Klebsiella pneumoniae was found only in traditional equipment. The percentages of Gram positive and Gram negative isolates were similar in both cell phone types. Among Gram negative, isolates were more frequent in traditional phones (p < 0.02. The most commonly isolated filamentous fungi were Aspergillus spp (20.5%, Trichoderma (8.4% and Rhizopus spp (4.8%. Among yeasts, Candida (9.0% species isolates were more frequent than those of genus Rhodotorula (3.6%. The percentages of filamentous fungi isolates were greater than those of yeasts, either on traditional telephones (p < 0.0001 or on the touch screen ones (p < 0.05. In traditional mobile phones the percentages of isolates were higher than in touch phones, either for filamentous fungi (p < 0.00005, and for yeasts (p < 0.002. We concluded that cell phones had on their surface a variety of bacteria indicative of fecal contamination and other germs with high potential to transmit infections to ears, skin and skin annexes.

  19. Do Honeybees Shape the Bacterial Community Composition in Floral Nectar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizenberg-Gershtein, Yana; Izhaki, Ido; Halpern, Malka

    2013-01-01

    Floral nectar is considered the most important reward animal-pollinated plants offer to attract pollinators. Here we explore whether honeybees, which act as pollinators, affect the composition of bacterial communities in the nectar. Nectar and honeybees were sampled from two plant species: Amygdalus communis and Citrus paradisi. To prevent the contact of nectar with pollinators, C. paradisi flowers were covered with net bags before blooming (covered flowers). Comparative analysis of bacterial communities in the nectar and on the honeybees was performed by the 454-pyrosequencing technique. No significant differences were found among bacterial communities in honeybees captured on the two different plant species. This resemblance may be due to the presence of dominant bacterial OTUs, closely related to the Arsenophonus genus. The bacterial communities of the nectar from the covered and uncovered C. paradisi flowers differed significantly; the bacterial communities on the honeybees differed significantly from those in the covered flowers’ nectar, but not from those in the uncovered flowers’ nectar. We conclude that the honeybees may introduce bacteria into the nectar and/or may be contaminated by bacteria introduced into the nectar by other sources such as other pollinators and nectar thieves. PMID:23844027

  20. Bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Karen L.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurological emergency. Empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy should be initiated as soon as a single set of blood cultures has been obtained. Clinical signs suggestive of bacterial meningitis include fever, headache, meningismus, vomiting, photophobia, and an

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Interventions to Impede Date Palm Sap Contamination by Bats to Prevent Nipah Virus Transmission in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Salah Uddin; Gurley, Emily S.; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Nahar, Nazmun; Sharker, M. A. Yushuf; Luby, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Drinking raw date palm sap is a risk factor for human Nipah virus (NiV) infection. Fruit bats, the natural reservoir of NiV, commonly contaminate raw sap with saliva by licking date palm’s sap producing surface. We evaluated four types of physical barriers that may prevent bats from contacting sap. Methods During 2009, we used a crossover design and randomly selected 20 date palm sap producing trees and observed each tree for 2 nights: one night with a bamboo skirt intervention applied and one night without the intervention. During 2010, we selected 120 trees and randomly assigned four types of interventions to 15 trees each: bamboo, dhoincha (local plant), jute stick and polythene skirts covering the shaved part, sap stream, tap and collection pot. We enrolled the remaining 60 trees as controls. We used motion sensor activated infrared cameras to examine bat contact with sap. Results During 2009 bats contacted date palm sap in 85% of observation nights when no intervention was used compared with 35% of nights when the intervention was used [psap when the skirt did not entirely cover the sap producing surface. Therefore, in 2010 we requested the sap harvesters to use larger skirts. During 2010 bats contacted date palm sap [2% vs. 83%, psap in trees with bamboo (psap during one night (7%) with the jute stick skirt (psap producing areas of a tree effectively prevented bat-sap contact. Community interventions should promote applying these skirts to prevent occasional Nipah spillovers to human. PMID:22905160

  2. Analysis of bacterial community in uranium contaminated soil by DGGE of 16S rDNA V3 fragment PCR products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Fangfang; Luo Xuegang

    2014-01-01

    Using the modified gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis method, the structure diversity of the soil microbial in the tested soils was investigated after the remediation of Broken rice sedges, Broussonetia papyrifera, and Abutilon for the simulated uranium tailings contaminated soils. The results showed that 52.2% of all the sequences information belong to proteobacteria. Additionally, compared with the contrast, the decrease in Shannon-Wiener Index (H) was observed ranging from 14.7 to 31.3% in the Broussonetia papyrifera group while the decrease ranging from 38.8 to 56.9% in the abutilon group. However, the Broken rice sedge group was different from the other two groups. The dominant microorganisms that have a strong tolerance to uranium belong to Acidobacteria and the microbial groups that was difficult to determine its classification. This study provided a basic information for the development and the application of microorganism resources resistant to stress. (authors)

  3. Effectiveness of onsite wastewater reuse system in reducing bacterial contaminants measured with human-specific IMS/ATP and qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agidi, Senyo; Vedachalam, Sridhar; Mancl, Karen; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-01-30

    Water shortages and the drive to recycle is increasing interest in reuse of reclaimed wastewater. Timely and cost-effective ways to detect fecal pollutants prior to reuse increases confidence of residents and neighbors concerned about reuse of reclaimed wastewater. The on-site wastewater treatment and reuse systems (OWTRS) used in this study include a septic tank, peat bioreactor, ClO(2) disinfection and land spray irrigation system. Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp., were tested with immunomagnetic separation/ATP bioluminescence (IMS/ATP), qPCR and culture-based methods. The results displayed a 2-log reduction in fecal bacteria in the peat bioreactor and a 5-log reduction following chloride dioxide disinfection. The fecal bacteria levels measured by IMS/ATP correlated with qPCR results: HuBac 16S (R(2) = 0.903), Bf-group 16S (R(2) = 0.956), gyrB (R(2) = 0.673), and Ent 23S (R(2) = 0.724). This is the first study in which the newly developed human-specific IMS/ATP and previously developed IMS/ATP were applied for determining OWTRS efficiency. Results of the study revealed that IMS/ATP is a timely and cost-effective way to detect fecal contaminants, and results were validated with qPCR and culture based methods. The new IMS/ATP can also be applied broadly in the detection of human-originated fecal contamination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Contaminant dispersion and bacterial declination studies ate the bay of Chimbote - Peru; Estudios de dispersion de contaminantes y declinacion bacteriana en la bahia del mar de Chimbote - Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian, C; Maghella, G; Mamani, E [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima (Peru)

    2000-02-01

    A review of both, the dispersion studies and preliminary determination of T-90 performed at the bay of Chimbote - Peru, has been made. As for the dispersion studies, a fundamental partial differential equation and its solution for three-dimensional case is presented. The shape and characteristics of the tracer plume is determined as well as the decrease rate of peak concentrations. The method considers a point injection with Rhodamine B and Iodine-131 as tracers, in order to determine the longitudinal, lateral and vertical dispersion coefficients that govern the dispersion rates of industrial and waste waters to be discharged through a submarine outfall that will be installed at the sea of Chimbote. The method presented herein allows the estimation of the dispersion coefficients and predicts the influence of the future diffuser as well, regardless of the nature of the body of water in which the tests were conducted. With regard to T-90 determinations, they were better performed by the use of a combined tracer technique, using I-131 for dilution measurement and Rhodamine B as a visual aid. Dilution and decrease in bacterial concentrations were taken into consideration as well as continuous radiotracer injection. The values of T-90 estimated from experiments should be reconfirmed in future experiments under different oceanographic conditions. (authors)

  5. Prevention of radioactive contamination in the manufacture of phosphate fertilizers; Prevencion de contaminacion radiactiva en la fabricacion de fertilizantes fosfatados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero G, E T

    1996-12-31

    In this work was studied the separation of uranium from the phosphate rock to decrease the level of radioactivity in the phosphate fertilizers, this prevents the redistribution of uranium in the environment. The uranium leaching conditions from phosphate rock were estimated using alkaline solutions. The changes in the natural phosphate rock after leaching were studied. The amenability to separate the uranium from phosphate rock with ammonium carbonate / bicarbonate solution was determined. The uranium extraction was approximately 40%. The leaching conditions showed high selectivity for uranium without changes in the ore structure. The bulk ore was not dissolved. (Author).

  6. Disinfection efficacy of an ultraviolet light on film cassettes for preventive of the nosocomial infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Jeon, Yong Woong; Cho, Am

    2001-01-01

    The bacterial infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient prevention from nosocomial infection and for improvement of the hospital environment. The laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the five different cassette size of the contact surface. Film cassettes were exposed to ultraviolet light for 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Ultraviolet light disinfection is proven suitable for bacterial. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. In addition education of nosocomial infection for radiographers will be required. In conclusion, ultraviolet is considered effective to irradiate bacterial. Additionally, two minutes are required to sterilize film cassettes

  7. Disinfection efficacy of an ultraviolet light on film cassettes for preventive of the nosocomial infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol [Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Yong Woong; Cho, Am [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    The bacterial infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient prevention from nosocomial infection and for improvement of the hospital environment. The laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the five different cassette size of the contact surface. Film cassettes were exposed to ultraviolet light for 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Ultraviolet light disinfection is proven suitable for bacterial. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. In addition education of nosocomial infection for radiographers will be required. In conclusion, ultraviolet is considered effective to irradiate bacterial. Additionally, two minutes are required to sterilize film cassettes.

  8. Hydrogeochemical characteristics and bacterial community diversity in leachate from animal carcass disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaown, D.; Kim, H.; Lee, S.; Hyun, Y.; Moon, H.; Ko, K.; Lee, K.

    2012-12-01

    The release of leachate from animal carcass disposal can potentially contaminate soil and groundwater. During the Korea's foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreak in 2010-2011, about 3.53 million of pigs and cattle were slaughtered and 4,538 burial sites were constructed. The objectives of this study are to determine the hydrogeochemical characteristics and bacterial community diversity in leachate from animal carcass disposal. Hydrogeochemical characteristics and bacterial community diversity in leachate from animal carcass burial facilities were monitored to prevent further soil and groundwater contamination and to build effective plans for stabilization of the burial site. Two burial sites were investigated in this study. An animal carcass disposal site is located in a flat area and another disposal site is found in mountain area. The hydrogeochemical and hydrogeological characteristics were analyzed to identify groundwater contamination by leachate from livestock burial sites. After 5-6 months of burial, the concentrations of NH4+, Cl-, and HCO3- in leachate were decreased since the leachate was regularly pumped and treated. However, high concentrations of major contaminants (NH4+, Cl-, and HCO3-) were still observed in landfill leachate of mountain area even though pumping and treatment of leachate were continuously conducted. Bacterial community diversity over time in leachate from animal carcass disposal was analyzed using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing. The impact of landfill leachate on change of bacterial community in soil and groundwater were monitored for a year.

  9. Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and bacterial vaginosis among women in sub-Saharan Africa: An individual participant data meta-analysis of 18 HIV prevention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrone, Elizabeth A; Morrison, Charles S; Chen, Pai-Lien; Kwok, Cynthia; Francis, Suzanna C; Hayes, Richard J; Looker, Katharine J; McCormack, Sheena; McGrath, Nuala; van de Wijgert, Janneke H H M; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Low, Nicola; Gottlieb, Sami L

    2018-02-01

    Estimates of sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevalence are essential for efforts to prevent and control STIs. Few large STI prevalence studies exist, especially for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Our primary objective was to estimate the prevalence of chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomoniasis, syphilis, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and bacterial vaginosis (BV) among women in sub-Saharan Africa by age, region, and population type. We analyzed individual-level data from 18 HIV prevention studies (cohort studies and randomized controlled trials; conducted during 1993-2011), representing >37,000 women, that tested participants for ≥1 selected STIs or BV at baseline. We used a 2-stage meta-analysis to combine data. After calculating the proportion of participants with each infection and standard error by study, we used a random-effects model to obtain a summary mean prevalence of each infection and 95% confidence interval (CI) across ages, regions, and population types. Despite substantial study heterogeneity for some STIs/populations, several patterns emerged. Across the three primary region/population groups (South Africa community-based, Southern/Eastern Africa community-based, and Eastern Africa higher-risk), prevalence was higher among 15-24-year-old than 25-49-year-old women for all STIs except HSV-2. In general, higher-risk populations had greater prevalence of gonorrhea and syphilis than clinic/community-based populations. For chlamydia, prevalence among 15-24-year-olds was 10.3% (95% CI: 7.4%, 14.1%; I2 = 75.7%) among women specifically recruited from higher-risk settings for HIV in Eastern Africa and was 15.1% (95% CI: 12.7%, 17.8%; I2 = 82.3%) in South African clinic/community-based populations. Among clinic/community-based populations, prevalence was generally greater in South Africa than in Southern/Eastern Africa for most STIs; for gonorrhea, prevalence among 15-24-year-olds was 4.6% (95% CI: 3.3%, 6.4%; I2 = 82.8%) in South Africa

  10. Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and bacterial vaginosis among women in sub-Saharan Africa: An individual participant data meta-analysis of 18 HIV prevention studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Charles S.; Chen, Pai-Lien; Kwok, Cynthia; McCormack, Sheena; McGrath, Nuala; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Gottlieb, Sami L.

    2018-01-01

    Background Estimates of sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevalence are essential for efforts to prevent and control STIs. Few large STI prevalence studies exist, especially for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Our primary objective was to estimate the prevalence of chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomoniasis, syphilis, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and bacterial vaginosis (BV) among women in sub-Saharan Africa by age, region, and population type. Methods and findings We analyzed individual-level data from 18 HIV prevention studies (cohort studies and randomized controlled trials; conducted during 1993–2011), representing >37,000 women, that tested participants for ≥1 selected STIs or BV at baseline. We used a 2-stage meta-analysis to combine data. After calculating the proportion of participants with each infection and standard error by study, we used a random-effects model to obtain a summary mean prevalence of each infection and 95% confidence interval (CI) across ages, regions, and population types. Despite substantial study heterogeneity for some STIs/populations, several patterns emerged. Across the three primary region/population groups (South Africa community-based, Southern/Eastern Africa community-based, and Eastern Africa higher-risk), prevalence was higher among 15–24-year-old than 25–49-year-old women for all STIs except HSV-2. In general, higher-risk populations had greater prevalence of gonorrhea and syphilis than clinic/community-based populations. For chlamydia, prevalence among 15–24-year-olds was 10.3% (95% CI: 7.4%, 14.1%; I2 = 75.7%) among women specifically recruited from higher-risk settings for HIV in Eastern Africa and was 15.1% (95% CI: 12.7%, 17.8%; I2 = 82.3%) in South African clinic/community-based populations. Among clinic/community-based populations, prevalence was generally greater in South Africa than in Southern/Eastern Africa for most STIs; for gonorrhea, prevalence among 15–24-year-olds was 4.6% (95% CI

  11. Metagenomic and functional analyses of the consequences of reduction of bacterial diversity on soil functions and bioremediation in diesel-contaminated microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaejoon; Philippot, Laurent; Park, Woojun

    2016-03-14

    The relationship between microbial biodiversity and soil function is an important issue in ecology, yet most studies have been performed in pristine ecosystems. Here, we assess the role of microbial diversity in ecological function and remediation strategies in diesel-contaminated soils. Soil microbial diversity was manipulated using a removal by dilution approach and microbial functions were determined using both metagenomic analyses and enzymatic assays. A shift from Proteobacteria- to Actinobacteria-dominant communities was observed when species diversity was reduced. Metagenomic analysis showed that a large proportion of functional gene categories were significantly altered by the reduction in biodiversity. The abundance of genes related to the nitrogen cycle was significantly reduced in the low-diversity community, impairing denitrification. In contrast, the efficiency of diesel biodegradation was increased in the low-diversity community and was further enhanced by addition of red clay as a stimulating agent. Our results suggest that the relationship between microbial diversity and ecological function involves trade-offs among ecological processes, and should not be generalized as a positive, neutral, or negative relationship.

  12. Degradation and mineralization of 2-chloro-, 3-chloro- and 4-chlorobiphenyl by a newly characterized natural bacterial strain isolated from an electrical transformer fluid-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilori, Matthew O; Robinson, Gary K; Adebusoye, Sunday A

    2008-01-01

    A bacterium classified as Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain IR08 by phenotypic typing coupled with 16S rRNA gene analysis was isolated from a soil contaminated with electrical transformer fluid for over sixty years using Aroclor 1221 as an enrichment substrate. The substrate utilization profiles revealed that IR08 could grow on all three monochlorobiphenyls (CBs), 2,4'- and 4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl as well as 2-chlorobenzoate (2-CBA), 3-CBA, 4-CBA, and 2,3-dichlorobenzoate. Unusually, growth was poorly sustained on biphenyl and benzoate. In growth experiments, IR08 degraded all CBs (0.27 mmol/L) in less than 96 h with concomitant stoichiometric release of inorganic chloride and growth yields were 2-3 times higher than those observed on biphenyl. In contrast to most of the chlorobiphenyl-degrading strains described in the literature, which are reported to form CBA, no metabolite was identified in the culture broth by HPLC analysis. When co-incubated with respective CBs and biphenyl, strain IR08 preferentially utilized the chlorinated analogues in less than 96 h while it took another 264 h before 90% of the initially supplied biphenyl could be degraded. The promotion of co-metabolic transformation of halogenated substrates by the inclusion of their non-halogenated derivatives may not therefore, result in universal benefits.

  13. Two Pilot Plant Reactors Designed for the In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorobenzene-contaminated Ground Water: Hydrogeological and Chemical Characteristics and Bacterial Consortia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Carsten, E-mail: vogt@umb.ufz.de; Alfreider, Albin [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology (Germany); Lorbeer, Helmut [University of Technology Dresden, Institute of Waste Management and Contaminated Site Treatment (Germany); Ahlheim, Joerg; Feist, Bernd [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Industrial and Mining Landscapes (Germany); Boehme, Olaf [GFE GmbH Halle (Germany); Weiss, Holger [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Industrial and Mining Landscapes (Germany); Babel, Wolfgang; Wuensche, Lothar [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology (Germany)

    2002-05-15

    The SAFIRA in situ pilot plant in Bitterfeld, Saxonia-Anhalt, Germany, currently serves as the test site for eight different in situ approaches to remediate anoxic chlorobenzene (CB)-contaminated ground water. Two reactors, both filled with original lignite-containing aquifer material, are designed for the microbiological in situ remediation of the ground water by the indigenous microbial consortia. In this study, the hydrogeological, chemical and microbiological conditions of the in flowing ground water and reactor filling material are presented,in order to establish the scientific basis for the start of the bioremediation process itself. The reactors were put into operation in June 1999. In the following, inflow CB concentrations in the ground water varied between 22 and 33 mg L{sup -1}; a chemical steady state for CB in both reactors was reached after 210 till 260 days operation time. The sediments were colonized by high numbers of a