WorldWideScience

Sample records for pretransplantation pet status

  1. Current status and future perspective of PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Chul

    2002-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging modality that consists of systemic administration to a subject of a radiopharmaceutical labeled with a positron-emitting radionuclide. Following administration, its distribution in the organ or structure under study can be assessed as a function of time and space by (1) detecting the annihilation radiation resulting from the interaction of the positrons with matter, and (2) reconstructing the distribution of the radioactivity from a series of that used in computed tomography (CT). The nuclides most generally exhibit chemical properties that render them particularly desirable in physiological studies. The radionuclides most widely used in PET are F-18, C-11, O-15 and N-13. Regarding to the number of the current PET Centers worldwide (based on ICP data), more than 300 PET Centers were in operation in 2000. The use of PET technology grew rapidly compared to that in 1992 and 1996, particularly in the USA, which demonstrates a three-fold rise in PET installations. In 2001, 194 PET Centers were operating in the USA. In 1994, two clinical and research-oriented PET Centers at Seoul National University Hospital and Samsung Medical Center, was established as the first dedicated PET and Cyclotron machines in Korea, followed by two more PET facilities at the Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Ajou Medical Center, Yonsei University Medical Center, National Cancer Center and established their PET Center. Catholic Medical School and Pusan National University Hospital have finalized a plan to install PET machine in 2002, which results in total of nine PET Centers in Korea. Considering annual trends of PET application in four major PET centers in Korea in Asan Medical Center recent six years (from 1995 to 2000), a total of 11,564 patients have been studied every year and the number of PET studies has shown steep growth year upon year. We had, 1,020 PET patients in 1995. This number increased to 1,196, 1,756, 2,379, 3

  2. Current status and prospects of cardiac PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Katuya

    1999-01-01

    With positron emission tomography (PET), noninvasive measurements of myocardial blood flow and metabolism have now become possible. 1) Myocardial blood flow: We developed a high-resolution PET system for rabbits and showed that myocardial N-13 ammonnia uptake correlated well with flow measure with microspheres. We also demonstrated that a simplified PET protocol using N-13 ammonia or Rb-82 provide noninvasive measurement of coronary flow reserve in dog experiments. This protocol enables to produce estimates of myocardial blood flow in man and that are well correlated with the complex compartment model. 2) Myocardial glucose metabolism: We validated experimentally a simple method to quantify tissue glucose utilization with the brain reference index (BRI) using C-14 deoxyglucose and assessed its clinical feasibility for myocardial PET. 3) Membrane integrity: Loss of cell membrane integrity for trapping the potassium or it's analog is a market of myocardial necrosis/viability. We recently synthetized potassium-38 as a PET tracer and started an experimental study. (author)

  3. Long-term detection of microchimaerism in peripheral blood after pretransplantation blood transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoordeldonk, S. F.; Doumaid, K.; Remmerswaal, E. B.; ten Berge, I. J.; Wilmink, J. M.; de Waal, L. P.; Boog, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    Renal allograft survival is prolonged after pretransplantation blood transfusion. The aim of this study was to test retrospectively the development and persistence of microchimaerism after pretransplantation blood transfusion and to assess whether the type of blood transfusion (partially matched [=

  4. Oncologic PET/CT: current status and controversies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, B.A.; Dehdashti, F.

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of integrated PET/CT has dramatically increased the worldwide rate of growth for PET, predominantly for oncologic imaging with the glucose analog 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). A rapidly expanding body of literature demonstrates that the use FDG-PET/CT and the resultant ability to interpret coregistered and fused PET and CT images lead to improved observer confidence and improved diagnostic performance by comparison with PET alone, CT alone, and visually correlated PET and CT. The value of PET/CT is likely to be even greater with new PET radiopharmaceuticals under development, many of which produce PET images with even fewer anatomical landmarks than FDG images. PET/CT is also likely to lead to the resurrection of 18 F-fluoride as a principal agent for radionuclide bone imaging. There are a number of controversies related to PET/CT, including minimum training and experience requirements for interpreting physicians and defining new models for technical and professional reimbursement. (orig.)

  5. A Study on Mental Health Status and Personality Traits of Pet Owners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Choobineh

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Many Iranian families manage to keep pets at home. Examining psychological consequences and personality traits of pet owners is important. The aim of this study was to examine mental health status and personality traits of pet owners. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive study, 612 pet owners (143 cat owners, 162 dog owners, 155 bird owners and 152 other pet owners were asked to complete General Health Questionnaire (GHQ and IPIP Personality Scale from January to December 2006. Results: Bird owners had the highest (234 cases (38.3% and other pet owners had the lowest (129 cases (42.3% mental health problems. In general, 188 cases (30.7% of all groups had mental health problems. 122 cases (20% of them had somatic compliance, 182 cases (29.7% had anxiety, 149 cases (24.3% had social dysfunction and 84 cases (13.7% had depression. Bird owners had significant high level of social dysfunction than other pet owners. With respect to personality traits, dog owners had low level of agreeableness and openness to experience than other groups. Other pet owners had high level of emotional stability than other groups. Conclusion: Contrary to other countries, it seems that having a pet in home enhances the probability of mental disorders in Iran. It is possible that lower mental health persons were keeping pets in Iran. In personality perspectives, dog owners are more disagreeable people and other pet owners are more emotionally stable ones.

  6. Higher Pretransplantation Hemoglobin A1c Is Associated With Greater Risk of Posttransplant Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Im Shin

    2017-11-01

    Discussion: Higher pretransplantation HbA1c above 5.4% is independently associated with greater risk of PTDM among kidney transplant recipients. A continuous relationship between pretransplantation HbA1c and risk of PTDM suggests that increased risk starts at HbA1c levels well below current thresholds for prediabetes.

  7. Cortico-thalamic activation in generalized status epilepticus, a PET study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, B. M.; van de Hoeven, J. H.; Pruim, J.; van der Naalt, J.; Meertens, John H. J. M.

    In a patient with a refractory generalized convulsive status epilepticus, the ictal distribution of regional cerebral glucose was assessed with positron emission tomography (PET). Synchronized seizure activity in the EEG was associated with bilateral metabolic activation of medial sensorimotor

  8. High pretransplantation soluble CD30 levels: impact in renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoli, C; Bonnet, M C; Perrat, G; Houillon, A; Reydet, S; Pouteil-Noble, C; Villar, E; Lefrançois, N; Morelon, E; Dubois, V

    2007-10-01

    In a retrospective study, the impact of the level of pretransplantation soluble CD30 molecule (sCD30) was evaluated on 3 year transplant survival, as well as the number and grade of acute rejection episodes among kidney recipients engrafted between 2000 and 2002. One hundred and ninety sera of 190 patients sampled on the cross-match day were tested for sCD30 concentrations using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit (Biotest). For the analysis, a sCD30 cutoff level of 100 U/mL was chosen: 87 (46%) recipients had a level >100, and 103 (54%) sCD30 level. The rate of biopsy-proven acute rejection was 26% in the sCD30 >100 group versus 22% in the sCD30 sCD30 >100 versus 20% for the lower level. The difference was more important for grade II acute rejection (Banff criteria): 6/87 (7%) showed high sCD30 versus 2/103 (2%) with sCD30 sCD30 >100) versus 1 (1%) in the second group (sCD30 sCD30 was not a significant risk factor for an acute rejection episode, but it seemed to be more predictive for antibody-mediated acute rejection and immunological graft loss. However, many recipients showed an increased pretransplantation concentration without any rejection episode or graft loss. Consequently, sCD30 pregraft measurements cannot be used as a predictor for acute kidney rejection among our transplant center, nor as an aid to adapt the immunosuppressive regimen.

  9. PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Rasmus Mølgaard; Schmidt, Regin; Heiberg, Morten Rievers

    PET handler om den hemmelige tjenestes arbejde under den kolde krig 1945-1989. Her fortæller Regin Schmidt, Rasmus Mariager og Morten Heiberg om de mest dramatiske og interessante sager fra PET's arkiv. PET er på flere måder en udemokratisk institution, der er sat til at vogte over demokratiet....... Dens virksomhed er skjult for offentligheden, den overvåger borgernes aktiviteter, og den registrerer følsomme personoplysninger. Historien om PET rejser spørgsmålet om, hvad man skal gøre, når befolkningen i et demokrati er kritisk indstillet over for overvågningen af lovlige politiske aktiviteter......, mens myndighederne mener, at det er nødvendigt for at beskytte demokratiet. PET er på en gang en fortælling om konkrete aktioner og begivenheder i PET's arbejde og et stykke Danmarkshistorie. Det handler om overvågning, spioner, politisk ekstremisme og international terrorisme.  ...

  10. Current status of PET imaging in Huntington's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagano, Gennaro; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2016-01-01

    To review the developments of recent decades and the current status of PET molecular imaging in Huntington's disease (HD). A systematic review of PET studies in HD was performed. The MEDLINE, Web of Science, Cochrane and Scopus databases were searched for articles in all languages published up to 19 August 2015 using the major medical subject heading ''Huntington Disease'' combined with text and key words ''Huntington Disease'', ''Neuroimaging'' and ''PET''. Only peer-reviewed, primary research studies in HD patients and premanifest HD carriers, and studies in which clinical features were described in association with PET neuroimaging results, were included in this review. Reviews, case reports and nonhuman studies were excluded. A total of 54 PET studies were identified and analysed in this review. Brain metabolism ([ 18 F]FDG and [ 15 O]H 2 O), presynaptic ([ 18 F]fluorodopa, [ 11 C]β-CIT and [ 11 C]DTBZ) and postsynaptic ([ 11 C]SCH22390, [ 11 C]FLB457 and [ 11 C]raclopride) dopaminergic function, phosphodiesterases ([ 18 F]JNJ42259152, [ 18 F]MNI-659 and [ 11 C]IMA107), and adenosine ([ 18 F]CPFPX), cannabinoid ([ 18 F]MK-9470), opioid ([ 11 C]diprenorphine) and GABA ([ 11 C]flumazenil) receptors were evaluated as potential biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and for assessing the development and efficacy of novel disease-modifying drugs in premanifest HD carriers and HD patients. PET studies evaluating brain restoration and neuroprotection were also identified and described in detail. Brain metabolism, postsynaptic dopaminergic function and phosphodiesterase 10A levels were proven to be powerful in assessing disease progression. However, no single technique may be currently considered an optimal biomarker and an integrative multimodal imaging approach combining different techniques should be developed for monitoring potential neuroprotective and preventive treatment

  11. Pretransplantation recipient regulatory T cell suppressive function predicts delayed and slow graft function after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh-Tri J P; Fryml, Elise; Sahakian, Sossy K; Liu, Shuqing; Michel, Rene P; Lipman, Mark L; Mucsi, Istvan; Cantarovich, Marcelo; Tchervenkov, Jean I; Paraskevas, Steven

    2014-10-15

    Delayed graft function (DGF) and slow graft function (SGF) are a continuous spectrum of ischemia-reperfusion-related acute kidney injury (AKI) that increases the risk for acute rejection and graft loss after kidney transplantation. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical in transplant tolerance and attenuate murine AKI. In this prospective observational cohort study, we evaluated whether pretransplantation peripheral blood recipient Treg frequency and suppressive function are predictors of DGF and SGF after kidney transplantation. Deceased donor kidney transplant recipients (n=53) were divided into AKI (n=37; DGF, n=10; SGF, n=27) and immediate graft function (n=16) groups. Pretransplantation peripheral blood CD4CD25FoxP3 Treg frequency was quantified by flow cytometry. Regulatory T-cell suppressive function was measured by suppression of autologous effector T-cell proliferation by Treg in co-culture. Pretransplantation Treg suppressive function, but not frequency, was decreased in AKI recipients (Paccounting for the effects of cold ischemic time and donor age, Treg suppressive function discriminated DGF from immediate graft function recipients in multinomial logistic regression (odds ratio, 0.77; Pfunction is a potential independent pretransplantation predictor of DGF and SGF.

  12. Radioligands for PET studies of central benzodiazepine receptors and PK (peripheral benzodiazepine) binding sites -current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, V.W.; Osman, S.; Shah, F.; Turton, D.R.; Waters, S.L.; Crouzel, C.; Nutt, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The status of the radiochemical development and biological evaluation of radioligands for PET studies of central benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors and the so-called peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites, here discriminated and referred to as PK binding sites, is reviewed against current pharmacological knowledge, indicating those agents with present value and those with future potential. Practical recommendations are given for the preparation of two useful radioligands for PET studies, [N-methyl- 11 C]flumazenil for central BZ receptors, and [N-methyl- 11 C]PK 11195 for PK binding sites. Quality assurance and plasma metabolite analysis are also reviewed for these radioligands and practical recommendations are given on methodology for their performance. (Author)

  13. Role of preoperative PET-CT in assessing mediastinal and hilar lymph node status in early stage lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yang Lin

    2012-05-01

    Conclusion: Integrated PET-CT is a useful tool for predicting the negativity of mediastinal LN status pre-operatively in clinically early stage (Stages I and II lung cancer but may be relatively inaccurate in predicting hilar LN status and largely confounded by false positives caused by inflammatory process.

  14. Current status of PET imaging in Huntington's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagano, Gennaro; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios [King' s College London, Neurodegeneration Imaging Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Maurice Wohl Clinical Neuroscience Institute, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), Camberwell, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    To review the developments of recent decades and the current status of PET molecular imaging in Huntington's disease (HD). A systematic review of PET studies in HD was performed. The MEDLINE, Web of Science, Cochrane and Scopus databases were searched for articles in all languages published up to 19 August 2015 using the major medical subject heading ''Huntington Disease'' combined with text and key words ''Huntington Disease'', ''Neuroimaging'' and ''PET''. Only peer-reviewed, primary research studies in HD patients and premanifest HD carriers, and studies in which clinical features were described in association with PET neuroimaging results, were included in this review. Reviews, case reports and nonhuman studies were excluded. A total of 54 PET studies were identified and analysed in this review. Brain metabolism ([{sup 18}F]FDG and [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O), presynaptic ([{sup 18}F]fluorodopa, [{sup 11}C]β-CIT and [{sup 11}C]DTBZ) and postsynaptic ([{sup 11}C]SCH22390, [{sup 11}C]FLB457 and [{sup 11}C]raclopride) dopaminergic function, phosphodiesterases ([{sup 18}F]JNJ42259152, [{sup 18}F]MNI-659 and [{sup 11}C]IMA107), and adenosine ([{sup 18}F]CPFPX), cannabinoid ([{sup 18}F]MK-9470), opioid ([{sup 11}C]diprenorphine) and GABA ([{sup 11}C]flumazenil) receptors were evaluated as potential biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and for assessing the development and efficacy of novel disease-modifying drugs in premanifest HD carriers and HD patients. PET studies evaluating brain restoration and neuroprotection were also identified and described in detail. Brain metabolism, postsynaptic dopaminergic function and phosphodiesterase 10A levels were proven to be powerful in assessing disease progression. However, no single technique may be currently considered an optimal biomarker and an integrative multimodal imaging approach combining different techniques should be developed

  15. FDG-PET status following chemoradiotherapy provides high management impact and powerful prognostic stratification in oesophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong, Cuong P.; Thomas, Robert J.S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Drummond, Elizabeth; Weih, LeAnn; Leong, Trevor; Michael, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET following chemoradiotherapy (CRT) on treatment planning and survival in patients with oesophageal cancer (OC). Fifty-three consecutive OC patients had a post-treatment PET scan to evaluate tumour response to CRT prior to possible surgery. Baseline pre-CRT PET was performed in 33 patients. Prospectively recorded post-CRT management plans were compared with post-PET treatment. High impact was defined as a change in treatment intent or modality. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method and Cox proportional hazards regression model. After completion of CRT, 23/53 patients (43%) achieved complete metabolic response (CMR), as compared with only four (8%) with complete response on computed tomography. High PET impact was observed in 19 patients (36%). CMR was strongly predictive of survival (p<0.008) on multivariate analysis. CMR patients in whom resection was not performed had comparable survival to those (CMR and non-CMR) who underwent resection. The use of post-treatment FDG-PET for assessment of tumour response after CRT changed the clinical management of more than one-third of OC patients. CMR status as assessed by PET powerfully stratified prognosis. Even in the absence of a baseline study, normalisation of uptake at all sites of known tumoral involvement carries a good medium-term prognosis. (orig.)

  16. Status gelasticus after temporal lobectomy: ictal FDG-PET findings and the question of dual pathology involving hypothalamic hamartomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmini, Andre; Van Paesschen, Wim; Dupont, Patrick; Van Laere, Koen; Van Driel, Guido

    2005-08-01

    To present the first ictal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) evidence of the hypothalamic origin of gelastic seizures in a patient with a hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) and to raise the issue of true dual pathology related to this entity. Ictal FDG-PET was acquired during an episode of status gelasticus with preserved consciousness, in a patient previously operated on for complex partial seizures (CPSs) due to a temporal lobe epileptogenic cyst. Ictal hypermetabolism was localized to the region of the HH during the status gelasticus. CPSs had been completely eliminated after temporal lobe surgery. Ictal FDG-PET independently confirmed that gelastic seizures in patients with HH do originate in the diencephalic lesion. An HH may coexist with another epileptogenic lesion, in a context of dual pathology.

  17. History and current status of PET development based on time of flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun Mingkai; Li Ting; Zhang Zhiming; Zhang Yubao; Shan Baoci; Wei Long

    2012-01-01

    The principle of time of flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) and a brief review of the history of TOF-PET are introduced. The factors influencing the time resolution of a TOF-PET scanner are presented, especially focus on the intrinsic properties of scintillators and front-end electronics. Challenges and achievements of the structure of data organization and image reconstruction are reviewed. Finally, the benefits of TOF-PET on image quality improvement and tumor detection are emphasized. (authors)

  18. PET/MRI of central nervous system: current status and future perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhen Lu; Zhang, Long Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Imaging plays an increasingly important role in the early diagnosis, prognosis prediction and therapy response evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. The newly emerging hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) can perform ''one-stop-shop'' evaluation, including anatomic, functional, biochemical and metabolic information, even at the molecular level, for personalised diagnoses and treatments of CNS diseases. However, there are still several problems to be resolved, such as appropriate PET detectors, attenuation correction and so on. This review will introduce the basic physical principles of PET/MRI and its potential clinical applications in the CNS. We also provide the future perspectives for this field. (orig.)

  19. Current status and future role of brain PET/MRI in clinical and research settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, P.; Barthel, H.; Sabri, O. [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Drzezga, A. [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Koeln (Germany)

    2015-01-09

    Hybrid PET/MRI systematically offers a complementary combination of two modalities that has often proven itself superior to the single modality approach in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Emerging PET tracers, technical advances in multiparametric MRI and obvious workflow advantages may lead to a significant improvement in the diagnosis of dementia disorders, neurooncological diseases, epilepsy and neurovascular diseases using PET/MRI. Moreover, simultaneous PET/MRI is well suited to complex studies of brain function in which fast fluctuations of brain signals (e.g. related to task processing or in response to pharmacological interventions) need to be monitored on multiple levels. Initial simultaneous studies have already demonstrated that these complementary measures of brain function can provide new insights into the functional and structural organization of the brain. (orig.)

  20. Current status and future role of brain PET/MRI in clinical and research settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, P.; Barthel, H.; Sabri, O.; Drzezga, A.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid PET/MRI systematically offers a complementary combination of two modalities that has often proven itself superior to the single modality approach in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Emerging PET tracers, technical advances in multiparametric MRI and obvious workflow advantages may lead to a significant improvement in the diagnosis of dementia disorders, neurooncological diseases, epilepsy and neurovascular diseases using PET/MRI. Moreover, simultaneous PET/MRI is well suited to complex studies of brain function in which fast fluctuations of brain signals (e.g. related to task processing or in response to pharmacological interventions) need to be monitored on multiple levels. Initial simultaneous studies have already demonstrated that these complementary measures of brain function can provide new insights into the functional and structural organization of the brain. (orig.)

  1. Contamination status and accumulation features of persistent organochlorines in pet dogs and cats from Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunisue, Tatsuya; Nakanishi, Shigeyuki; Watanabe, Mafumi; Abe, Takao; Nakatsu, Susumu; Kawauchi, Sakio; Sano, Akihiko; Horii, Akira; Kano, Yasumasa; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2005-01-01

    Concentrations of persistent organochlorines (OCs) such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), biphenyls, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and their metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers, hexachlorobenzene, and chlordane compounds were determined in genital organs of pet dogs and cats and pet foods from Japan. Levels of OCs in dogs were relatively lower than those in cats, while residue levels in their diets were almost similar, implying that accumulation and elimination mechanisms of these contaminants are different between dogs and cats. When bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were estimated from concentrations of OCs in dogs, cats, and their diets, BCFs of all the OCs except PCDD/DFs exceeded 1.0 in cats. On the other hand, in all the dogs, BCFs of DDTs were below 1.0, suggesting that dogs do not bioconcentrate DDTs. Furthermore, BCFs of all the OCs except PCDD/DFs in dogs were notably lower than those in cats, suggesting that dogs have higher metabolic and elimination capacity for these contaminants than cats. When residue levels of OCs in livers, adipose tissue, and genital organs of two pet dogs were examined, hepatic sequestration of PCDD/DFs and oxychlordane was observed. - Pet dogs may have higher metabolic and elimination capacity for organochlorines than pet cats

  2. PET/MRI of central nervous system: current status and future perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhen Lu; Zhang, Long Jiang [Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-10-15

    Imaging plays an increasingly important role in the early diagnosis, prognosis prediction and therapy response evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. The newly emerging hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) can perform ''one-stop-shop'' evaluation, including anatomic, functional, biochemical and metabolic information, even at the molecular level, for personalised diagnoses and treatments of CNS diseases. However, there are still several problems to be resolved, such as appropriate PET detectors, attenuation correction and so on. This review will introduce the basic physical principles of PET/MRI and its potential clinical applications in the CNS. We also provide the future perspectives for this field. (orig.)

  3. Current status of PET imaging of differentiated thyroid cancer with second generation radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauri, C.; Di Traglia, S.; Galli, F.; Pizzichini, P.; Signore, A.

    2015-01-01

    Although the prognosis of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is favorable, some histotypes show worst clinical outcome and higher risk of recurrence. Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels and 131 I-whole-body-scan (WBS), together with neck ultrasound (US), represent the golden standard for DTC follow-up. Nevertheless, the relatively high frequency of patients with high Tg levels and negative WBS requires further investigations by using new imaging modalities. The availability of whole body positron emission tomography (PET) methods, in parallel with the advances in radiochemistry, offer a wide substrate for many solutions. To this day 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET/CT still represents the imaging of choice in follow-up of patients with high serum Tg and negative 131 I-WBS but in the last decades the research has focused on finding “second generation” radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging, with both diagnostic and prognostic purposes, aiming to change the way to image thyroid cancer. Moreover, the use of various PET radiopharmaceuticals, that offer the possibility to explore different pathways involved in thyroid cancer, could find important applications in the near future for clinical decision making in order to program tailored treatments and follow-up. It would be desirable to use the same radiopharmaceutical for both imaging and dosimetric purpose to achieve a tailored therapy. Many efforts are focused in this direction and 124 I-PET/CT is now emerging as a valid tool in restaging and therapy management of DTC with promising results. Although the preliminary data available in literature require a confirmation in larger studies with longer follow-up, we think that in next future 124 -PET/CT could gain an important role for management of DTC. The aim of this review was to perform a systematic analysis of literature describing the state of art of “second generation” PET-radiopharmaceuticals for imaging DTC. Discussion is focused on the utility of 124 I-PET

  4. Prognostisk vaerdi af PET og MRS ved evaluering af cerebral status hos børn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Lise; Danielsen, Else Rubaek; Børch, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of a 12-week-old previously normal infant with severe brain damage after an episode of asphyxia during an RS-virus infection. Sub-acute MRI was normal, but new functional techniques, PET (positron emission tomography) and MRS (magnetic resonance spectroscopy) were severely abnormal...

  5. Post-treatment PET/CT and p16 status for predicting treatment outcomes in locally advanced head and neck cancer after definitive radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awan, Musaddiq J.; Machtay, Mitchell; Yao, Min [Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Lavertu, Pierre; Zender, Chad; Rezaee, Rod; Fowler, Nicole [University Hospitals, Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States); Karapetyan, Lilit; Gibson, Michael [University Hospitals, Department of Medical Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wasman, Jay [University Hospitals, Department of Pathology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Faulhaber, Peter [University Hospitals, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To retrospectively review post-treatment (post-tx) FDG-PET/CT scans in patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and known p16 status, treated with definitive (chemo)radiation (RT). A total of 108 eligible patients had N2A or greater HNSCC treated with chemoRT from August 1, 2008, to February 28, 2015, with post-tx PET/CT within 6 months after RT. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank statistics, and Cox proportional hazards regression were used for statistical analysis. Median follow-up was 2.38 years. Sixty-eight (63.0%) patients had p16+ and 40 (37.0%) had p16- status. Two-year overall survival and recurrence-free survival were 93.4% and 77.8%, respectively. The negative predictive value (NPV) of PET/CT for local recurrence (LR) was 100%. The NPV for regional recurrence (RR) was 96.5% for all patients, 100% for p16+ patients, and 88.5% for p16- patients. The positive predictive value (PPV) of PET/CT for recurrence was 77.3% for all patients, 50.0% for p16+, and 78.6% for p16-. The PPV for LR was 72.7% for all patients, 50.0% for p16+ patients, and 72.7% for p16- patients. The PPV for RR was 50.0% for all patients, 33% for p16+, and 66.6% for p16-. Post-tx PET/CT and p16 status were independent predictors of recurrence-free survival (p < 0.01). Post-tx PET/CT predicts treatment outcomes in both p16 + and p16- patients, and does so independently of p16 status. P16- patients with negative PET have a 10% risk of nodal recurrence, and closer follow-up in these patients is warranted. (orig.)

  6. Pre-transplantation specification of stem cells to cardiac lineage for regeneration of cardiac tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Maritza; Finan, Amanda; Penn, Marc

    2009-03-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a lead cause of mortality in the Western world. Treatment of acute MI is focused on restoration of antegrade flow which inhibits further tissue loss, but does not restore function to damaged tissue. Chronic therapy for injured myocardial tissue involves medical therapy that attempts to minimize pathologic remodeling of the heart. End stage therapy for chronic heart failure (CHF) involves inotropic therapy to increase surviving cardiac myocyte function or mechanical augmentation of cardiac performance. Not until the point of heart transplantation, a limited resource at best, does therapy focus on the fundamental problem of needing to replace injured tissue with new contractile tissue. In this setting, the potential for stem cell therapy has garnered significant interest for its potential to regenerate or create new contractile cardiac tissue. While to date adult stem cell therapy in clinical trials has suggested potential benefit, there is waning belief that the approaches used to date lead to regeneration of cardiac tissue. As the literature has better defined the pathways involved in cardiac differentiation, preclinical studies have suggested that stem cell pretreatment to direct stem cell differentiation prior to stem cell transplantation may be a more efficacious strategy for inducing cardiac regeneration. Here we review the available literature on pre-transplantation conditioning of stem cells in an attempt to better understand stem cell behavior and their readiness in cell-based therapy for myocardial regeneration.

  7. Pre-Transplantation Blockade of TNF-α-Mediated Oxygen Species Accumulation Protects Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takashi; Suzuki, Sachie; Lai, Chen-Yi; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Kakuta, Shigeru; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Nojima, Masanori; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Higashihara, Masaaki; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Otsu, Makoto

    2017-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) for malignancy requires toxic pre-conditioning to maximize anti-tumor effects and donor-HSC engraftment. While this induces bone marrow (BM)-localized inflammation, how this BM environmental change affects transplanted HSCs in vivo remains largely unknown. We here report that, depending on interval between irradiation and HSCT, residence within lethally irradiated recipient BM compromises donor-HSC reconstitution ability. Both in vivo and in vitro we demonstrate that, among inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α plays a role in HSC damage: TNF-α stimulation leads to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in highly purified hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs/HSPCs). Transplantation of flow-cytometry-sorted murine HSCs reveals damaging effects of accumulated ROS on HSCs. Short-term incubation either with an specific inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 signaling or an antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) prevents TNF-α-mediated ROS accumulation in HSCs. Importantly, pre-transplantation exposure to NAC successfully demonstrats protective effects in inflammatory BM on graft-HSCs, exhibiting better reconstitution capability than that of nonprotected control grafts. We thus suggest that in vivo protection of graft-HSCs from BM inflammation is a feasible and attractive approach, which may lead to improved hematopoietic reconstitution kinetics in transplantation with myeloablative conditioning that inevitably causes inflammation in recipient BM. Stem Cells 2017;35:989-1002. © 2016 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  8. Trends in PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, William W.

    2000-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT)

  9. Pretreatment evaluation of distant-site status in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma: accuracy of whole-body MRI at 3-Tesla and FDG-PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Shu-Hang; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Liao, Chun-Ta; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Wai, Yau-Yau; Wang, Hung-Ming; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Chen, Min-Chi

    2009-01-01

    We sought to prospectively evaluate the accuracy of 3.0-Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) and integrated fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (FDG-PET-CT), and their combined interpretation for the assessment of distant-site status in 150 patients with untreated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Eighteen (12%) patients were diagnosed as having distant malignancies (15 patients had distant metastases, and three distant synchronous tumours). On a patient-based analysis, WB-MRI and FDG-PET-CT showed similar sensitivity (77.8% vs 72.2%, P > 0.999), specificity (98.5% vs 97.7%, P > 0.999) and diagnostic capability (0.905 vs 0.878, P = 0.669). Combined interpretation of WB-MRI and FDG-PET-CT showed no significant benefit over either technique alone. In conclusion, 3.0-Tesla WB-MRI is a feasible, non-ionising technique that showed similar diagnostic capacity to FDG-PET-CT in assessing distant-site status in patients with untreated NPC and can be recommended as the first-line imaging technique for comprehensive evaluation of such patients. (orig.)

  10. Pretransplantation soluble CD30 level as a predictor of acute rejection in kidney transplantation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yile; Tai, Qiang; Hong, Shaodong; Kong, Yuan; Shang, Yushu; Liang, Wenhua; Guo, Zhiyong; He, Xiaoshun

    2012-11-15

    The question of whether high pretransplantation soluble CD30 (sCD30) level can be a predictor of kidney transplant acute rejection (AR) is under debate. Herein, we performed a meta-analysis on the predictive efficacy of sCD30 for AR in renal transplantation. PubMed (1966-2012), EMBASE (1988-2012), and Web of Science (1986-2012) databases were searched for studies concerning the predictive efficacy of sCD30 for AR after kidney transplantation. After a careful review of eligible studies, sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of the accuracy of sCD30 were pooled. A summary receiver operating characteristic curve was used to represent the overall test performance. Twelve studies enrolling 2507 patients met the inclusion criteria. The pooled estimates for pretransplantation sCD30 in prediction of allograft rejection risk were poor, with a sensitivity of 0.70 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.66-0.74), a specificity of 0.48 (95% CI, 0.46-0.50), a positive likelihood ratio of 1.35 (95% CI, 1.20-1.53), a negative likelihood ratio of 0.68 (95% CI, 0.55-0.84), and a diagnostic odds ratio of 2.07 (95% CI, 1.54-2.80). The area under curve of the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.60, indicating poor overall accuracy of the serum sCD30 level in the prediction of patients at risk for AR. The results of the meta-analysis show that the accuracy of pretransplantation sCD30 for predicting posttransplantation AR was poor. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the usefulness of this test for identifying risks of AR in transplant recipients.

  11. Role of [18F]FDG PET in prediction of KRAS and EGFR mutation status in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caicedo, Carlos; Garcia-Velloso, Maria Jose; Vigil Diaz, Carmen; Richter Echevarria, Jose Angel; Lozano, Maria Dolores; Labiano, Tania; Lopez-Picazo, Jose Maria; Gurpide, Alfonso; Perez Gracia, Jose Luis; Zulueta, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The tumour molecular profile predicts the activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, tissue availability and tumour heterogeneity limit its assessment. We evaluated whether [ 18 F]FDG PET might help predict KRAS and EFGR mutation status in NSCLC. Between January 2005 and October 2011, 340 NSCLC patients were tested for KRAS and EGFR mutation status. We identified patients with stage III and IV disease who had undergone [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT scanning for initial staging. SUVpeak, SUVmax and SUVmean of the single hottest tumour lesions were calculated, and their association with KRAS and EGFR mutation status was assessed. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and a multivariate analysis (including SUVmean, gender, age and AJCC stage) were performed to identify the potential value of [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT for predicting KRAS mutation. From 102 patients staged using [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT, 28 (27 %) had KRAS mutation (KRAS+), 22 (22 %) had EGFR mutation (EGFR+) and 52 (51 %) had wild-type KRAS and EGFR profiles (WT). KRAS+ patients showed significantly higher [ 18 F]FDG uptake than EGFR+ and WT patients (SUVmean 9.5, 5.7 and 6.6, respectively; p 18 F]FDG uptake between EGFR+ patients and WT patients. ROC curve analysis for KRAS mutation status discrimination yielded an area under the curve of 0.740 for SUVmean (p 18 F]FDG uptake than WT patients, as assessed in terms of SUVpeak, SUVmax and SUVmean. A multivariate model based on age, gender, AJCC stage and SUVmean might be used as a predictive marker of KRAS mutation status in patients with stage III or IV NSCLC. (orig.)

  12. The Relationship between Brown Adipose Tissue Activity and Neoplastic Status: an 18F-FDG PET/CT Study in the Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yung-Cheng

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brown adipose tissue (BAT has thermogenic potential. For its activation, cold exposure is considered a critical factor though other determinants have also been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between neoplastic status and BAT activity by 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT in people living in the tropics, where the influence of outdoor temperature was low. Methods 18F-FDG PET/CT scans were reviewed and the total metabolic activity (TMA of identified activated BAT quantified. The distribution and TMA of activated BAT were compared between patients with and without a cancer history. The neoplastic status of patients was scored according to their cancer history and 18F-FDG PET/CT findings. We evaluated the relationships between the TMA of BAT and neoplastic status along with other factors: age, body mass index, fasting blood sugar, gender, and outdoor temperature. Results Thirty of 1740 patients had activated BAT. Those with a cancer history had wider BAT distribution (p = 0.043 and a higher TMA (p = 0.028 than those without. A higher neoplastic status score was associated with a higher average TMA. Multivariate analyses showed that neoplastic status was the only factor significantly associated with the TMA of activated BAT (p = 0.016. Conclusions Neoplastic status is a critical determinant of BAT activity in patients living in the tropics. More active neoplastic status was associated with more vigorous TMA of BAT.

  13. Kidney graft recipients with pretransplantation HLA CLASS I antibodies and high soluble CD30 are at high risk for graft loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Libia M; París, Sara C; Arbeláez, Mario; Cotes, José M; Süsal, Caner; Torres, Yolanda; García, Luís F

    2007-08-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether pretransplantation HLA class I and class II antibodies and pretransplantation levels of soluble CD30 (sCD30) and IgA anti-Fab autoantibodies are predictive of kidney allograft survival. Pretransplantation sera of 504 deceased-donor kidney recipients were tested for IgG HLA class I and class II antibodies, sCD30, and IgA anti-Fab levels using the CTS 4 ELISA kit. Kidney graft survival was estimated by Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate Cox regression. Regardless of the presence of HLA class II antibodies, recipients with high HLA class I reactivity had lower 1-year graft survival than recipients with low reactivity (p sCD30 had lower 5-year graft survival rate than those with low sCD30 (p sCD30 effect was observed in presensitized and nonsensitized recipients, demonstrated a synergistic effect with HLA class I antibodies (p kidney graft survival. Our results indicate that high pretransplantation sCD30 levels and HLA class I positivity increase the risk of kidney graft loss regardless of other factors. Consequently, such determinations should be routinely performed to estimate recipients' risks of graft rejection before transplantation.

  14. Production, applications and status of zirconium-89 immunoPET agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalilian, A.R.; Osso, Joao Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Zirconium-89 has attracted huge interests and is used in tracing and quantification of slow biological processes and labeling of long half-live biomolecules such as monoclonal antibodies for pharmacokinetic studies and clinical trials. In this review, a concise introduction to targetry, irradiation data, separation and coordination chemistry of zirconium-89 has been presented. A detailed overreviwew on bi-functional ligands conjugation and "8"9Zr radiolabeling been addressed. The latest status of preclinical as well as clinical trials using "8"9Zr radioimmunomolecules in various human diseases has been presented since 2012. (author)

  15. Tingkat Pendidikan dan Status Ekonomi Pemilik Hewan Kesayangan dalam Hal Pengetahuan dan Penerapan Kesejahteraan Hewan (EDUCATION LEVEL AND ECONOMIC STATUS OF PET OWNERS ON KNOWLEDGE AND ANIMAL WELFARE IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Utari Rahmiati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pet is an animal that lives to partially or completely dependent on humans for a particular purpose.Keep a pet as a companion animal, should pay attention to animal welfare. This study aims to gain insightabout the relationship between education level and economic status of pet owners on knowledge andimplementation of the animal welfare principles. The data were collecting by direct interview or a face toface interview to the animal clinic or hospital visitors on site (accidental technique. The data were calculatedby statistical methods chi square to examined the relationship or the impact of the two nominal variablesand measure the strengthness of the relationships between variables with each other nominal variables.Data showed a significantly correlation between the economic status of n North Jakarta respondentsbehavior (p value is 0.040, with the economic status of the Central Jakarta respondents’ attitudes (pvalue is 0.020, level of education and attitude of South Jakarta respondents (p value is 0.000. There wereno difference significantly between the level of education and economic status of the respondents’ knowledgewas observed in all study sites. However, based on current information and on site observation, NorthJakarta and West Jakarta respondents were considered to be able to demonstrate more sufficientknowledge of the animal welfare principles.

  16. Static and dynamic 18F-FET PET for the characterization of gliomas defined by IDH and 1p/19q status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Antoine; Stoffels, Gabriele; Bauer, Elena K; Lohmann, Philipp; Blau, Tobias; Fink, Gereon R; Neumaier, Bernd; Shah, Nadim J; Langen, Karl-Josef; Galldiks, Norbert

    2018-03-01

    The molecular features isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion have gained major importance for both glioma typing and prognosis and have, therefore, been integrated in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification in 2016. The aim of this study was to characterize static and dynamic O-(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET) PET parameters in gliomas with or without IDH mutation or 1p/19q co-deletion. Ninety patients with newly diagnosed and untreated gliomas with a static and dynamic 18 F-FET PET scan prior to evaluation of tumor tissue according to the 2016 WHO classification were identified retrospectively. Mean and maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR mean/max ), as well as dynamic parameters (time-to-peak and slope) of 18 F-FET uptake were calculated. Sixteen (18%) oligodendrogliomas (IDH mutated, 1p/19q co-deleted), 27 (30%) astrocytomas (IDH mutated only), and 47 (52%) glioblastomas (IDH wild type only) were identified. TBR mean , TBR max , TTP and slope discriminated between IDH mutated astrocytomas and IDH wild type glioblastomas (P dynamic 18 F-FET PET parameters may allow determining non-invasively the IDH mutation status. However, IDH mutated and 1p/19q co-deleted oligodendrogliomas cannot be differentiated from glioblastomas and astrocytomas by 18 F-FET PET.

  17. Public health ethics and a status for pets as person-things : revisiting the place of animals in urbanized societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Melanie; Degeling, Chris

    2013-12-01

    Within the field of medical ethics, discussions related to public health have mainly concentrated on issues that are closely tied to research and practice involving technologies and professional services, including vaccination, screening, and insurance coverage. Broader determinants of population health have received less attention, although this situation is rapidly changing. Against this backdrop, our specific contribution to the literature on ethics and law vis-à-vis promoting population health is to open up the ubiquitous presence of pets within cities and towns for further discussion. An expanding body of research suggests that pet animals are deeply relevant to people's health (negatively and positively). Pet bylaws adopted by town and city councils have largely escaped notice, yet they are meaningful to consider in relation to everyday practices, social norms, and cultural values, and thus in relation to population health. Nevertheless, not least because they pivot on defining pets as private property belonging to individual people, pet bylaws raise emotionally charged ethical issues that have yet to be tackled in any of the health research on pet ownership. The literature in moral philosophy on animals is vast, and we do not claim to advance this field here. Rather, we pragmatically seek to reconcile philosophical objections to pet ownership with both animal welfare and public health. In doing so, we foreground theorizations of personhood and property from sociocultural anthropology.

  18. Impact of genome assembly status on ChIP-Seq and ChIP-PET data mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachs Laurent

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ChIP-Seq and ChIP-PET can potentially be used with any genome for genome wide profiling of protein-DNA interaction sites. Unfortunately, it is probable that most genome assemblies will never reach the quality of the human genome assembly. Therefore, it remains to be determined whether ChIP-Seq and ChIP-PET are practicable with genome sequences other than a few (e.g. human and mouse. Findings Here, we used in silico simulations to assess the impact of completeness or fragmentation of genome assemblies on ChIP-Seq and ChIP-PET data mapping. Conclusions Most currently published genome assemblies are suitable for mapping the short sequence tags produced by ChIP-Seq or ChIP-PET.

  19. Role of [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in prediction of KRAS and EGFR mutation status in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caicedo, Carlos; Garcia-Velloso, Maria Jose; Vigil Diaz, Carmen; Richter Echevarria, Jose Angel [University of Navarra, Nuclear Medicine Department, University Clinic of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Lozano, Maria Dolores; Labiano, Tania [University of Navarra, Pathology Department, University Clinic of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Lopez-Picazo, Jose Maria; Gurpide, Alfonso; Perez Gracia, Jose Luis [University of Navarra, Oncology Department, University Clinic of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Zulueta, Javier [University of Navarra, Pulmonology Department, University Clinic of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)

    2014-11-15

    The tumour molecular profile predicts the activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, tissue availability and tumour heterogeneity limit its assessment. We evaluated whether [{sup 18}F]FDG PET might help predict KRAS and EFGR mutation status in NSCLC. Between January 2005 and October 2011, 340 NSCLC patients were tested for KRAS and EGFR mutation status. We identified patients with stage III and IV disease who had undergone [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scanning for initial staging. SUVpeak, SUVmax and SUVmean of the single hottest tumour lesions were calculated, and their association with KRAS and EGFR mutation status was assessed. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and a multivariate analysis (including SUVmean, gender, age and AJCC stage) were performed to identify the potential value of [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT for predicting KRAS mutation. From 102 patients staged using [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT, 28 (27 %) had KRAS mutation (KRAS+), 22 (22 %) had EGFR mutation (EGFR+) and 52 (51 %) had wild-type KRAS and EGFR profiles (WT). KRAS+ patients showed significantly higher [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake than EGFR+ and WT patients (SUVmean 9.5, 5.7 and 6.6, respectively; p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake between EGFR+ patients and WT patients. ROC curve analysis for KRAS mutation status discrimination yielded an area under the curve of 0.740 for SUVmean (p < 0.001). The multivariate analysis showed a sensitivity and specificity of 78.6 % and 62.2 %, respectively, and the AUC was 0.773. NSCLC patients with tumours harbouring KRAS mutations showed significantly higher [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake than WT patients, as assessed in terms of SUVpeak, SUVmax and SUVmean. A multivariate model based on age, gender, AJCC stage and SUVmean might be used as a predictive marker of KRAS mutation status in patients with stage III or IV NSCLC. (orig.)

  20. The Relationship between Brown Adipose Tissue Activity and Neoplastic Status: an 18F-FDG PET/CT Study in the Tropics

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Yung-Cheng; Chen Tai-Been; Hsu Chien-Chin; Li Shau-Hsuan; Wang Pei-Wen; Lee Bi-Fang; Kuo Ching-Yuan; Chiu Nan-Tsing

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has thermogenic potential. For its activation, cold exposure is considered a critical factor though other determinants have also been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between neoplastic status and BAT activity by 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in people living in the tropics, where the influence of outdoor temperature was low. Methods 18F-FDG PE...

  1. Identification of patients at risk of acute rejection by pretransplantation and posttransplantation monitoring of soluble CD30 levels in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Sule; Keven, Kenan; Gormez, Ulku; Kutlay, Sim; Erturk, Sehsuvar; Erbay, Bulent

    2006-04-27

    In this study, we investigated the impact of pre- and posttransplantation sCD30 monitoring on early (acute rejection (AR) risk and analyzed the effect of different immunosuppressive regimens on posttransplantation sCD30 levels in kidney recipients. Fifty patients receiving kidney allograft and 10 healthy donors were included in this retrospective cohort study. Eight patients developed biopsy-proven AR (19%). In pretransplantation samples, patients showed a significantly higher sCD30 than healthy controls. The pretransplantation and posttransplantation (day-15) sCD30 levels were significantly elevated in rejecting patients compared to non-rejecting patients. No significant differences among immunosuppressive regimens were found in posttransplantation sCD30 levels. High pretransplantation and posttransplantation (day 15) sCD30 levels are associated with increased risk of early AR, and sCD30 can be another tool to evaluate immunological risk prior to kidney transplantation. There was no difference in immunosuppressive regimens used in this study on posttransplantation sCD30 levels at the first month.

  2. Gene transcript analysis blood values correlate with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-somatostatin analog (SSA) PET/CT imaging in neuroendocrine tumors and can define disease status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodei, L. [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Kidd, M.; Modlin, I.M.; Drozdov, I. [Wren Laboratories, Branford, CT (United States); Prasad, V. [Charite University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Severi, S.; Paganelli, G. [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine and Radiometabolic Units, Meldola (Italy); Ambrosini, V. [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Krenning, E.P. [Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Baum, R.P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, THERANOSTICS Center for Molecular Radiotherapy and Imaging, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Precise determination of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) disease status and response to therapy remains a rate-limiting concern for disease management. This reflects limitations in biomarker specificity and resolution capacity of imaging. In order to evaluate biomarker precision and identify if combinatorial blood molecular markers and imaging could provide added diagnostic value, we assessed the concordance between {sup 68}Ga-somatostatin analog (SSA) positron emission tomography (PET), circulating NET gene transcripts (NETest), chromogranin A (CgA), and Ki-67 in NETs. We utilized two independent patient groups with positive {sup 68}Ga-SSA PET: data set 1 ({sup 68}Ga-SSA PETs undertaken for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), as primary or salvage treatment, n = 27) and data set 2 ({sup 68}Ga-SSA PETs performed in patients referred for initial disease staging or restaging after various therapies, n = 22). We examined the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), circulating gene transcripts, CgA levels, and baseline Ki-67. Regression analyses, generalized linear modeling, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were undertaken to determine the strength of the relationships. SUV{sub max} measured in two centers were mathematically evaluated (regression modeling) and determined to be comparable. Of 49 patients, 47 (96 %) exhibited a positive NETest. Twenty-six (54 %) had elevated CgA (χ{sup 2} = 20.1, p < 2.5 x 10{sup -6}). The majority (78 %) had Ki-67 < 20 %. Gene transcript scores were predictive of imaging with >95 % concordance and significantly correlated with SUV{sub max} (R {sup 2} = 0.31, root-mean-square error = 9.4). The genes MORF4L2 and somatostatin receptors SSTR1, 3, and 5 exhibited the highest correlation with SUV{sub max}. Progressive disease was identified by elevated levels of a quotient of MORF4L2 expression and SUV{sub max} [ROC-derived AUC (R {sup 2} = 0.7, p < 0.05)]. No statistical relationship was identified

  3. Gene transcript analysis blood values correlate with 68Ga-DOTA-somatostatin analog (SSA) PET/CT imaging in neuroendocrine tumors and can define disease status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodei, L.; Kidd, M.; Modlin, I.M.; Drozdov, I.; Prasad, V.; Severi, S.; Paganelli, G.; Ambrosini, V.; Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Krenning, E.P.; Baum, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    Precise determination of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) disease status and response to therapy remains a rate-limiting concern for disease management. This reflects limitations in biomarker specificity and resolution capacity of imaging. In order to evaluate biomarker precision and identify if combinatorial blood molecular markers and imaging could provide added diagnostic value, we assessed the concordance between 68 Ga-somatostatin analog (SSA) positron emission tomography (PET), circulating NET gene transcripts (NETest), chromogranin A (CgA), and Ki-67 in NETs. We utilized two independent patient groups with positive 68 Ga-SSA PET: data set 1 ( 68 Ga-SSA PETs undertaken for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), as primary or salvage treatment, n = 27) and data set 2 ( 68 Ga-SSA PETs performed in patients referred for initial disease staging or restaging after various therapies, n = 22). We examined the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ), circulating gene transcripts, CgA levels, and baseline Ki-67. Regression analyses, generalized linear modeling, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were undertaken to determine the strength of the relationships. SUV max measured in two centers were mathematically evaluated (regression modeling) and determined to be comparable. Of 49 patients, 47 (96 %) exhibited a positive NETest. Twenty-six (54 %) had elevated CgA (χ 2 = 20.1, p < 2.5 x 10 -6 ). The majority (78 %) had Ki-67 < 20 %. Gene transcript scores were predictive of imaging with >95 % concordance and significantly correlated with SUV max (R 2 = 0.31, root-mean-square error = 9.4). The genes MORF4L2 and somatostatin receptors SSTR1, 3, and 5 exhibited the highest correlation with SUV max . Progressive disease was identified by elevated levels of a quotient of MORF4L2 expression and SUV max [ROC-derived AUC (R 2 = 0.7, p < 0.05)]. No statistical relationship was identified between CgA and Ki-67 and no relationship with imaging parameters

  4. Static and dynamic 18F-FET PET for the characterization of gliomas defined by IDH and 1p/19q status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verger, Antoine; Stoffels, Gabriele; Lohmann, Philipp; Neumaier, Bernd; Bauer, Elena K.; Blau, Tobias; Fink, Gereon R.; Shah, Nadim J.; Langen, Karl-Josef; Galldiks, Norbert

    2018-01-01

    The molecular features isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion have gained major importance for both glioma typing and prognosis and have, therefore, been integrated in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification in 2016. The aim of this study was to characterize static and dynamic O-(2- 18 F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ( 18 F-FET) PET parameters in gliomas with or without IDH mutation or 1p/19q co-deletion. Ninety patients with newly diagnosed and untreated gliomas with a static and dynamic 18 F-FET PET scan prior to evaluation of tumor tissue according to the 2016 WHO classification were identified retrospectively. Mean and maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR mean/max ), as well as dynamic parameters (time-to-peak and slope) of 18 F-FET uptake were calculated. Sixteen (18%) oligodendrogliomas (IDH mutated, 1p/19q co-deleted), 27 (30%) astrocytomas (IDH mutated only), and 47 (52%) glioblastomas (IDH wild type only) were identified. TBR mean , TBR max , TTP and slope discriminated between IDH mutated astrocytomas and IDH wild type glioblastomas (P < 0.01). TBR mean showed the best diagnostic performance (cut-off 1.95; sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 67%; accuracy, 81%). None of the parameters discriminated between oligodendrogliomas (IDH mutated, 1p/19q co-deleted) and glioblastomas or astrocytomas. Furthermore, TBR mean , TBR max , TTP, and slope discriminated between gliomas with and without IDH mutation (p < 0.01). The best diagnostic performance was obtained for the combination of TTP with TBR max or slope (accuracy, 73%). Data suggest that static and dynamic 18 F-FET PET parameters may allow determining non-invasively the IDH mutation status. However, IDH mutated and 1p/19q co-deleted oligodendrogliomas cannot be differentiated from glioblastomas and astrocytomas by 18 F-FET PET. (orig.)

  5. Effect of Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy on Somatostatin Receptor Status and Glucose Metabolism in Neuroendocrine Tumors: Intraindividual Comparison of Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT and F-18 FDG PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sowon; Prasad, Vikas; Lee, Dong Soo; Baum, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of the neuroendocrine tumors (NET) makes it challenging to find one uniformly applicable management protocol which is especially true for diagnosis. The discovery of the overexpression of somatostatin receptors (SMS-R) on neuroendocrine tumor cells lead to the generalized and rapid acceptance of radiolabeled somatostatin receptor analogs for staging and restaging of NET as well as for Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRNT) using Y-90 and Lu-177 DOTATATE/DOTATOC. In this present work we tried to look in to the effect of PRRNT on the glucose metabolism assessed by F-18 FDG PET/CT and SMS-R density assessed by Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT. We observed a complex relationship between the somatostatin receptor expression and glucose metabolism with only 56% (77/138) of the lesions showing match, while the others show mismatch between the receptor status and metabolism. The match between receptor expression and glucose metabolism increases with the grade of NET. In grade 3 NET, there is a concurrence between the changes in glucose metabolism and somatostatin receptor expression. PRRNT was found to be more effective in lesions with higher receptor expression. PMID:22121482

  6. Additional value of PET-CT in the staging of lung cancer: comparison with CT alone, PET alone and visual correlation of PET and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wever, W. de; Marchal, G.; Bogaert, J.; Verschakelen, J.A.; Ceyssens, S.; Mortelmans, L.; Stroobants, S.

    2007-01-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) is a new imaging modality offering anatomic and metabolic information. The purpose was to evaluate retrospectively the accuracy of integrated PET-CT in the staging of a suggestive lung lesion, comparing this with the accuracy of CT alone, PET alone and visually correlated PET-CT. Fifty patients undergoing integrated PET-CT for staging of a suggestive lung lesion were studied. Their tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) statuses were determined with CT, PET, visually correlated PET-CT and integrated PET-CT. These TNM stages were compared with the surgical TNM status. Integrated PET-CT was the most accurate imaging technique in the assessment of the TNM status. Integrated PET-CT predicted correctly the T status, N status, M status and TNM status in, respectively, 86%, 80%, 98%, 70% versus 68%, 66%,88%, 46% with CT, 46%, 70%, 96%, 30% with PET and 72%, 68%, 96%, 54% with visually correlated PET-CT. T status and N status were overstaged, respectively, in 8% and 16% with integrated PET-CT, in 20% and 28% with CT, in 16% and 20% with PET, in 12% and 20% with visually correlated PET-CT and understaged in 6% and 4% with integrated PET-CT, versus 12% and 6% with CT, 38% and 10% with PET and 12% with visually correlated PET-CT. Integrated PET-CT improves the staging of lung cancer through a better anatomic localization and characterization of lesions and is superior to CT alone and PET alone. If this technique is not available, visual correlation of PET and CT can be a valuable alternative. (orig.)

  7. Assessment of Lymph Nodes and Prostate Status Using Early Dynamic Curves with (18)F-Choline PET/CT in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Cédric; Ferrer, Ludovic; Carlier, Thomas; Colombié, Mathilde; Rusu, Daniela; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Campion, Loic; Rousseau, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic image acquisition with (18)F-Choline [fluorocholine (FCH)] PET/CT in prostate cancer is mostly used to overcome the bladder repletion, which could obstruct the loco-regional analysis. The aim of our study was to analyze early dynamic FCH acquisitions to define pelvic lymph node or prostate pathological status. Retrospective analysis was performed on 39 patients for initial staging (n = 18), or after initial treatment (n = 21). Patients underwent 10-min dynamic acquisitions centered on the pelvis, after injection of 3-4 MBq/kg of FCH. Whole-body images were acquired about 1 h after injection using a PET/CT GE Discovery LS (GE-LS) or Siemens Biograph mCT (mCT). Maximum and mean SUV according to time were measured on nodal and prostatic lesions. SUVmean was corrected for partial volume effect (PVEC) with suitable recovery coefficients. The status of each lesion was based on histological results or patient follow-up (>6 months). A Mann-Whitney test and ANOVA were used to compare mean and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The median PSA was 8.46 ng/mL and the median Gleason score was 3 + 4. Ninety-two lesions (43 lymph nodes and 49 prostate lesions) were analyzed, including 63 malignant lesions. In early dynamic acquisitions, the maximum and mean SUV were significantly higher, respectively, on mCT and GE-LS, in malignant versus benign lesions (p dynamic imaging using PET/CT FCH allowed prostate cancer detection in situations where proof of malignancy is difficult to obtain.

  8. Receptor PET/CT for determining the somatostatin receptor status of neuroendocrine tumors before and after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT): Clinical experience after 1,500 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Prasad, V.; Leonhardi, J.; Kroeger, R.; Wortmann, R.; Mueller, D.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The octapeptide [DOTA]-1-Nal3-octreotide (DOTA-NOC) has 3 to 4 times higher binding affinity to sstr2 than DOTATOC (Wild 2003). We labeled this peptide with the Ga-68 (t1/2 68 min) and used it in pts with metastatic NET before/after PRRT for evaluating the sstr status by semiquantitative PET/CT imaging. Methods: Ga-68 was eluted from a Ge-68/Ga-68 generator using 0.1 M HCl. Following purifications, Ga-68 was eluted into a labeling vial containing 0.05 mg DOTA-NOC. Radiolabeling yields of >80% were achieved within 15 min at >95C. After purification (C18 cartridge) and a final elution, 370-700 MBq of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC were obtained with 100% radiochemical purity within 20 min (about 70% yield). Results: 1,500 PET/CT studies were performed in pts with histologically proven NET and progressive metastases before and after PRRT. Acquisition was started 20-270 min after injection of a mean of 100 MBq (46-260 MBq) Ga-68 DOTA-NOC using an LSO-based PET/CT (biograph DUO, Siemens). SUV were determined for all tumor lesions and normal tissues. SUV in metastases was as high as 152 whereas normal tissue was in the range of 0.4 (lung) to 33 (spleen). Outstanding PET/CT images of all known tumor lesions and in addition very small lymph node and bone metastases (<5 mm) were easily visualized as early as 20 min p.i. Clearly more lesions were detected as compared to Tc-99m EDDA-HYNIC-TOC or In-111 DOTA-NOC SPECT or as seen on CT or MRI images (especially regarding lymph node metastases, bone lesions and unknown primaries). Conclusions: Molecular receptor PET/CT imaging using the Ga-68-labeled somatostatin analogue DOTA-NOC detects neuroendocrine tumor metastases with very high diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Semiquantitative uptake measurements (SUV) allow predicting the tumor uptake of Y-90 or Lu-177- labeled peptides before PRRT and are highly useful for therapy control to determine the 'molecular tumor response' which can precede the morphologic responses by months

  9. Current status of PET imaging of neuroendocrine tumours ([18F]FDOPA, [68Ga]traces, [11C/[18F]-HTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, A.; Morgini, J.J.; Nanni, C.; Castellucci, P.; Fanti, S.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) functional imaging is an evolving field that witnessed major advances in the past two decades. The routine use of PET/CT with an array of new radiotracers to specifically study NEN resulted in an increase in lesions detection. Currently, PET radiopharmaceuticals for NEN imaging include both metabolic ([18F]DOPA, [18F]FDG, [11C]/[18F]-HTP) and receptor-mediated compounds ([68Ga]DOTA-peptides). Discussion is still on-going regarding the clinical setting that may benefit the most from the use of one tracer over the other. [68Ga]DOTA-peptides are accurate for the detection of well differentiated NEN and are increasingly employed. Moreover, providing data on somatostatin receptors expression on NEN cells, they represent a fundamental procedure to be performed before starting therapy, as well as to guide treatment, with either hot or cold somatostatin analogues. The easy and economic synthesis process also favours their clinical employment even in centres without an on-site cyclotron. [18F]DOPA is accurate for studying well differentiated tumours however the difficult and expensive synthesis have limited its clinical employment. It currently can be successfully used for imaging tumours with variable to low expression of SSR (medullary thyroid carcinoma, neuroblastoma, pheocromocytoma), that cannot be accurately studied with [68Ga]DOTA-peptides. [11C]/[18F]-HTP has also been proposed to image well differentiated NEN, on the basis of serotonin pathway activity, for which [11C]/[18F]-HTP can be used as precursor. However, although preliminary data are encouraging, the feasibility of its widespread clinical use is still under discussion, mainly limited by a complex synthesis process and more proven advantages over other currently employed compounds. This review aims to provide an overview of the current status and clinical application of PET tracers to image well differentiated NEN and to focus on the still open-issues of debate

  10. Static and dynamic {sup 18}F-FET PET for the characterization of gliomas defined by IDH and 1p/19q status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verger, Antoine [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, INM-4, INM-5), Juelich (Germany); Lorraine University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Nancyclotep Imaging Platform, CHRU Nancy, Nancy (France); Lorraine University, IADI, INSERM, UMR 947, Nancy (France); Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Stoffels, Gabriele; Lohmann, Philipp; Neumaier, Bernd [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, INM-4, INM-5), Juelich (Germany); Bauer, Elena K. [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Blau, Tobias [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Neuropathology, Cologne (Germany); Fink, Gereon R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, INM-4, INM-5), Juelich (Germany); University Hospital Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Shah, Nadim J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, INM-4, INM-5), Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Section JARA-Brain, Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Juelich (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, INM-4, INM-5), Juelich (Germany); Section JARA-Brain, Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Juelich (Germany); RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3, INM-4, INM-5), Juelich (Germany); University Hospital Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Universities of Cologne and Bonn, Center of Integrated Oncology (CIO), Cologne (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    The molecular features isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion have gained major importance for both glioma typing and prognosis and have, therefore, been integrated in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification in 2016. The aim of this study was to characterize static and dynamic O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ({sup 18}F-FET) PET parameters in gliomas with or without IDH mutation or 1p/19q co-deletion. Ninety patients with newly diagnosed and untreated gliomas with a static and dynamic {sup 18}F-FET PET scan prior to evaluation of tumor tissue according to the 2016 WHO classification were identified retrospectively. Mean and maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR{sub mean/max}), as well as dynamic parameters (time-to-peak and slope) of {sup 18}F-FET uptake were calculated. Sixteen (18%) oligodendrogliomas (IDH mutated, 1p/19q co-deleted), 27 (30%) astrocytomas (IDH mutated only), and 47 (52%) glioblastomas (IDH wild type only) were identified. TBR{sub mean}, TBR{sub max}, TTP and slope discriminated between IDH mutated astrocytomas and IDH wild type glioblastomas (P < 0.01). TBR{sub mean} showed the best diagnostic performance (cut-off 1.95; sensitivity, 89%; specificity, 67%; accuracy, 81%). None of the parameters discriminated between oligodendrogliomas (IDH mutated, 1p/19q co-deleted) and glioblastomas or astrocytomas. Furthermore, TBR{sub mean}, TBR{sub max}, TTP, and slope discriminated between gliomas with and without IDH mutation (p < 0.01). The best diagnostic performance was obtained for the combination of TTP with TBR{sub max} or slope (accuracy, 73%). Data suggest that static and dynamic {sup 18}F-FET PET parameters may allow determining non-invasively the IDH mutation status. However, IDH mutated and 1p/19q co-deleted oligodendrogliomas cannot be differentiated from glioblastomas and astrocytomas by {sup 18}F-FET PET. (orig.)

  11. PET or PET-CT with cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Taisong; Zhao Jinhua; Song Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    At present, cancer screening remains a lot of debate in contemporary medical practice. Many constitutes have done a lot of experiments in cancer screening. The same version is that recommendations and decisions regarding cancer screening should be based on reliable data, not self- approbation. Now, some institutes advocate 18 F-FDG PET or 18 F-FDG PET-CT for cancer screening, here, discussed status quo, potential financial, radiation safety and statistical data in 18 F-FDG PET or 18 F-FDG PET- CT cancer screening. (authors)

  12. Lung PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chest PET scan; Lung positron emission tomography; PET - chest; PET - lung; PET - tumor imaging; ... Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  13. Annotating MYC Status in Treatment-Resistant Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer With Gallium-68 Citrate PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    which avidly binds to circulating transferrin) labeled transferrin (Tf) can detect MYC-positive prostate cancer tumors, since the transferrin receptor ...Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer with Androgen Receptor - Axis Imaging. Journal of nuclear medicine : official publication, Society of Nuclear...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0469 TITLE: Annotating MYC Status in Treatment-Resistant Metastatic Castration- Resistant Prostate Cancer With

  14. PET studies in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. 18Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients refractory to medical treatments who have noncontributory EEG and MRI. In addition to localizing epileptogenic focus, FDG-PET provide additional important information on the functional status of the rest of the brain. The main limitation of interictal FDG-PET is that it cannot precisely define the surgical margin as the area of hypometabolism usually extends beyond the epileptogenic zone. Various neurotransmitters (GABA, glutamate, opiates, serotonin, dopamine, acethylcholine, and adenosine) and receptor subtypes are involved in epilepsy. PET receptor imaging studies performed in limited centers help to understand the role of neurotransmitters in epileptogenesis, identify epileptic foci and investigate new treatment approaches. PET receptor imaging studies have demonstrated reduced 11C-flumazenil (GABAA-cBDZ) and 18F-MPPF (5-HT1A serotonin) and increased 11C-cerfentanil (mu opiate) and 11C-MeNTI (delta opiate) bindings in the area of seizure. 11C-flumazenil has been reported to be more sensitive than FDG-PET for identifying epileptic foci. The area of abnormality on GABAAcBDZ and opiate receptor images is usually smaller and more circumscribed than the area of hypometabolism on FDG images. Studies have demonstrated that 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan PET (to study synthesis of serotonin) can detect the epileptic focus within malformations of cortical development and helps in differentiating epileptogenic from non-epileptogenic tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

  15. Evaluation of lymph node status after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients: comparison of diagnostic performance of ultrasound, MRI and ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, S; Kang, D K; Jung, Y S; An, Y-S; Jeon, G S; Kim, T H

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of ultrasound, MRI and fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (¹⁸F-FDG PET)/CT for the diagnosis of metastatic axillary lymph node (ALN) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and to find out histopathological factors affecting the diagnostic performance of these imaging modalities. From January 2012 to November 2014, 191 consecutive patients with breast cancer who underwent NAC before surgery were retrospectively reviewed. We included 139 patients with ALN metastasis that was confirmed on fine needle aspiration or core needle biopsy at initial diagnosis. After NAC, 39 (28%) patients showed negative conversion of ALN on surgical specimens of sentinel lymph node (LN) or ALN. The sensitivity of ultrasound, MRI and PET/CT was 50% (48/96), 72% (70/97) and 22% (16/73), respectively. The specificity of ultrasound, MRI and PET/CT was 77% (30/39), 54% (21/39) and 85% (22/26), respectively. The Az value of combination of ultrasound and PET/CT was the highest (0.634) followed by ultrasound (0.626) and combination of ultrasound, MRI and PET/CT (0.617). The size of tumour deposit in LN and oestrogen receptor was significantly associated with the diagnostic performance of ultrasound (p performance of PET/CT (p = 0.023, p = 0.002, p = 0.036, p = 0.044 and p = 0.008, respectively). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, size of tumour deposit within LN was identified as being independently associated with diagnostic performance of ultrasound [odds ratio, 13.07; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.95-57.96] and PET/CT (odds ratio, 6.47; 95% CI, 1.407-29.737). Combination of three imaging modalities showed the highest sensitivity, and PET/CT showed the highest specificity for the evaluation of ALN metastasis after NAC. Ultrasound alone or combination of ultrasound and PET/CT showed the highest positive-predictive value. The size of tumour deposit within ALN was significantly associated with

  16. 18F-FDG PET/CT following chemoradiation of uterine cervix cancer provides powerful prognostic stratification independent of HPV status: a prospective cohort of 105 women with mature survival data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Shankar; Hicks, Rodney J.; Callahan, Jason; Deb, Siddhartha; Young, Richard J.; Bressel, Mathias; Mileshkin, Linda; Rischin, Danny; Bernshaw, David; Narayan, Kailash

    2015-01-01

    To report 5-year outcomes of a prospective registry study investigating posttherapy FDG PET/CT in women with locally advanced cervical cancer. A secondary analysis assessing the prognostic significance of HPV infection was performed. Patients underwent definitive chemoradiation followed by a single FDG PET/CT scan for response assessment. A complete metabolic response (CMR) was defined as no evidence of FDG-avid disease. Patients were dichotomized according to HPV infection status into a 'higher-risk' group and a 'lower-risk' group, with the higher-risk group comprising those with alpha-7 strain HPV (subtypes 18, 39 and 45) and those who were HPV-negative and the lower-risk group comprising those with alpha-9 strain HPV (subtypes 16, 31, 33, 52 and 58) and those with mixed strains. Survival outcomes, patterns of failure and salvage therapy outcomes were investigated for their association with metabolic response and HPV status. In 105 patients the median prospective follow-up was 5.2 years. The 5-year cancer-specific, overall and progression-free survival rates in patients with a CMR were 97 %, 93 % and 86 %, respectively. In patients without a CMR, the corresponding 5-year survival rates were 36 %, 22 % and 0 % respectively (p < 0.01). PET response was associated with patterns of failure (p < 0.01), with the 5-year freedom from local, nodal and distant failure in patients with a CMR being 94 %, 90 % and 94 %, respectively. Of 16 patients who underwent salvage therapy, 12 had disease detected on the surveillance PET scan, and 8 achieved a post-salvage CMR of whom all were alive at a median of 4.9 years. DNA adequate for HPV analysis was extracted in 68 patients. The likelihood of a PET metabolic response was not influenced by HPV infection status, with 71 % and 75 % of higher-risk and lower-risk patients, respectively, achieving CMR (p = 0.83). Higher-risk patients had a poorer OS (HR 2.6, range 1.0 - 6.6, p = 0.05) in univariable analysis but

  17. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT following chemoradiation of uterine cervix cancer provides powerful prognostic stratification independent of HPV status: a prospective cohort of 105 women with mature survival data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siva, Shankar; Hicks, Rodney J.; Callahan, Jason [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Parkville (Australia); Deb, Siddhartha [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Pathology, East Melbourne (Australia); Young, Richard J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Molecular Therapeutics and Biomarkers Laboratory, East Melbourne (Australia); Bressel, Mathias [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, East Melbourne (Australia); Mileshkin, Linda [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Cancer Medicine, East Melbourne (Australia); Rischin, Danny [University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Parkville (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Cancer Medicine, East Melbourne (Australia); Bernshaw, David; Narayan, Kailash [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    To report 5-year outcomes of a prospective registry study investigating posttherapy FDG PET/CT in women with locally advanced cervical cancer. A secondary analysis assessing the prognostic significance of HPV infection was performed. Patients underwent definitive chemoradiation followed by a single FDG PET/CT scan for response assessment. A complete metabolic response (CMR) was defined as no evidence of FDG-avid disease. Patients were dichotomized according to HPV infection status into a 'higher-risk' group and a 'lower-risk' group, with the higher-risk group comprising those with alpha-7 strain HPV (subtypes 18, 39 and 45) and those who were HPV-negative and the lower-risk group comprising those with alpha-9 strain HPV (subtypes 16, 31, 33, 52 and 58) and those with mixed strains. Survival outcomes, patterns of failure and salvage therapy outcomes were investigated for their association with metabolic response and HPV status. In 105 patients the median prospective follow-up was 5.2 years. The 5-year cancer-specific, overall and progression-free survival rates in patients with a CMR were 97 %, 93 % and 86 %, respectively. In patients without a CMR, the corresponding 5-year survival rates were 36 %, 22 % and 0 % respectively (p < 0.01). PET response was associated with patterns of failure (p < 0.01), with the 5-year freedom from local, nodal and distant failure in patients with a CMR being 94 %, 90 % and 94 %, respectively. Of 16 patients who underwent salvage therapy, 12 had disease detected on the surveillance PET scan, and 8 achieved a post-salvage CMR of whom all were alive at a median of 4.9 years. DNA adequate for HPV analysis was extracted in 68 patients. The likelihood of a PET metabolic response was not influenced by HPV infection status, with 71 % and 75 % of higher-risk and lower-risk patients, respectively, achieving CMR (p = 0.83). Higher-risk patients had a poorer OS (HR 2.6, range 1.0 - 6.6, p = 0.05) in univariable analysis but

  18. Pet Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... companionship and a feeling of safety to your life. Before getting a pet, think carefully about which ... Gaining or losing a lot of weight quickly Strange behavior Being sluggish and tired Trouble getting up ...

  19. Pet Allergy Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatments ▸ Allergies ▸ Pet Allergy ▸ Pet Allergy Quiz Share | Pet Allergy Quiz More than half of U.S. households ... cat family. Yet, millions of people suffer from pet allergies. Take this quiz to test your knowledge ...

  20. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs

  1. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  2. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  3. PET in cancer screening: a controversial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Minggang; Tan Tianzhi

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy has been one of the most dangerous threats to human health. Early diagnosis and treatment are key factors for improving prognosis. Cancer screening is an important way to detect early stage cancer and precancerous lesion. PET has been used increasingly in cancer screening in accordance with the requirement of the public. Though a great number of data show that PET can find some subclinical malignancy, yet as a cancer screening modality, PET is still controversial in contemporary medical practice. The aim of this article is to review the application status and existing problem of PET in cancer screening, and to offer some recognition and view about cancer srceening. (authors)

  4. The Assessment of Estrogen Receptor Status and Its Intratumoral Heterogeneity in Patients With Breast Cancer by Using 18F-Fluoroestradiol PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongyi; Sun, Yifei; Xu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yongping; Zhang, Jianping; Xue, Jing; Wang, Mingwei; Yuan, Huiyu; Hu, Silong; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Beiling; Zhang, Yingjian

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical value of F-fluoroestradiol (F-FES) PET/CT in the assessment of the estrogen receptor (ER) and its intratumoral heterogeneity in breast cancer patients. Forty-six female patients (50 lesions) with histologically confirmed invasive breast cancer who underwent both F-FES and F-FDG PET/CT in our center were retrospectively included. All the patients enrolled were scheduled to undergo biopsy. The F-FES and FDG uptakes were compared with pathological features (tumor size, ER, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, and Ki67%). The optimal threshold to discriminate ER-positive and ER-negative lesions was determined by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Furthermore, we observed the intratumoral heterogeneity by a heterogeneity index (SUVmax/SUVmean) and compared the results with the Chang-Gung Image Texture Analysis. There was good agreement between F-FES uptake and ER, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression (P heterogeneity index-FES can easily observe ER heterogeneity. In addition, our results suggested that recurrent/metastatic patients and lesions located other than breast might have greater heterogeneity. F-FES PET/CT is a feasible, noninvasive method for assessing ER expression in breast cancer patients. Because intratumoral heterogeneity exists, F-FES PET/CT might better reflect the ER expression, especially in metastatic patients after treatment, thus assisting in making individualized treatment decisions.

  5. {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET/CT in Burkitt's lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karantanis, Dimitrios, E-mail: dkarantanis@nuclmed.ne [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Durski, Jolanta M.; Lowe, Val J.; Nathan, Mark A.; Mullan, Brian P. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Georgiou, Evangelos [Medical Physics Department, Medical School, University of Athens (Greece); Johnston, Patrick B. [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Wiseman, Gregory A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Objective: To explore the value of {sup 18}F fluorodeoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in Burkitt's lymphoma. Methods: All Burkitt's lymphoma patients referred for FDG PET or FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) exams at our institution from June 2003 to June 2006 were included. Selected patients were followed and clinical information was reviewed retrospectively. Results from FDG PET-PET/CT, as blindly reviewed by a consensus of two experienced readers, were compared with the status of the disease as determined by other laboratory, clinical and imaging exams and clinical follow-up. FDG PET-PET/CT results were classified as true positive or negative and false positive or negative. The degree of FDG uptake in the positive lesions was semiquantified as maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax). Results: Fifty-seven FDG PET-PET/CT exams were done in 15 patients. Seven exams were done for initial staging, 8 during and 14 after the completion of therapy, and 28 for disease surveillance. For nodal disease FDG PET-PET/CT was true positive in 8, true negative in 47 and false positive in 2 exams (sensitivity 100%, specificity 96%). For extranodal disease FDG PET-PET/CT was true positive in 6, true negative in 48 and false positive in 3 exams (sensitivity 100%, specificity 94%). The mean SUVmax for the positive nodal lesions was 15.7 (range 6.9-21.7, median 18.5) and for extranodal lesions was 14.2 (range 6.2-24.3, median 12.4). Conclusions: FDG PET-PET/CT is sensitive for the detection of viable disease in Burkitt's lymphoma. Affected areas demonstrated high degree of uptake that was reversible upon successful implementation of treatment.

  6. 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in Burkitt's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karantanis, Dimitrios; Durski, Jolanta M.; Lowe, Val J.; Nathan, Mark A.; Mullan, Brian P.; Georgiou, Evangelos; Johnston, Patrick B.; Wiseman, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of 18 F fluorodeoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in Burkitt's lymphoma. Methods: All Burkitt's lymphoma patients referred for FDG PET or FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) exams at our institution from June 2003 to June 2006 were included. Selected patients were followed and clinical information was reviewed retrospectively. Results from FDG PET-PET/CT, as blindly reviewed by a consensus of two experienced readers, were compared with the status of the disease as determined by other laboratory, clinical and imaging exams and clinical follow-up. FDG PET-PET/CT results were classified as true positive or negative and false positive or negative. The degree of FDG uptake in the positive lesions was semiquantified as maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax). Results: Fifty-seven FDG PET-PET/CT exams were done in 15 patients. Seven exams were done for initial staging, 8 during and 14 after the completion of therapy, and 28 for disease surveillance. For nodal disease FDG PET-PET/CT was true positive in 8, true negative in 47 and false positive in 2 exams (sensitivity 100%, specificity 96%). For extranodal disease FDG PET-PET/CT was true positive in 6, true negative in 48 and false positive in 3 exams (sensitivity 100%, specificity 94%). The mean SUVmax for the positive nodal lesions was 15.7 (range 6.9-21.7, median 18.5) and for extranodal lesions was 14.2 (range 6.2-24.3, median 12.4). Conclusions: FDG PET-PET/CT is sensitive for the detection of viable disease in Burkitt's lymphoma. Affected areas demonstrated high degree of uptake that was reversible upon successful implementation of treatment.

  7. High variation of individual soluble serum CD30 levels of pre-transplantation patients: sCD30 a feasible marker for prediction of kidney allograft rejection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altermann, Wolfgang; Schlaf, Gerald; Rothhoff, Anita; Seliger, Barbara

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the pre-transplant levels of the soluble CD30 molecule (sCD30) represent a non-invasive tool which can be used as a biomarker for the prediction of kidney allograft rejections. In order to evaluate the feasibility of sCD30 for pre-transplantation monitoring the sera of potential kidney recipients (n = 652) were collected four times in a 3 months interval. Serum from healthy blood donors (n = 203) served as controls. The sCD30 concentrations of all samples were determined using a commercially available ELISA. This strategy allowed the detection of possible variations of individual sCD30 levels over time. Heterogeneous sCD30 concentrations were found in the samples obtained from individual putative kidney transplant recipients when quarterly measured over 1 year. Total 95% of serum samples obtained from healthy controls exhibited sCD30 values 30 U/ml). Total 524 patients (80.4%) constantly exhibited serum concentrations of sCD30 values >100 U/ml was significantly lower than that previously reported. The high degree of variation does not allow the stratification of patients into high and low immunological risk groups based on a single sCD30 value > 100 U/ml. Due to the heterogeneity of sCD30 levels during time course and the high values of SD, its implementation as a pre-transplant marker cannot be justified to generate special provisions for the organ allocation to patients with single sCD30 values > 100 U/ml.

  8. Healthy Pets and People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent the spread of germs between pets and people. Keep pets and their supplies out of the kitchen, and ... a local wildlife rehabilitation facility. More Information Healthy Pets Healthy People Clean Hands Save Lives! Stay Healthy at Animal ...

  9. PET studies in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herholz, K.

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolism (lCMRGlc) by positron emission tomography (PET) and 18 F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has become a standard technique during the past 20 years and is now available at many university hospitals in all highly developed countries. Many studies have documented a close relation between lCMRGlc and localized cognitive functions, such as language and visuoconstructive abilities. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by regional impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neocortical association areas (posterior cingulate, temporoparietal and frontal multimodal association cortex), whereas primary visual and sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum are relatively well preserved. In a multicenter study comprising 10 PET centers (Network for Efficiency and Standardization of Dementia Diagnosis, NEST-DD) that employed an automated voxel-based analysis of FDG PET images, the distinction between controls and AD patients was 93% sensitive and 93% specific, and even in very mild dementia (at Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) 24 or higher) sensitivity was still 84% at 93% specificity. Significantly abnormal metabolism in mild cognitive deficit (MCI) indicates a high risk to develop dementia within the next two years. Reduced neocortical glucose metabolism can probably be detected with FDG PET in AD on average one year before onset of subjective cognitive impairment. In addition to glucose metabolism, specific tracers for dopamine synthesis ( 18 F-F-DOPA) and for ( 11 C-MP4A) are of interest for differentiation among dementia subtypes. Cortical acetylcholine esterase activity (AChE) activity is significantly lower in patients with AD or with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) than in age-matched normal controls. In LBD there is also impairment of dopamine synthesis, similar to Parkinson disease. (author) 115 refs

  10. PET studies in dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, K. [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik and Max-Planck-Inst. fuer neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    Measurement of local cerebral glucose metabolism (lCMRGlc) by positron emission tomography (PET) and {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) has become a standard technique during the past 20 years and is now available at many university hospitals in all highly developed countries. Many studies have documented a close relation between lCMRGlc and localized cognitive functions, such as language and visuoconstructive abilities. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by regional impairment of cerebral glucose metabolism in neocortical association areas (posterior cingulate, temporoparietal and frontal multimodal association cortex), whereas primary visual and sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum are relatively well preserved. In a multicenter study comprising 10 PET centers (Network for Efficiency and Standardization of Dementia Diagnosis, NEST-DD) that employed an automated voxel-based analysis of FDG PET images, the distinction between controls and AD patients was 93% sensitive and 93% specific, and even in very mild dementia (at Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) 24 or higher) sensitivity was still 84% at 93% specificity. Significantly abnormal metabolism in mild cognitive deficit (MCI) indicates a high risk to develop dementia within the next two years. Reduced neocortical glucose metabolism can probably be detected with FDG PET in AD on average one year before onset of subjective cognitive impairment. In addition to glucose metabolism, specific tracers for dopamine synthesis ({sup 18}F-F-DOPA) and for ({sup 11}C-MP4A) are of interest for differentiation among dementia subtypes. Cortical acetylcholine esterase activity (AChE) activity is significantly lower in patients with AD or with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) than in age-matched normal controls. In LBD there is also impairment of dopamine synthesis, similar to Parkinson disease. (author) 115 refs.

  11. (R-[11C]Verapamil PET studies to assess changes in P-glycoprotein expression and functionality in rat blood-brain barrier after exposure to kainate-induced status epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lammertsma Adriaan A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased functionality of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier may contribute to decreased drug concentrations at the target site in CNS diseases like epilepsy. In the rat, pharmacoresistant epilepsy can be mimicked by inducing status epilepticus by intraperitoneal injection of kainate, which leads to development of spontaneous seizures after 3 weeks to 3 months. The aim of this study was to investigate potential changes in P-glycoprotein (P-gp expression and functionality at an early stage after induction of status epilepticus by kainate. Methods (R-[11C]verapamil, which is currently the most frequently used positron emission tomography (PET ligand for determining P-gp functionality at the blood-brain barrier, was used in kainate and saline (control treated rats, at 7 days after treatment. To investigate the effect of P-gp on (R-[11C]verapamil brain distribution, both groups were studied without or with co-administration of the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar. P-gp expression was determined using immunohistochemistry in post mortem brains. (R-[11C]verapamil kinetics were analyzed with approaches common in PET research (Logan analysis, and compartmental modelling of individual profiles as well as by population mixed effects modelling (NONMEM. Results All data analysis approaches indicated only modest differences in brain distribution of (R-[11C]verapamil between saline and kainate treated rats, while tariquidar treatment in both groups resulted in a more than 10-fold increase. NONMEM provided most precise parameter estimates. P-gp expression was found to be similar for kainate and saline treated rats. Conclusions P-gp expression and functionality does not seem to change at early stage after induction of anticipated pharmacoresistant epilepsy by kainate.

  12. (R)-[{sup 11}C]Verapamil PET studies to assess changes in P-glycoprotein expression and functionality in rat blood-brain barrier after exposure to kainate-induced status epilepticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syvänen, Stina [Division of Pharmacology, LACDR, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Luurtsema, Gert [Department of Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging, Groningen University Medical Center, P.O. Box 30.001 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands); Molthoff, Carla FM; Windhorst, Albert D; Huisman, Marc C; Lammertsma, Adriaan A [Department of Nuclear Medicine & PET Research, VU University Medical Center, P.O. Box 7057, 1007 MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Voskuyl, Rob A [Division of Pharmacology, LACDR, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Epilepsy Institute of The Netherlands Foundation (SEIN), P.O. Box 21, 2100 AA, Heemstede (Netherlands); Lange, Elizabeth C de [Division of Pharmacology, LACDR, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2011-01-03

    Increased functionality of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier may contribute to decreased drug concentrations at the target site in CNS diseases like epilepsy. In the rat, pharmacoresistant epilepsy can be mimicked by inducing status epilepticus by intraperitoneal injection of kainate, which leads to development of spontaneous seizures after 3 weeks to 3 months. The aim of this study was to investigate potential changes in P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression and functionality at an early stage after induction of status epilepticus by kainate. (R)-[{sup 11}C]verapamil, which is currently the most frequently used positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for determining P-gp functionality at the blood-brain barrier, was used in kainate and saline (control) treated rats, at 7 days after treatment. To investigate the effect of P-gp on (R)-[{sup 11}C]verapamil brain distribution, both groups were studied without or with co-administration of the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar. P-gp expression was determined using immunohistochemistry in post mortem brains. (R)-[{sup 11}C]verapamil kinetics were analyzed with approaches common in PET research (Logan analysis, and compartmental modelling of individual profiles) as well as by population mixed effects modelling (NONMEM). All data analysis approaches indicated only modest differences in brain distribution of (R)-[{sup 11}C]verapamil between saline and kainate treated rats, while tariquidar treatment in both groups resulted in a more than 10-fold increase. NONMEM provided most precise parameter estimates. P-gp expression was found to be similar for kainate and saline treated rats. P-gp expression and functionality does not seem to change at early stage after induction of anticipated pharmacoresistant epilepsy by kainate.

  13. (R)-[11C]Verapamil PET studies to assess changes in P-glycoprotein expression and functionality in rat blood-brain barrier after exposure to kainate-induced status epilepticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syvänen, Stina; Luurtsema, Gert; Molthoff, Carla FM; Windhorst, Albert D; Huisman, Marc C; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Voskuyl, Rob A; Lange, Elizabeth C de

    2011-01-01

    Increased functionality of efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier may contribute to decreased drug concentrations at the target site in CNS diseases like epilepsy. In the rat, pharmacoresistant epilepsy can be mimicked by inducing status epilepticus by intraperitoneal injection of kainate, which leads to development of spontaneous seizures after 3 weeks to 3 months. The aim of this study was to investigate potential changes in P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression and functionality at an early stage after induction of status epilepticus by kainate. (R)-[ 11 C]verapamil, which is currently the most frequently used positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for determining P-gp functionality at the blood-brain barrier, was used in kainate and saline (control) treated rats, at 7 days after treatment. To investigate the effect of P-gp on (R)-[ 11 C]verapamil brain distribution, both groups were studied without or with co-administration of the P-gp inhibitor tariquidar. P-gp expression was determined using immunohistochemistry in post mortem brains. (R)-[ 11 C]verapamil kinetics were analyzed with approaches common in PET research (Logan analysis, and compartmental modelling of individual profiles) as well as by population mixed effects modelling (NONMEM). All data analysis approaches indicated only modest differences in brain distribution of (R)-[ 11 C]verapamil between saline and kainate treated rats, while tariquidar treatment in both groups resulted in a more than 10-fold increase. NONMEM provided most precise parameter estimates. P-gp expression was found to be similar for kainate and saline treated rats. P-gp expression and functionality does not seem to change at early stage after induction of anticipated pharmacoresistant epilepsy by kainate

  14. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  15. Current opinion on PET for gastrointestinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederichs, C.G.; Schirrmeister, H.; Staib, L.

    2000-01-01

    The benefit of FDG-PET for restaging of colorectal carcinoma and for the differentiation of indeterminate hepatic lesions is well-documented. Accuracies of FDG-PET for recurrence, lymph node status and the detection of distant metastases are higher compared with computed tomography, for example. For other epithelial gastrointestinal tumors similar results have also been demonstrated in smaller trials or case presentations. The differentiation of recurrent rectal carcinoma from scar and PET for endocrine tumors are described elsewhere (Der Nuklearmediziner PET II, in preparation). Almost no data exist for rare tumors like anal carcinoma or tumors of the small intestines. For hepatocellular carcinoma, FDG-PET has a high positive predictive value, and the intensity of the uptake correlates well with grading. However, FDG-PET is not suitable for the exclusion of hepatocellular carcinoma due to insufficient sensitivity. The differentiation of benign and malignant pancreatic masses works well for selected patients. FDG-PET for lymph node staging is at least as accurate as conventional staging, and for the detection of distant metastases FDG-PET is superior compared with conventional staging. Few data exist on therapy control of gastrointestinal tumors. (orig.) [de

  16. Brain PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results on a PET scan. Blood sugar or insulin levels may affect the test results in people with diabetes . PET scans may be done along with a CT scan. This combination scan is called a PET/CT. Alternative Names Brain positron emission tomography; PET scan - brain References Chernecky ...

  17. PET reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, F.; Pawitan, Y.; Harrison, R.L.; Lewellen, T.K.

    1990-01-01

    In statistical terms, filtered backprojection can be viewed as smoothed Least Squares (LS). In this paper, the authors report on improvement in LS resolution by: incorporating locally adaptive smoothers, imposing positivity and using statistical methods for optimal selection of the resolution parameter. The resulting algorithm has high computational efficiency relative to more elaborate Maximum Likelihood (ML) type techniques (i.e. EM with sieves). Practical aspects of the procedure are discussed in the context of PET and illustrations with computer simulated and real tomograph data are presented. The relative recovery coefficients for a 9mm sphere in a computer simulated hot-spot phantom range from .3 to .6 when the number of counts ranges from 10,000 to 640,000 respectively. The authors will also present results illustrating the relative efficacy of ML and LS reconstruction techniques

  18. Imaging and PET - PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Schulthess, G.K.; Hany, Th.F.

    2008-01-01

    PET/CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes 'hardware-fusion' to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. for this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT. (authors)

  19. [18F]FDG PET/CT outperforms [18F]FDG PET/MRI in differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrachimis, Alexis; Wenning, Christian; Weckesser, Matthias; Stegger, Lars; Burg, Matthias Christian; Allkemper, Thomas; Schaefers, Michael

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [ 18 F]FDG in comparison to PET/CT in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer suspected or known to have dedifferentiated. The study included 31 thyroidectomized and remnant-ablated patients who underwent a scheduled [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT scan and were then enrolled for a PET/MRI scan of the neck and thorax. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated regarding lesion count, conspicuity, diameter and characterization. Standardized uptake values were determined for all [ 18 F]FDG-positive lesions. Histology, cytology, and examinations before and after treatment served as the standards of reference. Of 26 patients with a dedifferentiated tumour burden, 25 were correctly identified by both [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI. Detection rates by PET/CT and PET/MRI were 97 % (113 of 116 lesions) and 85 % (99 of 113 lesions) for malignant lesions, and 100 % (48 of 48 lesions) and 77 % (37 of 48 lesions) for benign lesions, respectively. Lesion conspicuity was higher on PET/CT for both malignant and benign pulmonary lesions and in the overall rating for malignant lesions (p < 0.001). There was a difference between PET/CT and PET/MRI in overall evaluation of malignant lesions (p < 0.01) and detection of pulmonary metastases (p < 0.001). Surgical evaluation revealed three malignant lesions missed by both modalities. PET/MRI additionally failed to detect 14 pulmonary metastases and 11 benign lesions. In patients with thyroid cancer and suspected or known dedifferentiation, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI was inferior to low-dose [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT for the assessment of pulmonary status. However, for the assessment of cervical status, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI was equal to contrast-enhanced neck [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT. Therefore, [ 18 F]FDG PET/MRI combined with a low-dose CT scan of the thorax may provide an imaging solution when high-quality imaging is needed and high-energy CT is undesirable or the use of a contrast agent is contraindicated. (orig.)

  20. PET / MRI vs. PET / CT. Indications Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva González, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid techniques in Nuclear Medicine is currently a field in full development for diagnosis and treatment of various medical conditions. With the recent advent of PET / MRI much it speculated about whether or not it is superior to PET / CT especially in oncology. The Conference seeks to clarify this situation by dealing issues such as: State of the art technology PET / MRI; Indications Oncology; Some clinical cases. It concludes by explaining the oncological indications of both the real and current situation of the PET / MRI. (author)

  1. PET in management of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung-Chul

    2004-01-01

    Full text: PET provides useful information about tumor metabolism enabling accurate visualization of malignant lesions. Approximately 60-80% suspicious lesions on mammography have benign histology and about 10% of breast cancers with palpable mass are not identified in mammography. The key roles of PET technology in breast cancer are in: primary diagnosis, staging, recurrent diseases monitoring and prediction of therapy response. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for the diagnosis of breast cancer has been reported to be 68-100% and 83-100%, respectively. Considering the increasing number of small breast tumors detected by mammography and false negative results, the clinical relevance of FDG-PET for the primary diagnosis is limited. In selected patients, however, for example with dense breasts, breasts implants, augmented breast or after breast surgery, which can affect the accuracy of mammography, and in cases with equivocal mammography, FDG-PET can provide clinically relevant information. PET accurately determines the extent of disease, including the loco-regional lymph node status. Furthermore, whole-body PET imaging promises a high diagnostic accuracy for detecting recurrent or metastatic breast carcinoma with a high positive predictive value. We studied the usefulness of the FDG-PET in 42 preoperative patients with suspected breast cancer in differentiation of lesions. The diagnostic value of FDG-PET in terms of sensitivity and specificity was 95% and 77% respectively in primary mass while it was 73% and 100% for axillary lymph nodes. PET is much more accurate than other conventional modalities. The sensitivity of FDG-PET for correct staging of axillary nodal status is 84-100%. It has the potential to replace conventional procedures for the staging of distant metastases. We observed the sensitivity and the specificity of FDG-PET to be 96% and 85% to detect distant metastases. FDG-PET may become the method of choice for the early assessment of

  2. NIRS report of investigations for the development of the next generation PET apparatus. FY 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The present status of studies conducted by representative technology fields for the development of the next generation PET apparatus, and the summary of opinions given by investigators of nuclear medicine are reported. The former involves chapters of: Summary of representative technologies for the development of the next generation PET apparatus; Count rate analysis of PET apparatuses for the whole body and small animals by PET simulator; Scintillator; DOI (depth of interaction) detector-evaluation of the detector with 256-ch fluorescence polarization-photomultiplier tubes (FP-PMT) trial apparatus etc; Examination of multi-slice DOI-MR compatible detector for PET; Development of application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for processing the front-end signals; Detector simulation; Circuit for processing PET detector signals; Signal processing-coincidence circuit; Data collection system; Signal processing technology for the next generation PET; Reconstruction of statistical PET image using DOI signals; Monte Carlo simulation and Unique directions-PET for infants and for the whole body autonomic nervous systems and mental activity; and Actual design and evaluation of image reconstruction by statistical means. Opinions are: Progress of clinical PET apparatus; Desirable PET drugs and apparatuses; From clinical practice for the development of the next generation PET apparatus; From clinical psychiatric studies for the development; From application of drug development and basic researches; From brain PET practice; From clinical PET practice; and The role of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in PET development. Also involved is the publication list. (N.I.)

  3. Pets and Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... good news is that this rarely happens. Most pet-to-people diseases can be avoided by following a few ... your doctor Can a parasite cause death in people and pets? Can human disease from a parasite be treated ...

  4. Heart PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  5. [Principles of PET].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuthien-Baumann, B

    2018-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a procedure in nuclear medicine, which is applied predominantly in oncological diagnostics. In the form of modern hybrid machines, such as PET computed tomography (PET/CT) and PET magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) it has found wide acceptance and availability. The PET procedure is more than just another imaging technique, but a functional method with the capability for quantification in addition to the distribution pattern of the radiopharmaceutical, the results of which are used for therapeutic decisions. A profound knowledge of the principles of PET including the correct indications, patient preparation, and possible artifacts is mandatory for the correct interpretation of PET results.

  6. PET and Hormone Receptor Ligands in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gemignani, Mary

    2006-01-01

    .... To investigate this further, this project's objectives are: To evaluate the use of estrogen-like ligands labeled with positron emitters in preoperatively determining the ER status of breast cancer using PET...

  7. Ten years summary: FDG-PET on irradiated brain tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuxia; Boethius, J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate FDG-PET in differentiation of post-radiotherapy status: recurrence, radiation necrosis, malignant regression of low grade primary brain tumour, and to evaluate PET in terms of survival prediction. Material and methods: 117 irradiated patients (156 PET) were consecutively included. PET results were judged by a set of rigid follow-up standards. Brain metastases from lung carcinoma were further studied. Survival time was analysed with Kaplan-Meier method. Results: There were 61 true-positive, 2 false-positive, 15 false-negative, 51 true-negative PET; leaving 5 positive and 22 negative PET results indeterminate. PET positive predictive value was 96% in all and 100% in brain metastasis from lung carcinoma. PET negative predictive value was 55.6% among surgically selected cases. Survival time was significantly longer in patient's with negative PET, both brain metastasis and primary brain tumour. Conclusions: FDG-PET was a good method to pick up tumour recurrence from radiation necrosis, especially metastasis from lung carcinoma. FDG uptake could be used as a non-invasive parameter to predict patient's prognosis. (authors)

  8. PET in Benign Bone Marrow Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bruggen, Wouter; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Vellenga, Edo; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.

    This review aims to describe the current status of benign bone marrow (BM) imaging using PET. BM imaging is important as the BM is not only involved in poiesis of different vital cell lines and. can be affected by primary BM disorders, but it is also frequently affected by several extramedullary

  9. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Evaluation After Initial Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy Predicts Local Control in Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmarajan, Kavita V., E-mail: dharmark@mskcc.org [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States); Wexler, Leonard H.; Gavane, Somali; Fox, Josef J.; Schoder, Heiko; Tom, Ashlyn K.; Price, Alison N.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L. [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Pediatric Oncology, and Nuclear Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is already an integral part of staging in rhabdomyosarcoma. We investigated whether primary-site treatment response characterized by serial PET imaging at specific time points can be correlated with local control. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively examined 94 patients with rhabdomyosarcoma who received initial chemotherapy 15 weeks (median) before radiotherapy and underwent baseline, preradiation, and postradiation PET. Baseline PET standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and the presence or absence of abnormal uptake (termed PET-positive or PET-negative) both before and after radiation were examined for the primary site. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS) was calculated according to baseline SUVmax, PET-positive status, and PET-negative status by the Kaplan-Meier method, and comparisons were tested with the log-rank test. Results: The median patient age was 11 years. With 3-year median follow-up, LRFS was improved among postradiation PET-negative vs PET-positive patients: 94% vs 75%, P=.02. By contrast, on baseline PET, LRFS was not significantly different for primary-site SUVmax {<=}7 vs >7 (median), although the findings suggested a trend toward improved LRFS: 96% for SUVmax {<=}7 vs 79% for SUVmax >7, P=.08. Preradiation PET also suggested a statistically insignificant trend toward improved LRFS for PET-negative (97%) vs PET-positive (81%) patients (P=.06). Conclusion: Negative postradiation PET predicted improved LRFS. Notably, 77% of patients with persistent postradiation uptake did not experience local failure, suggesting that these patients could be closely followed up rather than immediately referred for intervention. Negative baseline and preradiation PET findings suggested statistically insignificant trends toward improved LRFS. Additional study may further understanding of relationships between PET findings at these time points and outcome in rhabdomyosarcoma.

  10. Selecting Safe Pets (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supplies (pet bowls, pet bed, leash, etc.) as gifts, then selecting the pet as a family. That way, everyone has time to really think about whether your family is ready for a pet. Key Questions Before adopting or purchasing any pet, talk to all family members, discuss ...

  11. MR Imaging-Guided Attenuation Correction of PET Data in PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian

    2016-04-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) is one of the most important challenges in the recently introduced combined PET/magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. PET/MR AC (MR-AC) approaches aim to develop methods that allow accurate estimation of the linear attenuation coefficients of the tissues and other components located in the PET field of view. MR-AC methods can be divided into 3 categories: segmentation, atlas, and PET based. This review provides a comprehensive list of the state-of-the-art MR-AC approaches and their pros and cons. The main sources of artifacts are presented. Finally, this review discusses the current status of MR-AC approaches for clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pet-Related Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Michael J

    2016-11-15

    Physicians and veterinarians have many opportunities to partner in promoting the well-being of people and their pets, especially by addressing zoonotic diseases that may be transmitted between a pet and a human family member. Common cutaneous pet-acquired zoonoses are dermatophytosis (ringworm) and sarcoptic mange (scabies), which are both readily treated. Toxoplasmosis can be acquired from exposure to cat feces, but appropriate hygienic measures can minimize the risk to pregnant women. Persons who work with animals are at increased risk of acquiring bartonellosis (e.g., cat-scratch disease); control of cat fleas is essential to minimize the risk of these infections. People and their pets share a range of tick-borne diseases, and exposure risk can be minimized with use of tick repellent, prompt tick removal, and appropriate tick control measures for pets. Pets such as reptiles, amphibians, and backyard poultry pose a risk of transmitting Salmonella species and are becoming more popular. Personal hygiene after interacting with these pets is crucial to prevent Salmonella infections. Leptospirosis is more often acquired from wildlife than infected dogs, but at-risk dogs can be protected with vaccination. The clinical history in the primary care office should routinely include questions about pets and occupational or other exposure to pet animals. Control and prevention of zoonoses are best achieved by enhancing communication between physicians and veterinarians to ensure patients know the risks of and how to prevent zoonoses in themselves, their pets, and other people.

  13. Pet ownership, dog types and attachment to pets in 9-10 year old children in Liverpool, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgarth, Carri; Boddy, Lynne M; Stratton, Gareth; German, Alexander J; Gaskell, Rosalind M; Coyne, Karen P; Bundred, Peter; McCune, Sandra; Dawson, Susan

    2013-05-13

    Little is known about ethnic, cultural and socioeconomic differences in childhood ownership and attitudes to pets. The objective of this study was to describe the factors associated with living with different pet types, as well as factors that may influence the intensity of relationship or 'attachment' that children have to their pet. Data were collected using a survey of 1021 9-10 year old primary school children in a deprived area of the city of Liverpool, UK. Dogs were the most common pet owned, most common 'favourite' pet, and species most attached to. Twenty-seven percent of dog-owning children (10% of all children surveyed) reported living with a 'Bull Breed' dog (which includes Pit Bulls and Staffordshire Bull Terriers), and the most popular dog breed owned was the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. Multivariable regression modelling identified a number of variables associated with ownership of different pets and the strength of attachment to the child's favourite pet. Girls were more likely to own most pet types, but were no more or less attached to their favourite pet than boys. Children of white ethnicity were more likely to own dogs, rodents and 'other' pets but were no more or less attached to their pets than children of non-white ethnicity. Single and youngest children were no more or less likely to own pets than those with younger brothers and sisters, but they showed greater attachment to their pets. Children that owned dogs lived in more deprived areas than those without dogs, and deprivation increased with number of dogs owned. 'Pit Bull or cross' and 'Bull Breed' dogs were more likely to be found in more deprived areas than other dog types. Non-whites were also more likely to report owning a 'Pit Bull or cross' than Whites. Gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status were associated with pet ownership, and sibling status with level of attachment to the pet. These are important to consider when conducting research into the health benefits and risks of the

  14. Pets and the immunocompromised person

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... marrow transplant patients and pets; Chemotherapy patients and pets ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Healthy pets healthy people. www.cdc.gov/healthypets . Updated July 19, 2016. ...

  15. Sensory analysis of pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Kadri

    2014-08-01

    Pet food palatability depends first and foremost on the pet and is related to the pet food sensory properties such as aroma, texture and flavor. Sensory analysis of pet foods may be conducted by humans via descriptive or hedonic analysis, pets via acceptance or preference tests, and through a number of instrumental analysis methods. Sensory analysis of pet foods provides additional information on reasons behind palatable and unpalatable foods as pets lack linguistic capabilities. Furthermore, sensory analysis may be combined with other types of information such as personality and environment factors to increase understanding of acceptable pet foods. Most pet food flavor research is proprietary and, thus, there are a limited number of publications available. Funding opportunities for pet food studies would increase research and publications and this would help raise public awareness of pet food related issues. This mini-review addresses current pet food sensory analysis literature and discusses future challenges and possibilities. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Clinical PET application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Hong, Song W.; Choi, Chang W.; Yang, Seong Dae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1997-12-01

    PET gives various methabolic images, and is very important, new diagnostic modality in clinical oncology. In Korea Cancer Center Hospital, PET is installed as a research tool of long-mid-term atomic research project. For the efficient use of PET for clinical and research projects, income from the patients should be managed to get the raw material, equipment, manpower, and also for the clinical PET research. 1. Support the clinical application of PET in oncology. 2. Budgetary management of income, costs for raw material, equipment, manpower, and the clinical PET research project. In this year, 250 cases of PET images were obtained, which resulted total income of 180,000,000 won. 50,000,000 won was deposited for the 1998 PET clinical research. Second year PET clinical research should be managed under unified project. Increased demand for {sup 18}FDG in and outside KCCH need more than 2 times production of {sup 18}FDG in a day purchase of HPLC pump and {sup 68}Ga pin source which was delayed due to economic crisis, should be done early in 1998. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Imaging with PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Noreen Norfaraheen Lee Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    PET deals with biochemistry and metabolic changes that occur at molecular level. Hence, PET differs fundamentally from other imaging modalities. CT imaging is based on tissue density, whereas MRI conveys anatomic information based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. CT and MRI are useful in clinical diagnosis only when disease process has caused significant anatomic alterations. However, in most disease conditions chemical changes precede anatomic changes, that can be detected by PET technology. Thus, PET can provide earliest and unique information about ongoing disease process long before anatomic or structural changes take place. There is no other modality available at present that can replace PET technology. Although PET produces cross-sectional images like that obtained in MRI or CT, they represent circulation, function and metabolism, and not anatomic structure. PET is extremely sensitive measuring quantitatively concentration of tracers in nano to pico-molar range. Thus, PET enables merger of biochemistry and biology in medicine giving birth to molecular medicine that focuses on identifying the molecular errors of disease leading to developing molecular corrections including gene therapy. Molecular imaging with PET has been playing a role in examining the biological nature of a disease condition and its characterization to guide selection and evaluation of treatment. (author)

  18. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Demir; Türkay Toklu; Mohammad Abuqbeitah; Hüseyin Çetin; H. Sezer Sezgin; Nami Yeyin; Kerim Sönmezoğlu

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. Methods: According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated...

  19. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Demir, Mustafa; Toklu, Türkay; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Çetin, Hüseyin; Sezgin, H. Sezer; Yeyin, Nami; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. Methods: According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated asp...

  20. Birds Kept as Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your pet’s health Visit a veterinarian who has experience with pet birds for routine check-ups to keep your bird healthy and prevent infectious diseases. If your bird becomes sick or dies within a month after purchase or adoption: Contact your veterinarian. Inform the pet ...

  1. Model PET Scan Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Amber; Gazdovich, Jennifer; Redouté, Oriane; Reverte, Juan Manuel; Shelley, Samantha; Todorova, Vesela

    2018-05-01

    This paper provides a brief introduction to antimatter and how it, along with other modern physics topics, is utilized in positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It further describes a hands-on activity for students to help them gain an understanding of how PET scans assist in detecting cancer. Modern physics topics provide an exciting way to introduce students to current applications of physics.

  2. Usage of Recycled Pet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ebru Tayyar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing industrialization, urbanization and the technological development have caused to increase depletion of the natural resources and environmental pollution's problem. Especially, for the countries which have not enough space recycling of the waste eliminating waste on regular basis or decreasing the amount and volume of waste have provided the important advantages. There are lots of studies and projects to develop both protect resources and prevent environmental pollution. PET bottles are commonly used in beverage industry and can be reused after physical and chemical recycling processes. Usage areas of recycled PET have been developed rapidly. Although recycled PET is used in plastic industry, composite industry also provides usage alternatives of recycled PET. Textile is a suitable sector for recycling of some plastics made of polymers too. In this study, the recycling technologies and applications of waste PET bottles have been investigated and scientific works in this area have been summarized.

  3. Oncology PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inubushi, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    At the beginning of this article, likening medical images to 'Where is Waldo?' I indicate the concept of diagnostic process of PET/CT imaging, so that medical physics specialists could understand the role of each imaging modality and infer our distress for image diagnosis. Then, I state the present situation of PET imaging and the basics (e.g. health insurance coverage, clinical significance, principle, protocol, and pitfall) of oncology FDG-PET imaging which accounts for more than 99% of all clinical PET examinations in Japan. Finally, I would like to give a wishful prospect of oncology PET that will expand to be more cancer-specific in order to assess therapeutic effects of emerging molecular targeted drugs targeting the 'hallmarks of cancer'. (author)

  4. TH-A-17A-01: Innovation in PET Instrumentation and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, M [Siemens Healthcare, Knoxville, Tennessee (United States); Miyaoka, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Shao, Y [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Innovation in PET instrumentation has led to the new millennium revolutionary imaging applications for diagnosis, therapeutic guidance, and development of new molecular imaging probes, etc. However, after several decades innovations, will the advances of PET technology and applications continue with the same trend and pace? What will be the next big thing beyond the PET/CT, PET/MRI, and Time-of-flight PET? How will the PET instrumentation and imaging performance be further improved by novel detector research and advanced imaging system development? Or will the development of new algorithms and methodologies extend the limit of current instrumentation and leapfrog the imaging quality and quantification for practical applications? The objective of this session is to present an overview of current status and advances in the PET instrumentation and applications with speakers from leading academic institutes and a major medical imaging company. Presenting with both academic research projects and commercial technology developments, this session will provide a glimpse of some latest advances and challenges in the field, such as using semiconductor photon-sensor based PET detectors to improve performance and enable new applications, as well as the technology trend that may lead to the next breakthrough in PET imaging for clinical and preclinical applications. Both imaging and image-guided therapy subjects will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Describe the latest innovations in PET instrumentation and applications Understand the driven force behind the PET instrumentation innovation and development Learn the trend of PET technology development for applications.

  5. TH-A-17A-01: Innovation in PET Instrumentation and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, M; Miyaoka, R; Shao, Y

    2014-01-01

    Innovation in PET instrumentation has led to the new millennium revolutionary imaging applications for diagnosis, therapeutic guidance, and development of new molecular imaging probes, etc. However, after several decades innovations, will the advances of PET technology and applications continue with the same trend and pace? What will be the next big thing beyond the PET/CT, PET/MRI, and Time-of-flight PET? How will the PET instrumentation and imaging performance be further improved by novel detector research and advanced imaging system development? Or will the development of new algorithms and methodologies extend the limit of current instrumentation and leapfrog the imaging quality and quantification for practical applications? The objective of this session is to present an overview of current status and advances in the PET instrumentation and applications with speakers from leading academic institutes and a major medical imaging company. Presenting with both academic research projects and commercial technology developments, this session will provide a glimpse of some latest advances and challenges in the field, such as using semiconductor photon-sensor based PET detectors to improve performance and enable new applications, as well as the technology trend that may lead to the next breakthrough in PET imaging for clinical and preclinical applications. Both imaging and image-guided therapy subjects will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Describe the latest innovations in PET instrumentation and applications Understand the driven force behind the PET instrumentation innovation and development Learn the trend of PET technology development for applications

  6. [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT outperforms [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI in differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrachimis, Alexis; Wenning, Christian; Weckesser, Matthias; Stegger, Lars [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Burg, Matthias Christian; Allkemper, Thomas [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Schaefers, Michael [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Westfaelische Wilhelms University Muenster, European Institute for Molecular Imaging, Muenster (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [{sup 18}F]FDG in comparison to PET/CT in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer suspected or known to have dedifferentiated. The study included 31 thyroidectomized and remnant-ablated patients who underwent a scheduled [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT scan and were then enrolled for a PET/MRI scan of the neck and thorax. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated regarding lesion count, conspicuity, diameter and characterization. Standardized uptake values were determined for all [{sup 18}F]FDG-positive lesions. Histology, cytology, and examinations before and after treatment served as the standards of reference. Of 26 patients with a dedifferentiated tumour burden, 25 were correctly identified by both [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI. Detection rates by PET/CT and PET/MRI were 97 % (113 of 116 lesions) and 85 % (99 of 113 lesions) for malignant lesions, and 100 % (48 of 48 lesions) and 77 % (37 of 48 lesions) for benign lesions, respectively. Lesion conspicuity was higher on PET/CT for both malignant and benign pulmonary lesions and in the overall rating for malignant lesions (p < 0.001). There was a difference between PET/CT and PET/MRI in overall evaluation of malignant lesions (p < 0.01) and detection of pulmonary metastases (p < 0.001). Surgical evaluation revealed three malignant lesions missed by both modalities. PET/MRI additionally failed to detect 14 pulmonary metastases and 11 benign lesions. In patients with thyroid cancer and suspected or known dedifferentiation, [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI was inferior to low-dose [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT for the assessment of pulmonary status. However, for the assessment of cervical status, [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI was equal to contrast-enhanced neck [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT. Therefore, [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI combined with a low-dose CT scan of the thorax may provide an imaging solution when high-quality imaging is needed and high-energy CT is undesirable or the use of a contrast

  7. 11C-methionine PET as a prognostic marker in patients with glioma: comparison with18F-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungeun; Chung, June-Key; Jeong, Jae Min; Im, So-Hyang; Kim, Dong Gyu; Jung, Hee Won; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the prognostic value of 11 C-methionine (MET) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in glioma patients. The study population comprised 47 patients with gliomas (19 glioblastoma, 28 others). Pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging, MET PET and FDG PET were performed within a time interval of 2 weeks in all patients. The uptake ratio and standard uptake values were calculated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done to determine significant prognostic factors. Ki-67 index was measured by immunohistochemical staining, and compared with FDG and MET uptake in glioma. Among the several clinicopathological prognostic factors, tumour pathology (glioblastoma or not), age (≥60 or <60 years), Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (≥70 or <70) and MET PET (higher uptake or not compared with normal cortex) were found to be significant predictors by univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, tumour pathology, KPS and MET PET were identified as significant independent predictors. The Ki-67 proliferation index was significantly correlated with MET uptake (r=0.64), but not with FDG uptake. Compared with FDG PET in glioma, MET PET was an independent significant prognostic factor and MET uptake was correlated with cellular proliferation. MET PET may be a useful biological prognostic marker in glioma patients. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Mustafa; Toklu, Türkay; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Çetin, Hüseyin; Sezgin, H Sezer; Yeyin, Nami; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated aspects were spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, count rate performance, image quality, count loss and random events correction accuracy. The findings of this study demonstrated superior sensitivity (~ 4 folds) of PET scanner in PET/MR compared to PET/CT system. Image quality test exhibited higher contrast in PET/MR (~ 9%) compared with PET/CT. The scatter fraction of PET/MR was 43.4% at noise equivalent count rate (NECR) peak of 218 kcps and the corresponding activity concentration was 17.7 kBq/cc. Whereas the scatter fraction of PET/CT was found as 39.2% at NECR peak of 72 kcps and activity concentration of 24.3 kBq/cc. The percentage error of the random event correction accuracy was 3.4% and 3.1% in PET/MR and PET/CT, respectively. It was concluded that PET/MR system is about 4 times more sensitive than PET/CT, and the contrast of hot lesions in PET/MR was ~ 9% higher than PET/CT. These outcomes also emphasize the possibility to achieve excellent clinical PET images with low administered dose and/or a short acquisition time in PET/MR.

  9. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, F.D.; Hines, H.

    2001-01-01

    ADAC Laboratories has two main imaging strengths: PET and Gamma Cameras. PET's three-dimensional imaging of metabolic function is used in oncology, with emerging opportunties in cardiology, genetic mapping and pharmaceuticals research. In oncology, PET imaging can provide comprehensive and accurate staging information which is not available from CT or MRI. In some cases, this information can lead to modification of treatment, for example from an aggressive approach to one of palliation. The SKYLight is the world's first and only gantry-free camera. It is a dual-detector variable angle camera designed for high throughput, with unsurpassed openness and patient access. (orig.)

  10. Performance evaluation of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García Hernández, Trinitat, E-mail: mtrinitat@eresa.com; Vicedo González, Aurora; Brualla González, Luis; Granero Cabañero, Domingo [Department of Medical Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Ferrer Rebolleda, Jose; Sánchez Jurado, Raúl; Puig Cozar Santiago, Maria del [Department of Nuclear Medicine, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Roselló Ferrando, Joan [Department of Medical Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Department of Physiology, University of Valencia, Valencia 46010 (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Early stage breast cancers may not be visible on a whole-body PET scan. To overcome whole-body PET limitations, several dedicated breast positron emission tomography (DbPET) systems have emerged nowadays aiming to improve spatial resolution. In this work the authors evaluate the performance of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner (Mammi-PET, Oncovision). Methods: Global status, uniformity, sensitivity, energy, and spatial resolution were measured. Spheres of different sizes (2.5, 4, 5, and 6 mm diameter) and various 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) activity concentrations were randomly inserted in a gelatine breast phantom developed at our institution. Several lesion-to-background ratios (LBR) were simulated, 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, 30:1, and 50:1. Images were reconstructed using different voxel sizes. The ability of experienced reporters to detect spheres was tested as a function of acquisition time, LBR, sphere size, and matrix reconstruction voxel size. For comparison, phantoms were scanned in the DbPET camera and in a whole body PET (WB-PET). Two patients who just underwent WB-PET/CT exams were imaged with the DbPET system and the images were compared. Results: The measured absolute peak sensitivity was 2.0%. The energy resolution was 24.0% ± 1%. The integral and differential uniformity were 10% and 6% in the total field of view (FOV) and 9% and 5% in the central FOV, respectively. The measured spatial resolution was 2.0, 1.9, and 1.7 mm in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. The system exhibited very good detectability for spheres ≥4 mm and LBR ≥10 with a sphere detection of 100% when acquisition time was set >3 min/bed. For LBR = 5 and acquisition time of 7 min the detectability was 100% for spheres of 6 mm and 75% for spheres of 5, 4, and 2.5 mm. Lesion WB-PET detectability was only comparable to the DbPET camera for lesion sizes ≥5 mm when acquisition time was >3 min and LBR > 10. Conclusions: The DbPET has a good

  11. Performance evaluation of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García Hernández, Trinitat; Vicedo González, Aurora; Brualla González, Luis; Granero Cabañero, Domingo; Ferrer Rebolleda, Jose; Sánchez Jurado, Raúl; Puig Cozar Santiago, Maria del; Roselló Ferrando, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Early stage breast cancers may not be visible on a whole-body PET scan. To overcome whole-body PET limitations, several dedicated breast positron emission tomography (DbPET) systems have emerged nowadays aiming to improve spatial resolution. In this work the authors evaluate the performance of a high resolution dedicated breast PET scanner (Mammi-PET, Oncovision). Methods: Global status, uniformity, sensitivity, energy, and spatial resolution were measured. Spheres of different sizes (2.5, 4, 5, and 6 mm diameter) and various 18 fluorodeoxyglucose ("1"8F-FDG) activity concentrations were randomly inserted in a gelatine breast phantom developed at our institution. Several lesion-to-background ratios (LBR) were simulated, 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, 30:1, and 50:1. Images were reconstructed using different voxel sizes. The ability of experienced reporters to detect spheres was tested as a function of acquisition time, LBR, sphere size, and matrix reconstruction voxel size. For comparison, phantoms were scanned in the DbPET camera and in a whole body PET (WB-PET). Two patients who just underwent WB-PET/CT exams were imaged with the DbPET system and the images were compared. Results: The measured absolute peak sensitivity was 2.0%. The energy resolution was 24.0% ± 1%. The integral and differential uniformity were 10% and 6% in the total field of view (FOV) and 9% and 5% in the central FOV, respectively. The measured spatial resolution was 2.0, 1.9, and 1.7 mm in the radial, tangential, and axial directions. The system exhibited very good detectability for spheres ≥4 mm and LBR ≥10 with a sphere detection of 100% when acquisition time was set >3 min/bed. For LBR = 5 and acquisition time of 7 min the detectability was 100% for spheres of 6 mm and 75% for spheres of 5, 4, and 2.5 mm. Lesion WB-PET detectability was only comparable to the DbPET camera for lesion sizes ≥5 mm when acquisition time was >3 min and LBR > 10. Conclusions: The DbPET has a good performance

  12. PET and Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Funda Sevencan; Songul A. Vaizoglu

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to clarify the need of decreasing the environmental effects caused by human and draw attention to the increasing environmental effects of plastics wastes. Plastics consist of organic molecules with high density molecules or polymers. Main resources of plastics are the residue of oil rafineries. Several advantages of plastics, have increased the usage continuously. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) is the most commonly used plastics. PET is used to protect food, drinking water,...

  13. Pets, Purity and Pollution: Why Conventional Models of Disease Transmission Do Not Work for Pet Rat Owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Charlotte; Perkins, Elizabeth; Watkins, Francine; Christley, Robert

    2017-12-07

    In the United Kingdom, following the emergence of Seoul hantavirus in pet rat owners in 2012, public health authorities tried to communicate the risk of this zoonotic disease, but had limited success. To explore this lack of engagement with health advice, we conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with pet rat owners and analysed them using a grounded theory approach. The findings from these interviews suggest that rat owners construct their pets as different from wild rats, and by elevating the rat to the status of a pet, the powerful associations that rats have with dirt and disease are removed. Removing the rat from the contaminated outside world moves their pet rat from being 'out of place' to 'in place'. A concept of 'bounded purity' keeps the rat protected within the home, allowing owners to interact with their pet, safe in the knowledge that it is clean and disease-free. Additionally, owners constructed a 'hierarchy of purity' for their pets, and it is on this structure of disease and risk that owners base their behaviour, not conventional biomedical models of disease.

  14. Impact of Pretransplantation Indices in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Knowledge of Center-Specific Outcome Data Is Pivotal before Making Index-Based Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törlén, Johan; Remberger, Mats; Le Blanc, Katarina; Ljungman, Per; Mattsson, Jonas

    2017-04-01

    Outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is influenced by patient comorbidity, disease type, and status before treatment. We performed a retrospective study involving 521 consecutive adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients who underwent transplantation for hematological malignancy at our center from 2000 to 2012 to compare the predictive value of the hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI) and the disease risk index (DRI) for overall survival and transplantation-related mortality. Patients in the highest HCT-CI risk group (HCT-CI score ≥3) had a lower 5-year overall survival rate (50%) than the low-risk group (63%; P 6 [n = 9]). Five-year overall survival in the highest DRI risk group was significantly poorer (44%) than in the low-risk group (63%; P indices failed to predict differences in transplantation-related mortality (HCT-CI, P = .54; DRI, P = .17). We conclude that HCT-CI and DRI were predictive of overall survival in our patient population. Even so, our data show that different patient groups may have different outcomes despite sharing the same index risk group and that indices should, therefore, be evaluated according to local data before clinical implementation at the single-center level. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Medical application of PET technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [ 18 F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals

  16. PET in neuro-oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelcke, U; Leenders, K.L.

    This article reviews possible clinical applications of positron emission tomography (PET) in brain tumor patients. PET allows quantitative assessment of brain tumor pathophysiology and biochemistry. It therefore provides different information about tumors when compared to histological or

  17. Take Care with Pet Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... young children. [775 KB] Animals and Health Healthy Pets Healthy People : CDC website with helpful resources and information on health benefits of pets and disease risks Safe Handling Tips for Reptiles ...

  18. Medical application of PET technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [{sup 18}F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals.

  19. PET applications in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulkin, B. L. [Ann Arbor, Univ. of Michigan Medical Center (United States). Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Section

    1997-12-01

    This article summarizes the major PET studies which have been performed in pediatric patients to elucidate and characterize diseases and normal development. Issues special for the application of the technique in children, such as dosimetry, patient preparation, and image acquisition are discussed. Studies of central nervous system (CNS) development and pathology, including epilepsy, intraventricular hemorrhage, neonatal asphyxia, tumors, and effects on the CNS from treatment of other tumors are reviewed. These have contributed information fundamental to their understanding of CNS development and pathology. PET investigations into the pathophysiology of congenital heart disease have begun and hold great promise to aid their understanding of these conditions. The second major area in which PET has been applied is the study of non CNS neoplasms. Neuroblastoma has been investigated with tracers which explore basic biochemical features which characterize this tumor, as well as with tracers which explore biochemical events relatively specific for this malignancy. Other common and uncommon tumors of childhood are discussed. The PET technique has been shown useful for answering questions of clinical relevance for the management of these uncommon neoplasms. PET is likely to continue to aid their understanding of many pediatric diseases and may gain more widespread clinical acceptance as the technology continues to disseminate rapidly.

  20. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D L; Pichler, B J; Gückel, B

    2018-01-01

    The 6th annual meeting to address key issues in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was held again in Tübingen, Germany, from March 27 to 29, 2017. Over three days of invited plenary lectures, round table discussions and dialogue board deliberations, participants c...... of response to pharmacological interventions and therapies. As such, PET/MRI is a key to advancing medicine and patient care.......The 6th annual meeting to address key issues in positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was held again in Tübingen, Germany, from March 27 to 29, 2017. Over three days of invited plenary lectures, round table discussions and dialogue board deliberations, participants...... critically assessed the current state of PET/MRI, both clinically and as a research tool, and attempted to chart future directions. The meeting addressed the use of PET/MRI and workflows in oncology, neurosciences, infection, inflammation and chronic pain syndromes, as well as deeper discussions about how...

  1. PET imaging in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faria, Daniele de Paula; Copray, Sjef; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Dierckx, Rudi; de Vries, Erik

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive technique for quantitative imaging of biochemical and physiological processes in animals and humans. PET uses probes labeled with a radioactive isotope, called PET tracers, which can bind to or be converted by a specific biological target and thus

  2. PET imaging of inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscombe, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases are common place and often chronic. Most inflammatory cells have increased uptake of glucose which is enhanced in the presence of local cytokines. Therefore, imaging glucose metabolism by the means of 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) holds significant promise in imaging focal inflammation. Most of the work published involved small series of patients with either vasculitis, sarcoid or rheumatoid arthritis. It would appear that FDG PET is a simple and effective technique to identify inflammatory tissue in these conditions. There is even some work to suggest that by comparing baseline and early post therapy scans clinical outcome can be predicted. This would appear to be true with vasculitis as well as retroperitoneal fibrosis. The number of patients in each study is small but the evidence is compelling enough to recommend FDG PET imaging in the routine care of these patients.

  3. Pet in Clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsche, A.; Grossman, G.; Santana, M.; Santana, C.; Halkar, R.; Garcia, E.

    2003-01-01

    The utility of the PET (positron emission tomography in clinical oncology has been recognized for more than two decades, locating it as a sensible technique for the diagnosis and the prognosis stratification of the oncology patients. The sensitivity and specificity of the PET in comparation to other image studies have demonstrated to be greater. For some years, there was a restriction of PET because of the high cost of the equipment and the cyclotrons. Nevertheless, the relation of cost/benefits is considered as a priority as this technique offers important clinical information. In this article the results observed when using it in diverse types of cancer, as well as the effectiveness shown in the pre-operating evaluation, the evaluation of residual disease, diagnosis of recurrences, pursuit and prognosis stratification of the patients with cancer. (The author)

  4. Metabolic imaging using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that myocardial metabolism plays a key role not only in ischaemic heart disease but also in a variety of diseases which involve myocardium globally, such as heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Understanding myocardial metabolism in such diseases helps to elucidate the pathophysiology and assists in making therapeutic decisions. As well as providing information on regional changes, PET can deliver quantitative information about both regional and global changes in metabolism. This capability of quantitative measurement is one of the major advantages of PET along with physiological positron tracers, especially relevant in evaluating diseases which involve the whole myocardium. This review discusses major PET tracers for metabolic imaging and their clinical applications and contributions to research regarding ischaemic heart disease and other diseases such as heart failure and diabetic heart disease. Future applications of positron metabolic tracers for the detection of vulnerable plaque are also highlighted briefly. (orig.)

  5. Novel PET sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, C.R.

    2001-03-01

    This thesis describes the design, synthesis and evaluation of novel molecular sensors that utilize the phenomena of Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET). PET design can be incorporated into molecules to allow them to selectively bind certain guest molecules. PET works by the modulation of electron potentials within a molecule. Binding events between a host and guest can, if designed suitably, change these potentials enough to cause a transfer of electronic charge within the molecular sensor. This event can be accurately and sensitively monitored by the use of ultra violet or fluorescence spectroscopy. A sensor molecule can be constructed by matching the guest to a suitable receptor site and incorporating this into a molecule containing a fluorophore with the correct electron potential characteristics. By using existing synthetic routes as well as exploiting new pathways these sensor molecules C n be constructed to contain a fluorophore separated from a guest receptor(s) by suitable spacers units. When put together these facets go to creating molecules that by design are sensitive and selective for certain guest molecules or functional groups. This methodology allows the synthetic chemist to rationally design and synthesise PET sensors, tailored to the needs of the guest. In this thesis the synthesis and evaluation of a novel PET sensors for D-glucosamine, disaccharides and fluoride is presented. It is believed that the novel sensors using the PET phenomenon presented in this thesis are a worthwhile extension of previous works undertaken by other groups around the world and shows new pathways to increasingly complex and sophisticated sensor molecular design. (author)

  6. PET and endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.; Belhocine, T.; Hustinx, R.; Foidart-Willems, J.

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the main indications of PET examination, and specifically of 18 FDG, in the assessment of endocrine tumors: of the thyroid, of the parathyroid, of the adrenal and of the pituitary glands. Neuroendocrine tumors, gastro-entero-pancreatic or carcinoid tumors are also under the scope. Usually, the most differentiated tumors show only poor uptake of the FDG as they have a weak metabolic and proliferative activity. In the assessment of endocrine tumors, FDG-PET should be used only after most specific nuclear examinations been performed. (author)

  7. PET/MR in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin

    2012-01-01

    of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to a number...... be applied together with PET increasing the amount of information about the tissues of interest. The potential clinical benefit of applying PET/MR in staging, radiotherapy planning and treatment evaluation in oncology, as well as the research perspectives for the use of PET/MR in the development of new...

  8. Simultaneous PET and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiping Shao; Cherry, Simon R.; Meadors, Ken; Siegel, Stefan; Silverman, Robert W.; Farahani, Keyvan; Marsden, Paul K.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a prototype PET detector which is compatible with a clinical MRI system to provide simultaneous PET and MR imaging. This single-slice PET system consists of 48 2x2x10mm 3 LSO crystals in a 38 mm diameter ring configuration that can be placed inside the receiver coil of the MRI system, coupled to three multi-channel photomultipliers housed outside the main magnetic field via 4 m long and 2 mm diameter optical fibres. The PET system exhibits 2 mm spatial resolution, 41% energy resolution at 511 keV and 20 ns timing resolution. Simultaneous PET and MR phantom images were successfully acquired. (author)

  9. PET and PET/CT in malignant melanoma; PET y PET/CT en melanoma maligno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia O, J R [Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging PET/CT, Centro Medico ABC, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The advantages that it has the PET/CT are: 1. It diminishes mainly positive false lesions. It identifies physiologic accumulate places. 2. It diminishes in smaller grade false negative. Small injuries. Injuries with low grade concentration. Injure on intense activity areas. 3. Precise anatomical localization of accumulate places. 4. Reduction of the acquisition time. (Author)

  10. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...

  11. I Love Petting Zoos!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-23

    This Kidtastics podcast helps children learn about how to stay safe and healthy when visiting petting zoos and other animal exhibits.  Created: 3/23/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/23/2010.

  12. PET's indsats under lup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peer Henrik

    2006-01-01

    En undersøgelseskommission nedsat i 1999. Fem medlemmer skal undersøge PET's efterretningsvirksomhed i forhold til politiske partier, faglige konflikter og politisk ideologiske bevægelser i Danmark under den kolde krig. Kommissionens rapport forventes færdig næste år. Udgivelsesdato: 2. juli 2006...

  13. Choosing a Pet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    THE capital boasts countless markets of all kinds,but some of its insect,bird and pet markets immortalize Beijing culture and folkloric traditions.Don’t miss it! The Huasheng Tianqiao Market,south of the famous Panjiayuan Antique Market, was moved a few years ago and rebuilt in the

  14. PET CT and lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about Tc and lymphomas. Classification and clinical cases of various cancer such as gastro duodenal or ulcer, mama, medullary, lymph and neck, leukemia, nodular sclerosis. Metabolic information, anatomical nature of lymphoma and its clinical presentation determine the extent that PET should be used in the patient.

  15. The emerging disease occurrence of pet animals in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umma Habiba

    2016-12-01

    Results: Among the most general pet animals in Bangladesh (dog, cat, rabbit, the mostly occured diseases were scabies (23.07%, feline ascariasis (37.14% and rabbit mange (34.61%, while the less frequent diseases were canine parvovirus enteritis (2.19%, cat scratch disease (5.71% and overgrown teeth (7.69%. Conclusion: The study provides basic information about the current status and the percentage (% of disease occurrence considering the emerging diseases of pet animals in Bangladesh. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2016; 3(4.000: 413-419

  16. The impact of PET-CT in suspected recurrent ovarian cancer: A prospective multi-centre study as part of the Australian PET Data Collection Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulham, M J; Carter, J; Baldey, A; Hicks, R J; Ramshaw, J E; Gibson, M

    2009-03-01

    To assess the impact of FDG PET-CT on the management of patients with suspected recurrent ovarian cancer and to determine the incremental information provided by PET-CT. This was a prospective, multi-centre, cohort study. Ninety women (mean age 59.9 years; age range 35-85 years) with a previous history of treated epithelial ovarian carcinoma and suspected recurrence based on elevated CA-125, anatomical imaging or clinical symptoms were studied with FDG PET-CT across two States. Referring doctors were asked to specify a management plan pre-PET, if management was altered after PET-CT and, the impact (rated - none, low, medium, high) of PET-CT on patient management. The pre-PET management plan could include radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgery, and 'other' including observation. Patients were followed at 6 and 12 months and clinical status, evidence of recurrence and progression were recorded. Patients were referred by 34 individual specialists. At least 168 additional sites of disease in 61 patients (68%), not identified by conventional imaging were identified by PET-CT. In 77% the additional lesions were located below the diaphragm and most were nodal or peritoneal. PET-CT affected management in 60% (49% high, 11% medium impact). Patients where more disease was detected with PET-CT were more likely to progress in the following 12 months. For women with previously treated ovarian carcinoma with recurrent disease, PET-CT can: a) alter management in close to 60% of patients, b) detect more sites of disease than abdominal and pelvic CT, c) is superior in the detection of nodal, peritoneal and subcapsular liver disease and d) offers the opportunity for technology replacement in this setting.

  17. Read the Label First: Protect Your Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the importance of reading pet products labels before purchasing and using any product to insure the safety of your pets. Find tips for ways to reduce the changes of pets accessing potentially dangerous products.

  18. Cyclotron/PET project in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, H.

    2006-01-01

    The Positron Computed Tomography (PET) is a tri dimensional image technique which shows biochemical information. PET is used in neurology and cardiology diseases. The National Center Cyclotron PET has been found to research, development and health science applications.

  19. Staging of untreated nasopharyngeal carcinoma with PET/CT: comparison with conventional imaging work-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Shu-Hang; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liu, Feng-Yuan; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Liao, Chun-Ta; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Chin, Shu-Chyn; Hsu, Cheng-Lung

    2009-01-01

    We prospectively compared PET/CT and conventional imaging for initial staging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A total of 111 patients with histologically proven NPC were investigated with PET/CT and conventional imaging (head-and-neck MRI, chest X-ray, abdominal ultrasound, and bone scan) before treatment. The respective findings were reviewed independently and then compared with each other. With regard to T staging, PET/CT showed a discrepancy with head-and-neck MRI in 36 (32.4%) of the study subjects. With regard to N staging, PET/CT showed a discrepancy with head-and-neck MRI in 15 (13.5%) patients. Among the discordant cases, MRI was superior in demonstrating tumor involvement in the parapharyngeal space, skull base, intracranial area, sphenoid sinus, and retropharyngeal nodes while PET/CT was superior in demonstrating neck nodal metastasis. PET/CT disclosed 13 of 16 patients with distant malignancy compared with four patients disclosed by conventional imaging work-up. The false-positive rate of PET/CT was 18.8%. PET/CT correctly modified M staging in eight patients (7.2%) and disclosed a second primary lung malignancy in one patient (0.9%). In NPC patients, MRI appears to be superior to PET/CT for the assessment of locoregional invasion and retropharyngeal nodal metastasis. PET/CT is more accurate than MRI for determining cervical nodal metastasis and should be the better reference for the neck status. PET/CT has an acceptable diagnostic yield and a low false-positive rate for the detection of distant malignancy and can replace conventional work-up to this aim. PET/CT and head-and-neck MRI are suggested for the initial staging of NPC patients. (orig.)

  20. Quantitation of respiratory motion during 4D-PET/CT acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehmeh, S.A.; Erdi, Y.E.; Pan, T.; Yorke, E.; Mageras, G.S.; Rosenzweig, K.E.; Schoder, H.; Mostafavi, H.; Squire, O.; Pevsner, A.; Larson, S.M.; Humm, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the variability of the respiratory motion during 4D-PET/CT acquisition. The respiratory motion for five lung cancer patients was monitored by tracking external markers placed on the abdomen. CT data were acquired over an entire respiratory cycle at each couch position. The x-ray tube status was recorded by the tracking system, for retrospective sorting of the CT data as a function of respiration phase. Each respiratory cycle was sampled in ten equal bins. 4D-PET data were acquired in gated mode, where each breathing cycle was divided into ten 500 ms bins. For both CT and PET acquisition, patients received audio prompting to regularize breathing. The 4D-CT and 4D-PET data were then correlated according to their respiratory phases. The respiratory periods, and average amplitude within each phase bin, acquired in both modality sessions were then analyzed. The average respiratory motion period during 4D-CT was within 18% from that in the 4D-PET sessions. This would reflect up to 1.8% fluctuation in the duration of each 4D-CT bin. This small uncertainty enabled good correlation between CT and PET data, on a phase-to-phase basis. Comparison of the average-amplitude within the respiration trace, between 4D-CT and 4D- PET, on a bin-by-bin basis show a maximum deviation of ∼15%. This study has proved the feasibility of performing 4D-PET/CT acquisition. Respiratory motion was in most cases consistent between PET and CT sessions, thereby improving both the attenuation correction of PET images, and co-registration of PET and CT images. On the other hand, in two patients, there was an increased partial irregularity in their breathing motion, which would prevent accurately correlating the corresponding PET and CT images

  1. Early mortality after radical radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer: comparison of PET-staged and conventionally staged cohorts treated at a large tertiary referral center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Manus, Michael P.; Wong, Kevin; Hicks, Rodney J.; Matthews, Jane P.; Wirth, Andrew; Ball, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: At our center, approximately 30% of radical radiotherapy (RRT) candidates become ineligible for RRT for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after positron emission tomography (PET). We hypothesized that early cancer death rates would be lower in patients receiving RRT after PET staging compared with conventionally staged patients. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts were compared. Cohort 1 consisted of all participants in an Australian randomized trial from our center given 60 Gy conventionally fractionated RRT with or without concurrent carboplatin from 1989 to 1995. Eligible patients had Stage I-III, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status 0 or 1, <10% weight loss, and had not undergone PET. Cohort 2 included all RRT candidates between November 1996 and April 1999 who received RRT after PET staging and fulfilled the above criteria for stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status, and weight loss. Results: Eighty and 77 eligible patients comprised the PET and non-PET groups, respectively. The PET-selected patients had significantly less weight loss; 73% and 49% of the PET and non-PET patients, respectively, received chemotherapy. The median survival was 31 months for PET patients and 16 months for non-PET patients. Mortality from NSCLC and other causes in the first year was 17% and 8% for PET patients and 32% and 4% for non-PET patients, respectively. The hazard ratio for NSCLC mortality for PET vs. non-PET patients was 0.49 (p=0.0016) on unifactorial analysis and was 0.55 (p = 0.0075) after adjusting for chemotherapy, which significantly improved survival. Conclusion: Patients selected for RRT after PET have lower early cancer mortality than those selected using conventional imaging

  2. Value of retrospective image fusion of 18F-FDG PET and MRI for preoperative staging of head and neck cancer: Comparison with PET/CT and contrast-enhanced neck MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Tomonori; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suenaga, Yuko; Konishi, Jyunya; Sasaki, Ryohei; Morimoto, Koichi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-ichi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical value of retrospective image fusion of neck MRI and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET for locoregional extension and nodal staging of neck cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity or hypopharynx underwent PET/CT and contrast-enhanced neck MRI for initial staging before surgery including primary tumor resection and neck dissection. Diagnostic performance of PET/CT, MRI, and retrospective image fusion of PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessment of the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional lymph nodes (N stage) was evaluated. Results: Accuracy for T status was 87% for fused PET/MRI and 90% for MRI, thus proving significantly superior to PET/CT, which had an accuracy of 67% (p = 0.041 and p = 0.023, respectively). Accuracy for N status was 77% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/CT, being superior to MRI, which had an accuracy of 63%, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.13). On a per-level basis, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detection of nodal metastasis were 77%, 96% and 93% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/CT, compared with 49%, 99% and 91% for MRI, respectively. The differences for sensitivity (p = 0.0026) and accuracy (p = 0.041) were significant. Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI combining the individual advantages of MRI and PET is a valuable technique for assessment of staging neck cancer

  3. Value of retrospective image fusion of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and MRI for preoperative staging of head and neck cancer: Comparison with PET/CT and contrast-enhanced neck MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanda, Tomonori [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Hyogo (Japan); Kitajima, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kitajima@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Suenaga, Yuko; Konishi, Jyunya [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Sasaki, Ryohei [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Morimoto, Koichi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-ichi [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical value of retrospective image fusion of neck MRI and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET for locoregional extension and nodal staging of neck cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity or hypopharynx underwent PET/CT and contrast-enhanced neck MRI for initial staging before surgery including primary tumor resection and neck dissection. Diagnostic performance of PET/CT, MRI, and retrospective image fusion of PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessment of the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional lymph nodes (N stage) was evaluated. Results: Accuracy for T status was 87% for fused PET/MRI and 90% for MRI, thus proving significantly superior to PET/CT, which had an accuracy of 67% (p = 0.041 and p = 0.023, respectively). Accuracy for N status was 77% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/CT, being superior to MRI, which had an accuracy of 63%, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.13). On a per-level basis, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detection of nodal metastasis were 77%, 96% and 93% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/CT, compared with 49%, 99% and 91% for MRI, respectively. The differences for sensitivity (p = 0.0026) and accuracy (p = 0.041) were significant. Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI combining the individual advantages of MRI and PET is a valuable technique for assessment of staging neck cancer.

  4. Pet Overpopulation: An Economic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Coate; Brian Knight

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of pet overpopulation. It develops a tractable dynamic model whose positive predictions square well with key features of the current U.S. market for pets. The model is used to understand, from a welfare economic perspective, the sense in which there is \\overpopulation" of pets and the underlying causes of the problem. The paper also employs the model to consider what policies might be implemented to deal with the problem. A calibrated example is developed to i...

  5. Click synthesis of PET radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Mei; Kuang Chunxiang

    2009-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on synthesis radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET). The recent years witnessed applications of click chemistry to PET radiopharmaceutical synthesis,because of its distinctive advantages including high speed,yield and stereospecificity under mild conditions. Synthesis of 18 F-labeled and 11 C-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and intermediates via click chemistry are reviewed. The future trend of click chemistry for the synthesis of PET radiopharmaceutical is prospected. (authors)

  6. PET and Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Sevencan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to clarify the need of decreasing the environmental effects caused by human and draw attention to the increasing environmental effects of plastics wastes. Plastics consist of organic molecules with high density molecules or polymers. Main resources of plastics are the residue of oil rafineries. Several advantages of plastics, have increased the usage continuously. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET is the most commonly used plastics. PET is used to protect food, drinking water, fruit juice, alcoholic beverage, and food packing films. By the increasing interest on the environmental effects of plastic wastes, concerns on the recyclable packing materials also grew up. Also the daily use of recyclable containers consisting PET have increased. There are five steps for recycling of plastics. These steps are; using large amounts of plastics, collecting them in a big center, classifying and sorting the plastics, reproducing the polymers and obtaining new products with melted plastics. Providing a healthy recycling of plastics, the consumers should have knowledge and responsibility. The consumer should know what he/she has to do before putting the plastics in the recycling containers. Recycling containers and bags should be placed near the sources of plastic wastes. Consequently, the plastic wastes and environmental problems they cause will be on the agenda in future. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(4: 307-312

  7. PET and Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Sevencan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to clarify the need of decreasing the environmental effects caused by human and draw attention to the increasing environmental effects of plastics wastes. Plastics consist of organic molecules with high density molecules or polymers. Main resources of plastics are the residue of oil rafineries. Several advantages of plastics, have increased the usage continuously. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET is the most commonly used plastics. PET is used to protect food, drinking water, fruit juice, alcoholic beverage, and food packing films. By the increasing interest on the environmental effects of plastic wastes, concerns on the recyclable packing materials also grew up. Also the daily use of recyclable containers consisting PET have increased. There are five steps for recycling of plastics. These steps are; using large amounts of plastics, collecting them in a big center, classifying and sorting the plastics, reproducing the polymers and obtaining new products with melted plastics. Providing a healthy recycling of plastics, the consumers should have knowledge and responsibility. The consumer should know what he/she has to do before putting the plastics in the recycling containers. Recycling containers and bags should be placed near the sources of plastic wastes. Consequently, the plastic wastes and environmental problems they cause will be on the agenda in future. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(4.000: 307-312

  8. Extended suicide with a pet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the killing of a pet and a suicide is a perplexing scenario that is largely unexplored in the literature. Many forensic psychiatrists and psychologists may be unaccustomed to considering the significance of the killing of a pet. The subject is important, however, because many people regard their pets as members of their family. A case is presented of a woman who killed her pet dog and herself by carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to provide an initial exploration of the topic of extended suicide with a pet. Forensic mental health evaluations may have a role in understanding the etiology of this event and in opining as to the culpability of individuals who attempt to or successfully kill a pet and then commit suicide. Because the scientific literature is lacking, there is a need to understand this act from a variety of perspectives. First, a social and anthropological perspective will be presented that summarizes the history of the practice of killing of one's pet, with a focus on the ancient Egyptians. A clinical context will examine what relationship animals have to mental illness. A vast body of existing scientific data showing the relevance of human attachment to pets suggests that conclusions from the phenomena of homicide-suicide and filicide-suicide are applicable to extended suicide with a pet. Finally, recommendations will be proposed for both clinical and forensic psychiatrists faced with similar cases.

  9. PET/CT and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messa, C.; CNR, Milano; S. Gerardo Hospital, Monza; Di Muzio, N.; Picchio, M.; Bettinardi, V.; Gilardi, M.C.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; Fazio, F.; CNR, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano; San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art of PET/CT applications in radiotherapy, specifically its use in disease staging, patient selection, treatment planning and treatment evaluation. Diseases for which radiotherapy with radical intent is indicated will be considered, as well as those in which PET/CT may actually change the course of disease. The methodological and technological aspects of PET/CT in radiotherapy are discussed, focusing on the problem of target volume definition with CT and PET functional imaging and the problem of tumor motion with respect to imaging and dose delivery

  10. Value of fusion of PET and MRI for staging of endometrial cancer: Comparison with {sup 18}F-FDG contrast-enhanced PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced pelvic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kitajima@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Suenaga, Yuko; Ueno, Yoshiko [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Kanda, Tomonori [Department of Obsterics and Gynecology of Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Hyogo (Japan); Maeda, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Satoru [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Ebina, Yasuhiko; Miyahara, Yoshiya; Yamada, Hideto [Department of Obsterics and Gynecology of Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Hyogo (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of retrospective fusion of pelvic MRI and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET images for assessment of locoregional extension and nodal staging of endometrial cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with biopsy-proven endometrial cancer underwent preoperative contrast-enhanced PET/CT (PET/ceCT) and pelvic dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for initial staging. Diagnostic performance of PET/ceCT, contrast-enhanced MRI, and retrospective image fusion from PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessing the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional LNs (N stage) was evaluated by two experienced readers. Histopathological and follow-up imaging results were used as the gold standard. The McNemar test was employed for statistical analysis. Results: Fused PET/MRI and MRI detected 96.7% of the primary tumors, whereas PET/ceCT detected 93.3%. Accuracy for T status was 80.0% for fused PET/MRI, and MRI proved significantly more accurate than PET/ceCT, which had an accuracy of 60.0% (p = 0.041). Patient-based sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting pelvic nodal metastasis were 100%, 96.3% and 96.7% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/ceCT, and 66.7%, 100% and 96.7% for MRI, respectively. These three parameters were not statistically significant (p = 1). Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI, which complements the individual advantages of MRI and PET, is a valuable technique for assessment of the primary tumor and nodal staging in patients with endometrial cancer.

  11. Value of fusion of PET and MRI for staging of endometrial cancer: Comparison with 18F-FDG contrast-enhanced PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced pelvic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Suenaga, Yuko; Ueno, Yoshiko; Kanda, Tomonori; Maeda, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Satoru; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Miyahara, Yoshiya; Yamada, Hideto; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the diagnostic value of retrospective fusion of pelvic MRI and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET images for assessment of locoregional extension and nodal staging of endometrial cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with biopsy-proven endometrial cancer underwent preoperative contrast-enhanced PET/CT (PET/ceCT) and pelvic dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for initial staging. Diagnostic performance of PET/ceCT, contrast-enhanced MRI, and retrospective image fusion from PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessing the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional LNs (N stage) was evaluated by two experienced readers. Histopathological and follow-up imaging results were used as the gold standard. The McNemar test was employed for statistical analysis. Results: Fused PET/MRI and MRI detected 96.7% of the primary tumors, whereas PET/ceCT detected 93.3%. Accuracy for T status was 80.0% for fused PET/MRI, and MRI proved significantly more accurate than PET/ceCT, which had an accuracy of 60.0% (p = 0.041). Patient-based sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting pelvic nodal metastasis were 100%, 96.3% and 96.7% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/ceCT, and 66.7%, 100% and 96.7% for MRI, respectively. These three parameters were not statistically significant (p = 1). Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI, which complements the individual advantages of MRI and PET, is a valuable technique for assessment of the primary tumor and nodal staging in patients with endometrial cancer

  12. Cost-effectiveness of PET and PET/Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerke, Oke; Hermansson, Ronnie; Hess, Søren

    2015-01-01

    measure by means of incremental cost-effectiveness ratios when considering the replacement of the standard regimen by a new diagnostic procedure. This article discusses economic assessments of PET and PET/computed tomography reported until mid-July 2014. Forty-seven studies on cancer and noncancer...

  13. Progress on dedicated animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography, as the leading technology providing molecular imaging of biological processes, is widely used on living laboratory animals. High-resolution dedicated animal PET scanners have been developed. Although the dedicated animal PET faces obstacles and challenges, this advanced technology would play an important role in molecular biomedicine researches, such as diseases study, medicine development, and gene therapy

  14. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update

  15. Welfare assessment in pet rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, F.; Koene, P.; Beerda, B.

    2009-01-01

    One million pet rabbits are kept in The Netherlands, but there are no data available on their behaviour and welfare. This study seeks to assess the welfare of pet rabbits in Dutch households and is a first step in the development of a welfare assessment system. In an internet survey, housing

  16. Selected PET radiomic features remain the same.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, Tetsuya; Tsuyoshi, Hideaki; Kanno, Masafumi; Yamada, Shizuka; Kobayashi, Masato; Narita, Norihiko; Kimura, Hirohiko; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Yoshida, Yoshio; Okazawa, Hidehiko

    2018-04-17

    We investigated whether PET radiomic features are affected by differences in the scanner, scan protocol, and lesion location using 18 F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MR scans. SUV, TMR, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and homogeneity strongly correlated between PET/CT and PET/MR images. SUVs were significantly higher on PET/MR 0-2 min and PET/MR 0-10 min than on PET/CT in gynecological cancer ( p = 0.008 and 0.008, respectively), whereas no significant difference was observed between PET/CT, PET/MR 0-2 min , and PET/MR 0-10 min images in oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancer. TMRs on PET/CT, PET/MR 0-2 min , and PET/MR 0-10 min increased in this order in gynecological cancer and oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancer. In contrast to conventional and histogram indices, 4 textural features (entropy, homogeneity, SRE, and LRE) were not significantly different between PET/CT, PET/MR 0-2 min , and PET/MR 0-10 min images. 18 F-FDG PET radiomic features strongly correlated between PET/CT and PET/MR images. Dixon-based attenuation correction on PET/MR images underestimated tumor tracer uptake more significantly in oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancer than in gynecological cancer. 18 F-FDG PET textural features were affected less by differences in the scanner and scan protocol than conventional and histogram features, possibly due to the resampling process using a medium bin width. Eight patients with gynecological cancer and 7 with oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancer underwent a whole-body 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan and regional PET/MR scan in one day. PET/MR scans were performed for 10 minutes in the list mode, and PET/CT and 0-2 min and 0-10 min PET/MR images were reconstructed. The standardized uptake value (SUV), tumor-to-muscle SUV ratio (TMR), skewness, kurtosis, entropy, homogeneity, short-run emphasis (SRE), and long-run emphasis (LRE) were compared between PET/CT, PET/MR 0-2 min , and PET/MR 0-10 min images.

  17. Neurotransmission imaging by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Akihiro; Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    PET studies on neurotransmission in psychological disorders to evaluate abnormal neurotransmission and therapeutic effects are thoroughly reviewed by type of major neurotransmitters. Studies on dopaminergic neurotransmission have focused on the function of dopamine D{sub 2} receptors, receptor subtypes, such as the D{sub 1} receptor, and ligands, such as transporters. PET studies of dopamine D{sub 2} receptor, which began in the early 1980s, have predominantly been performed in schizophrenia, and most have failed to detect any statistically significant differences between schizophrenia patients and controls. The studies in the early 1980s were performed by using [{sup 11}C]N-methyl-spiperone (NMSP) and [{sup 11}C]raclopride, ligands for striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptors. [{sup 11}C]FLB457, which has much higher affinity for D{sub 2} receptors than raclopride, began to be used in the 1990s. Dopamine D{sub 2} occupancy after drug ingestion has also been investigated to clarify the mechanisms and effects of antipsychotic drugs, and there have also been studies on the effect of aging and personality traits on dopamine D{sub 2} receptor levels in healthy subjects. In studies on dopamine receptor subtypes other than D{sub 2}, dopamine D{sub 1} receptors have been studied in connection with assessments of cognitive functions. Most studies on dopamine transporters have been related to drug dependence. Serotonin 5-HT{sub 2A} receptors have been studied with [{sup 11}C]NMSP in schizophrenia patients, while studies of another serotonin receptor subtype, 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors, have been mainly conducted in patients with depression. [{sup 11}C]NMSP PET showed no difference between schizophrenia patients who had not undergone phamacotherapy and normal subjects. Because serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect serotonin transporters, and abnormalities in serotonin transporters detected in mood disorders, PET ligands for serotonin transporters have increasingly

  18. Neurotransmission imaging by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Akihiro; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2001-01-01

    PET studies on neurotransmission in psychological disorders to evaluate abnormal neurotransmission and therapeutic effects are thoroughly reviewed by type of major neurotransmitters. Studies on dopaminergic neurotransmission have focused on the function of dopamine D 2 receptors, receptor subtypes, such as the D 1 receptor, and ligands, such as transporters. PET studies of dopamine D 2 receptor, which began in the early 1980s, have predominantly been performed in schizophrenia, and most have failed to detect any statistically significant differences between schizophrenia patients and controls. The studies in the early 1980s were performed by using [ 11 C]N-methyl-spiperone (NMSP) and [ 11 C]raclopride, ligands for striatal dopamine D 2 receptors. [ 11 C]FLB457, which has much higher affinity for D 2 receptors than raclopride, began to be used in the 1990s. Dopamine D 2 occupancy after drug ingestion has also been investigated to clarify the mechanisms and effects of antipsychotic drugs, and there have also been studies on the effect of aging and personality traits on dopamine D 2 receptor levels in healthy subjects. In studies on dopamine receptor subtypes other than D 2 , dopamine D 1 receptors have been studied in connection with assessments of cognitive functions. Most studies on dopamine transporters have been related to drug dependence. Serotonin 5-HT 2A receptors have been studied with [ 11 C]NMSP in schizophrenia patients, while studies of another serotonin receptor subtype, 5-HT 1A receptors, have been mainly conducted in patients with depression. [ 11 C]NMSP PET showed no difference between schizophrenia patients who had not undergone phamacotherapy and normal subjects. Because serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect serotonin transporters, and abnormalities in serotonin transporters detected in mood disorders, PET ligands for serotonin transporters have increasingly been developed, and serotonin transporters have recently begun to be

  19. FDG PET evaluation of therapeutic response and toxicity after radiotherapy for NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, R.J.; MacManus, M.P.; Matthews, J.P.; Rischin, D.; Binns, D.; McKenzie, A.F.; Ball, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is recognised for staging and therapeutic planning of patients with non-small cell carcinoma of the lung (NSCLC). The potential for this technique to be used in the assessment of therapeutic response has also been highlighted but may be limited by false positive results due to inflammatory response, particularly early after radiotherapy (RT). To evaluate the utility of FEX PET for therapeutic monitoring early (<12 weeks) after completion of radical RT we prospectively evaluated metabolic response and radiation toxicity using a standardised scoring system in 73 consecutive patients. All 73 had evaluable PET scans but 6 of the CT scan results were considered non-evaluable for therapeutic response using WHO criteria. PET therapeutic response category differed from that by CT in 40/67 (60%) cases and in 80% of such cases suggested a more marked response than suggested by CT (p 0.0002). Multifactor analysis including PET response, CT response, performance status, weight loss and stage revealed that PET response was the only significant predictor of survival (p 0.0001). Radiation toxicity scores were inversely related to therapeutic response on both PET (p = 0.022) and CT (p =0.029). In particular, more severe (grade 2 or 3) radiotoxicity scores on PET were associated with a greater proportion of partial or complete responses on both PET and CT than were lower (grade 0 and 1) scores (p =0.0044 and 0.041 respectively) consistent with the known relationship between the radiosensitivity of normal host and tumoral tissues. Early after completion of radiotherapy for NSCLC, PET response provides better prognostic stratification than CT response. PET can also identify typical radiation toxicity changes which are associated with response to treatment. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  20. Pet ownership may attenuate loneliness among older adult primary care patients who live alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Ian H; Conwell, Yeates; Bowen, Connie; Van Orden, Kimberly A

    2014-01-01

    Older adults who report feelings of loneliness are at increased risk for a range of negative physical and mental health outcomes, including early mortality. Identifying potential sources of social connectedness, such as pet ownership, could add to the understanding of how to promote health and well-being in older adults. The aim of this study is to describe the association of pet ownership and loneliness. The current study utilizes cross-sectional survey data from a sample (N = 830) of older adult primary care patients (age ≥ 60 years). Pet owners were 36% less likely than non-pet owners to report loneliness, in a model controlling for age, living status (i.e., alone vs. not alone), happy mood, and seasonal residency (adjOR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.41-0.98, p pet ownership and living status (b = -1.60, p pet was associated with the greatest odds of reporting feelings of loneliness. The findings suggest that pet ownership may confer benefits for well-being, including attenuating feelings of loneliness and its related sequelae, among older adults who live alone.

  1. PET-CT detection rate of primary breast cancer lesions. Correlation with the clinicopathological factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Tomoko; Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Fukuma, Eisuke

    2008-01-01

    One hundred and forty lesions of primary breast cancer underwent positron emission tomography (PET)-CT between June 2006 and May 2007. The PET-CT detection rate of primary breast cancer lesions was 72.1%. The detection rate was 52.1% for invasive cancer ≤20 mm, 92.8% for invasive breast cancers >20 mm, and these results were significant. In the present study, no significant relationship was observed between tumor types, however, invasive lobular carcinoma showed a lower detection rate, 58.3%. The PET-CT results were not significantly affected by either estrogen and progesterone receptors or distant metastasis. A significant correlation regarding the detection rate of PET-CT was found with HER2 status, tumor grade, and axillary lymph node status. The detection rate was 100% for invasive cancer ≤20 mm when the interval between prior diagnostic Mammotome biopsies and PET-CT was less than 3 weeks, 18.8% for invasive cancer ≤20 mm when the interval was more than 3 weeks, and these results were significant. Mammotome biopsies may therefore affect the detection rate of PET-CT. Invasive cancers ≤20 mm showed a low detection rate, therefore, it is considered to be insufficient to use PET-CT for the detection of early breast cancer. (author)

  2. Health survey of 167 pet rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkitaipale, J; Harcourt-Brown, F M; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, O

    2015-10-24

    Only a limited amount of information is available about health status of pet rabbits. The aim of this study was to obtain data about the health status of pet rabbits considered healthy by the owners in Finland. Physical examination and lateral abdominal and lateral skull radiography were performed on 167 pet rabbits of which 118 (70.7 per cent) had abnormal findings in at least one examination. The most common findings were acquired dental disease (n=67, 40.1 per cent), vertebral column deformities and degenerative lesions (n=52, 31.1 per cent), skin disorders (n=28, 16.8 per cent) and eye disorders (n=12, 7.2 per cent). Vertebral column angulating deformities were significantly more common in dwarf lop rabbits (P≤0.001). The prevalence of health disorders was significantly higher in rabbits over three years of age of which 51 (82.3 per cent) had findings in at least one examination (Phealth problems. Because of the high prevalence of clinical and radiological findings in apparently healthy pet rabbits, regular physical examinations are advised, especially for animals over three years old. British Veterinary Association.

  3. Simultaneous PET-MRI in Oncology: A Solution Looking for a Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Peterson, Todd E.; Abramson, Richard G.; Garcia-Izquierdo, David; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Li, Xia; Atuegwu, Nkiruka C.; Catana, Ciprian; Manning, H. Charles; Fayad, Zahi A.; Gore, John C.

    2012-01-01

    With the recent development of integrated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) scanners, new possibilities for quantitative molecular imaging of cancer are realized. However, the practical advantages and potential clinical benefits of the ability to record PET and MRI data simultaneously must be balanced against the substantial costs and other requirements of such devices. In this review we highlight several of the key areas where integrated PET-MRI measurements, obtained simultaneously, are anticipated to have a significant impact on clinical and/or research studies. These areas include the use of MR-based motion corrections and/or a priori anatomical information for improved reconstruction of PET data; improved arterial input function characterization for PET kinetic modeling; the use of dual-modality contrast agents; and patient comfort and practical convenience. For widespread acceptance, a compelling case could be made if the combination of quantitative MRI and specific PET biomarkers significantly improves our ability to assess tumor status and response to therapy, and some likely candidates are now emerging. We consider the relative advantages and disadvantages afforded by PET-MRI and summarize current opinions and evidence as to the likely value of PET-MRI in the management of cancer. PMID:22795930

  4. Gamma camera based FDG PET in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography(PET) was introduced as a research tool in the 1970s and it took about 20 years before PET became an useful clinical imaging modality. In the USA, insurance coverage for PET procedures in the 1990s was the turning point, I believe, for this progress. Initially PET was used in neurology but recently more than 80% of PET procedures are in oncological applications. I firmly believe, in the 21st century, one can not manage cancer patients properly without PET and PET is very important medical imaging modality in basic and clinical sciences. PET is grouped into 2 categories; conventional (c) and gamma camera based ( CB ) PET. CB PET is more readily available utilizing dual-head gamma cameras and commercially available FDG to many medical centers at low cost to patients. In fact there are more CB PET in operation than cPET in the USA. CB PET is inferior to cPET in its performance but clinical studies in oncology is feasible without expensive infrastructures such as staffing, rooms and equipments. At Ajou university Hospital, CBPET was installed in late 1997 for the first time in Korea as well as in Asia and the system has been used successfully and effectively in oncological applications. Our was the fourth PET operation in Korea and I believe this may have been instrumental for other institutions got interested in clinical PET. The following is a brief description of our clinical experience of FDG CBPET in oncology

  5. Neutering of cats and dogs in Ireland; pet owner self-reported perceptions of enabling and disabling factors in the decision to neuter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Downes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Failure among pet owners to neuter their pets results in increased straying and overpopulation problems. Variations in neutering levels can be explained by cultural differences, differences in economic status in rural and urban locations, and owner perceptions about their pet. There are also differences between male and female pet owners. There is no research pertaining to Irish pet owner attitudes towards neutering their pets. This paper identified the perceptions of a sample of Irish cat and dog owners that influenced their decisions on pet neutering.Methods. This study was conducted using social science (qualitative methods, including an interview-administered survey questionnaire and focus group discussions. Data was coded and managed using Nvivo 8 qualitative data analysis software.Results. Focus groups were conducted with 43 pet (cats and dogs owners. Two major categories relating to the decision to neuter were identified: (1 enabling perceptions in the decision to neuter (subcategories were: controlling unwanted pet behaviour; positive perceptions regarding pet health and welfare outcomes; perceived owner responsibility; pet function; and the influence of veterinary advice, and (2 disabling perceptions in the decision to neuter (subcategories were: perceived financial cost of neutering; perceived adequacy of existing controls; and negative perceptions regarding pet health and welfare outcomes.Discussion. Pet owner sense of responsibility and control are two central issues to the decision to neuter their pets. Understanding how pet owners feel about topics such as pet neutering, can help improve initiatives aimed at emphasising the responsibility of population control of cats and dogs.

  6. Neuropsychiatry: PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana F, Juan Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Functional brain imaging with PET and SPECT have a definitive and well established role in the investigation of a variety of conditions such as dementia, epilepsy and drug addiction. With these methods it is possible to detect early rCBF (regional Cerebral Blood Flow) changes seen in dementia (even before clinical symptoms) and differentiate Alzheimer's disease from other dementias by means of the rCBF pattern change. 18-F-FDG PET imaging is a useful tool in partial epilepsy because both rCBF and brain metabolism are compromised at the epileptogenic focus. During the seizure, rCBF dramatically increases locally. Using SPECT it is possible to locate such foci with 97% accuracy. In drug addiction, particularly with cocaine, functional imaging has proven to be very sensitive to detect brain flow and metabolism derangement early in the course of this condition. These findings are important in many ways: prognostic value, they are used as a powerful reinforcement tool and to monitor functional recovery with rehabilitation. There are many other conditions in which functional brain imaging is of importance such as acute stroke treatment assessment, trauma rehabilitation and in psychiatric and abnormal movement diseases specially with the development of receptor imaging (au)

  7. FDG PET imaging dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Kyungpook National University Medical School and Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia.

  8. FDG PET imaging dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol

    2007-01-01

    Dementia is a major burden for many countries including South Korea, where life expectancy is continuously growing and the proportion of aged people is rapidly growing. Neurodegenerative disorders, such as, Alzheimer disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia. Parkinson disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, Huntington disease, can cause dementia, and cerebrovascular disease also can cause dementia. Depression or hypothyroidism also can cause cognitive deficits, but they are reversible by management of underlying cause unlike the forementioned dementias. Therefore these are called pseudodementia. We are entering an era of dementia care that will be based upon the identification of potentially modifiable risk factors and early disease markers, and the application of new drugs postpone progression of dementias or target specific proteins that cause dementia. Efficient pharmacologic treatment of dementia needs not only to distinguish underlying causes of dementia but also to be installed as soon as possible. Therefore, differential diagnosis and early diagnosis of dementia are utmost importance. F-18 FDG PET is useful for clarifying dementing diseases and is also useful for early detection of the disease. Purpose of this article is to review the current value of FDG PET for dementing diseases including differential diagnosis of dementia and prediction of evolving dementia

  9. Pet ownership and physical health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchock, Robert L

    2015-09-01

    Pet ownership and brief human-animal interactions can serve as a form of social support and convey a host of beneficial psychological and physiological health benefits. This article critically examines recent relevant literature on the pet-health connection. Cross-sectional studies indicate correlations between pet ownership and numerous aspects of positive health outcomes, including improvements on cardiovascular measures and decreases in loneliness. Quasi-experimental studies and better controlled experimental studies corroborate these associations and suggest that owning and/or interacting with a pet may be causally related to some positive health outcomes. The value of pet ownership and animal-assisted therapy (AAT), as a nonpharmacological treatment modality, augmentation to traditional treatment, and healthy preventive behavior (in the case of pet ownership), is starting to be realized. However, more investigations that employ randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes and investigations that more closely examine the underlying mechanism of the pet-health effect, such as oxytocin, are needed.

  10. Emergency Surgery for Refractory Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botre, Abhijeet; Udani, Vrajesh; Desai, Neelu; Jagadish, Spoorthy; Sankhe, Milind

    2017-08-15

    Management of refractory status epilepticus in children is extremely challenging. Two children with medically refractory status epilepticus, both of whom had lesional pathology on MRI and concordant data on EEG and PET scan. Emergency hemispherotomy performed in both patients. A complete, sustained seizure freedom obtained postoperatively. Emergency surgery is a treatment option in selected cases of drug refractory status epilepticus with lesional pathology and concordant data.

  11. New developments in PET detector technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Lingxin; Zhao Shujun; Zhang Bin; Liu Haojia

    2010-01-01

    The researches on PET detector are always active and innovative area. The research direction of PET detector includes improving performances of scintillator-based detectors, investigating new detectors suitable for multi-modality imaging (e.g. PET/CT and PET/MRI), meeting requirements of TOF and DOI technologies and boosting the development of the technologies. In this paper, new developments in PET detector technology about scintillation crystal, photodetector and semiconductor detector is introduced. (authors)

  12. PET and PET/CT in tumour of undetermined origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia O, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    In this presentation the following conclusions were obtained regarding the use of PET and PET/CT in patient with cancer of unknown primary: 1. Detection of the primary one in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 2. It detects metastases in other places in 50%. 3. It changes the initial therapy planned in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 4. Useful in initial phases of protocol study to limit the other procedures. After standard evaluation. Before advanced protocol. 5. PET/CT study increases the % of primary detection, although in a non significant way vs. PET. 6. They are required more studies to value their utility to a more objective manner. (Author)

  13. PET/TAC in Oncology; PET/TAC en Oncologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez V, A M [Especialista en Medicina Nuclear, Profa. Depto. Radiologia de la Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    From this presentation of PET-TAC in oncology the following advantages on the conventional PET are obtained: 1. More short study and stadium in one session. 2. It adds the information of both techniques. 3. Better localization of leisure: affected organ, stadium change (neck, mediastinum, abdomen). 4. Reduction of false positive (muscle, brown fat, atelectasis, pneumonias, intestine, urinary vials, etc.). 5. Reduction of negative false. 6. Reduction of not conclusive. 7. More understandable for other specialists. 8. Biopsies guide. 9. Planning radiotherapy.

  14. SU-F-I-59: Quality Assurance Phantom for PET/CT Alignment and Attenuation Correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T; Hamacher, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study utilizes a commercial PET/CT phantom to investigate two specific properties of a PET/CT system: the alignment accuracy of PET images with those from CT used for attenuation correction and the accuracy of this correction in PET images. Methods: A commercial PET/CT phantom consisting of three aluminum rods, two long central cylinders containing uniform activity, and attenuating materials such as air, water, bone and iodine contrast was scanned using a standard PET/CT protocol. Images reconstructed with 2 mm slice thickness and a 512 by 512 matrix were obtained. The center of each aluminum rod in the PET and CT images was compared to evaluate alignment accuracy. ROIs were drawn on transaxial images of the central rods at each section of attenuating material to determine the corrected activity (in BQML). BQML values were graphed as a function of slice number to provide a visual representation of the attenuation-correction throughout the whole phantom. Results: Alignment accuracy is high between the PET and CT images. The maximum deviation between the two in the axial plane is less than 1.5 mm, which is less than the width of a single pixel. BQML values measured along different sections of the large central rods are similar among the different attenuating materials except iodine contrast. Deviation of BQML values in the air and bone sections from the water section is less than 1%. Conclusion: Accurate alignment of PET and CT images is critical to ensure proper calculation and application of CT-based attenuation correction. This study presents a simple and quick method to evaluate the two with a single acquisition. As the phantom also includes spheres of increasing diameter, this could serve as a straightforward means to annually evaluate the status of a modern PET/CT system.

  15. SU-F-I-59: Quality Assurance Phantom for PET/CT Alignment and Attenuation Correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, T; Hamacher, K [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study utilizes a commercial PET/CT phantom to investigate two specific properties of a PET/CT system: the alignment accuracy of PET images with those from CT used for attenuation correction and the accuracy of this correction in PET images. Methods: A commercial PET/CT phantom consisting of three aluminum rods, two long central cylinders containing uniform activity, and attenuating materials such as air, water, bone and iodine contrast was scanned using a standard PET/CT protocol. Images reconstructed with 2 mm slice thickness and a 512 by 512 matrix were obtained. The center of each aluminum rod in the PET and CT images was compared to evaluate alignment accuracy. ROIs were drawn on transaxial images of the central rods at each section of attenuating material to determine the corrected activity (in BQML). BQML values were graphed as a function of slice number to provide a visual representation of the attenuation-correction throughout the whole phantom. Results: Alignment accuracy is high between the PET and CT images. The maximum deviation between the two in the axial plane is less than 1.5 mm, which is less than the width of a single pixel. BQML values measured along different sections of the large central rods are similar among the different attenuating materials except iodine contrast. Deviation of BQML values in the air and bone sections from the water section is less than 1%. Conclusion: Accurate alignment of PET and CT images is critical to ensure proper calculation and application of CT-based attenuation correction. This study presents a simple and quick method to evaluate the two with a single acquisition. As the phantom also includes spheres of increasing diameter, this could serve as a straightforward means to annually evaluate the status of a modern PET/CT system.

  16. Concordance between brain 18F-FDG PET and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in diagnosing Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubí, S; Noguera, A; Tarongí, S; Oporto, M; García, A; Vico, H; Espino, A; Picado, M J; Mas, A; Peña, C; Amer, G

    Cortical posterior hypometabolism on PET imaging with 18 F-FDG (FDG-PET), and altered levels of Aß 1-42 peptide, total Tau (tTau) and phosphorylated Tau (pTau) proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are established diagnostic biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD). An evaluation has been made of the concordance and relationship between the results of FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers in symptomatic patients with suspected AD. A retrospective review was carried out on 120 patients with cognitive impairment referred to our Cognitive Neurology Unit, and who were evaluated by brain FDG-PET and a lumbar puncture for CSF biomarkers. In order to calculate their Kappa coefficient of concordance, the result of the FDG-PET and the set of the three CSF biomarkers in each patient was classified as normal, inconclusive, or AD-compatible. The relationship between the results of both methods was further assessed using logistic regression analysis, including the Aß 1-42 , tTau and pTau levels as quantitative predictors, and the FDG-PET result as the dependent variable. The weighted Kappa coefficient between FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.35-0.57). Logistic regression analysis showed that the Aß 1-42 and tTau values together were capable of discriminating an FDG-PET result metabolically suggestive of AD from one non-suggestive of AD, with a 91% sensitivity and 93% specificity at the cut-off line Aß 1-42 =44+1.3×tTau. The level of concordance between FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers was moderate, indicating their complementary value in diagnosing AD. The Aß 1-42 and tTau levels in CSF help to predict the patient FDG-PET cortical metabolic status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  17. PET and PET/CT in tumour of undetermined origin; PET y PET/CT en tumor de origen indeterminado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia O, J R [Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, PET/CT, Centro Medico ABC, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    In this presentation the following conclusions were obtained regarding the use of PET and PET/CT in patient with cancer of unknown primary: 1. Detection of the primary one in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 2. It detects metastases in other places in 50%. 3. It changes the initial therapy planned in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 4. Useful in initial phases of protocol study to limit the other procedures. After standard evaluation. Before advanced protocol. 5. PET/CT study increases the % of primary detection, although in a non significant way vs. PET. 6. They are required more studies to value their utility to a more objective manner. (Author)

  18. PET imaging for brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Described are the principle of PET and its characteristics, imaging of human brain function, mapping of detailed human cerebral functions and PET imaging of nerve transmission. Following compounds labeled by positron emitters are used for PET imaging of brain functions: for blood flow and oxygen metabolism, 15 O-O 2 gas, water and carbon dioxide; for energy metabolism, 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose; and for nerve transmission functions in receptor binding, transporter, transmitter synthesis and enzyme, 11 C- or 18 F-dopamine, serotonin and their analogues, and acetylcholine analogues. For brain mapping, examples of cognition tasks, results and their statistics are presented with images for blood flow. Nerve transmissions in schizophrenia and Alzheimer disease are imaged with labeled analogues of dopamine and acetylcholine, respectively. PET is becoming more and more important in the field of psychiatric science particularly in the coming society of increasing aged people. (N.I.)

  19. Measuring receptor occupancy with PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, A

    Many physiological and biochemical measurements can be performed noninvasively in humans with modern imaging techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). This review focuses on the monitoring of

  20. Radiation monitoring of PET staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a common diagnostic tool in hospitals, often located in and employing staff from the Nuclear Medicine or Radiology departments. Although similar in some ways, staff in PET departments are commonly found to have the highest radiation doses in the hospital environment due to unique challenges which PET tracers present in administration as well as production. The establishment of a PET centre with a dedicated cyclotron has raised concerns of radiation protection to the staff at the WA PET Centre and the Radiopharmaceutical Production and Development (RAPID) team. Since every PET centre has differing designs and practices, it was considered important to closely monitor the radiation dose to our staff so that improvements to practices and design could be made to reduce radiation dose. Electronic dosimeters (MGP DMC 2000XB), which have a facility to log time and dose at 10 second intervals, were provided to three PET technologists and three PET nurses. These were worn in the top pocket of their lab coats throughout a whole day. Each staff member was then asked to note down their duties throughout the day and also note the time they performed each duty. The duties would then correlate with the dose with which the electronic monitor recorded and an estimate of radiation dose per duty could be given. Also an estimate of the dose per day to each staff member could be made. PET nurses averaged approximately 20 μ8v per day getting their largest dose from caring for occasional problematic patients. Smaller doses of a 1-2 μ8v were recorded for injections and removing cannulas. PET technologists averaged approximately 15 μ8v per day getting their largest dose of 1-5μ8v mainly from positioning of patients and sometimes larger doses due to problematic patients. Smaller doses of 1-2 μ5v were again recorded for injections and removal of cannulas. Following a presentation given to staff, all WA PET Centre and RAPID staff

  1. Clinical impact of FDG PET-CT on the management of patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, S.; Cooper, R.A.; Swift, S.E.; Thygesen, H.H.; Chowdhury, F.U.; Scarsbrook, A.F.; Patel, C.N.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the impact of staging FDG PET-CT on the initial management of patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma (LACC) and any prognostic variables predicting survival. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients undergoing FDG PET-CT for staging of LACC in a single tertiary referral centre, between April 2008 and August 2011. Comparison was made between MRI and PET-CT findings and any subsequent impact on treatment intent or radiotherapy planning was evaluated. Results: Sixty-three patients underwent FDG PET-CT for initial staging of LACC. Major impact on management was found in 20 patients (32%), a minor impact in five (8%), and no impact in 38 (60%). In those patients where PET-CT had a major impact, 12 had more extensive local nodal involvement, five had occult metastatic disease, two had synchronous tumours, and one patient had equivocal lymph nodes on MRI characterized as negative. PET-positive nodal status at diagnosis was found to be a statistically significant predictor of relapse-free survival (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Staging FDG PET-CT has a major impact on the initial management of approximately one-third of patients with LACC by altering treatment intent and/or radiotherapy planning. PET-defined nodal status is a poor prognostic indicator. - Highlights: • Cervical carcinoma is one of the commonest cancers in women worldwide. • Locally advanced cervical carcinoma is usually treated with chemo-radiotherapy. • FDG PET-CT can have a major impact on management in up to one-third of patients. • It may alter treatment intent or radiotherapy-planning by detecting occult disease. • PET nodal status at diagnosis is an important predictor of relapse-free survival

  2. PET/TAC in Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez V, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    From this presentation of PET-TAC in oncology the following advantages on the conventional PET are obtained: 1. More short study and stadium in one session. 2. It adds the information of both techniques. 3. Better localization of leisure: affected organ, stadium change (neck, mediastinum, abdomen). 4. Reduction of false positive (muscle, brown fat, atelectasis, pneumonias, intestine, urinary vials, etc.). 5. Reduction of negative false. 6. Reduction of not conclusive. 7. More understandable for other specialists. 8. Biopsies guide. 9. Planning radiotherapy

  3. PET imaging in pediatric oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulkin, B.L.

    2004-01-01

    High-quality PET imaging of pediatric patients is challenging and requires attention to issues commonly encountered in the practice of pediatric nuclear medicine, but uncommon to the imaging of adult patients. These include intravenous access, fasting, sedation, consent, and clearance of activity from the urinary tract. This paper discusses some technical differences involved in pediatric PET to enhance the quality of scans and assure the safety and comfort of pediatric patients. (orig.)

  4. Quantitative PET of liver functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Susanne; Sørensen, Michael; Frisch, Kim; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2018-01-01

    Improved understanding of liver physiology and pathophysiology is urgently needed to assist the choice of new and upcoming therapeutic modalities for patients with liver diseases. In this review, we focus on functional PET of the liver: 1) Dynamic PET with 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro- D -galactose ( 18 F-FDGal) provides quantitative images of the hepatic metabolic clearance K met (mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Standard-uptake-value ( SUV ) from a static liver 18 F-FDGal PET/CT scan can replace K met and is currently used clinically. 2) Dynamic liver PET/CT in humans with 11 C-palmitate and with the conjugated bile acid tracer [ N -methyl- 11 C]cholylsarcosine ( 11 C-CSar) can distinguish between individual intrahepatic transport steps in hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatic transport of bile acid from blood to bile, respectively, showing diagnostic potential for individual patients. 3) Standard compartment analysis of dynamic PET data can lead to physiological inconsistencies, such as a unidirectional hepatic clearance of tracer from blood ( K 1 ; mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) greater than the hepatic blood perfusion. We developed a new microvascular compartment model with more physiology, by including tracer uptake into the hepatocytes from the blood flowing through the sinusoids, backflux from hepatocytes into the sinusoidal blood, and re-uptake along the sinusoidal path. Dynamic PET data include information on liver physiology which cannot be extracted using a standard compartment model. In conclusion , SUV of non-invasive static PET with 18 F-FDGal provides a clinically useful measurement of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Secondly, assessment of individual intrahepatic transport steps is a notable feature of dynamic liver PET.

  5. Quantitative PET of liver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Susanne; Sørensen, Michael; Frisch, Kim; Gormsen, Lars C; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2018-01-01

    Improved understanding of liver physiology and pathophysiology is urgently needed to assist the choice of new and upcoming therapeutic modalities for patients with liver diseases. In this review, we focus on functional PET of the liver: 1) Dynamic PET with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-galactose (18F-FDGal) provides quantitative images of the hepatic metabolic clearance K met (mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Standard-uptake-value (SUV) from a static liver 18F-FDGal PET/CT scan can replace K met and is currently used clinically. 2) Dynamic liver PET/CT in humans with 11C-palmitate and with the conjugated bile acid tracer [N-methyl-11C]cholylsarcosine (11C-CSar) can distinguish between individual intrahepatic transport steps in hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatic transport of bile acid from blood to bile, respectively, showing diagnostic potential for individual patients. 3) Standard compartment analysis of dynamic PET data can lead to physiological inconsistencies, such as a unidirectional hepatic clearance of tracer from blood (K 1; mL blood/min/mL liver tissue) greater than the hepatic blood perfusion. We developed a new microvascular compartment model with more physiology, by including tracer uptake into the hepatocytes from the blood flowing through the sinusoids, backflux from hepatocytes into the sinusoidal blood, and re-uptake along the sinusoidal path. Dynamic PET data include information on liver physiology which cannot be extracted using a standard compartment model. In conclusion, SUV of non-invasive static PET with 18F-FDGal provides a clinically useful measurement of regional and whole-liver hepatic metabolic function. Secondly, assessment of individual intrahepatic transport steps is a notable feature of dynamic liver PET. PMID:29755841

  6. Do carotid MR surface coils affect PET quantification in PET/MR imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemink, Martin J; Eldib, Mootaz; Leiner, Tim; Fayad, Zahi A; Mani, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of surface coils for carotid MR imaging on PET quantification in a clinical simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanner. A cylindrical phantom was filled with a homogeneous 2L water-FDG mixture at a starting dose of 301.2MBq. Clinical PET/MR and PET/CT systems were used to acquire PET-data without a coil (reference standard) and with two carotid MRI coils (Siemens Special Purpose 8-Channel and Machnet 4-Channel Phased Array). PET-signal attenuation was evaluated with Osirix using 51 (PET/MR) and 37 (PET/CT) circular ROIs. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) were quantified for each ROI. Furthermore, SUVs of PET/MR and PET/CT were compared. For validation, a patient was scanned with an injected dose of 407.7MBq on both a PET/CT and a PET/MR system without a coil and with both coils. PET/MR underestimations were -2.2% (Siemens) and -7.8% (Machnet) for SUVmean, and -1.2% (Siemens) and -3.3% (Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively. For PET/CT, underestimations were -1.3% (Siemens) and -1.4% (Machnet) for SUVmean and -0.5% (both Siemens and Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively using no coil data as reference. Except for PET/CT SUVmax values all differences were significant. SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT with SUVmean values of 0.51-0.55 for PET/MR and 0.68-0.69 for PET/CT, respectively. The patient examination showed that median SUVmean values measured in the carotid arteries decreased from 0.97 without a coil to 0.96 (Siemens) and 0.88 (Machnet). Carotid surface coils do affect attenuation correction in both PET/MR and PET/CT imaging. Furthermore, SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT.

  7. Clinical applications of PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc Ha

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the evolution of PET, PET/CT focusing on the technical aspects, PET radiopharmaceutical developments and current clinical applications as well. The newest technologic advances have been reviewed, including improved crystal design, acquisition modes, reconstruction algorithms, etc. These advancements will continue to improve contrast, decrease noise, and increase resolution. Combined PET/CT system provides faster attenuation correction and useful anatomic correlation to PET functional information. A number of new radiopharmaceuticals used for PET imaging have been developed, however, FDG have been considered as the principal PET radiotracer. The current clinical applications of PET and PET/CT are widespread and include oncology, cardiology and neurology. (author)

  8. Are Pets in the Bedroom a Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Lois E; Tovar, M Diane; Miller, Bernie

    2015-12-01

    The presence of pets in the bedroom can alter the sleep environment in ways that could affect sleep. Data were collected by questionnaire and interview from 150 consecutive patients seen at the Center for Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic in Arizona. Seventy-four people (49%) reported having pets, with 31 (41% of pet owners) having multiple pets. More than half of pet owners (56%) allowed their pets to sleep in the bedroom. Fifteen pet owners (20%) described their pets as disruptive, whereas 31 (41%) perceived their pets as unobtrusive or even beneficial to sleep. Health care professionals working with patients with sleep concerns should inquire about the presence of companion animals in the sleep environment to help them find solutions and optimize their sleep. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Early and delayed prediction of axillary lymph node neoadjuvant response by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with locally advanced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Vicente, Ana Maria; Soriano Castrejon, Angel; Jimenez Londono, German Andres [University General Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Ciudad Real (Spain); Leon Martin, Alberto [University General Hospital, Investigation Unit, Ciudad Real (Spain); Relea Calatayud, Fernanda [University General Hospital, Pathology Department, Ciudad Real (Spain); Munoz Sanchez, Maria del Mar [Virgen de la Luz Hospital, Oncology Department, Cuenca (Spain); Cruz Mora, Miguel Angel [Virgen de la Salud Hospital, Oncology Department, Toledo (Spain); Espinosa Aunion, Ruth [La Mancha Centro Hospital, Oncology Department, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-07-15

    To determine the utility of {sup 18}F-FDG (FDG) PET/CT performed in an early and delayed phase during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the prediction of lymph node histopathological response in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. FDG PET/CT studies performed in 76 patients (mean age 53 years) at baseline (PET-1), after the second course of chemotherapy (PET-2) and after the last course of chemotherapy (PET-3) were prospectively analysed. Inclusion criteria were lymph node involvement detected by PET/CT and non-sentinel node biopsy before or after the baseline PET/CT scan. Following the recommendations of the 12th International Breast Conference (St. Gallen), the patients were divided into five subgroups in relation to biological prognostic factors by immunohistochemistry. For diagnosis visual and semiquantitative analyses was performed. Absence of detectable lymph node uptake on the PET-2 or PET-3 scan with respect to the PET-1 scan was considered metabolic complete response (mCR). Lymph nodes were histopathologically classified according the lymph node regression grade and in response groups as pathological complete response (pCR) or not pCR (type A/D or B/C of the Smith grading system, respectively). ROC analysis was performed to determine a cut-off value of Δ% SUV1-2 and SUV1-3 for prediction of nodal status after chemotherapy. An association between mCR and pCR was found (Cohen's kappa analysis), and associations between phenotypes and metabolic behaviour and the final histopathological status were also found. Lymph node pCR was seen in 34 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of PET-2 and PET-3 in establishing the final status of the axilla after chemotherapy were 52 %, 45 %, 50 % and 47 %, and 33 %, 84 %, 67 % and 56 %, respectively. No significant relationship was observed between mCR on PET-2 and PET-3 and pCR (p = 0.31 and 0.99, respectively). Lymph node metabolism on PET-1 was not able to predict

  10. Game Design to Introduce Pets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Febriyanto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of animals from an early age can make children to love animals, especially pets. Children are the easiest group to receive stimulation, such as for example the stimulation of introducing children to the pet. Various media are used by parents to introduce pet. For examplle, by the media of books, multimedia, etc. One of the interesting media to introduce pet is with game. Of these problems then need to know how to make concept and design game to introduced pets for children age 3-6 years. In this paper, author formulate how to make pet game design include game genre, user interface design, image model selection, game characters, and game engine. The expected design of this game can be formulation of learning through proper game as a learning tool children. Game design derived from this writing by using model 2-dimensional images are funny and interesting coloring. And combines several game genres into one, or use the mini games that children do not get bored quickly. Design of GUI (Graphical User Interface is made as simple as possible so that children easily understand in playing this game, but also must use an interesting image

  11. Nutritional sustainability of pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kelly S; Carter, Rebecca A; Yount, Tracy P; Aretz, Jan; Buff, Preston R

    2013-03-01

    Sustainable practices meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Applying these concepts to food and feed production, nutritional sustainability is the ability of a food system to provide sufficient energy and essential nutrients required to maintain good health in a population without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their nutritional needs. Ecological, social, and economic aspects must be balanced to support the sustainability of the overall food system. The nutritional sustainability of a food system can be influenced by several factors, including the ingredient selection, nutrient composition, digestibility, and consumption rates of a diet. Carbon and water footprints vary greatly among plant- and animal-based ingredients, production strategy, and geographical location. Because the pet food industry is based largely on by-products and is tightly interlinked with livestock production and the human food system, however, it is quite unique with regard to sustainability. Often based on consumer demand rather than nutritional requirements, many commercial pet foods are formulated to provide nutrients in excess of current minimum recommendations, use ingredients that compete directly with the human food system, or are overconsumed by pets, resulting in food wastage and obesity. Pet food professionals have the opportunity to address these challenges and influence the sustainability of pet ownership through product design, manufacturing processes, public education, and policy change. A coordinated effort across the industry that includes ingredient buyers, formulators, and nutritionists may result in a more sustainable pet food system.

  12. Evaluation of pet contact as a risk factor for carriage of multidrug-resistant staphylococci in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi-Decristophoris, Paola; De Benedetti, Anna; Petignat, Christiane; Attinger, Monica; Guillaume, Jan; Fiebig, Lena; Hattendorf, Jan; Cernela, Nicole; Regula, Gertraud; Petrini, Orlando; Zinsstag, Jakob; Schelling, Esther

    2012-03-01

    Pets, often used as companionship and for psychological support in the therapy of nursing home residents, have been implicated as reservoirs for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. We investigated the importance of pets as reservoirs of multidrug-resistant (MDR) staphylococci in nursing homes. We assessed the carriage of MDR staphylococci in pets and in 2 groups of residents, those living in nursing homes with pets and those living without pet contacts. We collected demographic, health status, and human-pet contact data by means of questionnaires. We assessed potential bacteria transmission pathways by investigating physical resident-to-pet contact. The observed prevalence of MDR staphylococci carriage was 84/229 (37%) in residents living with pets and 99/216 (46%) in those not living with pets (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.4-0.9). Active pet contact was associated with lower carriage of MDR staphylococci (aOR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.4-0.8). Antibiotic treatment during the previous 3 months was associated with significantly increased risk for MDR carriage in residents (aOR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.8-5.7). We found no evidence that the previously reported benefits of pet contact are compromised by the increased risk of carriage of MDR staphylococci in residents associated with interaction with these animals in nursing homes. Thus, contact with pets, always under good hygiene standards, should be encouraged in these settings. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. What do we measure in oncology PET?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, Kyoung June; Kim, Seong Jang [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has come to the practice of oncology. It is known that {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET is more sensitive for the assessment of treatment response than conventional imaging. In addition, PET has an advantage in the use of quantitative analysis of the study. Nowadays, various PET parameters are adopted in clinical settings. In addition, a wide range of factors has been known to be associated with FDG uptake. Therefore, there has been a need for standardization and harmonization of protocols and PET parameters. We will introduce PET parameters and discuss major issues in this review.

  14. Application of cross-species PET imaging to assess neurotransmitter release in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnema, Sjoerd J; Scheinin, Mika; Shahid, Mohammed; Lehto, Jussi; Borroni, Edilio; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Sallinen, Jukka; Wong, Erik; Farde, Lars; Halldin, Christer; Grimwood, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    This review attempts to summarize the current status in relation to the use of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in the assessment of synaptic concentrations of endogenous mediators in the living brain. Although PET radioligands are now available for more than 40 CNS targets, at the initiation of the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) "Novel Methods leading to New Medications in Depression and Schizophrenia" (NEWMEDS) in 2009, PET radioligands sensitive to an endogenous neurotransmitter were only validated for dopamine. NEWMEDS work-package 5, "Cross-species and neurochemical imaging (PET) methods for drug discovery", commenced with a focus on developing methods enabling assessment of changes in extracellular concentrations of serotonin and noradrenaline in the brain. Sharing the workload across institutions, we utilized in vitro techniques with cells and tissues, in vivo receptor binding and microdialysis techniques in rodents, and in vivo PET imaging in non-human primates and humans. Here, we discuss these efforts and review other recently published reports on the use of radioligands to assess changes in endogenous levels of dopamine, serotonin, noradrenaline, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, acetylcholine, and opioid peptides. The emphasis is on assessment of the availability of appropriate translational tools (PET radioligands, pharmacological challenge agents) and on studies in non-human primates and human subjects, as well as current challenges and future directions. PET imaging directed at investigating changes in endogenous neurochemicals, including the work done in NEWMEDS, have highlighted an opportunity to further extend the capability and application of this technology in drug development.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided attenuation correction of positron emission tomography data in PET/MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian

    2018-01-01

    Synopsis Attenuation correction (AC) is one of the most important challenges in the recently introduced combined positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MR) scanners. PET/MR AC (MR-AC) approaches aim to develop methods that allow accurate estimation of the linear attenuation coefficients (LACs) of the tissues and other components located in the PET field of view (FoV). MR-AC methods can be divided into three main categories: segmentation-, atlas- and PET-based. This review aims to provide a comprehensive list of the state of the art MR-AC approaches as well as their pros and cons. The main sources of artifacts such as body-truncation, metallic implants and hardware correction will be presented. Finally, this review will discuss the current status of MR-AC approaches for clinical applications. PMID:26952727

  16. The system of the designing for PET detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Zongliang

    2006-01-01

    PET stands for Positron Emission Tomography, a new nuclear medicine imaging device. PET detector is the key of PET. This paper introduces a system of the designing for PET detector. The system can be used to design various PET detector. A PET detector BLOCK with 8 x 8 crystals has been designed and built by this system. (authors)

  17. Comparison of PET/CT with Sequential PET/MRI Using an MR-Compatible Mobile PET System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakamoto, Yuji; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Kido, Aki; Togashi, Kaori

    2018-05-01

    The current study tested a newly developed flexible PET (fxPET) scanner prototype. This fxPET system involves dual arc-shaped detectors based on silicon photomultipliers that are designed to fit existing MRI devices, allowing us to obtain fused PET and MR images by sequential PET and MR scanning. This prospective study sought to evaluate the image quality, lesion detection rate, and quantitative values of fxPET in comparison with conventional whole-body (WB) PET and to assess the accuracy of registration. Methods: Seventeen patients with suspected or known malignant tumors were analyzed. Approximately 1 h after intravenous injection of 18 F-FDG, WB PET/CT was performed, followed by fxPET and MRI. For reconstruction of fxPET images, MRI-based attenuation correction was applied. The quality of fxPET images was visually assessed, and the number of detected lesions was compared between the 2 imaging methods. SUV max and maximum average SUV within a 1 cm 3 spheric volume (SUV peak ) of lesions were also compared. In addition, the magnitude of misregistration between fxPET and MR images was evaluated. Results: The image quality of fxPET was acceptable for diagnosis of malignant tumors. There was no significant difference in detectability of malignant lesions between fxPET and WB PET ( P > 0.05). However, the fxPET system did not exhibit superior performance to the WB PET system. There were strong positive correlations between the 2 imaging modalities in SUV max (ρ = 0.88) and SUV peak (ρ = 0.81). SUV max and SUV peak measured with fxPET were approximately 1.1-fold greater than measured with WB PET. The average misregistration between fxPET and MR images was 5.5 ± 3.4 mm. Conclusion: Our preliminary data indicate that running an fxPET scanner near an existing MRI system provides visually and quantitatively acceptable fused PET/MR images for diagnosis of malignant lesions. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  18. Detection of Cancer with PET and PET/CT in Asymptomatic Volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Ji In; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae; Choi, Yoon Ho; Cho, Han Byoul; Shim, Jae Yong

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the diagnostic performance of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT for cancer detection in asymptomatic health-check examinees. This study consisted of 5091 PET or PET/CT conducted as part of annual health examination at one hospital from March 1998 to February 2008. To find the incidence of cancers, medical records of the subjects were thoroughly reviewed for a follow-up period of one year. The patterns of formal readings of PET and PET/CT were analyzed to assess the sensitivity and specificity for cancer detection. The histopathology and stage of the cancers were evaluated in relation to the results of PET. Eighty-six cancers (1.7%) were diagnosed within one year after PET or PET/CT. When PET and PET/CT results were combined, the sensitivity was 48.8% and specificity was 81.1% for cancer detection. PET only had a sensitivity of 46.2% and a specificity of 81.4%, and PET/CT only had a sensitivity of 75.0% and a specificity of 78.5% respectively. There were no significant differences in cancer site, stage and histopathology between PET positive and PET negative cancers. In 19.3% of formal readings of PET and PET/CT, further evaluation to exclude malignancy or significant disease was recommended. Head and neck area and upper gastrointestinal tract were commonly recommended sites for further evaluation. PET and PET/CT showed moderate performance for detecting cancers in asymptomatic adults in this study. More experience and further investigation are needed to overcome limitations of PET and PET/CT for cancer screening

  19. Parasites in pet reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavri Urška

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Exotic reptiles originating from the wild can be carriers of many different pathogens and some of them can infect humans. Reptiles imported into Slovenia from 2000 to 2005, specimens of native species taken from the wild and captive bred species were investigated. A total of 949 reptiles (55 snakes, 331 lizards and 563 turtles, belonging to 68 different species, were examined for the presence of endoparasites and ectoparasites. Twelve different groups (Nematoda (5, Trematoda (1, Acanthocephala (1, Pentastomida (1 and Protozoa (4 of endoparasites were determined in 26 (47.3% of 55 examined snakes. In snakes two different species of ectoparasites were also found. Among the tested lizards eighteen different groups (Nematoda (8, Cestoda (1, Trematoda (1, Acanthocephala (1, Pentastomida (1 and Protozoa (6 of endoparasites in 252 (76.1% of 331 examined animals were found. One Trombiculid ectoparasite was determined. In 563 of examined turtles eight different groups (Nematoda (4, Cestoda (1, Trematoda (1 and Protozoa (2 of endoparasites were determined in 498 (88.5% animals. In examined turtles three different species of ectoparasites were seen. The established prevalence of various parasites in reptiles used as pet animals indicates the need for examination on specific pathogens prior to introduction to owners.

  20. PET and PET/CT in oncology: the key of diagnostic challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortelmans, L.; Stroobants, S.; Spaepen, K.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation authors present use of positron emission tomography (PET) in oncology. This lecture is divided to the following parts: (1) Assessment of treatment response; (2) Treatment monitoring by PET: clinical examples; (3) PET for early response assessment; (4) Use of PET in Radiotherapy planning

  1. Quantitative PET imaging with the 3T MR-BrainPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weirich, C.; Scheins, J.; Lohmann, P.; Tellmann, L.; Byars, L.; Michel, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Brenner, D.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    The new hybrid imaging technology of MR-PET allows for simultaneous acquisition of versatile MRI contrasts and the quantitative metabolic imaging with PET. In order to achieve the quantification of PET images with minimal residual error the application of several corrections is crucial. In this work we present our results on quantification with the 3T MR BrainPET scanner

  2. Clinical usefulness of PET in the management of oral cancer. Comparison between FDG-PET and MET-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Saitoh, Masaaki; Nakamura, Mikiko

    2007-01-01

    Inductive chemoradiotherapy has played an important role in preserving organs and functions in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To determine whether a reduced form of surgery should be performed after chemoradiotherapy, accurate evaluation of residual tumor cells is essential. We investigated the clinical value of positron emission tomography with 18 F labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in the management of oral SCCs. Forty-five patients underwent two FDG-PET studies, one prior to and one at 6 weeks after the chemoradiotherapy. Pretreatment FDG-PET was useful in predicting the response to treatment. Posttreatment FDG-PET could evaluate residual viable cells and prognosis. Organ preservation may be feasible based on PET evaluation. Hence FDG-PET is a valuable tool in the treatment of oral cancer. 11 C-Methionine (MET) is another promising tracer for PET that can be used to assess metabolic demand for amino acids in cancer cells. A MET-PET and FDG-PET study was performed during the same period to investigate diagnostic accuracy in 40 oral malignancies. Sensitivity and positive predictive value of MET-PET were 95% and 100%, respectively, and were comparable with those of FDG-PET. Further study is required to determine the diagnostic significance of MET-PET in evaluating response to chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  3. Magnetic Resonance-based Motion Correction for Quantitative PET in Simultaneous PET-MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; El Fakhri, Georges

    2017-07-01

    Motion degrades image quality and quantitation of PET images, and is an obstacle to quantitative PET imaging. Simultaneous PET-MR offers a tool that can be used for correcting the motion in PET images by using anatomic information from MR imaging acquired concurrently. Motion correction can be performed by transforming a set of reconstructed PET images into the same frame or by incorporating the transformation into the system model and reconstructing the motion-corrected image. Several phantom and patient studies have validated that MR-based motion correction strategies have great promise for quantitative PET imaging in simultaneous PET-MR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. PET imaging in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombardieri, E.; Crippa, F.

    2001-01-01

    The basis of tumour imaging with PET is a specific uptake mechanism of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals. Among the potential tracers for breast cancer (fluorodeoxyglucose, methionine, tyrosine, fluoro-estradiol, nor-progesterone), 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose labelled with fluorine (FDG) is the most widely used radiopharmaceutical because breast cancer is particularly avid of FDG and 18 F has the advantages of the a relatively long physical half-life. Mammography is the first choice examination in studying breast masses, due to its very good performances, an excellent compliance and the best value regarding the cost/effectiveness aspects. The FDG uptake in tissue correlates with the histological grade and potential aggressiveness of breast cancer and this may have prognostic consequences. Besides the evaluation of breast lesions, FDG-PET shows a great efficacy in staging lymph node involvement prior surgery and this could have a great value in loco-regional staging. Whole body PET provides also information with regard to metastasis localizations both in soft tissue and bone, and plays an important clinical role mainly in detecting recurrent metastatic disease. In fact for its metabolic characteristics PET visualizes regions of enhanced metabolic activity and can complete other imaging modalities based on structural anatomic changes. Even though CT and MRI show superior resolution characteristics, it has been demonstrated that PET provides more accurate information in discriminating between viable tumour, fibrotic scar or necrosis. These statements are coming from the examination of more than 2000 breast cancer detection

  5. Quantitative dynamic ¹⁸FDG-PET and tracer kinetic analysis of soft tissue sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusten, Espen; Rødal, Jan; Revheim, Mona E; Skretting, Arne; Bruland, Oyvind S; Malinen, Eirik

    2013-08-01

    To study soft tissue sarcomas using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose analog tracer [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)FDG), to investigate correlations between derived PET image parameters and clinical characteristics, and to discuss implications of dynamic PET acquisition (D-PET). D-PET images of 11 patients with soft tissue sarcomas were analyzed voxel-by-voxel using a compartment tracer kinetic model providing estimates of transfer rates between the vascular, non-metabolized, and metabolized compartments. Furthermore, standard uptake values (SUVs) in the early (2 min p.i.; SUVE) and late (45 min p.i.; SUVL) phases of the PET acquisition were obtained. The derived transfer rates K1, k2 and k3, along with the metabolic rate of (18)FDG (MRFDG) and the vascular fraction νp, was fused with the computed tomography (CT) images for visual interpretation. Correlations between D-PET imaging parameters and clinical parameters, i.e. tumor size, grade and clinical status, were calculated with a significance level of 0.05. The temporal uptake pattern of (18)FDG in the tumor varied considerably from patient to patient. SUVE peak was higher than SUVL peak for four patients. The images of the rate constants showed a systematic pattern, often with elevated intensity in the tumors compared to surrounding tissue. Significant correlations were found between SUVE/L and some of the rate parameters. Dynamic (18)FDG-PET may provide additional valuable information on soft tissue sarcomas not obtainable from conventional (18)FDG-PET. The prognostic role of dynamic imaging should be investigated.

  6. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF EEC PET INSTRUMENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PAANS, AMJ

    1991-01-01

    As a result of a Guide-Questionnaire distributed among all European PET centers an inventory of the European PET instrumentation has become available in a data base. An overview and analysis of the European PET equipment, cyclotrons, scanners and software, together with some global information on

  7. Pets in the family: practical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Kate; Darling, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    Adapting family life cycle theory to include pets provides veterinarians with a framework for understanding and reinforcing the human-animal bond. The family genogram with pets is a practice tool that identifies all people and pets in the family, enhancing the practice of One Health at the community level.

  8. Pets or People: Another Research Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmeier, John

    1986-01-01

    Compared four samples of elderly women: living alone, with other persons, and with and without a pet. Pets only made a difference for those living alone. At best, pets only attenuate the sense of loneliness. In intervention with the elderly, the provision of human supports should remain a priority. (Author/BL)

  9. Pain Medicines for Pets: Know the Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... approved veterinary oral NSAIDs. Are OTC Meds for People Safe for Pets? McLean says that it’s not unusual for pet ... or that a dose that is safe for people may not be safe for their pets,” she notes. In fact, some over-the-counter ( ...

  10. PET/MRI. Challenges, solutions and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Hans [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4

    2012-07-01

    Already from the start of PET/CT integrating positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) in one instrument, there have been considerations how to combine PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) so that their complementary abilities can be utilized in a single investigation. Since classical PET electronics fail in an even weak magnetic field and PET signal processing might disturb high-frequency signals of MRI, it soon became clear that new solutions had to be found to avoid mutual interferences. During the last fifteen years a number of different approaches towards PET/MRI for small animal imaging have been developed by research groups which together with their specific features are summarized in this review. Recently, PET/MRI for human imaging became available as well - this time by industrial initiatives. First some prototypes of BrainPET/MRI were developed followed by commercial products for simultaneous and non-simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI. Although only PET/MRI integrated in one scanner offers the full diversity of complementary multiparametric imaging, there are also promising applications of non-simultaneous sequential PET/MRI. While describing the present instrumentation for human PET/MRI, this review discusses the challenges and promises related to this new imaging technology. (orig.)

  11. Application of PET in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Dong Young

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging method that employs radionuclide and tomography techniques. Since 1995, we applied PET not only to the diagnosis of breast cancer but also to the detection of abnormalities in the augmented breast and to the detection of metastasis. Until 2001, we evaluated 242 breast cases by PET at PET center of Seoul National University Hospital. Our group has reported serially at the international journals. In the firtst report, PET showed high sensitivity for detecting breast cancer, both the primary and axillary node metastasis. A total of 27 patients underwent breast operations based on PET results at Seoul National University Hospital from 1995 to 1996. The diagnostic accuracy of PET were 97% for the primary tumor mass and 96% for axillary lymph node metastasis. In case of the breast augmented, PET also showed excellent diagnostic results for primary breast cancer and axillary lymph node metastasis where mammography and ultrasound could not diagnose properly. PET also had outstanding results in the detection of recurrent or metastatic breast cancer(sensitivity 94%, specificity 80%, accuracy 89%). In addition, our study gave some evidence that PET could be applied further to evaluate the growth rate of tumors by measuring SUV, and finally to prognosticated the disease. PET could also be applied to evaluate the response after chemotherapy to measure its metabolic rate and size. In conclsion, PET is a highly sensitive, accurate diagnostic tool for breast cancer of primary lesion in various conditions including metastasis

  12. Decreased occipital lobe metabolism by FDG-PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solnes, Lilja; Nalluri, Abhinav; Cohen, Jesse; Jones, Krystyna M.; Zan, Elcin; Javadi, Mehrbod S.; Venkatesan, Arun

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare brain metabolism patterns on fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT in anti–NMDA receptor and other definite autoimmune encephalitis (AE) and to assess how these patterns differ between anti–NMDA receptor neurologic disability groups. Methods: Retrospective review of clinical data and initial dedicated brain FDG-PET/CT studies for neurology inpatients with definite AE, per published consensus criteria, treated at a single academic medical center over a 10-year period. Z-score maps of FDG-PET/CT were made using 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projections in comparison to age group–matched controls. Brain region mean Z scores with magnitudes ≥2.00 were interpreted as significant. Comparisons were made between anti–NMDA receptor and other definite AE patients as well as among patients with anti–NMDA receptor based on modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores at the time of FDG-PET/CT. Results: The medial occipital lobes were markedly hypometabolic in 6 of 8 patients with anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis and as a group (Z = −4.02, interquartile range [IQR] 2.14) relative to those with definite AE (Z = −2.32, 1.46; p = 0.004). Among patients with anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis, the lateral and medial occipital lobes were markedly hypometabolic for patients with mRS 4–5 (lateral occipital lobe Z = −3.69, IQR 1; medial occipital lobe Z = −4.08, 1) compared with those with mRS 0–3 (lateral occipital lobe Z = −0.83, 2; p occipital lobe Z = −1.07, 2; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Marked medial occipital lobe hypometabolism by dedicated brain FDG-PET/CT may serve as an early biomarker for discriminating anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis from other AE. Resolution of lateral and medial occipital hypometabolism may correlate with improved neurologic status in anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis. PMID:29159205

  13. 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging in breast cancer patients. Is there a relevant impact on treatment planning compared to conventional staging modalities?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krammer, J.; Schnitzer, A.; Kaiser, C.G.; Buesing, K.A.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Wasser, K.; Sperk, E.; Brade, J.; Wasgindt, S.; Suetterlin, M.; Sutton, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of whole-body 18 F-FDG PET/CT on initial staging of breast cancer in comparison to conventional staging modalities. This study included 102 breast cancer patients, 101 patients were eligible for evaluation. Preoperative whole-body staging with PET/CT was performed in patients with clinical stage ≥ T2 tumours or positive local lymph nodes (n = 91). Postoperative PET/CT was performed in patients without these criteria but positive sentinel lymph node biopsy (n = 10). All patients underwent PET/CT and a conventional staging algorithm, which included bone scan, chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound. PET/CT findings were compared to conventional staging and the impact on therapeutic management was evaluated. PET/CT led to an upgrade of the N or M stage in overall 19 patients (19 %) and newly identified manifestation of breast cancer in two patients (2 %). PET/CT findings caused a change in treatment of 11 patients (11 %). This is within the range of recent studies, all applying conventional inclusion criteria based on the initial T and N status. PET/CT has a relevant impact on initial staging and treatment of breast cancer when compared to conventional modalities. Further studies should assess inclusion criteria beyond the conventional T and N status, e.g. tumour grading and receptor status. (orig.)

  14. Understanding advertising in pet nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R G

    1994-04-01

    Advertising is part of the effort to attract attention of consumers to products, in this case, pet foods. It is generally benign in its effect, but it can be misleading, although rarely deliberately so. It uses a specialized vocabulary, which must be mastered if one is to understand what is intended. For all of the expense and effort, advertising figures directly in relatively few decisions to purchase. Its main intention is to call our attention to a particular pet food and to give that product an image. If the pet food does not perform in the consumer's hands, then all of the advertising on earth will not be persuasive. On the other hand, if a product performs well, the word-of-mouth will be positive and that mode of advertising is one of the most effective.

  15. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  16. PET and SPECT in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Ghent Univ.; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van; Otte, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  17. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...... of our study was to compare the resulting imaging quality by the use of a time-based respiratory gating system in two groups administered either adenosine or dipyridamole as the pharmacological stress agent. METHODS AND RESULTS: Forty-eight patients were randomized to adenosine or dipyridamole cardiac...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4...

  18. PET Metabolic Biomarkers for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Croteau

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The body's main fuel sources are fats, carbohydrates (glucose, proteins, and ketone bodies. It is well known that an important hallmark of cancer cells is the overconsumption of glucose. Positron emission tomography (PET imaging using the glucose analog 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG has been a powerful cancer diagnostic tool for many decades. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy represent the two main domains for cancer therapy, targeting tumor proliferation, cell division, and DNA replication–-all processes that require a large amount of energy. Currently, in vivo clinical imaging of metabolism is performed almost exclusively using PET radiotracers that assess oxygen consumption and mechanisms of energy substrate consumption. This paper reviews the utility of PET imaging biomarkers for the detection of cancer proliferation, vascularization, metabolism, treatment response, and follow-up after radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and chemotherapy-related side effects.

  19. PET-CMR in heart failure - synergistic or redundant imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quail, Michael A; Sinusas, Albert J

    2017-07-01

    Imaging in heart failure (HF) provides data for diagnosis, prognosis and disease monitoring. Both MRI and nuclear imaging techniques have been successfully used for this purpose in HF. Positron Emission Tomography-Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (PET-CMR) is an example of a new multimodality diagnostic imaging technique with potential applications in HF. The threshold for adopting a new diagnostic tool to clinical practice must necessarily be high, lest they exacerbate costs without improving care. New modalities must demonstrate clinical superiority, or at least equivalence, combined with another important advantage, such as lower cost or improved patient safety. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of multimodality PET-CMR with regard to HF applications, and determine whether the clinical utility of this new technology justifies the cost.

  20. Seroprevalences of antibodies against Bartonella henselae and Toxoplasma gondii and fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium spp, Giardia spp, and Toxocara cati in feral and pet domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, Felicia B; Dubey, J P; Levine, Jay F; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Ford, Richard B; Stoskopf, Michael K

    2004-11-01

    To compare seroprevalences of antibodies against Bartonella henselae and Toxoplasma gondii and fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium spp, Giardia spp, and Toxocara cati in feral and pet domestic cats. Prospective cross-sectional serologic and coprologic survey. 100 feral cats and 76 pet domestic cats from Randolph County, NC. Blood and fecal samples were collected and tested. Percentages of feral cats seropositive for antibodies against B. henselae and T. gondii (93% and 63%, respectively) were significantly higher than percentages of pet cats (75% and 34%). Percentages of feral and pet cats with Cryptosporidium spp (7% of feral cats; 6% of pet cats), Giardia spp (6% of feral cats; 5% of pet cats), and T. cati ova (21% of feral cats; 18% of pet cats) in their feces were not significantly different between populations. Results of CBCs and serum biochemical analyses were not significantly different between feral and pet cats, except that feral cats had a significantly lower median PCV and significantly higher median neutrophil count. Results suggested that feral and pet cats had similar baseline health status, as reflected by results of hematologic and serum biochemical testing and similar prevalences of infection with Cryptosporidium spp, Giardia spp, and T. cati. Feral cats did have higher seroprevalences of antibodies against B. henselae and T. gondii than did pet cats, but this likely was related to greater exposure to vectors of these organisms.

  1. 18F-FDG PET-CT对结直肠癌诊断及治疗的影响%Impact of 18F-FDG PET-CT on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Colorectal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    招丽蓉; 王巍; 胡斌

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography ( F-FDG PET-CT ) on the diagnosis and clinical therapeutical strategy in patients with colorectal carcinoma. Methods 56 patients with histologically confirmed colorectal carcinoma received PET-CT scan. The stage and homologous treatment strategy were designed according to CT or PET-CT findings, then analyze the the different stage and management between the two examination ways. Results In the judgement of tumor status, PET-CT were correct in 53 cases, whereas CT were correct in 44 cases and the difference was statisticlly significant ( x2 = 6. 235 ,P = 0. 024 ). In the judgement of nodal status,PET-CT were correct in 52 cases, whereas CT were correct in 43 cases and the difference was statisticlly significant also ( x2=5. 617 ,P = 0. 033 ). 27 distant metastases were detected in 15 patients with CT,and 48 distant metastases were detected in 21 patients with PET-CT. PET-CT findings changed the M stage in 6 patients besides the CT examination. The clinical therapeutic strategies were changed in 15 case due to the results of PET-CT, and the influence rate of PET-CT was 26. 8%. Conclusion PET-CT can provide additional useful information that could make significant alteration to clinical stage and treatment plan in patients with colorectal carcinoma.%目的 探讨18F-FDG PET-CT检查对结直肠癌诊断及治疗的影响.方法 对56例经病理检查确诊的结直肠癌患者行全身PET-CT检查.将入组患者根据其CT表现及PET-CT扫描结果进行分期,并比较2种分期结果.结果 PET-CT 检查判断临床分期:56例结直肠癌T分期中,53例PET-CT检查分期判断准确,44例CT检查分期判断准确,PET-CT检查对判断结直肠癌T分期的准确性较CT检查高(χ2=6.235,P=0.024) ;56例结直肠癌N分期,PET-CT检查判断准确52例,CT检查判断准确43例;PET-CT检查对判断结直肠癌N分期的准确性与CT

  2. Introducing the PET Centre Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belohlavek, O.

    2001-01-01

    The PET Centre Prague (www.homolka.cz/nm) was established in 1999 as the outcome of a joint project of the public Na Homolce Hospital and the Nuclear Research Institute Rez, plc, the Czech radiopharmaceutical producer. Technical and financial assistance was provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency, which perceived the Centre as its model project that could serve as a guide for the development of PET centres in countries sharing a comparable level of development with the Czech Republic. The article maps the history of the project, its design, workplace lay-out and equipment, radiation protection arrangements and spectrum of the first approx. 3000 investigations. (author)

  3. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadvar, Hossein, E-mail: jadvar@usc.edu; Colletti, Patrick M.

    2014-01-15

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved.

  4. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadvar, Hossein; Colletti, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved

  6. PET and PET/CT in malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia O, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    The advantages that it has the PET/CT are: 1. It diminishes mainly positive false lesions. It identifies physiologic accumulate places. 2. It diminishes in smaller grade false negative. Small injuries. Injuries with low grade concentration. Injure on intense activity areas. 3. Precise anatomical localization of accumulate places. 4. Reduction of the acquisition time. (Author)

  7. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Hansen, Anders E

    2014-01-01

    be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET......Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can...... analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia....

  8. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook; Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  9. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi.image@gmail.com; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-709 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  10. The MiniPET: a didactic PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedro, R; Silva, J; Maio, A; Gurriana, L; Silva, J M; Augusto, J Soares

    2013-01-01

    The MiniPET project aims to design and build a small PET system. It consists of two 4 × 4 matrices of 16 LYSO scintillator crystals and two PMTs with 16 channels resulting in a low cost system with the essential functionality of a clinical PET instrument. It is designed to illustrate the physics of the PET technique and to provide a didactic platform for the training of students and nuclear imaging professionals as well as for scientific outreach. The PET modules can be configured to test for the coincidence of 511 keV gamma rays. The model has a flexible mechanical setup [1] and can simulate 14 diferent ring geometries, from a configuration with as few as 18 detectors per ring (ring radius φ=51 mm), up to a geometry with 70 detectors per ring (φ=200 mm). A second version of the electronic system [2] allowed measurement and recording of the energy deposited in 4 detector channels by photons from a 137 Cs radioactive source and by photons resulting of the annihilation of positrons from a 22 Na radioactive source. These energy spectra are used for detector performance studies, as well as angular dependency studies. In this paper, the mechanical setup, the front-end high-speed analog electronics, the digital acquisition and control electronics implemented in a FPGA, as well as the data-transfer interface between the FPGA board and a host PC are described. Recent preliminary results obtained with the 4 active channels in the prototype are also presented.

  11. Epilepsy and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Ishijima, Buichi

    1984-01-01

    The glucose metabolism of interictal epileptic foci in human brains were analyzed by positron emission tomography. The seizure patterns of 29 epileptic patients were as follows; complex partial 13 cases, elementary partial 9 cases, and generalized 7 cases. 11 C was produced by a JSW medical cyclotron BC105 and was randomly tagged to glucose prepared by photosynthesis. Data sampling by PET was started 15 minutes after peroral administration of 11 C-glucose to the patients. Three slices with 1.75 cm distance were obtained by a single scanning. In temporal lobe epilepsy, three slices were selected as 2.0 cm, 3.75 cm and 5.5 cm above orbitomeatal line. The basal ganglia were scanned 4.5 -- 5.0 cm and the motor and sensory strips were 5.0 -- 9.0 cm above OML. The glucose metabolic rate was expressed with color scales and qualitatively estimated. The results disclosed an obvious hypometabolic zone around a focus area in 22 cases (76%) out of the 29 subjects. This hypometabolic zone was observed in 12 cases (92%) of 13 complex partial, 9 cases (78%) of 9 elementary partial, and 3 cases (43%) of 7 generalized seizure patterns. In temporal lobe epilepsy, the location of the hypometabolic zone was different according to the clinical symptoms. The patients with automatism, pseudoabsence, autonomic, and emotional symptoms had its foci in the mesial portion of the temporal lobe. On the other hand, the patients with psychical seizure revealed its low metabolic area in the lateral temporal cortex. In the elementary partial epilepsy, the hypoactive zones were observed in the motor, sensory, and visual cortical area in accordance with the clinical symptoms. Very interestingly, an explicit cortical focus was discovered in two cases of the generalized epilepsy. In these cases the mechanism of secondary generalization was supposed to proceed in the expression of their clinical symptoms. In one Lennox-Gastaut case, a unilateral temporal lobe was involved as the seizure focus. (J.P.N.)

  12. 'PET -Compton' system. Comparative evaluation with PET system using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Garcia, Angelina; Arista Romeu, Eduardo; Abreu Alfonso, Yamiel; Leyva Fabelo, Antonio; Pinnera Hernandez, Ibrahin; Bolannos Perez, Lourdes; Rubio Rodriguez, Juan A; Perez Morales, Jose M.; Arce Dubois, Pedro; Vela Morales, Oscar; Willmott Zappacosta, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in small animals has actually achieved spatial resolution round about 1 mm and currently there are under study different approaches to improve this spatial resolution. One of them combines PET technology with Compton Cameras. This paper presents the idea of the so called 'PET-Compton' systems and includes comparative evaluation of spatial resolution and global efficiency in both PET and PET-Compton system by means of Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 code. Simulation is done on a PET-Compton system consisting of LYSO-LuYAP scintillating detectors of particular small animal PET scanner named 'Clear-PET' and for Compton detectors based on CdZnTe semiconductor. A group of radionuclides that emits a positron (e + ) and γ quantum almost simultaneously and fulfills some selection criteria for their possible use in PET-Compton systems for medical and biological applications were studied under simulation conditions. (Author)

  13. Recommendations for the use of PET and PET-CT for radiotherapy planning in research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somer, E J; Pike, L C; Marsden, P K

    2012-08-01

    With the increasing use of positron emission tomography (PET) for disease staging, follow-up and therapy monitoring in a number of oncological indications there is growing interest in the use of PET and PET-CT for radiation treatment planning. In order to create a strong clinical evidence base for this, it is important to ensure that research data are clinically relevant and of a high quality. Therefore the National Cancer Research Institute PET Research Network make these recommendations to assist investigators in the development of radiotherapy clinical trials involving the use of PET and PET-CT. These recommendations provide an overview of the current literature in this rapidly evolving field, including standards for PET in clinical trials, disease staging, volume delineation, intensity modulated radiotherapy and PET-augmented planning techniques, and are targeted at a general audience. We conclude with specific recommendations for the use of PET in radiotherapy planning in research projects.

  14. PET/MR Imaging in Gynecologic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohliger, Michael A; Hope, Thomas A; Chapman, Jocelyn S; Chen, Lee-May; Behr, Spencer C; Poder, Liina

    2017-08-01

    MR imaging and PET using 2-Deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoroglucose (FDG) are both useful in the evaluation of gynecologic malignancies. MR imaging is superior for local staging of disease whereas fludeoxyglucose FDG PET is superior for detecting distant metastases. Integrated PET/MR imaging scanners have great promise for gynecologic malignancies by combining the advantages of each modality into a single scan. This article reviews the technology behind PET/MR imaging acquisitions and technical challenges relevant to imaging the pelvis. A dedicated PET/MR imaging protocol; the roles of PET and MR imaging in cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers; and future directions for PET/MR imaging are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative simultaneous PET-MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-06-01

    Whole-body PET is currently limited by the degradation due to patient motion. Respiratory motion degrades imaging studies of the abdomen. Similarly, both respiratory and cardiac motions significantly hamper the assessment of myocardial ischemia and/or metabolism in perfusion and viability cardiac PET studies. Based on simultaneous PET-MR, we have developed robust and accurate MRI methods allowing the tracking and measurement of both respiratory and cardiac motions during abdominal or cardiac studies. Our list-mode iterative PET reconstruction framework incorporates the measured motion fields into PET emission system matrix as well as the time-dependent PET attenuation map and the position dependent point spread function. Our method significantly enhances the PET image quality as compared to conventional methods.

  16. PET and SPECT in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Otte, Andreas; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van

    2014-01-01

    Covers classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT in Psychiatry showcases the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of psychiatric disease through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. The classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects - such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism - are discussed and the latest results in functional neuroimaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical psychiatrist and a nuclear medicine expert to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to all who have an interest in the field of neuroscience, from the psychiatrist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and cognitive psychologist. It is the first volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences; other volumes will focus on PET and SPECT in neurology and PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems.

  17. SPECT og PET i neurobiologien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, O.B.; Lassen, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) and SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) are isotopic methods in which the distribution is registered of radiolabelled tracers given in such small amounts that they are without effect on the organism or the organism's disposal of them. Thus, a series...

  18. Diagnostic imaging of exotic pets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, S.

    1993-01-01

    Radiographic, ultrasonographic, and computed tomographic (CT) imaging are important diagnostic modalities in exotic pets. The use of appropriate radiographic equipment, film-screen combinations, and radiographic projections enhances the information obtained from radiographs. Both normal findings and common radiographic abnormalities are discussed. The use of ultrasonography and CT scanning for exotic small mammals and reptiles is described

  19. PET and SPECT in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Otte, Andreas [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van (eds.) [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2014-09-01

    Covers classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism. Emphasis on a multidisciplinary approach. Written by internationally acclaimed experts. PET and SPECT in Psychiatry showcases the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of psychiatric disease through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. The classical psychiatric disorders as well as other subjects - such as suicide, sleep, eating disorders, and autism - are discussed and the latest results in functional neuroimaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical psychiatrist and a nuclear medicine expert to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state of the art compendium will be valuable to all who have an interest in the field of neuroscience, from the psychiatrist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and cognitive psychologist. It is the first volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences; other volumes will focus on PET and SPECT in neurology and PET and SPECT of neurobiological systems.

  20. Innovations in PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin Klausen, T; Høgild Keller, S; Vinter Olesen, O

    2012-01-01

    especially as spatial resolution improves. Software based image fusion remains a complex issue outside the brain. State of the art image quality in a modern PET/CT system includes incorporation of point spread function (PSF) and time-of-flight (TOF) information into the reconstruction leading to the high...

  1. Evaluation of the response to preoperative chemotherapy with PET image in osteosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Dae Geun; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Sug Jun; Lee, Soo Yong

    1999-12-01

    F18 FDG PET scan has an advantage in evaluating the biologic status of the tumors. The purpose of this study is evaluate the role of PET scan in pre- and post chemotherapeutic osteosarcomas and correlate the findings with pathologic examination. Nine cases of osteosarcoma had biopsy and preoperative chemotherapy at our department. There were 4 distal femur, 4 proximal tibia and 1 distal ulna. All case had initial MRI and PET scan and these were repeated after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Under PET image parameters such as VOI (volume of interest), total activity, degree of necrosis and T/N (tumor/normal tissue) ratio were analyzed. There was a significant correlation between the calculated necrosis in PET and observed one on pathologic specimen (r2=0.78, p<0.05). Cross correlation among identified variables revealed meaningful result between T/N ration and tumor necrosis (r2=0.45, p<0.05). As the T/N ratio decrease, so much more the tumor necrosis was. F18 FDG PET scan could get objective data such as volume, degree of necrosis and total activity and was also useful in estimating the contribution of chemotherapy in tumor necrosis over the innate necrosis before treatment.

  2. Evaluation of the response to preoperative chemotherapy with PET image in osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Dae Geun; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Sug Jun; Lee, Soo Yong

    1999-12-01

    F18 FDG PET scan has an advantage in evaluating the biologic status of the tumors. The purpose of this study is evaluate the role of PET scan in pre- and post chemotherapeutic osteosarcomas and correlate the findings with pathologic examination. Nine cases of osteosarcoma had biopsy and preoperative chemotherapy at our department. There were 4 distal femur, 4 proximal tibia and 1 distal ulna. All case had initial MRI and PET scan and these were repeated after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Under PET image parameters such as VOI (volume of interest), total activity, degree of necrosis and T/N (tumor/normal tissue) ratio were analyzed. There was a significant correlation between the calculated necrosis in PET and observed one on pathologic specimen (r2=0.78, p<0.05). Cross correlation among identified variables revealed meaningful result between T/N ration and tumor necrosis (r2=0.45, p<0.05). As the T/N ratio decrease, so much more the tumor necrosis was. F18 FDG PET scan could get objective data such as volume, degree of necrosis and total activity and was also useful in estimating the contribution of chemotherapy in tumor necrosis over the innate necrosis before treatment

  3. Puppy Love, Adolescence, and Chronic Illness: The Importance of Pets for Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashby F. Walker PhD

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of animal-companion ties to well-being are consistently documented, yet few studies use patient-centered methodologies to examine how youth living with chronic illnesses rely on domestic pets for support. Youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D aged 12 to 19 years (N=40 completed surveys involving a prompt to take five photos of “what diabetes means to you,” with an accompanying narrative. Content analysis was conducted for photos/narratives and numeric variables analyzed including socio-economic status (SES: measured by total household income and years of parental education and HbA1C. More than half of the youth participants took pictures of coping mechanisms, including pictures of their pets. In fact, pictures of pets outnumbered pictures of people three to one. Pet depictions were captured by youth from all SES levels. Youth with T1D identify pets as an important source of support. More research is needed to understand how pets may offset disease burden for youth with T1D.

  4. Puppy Love, Adolescence, and Chronic Illness: The Importance of Pets for Youth with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ashby F; Johnson, Cathryn; Schatz, Desmond A; Silverstein, Janet H; Rohrs, Henry J

    2015-05-01

    The benefits of animal-companion ties to well-being are consistently documented, yet few studies use patient-centered methodologies to examine how youth living with chronic illnesses rely on domestic pets for support. Youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) aged 12 to 19 years (N=40) completed surveys involving a prompt to take five photos of "what diabetes means to you," with an accompanying narrative. Content analysis was conducted for photos/narratives and numeric variables analyzed including socio-economic status (SES: measured by total household income and years of parental education) and HbA1C. More than half of the youth participants took pictures of coping mechanisms, including pictures of their pets. In fact, pictures of pets outnumbered pictures of people three to one. Pet depictions were captured by youth from all SES levels. Youth with T1D identify pets as an important source of support. More research is needed to understand how pets may offset disease burden for youth with T1D.

  5. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET imaging in breast carcinoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathekge, Mike; Lengana, Thabo; Modiselle, Moshe; Vorster, Mariza; Zeevaart, JanRijn; Ebenhan, Thomas [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Maes, Alex [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Wiele, Christophe van de [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); University Ghent, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-04-15

    To report on imaging findings using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET in a series of 19 breast carcinoma patients. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET imaging results obtained were compared to routinely performed staging examinations and analyzed as to lesion location and progesterone receptor status. Out of 81 tumor lesions identified, 84% were identified on {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC SUVmean values of distant metastases proved significantly higher (mean, 6.86, SD, 5.68) when compared to those of primary or local recurrences (mean, 2.45, SD, 2.55, p = 0.04) or involved lymph nodes (mean, 3.18, SD, 1.79, p = 0.011). SUVmean values of progesterone receptor-positive lesions proved not significantly different from progesterone receptor-negative lesions. SUV values derived from FDG PET/CT, available in seven patients, and {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT imaging proved weakly correlated (r = 0.407, p = 0.015). {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT imaging in breast carcinoma confirms the reported considerable variation of PSMA expression on human solid tumors using immunohistochemistry. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of the PET component of simultaneous [18F]choline PET/MRI in prostate cancer: comparison with [18F]choline PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetter, Axel; Lipponer, Christine; Nensa, Felix; Altenbernd, Jens-Christian; Schlosser, Thomas; Lauenstein, Thomas; Heusch, Philipp; Ruebben, Herbert; Bockisch, Andreas; Poeppel, Thorsten; Nagarajah, James

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the positron emission tomography (PET) component of [ 18 F]choline PET/MRI and compare it with the PET component of [ 18 F]choline PET/CT in patients with histologically proven prostate cancer and suspected recurrent prostate cancer. Thirty-six patients were examined with simultaneous [ 18 F]choline PET/MRI following combined [ 18 F]choline PET/CT. Fifty-eight PET-positive lesions in PET/CT and PET/MRI were evaluated by measuring the maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV mean ) using volume of interest (VOI) analysis. A scoring system was applied to determine the quality of the PET images of both PET/CT and PET/MRI. Agreement between PET/CT and PET/MRI regarding SUV max and SUV mean was tested using Pearson's product-moment correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. All PET-positive lesions that were visible on PET/CT were also detectable on PET/MRI. The quality of the PET images was comparable in both groups. Median SUV max and SUV mean of all lesions were significantly lower in PET/MRI than in PET/CT (5.2 vs 6.1, p max of PET/CT and PET/MRI (R = 0.86, p mean of PET/CT and PET/MRI (R = 0.81, p max of PET/CT vs PET/MRI and -1.12 to +2.23 between SUV mean of PET/CT vs PET/MRI. PET image quality of PET/MRI was comparable to that of PET/CT. A highly significant correlation between SUV max and SUV mean was found. Both SUV max and SUV mean were significantly lower in [ 18 F]choline PET/MRI than in [ 18 F]choline PET/CT. Differences of SUV max and SUV mean might be caused by different techniques of attenuation correction. Furthermore, differences in biodistribution and biokinetics of [ 18 F]choline between the subsequent examinations and in the respective organ systems have to be taken into account. (orig.)

  7. The prognostic value of FET PET at radiotherapy planning in newly diagnosed glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejklint Poulsen, Sidsel [The Finsen Center, Rigshospitalet, Department of Radiation Biology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center of Diagnostic Investigation, Rigshospitalet, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Copenhagen (Denmark); Urup, Thomas; Grunnet, Kirsten; Skovgaard Poulsen, Hans [The Finsen Center, Rigshospitalet, Department of Radiation Biology, Copenhagen (Denmark); The Finsen Center, Rigshospitalet, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jarle Christensen, Ib [University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre Hospital, Laboratory of Gastroenterology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsen, Vibeke Andree [Center of Diagnostic Investigation, Rigshospitalet, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lundemann Jensen, Michael; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per [The Finsen Center, Rigshospitalet, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); The Finsen Center, Rigshospitalet, Section of Radiotherapy, Copenhagen (Denmark); Law, Ian [Center of Diagnostic Investigation, Rigshospitalet, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2017-03-15

    Glioblastoma patients show a great variability in progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). To gain additional pretherapeutic information, we explored the potential of O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) PET as an independent prognostic biomarker. We retrospectively analyzed 146 consecutively treated, newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients. All patients were treated with temozolomide and radiation therapy (RT). CT/MR and FET PET scans were obtained postoperatively for RT planning. We used Cox proportional hazards models with OS and PFS as endpoints, to test the prognostic value of FET PET biological tumor volume (BTV). Median follow-up time was 14 months, and median OS and PFS were 16.5 and 6.5 months, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, increasing BTV (HR = 1.17, P < 0.001), poor performance status (HR = 2.35, P < 0.001), O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein status (HR = 1.61, P = 0.024) and higher age (HR = 1.32, P = 0.013) were independent prognostic factors of poor OS. For poor PFS, only increasing BTV (HR = 1.18; P = 0.002) was prognostic. A prognostic index for OS was created based on the identified prognostic factors. Large BTV on FET PET is an independent prognostic factor of poor OS and PFS in glioblastoma patients. With the introduction of FET PET, we obtain a prognostic index that can help in glioblastoma treatment planning. (orig.)

  8. Pet insurance--essential option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, J D

    2000-08-01

    As Hawn (2) says, "insurance is about risk and peace of mind." She reports that the American Humane Society supports pet insurance because companion animals are able to be treated for disease or accidents that are life-threatening where, otherwise, they would have been euthanized. For veterinarians, she suggests that pet insurance allows them to practice veterinary medicine "as if it were free." It is inevitable that pet insurance will grow as a recourse for veterinary fees. This may be a savior to some families whose budget is stretched to the limit at a critical moment in the health care of their cherished pet. We in the veterinary profession have an advantage over other professions. We have seen the good, the bad, and the ugly of insurance, as it applies to human health and dental care. If we work hand-in-hand with our own industries, collectively we may be able to develop a system that wins for everyone, with fees that allow practice to thrive and growth strategies that accommodate new treatment and diagnostic modalities, as well as consistent and exemplary customer service. The path ahead is always fraught with bumps and potholes. We can be a passive passenger and become a victim of the times or an active driver to steer the profession to a clearer route. Pet insurance is but one of the solutions for the profession; the others are a careful assessment of our fees--charging what we are worth, not what we think the client will pay; business management; customer service; leadership of our health care team; lifelong learning; and more efficient delivery systems. Let us stop being a victim, stop shooting ourselves in the professional foot, and seize the day!

  9. PET in cerebrovascular disease; PET bei zerebrovaskulaeren Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, K. [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik der Univ. Koeln (Germany)]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer Neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Tissue viability is of particular interest in acute cerebral ischemia because it may be preserved if reperfusion can be achieved rapidly, e.g. by acute thrombolysis. Measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen consumption by PET can assess tissue viability, and they have substantially increased our knowledge of th pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and the associated penumbra. Widerspread clinical application in acute stroke, however, is unlikely because of the large logistic and personnel resources required. In chronic cerebrovascular disease, measurement of regional CBF and glucose metabolism, which is usually coupled, provide detailed insights in disturbance of cortical function, e.g. due to deafferentiation, and contribute to differentiation of dementia types. Chronic misery perfusion, i.e. reduced perfusion that does not match the metabolic demand of the tissue, can be demonstrated by PET. It may be found in some patients with high-grade arterial stenoses. Less severe impairment of brain perfusion can be demonstrated by measurement of the cerebrovascular reserve capacity. The most frequent clinical situations can be assessed by less demanding procedures, e.g. by SPECT. In conclusion, PET has its role in cerebrovascular disease primarily within scientific studies, where high resolution and absolute quantitation of physiological variables are essential. (orig.). 65 refs. [Deutsch] Beim akuten ischaemischen Insult ist die Vitalitaet des Gewebes von besonderem Interesse, da sie durch rasche Reperfusion, z.B. durch Thrombolyse, erhalten bleiben kann. Messungen der zerebralen Durchblutung und des Sauerstoffumsatzes mittels PET geben darueber wesentliche Aufschluesse, und sie sind wichtig fuer das Verstaendnis der Pathophysiologie ischaemischer Infarkte und der Penumbra mit kritischer Perfusion beim Menschen. Ihre breitere Anwendung in der klinischen Patientenversorgung kommt allerdings wegen des hohen Aufwandes derzeit kaum in Betracht. Bei

  10. Contribution of whole body F-18-FDG-PET and lymphoscintigraphy to the assessment of regional and distant metastases in cutaneous malignant melanoma. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, M.; Freedman, N.; Marciano, R.; Moshe, S.; Chisin, R. [Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Medical Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine; Lotem, M. [Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Oncology; Gimon, Z. [Hadassah Univ. Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Surgery

    2000-05-01

    Aim: This pilot study describes use of whole body PET (WB PET) for staging of melanoma. WB PET in conjunction with lymphoscintigraphy (LS) for evaluating status of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) in primary melanoma was investigated with comparison to histopathological results. WB PET was also used both for primary and metastatic melanoma for screening for distant metastases, restaging and follow-up. Methods: Group I: 17 patients with primary cutaneous melanoma underwent LS, WB PET and SLN dissection. WB PET findings were compared with biopsy results at the SLN site and were used for screening for distant metastases. Group II: 17 patients with a history of melanoma underwent WB PET for follow-up and/or restaging. Results were confirmed or refuted by other radiological modalities or by biopsy of clinical follow-up. Results: Group I: Out of 20 SLNs identified by LS in the 17 patients, 18 were negative on WB PET and 2 were positive. 19/20 WB PET findings were confirmed either by histopathology or by clinical follow-up (20 mo). Accuracy was 94% for the assessment of the status of the SLN. Group II: WB PET findings altered staging and treatment in 12/17 patients and confirmed the validity of treatment in 3/17 patients. Overall, in 15/17 patients (88%), WB PET had an impact on treatment strategy. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Diese Pilot-Studie beschreibt die Anwendung der Ganzkoerper-PET (WB PET) zum Staging beim Melanom. Bei primaerem Melanom wurde WB PET in Verbindung mit der Lymphszintigraphie (LS) angewandt und mit der Histopathologie verglichen, um den Status des Sentinel Lymph Node (SLN) zu untersuchen. Zusaetzlich wurde WB PET fuer primaere und metastatische Melanome zum Screening auf Fernmetastasen, zum Restaging und zum Follow-up benutzt. Methoden: Gruppe I: 17 Patienten mit primaerem kutanem Melanom erhielten LS, WB PET und eine operative SLN-Entfernung. Die WB PET-Ergebnisse wurden mit den SLN-Biopsien verglichen und zum Screening fuer Fernmetastasen benutzt. Gruppe

  11. Pet Ownership by Elderly People: Two New Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David W. E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined two issues of pet ownership in mail questionnaire and interview survey of 1,595 older adults over age 60, 377 of whom had a pet. Found evidence that pets were important determinant of housing choice. Many elderly pet owners had made no arrangements for pet if they predecease it or become unable to care for it. (Author/NB)

  12. [18F]DOPA PET/ceCT in diagnosis and staging of primary medullary thyroid carcinoma prior to surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasul, Sazan; Hartenbach, Sabrina; Rebhan, Katharina; Göllner, Adelina; Karanikas, Georgios; Mayerhoefer, Marius; Mazal, Peter; Hacker, Marcus; Hartenbach, Markus

    2018-05-15

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is characterized by a high rate of metastasis. In this study we evaluated the ability of [ 18 F]DOPA PET/ceCT to stage MTC in patients with suspicious thyroid nodules and pathologically elevated serum calcitonin (Ctn) levels prior to total thyroidectomy and lymph node (LN) dissection. A group of 32 patients with sonographically suspicious thyroid nodules and pathologically elevated basal Ctn (bCtn) and stimulated Ctn (sCtn) levels underwent DOPA PET/ceCT prior to surgery. Postoperative histology served as the standard of reference for ultrasonography and DOPA PET/ceCT region-based LN staging. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses as well as receiver operating characteristic analysis were used to evaluate the correlations between preoperative and histological parameters and postoperative tumour persistence or relapse. Primary MTC was histologically verified in all patients. Of the 32 patients, 28 showed increased DOPA decarboxylase activity in the primary tumour (sensitivity 88%, mean SUVmax 10.5). Undetected tumours were exclusively staged pT1a. The sensitivities of DOPA PET in the detection of central and lateral metastatic neck LN were 53% and 73%, in contrast to 20% and 39%, respectively, for neck ultrasonography. Preoperative bCtn and carcinoembryonic antigen levels as well as cN1b status and the number of involved neck regions on DOPA PET/ceCT were predictive of postoperative tumour persistence/relapse in the univariate regression analysis (P PET/ceCT cN1b status remained significant in the multivariate analysis (P = 0.016, relative risk 4.02). This study revealed that DOPA PET/ceCT has high sensitivity in the detection of primary MTC and superior sensitivity in the detection of LN metastases compared to ultrasonography. DOPA PET/ceCT identification of N1b status predicts postoperative tumour persistence. Thus, implementation of a DOPA-guided LN dissection might improve surgical success.

  13. Comparison of dosimetry between PET/CT and PET alone using 11C-ITMM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kimiteru; Sakata, Muneyuki; Wagarsuma, Kei; Toyohara, Jun; Ishibashi, Kenji; Ishii, Kenji; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Oda, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    We used a new tracer, N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino) pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-4- 11 C-methoxy-N-methylbenzamide ( 11 C-ITMM), to compare radiation doses from positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with previously published doses from PET alone. Twelve healthy volunteers [six males (mean age ± SD, 27.7 ± 6.7 years) and six females (31.8 ± 14.5 years)] in 12 examinations were recruited. Dose estimations from PET/CT were compared with those from PET alone. Regions of interest (ROIs) in PET/CT were delineated on the basis of low-dose CT (LD-CT) images acquired during PET/CT. Internal and external radiation doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 and CT-Expo software. The effective dose (ED) for 11 C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT was estimated to be 4.7 ± 0.5 μSv/MBq for the male subjects and 4.1 ± 0.7 μSv/MBq for the female subjects. The mean ED for 11 C-ITMM calculated from PET alone in a previous report was estimated to be 4.6 ± 0.3 μSv/MBq (males, n = 3). The ED values for 11 C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT in the male subjects were almost identical to those from PET alone. The absorbed doses (ADs) of the gallbladder, stomach, red bone marrow, and spleen calculated from PET/CT were significantly different from those calculated from PET alone. The EDs of 11 C-ITMM calculated from PET/CT were almost identical to those calculated from PET alone. The ADs in several organs calculated from PET/CT differed from those from PET alone. LD-CT images acquired during PET/CT may facilitate organ identification.

  14. PET/MRI and PET/CT in advanced gynaecological tumours: initial experience and comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Marcelo A.; Schulthess, Gustav von; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Freiwald-Chilla, Bianka [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Hauser, Nik [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Gynaecology, Baden (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Guerbet AG, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-08-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI and PET/CT for staging and re-staging advanced gynaecological cancer patients as well as identify the potential benefits of each method in such a population. Twenty-six patients with suspicious or proven advanced gynaecological cancer (12 ovarian, seven cervical, one vulvar and four endometrial tumours, one uterine metastasis, and one primary peritoneal cancer) underwent whole-body imaging with a sequential trimodality PET/CT/MR system. Images were analysed regarding primary tumour detection and delineation, loco-regional lymph node staging, and abdominal/extra-abdominal distant metastasis detection (last only by PET/CT). Eighteen (69.2 %) patients underwent PET/MRI for primary staging and eight patients (30.8 %) for re-staging their gynaecological malignancies. For primary tumour delineation, PET/MRI accuracy was statistically superior to PET/CT (p < 0.001). Among the different types of cancer, PET/MRI presented better tumour delineation mainly for cervical (6/7) and endometrial (2/3) cancers. PET/MRI for local evaluation as well as PET/CT for extra-abdominal metastases had therapeutic consequences in three and one patients, respectively. PET/CT detected 12 extra-abdominal distant metastases in 26 patients. PET/MRI is superior to PET/CT for primary tumour delineation. No differences were found in detection of regional lymph node involvement and abdominal metastases detection. (orig.)

  15. Childhood Attachment to Pets: Associations between Pet Attachment, Attitudes to Animals, Compassion, and Humane Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne D. Hawkins

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Attachment to pets has an important role in children’s social, emotional, and cognitive development, mental health, well-being, and quality of life. This study examined associations between childhood attachment to pets and caring and friendship behaviour, compassion, and attitudes towards animals. This study also examined socio-demographic differences, particularly pet ownership and pet type. A self-report survey of over one thousand 7 to 12 year-olds in Scotland, UK, revealed that the majority of children are strongly attached to their pets, but attachment scores differ depending on pet type and child gender. Analysis revealed that attachment to pets is facilitated by compassion and caring and pet-directed friendship behaviours and that attachment to pets significantly predicts positive attitudes towards animals. The findings have implications for the promotion of prosocial and humane behaviour. Encouraging children to participate in pet care behaviour may promote attachment between children and their pet, which in turn may have a range of positive outcomes for both children (such as reduced aggression, better well-being, and quality of life and pets (such as humane treatment. This study enhances our understanding of childhood pet attachment and has implications for humane education and promoting secure emotional attachments in childhood.

  16. Basic study of entire whole-body PET scanners based on the OpenPET geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.j [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-21

    A conventional PET scanner has a 15-25 cm axial field-of-view (FOV) and images a whole body using about six bed positions. An OpenPET geometry can extend the axial FOV with a limited number of detectors. The entire whole-body PET scanner must be able to process a large amount of data effectively. In this work, we study feasibility of the fully 3D entire whole-body PET scanner using the GATE simulation. The OpenPET has 12 block detector rings with the ring diameter of 840 mm and each block detector ring consists of 48 depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors. The OpenPET has the axial length of 895.95 mm with five parts of 58.95 mm open gaps. The OpenPET has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits. NECR of the OpenPET decreases by single data loss. But single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into two parts. Also, multiple coincidences are found to be important for the entire whole-body PET scanner. The entire whole-body PET scanner with the OpenPET geometry promises to provide a large axial FOV with the open space and to have sufficient performance values. But single data loss at the grouping circuits and multiple coincidences are limited to the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) for the entire whole-body PET scanner.

  17. Pseudarthrosis after lumbar spinal fusion: the role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Marloes; Willems, Paul; Jutten, Liesbeth; Arts, Chris; Rhijn, Lodewijk van [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Weijers, Rene; Wierts, Roel; Urbach, Christian; Brans, Boudewijn [Maastricht University Medical Center, Radiology /Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Painful pseudarthrosis is one of the most important indications for (revision) surgery after spinal fusion procedures. If pseudarthrosis is the source of recurrent pain it may require revision surgery. It is therefore of great clinical importance to ascertain if it is the source of such pain. The correlation between findings on conventional imaging (plain radiography and CT) and clinical well-being has been shown to be moderate. The goal of this study was to determine the possible role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET in patients after lumbar spinal interbody fusion by investigating the relationship between PET/CT findings and clinical function and pain. A cohort of 36 patients was retrospectively included in the study after {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT for either persistent or recurrent low back pain (18 patients) or during routine postoperative investigation (18 patients) between 9 and 76 months and 11 and 14 months after posterior lumbar interbody fusion, respectively. Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 156 - 263 MBq (mean 199 MBq, median 196 MBq) {sup 18}F-fluoride, PET and CT images were acquired using an integrated PET/CT scanner, followed by a diagnostic CT scan. Two observers independently scored the images. The number of bony bridges between vertebrae was scored on the CT images to quantify interbody fusion (0, 1 or 2). Vertebral endplate and intervertebral disc space uptake were evaluated visually as well as semiquantitatively following {sup 18}F-fluoride PET. Findings on PET and CT were correlated with clinical wellbeing as measured by validated questionnaires concerning general daily functioning (Oswestry Disability Index), pain (visual analogue scale) and general health status (EuroQol). Patients were divided into three categories based on these questionnaire scores. No correlation was found between symptom severity and fusion status. However, {sup 18}F-fluoride activity in the vertebral endplates was significantly higher in patients in the lowest

  18. Pseudarthrosis after lumbar spinal fusion: the role of 18F-fluoride PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Marloes; Willems, Paul; Jutten, Liesbeth; Arts, Chris; Rhijn, Lodewijk van; Weijers, Rene; Wierts, Roel; Urbach, Christian; Brans, Boudewijn

    2015-01-01

    Painful pseudarthrosis is one of the most important indications for (revision) surgery after spinal fusion procedures. If pseudarthrosis is the source of recurrent pain it may require revision surgery. It is therefore of great clinical importance to ascertain if it is the source of such pain. The correlation between findings on conventional imaging (plain radiography and CT) and clinical well-being has been shown to be moderate. The goal of this study was to determine the possible role of 18 F-fluoride PET in patients after lumbar spinal interbody fusion by investigating the relationship between PET/CT findings and clinical function and pain. A cohort of 36 patients was retrospectively included in the study after 18 F-fluoride PET/CT for either persistent or recurrent low back pain (18 patients) or during routine postoperative investigation (18 patients) between 9 and 76 months and 11 and 14 months after posterior lumbar interbody fusion, respectively. Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 156 - 263 MBq (mean 199 MBq, median 196 MBq) 18 F-fluoride, PET and CT images were acquired using an integrated PET/CT scanner, followed by a diagnostic CT scan. Two observers independently scored the images. The number of bony bridges between vertebrae was scored on the CT images to quantify interbody fusion (0, 1 or 2). Vertebral endplate and intervertebral disc space uptake were evaluated visually as well as semiquantitatively following 18 F-fluoride PET. Findings on PET and CT were correlated with clinical wellbeing as measured by validated questionnaires concerning general daily functioning (Oswestry Disability Index), pain (visual analogue scale) and general health status (EuroQol). Patients were divided into three categories based on these questionnaire scores. No correlation was found between symptom severity and fusion status. However, 18 F-fluoride activity in the vertebral endplates was significantly higher in patients in the lowest Oswestry Disability Index

  19. Comparison of the prognostic values of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Punit; Naswa, Niraj; Kc, Sudhir Suman; Yadav, Yashwant; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India); Alvarado, Luis Andres; Dwivedi, Alok Kumar [Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, El Paso, TX (United States); Ammini, Ariachery C. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, New Delhi (India)

    2014-12-15

    To determine the prognostic value of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT in patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET), and to compare the prognostic value with that of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and other conventional clinicopathological prognostic factors. Data from 37 consecutive patients (age 46.6 ± 13.5 years, 51 % men) with well-differentiated NET who underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT were analyzed. All patients underwent a baseline visit with laboratory and radiological examinations. Clinical and imaging follow-up was performed in all patients. Progression-free survival (PFS) was measured from the date of the first PET/CT scan to the first documentation of progression of disease. {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was positive in 37 of the 37 patients and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 21. During follow-up 10 patients (27 %) showed progression of disease and 27 (73 %) showed no progression (24 stable disease, 3 partial response). The median follow-up was 25 months (range 2 - 52 months). Among the variables evaluated none was significantly different between the progressive disease and nonprogressive disease groups, with only SUVmax on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT being borderline significant (P = 0.073). In the univariate analysis for PFS outcome, SUVmax on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT (HR 0.122, 95 % CI 0.019 - 0.779; P = 0.026) and histopathological tumor grade (HR 4.238, 95 % CI 1.058 - 16.976; P = 0.041) were found to be associated with PFS. Other factors including age, sex, primary site, Ki-67 index, TNM stage, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT status (positive/negative), SUVmax on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and type of treatment were not significant. In multivariable analysis, only SUVmax on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was found to be an independent positive predictor of PFS (HR 0.122, 95 % CI 0.019 - 0.779; P = 0.026). SUVmax measured on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT is an independent, positive prognostic factor in patients with well-differentiated NET and

  20. Present and future aspects of PET examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tomio

    2003-01-01

    The PET examination gives the body distribution image of a compound labeled with the positron emitter manufactured by cyclotron. Recently, PET with F18-deoxyglucose (FDG) attracts considerable attention because the imaging is particularly useful for cancer detection. Since the technique was authorized by the United States (US) official health insurance in 1998, the number of the examination is increasing, which is also under similar situation in Japan due to the latest partial authorization for some malignant tumors. In Japan, about 30,000 examinations per year are carried out, half of which, in private hospitals. Their purpose is increasingly for cancer detection. For future PET examination, awaited are improvement of PET camera and development of a novel imaging agent. PET/CT imaging is for the former and F18-α-methyltyrosine, for the latter. Miniaturization of cyclotron, FDG delivery system, improved FDG synthetic method, popularization of PET/CT, development of PET camera for health examination, clinical trial of a novel imaging agent, and spread of PET health examination and operation of PET Center, are expected for future progress of PET technique. (N.I.)

  1. The value of f-18 FDG PET /CT in the assessment of recurrent ovarian cancer after cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hae Won; Zeon, Seok Kil; Won, Kyoung Sook

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and clinical impact of integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) for detection of recurrent ovarian carcinoma after cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy. Medical records of 39 patients (age, 54.912.6 years) with previously treated ovarian cancer who underwent integrated PET/CT between April 1, 2007 and June 30, 2007 were reviewed retrospectively. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT was performed for the evaluation of suspected recurrence. Imaging findings were compared with results of histological examination after surgical exploration or clinical follow-up to determine the diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT in the evaluation of disease status. The clinical impact of information provided by PET/CT on patient management was assessed on the basis of clinical follow up data concerning further diagnostic or therapeutic approach. Sixteen of the 39 patients had documented recurrence during surgical exploration or clinical follow-up. Of the 16 patients with recurrence, 14 patients showed suspected lesions on PET/CT. Twenty-three of the 39 patients had no evidence of recurrent tumor during surgical exploration or clinical follow-up, and two of the 23 patients with no recurrent tumor showed suspected lesions on PET/CT. The overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of PET/CT were 87.5 %, 91.3 %, 89.7 %, 87.5 % and 91.3 %, respectively. PET/CT modified the diagnostic or treatment plan in 15 (38.4 %) patients, by leading to the use of previously unplanned therapeutic procedures in 10 (66.7 %) patients and the avoidance of previously planned diagnostic procedures in 5 (33.3 %) patients. Integrated FDG PET/CT has high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of recurrent ovarian cancer. Thus, it is likely to play a significant role in management of recurrent ovarian cancer

  2. Diagnostic and prognostic value of baseline FDG PET/CT skeletal textural features in diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aide, Nicolas; Talbot, Marjolaine; Fruchart, Christophe; Damaj, Gandhi; Lasnon, Charline

    2018-05-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of skeletal textural features (TFs) on baseline FDG PET in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients. Eighty-two patients with DLBCL who underwent a bone marrow biopsy (BMB) and a PET scan between December 2008 and December 2015 were included. Two readers blinded to the BMB results visually assessed PET images for bone marrow involvement (BMI) in consensus, and a third observer drew a volume of interest (VOI) encompassing the axial skeleton and the pelvis, which was used to assess skeletal TFs. ROC analysis was used to determine the best TF able to diagnose BMI among four first-order, six second-order and 11 third-order metrics, which was then compared for diagnosis and prognosis in disease-free patients (BMB-/PET-) versus patients considered to have BMI (BMB+/PET-, BMB-/PET+, and BMB+/PET+). Twenty-two out of 82 patients (26.8%) had BMI: 13 BMB-/PET+, eight BMB+/PET+ and one BMB+/PET-. Among the nine BMB+ patients, one had discordant BMI identified by both visual and TF PET assessment. ROC analysis showed that SkewnessH, a first-order metric, was the best parameter for identifying BMI with sensitivity and specificity of 81.8% and 81.7%, respectively. SkewnessH demonstrated better discriminative power over BMB and PET visual analysis for patient stratification: hazard ratios (HR), 3.78 (P = 0.02) versus 2.81 (P = 0.06) for overall survival (OS) and HR, 3.17 (P = 0.03) versus 1.26 (P = 0.70) for progression-free survival (PFS). In multivariate analysis accounting for IPI score, bulky status, haemoglobin and SkewnessH, the only independent predictor of OS was the IPI score, while the only independent predictor of PFS was SkewnessH. The better discriminative power of skeletal heterogeneity for risk stratification compared to BMB and PET visual analysis in the overall population, and more specifically in BMB-/PET- patients, suggests that it can be useful to identify diagnostically

  3. PET Performance Evaluation of an MR-Compatible PET Insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yibao; Catana, Ciprian; Farrell, Richard; Dokhale, Purushottam A.; Shah, Kanai S.; Qi, Jinyi; Cherry, Simon R.

    2010-01-01

    A magnetic resonance (MR) compatible positron emission tomography (PET) insert has been developed in our laboratory for simultaneous small animal PET/MR imaging. This system is based on lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillator arrays with position-sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) photodetectors. The PET performance of this insert has been measured. The average reconstructed image spatial resolution was 1.51 mm. The sensitivity at the center of the field of view (CFOV) was 0.35%, which is comparable to the simulation predictions of 0.40%. The average photopeak energy resolution was 25%. The scatter fraction inside the MRI scanner with a line source was 12% (with a mouse-sized phantom and standard 35 mm Bruker 1H RF coil), 7% (with RF coil only) and 5% (without phantom or RF coil) for an energy window of 350–650 keV. The front-end electronics had a dead time of 390 ns, and a trigger extension dead time of 7.32 μs that degraded counting rate performance for injected doses above ~0.75 mCi (28 MBq). The peak noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) of 1.27 kcps was achieved at 290 μCi (10.7 MBq). The system showed good imaging performance inside a 7-T animal MRI system; however improvements in data acquisition electronics and reduction of the coincidence timing window are needed to realize improved NECR performance. PMID:21072320

  4. Clinical Application of F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) in Malignancy of Unknown Origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Il

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis of primary origin site in the management of malignancy of unknown origin (MUO) is the most important issue. According to the histopathologic subtype of primary lesion, specialized treatment can be given and survival gain is expected. F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) has been estimated as useful in detection of primary lesion with high sensitivity and moderate specificity. F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) study before conventional studies is also recommended because it has high diagnostic performance compared to conventional studies. Although there has few data, F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) is expected to be useful in diagnosis of recurrence, restaging, evaluation of treatment effect, considering that PET (PET/CT) has been reported as useful in other malignancies

  5. Comparison between PET/MR and PET/CT in evaluation of oncological patients%PET/MR与PET/CT的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐白萱; 富丽萍; 关志伟; 尹大一; 刘家金; 杨晖; 张锦明; 陈英茂; 安宁豫

    2014-01-01

    Objective To verify the feasibility of the integrated PET/MR for oncological applications by comparing PET/MR with PET/CT in terms of lesion detection and quantitative measurement.Methods A total of 277 patients (165 males,112 females,average age (52.9± 12.6) years) voluntarily participated in this same-day PET/CT and PET/MR comparative study.The time interval between the two studies was 15-35 min.PET/CT images were acquired and reconstructed following standard protocols.PET/MR covered the body trunk with a sequence combination of transverse T1 weighted imaging (WI) 3D-volumetric interpolated breath-hold,T2WI turbo spin echo with fat saturation,diffusion-weighted imaging,and simultaneous PET acquisition.PET images were reconstructed by vender-provided attenuation correction methods.The results of PET/CT and PET/MR were regarded as positive if any modality (CT,PET or MRI) was positive.SUVmax was obtained by the manually drawn ROI.Detection rates were compared with x2 test and SUVmax from the two modalities was analyzed with Spearman correlation analysis.Results A total of 353 lesions were detected in 220 patients.Compared to PET/CT,PET/MR revealed 30 additional true-positive lesions,while missed 6.The detection rates between PET/CT and PET/MR were significantly different (P<0.05).The lesion-based and patient-based consistency was 89.8% (317/353) and 85.9% (189/220),respectively.There were significant correlations of SUVmax between PET/MR and PET/CT for lesions(rs =0.91,P<0.01) and for normal tissues(rs =0.62-0.76,all P<0.01).Conclusions With reference to PET/CT,integrated PET/MR may provide comparable semi-quantitative measurements of pathological lesions as well as normal tissues.Integrated PET/MR may be more effective to detect lesions in abdomen and pelvis.%目的 通过与PET/CT在病灶检测及定量分析方面的比较,论证PET/MR一体机应用于临床的可行性.方法 2012年5月至2013年2月共300例患者同天间隔15 ~ 35 min行PET

  6. PET radioligands for imaging of Tau pathology: Current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Yearn Seong [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Han [Dept. of Health Sciences and Technology, SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The incidence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, continues to soar with the rapid growth of the elderly population, thus creating an enormous social and economic burden. Although disease-modifying drugs to treat AD are not yet available, several candidate drugs are in clinical trials. Most of these drugs are expected to be effective at the early stages of the disease, and therefore the early and accurate diagnosis of AD will be a critical factor in efforts to improve the prognosis of patients with AD. This review focuses on lead radioligands developed to date and their preclinical data in order to facilitate the development of tau-specific positron emission tomography radioligands that are of great interest to the scientific community.

  7. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/contrast enhanced CT in the standard surveillance of high risk colorectal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez Londoño, Germán Andrés, E-mail: gjimenez91@yahoo.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real (Spain); García Vicente, Ana María [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real (Spain); Sánchez Pérez, Victoria [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real (Spain); Jiménez Aragón, Fátima [Department of Radiology, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real (Spain); León Martin, Alberto [Investigation Unit, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real (Spain); Cano Cano, Juana María [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real (Spain); Domínguez Ferreras, Esther [Department of Radiology, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real (Spain); Gómez López, Ober Van [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real (Spain); Espinosa Arranz, Javier [Department of Oncology, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real (Spain); Soriano Castrejón, Ángel María [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We assessed the accuracy of FDG-PET/contrast enhanced CT (FDG-PET/ceCT) in the detection of unsuspected recurrence of colorectal cancer. In regard to our knowledge, no previous experience has been reported about the combined acquisition and interpretation of a FDG-PET/ceCT in the surveillance of colorectal cancer. • We designed a prospective study and performed an individual and combined assessment of both techniques (PET and ceCT), in a patient-based analysis and a lesion-based analysis. • The value of PET and ceCT was found to be similar in the detection of unsuspected recurrence of CRC in a patient-based analysis. The most interesting of our result, is that the combined assessment of PET/ceCT improves the accuracy in the lesion-based analysis. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the accuracy of FDG-PET/contrast enhanced CT (FDG-PET/ceCT) in the detection of unsuspected recurrence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients with high risk of relapse. Methods: Thirty-three patients (14 females and 19 males, mean age: 62, range: 41–78), with CRC in complete remission, were prospectively included. All patients underwent FDG-PET/ceCT (58 studies). FDG-PET/ceCT was requested in the surveillance setting, and performed following a standardized protocol. A portal venous phase CT scan was performed after the injection of iodinated contrast agent. An individual and combined assessment of both techniques (PET and ceCT) was performed. Concordant and discordant findings of PET, ceCT and FDG-PET/ceCT were compared in a patient-based and a lesion-based analysis. The final diagnosis, recurrence or disease free status (DFS), were established by histopathology or clinical/radiological follow-up of at least 6 months. Results: Seven out of 33 patients had a confirmed recurrence and the rest of patients had a DFS. In a patient-based analysis the sensitivity and specificity of PET, ceCT and PET/ceCT was of 86% and 88%, 86% and 92%, 86% and 85%, respectively. Attending to

  8. Laboratory and cyclotron requirements for PET research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlyer, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The requirements for carrying out PET research can vary widely depending on the type of basic research being carried out and the extent of a clinical program at a particular center. The type of accelerator and laboratory facilities will, of course, depend on the exact mix. These centers have been divided into four categories. 1. Clinical PET with no radionuclide production facilities, 2. clinical PET with some radionuclide production facilities, 3. clinical PET with research support, and 4. a PET research facility developing new tracers and exploring clinical applications. Guidelines for the choice of an accelerator based on these categories and the practical yields of the common nuclear reactions for production of PET isotopes have been developed and are detailed. Guidelines as to the size and physical layout of the laboratory space necessary for the synthesis of various radiopharmaceuticals have also been developed and are presented. Important utility and air flow considerations are explored

  9. Utility of PET in gynecological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woon

    2002-01-01

    Clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) is rapidly increasing for the detection and staging of cancer at whole-body studies performed with 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). Although many cancers can be detected by FDG-PET, there has been limited clinical experience with FDG-PET for the detection of gynecological cancers including malignancies in uterus and ovary. FDG-PET can show foci of metastatic disease that may not be apparent at conventional anatomic imaging and can aid in the characterization of indeterminate soft-tissue masses. Most gynecological cancers need to surgical management. FDG-PET can improve the selection of patients for surgical treatment and thereby reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with inappropriate surgery. FDG-PET is also useful for the early detection of recurrence and the monitoring of therapeutic effect. In this review, I discuss the clinical feasibility and imitations of this imaging modality in patients with gynecological cancers

  10. Application of PET in brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, June Key

    2002-01-01

    The annual incidence of primary brain tumors is 7-19 cases per 100,000 people. The unique capacity of visualizing biochemical processes allows PET to determine functional metabolic activities of the brain tumors. Like other malignant tumors, F-18 FDG has been used commonly in the imaging of brain tumors. FDG PET is valuable in grading malignancy, predicting prognosis, monitoring treatment, differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation nucrosis, and detecting primary lesion in metastatric brain tumors. Among amino acids labeled with positron emitters, C-11 methionine is used clinically.Tumor delineation is much better with methionine PET than with FDG PET. Low grade gliomas, in particular, are better evaluated with methionine than with FDG. PET opens another dimension in brain tumor imaging. PET imaging has clearly entered the clinical area with a profound impact on patient care in many indications

  11. Towards enhanced PET quantification in clinical oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaidi, Habib; Karakatsanis, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    is still a matter of debate. Quantitative PET has advanced elegantly during the last two decades and is now reaching the maturity required for clinical exploitation, particularly in oncology where it has the capability to open many avenues for clinical diagnosis, assessment of response to treatment...... and therapy planning. Therefore, the preservation and further enhancement of the quantitative features of PET imaging is crucial to ensure that the full clinical value of PET imaging modality is utilized in clinical oncology. Recent advancements in PET technology and methodology have paved the way for faster...... PET acquisitions of enhanced sensitivity to support the clinical translation of highly quantitative 4D parametric imaging methods in clinical oncology. In this report, we provide an overview of recent advances and future trends in quantitative PET imaging in the context of clinical oncology. The pros...

  12. PET/MRI in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Loft, Annika; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Combined PET/MRI systems are now commercially available and are expected to change the medical imaging field by providing combined anato-metabolic image information. We believe this will be of particular relevance in imaging of cancer patients. At the Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear...... described include brain tumors, pediatric oncology as well as lung, abdominal and pelvic cancer. In general the cases show that PET/MRI performs well in all these types of cancer when compared to PET/CT. However, future large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish when to use PET/MRI. We envision...... that PET/MRI in oncology will prove to become a valuable addition to PET/CT in diagnosing, tailoring and monitoring cancer therapy in selected patient populations....

  13. Pet Store Loyalty in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Leong, Yuen Yee

    2010-01-01

    Loyalty is open studied topic within the retailing and marketing discipline. A strong and profitable base of loyal customers is an asset to any organization, and is one of the epitomes of success for a company. The flourishing of large, specialty niche retailers like Starbucks, Victoria Secret and Barnes & Noble are stellar success stories that thrive on their troop of staunch followers. Pet retailing is a niche market which has its own interesting market characteristics. The emergence of ...

  14. First PET scans in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, Sergei

    2003-01-01

    First PET scans in Estonia were performed on 25th November 2002 in North Estonia Regional Hospital, Tallinn. Six patients with melanoma underwent scanning with FDG. This event was a result of thorough extensive preparations first started in 2000 during the European Association of Nuclear Medicine congress in Paris. During the congress first contacts were made with providers of mobile PET units. At the same time negotiations were begun with potential FDG suppliers. For the introduction of PET in Estonia mobile truckmounted scanning technology was chosen due to low level of initial investments. Of particular importance was also availability of maintenance personnel from the device providers. A significant prerequisite was potential availability of FDG from the neighbourhood - Finland and Sweden. The latter avoided the necessity for investments into local cyclotrons and local FDG production. For the first scanning experience the dedicated truckmounted PET-camera Accel, Siemens was brought by the International Hospital Group (IHG, Amersfoort, Netherlands). The device arrived by ferry from Stockholm to Tallinn harbour at 10 o'clock in the morning and left by ferry for Helsinki at 23 o'clock. The team-on-truck consisted of one technician for device operation, two drivers and two company representatives. North Estonia Regional Hospital provided three additional technicians for patient preparation and FDG injection, one nuclear medicine doctor and one specialist of biomedical engineering and medical physics. The FDG was provided by MAP Medical Technologies, Schering, Helsinki, Finland. The shipments were made by air. This was possible due to small distance between Tallinn and Helsinki of approximately 80 km due to the regular flight connections between the two cities. The FDG was shipped in two lots with a time interval of 4 hours. The patient selection was based on clinical and histopathology data. In all six patients the exam was justified for detailied staging and

  15. SPECT and PET imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semah, F.

    2007-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging are very useful for the management of patients with medically refractory partial epilepsy. Presurgical evaluation of patients with medically refractory partial epilepsy often included PET imaging using FDG. The use of SPECT in these patients adds some more information and gives the clinicians the possibility of having ictal imaging. Furthermore, PET and SPECT imaging are performed to better understand the pathophysiology of epilepsy. (authors)

  16. Human salmonellosis associated with exotic pets.

    OpenAIRE

    Woodward, D L; Khakhria, R; Johnson, W M

    1997-01-01

    During the period from 1994 to 1996, an increase in the number of laboratory-confirmed cases of human salmonellosis associated with exposure to exotic pets including iguanas, pet turtles, sugar gliders, and hedgehogs was observed in Canada. Pet turtle-associated salmonellosis was recognized as a serious public health problem in the 1960s and 1970s, and in February 1975 legislation banning the importation of turtles into Canada was enacted by Agriculture Canada. Reptile-associated salmonellosi...

  17. Effect of Attenuation Correction on Regional Quantification Between PET/MR and PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teuho, Jarmo; Johansson, Jarkko; Linden, Jani

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A spatial bias in brain PET/MR exists compared with PET/CT, because of MR-based attenuation correction. We performed an evaluation among 4 institutions, 3 PET/MR systems, and 4 PET/CT systems using an anthropomorphic brain phantom, hypothesizing that the spatial bias would be minimized....../MR systems, CTAC was applied as the reference method for attenuation correction. RESULTS: With CTAC, visual and quantitative differences between PET/MR and PET/CT systems were minimized. Intersystem variation between institutions was +3.42% to -3.29% in all VOIs for PET/CT and +2.15% to -4.50% in all VOIs...... for PET/MR. PET/MR systems differed by +2.34% to -2.21%, +2.04% to -2.08%, and -1.77% to -5.37% when compared with a PET/CT system at each institution, and these differences were not significant (P ≥ 0.05). CONCLUSION: Visual and quantitative differences between PET/MR and PET/CT systems can be minimized...

  18. The application of PET and PET-CT in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jianmin; Pan Liping; Li Dongxue

    2007-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the common malignancies in woman, 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET is a well-established method for detecting, staging, cancer recurrence, therapeutic response and prognosis of cervical cancer. PET-CT can accurately locate the anatomical sites of tracer uptake and improve the diagnostic accuraccy of PET. (authors)

  19. Evacuating People and Their Pets: Older Floridians' Need for and Proximity to Pet-Friendly Shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Rachel; Kocatepe, Ayberk; Barrett, Anne E; Ozguven, Eren Erman; Gumber, Clayton

    2017-10-04

    Pets influence evacuation decisions, but little is known about pet-friendly emergency shelters' availability or older adults' need for them. Our study addresses this issue, focusing on the most densely populated area of Florida (Miami-Dade)-the state with the oldest population and greatest hurricane susceptibility. We use Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based methodology to identify the shortest paths to pet-friendly shelters, based on distance and congested and uncongested travel times-taking into account the older population's spatial distribution. Logistic regression models using the 2013 American Housing Survey's Disaster Planning Module examine anticipated shelter use as a function of pet ownership and requiring pet evacuation assistance. Thirty-four percent of older adults in the Miami-Dade area have pets-35% of whom report needing pet evacuation assistance. However, GIS accessibility measures show that travel time factors are likely to impede older adults' use of the area's few pet-friendly shelters. Logistic regression results reveal that pet owners are less likely to report anticipating shelter use; however, the opposite holds for pet owners reporting they would need help evacuating their pets-they anticipate using shelters. High pet shelter need coupled with low availability exacerbates older adults' heightened vulnerability during Florida's hurricane season. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. PET-COMPTON System. Comparative evaluation with PET System using Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Garcia, Angelina; Arista Romeu, Eduardo; Abreu Alfonso, Yamiel; Leyva Fabelo, Antonio; Pinnera HernAndez, Ibrahin; Bolannos Perez, Lourdes; Rubio Rodriguez, Juan A.; Perez Morales, Jose M.; Arce Dubois, Pedro; Vela Morales, Oscar; Willmott Zappacosta, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in small animals has actually achieved spatial resolution round about 1 mm and currently there are under study different approaches to improve this spatial resolution. One of them combines PET technology with Compton Cameras. This paper presents the idea of the so called PET-Compton systems and has included comparative evaluation of spatial resolution and global efficiency in both PET and PET-Compton system by means of Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 code. Simulation was done on a PET-Compton system made-up of LYSO-LuYAP scintillating detectors of particular small animal PET scanner named Clear-PET and for Compton detectors based on CdZnTe semiconductor. A group of radionuclides that emits a positron (e+) and quantum almost simultaneously and fulfills some selection criteria for their possible use in PET-Compton systems for medical and biological applications were studied under simulation conditions. By means of analytical reconstruction using SSRB (Single Slide Rebinning) method were obtained superior spatial resolution in PET-Compton system for all tested radionuclides (reaching sub-millimeter values of for 22Na source). However this analysis done by simulation have shown limited global efficiency values in PET-Compton system (in the order of 10 -5 -10 -6 %) instead of values around 5*10 -1 % that have been achieved in PET system. (author)

  1. Processing and characterization of extruded PET and its r-PET and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of r-PET and r-PET+ MWCNT fillers was obtained by the precipitation method using TFA as a solvent and acetone ... crystallinity in r-PET and decrease in chain entanglements. ..... insufficient to supply the complete information of the surface.

  2. Particle Accelerators for PET radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    The requirements set for particle accelerators for production of radioactive isotopes for PET can easily be derived from first principles. The simple general need is for proton beams with energy in the region 10–20 MeV and current 20–100 microAmps. This is most reliably and cost-effectively achie......The requirements set for particle accelerators for production of radioactive isotopes for PET can easily be derived from first principles. The simple general need is for proton beams with energy in the region 10–20 MeV and current 20–100 microAmps. This is most reliably and cost......-effectively achieved by the well proven technology of the compact medical cyclotron, presently available from several companies. The main features of these cyclotrons are essential similar: resistive, sector focused iron magnets, internal negative ion sources and stripping extraction. The remaining differences between...... different manufacturers will be discussed the light of what is actually needed for a given PET site operation. Alternatives to the conventional cyclotron have been proposed and tested but have at present very limited use. These alternatives will be discussed, as well as the future possibilities of supplying...

  3. Cancer screening with FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, M.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: This study is based on medical health check-up and cancer screening on of a medical health club using PET, MRI, spiral CT and other conventional examinations. Methods: Between October 1994 and June 2005, 9357 asymptomatic members of the health club participated in 24772 screening session (5693 men and 3664 women, mean age 52.2±10.4 years). Results: Malignant tumors were discovered in 296 of the 9357 participants (3.16%) and 24772 screening sessions (1.19%). The detection rate of our program is much higher than that of mass screening in Japan. The thyroid, lung, colon and breast cancers were PET positive, but the prostate, renal and bladder cancers were generally PET negative. Conclusion: FDG-PET has the potential to detect a wide variety of cancers at curable stages in asymptomatic individuals. To reduce false-positive and false-negative results of PET examination, there is a need of experienced radiologist and/or oncologists who had training in the wide aspect of FDG-PET. FDG-PET has limitations in the detection of urological cancers, cancers of low cell density, small cancers and hypo metabolic or FDG non-avid cancers. Therefore, conventional examinations and/or PET/CT are also needed for cancer screening in association with FDG-PET

  4. PET scanning in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodaki, Eirini; Eirini, Liodaki; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Emmanouil, Liodakis; Papadopoulos, Othonas; Othonas, Papadopoulos; Machens, Hans-Günther; Hans-Günther, Machens; Papadopulos, Nikolaos A; Nikolaos, Papadopulos A

    2012-02-01

    In this report we highlight the use of PET scan in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PET scanning is a very important tool in plastic surgery oncology (melanoma, soft-tissue sarcomas and bone sarcomas, head and neck cancer, peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities and breast cancer after breast esthetic surgery), as diagnosis, staging, treatment planning and follow-up of cancer patients is based on imaging. PET scanning seems also to be useful as a flap monitoring system as well as an infection's imaging tool, for example in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. PET also contributes to the understanding of pathophysiology of keloids which remain a therapeutic challenge.

  5. Progress of PET imaging in Schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Li; Gao Shuo

    2011-01-01

    PET is an important functional neuroimaging technique that can be used to assessment of cerebral metabolic activity and blood flow and identifies the distribution of important neurotransmitters in the human brain. Compared with other conventional imaging techniques, PET enables regional cerebral glucose metabolism, blood flow, dopaminergic and serotonergic receptor function to be assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. In recent years, PET increasingly being used greatly to advance our understanding of the neurobiology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia. This review focuses on the use of PET tracers in identifying regional brain abnormalities and regions associated with cognitive functioning in schizophrenia. (authors)

  6. PET-MRI and multimodal cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Taisong; Zhao Jinhua; Song Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Multimodality imaging, specifically PET-CT, brought a new perspective into the fields of clinical imaging. Clinical cases have shown that PET-CT has great value in clinical diagnosis and experimental research. But PET-CT still bears some limitations. A major drawback is that CT provides only limited soft tissue contrast and exposes the patient to a significant radiation dose. MRI overcome these limitations, it has excellent soft tissue contrast, high temporal and spatial resolution and no radiation damage. Additionally, since MRI provides also functional information, PET-MRI will show a new direction of multimodality imaging in the future. (authors)

  7. Investigation progress of PET reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yumei; Huang Gang

    2006-01-01

    Molecular imaging for gene therapy and gene expression has been more and more attractive, while the use of gene therapy has been widely investigated and intense research have allowed it to the clinical setting in the last two-decade years. In vivo imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) by combination of appropriate PET reporter gene and PET reporter probe could provide qualitative and quantitative information for gene therapy. PET imaging could also obtain some valuable parameters not available by other techniques. This technology is useful to understand the process and development of gene therapy and how to apply it into clinical practice in the future. (authors)

  8. Dynamic observation by PET in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Ishijima, Buichi; Iio, Masaaki.

    1990-01-01

    Before the era when positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged, much controversy has existed concerning regional cerebral blood flow in partial epilepsy. In 1979, PET revealed that cerebral blood flow is decreased during the interictal period, but is remarkably increased in the intraictal phase. In this paper, historical process of dynamic observation in epilepsy is reviewed. Potential use and limitations of PET in the clinical setting are discussed in view of the scanning methods and the relationships between PET and electroencephalograms, magnetic resonance imaging, and surgical treatment. (N.K.) 106 refs

  9. Decay correction methods in dynamic PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.; Reiman, E.; Lawson, M.

    1995-01-01

    In order to reconstruct positron emission tomography (PET) images in quantitative dynamic studies, the data must be corrected for radioactive decay. One of the two commonly used methods ignores physiological processes including blood flow that occur at the same time as radioactive decay; the other makes incorrect use of time-accumulated PET counts. In simulated dynamic PET studies using 11 C-acetate and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), these methods are shown to result in biased estimates of the time-activity curve (TAC) and model parameters. New methods described in this article provide significantly improved parameter estimates in dynamic PET studies

  10. Blind source separation analysis of PET dynamic data: a simple method with exciting MR-PET applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oros-Peusquens, Ana-Maria; Silva, Nuno da [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Weiss, Carolin [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Cologne, 50924 Cologne (Germany); Stoffels, Gabrielle; Herzog, Hans; Langen, Karl J [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Shah, N Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    Denoising of dynamic PET data improves parameter imaging by PET and is gaining momentum. This contribution describes an analysis of dynamic PET data by blind source separation methods and comparison of the results with MR-based brain properties.

  11. Colorectal cancer staging: comparison of whole-body PET/CT and PET/MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Onofrio A; Coutinho, Artur M; Sahani, Dushyant V; Vangel, Mark G; Gee, Michael S; Hahn, Peter F; Witzel, Thomas; Soricelli, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco; Catana, Ciprian; Mahmood, Umar; Rosen, Bruce R; Gervais, Debra

    2017-04-01

    Correct staging is imperative for colorectal cancer (CRC) since it influences both prognosis and management. Several imaging methods are used for this purpose, with variable performance. Positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance (PET/MR) is an innovative imaging technique recently employed for clinical application. The present study was undertaken to compare the staging accuracy of whole-body positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) with whole-body PET/MR in patients with both newly diagnosed and treated colorectal cancer. Twenty-six patients, who underwent same day whole-body (WB) PET/CT and WB-PET/MR, were evaluated. PET/CT and PET/MR studies were interpreted by consensus by a radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician. Correlations with prior imaging and follow-up studies were used as the reference standard. Correct staging was compared between methods using McNemar's Chi square test. The two methods were in agreement and correct for 18/26 (69%) patients, and in agreement and incorrect for one patient (3.8%). PET/MR and PET/CT stages for the remaining 7/26 patients (27%) were discordant, with PET/MR staging being correct in all seven cases. PET/MR significantly outperformed PET/CT overall for accurate staging (P = 0.02). PET/MR outperformed PET/CT in CRC staging. PET/MR might allow accurate local and distant staging of CRC patients during both at the time of diagnosis and during follow-up.

  12. Standardised uptake values from PET/CT images: comparison with conventional attenuation-corrected PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souvatzoglou, M.; Ziegler, S.I.; Martinez, M.J.; Dzewas, G.; Schwaiger, M.; Bengel, F.; Busch, R.

    2007-01-01

    In PET/CT, CT-derived attenuation factors may influence standardised uptake values (SUVs) in tumour lesions and organs when compared with stand-alone PET. Therefore, we compared PET/CT-derived SUVs intra-individually in various organs and tumour lesions with stand-alone PET-derived SUVs. Thirty-five patients with known or suspected cancer were prospectively included. Sixteen patients underwent FDG PET using an ECAT HR+scanner, and subsequently a second scan using a Biograph Sensation 16PET/CT scanner. Nineteen patients were scanned in the reverse order. All images were reconstructed with an iterative algorithm (OSEM). Suspected lesions were grouped as paradiaphragmatic versus distant from the diaphragm. Mean and maximum SUVs were also calculated for brain, lung, liver, spleen and vertebral bone. The attenuation coefficients (μ values) used for correction of emission data (bone, soft tissue, lung) in the two data sets were determined. A body phantom containing six hot spheres and one cold cylinder was measured using the same protocol as in patients. Forty-six lesions were identified. There was a significant correlation of maximum and mean SUVs derived from PET and PET/CT for 14 paradiaphragmatic lesions (r=0.97 respectively; p<0.001 respectively) and for 32 lesions located distant from the diaphragm (r=0.87 and r=0.89 respectively; p<0.001 respectively). No significant differences were observed in the SUVs calculated with PET and PET/CT in the lesions or in the organs. In the phantom, radioactivity concentration in spheres calculated from PET and from PET/CT correlated significantly (r=0.99; p<0.001). SUVs of cancer lesions and normal organs were comparable between PET and PET/CT, supporting the usefulness of PET/CT-derived SUVs for quantification of tumour metabolism. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of lesion detection and quantitation of tracer uptake between PET from a simultaneously acquiring whole-body PET/MR hybrid scanner and PET from PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesmueller, Marco; Schmidt, Daniela; Beck, Michael; Kuwert, Torsten; Gall, Carl C. von; Quick, Harald H.; Navalpakkam, Bharath; Lell, Michael M.; Uder, Michael; Ritt, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    PET/MR hybrid scanners have recently been introduced, but not yet validated. The aim of this study was to compare the PET components of a PET/CT hybrid system and of a simultaneous whole-body PET/MR hybrid system with regard to reproducibility of lesion detection and quantitation of tracer uptake. A total of 46 patients underwent a whole-body PET/CT scan 1 h after injection and an average of 88 min later a second scan using a hybrid PET/MR system. The radioactive tracers used were 18 F-deoxyglucose (FDG), 18 F-ethylcholine (FEC) and 68 Ga-DOTATATE (Ga-DOTATATE). The PET images from PET/CT (PET CT ) and from PET/MR (PET MR ) were analysed for tracer-positive lesions. Regional tracer uptake in these foci was quantified using volumes of interest, and maximal and average standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV avg , respectively) were calculated. Of the 46 patients, 43 were eligible for comparison and statistical analysis. All lesions except one identified by PET CT were identified by PET MR (99.2 %). In 38 patients (88.4 %), the same number of foci were identified by PET CT and by PET MR . In four patients, more lesions were identified by PET MR than by PET CT , in one patient PET CT revealed an additional focus compared to PET MR . The mean SUV max and SUV avg of all lesions determined by PET MR were by 21 % and 11 % lower, respectively, than the values determined by PET CT (p CT and PET MR were minor, but statistically significant. Nevertheless, a more detailed study of the quantitative accuracy of PET MR and the factors governing it is needed to ultimately assess its accuracy in measuring tissue tracer concentrations. (orig.)

  14. Head and neck imaging with PET and PET/CT: artefacts from dental metallic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerres, Gerhard W.; Hany, Thomas F.; Kamel, Ehab; Schulthess von, Gustav K.; Buck, Alfred

    2002-01-01

    Germanium-68 based attenuation correction (PET Ge68 ) is performed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for quantitative measurements. With the recent introduction of combined in-line PET/CT scanners, CT data can be used for attenuation correction. Since dental implants can cause artefacts in CT images, CT-based attenuation correction (PET CT ) may induce artefacts in PET images. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of dental metallic artwork on the quality of PET images by comparing non-corrected images and images attenuation corrected by PET Ge68 and PET CT . Imaging was performed on a novel in-line PET/CT system using a 40-mAs scan for PET CT in 41 consecutive patients with high suspicion of malignant or inflammatory disease. In 17 patients, additional PET Ge68 images were acquired in the same imaging session. Visual analysis of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) distribution in several regions of the head and neck was scored on a 4-point scale in comparison with normal grey matter of the brain in the corresponding PET images. In addition, artefacts adjacent to dental metallic artwork were evaluated. A significant difference in image quality scoring was found only for the lips and the tip of the nose, which appeared darker on non-corrected than on corrected PET images. In 33 patients, artefacts were seen on CT, and in 28 of these patients, artefacts were also seen on PET imaging. In eight patients without implants, artefacts were seen neither on CT nor on PET images. Direct comparison of PET Ge68 and PET CT images showed a different appearance of artefacts in 3 of 17 patients. Malignant lesions were equally well visible using both transmission correction methods. Dental implants, non-removable bridgework etc. can cause artefacts in attenuation-corrected images using either a conventional 68 Ge transmission source or the CT scan obtained with a combined PET/CT camera. We recommend that the non-attenuation-corrected PET images also be

  15. FDG PET and PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for tumour PET imaging: version 1.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boellaard, Ronald; O'Doherty, Mike J; Weber, Wolfgang A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a minimum standard for the acquisition and interpretation of PET and PET/CT scans with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). This guideline will therefore address general information about[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomogr...

  16. FDG PET and PET/CT : EANM procedure guidelines for tumour PET imaging: version 1.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boellaard, Ronald; O'Doherty, Mike J.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Mottaghy, Felix M.; Lonsdale, Markus N.; Stroobants, Sigrid G.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Kotzerke, Joerg; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Pruim, Jan; Marsden, Paul K.; Tatsch, Klaus; Hoekstra, Corneline J.; Visser, Eric P.; Arends, Bertjan; Verzijlbergen, Fred J.; Zijlstra, Josee M.; Comans, Emile F. I.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Paans, Anne M.; Willemsen, Antoon T.; Beyer, Thomas; Bockisch, Andreas; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Delbeke, Dominique; Baum, Richard P.; Chiti, Arturo; Krause, Bernd J.

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a minimum standard for the acquisition and interpretation of PET and PET/CT scans with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). This guideline will therefore address general information about [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed

  17. FDG PET and PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for tumour PET imaging: version 1.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boellaard, Ronald; O'Doherty, Mike J.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Mottaghy, Felix M.; Lonsdale, Markus N.; Stroobants, Sigrid G.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Kotzerke, Joerg; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Pruim, Jan; Marsden, Paul K.; Tatsch, Klaus; Hoekstra, Corneline J.; Visser, Eric P.; Arends, Bertjan; Verzijlbergen, Fred J.; Zijlstra, Josee M.; Comans, Emile F. I.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Paans, Anne M.; Willemsen, Antoon T.; Beyer, Thomas; Bockisch, Andreas; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Delbeke, Dominique; Baum, Richard P.; Chiti, Arturo; Krause, Bernd J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a minimum standard for the acquisition and interpretation of PET and PET/CT scans with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). This guideline will therefore address general information about[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed

  18. Adapting MR-BrainPET scans for comparison with conventional PET: experiences with dynamic FET-PET in brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Philipp; Herzog, Hans; Kops, Elena Rota; Stoffels, Gabriele; Filss, Christian [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Department of Neurology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Coenen, Heinrich H; Shah, N Jon; Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    Imaging results from subsequent measurements (preclinical 3T MR-BrainPET, HR+) are compared. O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) may exhibit non-uniform tracer uptake in gliomas. The aim was to analyse and adapt the physical properties of the scanners and study variations of biological tumour volume (BTV) in early and late FET-PET.

  19. FDG PET and PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for tumour PET imaging: version 1.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boellaard, R.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Weber, W.A.; Mottaghy, F.M.; Lonsdale, M.N.; Stroobants, S.G.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kotzerke, J.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Pruim, J.; Marsden, P.K.; Tatsch, K.; Hoekstra, C.J.; Visser, E.P.; Arends, B.; Verzijlbergen, F.J.; Zijlstra, J.M.; Comans, E.F.I.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Paans, A.M.; Willemsen, A.T.; Beyer, T.; Bockisch, A.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.; Delbeke, D.; Baum, R.P.; Chiti, A.; Krause, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide a minimum standard for the acquisition and interpretation of PET and PET/CT scans with [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). This guideline will therefore address general information about [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed

  20. A proposal of an open PET geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaya, Taiga [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Inaniwa, Taku [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Minohara, Shinichi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Inadama, Naoko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Nishikido, Fumihiko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Shibuya, Kengo [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Lam, Chih Fung [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Murayama, Hideo [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan)

    2008-02-07

    The long patient port of a PET scanner tends to put stress on patients, especially patients with claustrophobia. It also prevents doctors and technicians from taking care of patients during scanning. In this paper, we proposed an 'open PET' geometry, which consists of two axially separated detector rings. A long and continuous field-of-view (FOV) including a 360 deg. opened gap between two detector rings can be imaged enabling a fully 3D image reconstruction of all the possible lines-of-response. The open PET will become practical if iterative image reconstruction methods are applied even though image reconstruction of the open PET is analytically an incomplete problem. First we implemented a 'masked' 3D ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM) in which the system matrix was obtained from a long 'gapless' scanner by applying a mask to detectors corresponding to the open space. Next, in order to evaluate imaging performance of the proposed open PET geometry, we simulated a dual HR+ scanner (ring diameter of D = 827 mm, axial length of W = 154 mm x 2) separated by a variable gap. The gap W was the maximum limit to have axially continuous FOV of 3W though the maximum diameter of FOV at the central slice was limited to D/2. Artifacts, observed on both sides of the open space when the gap exceeded W, were effectively reduced by inserting detectors partially into unnecessary open spaces. We also tested the open PET geometry using experimental data obtained by the jPET-D4. The jPET-D4 is a prototype brain scanner, which has 5 rings of 24 detector blocks. We simulated the open jPET-D4 with a gap of 66 mm by eliminating 1 block-ring from experimental data. Although some artifacts were seen at both ends of the opened gap, very similar images were obtained with and without the gap. The proposed open PET geometry is expected to lead to realization of in-beam PET, which is a method for an in situ monitoring of charged particle therapy, by

  1. Multiparametric PET imaging in thyroid malignancy characterizing tumour heterogeneity: somatostatin receptors and glucose metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Putzer, Daniel; Bale, Reto [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Dobrozemsky, Georg; Nilica, Bernhard; Kendler, Dorota; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    Radiolabelled somatostatin (SST) analogues have proven useful in diagnosing tumours positive for SST receptor (SSTR). As different subtypes of SSTR are expressed on the tumour cell surface, the choice of appropriate therapeutic SST analogue is crucial. We evaluated the SSTR status of thyroid cancer patients who had signs of progressive disease comparing different SSTR ligands for PET imaging to evaluate possible further therapeutic options. PET with {sup 68}Ga-radiolabelled SSTR ligands DOTA lanreotide (DOTA-LAN), DOTA-Tyr{sup 3} octreotide (DOTA-TOC) and {sup 18}F-FDG was performed in 31 patients with thyroid cancer (TC). These 31 patients comprised 18 with radioiodine non-avid differentiated TC (DTC) including 6 papillary TC (PTC), 8 follicular TC (FTC) and 4 oxyphilic TC (oxyTC), 5 with anaplastic TC (ATC), and 8 with medullary TC (MTC). The PET results were compared in a region-based evaluation. All patients underwent a PET study with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN, 28 patients with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC and 28 patients with {sup 18}F-FDG. A lack of SSTR expression was found in 13 of the 31 patients (42 %) with negative results with both SSTR tracers in 12 patients. Ambiguous results with both SSTR tracers were observed in one patient. High tracer uptake in SSTR PET images was seen in seven DTC patients (39 %; two PTC, three FTC, two oxyTC), in four ATC patients (80 %) and in six MTC patients (75 %). Lesions showing aerobic glycolysis on {sup 18}F-FDG PET were found in 24 of 28 patients (86 %) with corresponding positive results with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN in 35 % and with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC in 29 %. The heterogeneous SSTR profile of TC tumour lesions needs to be evaluated using different SSTR PET tracers to characterize more closely the SSTR subtype affinities in patients with progressive TC in order to further stratify therapy with SSTR therapeutics. (orig.)

  2. Survival outcomes in patients with cervical cancer after inclusion of PET/CT in staging procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Henrik Villibald [University of Copenhagen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Section for Radiotherapy, Rigshospitalet, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Loft, Annika [University of Copenhagen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Berthelsen, Anne Kiil [University of Copenhagen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); University of Copenhagen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [University of Copenhagen, The Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); University of Copenhagen, Biotech Research and Innovation Centre (BRIC), Copenhagen (Denmark); Hoegdall, Claus [University of Copenhagen, Department of Gynecology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Engelholm, Svend Aage [University of Copenhagen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-11-15

    In cancer of the uterine cervix, lymph node metastases are associated with a poor prognosis. Even so, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) does not take into account diagnostic results of methods such as PET/CT, since these are not readily available everywhere. As undetected lymph node metastases can lead to undertreatment, any difference in the underlying prevalence of false-negative scans between CT and PET/CT may be reflected in treatment outcomes. This study investigated survival outcomes in node-negative patients before and after the introduction of PET/CT. This was a single-institution retrospective analysis of 301 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of cervical cancer. The patients were receiving chemoradiotherapy with curative intent according to the standard protocol of the department for patients without lymph node metastases as assessed by pretreatment CT or PET/CT. Patients were stratified into two groups: PET/CT and non-PET/CT. Patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were acquired from the treatment database. Significant differences of 23 % (95 % CI 17 - 29 %), 19 % (95 % CI 13 - 25 %) and 12 % (95 % CI 6 - 18 %) in 5-year overall, disease-free and disease-specific survival, respectively, were observed between the two patient groups. The difference remained significant in univariate and multivariate analyses of overall survival (hazard ratio 0.61, 95 % CI 0.42 - 0.89; p = 0.010), including age, FIGO stage, performance status, BMI, and histopathology. Inclusion of PET/CT in the preradiotherapy diagnostic protocol may lead to nodal stage migration not reflected in the FIGO stage. It was found to be a significant covariate, and could lead to selection bias that needs to be taken into account when designing and reporting on clinical trials. (orig.)

  3. Clinical significance of pretreatment FDG PET/CT IN MOBG-avid pediatric neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seo Young; Kim, Yong Il; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, E. Edmund [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rahim, Muhammad Kashif [Nishtar Medical College and Hospital, Multan (Pakistan)

    2017-06-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging is well known to have clinical significance in the initial staging and response evaluation of the many kinds of neoplasms. However, its role in the pediatric neuroblastoma is not clearly defined. In the present study, the clinical significance of FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) in 123I- or 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG)-avid pediatric neuroblastoma was investigated. Twenty patients with neuroblastoma who undertook pretreatment FDG PET/CT at our institute between 2008 and 2015 and showed MIBG avidity were retrospectively enrolled in the present study. Clinical information—including histopathology, and serum markers—and several PET parameters—including SUVmax of the primary lesion (Psuv), target-to-background ratio (TBR), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and coefficient of variation (CV)—were analyzed. The prognostic effect of PET parameters was evaluated in terms of progression-free survival (PFS). Total 20 patients (4.5 ± 3.5 years) were divided as two groups by disease progression. Six patients (30.0 %) experienced disease progression and one patient (5.0 %) died during follow-up period. There were not statistically significant in age, stage, MYCN status, primary tumor size, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and ferritin level between two groups with progression or no progression. However, Psuv (p = 0.017), TBR (p = 0.09), MTV (p = 0.02), and CV (p = 0.036) showed significant differences between two groups. In univariate analysis, PFS was significantly associated with Psuv (p = 0.021) and TBR (p = 0.023). FDG-PET parameters were significantly related with progression of neuroblastoma. FDG-PET/CT may have the potential as a valuable modality for evaluating prognosis in the patients with MIBG-avid pediatric neuroblastoma.

  4. Survival outcomes in patients with cervical cancer after inclusion of PET/CT in staging procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Henrik Villibald; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Hoegdall, Claus; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2015-01-01

    In cancer of the uterine cervix, lymph node metastases are associated with a poor prognosis. Even so, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) does not take into account diagnostic results of methods such as PET/CT, since these are not readily available everywhere. As undetected lymph node metastases can lead to undertreatment, any difference in the underlying prevalence of false-negative scans between CT and PET/CT may be reflected in treatment outcomes. This study investigated survival outcomes in node-negative patients before and after the introduction of PET/CT. This was a single-institution retrospective analysis of 301 patients with a histopathological diagnosis of cervical cancer. The patients were receiving chemoradiotherapy with curative intent according to the standard protocol of the department for patients without lymph node metastases as assessed by pretreatment CT or PET/CT. Patients were stratified into two groups: PET/CT and non-PET/CT. Patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were acquired from the treatment database. Significant differences of 23 % (95 % CI 17 - 29 %), 19 % (95 % CI 13 - 25 %) and 12 % (95 % CI 6 - 18 %) in 5-year overall, disease-free and disease-specific survival, respectively, were observed between the two patient groups. The difference remained significant in univariate and multivariate analyses of overall survival (hazard ratio 0.61, 95 % CI 0.42 - 0.89; p = 0.010), including age, FIGO stage, performance status, BMI, and histopathology. Inclusion of PET/CT in the preradiotherapy diagnostic protocol may lead to nodal stage migration not reflected in the FIGO stage. It was found to be a significant covariate, and could lead to selection bias that needs to be taken into account when designing and reporting on clinical trials. (orig.)

  5. FDG-PET/CT in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients with suspected cyst infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijl, Jordy Pieter; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Slart, Riemer H J A; Kwee, Thomas Christian

    2018-04-13

    Purpose: To determine the value of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing renal or hepatic cyst infection in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Methods: This retrospective single-center study included all patients with ADPKD who underwent FDG-PET/CT because of suspected cyst infection between 2010 and 2017. Results: Thirty FDG-PET/CT scans of thirty individual patients were included, of which 19 were positive for cyst infection. According to a previously established clinical and biochemical reference standard, FDG-PET/CT achieved sensitivity of 88.9%, specificity of 75.0%, positive predictive value of 84.2%, and negative predictive value of 81.8% for the diagnosis of cyst infection. In 5 cases, FDG-PET/CT suggested a different pathologic process that explained the symptoms, including pneumonia ( n = 1), generalized peritonitis ( n = 1), pancreatitis ( n = 1), colitis ( n = 1), and cholangitis ( n = 1). Total duration of hospital stay and duration between FDG-PET/CT scan and hospital discharge of patients with an FDG-PET/CT scan positive for cyst infection were significantly longer than those with a negative scan ( P = 0.005 and P = 0.009, respectively). Creatinine levels were significantly higher in patients with an FDG-PET/CT scan positive for cyst infection than in patients with a negative scan ( P = 0.015). Other comparisons of clinical parameters (age, gender, presence of fever (>38.5°C) for more than 3 days, abdominal pain, history of solid organ transplantation and nephrectomy, immune status), laboratory values (C-reactive protein level (CRP), leukocyte count, estimated glomerular filtration rate), and microbiologic results (blood and urine cultures) were not significantly different ( P = 0.13-1.00) between FDG-PET/CT-positive and -negative patients. Conclusion: FDG-PET/CT is a useful and recommendable (upfront) imaging modality for the evaluation of

  6. Role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis of prolonged febrile states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaruskova, M.; Belohlavek, O.

    2006-01-01

    The role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in patients whose main symptom is prolonged fever has not yet been defined. We addressed this topic in a retrospective study. A total of 124 patients (referred between May 2001 and December 2004) with fever of unknown origin or prolonged fever due to a suspected infection of a joint or vascular prosthesis were included in the study. The patients underwent either FDG-PET or FDG-PET/CT scanning. Sixty-seven patients had a negative focal FDG-PET finding; in this group the method was regarded as unhelpful in determining a diagnosis, and no further investigation was pursued. We tried to obtain clinical confirmation for all patients with positive PET findings. Fifty-seven (46%) patients had positive FDG-PET findings. In six of them no further clinical information was available. Fifty-one patients with positive PET findings and 118 patients in total were subsequently evaluated. Systemic connective tissue disease was confirmed in 17 patients, lymphoma in three patients, inflammatory bowel disease in two patients, vascular prosthesis infection in seven patients, infection of a hip or knee replacement in seven patients, mycotic aneurysm in two patients, abscess in four patients and AIDS in one patient. In eight (16%) patients the finding was falsely positive. FDG-PET or PET/CT contributed to establishing a final diagnosis in 84% of the 51 patients with positive PET findings and in 36% of all 118 evaluated patients with prolonged fever. (orig.)

  7. Positron emission tomography (PET) in psychiatry. PET in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, K [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Neurologische Forschung und Neurologische Klinik der Universitaet Koeln (Germany)

    1993-08-13

    Currently, clinical PET is mainly useful in psychiatry and related areas for differential diagnosis of dementia. In dementia of Alzheimer type reductions of glucose metabolism are found mainly in the temporoparietal assocaiton cortex, in Pick's disease mainly in the frontal cortex, and in Huntington's disease in the striatum. Other demential diseases usually show less toposelective metabolic impairment. In the future, new diagnostic possibilities may arise from analysis of functional stimulation of specific brain areas and from the use of ligands for specific neurotransmitter systems. (orig.)

  8. Positron emission tomography (PET) in psychiatry. PET in der Psychiatrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, K. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Neurologische Forschung und Neurologische Klinik der Universitaet Koeln (Germany))

    1993-08-13

    Currently, clinical PET is mainly useful in psychiatry and related areas for differential diagnosis of dementia. In dementia of Alzheimer type reductions of glucose metabolism are found mainly in the temporoparietal assocaiton cortex, in Pick's disease mainly in the frontal cortex, and in Huntington's disease in the striatum. Other demential diseases usually show less toposelective metabolic impairment. In the future, new diagnostic possibilities may arise from analysis of functional stimulation of specific brain areas and from the use of ligands for specific neurotransmitter systems. (orig.)

  9. Indeterminate findings on oncologic PET/CT: What difference dose PET/MRI make?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraum, Tyler J.; Fowler, Kathryn J.; McConathy, Jonathan; Dehdashti, Farokh [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) has become the standard of care for the initial staging and subsequent treatment response assessment of many different malignancies. Despite this success, PET/CT is often supplemented by MRI to improve assessment of local tumor invasion and to facilitate detection of lesions in organs with high background FDG uptake. Consequently, PET/MRI has the potential to expand the clinical value of PET examinations by increasing reader certainty and reducing the need for subsequent imaging. This study evaluates the ability of FDG-PET/MRI to clarify findings initially deemed indeterminate on clinical FDG-PET/CT studies. A total of 190 oncology patients underwent whole-body PET/CT, immediately followed by PET/MRI utilizing the same FDG administration. Each PET/CT was interpreted by our institution's nuclear medicine service as a standard-of-care clinical examination. Review of these PET/CT reports identified 31 patients (16 %) with indeterminate findings. Two readers evaluated all 31 PET/CT studies, followed by the corresponding PET/MRI studies. A consensus was reached for each case, and changes in interpretation directly resulting from PET/MRI review were recorded. Interpretations were then correlated with follow-up imaging, pathology results, and other diagnostic studies. In 18 of 31 cases with indeterminate findings on PET/CT, PET/MRI resulted in a more definitive interpretation by facilitating the differentiation of infection/inflammation from malignancy (15/18), the accurate localization of FDG-avid lesions (2/18), and the characterization of incidental non-FDG-avid solid organ lesions (1/18). Explanations for improved reader certainty with PET/MRI included the superior soft tissue contrast of MRI and the ability to assess cellular density with diffusion-weighted imaging. The majority (12/18) of such cases had an appropriate standard of reference; in all 12 cases

  10. Indeterminate findings on oncologic PET/CT: What difference dose PET/MRI make?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraum, Tyler J.; Fowler, Kathryn J.; McConathy, Jonathan; Dehdashti, Farokh

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 2-deoxy-2-["1"8F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) has become the standard of care for the initial staging and subsequent treatment response assessment of many different malignancies. Despite this success, PET/CT is often supplemented by MRI to improve assessment of local tumor invasion and to facilitate detection of lesions in organs with high background FDG uptake. Consequently, PET/MRI has the potential to expand the clinical value of PET examinations by increasing reader certainty and reducing the need for subsequent imaging. This study evaluates the ability of FDG-PET/MRI to clarify findings initially deemed indeterminate on clinical FDG-PET/CT studies. A total of 190 oncology patients underwent whole-body PET/CT, immediately followed by PET/MRI utilizing the same FDG administration. Each PET/CT was interpreted by our institution's nuclear medicine service as a standard-of-care clinical examination. Review of these PET/CT reports identified 31 patients (16 %) with indeterminate findings. Two readers evaluated all 31 PET/CT studies, followed by the corresponding PET/MRI studies. A consensus was reached for each case, and changes in interpretation directly resulting from PET/MRI review were recorded. Interpretations were then correlated with follow-up imaging, pathology results, and other diagnostic studies. In 18 of 31 cases with indeterminate findings on PET/CT, PET/MRI resulted in a more definitive interpretation by facilitating the differentiation of infection/inflammation from malignancy (15/18), the accurate localization of FDG-avid lesions (2/18), and the characterization of incidental non-FDG-avid solid organ lesions (1/18). Explanations for improved reader certainty with PET/MRI included the superior soft tissue contrast of MRI and the ability to assess cellular density with diffusion-weighted imaging. The majority (12/18) of such cases had an appropriate standard of reference; in all 12 cases, the

  11. The effectiveness of PET for the distinction of perirectal lymph node metastasis of rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dae Yong; Choi, Chang Woon

    1999-12-01

    If the effectiveness for the distinction of perirectal lymph node metastasis is proved to be higher than the previous conventional detection methods, likewise CT and endorectal ultrasound, more precise and more specific information will be taken by this new modality. Preoperative biopsy-proven rectal adenocarcinoma patients with or without distant metastasis were included for this study. For the effectiveness of PET for the distinction of perirectal lymph node metastasis, CT and endorectal ultrasound versus findings of perirectal lymph node status were compared with permanent pathology results. The findings of preoperative conventional methods showed that 8 patients had not preirectal lymph node metastasis and 6 patients and perirectal lymph node metastasis. The accuracy of conventional methods was 50 % compared with 37.5 % of that of PET in the case of 8 patients. In the case of 6 patients, accuracy was 100 % in the conventional methods and 66.7 % in PET study. Overall sensitivity and specificity were 60 % and 100 % in the conventional methods and 40 % and 75 % in PET study respectively. Therefore, PET is not effective for the distinction of L/N metastasis of rectal cancer comparing with conventional methods such as CT and ERUS preoperatively.

  12. Choline-PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer; Cholin-PET/CT zur Bildgebung des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Bernd Joachim [Klinik- und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Treiber, U.; Schwarzenboeck, S.; Souvatzoglou, M. [Klinik fuer Urologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives are increasingly being used for imaging of prostate cancer. The value of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer has been examined in many studies and demonstrates an increasing importance. Primary prostate cancer can be detected with moderate sensitivity using PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives - the differentiation between benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis or high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is not always possible. At the present time [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT is not recommended in the primary setting but may be utilized in clinically suspected prostate cancer with repeatedly negative prostate biopsies, in preparation of a focused re-biopsy. Promising results have been obtained for the use of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in patients with biochemical recurrence. The detection rate of choline PET and PET/CT for local, regional, and distant recurrence in patients with a biochemical recurrence shows a linear correlation with PSA values at the time of imaging and reaches about 75% in patients with PSA > 3 ng/mL. At PSA values below 1 ng/mL, the recurrence can be diagnosed with choline PET/CT in approximately 1/3 of the patients. PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]choline derivates can be helpful for choosing a therapeutic strategy in the sense of an individualized treatment: since an early diagnosis of recurrence is crucial to the choice of optimal treatment. The localization of the site of recurrence - local recurrence, lymph node metastasis or systemic dissemination - has important influence on the therapy regimen. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of attenuation correction in cardiac PET using PET/MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jeffrey M C; Laforest, R; Sotoudeh, H; Nie, X; Sharma, S; McConathy, J; Novak, E; Priatna, A; Gropler, R J; Woodard, P K

    2017-06-01

    Simultaneous acquisition Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) is a new technology that has potential as a tool both in research and clinical diagnosis. However, cardiac PET acquisition has not yet been validated using MR imaging for attenuation correction (AC). The goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of PET imaging using a standard 2-point Dixon volume interpolated breathhold examination (VIBE) MR sequence for AC. Evaluation was performed in both phantom and patient data. A chest phantom containing heart, lungs, and a lesion insert was scanned by both PET/MR and PET/CT. In addition, 30 patients underwent whole-body 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT followed by simultaneous cardiac PET/MR. Phantom study showed 3% reduction of activity values in the myocardium due to the non-inclusion of the phased array coil in the AC. In patient scans, average standardized uptake values (SUVs) obtained by PET/CT and PET/MR showed no significant difference (n = 30, 4.6 ± 3.5 vs 4.7 ± 2.8, P = 0.47). There was excellent per patient correlation between the values acquired by PET/CT and PET/MR (R 2  = 0.97). Myocardial SUVs PET imaging using MR for AC shows excellent correlation with myocardial SUVs obtained by standard PET/CT imaging. The 2-point Dixon VIBE MR technique can be used for AC in simultaneous PET/MR data acquisition.

  14. Application of PET and PET/CT imaging for cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yenkung; Hu Fenglan; Shen Yehyou; Liao, A.C.; Hung, T.Z.; Su, Chentau; Chen Liangkuang

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential application of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT for cancer screening in asymptomatic individuals. Methods: The subjects consisted of 3631 physical check up examinees (1947 men, 1684 women; mean age ±SD, 52.1±8.2 y) with non-specific medical histories. Whole-body FDG PET (or PET/CT), ultrasound and tumor markers were performed on all patients. Focal hypermetabolic areas with intensities equal to or exceeding the level of FDG uptake in the brain and bladder were considered abnormal and interpreted as neoplasia. Follow-up periods were longer than one year. Results: Among the 3631 FDG PET (including 1687 PET/CT), ultrasound and tumor markers examinations, malignant tumors were discovered in 47 examinees (1.29%). PET findings were true-positive in 38 of the 47 cancers (80.9%). In addition, 32 of the 47 cancers were performed with the PET-CT scan. PET detected cancer lesions in 28 of the 32 examinees. However, the CT detected cancer lesions in only 15 of 32 examinees. Conclusion: The sensitivity of FDG PET in the detection of a wide variety of cancers is high. Most cancer can be detected with FDG PET in a resectable stage. CT of the PET/CT for localization and characteristics of the lesion shows an increased specificity of the PET scan. Using ultrasound and tumor markers may complement the PET scan in cancer screening for hepatic and urologic neoplasms. (authors)

  15. Development of PET insert for simultaneous PET/MR imaging of human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jiwoong; Choi, Yong; Jung, Jin Ho; Kim, Sangsu; Im, Ki Chun; Lim, Hyun Keong [Molecular Imaging Research & Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Changheun; Park, HyunWook; Cho, Gyuseong [Departments of Electrical Engineering and Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-29

    Recently, there has been great interest on the development of combined PET/MR, which is a useful tool for both functional and anatomic imaging. The purpose of this study was to develop a MR compatible PET insert for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain and to evaluate the performance of the hybrid PET-MRI. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks arranged in a ring of 390 mm diameter with 60 mm axial FOV. Each detector block was composed of 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each of which consisted of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 GAPD array. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuits (PDCs) and then transferred to FPGA-embedded DAQ modules. The PDCs and DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box and located at the rear of the MR bore inside MRI room. 3-T human MRIs of two different vendors were used to evaluate the MR compatibility of developed PET insert. No significant changes of the PET performance and the homogeneity of MR images caused by the non-compatibility of PET-MRI were observed with the 2 different MRIs. The signal intensities of MR images were slightly degraded (<3.6%) with the both MRI systems. The difference between independently and simultaneously acquired PET images of brain phantom was negligibly small (<4.3%). High quality simultaneous brain PET and MRI of 3 normal volunteers were successfully acquired. Experimental results indicate that the high performance compact and lightweight PET insert for hybrid PET/MRI, which could be utilized with the MRI from various manufactures, can be developed using GAPD arrays and charge signal transmission method proposed in this study.

  16. Utilization of Pets in a Hospice Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Kathleen; Kukowski, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    The therapeutic use of animals with specific populations has gained increased attention and interest. Pet placement in special settings such as prisons, mental institutions and hospices have shown beneficial results. Development of a pet visitation program requires specific planning and organization. (JD)

  17. Developing simplified Regional Potential Evapotranspiration (PET ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regional Potential Evapotranspiration (PET) estimation method was developed to estimate the potential evapotranspiration (reference evapotranspiration) over Abbay Basin as a function of basin maximum and minimum temperature, and modulated by site specific elevation data. The method is intended to estimate PET in ...

  18. Integrating Pet Therapy into Daily School Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brous, Miriam T.

    2010-01-01

    Stories abound in literature of the ways that people and their pets have fostered and created valuable relationships. More recently, research has shown a strong impact from the pet relationship in health-related settings. Positive changes have been seen in people developing resilience, self-reliance, and in making progress in treatment. Children…

  19. Infections That Pets Carry (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how to protect your family from infections. How Pets Spread Infections Like people, all animals carry germs . Illnesses common among housepets — ... get an infection that can be passed to people. Safely Caring for Your Pet Here are some tips to help your family ...

  20. Other PET tracers for neuroendocrine tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Klaas Pieter; Glaudemans, Andor W J M

    In this article the applicability of (124)I-MIBG and (11)C-5-HTP PET for the detection of abdominal gastro-enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is discussed. (124)I-MIBG is a positron-emitting variant of (123)I-MIBG and therefore suited for PET imaging. Due to the better intrinsic characteristics

  1. PET/MR Imaging in Vascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Kjær, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    For imaging of atherosclerotic disease, lumenography using computed tomography, ultrasonography, or invasive angiography is still the backbone of evaluation. However, these methods are less effective to predict the likelihood of future thromboembolic events caused by vulnerability of plaques. PET...... through data and arguments that support increased use of PET/MR imaging in atherosclerotic imaging....

  2. 7 CFR 501.10 - Pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pets. 501.10 Section 501.10 Agriculture Regulations of... CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.10 Pets. Animals shall be brought... Director, Research Center, except seeing eye dogs may be brought to the reception area serving the offices...

  3. The application of PET in endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zhibin

    2003-01-01

    There are wide application of PET in endocrine tumors, including thyroid cancer, parathyroid adenoma, pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma. Many papers concluded that in diagnosing endocrine tumors, PET does not show apparent advantages comparing with traditional radionuclide imaging methods. But as a useful complementary method, its clinical value has been recognized

  4. Radiation Protection in PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-10-01

    The presentation is based on the following areas: radiological monitoring installations in the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals, personal dose, dosage advertising, nuclear medicine, PET, radiation protection of patients, requirements for medical practice, regulatory aspects, dose calculation, shields, quantities, center Cudim, cyclotron and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals, biological effects of radiation protection practices.

  5. Analisis Gameplay Game Genre Virtual Pet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abi Senoprabowo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Game adalah struktur interaktif yang membuat pemain berjuang menuju sebuah tujuan. Game dapat memberikan emosi dan mood, menghubungkan dengan orang latihan, sarana latihan, serta dapat memberikan edukasi. Salah satu game yang berkembang saat ini adalah game bergenre Virtual pet. Game virtual pet merupakan game simulasi memelihara sesuatu. Virtual pet memiliki gameplay yang menarik dan menyenangkan yang membuat pemain seolah-olah benar-benar memiliki binatang peliharaan mereka sendiri. Virtual pet dianggap oleh sebagian besar penggunanya dapat memberikan kegembiraan serta rasa kasih sayang karena tingkat interaksinya yang baik. Banyak pengembang game pemula yang mengembangkan genre ini sebagai game yang mereka buat karena kemudahaan dan tingkat penggunanya yang banyak. Akan tetapi banyak dari pengembang game pemula tidak memperhatikan tingkat keberlanjutan game virtual pet yang mereka buat sehingga membuat pemain cepat bosan. Pada penelitian ini, analisis game bergenre virtual pet yang sudah sukses dibuat seperti Zombigotchi, Tamagotchi Unicorn, dan Bird Land, diharapkan dapat membantu para pengembang game pemula agar mengetahui cara merancang dan mengembangkan game virtual pet dengan baik. Kata Kunci: game, gameplay, virtual pet

  6. Clinical PET/MR Imaging in Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-01-01

    . The question, therefore, arises regarding what the future clinical applications of PET/MR imaging will be. In this article, the authors discuss ways in which PET/MR imaging may be used in future applications that justify the added cost, predominantly focusing on oncologic applications. The authors suggest...

  7. Salmonella infection acquired from reptilian pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, D; Douglas, T; Roberts, R

    1997-10-01

    Two children presented with signs and symptoms of gastroenteritis. Salmonella chameleon was isolated from the stool of one child and also from an iguana kept in the home as a pet. Salmonella arizonae was isolated from the stool of the other child and also from four snakes sharing the same household. Exotic reptiles are unsuitable pets to share the home environment with infants.

  8. Experience of Dual Time Point Brain F-18 FDG PET/CT Imaging in Patients with Infections Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Weung; Kim, Chang Guhn; Park, Soon Ah; Jung, Sang Ah [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Dual time point FDG PET imaging (DTPI) has been considered helpful for discrimination of benign and malignant disease, and staging lymph node status in patients with pulmonary malignancy. However, DTPI for benign disease has been rarely reported, and it may show a better description of metabolic status and extent of benign infection disease than early imaging only. The authors report on the use F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging with additional delayed imaging on a 52-year-old man with sparganosis and a 70-year-old man with tuberculous meningitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on dual time point PET/CT imaging in patients with cerebral sparganosis and tuberculous meningitis.

  9. Development of scintillation materials for PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhik, Mikhail; Annenkov, Alexander N; Borissevitch, Andrei; Dossovitski, Alexei; Missevitch, Oleg; Lecoq, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The growing demand on PET methodology for a variety of applications ranging from clinical use to fundamental studies triggers research and development of PET scanners providing better spatial resolution and sensitivity. These efforts are primarily focused on the development of advanced PET detector solutions and on the developments of new scintillation materials as well. However Lu containing scintillation materials introduced in the last century such as LSO, LYSO, LuAP, LuYAP crystals still remain the best PET species in spite of the recent developments of bright, fast but relatively low density lanthanum bromide scintillators. At the same time Lu based materials have several drawbacks which are high temperature of crystallization and relatively high cost compared to alkali-halide scintillation materials. Here we describe recent results in the development of new scintillation materials for PET application.

  10. FDG-PET in Follicular Lymphoma Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bodet-Milin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available 18-Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerised tomography (FDG PET/CT is commonly used in the management of patients with lymphomas and is recommended for both initial staging and response assessment after treatment in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. Despite the FDG avidity of follicular lymphoma (FL, FDG PET/CT is not yet applied in standard clinical practice for patients with FL. However, FDG PET/CT is more accurate than conventional imaging for initial staging, often prompting significant management change, and allows noninvasive characterization to guide assessment of high-grade transformation. For restaging, FDG PET/CT assists in distinguishing between scar tissue and viable tumors in residual masses and a positive PET after induction treatment would seem to predict a shorter progression-free survival.

  11. PET after use. From problem to opportunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiacchio, G.; Malinconico, M.; Santacesaria, E.; Di Sero, M.

    1999-01-01

    Due to collection, separation and legislation problems, the only type of PET suitable for recycling, is, at moment, the polymer employed in liquid containers or, more precisely, PET from drink bottles. The paper refer to the most up-to-date strategies to overcomes typical problems occurring during physical recycling of PET (hydrolytic and thermal degradation). Among others, a recent procedure is cited, that utilizes p-hydroxybenzoic acid and titanium tetraisopropylate. As far as chemical recycling is concerned, alternative methodologies to PET glycolysis (normally employing ethyleneglycol to obtain monomers) using unsaturated diols to obtain polyesters suitable for production of thermosetting resins, are reported. Finally, chemical recycling of PET to produce alkyl-phthalates (well know plasticizers for thermoplastic polymers) is described [it

  12. PET/MRI for Neurological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Drzezga, Alexander; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Rosen, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    PET and MRI provide complementary information in the study of the human brain. Simultaneous PET/MR data acquisition allows the spatial and temporal correlation of the measured signals, opening up opportunities impossible to realize using stand-alone instruments. This paper reviews the methodological improvements and potential neurological and psychiatric applications of this novel technology. We first present methods for improving the performance and information content of each modality by using the information provided by the other technique. On the PET side, we discuss methods that use the simultaneously acquired MR data to improve the PET data quantification. On the MR side, we present how improved PET quantification could be used to validate a number of MR techniques. Finally, we describe promising research, translational and clinical applications that could benefit from these advanced tools. PMID:23143086

  13. PET/MRI for neurologic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Drzezga, Alexander; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Rosen, Bruce R

    2012-12-01

    PET and MRI provide complementary information in the study of the human brain. Simultaneous PET/MRI data acquisition allows the spatial and temporal correlation of the measured signals, creating opportunities impossible to realize using stand-alone instruments. This paper reviews the methodologic improvements and potential neurologic and psychiatric applications of this novel technology. We first present methods for improving the performance and information content of each modality by using the information provided by the other technique. On the PET side, we discuss methods that use the simultaneously acquired MRI data to improve the PET data quantification. On the MRI side, we present how improved PET quantification can be used to validate several MRI techniques. Finally, we describe promising research, translational, and clinical applications that can benefit from these advanced tools.

  14. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Joergensen, Jesper T; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET contains additional valuable information on the temporal changes in tracer distribution. Kinetic modeling can be used to extract relevant pharmacokinetic parameters of tracer behavior in vivo that reflects relevant physiological processes. In this paper, we review the potential contribution of kinetic analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia. PMID:25250200

  15. Prognostic meaning of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and lymphocyte to monocyte ration (LMR) in newly diagnosed Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated upfront with a PET-2 based strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Alessandra; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Vetro, Calogero; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Cerchione, Claudio; Ippolito, Massimo; Palumbo, Giuseppe Alberto; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2018-06-01

    Recent reports identify NLR (the ratio between absolute neutrophils counts, ANC, and absolute lymphocyte count, ALC), as predictor of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in cancer patients. We retrospectively tested NLR and LMR (the ratio between absolute lymphocyte and monocyte counts) in newly diagnosed Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients treated upfront with a PET-2 risk-adapted strategy. NLR and LMR were calculated using records obtained from the complete blood count (CBC) from 180 newly diagnosed HL patients. PFS was evaluated accordingly to Kaplan-Meier method. Higher NLR was associated to advanced stage, increased absolute counts of neutrophils and reduced count of lymphocytes, and markers of systemic inflammation. After a median follow-up of 68 months, PFS at 60 months was 86.6% versus 70.1%, respectively, in patients with NLR ≥ 6 or NLR PET-2 scan (p PET-2 was an independent predictor of PFS in multivariate analysis. Advanced-stage patients (N = 119) were treated according to a PET-2 risk-adapted protocol, with an early switch to BEACOPP regimen in case of PET-2 positivity. Despite this strategy, patients with positive PET-2 still had an inferior outcome, with PFS at 60 months of 84.7% versus 40.1% (negative and positive PET-2 patients, respectively, p PET-2 status and to a lesser extend NLR in advanced stage, while LMR maintained its significance in early stage. By focusing on PET-2 negative patients, we found that patients with NLR ≥ 6.0 or LMR PET-2 scan, NLR and LMR can result in a meaningful prognostic system that needs to be further validated in prospective series including patients treated upfront with PET-2 adapted-risk therapy.

  16. SPECT og PET i neurobiologien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, O.B.; Lassen, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) and SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) are isotopic methods in which the distribution is registered of radiolabelled tracers given in such small amounts that they are without effect on the organism or the organism's disposal of them. Thus, a series...... of important biological processes in the intact organism can be studied. The methods have been used in many disciplines but in particular for neurobiological research on the brain--e.g., the brain's regional blood circulation and mapping of the brain's functional structure. The methods have also been used...

  17. PET-CT in endocrinology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parysow, O.; Jager, V.; Racioppi, S.; Mollerach, A.M.; Collaud, C.; Arma, I.

    2008-01-01

    PET/CT scans have reached an important place in the evaluation of endocrine tumors. The metabolic marker 18F-FDG is the most widespread over the world, and, for the time being, it is the only one available in our country. The limitations of this technique in Endocrinology include high differentiation and low aggressiveness of most endocrine tumors, and low detection rate for low cellularity and/or small lesions. Indications for PET/CT scan in these tumors should be precise, due to the fact that not all of these lesions are significantly glucose-avid and to extract the maximum diagnostic efficacy of this modality to achieve the optimum diagnostic accuracy. The most important indication is DTC with high Tg levels and negative 131-Iodine scans. It is advisable to indicate a PET/CT scan in patients with Tg > 10 ng/ml and stimulated TSH (endogenous or exogenous). The aim is to locate recurrences and metastases in order to remove them, either surgically or by any other therapy alternative to 131 I. Due to higher uptake in more aggressive lesions, this study has a high prognostic value. In patients with high Tg levels, negative 131 I scan, and abnormal FDG uptake, the practitioner must act more aggressively in order to remove the pathologic foci, while with a negative FDG -PET scan, the conduct can be expectant, with periodic follow-up. The introduction of other positron-emitting tracers like 124-Iodine, is likely to yield superior quality images and provide better diagnoses. FDG has a limited efficiency in neuroendocrine tumors, unless they show a significant level of dedifferentiation. The scan is indicated in MTC, when calcitonin levels are above 1000 pg/ml, in order to locate the tumor sites. With the introduction of more specific positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, such as 18F-DOPA, 68Ga DOTA, 11C methomidate, 11C-hydroxytryptophan and others, it will be possible to study the metabolic-molecular behavior of these tumors with a more accurate approach. (author) [es

  18. PET scan and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, F.; Lahmi, A.; Rousseau, A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose was the optimization of the radiation protection during examinations with 18 F-FDG, The immediate validation by the D.G.S.N.R., the results of dosimetry (h.p.10 = 12 μ sievert (average value/ technician / day for 6 patients) demonstrate the efficiency of the implemented means. From the very beginning, the installation of a PET-scanner requires a multidisciplinary conception. This essential thought contributes to an optimal radiation protection of the entire personnel of the service. (N.C.)

  19. The petit rat (pet/pet), a new semilethal mutant dwarf rat with thymic and testicular anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Junko; Suzuki, Katsushi; Suzuki, Hiroetsu

    2008-12-01

    The petit rat (pet/pet) is a recently discovered semilethal mutant dwarf. The neonatal pet/pet rats had a low body weight and small thymus and testis. During the first 3 d after birth, 50% of the male and 80% of the female pet/pet pups were lost or found dead. Surviving pet/pet rats showed marked retardation of postnatal growth, and their body weights were 41% (female rats) and 32% (male rats) of those of normal rats at the adult stage. The pet/pet rats exhibited proportional dwarfism, and their longitudinal bones were shorter than those of controls without skeletal malformations. Most organs of male pet/pet rats, especially the thymus, testis, adipose tissue surrounding the kidney, and accessory sex organs, weighed markedly less at 140 d of age than did those of their normal counterparts. The thymus of pet/pet rats was small with abnormal thymic follicles. Testes from pet/pet rats exhibited 2 patterns of abnormal histology. Spermatogenesis was present in testes that were only slightly anomalous, but the seminiferous tubules were reduced in diameter. In severely affected testes, most of the seminiferous tubules showed degeneration, and interstitial tissue was increased. Plasma growth hormone concentrations did not differ between pet/pet and normal male rats. The dwarf phenotype of pet/pet rats was inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. These results indicate that the pet/pet rat has a semilethal growth-hormone-independent dwarf phenotype that is accompanied by thymic and testicular anomalies and low birth weight.

  20. Clinical Applications of FDG PET and PET/CT in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Al-Ibraheem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 18F-FDG PET plays an increasing role in diagnosis and management planning of head and neck cancer. Hybrid PET/CT has promoted the field of molecular imaging in head and neck cancer. This modality is particular relevant in the head and neck region, given the complex anatomy and variable physiologic FDG uptake patterns. The vast majority of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT applications in head and neck cancer related to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Clinical applications of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in head and neck cancer include diagnosis of distant metastases, identification of synchronous 2nd primaries, detection of carcinoma of unknown primary and detection of residual or recurrent disease. Emerging applications are precise delineation of the tumor volume for radiation treatment planning, monitoring treatment, and providing prognostic information. The clinical role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in N0 disease is limited which is in line with findings of other imaging modalities. MRI is usually used for T staging with an intense discussion concerning the preferable imaging modality for regional lymph node staging as PET/CT, MRI, and multi-slice spiral CT are all improving rapidly. Is this review, we summarize recent literature on 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT imaging of head and neck cancer.

  1. The spatial distribution of pet dogs and pet cats on the island of Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    More Simon J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable international research regarding the link between human demographics and pet ownership. In several international studies, pet ownership was associated with household demographics including: the presence of children in the household, urban/rural location, level of education and age/family structure. What is lacking across all these studies, however, is an understanding of how these pets are spatially distributed throughout the regions under study. This paper describes the spatial distribution of pet dog and pet cat owning households on the island of Ireland. Results In 2006, there were an estimated 640,620 pet dog owning households and 215,542 pet cat owning households in Ireland. These estimates are derived from logistic regression modelling, based on household composition to determine pet dog ownership and the type of house to determine pet cat ownership. Results are presented using chloropleth maps. There is a higher density of pet dog owning households in the east of Ireland and in the cities than the west of Ireland and rural areas. However, in urban districts there are a lower proportion of households owning pet dogs than in rural districts. There are more households with cats in the urban areas, but the proportion of households with cats is greater in rural areas. Conclusions The difference in spatial distribution of dog ownership is a reflection of a generally higher density of households in the east of Ireland and in major cities. The higher proportion of ownership in the west is understandable given the higher proportion of farmers and rural dwellings in this area. Spatial representation allows us to visualise the impact of human household distribution on the density of both pet dogs and pet cats on the island of Ireland. This information can be used when analysing risk of disease spread, for market research and for instigating veterinary care.

  2. Microfluidic technology for PET radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, J.M.; Prenant, C.; Chimon, G.N.; Smethurst, G.J.; Dekker, B.A.; Zweit, J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the first application of a microfabricated reaction system to positron emission tomography (PET) radiochemistry. We have applied microfluidic technology to synthesise PET radiopharmaceuticals using 18 F and 124 I as labels for fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and Annexin-V, respectively. These reactions involved established methods of nucleophilic substitution on a mannose triflate precursor and direct iodination of the protein using iodogen as an oxidant. This has demonstrated a proof of principle of using microfluidic technology to radiochemical reactions involving low and high molecular weight compounds. Using microfluidic reactions, [ 18 F]FDG was synthesised with a 50% incorporation of the available F-18 radioactivity in a very short time of 4 s. The radiolabelling efficiency of 124 I Annexin-V was 40% after 1 min reaction time. Chromatographic analysis showed that such reaction yields are comparable to conventional methods, but in a much shorter time. The yields can be further improved with more optimisation of the microfluidic device itself and its fluid mixing profiles. This demonstrates the potential for this technology to have an impact on rapid and simpler radiopharmaceutical synthesis using short and medium half-life radionuclides

  3. Modern imaging methods: positron emission tomography (PET) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Votrubova, J.; Belohlavek, O.

    2004-01-01

    An overview of the title topic is presented. Attention is paid to the technical principles of PET and CT, indications for PET and PET/CT examination, and achievements of the PET Centre of the Na Homolce hospital. (P.A.)

  4. Comparing life cycle energy and GHG emissions of bio-based PET, recycled PET, PLA and man-made cellulosics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, L.; Worrell, E.; Patel, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the environmental profiles of petrochemical PET, (partially) bio-based PET, recycled PET, and recycled (partially) bio-based PET, and compare them with other bio-based materials, namely PLA (polylactic acid, a bio-based polyester) and man-made cellulose

  5. Compensation for photon attenuation in PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintu Chen; Ordonez, C.E.; Xiaolin Yu.

    1992-01-01

    CT/MR and PET images usually are not in registration spatially because of differences in the imaging setup. CT, MR and PET imaging parameters that are used regularly for brain studies in their institution are compared, in addition, because the patient orientations in CT/MR and PET scanners are not the same, slice centers are positioned differently relative to the patients anatomy. For application of the new idea of using structural information from CT or MR images in PET image reconstruction for attenuation correction, image registration is required as a first step so that one can obtain a corresponding anatomic map for any selected PET image plane. The authors chose to use the surface-matching technique developed in their laboratories for image registration because this method is retrospective and accurate. After the PET and CT/MR scans are registered, they reslice the CT/MR images along the planes of the PET images. The differences in slice thickness and slice separation, as well as in image resolution between various image modalities are to be considered

  6. Current status of theranostics in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgolini, Irene; Decristoforo, Clemens; Uprimny, Christian [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Haug, Alexander [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, S. Orsola Hospital Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Bologna (Italy)

    2018-03-15

    The aim of this review is to report on the current status of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-directed theranostics in prostate cancer (PC) patients. The value of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-directed PET imaging as a diagnostic procedure for primary and recurrent PC as well as the role of evolving PSMA radioligand therapy (PRLT) in castration-resistant (CR)PC is assessed. The most eminent data from mostly retrospective studies currently available on theranostics of prostate cancer are discussed. The current knowledge on {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT implicates that primary staging with PET/CT is meaningful in patients with high-risk PC and that the combination with pelvic multi parametric (mp)MR (or PET/mpMR) reaches the highest impact on patient management. There may be a place for {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT in intermediate-risk PC patients as well, however, only a few data are available at the moment. In secondary staging for local recurrence, {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/mpMR is superior to PET/CT, whereas for distant recurrence, PET/CT has equivalent results and is faster and cheaper compared to PET/mpMR. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT is superior to {sup 18}F / {sup 11}Choline PET/CT in primary staging as well as in secondary staging. In patients with biochemical relapse, PET/CT positivity is directly associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) increase and amounts to roughly 50% when PSA is raised to ≤0.5 ng/ml and to ≥90% above 1 ng/ml. Significant clinical results have so far been achieved with the subsequent use of radiolabeled PSMA ligands in the treatment of CRPC. Accumulated activities of 30 to 50 GBq of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA ligands seem to be clinically safe with biochemical response and PERCIST/RECIST response in around 75% of patients along with xerostomia in 5-10% of patients as the only notable side effect. On the basis of the current literature, we conclude that PSMA-directed theranostics do have a major clinical impact in diagnosis and therapy of PC patients. We recommend

  7. Not Just "A Walking the Dog": Dog Walking and Pet Play and Their Association With Recommended Physical Activity Among Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karen E; Wood, Lisa; Christian, Hayley; Trapp, Georgina S A

    2015-01-01

    To examine the role of pet play and dog walking in children's and adolescents' leisure time, and the relationship between these activities and physical activity. The study design was observational. The study setting was metropolitan Perth and nonmetropolitan regions in Western Australia. The study included 1097 primary school (mean age, 10.1 years; SD, 1.6 years) and 657 secondary school (mean age, 14.0 years; SD, 1.3 years) students. Validated measures of total physical activity, dog walking, and pet play activity (prevalence and time) were calculated. Generalized linear models tested for differences between proportions, while adjusting for socioeconomic status, age, and school-level clustering. Approximately one third of primary school and one quarter of secondary school students reported that they walked the dog at least once in the last week. Pet play was the most common play activity for primary and secondary school girls, and the second and third most popular play activity for secondary and primary school boys, respectively. Secondary school students who walked the dog or played with pets spent an average of 1 hour per week on each activity, and they were significantly more likely (p physical activity recommendations than secondary school students not reporting these activities. Given the significant proportion of young people who frequently engage in dog walking and pet play, and the high level of pet ownership in many Western countries, promotion of these activities to support young people's health is warranted.

  8. How much can a negative FDG-PET be trusted?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuxia

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: False-negative FDG-PET constituted 22.7% of all clinically identified negative PET in a ten year retrospective review about FDG-PET on irradiated brain tumour. Uncovering possible influencing factors of false-negative FDG-PET may have significant value. Material and methods: 10 patients with a first negative and then a second positive PET during very short time separation and 6 patients with surgically confirmed false-negative PET were traced. Histological type, irradiation parameter, steroids effect were discussed. To define temporary irradiation effect on FDG uptake, interval between radiation treatment to PET examination of these two groups were compared with 24 surgically confirmed true-positive PET, 5 surgically confirmed true-negative PET Results: 80% negative-positive PET transformation happened within 31 weeks. No statistically significant difference with regard to time from irradiation could be found between groups. Steroids medication closely before PET examination was about the same before the first negative and second positive PET scan. 5/6 surgically confirmed false-negative PET patients did not take steroids before PET examination. Conclusion: Tumour histology type, temporary irradiation effect and steroids medication did not constitute the reasons for false negative PET in our patient series. PET could not identify tumour relapse in the very early stage. Therefore, if clinically indicated, second FDG-PET might be a better selection to pick up tumour relapse instead of exploratory surgery or biopsy. In that case, the suitable time point for the second PET could be within 31 weeks after the first PET examination. Keywords: false-negative, FDG-PET, influencing factor, irradiation effect, steroids. (author)

  9. The impact of owner age on companionship with virtual pets

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, Shaun W.; Chesney, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on issues of interaction with a particular type of mobile information system – virtual pets. It examines the impact of owner age on companionship with virtual pets, and tests the hypothesis that younger virtual pet owners will experience closer companionship with their virtual pet than older owners. This is in response to the marketing stance adopted by virtual pet manufacturers who clearly target younger people as the main consumers of their products. The hypothesis was te...

  10. Practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Lise; Larsen, Helle Jung; Pedersen, Kate

    2003-01-01

    Children are not just small adults-they differ in their psychology, normal physiology and pathophysiology, and various aspects should be considered when planning a positron emission tomography (PET) scan in a child. PET in children is a growing area, and this article describes the practical use...... and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre. It is intended to be of use to nuclear medicine departments implementing or starting to implement PET scans in children. Topics covered are: dealing with children, dosimetry, organisation within the department and relations with other departments......, preparation of the child (provision of information to the child and parents and the fasting procedure), the imaging procedure (resting, tracer injection, positioning, sedation and bladder emptying) and pitfalls in the interpretation of PET scans in children, including experiences with telemedicine....

  11. PET/CT with intravenous contrast can be used for PET attenuation correction in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, A K; Holm, S; Loft, A

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: If the CT scan of a combined PET/CT study is performed as a full diagnostic quality CT scan including intravenous (IV) contrast agent, the quality of the joint PET/CT procedure is improved and a separate diagnostic CT scan can be avoided. CT with IV contrast can be used for PET attenuation...... correction, but this may result in a bias in the attenuation factors. The clinical significance of this bias has not been established. Our aim was to perform a prospective clinical study where each patient had CT performed with and without IV contrast agent to establish whether PET/CT with IV contrast can...... scans without, and then with contrast agent, followed by an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose whole-body PET scan. The CT examinations were performed with identical parameters on a GE Discovery LS scanner. The PET data were reconstructed with attenuation correction based on the two CT data sets. A global...

  12. Practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgwardt, Lise; Larsen, Helle Jung; Pedersen, Kate; Hoejgaard, Liselotte

    2003-01-01

    Children are not just small adults - they differ in their psychology, normal physiology and pathophysiology, and various aspects should be considered when planning a positron emission tomography (PET) scan in a child. PET in children is a growing area, and this article describes the practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre. It is intended to be of use to nuclear medicine departments implementing or starting to implement PET scans in children. Topics covered are: dealing with children, dosimetry, organisation within the department and relations with other departments, preparation of the child (provision of information to the child and parents and the fasting procedure), the imaging procedure (resting, tracer injection, positioning, sedation and bladder emptying) and pitfalls in the interpretation of PET scans in children, including experiences with telemedicine. (orig.)

  13. Molecular Imaging in Breast Cancer: From Whole-Body PET/CT to Dedicated Breast PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Koolen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET, with or without integrated computed tomography (CT, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG is based on the principle of elevated glucose metabolism in malignant tumors, and its use in breast cancer patients is frequently being investigated. It has been shown useful for classification, staging, and response monitoring, both in primary and recurrent disease. However, because of the partial volume effect and limited resolution of most whole-body PET scanners, sensitivity for the visualization of small tumors is generally low. To improve the detection and quantification of primary breast tumors with FDG PET, several dedicated breast PET devices have been developed. In this nonsystematic review, we shortly summarize the value of whole-body PET/CT in breast cancer and provide an overview of currently available dedicated breast PETs.

  14. Practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgwardt, Lise; Larsen, Helle Jung; Pedersen, Kate; Hoejgaard, Liselotte [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2003-10-01

    Children are not just small adults - they differ in their psychology, normal physiology and pathophysiology, and various aspects should be considered when planning a positron emission tomography (PET) scan in a child. PET in children is a growing area, and this article describes the practical use and implementation of PET in children in a hospital PET centre. It is intended to be of use to nuclear medicine departments implementing or starting to implement PET scans in children. Topics covered are: dealing with children, dosimetry, organisation within the department and relations with other departments, preparation of the child (provision of information to the child and parents and the fasting procedure), the imaging procedure (resting, tracer injection, positioning, sedation and bladder emptying) and pitfalls in the interpretation of PET scans in children, including experiences with telemedicine. (orig.)

  15. PET/CT assessment in follicular lymphoma using standardized criteria: central review in the PRIMA study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tychyj-Pinel, Christelle [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre-Benite (France); Ricard, Fabien [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre-Benite (France); Universite de Lyon, Faculte de Medecine, UCB Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Fulham, Michael [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Sydney (Australia); University of Sydney, Sydney Medical School, Sydney (Australia); Fournier, Marion [Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, The Lymphoma Academic Research Organisation (LYSARC), Pierre-Benite (France); Meignan, Michel [CHU Henri Mondor, Medicine Nucleaire, Creteil (France); Lamy, Thierry [Service d' Hematologie, CHU, Rennes (France); Vera, Pierre [Centre Henri Becquerel, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Rouen (France); Rouen University, QuantIF (Litis EA4108), Rouen (France); Salles, Gilles [Universite de Lyon, Faculte de Medecine, UCB Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Service d' Hematologie, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre-Benite (France); Trotman, Judith [University of Sydney, Sydney Medical School, Sydney (Australia); Concord Hospital, Department of Haematology, Concord, NSW (Australia)

    2014-03-15

    We aimed to compare the standardized central review of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans performed after induction therapy for follicular lymphoma (FL) in the PRIMA study (Salles et al., Lancet 377:42-51, 2011; Trotman et al., J Clin Oncol 29:3194-3200, 2011) to scan review at local centres. PET/CT scans were independently evaluated by two nuclear medicine physicians using the 2007 International Harmonization Project (IHP) criteria (Cheson et al., J Clin Oncol 25:579-586, 2007; Juweid et al., J Clin Oncol 25:571-578, 2007; Shankar et al., J Nucl Med 47:1059-1066, 2006) and Deauville 5-point scale (5PS) criteria (Meignan et al., Leuk Lymphoma 50:1257-1260, 2009; Meignan et al., Leuk Lymphoma 51:2171-2180, 2010; Barrington et al., Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 37:1824-1833, 2010). PET/CT status was compared with prospectively recorded patient outcomes. Central evaluation was performed on 119 scans. At diagnosis, 58 of 59 were recorded as positive, with a mean maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of 11.7 (range 4.6-35.6). There was no significant association between baseline SUV{sub max} and progression-free survival (PFS). Sixty post-induction scans were interpreted using both the IHP criteria and 5PS. Post-induction PET-positive status failed to predict progression when applying the IHP criteria [p = 0.14; hazard ratio (HR) 1.9; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.8-4.6] or 5PS with a cut-off ≥3 (p = 0.12; HR 2.0; 95 % CI 0.8-4.7). However, when applying the 5PS with a cut-off ≥4, there was a significantly inferior 42-month PFS in PET-positive patients of 25.0 % (95 % CI 3.7-55.8 %) versus 61.4 % (95 % CI 45.4-74.1 %) in PET-negative patients (p = 0.01; HR 3.1; 95 % CI 1.2-7.8). The positive predictive value (PPV) of post-induction PET with this liver cut-off was 75 %. The 42-month PFS for patients remaining PET-positive by local assessment was 31.1 % (95 % CI 10.2-55.0 %) vs 64.6 % (95 % CI 47.0-77.6 %) for PET

  16. Clinical Application of F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) in Colo-rectal and Anal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Il

    2008-01-01

    In the management of colo-retal and anal cancer, accurate staging, treatment evaluation, early detection of recurrence are main clinical problems. F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) has been reported as useful in the management of colo-rectal and anal cancer because that PET has high diagnostic performance comparing to conventional studies. In case of liver metastases, for confirmation of no extrahepatic metastases, in case of high risk of metastasis, for avoiding unnecessary operation, PET (PET/CT) is expected more useful. In anal cancer, PET is expected useful in lymph node staging. For the early prediction of chemotherapy or radiation therapy effect PET has been reported as useful, also. In early detection of recurrence by PET, cost-benefit advantages has been suggested, also. PET/CT is expected to have higher diagnostic performance than PET alone

  17. SPECT and PET imaging in epilepsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landvogt, C.

    2007-01-01

    In preoperative localisation of epileptogenic foci, nuclear medicine diagnostics plays a crucial role. FDG-PET is used as first line diagnostics. In case of inconsistent MRI, EEG and FDG-PET findings, 11 C-Flumazenil-PET or ictal and interictal perfusion-SPECT should be performed. Other than FDG, Flumazenil can help to identify the extend of the region, which should be resected. To enhance sensitivity and specificity, further data analysis using voxelbased statistical analyses or SISCOM (substraction ictal SPECT coregistered MRI) should be performed

  18. Properties of tribology for Si implanted PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yuguang; Zhang Tonghe; Zhang Xu; Liu Andong; Xie Mengxia; Zhang Aimin; Chen Jianmin

    2002-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) has been modified with Si ions from a metal vapor arc source (MEVVA). After implantation, the surface structure has been greatly changed. The experimental results of infrared absorption indicated that the particles are referred to rich carbon and SiC particles. The PET has been strengthened by these dispersed particles. The measurement results using nanometer hardness tester reveal that both surface hardness and modulus increase obviously. Therefore the surface wear resistance improved extremely. Finally the modification mechanism of Si implanted PET was discussed

  19. Uncertainces in tumor target definition using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirov, A.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: PET entered into the clinics for radiation therapy as a means of displaying the metabolically active part of the tumor. However this advantage, PET has a number of shortcomings that prevent its use for precise determination of the tumor boundaries. What you will learn: The aim of the lecture is to present: the requirements for the accuracy of the determination of tumor boundaries in radiation therapy; the main phenomena which bring uncertainty using PET and a brief overview of methods for segmentation of tumors and their problems

  20. The heritage of radiotracers for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    The history of PET research clearly demonstrates that it is advances in chemistry coupled with a detailed examination of the biochemistry of new radiotracers which has allowed the PET method to be applied to new areas of biology and medicine. Radiotracers whose regional distribution reflects glucose metabolism, neutrotransmitter activity and enzyme activity have all required the development of rapid synthetic methods for the radiotracers themselves and the characterization of their biochemical behavior. This article traces some of the advances in the production of labeled precursors and in radiotracer synthesis and evaluation which have shaped the rapidly expanding application of PET to problems in the neurosciences, in cardiology and in oncology. 54 refs

  1. Phantom study on three-dimensional target volume delineation by PET/CT-based auto-contouring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Tiejiao; Sakaguchi, Yuichi; Mitsumoto, Katsuhiko; Mitsumoto, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Masayuki; Tachiya, Yosuke; Ohya, Nobuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine an appropriate threshold value for delineation of the target volume in positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and to investigate whether we could delineate a target volume by phantom studies. A phantom consisted of six spheres (φ10-37 mm) filled with 18 F solution. Data acquisition was performed PET/CT in non-motion and motion status with high 18 F solution and in non-motion status with low 18 F solution. In non-motion phantom experiments, we determined two types of threshold value, an absolute SUV (T SUV ) and a percentage of the maximum SUV (T % ). Delineation using threshold values was applied for all spheres and for selected large spheres (a diameter of 22 mm or larger). In motion phantom experiments, data acquisition was performed in a static mode (sPET) and a gated mode (gPET). CT scanning was performed with helical CT (HCT) and 4-dimentional CT (4DCT). The appropriate threshold values were aT % =27% and aT SUV =2.4 for all spheres, and sT % =30% and sT SUV =4.3 for selected spheres. For all spheres in sPET/HCT in motion, the delineated volumes were 84%-129% by the aT % and 34%-127% by the aT SUV . In gPET/4DCT in motion, the delineated volumes were 94-103% by the aT % and 51-131% by the aT SUV . For low radioactivity spheres, the delineated volumes were all underestimated. A threshold value of T % =27% was proposed for auto-contouring of lung tumors. Our results also suggested that the respiratory gated data acquisition should be performed in both PET and CT for target volume delineation. (author)

  2. Neuroreceptor and its transporters imaging by PET and SPECT in heroin addiction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jie; Liu Xingdang; Han Mei

    2013-01-01

    Heroin abuse can cause prominent hazardous effects,including the collapse of social,economic status and health. The research of heroin addiction mechanism has got some progress, but the neurotransmitter and receptor mechanism are still not clear. This review discussed potential neurobiology mechanisms of heroin addiction, including opioid receptor, dopamine receptors and dopamine transporters in different brain areas when exposed to heroin and the application of PET and SPECT imaging of Neuroreceptor and its transporters in heroin addiction research. (authors)

  3. PET and PET-CT. State of the art and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanti, Stefano; Franchi, Roberto; Battista, Giuseppe; Monetti, Nino; Canini, Romeo

    2005-01-01

    Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) enables the in vivo study of tissue metabolism, and thus is able to identify malignant tumours as hypermetabolic lesions by an increase in tracer uptake. Many papers have demonstrated both the relevant impact of FDG PET on staging of many cancers and the superior accuracy of the technique compared with conventional diagnostic methods for pre-treatment evaluation, therapy response evaluation and relapse identification. In particular PET was found useful in identifying lymph nodal and metastatic spread. thus altering patient management in more than 30% of cases. PET images, however, provide limited anatomical data, which in regions such as the head and neck, mediastinum and pelvic cavity is a significant drawback. The exact localization of lesions may also be difficult in some cases, on the basis of PET images alone. The introduction of combined PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) scanners enables the almost simultaneous acquisition of transmission and emission images, thus obtaining optimal fusion images in a very short time. PET-CT fusion images enable lesions to be located, reducing false positive studies and increasing accuracy; the overall duration of examination may also be reduced. On the basis of both literature data and our experience we established the clinical indications when PET-CT may be particularly useful, in comparison with PET alone. It should also be underlined that the use of PET-CT is almost mandatory for new traces such as C-choline and C-methionine; these new tracers may be applied for studying tumours not assessable with FDG, such as prostate cancer. In conclusion PET-CT is at present the most advanced method for metabolic imaging, and is capable of precisely localizing and assessing tumours; fusion images reduce false positive and inconclusive studies, thus increasing diagnostic accuracy [it

  4. Amyloid- and FDG-PET imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matias-Guiu, Jordi A.; Pytel, Vanesa; Galan, Lucia; Valles-Salgado, Maria; Guerrero, Antonio; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Matias-Guiu, Jorge; Cabrera-Martin, Maria Nieves; Carreras, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to study brain metabolism and presence of beta-amyloid deposits using positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This prospective cross-sectional study included 18 patients with definite or probable ALS according to the revised El Escorial diagnostic criteria, and 24 healthy controls. Patients underwent neurological and neuropsychological assessments, PET with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and amyloid-PET with 18 F-florbetaben. Patients with ALS showed hypometabolism in the frontal area and hypermetabolism in the cerebellum compared to healthy controls. Four patients (22 %) displayed cognitive impairment and decreased metabolism in the frontal area extending bilaterally to the parietal regions, and increased metabolism in the posterior area of the cerebellum. In patients with no cognitive impairment, metabolism was lower in the left superior frontal gyrus and higher in the anterior and posterior lobes of the cerebellum. In the individual analysis, six patients (35 %) displayed more anterior involvement with hypometabolism affecting the superior frontal, medial, and inferior gyri; six patients (35 %) exhibited a more posterior pattern with hypometabolism in the precentral and postcentral gyri and in the superior and inferior parietal lobules; two patients (11 %) showed a mixed pattern; and three patients (17 %) showed no alterations in brain metabolism. Three (16 %) showed increased 18 F-florbetaben uptake compared to controls. We have identified two main patterns of brain metabolism with an association to cognitive status. Only a subgroup of patients showed an increased uptake of the amyloid tracer. Our results suggest that ALS is heterogeneous from a clinical, metabolic, and molecular standpoint. (orig.)

  5. Amyloid- and FDG-PET imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matias-Guiu, Jordi A.; Pytel, Vanesa; Galan, Lucia; Valles-Salgado, Maria; Guerrero, Antonio; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Matias-Guiu, Jorge [Hospital Clinico San Carlos, San Carlos Institute for Health Research (IdISSC), Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Department of Neurology, Madrid (Spain); Cabrera-Martin, Maria Nieves; Carreras, Jose Luis [Hospital Clinico San Carlos, San Carlos Institute for Health Research (IdISSC), Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    We aimed to study brain metabolism and presence of beta-amyloid deposits using positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This prospective cross-sectional study included 18 patients with definite or probable ALS according to the revised El Escorial diagnostic criteria, and 24 healthy controls. Patients underwent neurological and neuropsychological assessments, PET with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and amyloid-PET with {sup 18}F-florbetaben. Patients with ALS showed hypometabolism in the frontal area and hypermetabolism in the cerebellum compared to healthy controls. Four patients (22 %) displayed cognitive impairment and decreased metabolism in the frontal area extending bilaterally to the parietal regions, and increased metabolism in the posterior area of the cerebellum. In patients with no cognitive impairment, metabolism was lower in the left superior frontal gyrus and higher in the anterior and posterior lobes of the cerebellum. In the individual analysis, six patients (35 %) displayed more anterior involvement with hypometabolism affecting the superior frontal, medial, and inferior gyri; six patients (35 %) exhibited a more posterior pattern with hypometabolism in the precentral and postcentral gyri and in the superior and inferior parietal lobules; two patients (11 %) showed a mixed pattern; and three patients (17 %) showed no alterations in brain metabolism. Three (16 %) showed increased {sup 18}F-florbetaben uptake compared to controls. We have identified two main patterns of brain metabolism with an association to cognitive status. Only a subgroup of patients showed an increased uptake of the amyloid tracer. Our results suggest that ALS is heterogeneous from a clinical, metabolic, and molecular standpoint. (orig.)

  6. Pet Ownership and the Risk of Dying from Cardiovascular Disease Among Adults Without Major Chronic Medical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogechi, Imala; Snook, Kassandra; Davis, Bionca M; Hansen, Andrew R; Liu, Fengqi; Zhang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    In a recent statement, the American Heart Association stated "There are scant data on pet ownership and survival in people without established cardiovascular disease (CVD)". This study sought to fill this gap. We analyzed nationally representative data of 3964 adults aged ≥50 who were free from major physical illnesses. Pet ownership was assessed at baseline between 1988 and 1994. Vital status was followed through December 31st 2006. With dogs being most popular pets owned by 22.0 (standard error 0.34) % of the participants, 34.6 % of the study population owned a pet. Pet ownership was associated with low rates of CVD deaths [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.69 (95 % CI 0.45-1.07)] and stroke [0.54 (0.28-1.01)] at borderline significant levels among women. These associations were adjusted for physical activity and largely attributed to having a cat rather than a dog. Among cat owners, the HR of all CVD deaths was 0.62 (0.36-1.05) and the HR of dying from stroke was 0.22 (0.07-0.68) compared with non-cat owners. The corresponding HRs among dog owners were 0.82 (0.51-1.34) and 0.76 (0.34-1.71) respectively. No similar associations were observed among men. The hazard of dying from hypertension was not associated with pet ownership for both men and women. Owning a cat rather than a dog was significantly associated with a reduced hazard of dying from CVD events, in particular, stroke. The protection pets confer may not be from physical activities, but possibly due to personality of the pet owners or stress-relieving effects of animal companionship.

  7. Clinical Utility of Amyloid PET Imaging in the Differential Diagnosis of Atypical Dementias and Its Impact on Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaïdane, Mohamed Reda; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Poulin, Stéphane; Buteau, François-Alexandre; Guimond, Jean; Bergeron, David; Verret, Louis; Fortin, Marie-Pierre; Houde, Michèle; Bouchard, Rémi W; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Laforce, Robert

    2016-04-18

    Recent studies have supported a role for amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in distinguishing Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology from other pathological protein accumulations leading to dementia. We investigated the clinical utility of amyloid PET in the differential diagnosis of atypical dementia cases and its impact on caregivers. Using the amyloid tracer 18F-NAV4694, we prospectively scanned 28 patients (mean age 59.3 y, s.d. 5.8; mean MMSE 21.4, s.d. 6.0) with an atypical dementia syndrome. Following a comprehensive diagnostic workup (i.e., history taking, neurological examination, blood tests, neuropsychological evaluation, MRI, and FDG-PET), no certain diagnosis could be arrived at. Amyloid PET was then conducted and classified as positive or negative. Attending physicians were asked to evaluate whether this result led to a change in diagnosis or altered management. They also reported their degree of confidence in the diagnosis. Caregivers were met after disclosure of amyloid PET results and completed a questionnaire/interview to assess the impact of the scan. Our cohort was evenly divided between positive (14/28) and negative (14/28) 18F-NAV4694 cases. Amyloid PET resulted in a diagnostic change in 9/28 cases (32.1%: 17.8% changed from AD to non-AD, 14.3% from non-AD to AD). There was a 44% increase in diagnostic confidence. Altered management occurred in 71.4% (20/28) of cases. Knowledge of amyloid status improved caregivers' outcomes in all domains (anxiety, depression, disease perception, future anticipation, and quality of life). This study suggests a useful additive role for amyloid PET in atypical cases with an unclear diagnosis beyond the extensive workup of a tertiary memory clinic. Amyloid PET increased diagnostic confidence and led to clinically significant alterations in management. The information gained from that test was well received by caregivers and encouraged spending quality time with their loved ones.

  8. Comparative analysis of PET/CT and PET/MR image characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma%对比分析头颈部鳞状细胞癌PET/CT与PET/MR特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白乐; 程勇; 唐勇进; 凌雪英

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate PET/CT and PET/MR characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).Methods Totally 40 patients with HNSCC underwent whole body 18F-FDG PET/CT and MR scans of head and neck before anti-tumor treatment.PET positive lesions of HNSCC,including primary lesions and lymph nodes were evaluated by 2 radiologists independently.Then the imaging quality,fusion quality,lesion conspicuity and lesion characteristics were assessed based on PET/CT,PET/MR T1WI and PET/MR T2WI.Results Ninety PET positive lesions in all 40patients were evaluated,including 40 primary lesions and 50 lymph nodes.Similar imaging quality and fusion quality of PET/CT,PET/MR T1WI and PET/MR T2WI were obtained without statistical difference (both P>0.05).For the lesion conspicuity,PET/MR T1WI and PET/MR T2WI demonstrated significantly better than PET/CT in positive primary lesions and lymph nodes (all P<0.05).For the characteristics of positive primary lesions,PET/MR T2WI provided more information than PET/CT in 29 lesions,equal to PET/CT in 4 lesions,and less than PET/CT in 7 lesions.Conclusion The application of PET/MR in HNSCC is feasible,being superior to PET/CT in indication of lesions in head and neck area.%目的 探讨头颈部鳞状细胞癌(HNSCC)的PET/CT及PET/MR特征.方法 纳入未经抗肿瘤治疗的头颈部鳞状细胞癌患者40例,所有患者均接受PET/CT及头颈部MR检查.由2名观察者独立观察PET阳性病灶,包括阳性原发灶及阳性淋巴结;并对PET/CT、PET/MR T1WI及PET/MR T2WI的图像质量、融合准确度、病灶清晰度、病灶特征等进行评分.分析2名观察者间的一致性.结果 40例患者共90个PET阳性病灶,包括阳性原发灶40个、阳性淋巴结50个.PET/CT、PET/MR T1WI及PET/MR T2WI在图像质量及融合准确度方面差异均无统计学意义(P均>0.05);在显示阳性原发灶及阳性淋巴结的清晰度方面,PET/MR T1WI及PET/MR T2WI均优于PET/CT(P均<0.05).40个阳性原发灶中,PET

  9. Dedicated brain PET system of PET/MR for brain research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Li; Liu, Yaqiang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Wei, Qingyang; Xu, Tianpeng

    2015-01-01

    This work is to replace PET ring in human brain PET/MR system with a dedicated wearable PET insert, aimed at improving both patient feasibility and system performance for brain imaging. The designed PET/MR system includes two parts: the inside parts, including a radio frequency (RF) coil and PET ring, are mounted on patient’s head, and the outside part, a MR imager, is dependent of patient. The RF coil is the innermost layer, surrounded by an outer PET-ring layer. They are supported by a MRcompatible structure. And both RF coil and PET detectors are placed inside a standard clinical 3-T MR imager. From the design of the system we can infer that some advantages can be achieved. First, high sensitivity will be achieved with the same amount crystals as the PET ring is more close to region-of-interest area, at a reduced cost. Second, by using a 2-layer depth of interaction (DOI) detector, the parallax effect can be minimized. The resolution will benefit from short positron range caused by magnetic field and smaller ring diameter will also reduce the effect of non-collinearity. Thirdly, as the PET ring is mounted on head, impact of patient motion will be reduced.

  10. Value of PET and PET-CT for monitoring tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiang; Zhao Jinhua

    2007-01-01

    18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET or PET-CT is an accurate test for differentiating residual viable tumor tissue from therapy-induced changes in tumor. Furthermore, quantitative assessment of therapy-induced changes in tumor 18 F-FDG uptake may allow the prediction of tumor response. Treatment may be adjusted according to tumor response. So it is increasingly used to monitor tumor response in patients undergoing chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Here we focused on practical aspects of 18 F-FDG PET or PET-CT for treatment monitoring and on the existing advantages and challenges. (authors)

  11. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET and PET-CT in early detection of cancer recurrent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yan; Zhao Jinhua

    2007-01-01

    Early detection of recurrent can improve prognosis and survival of patients with cancer. 18 F- fluorodeoxyglucose( 18 F-FDG) PET can detect metabolic changes before structural changes. The fused imaging provided by PET-CT can precisely localize the foci and demonstrate the complementary roles of functional and anatomic assessments in the diagnosis of cancer recurrence. In addition to the accurate diagnosis and definition of the whole extent of recurrent cancer, 18 F-FDG PET and PET-CT can impact patients management. (authors)

  12. Initial evaluation of a practical PET respiratory motion correction method in clinical simultaneous PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manber, Richard; Thielemans, Kris; Hutton, Brian; Barnes, Anna; Ourselin, Sebastien; Arridge, Simon; O’Meara, Celia; Atkinson, David

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory motion during PET acquisitions can cause image artefacts, with sharpness and tracer quantification adversely affected due to count ‘smearing’. Motion correction by registration of PET gates becomes increasingly difficult with shorter scan times and less counts. The advent of simultaneous PET/MRI scanners allows the use of high spatial resolution MRI to capture motion states during respiration [1, 2]. In this work, we use a respiratory signal derived from the PET list-mode data [3, ], with no requirement for an external device or MR sequence modifications.

  13. Dedicated brain PET system of PET/MR for brain research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Li; Liu, Yaqiang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Wei, Qingyang; Xu, Tianpeng [Institute of Medical Physics, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2015-05-18

    This work is to replace PET ring in human brain PET/MR system with a dedicated wearable PET insert, aimed at improving both patient feasibility and system performance for brain imaging. The designed PET/MR system includes two parts: the inside parts, including a radio frequency (RF) coil and PET ring, are mounted on patient’s head, and the outside part, a MR imager, is dependent of patient. The RF coil is the innermost layer, surrounded by an outer PET-ring layer. They are supported by a MRcompatible structure. And both RF coil and PET detectors are placed inside a standard clinical 3-T MR imager. From the design of the system we can infer that some advantages can be achieved. First, high sensitivity will be achieved with the same amount crystals as the PET ring is more close to region-of-interest area, at a reduced cost. Second, by using a 2-layer depth of interaction (DOI) detector, the parallax effect can be minimized. The resolution will benefit from short positron range caused by magnetic field and smaller ring diameter will also reduce the effect of non-collinearity. Thirdly, as the PET ring is mounted on head, impact of patient motion will be reduced.

  14. PET Probe-Guided Surgery in Patients with Breast Cancer: Proposal for a Methodological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    ORSARIA, PAOLO; CHIARAVALLOTI, AGOSTINO; FIORENTINI, ALESSANDRO; PISTOLESE, CHIARA; VANNI, GIANLUCA; VITTORIA GRANAI, ALESSANDRA; VARVARAS, DIMITRIOS; DANIELI, ROBERTA; SCHILLACI, ORAZIO; PETRELLA, GIUSEPPE; CLAUDIO BUONOMO, ORESTE

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although it is valuable for detecting distant metastases, identifying recurrence, and evaluating responses to chemotherapy, the role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in assessing locoregional nodal status for initial staging of breast cancer has not yet been well-defined in clinical practice. In the current report, we describe a new PET probe-based clinical approach, with evaluation of the technical performance of a handheld high-energy gamma probe for intraoperative localization of breast carcinomas, and evaluation of lymph node metastases during radio-guided oncological surgery. Patients and Methods: Three patients underwent a PET/CT scan immediately prior to surgery following the standard clinical protocol. Intraoperatively, tumors were localized and resected with the assistance of a hand-held gamma probe. PET-guided assessment of the presence or absence of regional nodal spread of malignancy was compared with the reference standard of histopathological examination. Results: In all three cases, perioperative 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging and intraoperative gamma probe detection verified complete resection of the hypermetabolic lesions and demonstrated no additional suspicious occult disease. Conclusion: This innovative approach demonstrates great promise for providing real-time access to metabolic and morphological tumor information that may lead to an optimal disease-tailored approach. In carefully selected indications, a PET probe can be a useful adjunct in surgical practice, but further trials with a larger number of patients need to be performed to verify these findings. PMID:28064227

  15. CT-based texture analysis potentially provides prognostic information complementary to interim fdg-pet for patients with hodgkin's and aggressive non-hodgkin's lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganeshan, B.; Miles, K.A.; Shortman, R.; Afaq, A.; Ardeshna, K.M.; Groves, A.M.; Kayani, I.; Babikir, S.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of computed tomography texture analysis (CTTA) to provide additional prognostic information in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). This retrospective, pilot-study approved by the IRB comprised 45 lymphoma patients undergoing routine 18F-FDG-PET-CT. Progression-free survival (PFS) was determined from clinical follow-up (mean-duration: 40 months; range: 10-62 months). Non-contrast-enhanced low-dose CT images were submitted to CTTA comprising image filtration to highlight features of different sizes followed by histogram-analysis using kurtosis. Prognostic value of CTTA was compared to PET FDG-uptake value, tumour-stage, tumour-bulk, lymphoma-type, treatment-regime, and interim FDG-PET (iPET) status using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Cox regression analysis determined the independence of significantly prognostic imaging and clinical features. A total of 27 patients had aggressive NHL and 18 had HL. Mean PFS was 48.5 months. There was no significant difference in pre-treatment CTTA between the lymphoma sub-types. Kaplan-Meier analysis found pre-treatment CTTA (medium feature scale, p=0.010) and iPET status (p<0.001) to be significant predictors of PFS. Cox analysis revealed that an interaction between pre-treatment CTTA and iPET status was the only independent predictor of PFS (HR: 25.5, 95% CI: 5.4-120, p<0.001). Specifically, pre-treatment CTTA risk stratified patients with negative iPET. CTTA can potentially provide prognostic information complementary to iPET for patients with HL and aggressive NHL. (orig.)

  16. Molecular Imaging Challenges With PET

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P

    2010-01-01

    The future trends in molecular imaging and associated challenges for in-vivo functional imaging are illustrated on the basis of a few examples, such as atherosclerosis vulnerable plaques imaging or stem cells tracking. A set of parameters are derived to define the specifications of a new generation of in-vivo imaging devices in terms of sensitivity, spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. The limitations of strategies used in present PET scanners are discussed and new approaches are proposed taking advantage of recent progress on materials, photodetectors and readout electronics. A special focus is put on metamaterials, as a new approach to bring more functionality to detection devices. It is shown that the route is now open towards a fully digital detector head with very high photon counting capability over a large energy range, excellent timing precision and possibility of imaging the energy deposition process.

  17. Business administration of PET facilities. A nationwide survey for prices of PET screening and a cost analysis of three facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsutake, Naohiro; Fujii, Ryo; Oku, Shinya; Furui, Yuji; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the business administration of positron emission tomography (PET) facilities based on the survey of the price of PET cancer screening and cost analysis of PET examination. The questionnaire survey of the price of PET cancer screening was implemented for all PET facilities in Japan. Cost data of PET examination, including fixed costs and variable costs, were obtained from three different medical institutions. The marked price of the PET cancer screening was yen111,499 in average, and the most popular range of prices was between yen80,000 and yen90,000. Costs of PET per examination were accounted for yen110,675, yen79,158 and yen111,644 in facility A, B and C, respectively. The results suggested that facilities with two or more PET/CT per a cyclotron could only secure profits. In Japan, the boom in PET facility construction could not continue in accordance with increasing number of PET facilities. It would become more essential to analyze the appropriate distribution of PET facilities and the adequate amount of PET procedures from the perspective of efficient utilization of the PET equipments and supply of PET-related healthcare. (author)

  18. Interobserver and Intraobserver Variability among Measurements of FDG PET/CT Parameters in Pulmonary Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülgün Büyükdereli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET/CT provides information about metabolic and morphologic status of malignancies. Tumor size and standardized uptake value (SUV measurements are crucial for cancer treatment monitoring.: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET/CT provides information about metabolic and morphologic status of malignancies. Tumor size and standardized uptake value (SUV measurements are crucial for cancer treatment monitoring. Aims: The purpose of our study was to assess the variability of these measurements performed by observers evaluating lung tumors. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: FDG PET/CT images of 97 patients with pulmonary tumors were independently evaluated by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Primary tumor size (UDCT, maximum SUV (SUVmax, mean SUV (SUVmean and maximum SUV normalized to liver mean SUV (SUVnliv max were measured by each observer at two different times with an interval of at least 2 weeks. Interobserver and intraobserver variabilities of measurements were evaluated through statistical methods. Results: Size of the lesions varied from 0.81 to 13.6 cm (mean 4.29±2.24 cm. Very good agreement was shown with correlation, Bland-Altman and regression analysis for all measured PET/CT parameters. In the interobserver and intraobserver variability analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficients were greater than 0.96 and 0.98, respectively. Conclusion: Semi-quantitative measurements of pulmonary tumors were highly reproducible when determined by experienced physicians with clinically available software for routine FDG PET/CT evaluation. Consistency may be improved if the same observer performs serial measurements for any one patient.

  19. PET scanning in plastic and reconstructive surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eirini, L.; Emmanouil, L.; Othonas, P.; Hans-Guenther, M.; Nikolaos, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this report we highlight the use of position emission tomography (PET) scan in plastic and reconstructive surgery. PET scanning is a very important tool in plastic surgery oncology (melanoma, soft-tissue sarcomas and bone sarcomas, head and neck cancer, peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities and breast cancer after breast esthetic surgery), as diagnosis, staging, treatment planning and follow-up of cancer patients is based on imaging. PET scanning seems also to be useful as a flap monitoring system as well as an infection's imaging tool, for example in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. PET also contributes to the understanding of pathophysiology of keloids which remain a therapeutic challenge. (author)

  20. Bacterial Zoonoses Transmitted by Household Pets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Peter Panduro; Broens, E.M.; Chomel, B.B.

    2016-01-01

    The close contact between household pets and people offers favourable conditions for bacterial transmission. In this article, the aetiology, prevalence, transmission, impact on human health and preventative measures are summarized for selected bacterial zoonoses transmissible by household pets. Six...... zoonoses representing distinct transmission routes were selected arbitrarily based on the available information on incidence and severity of pet-associated disease caused by zoonotic bacteria: bite infections and cat scratch disease (physical injuries), psittacosis (inhalation), leptospirosis (contact...... with urine), and campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis (faecal–oral ingestion). Antimicrobial resistance was also included due to the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria of zoonotic potential in dogs and cats. There is a general lack of data on pathogen prevalence in the relevant pet population...

  1. FDG PET/CT in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Henrik; Holdgaard, Paw Christian; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Region of Southern Denmark (RSD), covering 1.2 of Denmark's 5.6 million inhabitants, established a task force to (1) retrieve literature evidence for the clinical use of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and provide consequent recommendations and further to (2) compare the actual...... use of PET/CT in the RSD with these recommendations. This article summarizes the results. METHODS: A Work Group appointed a professional Subgroup which made Clinician Groups conduct literature reviews on six selected cancers responsible for 5,768 (62.6 %) of 9,213 PET/CT scans in the RSD in 2012...... use of PET/CT and literature-based recommendations was high in the first five mentioned cancers in that 96.2 % of scans were made for grade A or B indications versus only 22.2 % in gynaecological cancers. CONCLUSION: Evidence-based usefulness was reported in five of six selected cancers; evidence...

  2. Therapy assessment in multiple myeloma with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, Cristina [Medicina Nucleare Metropolitana di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Zamagni, Elena [Bologna University School of Medicine, Seragnoli Institute of Hematology, Bologna (Italy)

    2017-08-15

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell dyscrasia producing bone lytic lesions. In recent years, a wide spectrum of therapeutic approaches are available to treat the disease: an accurate therapy assessment has, therefore, become of utmost importance. In this field, imaging is becoming a cornerstone, especially in association with clinical parameters. Among imaging procedures, FDG PET/CT is recognized to provide reliable information, achieved in a very safe and fast procedure. The literature has produced very concordant results from different groups assessing the value of FDG PET/CT as a prognostic factor in general and in therapy assessment, but some issues remain regarding a standardization of image interpretation especially in borderline cases. So far, no data regarding nor other imaging compounds and the use of hybrid tomographs PET/MR are available to define therapy assessment in PET. (orig.)

  3. PET/CT applications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva González, Juan Perfecto; Martínez Ramírez, Aldo; Baum, Richard Paul

    2017-01-01

    PET means Positron Emission Tomography, it is a nuclear medicine technique in which radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitters are used to obtain biochemical-metabolic images of the human body. The use of PET / CT contributes to obtain multimodal images that combine anatomical and metabolic information, allowing a more reliable diagnosis of a tumor or local or distant metastases in an organ or tissue. Other multimodal devices combine metabolic imaging with nuclear magnetic resonance. PET/CT is mainly used in Oncology (85-90%), Neurology, Cardiology, Inflammation and Infection although it is currently also used in different medical and surgical pathologies. The present work is aimed at showing what PET/CT is and how useful it is in Oncology. (author)

  4. Don't Just Pet Your Chia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershey, David R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents ways to use ChiaPets to link biology-related topics such as taxonomy, morphology, ethnobotany, economic botany, hydroponics, salinity, photomorphogenesis, and phototropism with food and fertilizer chemistry, mathematics, art, and history. (MKR)

  5. Resting functional imaging tools (MRS, SPECT, PET and PCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Naalt, J

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging includes imaging techniques that provide information about the metabolic and hemodynamic status of the brain. Most commonly applied functional imaging techniques in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) include magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET) and perfusion CT (PCT). These imaging modalities are used to determine the extent of injury, to provide information for the prediction of outcome, and to assess evidence of cerebral ischemia. In TBI, secondary brain damage mainly comprises ischemia and is present in more than 80% of fatal cases with traumatic brain injury (Graham et al., 1989; Bouma et al., 1991; Coles et al., 2004). In particular, while SPECT measures cerebral perfusion and MRS determines metabolism, PET is able to assess both perfusion and cerebral metabolism. This chapter will describe the application of these techniques in traumatic brain injury separately for the major groups of severity comprising the mild and moderate to severe group. The application in TBI and potential difficulties of each technique is described. The use of imaging techniques in children will be separately outlined. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Eye Contact Is Crucial for Referential Communication in Pet Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savalli, Carine; Resende, Briseida; Gaunet, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Dogs discriminate human direction of attention cues, such as body, gaze, head and eye orientation, in several circumstances. Eye contact particularly seems to provide information on human readiness to communicate; when there is such an ostensive cue, dogs tend to follow human communicative gestures more often. However, little is known about how such cues influence the production of communicative signals (e.g. gaze alternation and sustained gaze) in dogs. In the current study, in order to get an unreachable food, dogs needed to communicate with their owners in several conditions that differ according to the direction of owners' visual cues, namely gaze, head, eyes, and availability to make eye contact. Results provided evidence that pet dogs did not rely on details of owners' direction of visual attention. Instead, they relied on the whole combination of visual cues and especially on the owners' availability to make eye contact. Dogs increased visual communicative behaviors when they established eye contact with their owners, a different strategy compared to apes and baboons, that intensify vocalizations and gestures when human is not visually attending. The difference in strategy is possibly due to distinct status: domesticated vs wild. Results are discussed taking into account the ecological relevance of the task since pet dogs live in human environment and face similar situations on a daily basis during their lives.

  7. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  8. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  9. The establishment of the Rossendorf PET Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, B.; Steinbach, J.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the newly established Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Center at the Institut of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry in Rossendorf are described, referring to medical research, development of tracers and radiochemicals developments, biochemistry and future prospects of PET in Rossendorf. The layout of the center is also described considering the cyclotron and targetry, the transport system, the radiopharmaceutical laboratories and the tomograph. A schedule for project development is going. (BBR)

  10. PET tracer for imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    There is provided a radiolabelled peptide-based compound for diagnostic imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). The compound may thus be used for diagnosis of malignant diseases. The compound is particularly useful for imaging of somatostatin overexpression in tumors, wherein the compound...... is capable of being imaged by PET when administered with a target dose in the range of 150-350 MBq, such as 150-250 MBq, preferable in the range of 191-210 MBq....

  11. PET/MRI. Methodology and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrio, Ignasi [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona, Hospital Sant Pau (Spain). Dept. Medicina Nuclear; Ros, Pablo (ed.) [Univ. Hospitals Case, Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Provides detailed information on the methodology and equipment of MRI-PET. Covers a wide range of clinical applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Written by an international group of experts in MRI and PET. PET/MRI is an exciting novel diagnostic imaging modality that combines the precise anatomic and physiologic information provided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the molecular data obtained with positron emission tomography (PET). PET/MRI offers the promise of a simplified work flow, reduced radiation, whole-body imaging with superior soft tissue contrast, and time of flight physiologic information. It has been described as the pathway to molecular imaging in medicine. In compiling this textbook, the editors have brought together a truly international group of experts in MRI and PET. The book is divided into two parts. The first part covers methodology and equipment and comprises chapters on basic molecular medicine, development of specific contrast agents, MR attenuation and validation, quantitative MRI and PET motion correction, and technical implications for both MRI and PET. The second part of the book focuses on clinical applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Imaging of major neoplasms, including lymphomas and tumors of the breast, prostate, and head and neck, is covered in individual chapters. Further chapters address functional and metabolic cardiovascular examinations and major central nervous system applications such as brain tumors and dementias. Risks, safety aspects, and healthcare costs and impacts are also discussed. This book will be of interest to all radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians who wish to learn more about the latest developments in this important emerging imaging modality and its applications.

  12. Bringing Physiology into PET of the Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Keiding, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Several physiologic features make interpretation of PET studies of liver physiology an exciting challenge. As with other organs, hepatic tracer kinetics using PET is quantified by dynamic recording of the liver after the administration of a radioactive tracer, with measurements of time–activity curves in the blood supply. However, the liver receives blood from both the portal vein and the hepatic artery, with the peak of the portal vein time–activity curve being delayed and dispersed compared...

  13. Clinical evaluation of PET image quality as a function of acquisition time in a new TOF-PET/MR compared to TOF-PET/CT - initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Huellner, Martin; De Galiza Barbosa, Felipe; Ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The recently available integrated PET/MR imaging can offer significant additional advances in clinical imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the PET performance between a PET/CT scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MR scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of SUV as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). Five brain and five whole body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MR acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed good correlation between PET/CT and PET/MR brain SUVs. Liver correlation was lower, with uptake underestimation in PET/MR, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MR offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artefacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole body scans, while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The PET-component of the TOF-PET/MR showed higher image quality compared to PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, these results account mainly for body imaging, while no significant difference were found in brain imaging. This overall higher image quality suggests that the acquisition time or injected activity can be reduced by at least 37% on the PET/MR scanner.

  14. Clinical evaluation of PET image quality as a function of acquisition time in a new TOF-PET/MR compared to TOF-PET/CT - initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Huellner, Martin; De Galiza Barbosa, Felipe; Ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-18

    The recently available integrated PET/MR imaging can offer significant additional advances in clinical imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the PET performance between a PET/CT scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MR scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of SUV as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). Five brain and five whole body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MR acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed good correlation between PET/CT and PET/MR brain SUVs. Liver correlation was lower, with uptake underestimation in PET/MR, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MR offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artefacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole body scans, while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The PET-component of the TOF-PET/MR showed higher image quality compared to PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, these results account mainly for body imaging, while no significant difference were found in brain imaging. This overall higher image quality suggests that the acquisition time or injected activity can be reduced by at least 37% on the PET/MR scanner.

  15. TOF-PET/MR和TOF-PET/CT在体部恶性肿瘤SUVmax值的比较%Comparision of SUVmax of TOF-PET/MR and TOF-PET/CT in body malignant tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋天彬; 卢洁; 崔碧霄; 马杰; 杨宏伟; 马蕾; 梁志刚

    2017-01-01

    目的 探讨时间飞行(TOF)技术PET/CT和PET/MR检查体部恶性病变SUVmax值的一致性.方法 回顾性分析接受TOF-PET/CT和TOF-PET/MR检查的体部恶性肿瘤患者20例,分为先PET/CT后PET/MR组和先PET/MR后PET/CT组,每组10例.采用Bland-Altma图评价两次检查病灶SUVmax值的一致性,采用多因素方差分析评价扫描顺序和机器类型对病灶的SUVmax测量值的影响.结果 TOF-PET/CT与TOF-PET/MR检查病灶的SUVmax值有较好的一致性[先PET/CT后PET/MR组:均值差为3.06,95%CI(-7.5,13.6),先PET/MR后PET/CT组:均值差3.0,95%CI(-2.4,8.3)].扫描顺序对于恶性病灶的SUVmax有影响(F=46.00,P<0.001),而机器类型对恶性病灶的SUVmax值无影响(F=0.005,P=0.95).结论 TOF-PET/MR和TOF-PET/CT在体部恶性病变SUVmax值测量方面具有相当的诊断价值,且延迟显像SUVmax的增加与采集时间有关,而与检查机器类型无关.%Objective To explore the consistency of time-of-flight (TOF) technology of PET/MRI and PET/CT for max standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of body malignant tumors.Methods A retrospective analysis of TOF-PET/CT and TOF-PET/MR imaging data about twenty patients with body malignant tumors was performed.Patients were divided into two groups (each n=10),including PET/CT first and sequentially PET/MR group and PET/MR first and sequentially PET/CT group.Bland-Altman figure was used to evaluate consistency of SUVmax of malignant lesions between TOF-PET/CT and TOF-PET/MR.Multi-way ANOVA was used to analysis effect of machine type and exam order on SUVmaxof malignant lesions in TOF-PET/CT and TOF-PET/MR.Results SUVmax of malignant lesions in TOF-PET/CT and TOF-PET/MR had good consistency in two groups (PET/CT first and sequentially PET/MR group:Mean difference was 3.06,95%CI was [-7.5,13.6];PET/MR first and sequentially PET/CT group:Mean difference was 3.0,95%CI was [-2.4,8.3]).SUVmax was not influenced by machine type (F=0.005,P=0.95),but exam order (F=46.00,P<0

  16. FDG-PET and FDG-PET/CT for therapy monitoring and restaging in malignant lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottaghy, F.M.; Krause, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET allows to assess residual masses in patients with malignant lymphoma differentiating vital tumor from scar tissue. This approach is not applicable with conventional imaging methods (CDM) such as CT or MRI. On the other hand circumscribed results often cannot be definitely allocated in PET, therefore the combined morphological-biochemical approach using the now available PET/CT systems promises to be a pathbreaking technical progress. There is no doubt that stand alone PET is superior to CDM differentiating residual scar tissue from vital tumor as has been shown in 15 recently published studies. The median sensitivity for detecting active disease with FDG PET across the studies was 91%; the corresponding specificity was 89%. As a result FDG PET had a high negative predictive value of 94%. In contrast, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of CDM in the 9 studies were a direct comparison was available were low (31% and 46%, one study 82%). PET positive residual masses were associated with a progression-free survival of 0 - 55%. Only a few studies have included FDG-PET in therapy response monitoring studies, however also these results are promising. At the moment FDG-PET seems to be the best possibility to characterize and qualitatively visualize vitality of tumor masses and also hold promises for efficient therapy response monitoring in patients with malignant lymphoma. Therefore it should be included in standard diagnostic protocols in lymphoma patients. The combined PET/CT has to be ranked superior to conventional PET studies as in many cases the combined structural and functional imaging brings a clearer diagnostic statement. (orig.) [de

  17. PeneloPET, a Monte Carlo PET simulation tool based on PENELOPE: features and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espana, S; Herraiz, J L; Vicente, E; Udias, J M [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J J; Desco, M [Unidad de Medicina y CirugIa Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jose@nuc2.fis.ucm.es

    2009-03-21

    Monte Carlo simulations play an important role in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, as an essential tool for the research and development of new scanners and for advanced image reconstruction. PeneloPET, a PET-dedicated Monte Carlo tool, is presented and validated in this work. PeneloPET is based on PENELOPE, a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of the transport in matter of electrons, positrons and photons, with energies from a few hundred eV to 1 GeV. PENELOPE is robust, fast and very accurate, but it may be unfriendly to people not acquainted with the FORTRAN programming language. PeneloPET is an easy-to-use application which allows comprehensive simulations of PET systems within PENELOPE. Complex and realistic simulations can be set by modifying a few simple input text files. Different levels of output data are available for analysis, from sinogram and lines-of-response (LORs) histogramming to fully detailed list mode. These data can be further exploited with the preferred programming language, including ROOT. PeneloPET simulates PET systems based on crystal array blocks coupled to photodetectors and allows the user to define radioactive sources, detectors, shielding and other parts of the scanner. The acquisition chain is simulated in high level detail; for instance, the electronic processing can include pile-up rejection mechanisms and time stamping of events, if desired. This paper describes PeneloPET and shows the results of extensive validations and comparisons of simulations against real measurements from commercial acquisition systems. PeneloPET is being extensively employed to improve the image quality of commercial PET systems and for the development of new ones.

  18. PeneloPET, a Monte Carlo PET simulation tool based on PENELOPE: features and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espana, S; Herraiz, J L; Vicente, E; Udias, J M; Vaquero, J J; Desco, M

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations play an important role in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, as an essential tool for the research and development of new scanners and for advanced image reconstruction. PeneloPET, a PET-dedicated Monte Carlo tool, is presented and validated in this work. PeneloPET is based on PENELOPE, a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of the transport in matter of electrons, positrons and photons, with energies from a few hundred eV to 1 GeV. PENELOPE is robust, fast and very accurate, but it may be unfriendly to people not acquainted with the FORTRAN programming language. PeneloPET is an easy-to-use application which allows comprehensive simulations of PET systems within PENELOPE. Complex and realistic simulations can be set by modifying a few simple input text files. Different levels of output data are available for analysis, from sinogram and lines-of-response (LORs) histogramming to fully detailed list mode. These data can be further exploited with the preferred programming language, including ROOT. PeneloPET simulates PET systems based on crystal array blocks coupled to photodetectors and allows the user to define radioactive sources, detectors, shielding and other parts of the scanner. The acquisition chain is simulated in high level detail; for instance, the electronic processing can include pile-up rejection mechanisms and time stamping of events, if desired. This paper describes PeneloPET and shows the results of extensive validations and comparisons of simulations against real measurements from commercial acquisition systems. PeneloPET is being extensively employed to improve the image quality of commercial PET systems and for the development of new ones.

  19. Positron emission tomography (PET) and pancreatic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montravers, F.; Kerrou, K.; Grahek, D.; Gutman, F.; Beco, V. de; Talbot, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    Neoplasms of the pancreas may originate front both exocrine and endocrine cells but in 90% of the cases, they correspond to ductal adenocarcinomas. For adenocarcinomas, the major indication of FDG-PET corresponds to the pre-operative staging because unexpected distant metastases can be detected by FDG-PET in about 20 to 40% of the cases, which results in avoidance of unnecessary surgical procedures. FDG PET is also useful in evaluation of the treatment effect, monitoring after the operation and detection of recurrent pancreatic cancers. For the characterisation of the pancreatic tumour, the performance of FDG-PET is sometimes limited due to poor cellularity, hyperglycemia or inflammatory processes. especially for large tumours and is indicated only in cases of doubtful results of CT or MRI. For endocrine pancreatic tumours, FDG-PET is useful only in case of poorly-differentiated and aggressive tumours. F-DOPA PET can he useful, complementary to pentetreotide scintigraphy, in well-differentiated endocrine tumours. (authors)

  20. Effect of PET functionalization in composites of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Cazan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The functionalization of polyethylene terephthalate (PET from tire rubber–PET–high density polyethylene (HDPE composites represents a key strategy for improving the composite properties. This is a practical and effective method to improve the interface between matrix (waste tire rubber and fillers (waste PET and HDPE. By PET functionalization, adherence and surface properties of composite materials can be controlled. PET functionalization was performed with polyethylene glycol (PEG 400, 1% and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS 1%. The characterization of the components and composite are discussed in terms of surface energy values (evaluated from water contact angle measurements and surface morphology by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The structural and conformational changes were investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR Spectroscopy while the crystalline structure was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The improved interfacial adhesion, thermal stability and mechanical properties (stress–strain, compression and impact resistance of the composites are correlated with the PET functionalization, with non-ionic (PEG and an anionic surfactant (SDS. The results proved that the interface properties are improved by functionalization of PET. The best mechanical properties were recorded at 30 min moulding. The samples with 45% PET–SDS showed the best combination of mechanical properties: tensile strength (1.56 N/mm2, impact strength (43.72 kJ/m2 and compression (158.78 N/mm2.

  1. Clinical application of PET in abdominal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woon

    2002-01-01

    Clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) is rapidly increasing for the detection and staging of cancer at whole-body studies performed with the glucose analogue tracer 2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FG). Although FDG PET cannot match the anatomic resolution of conventional imaging techniques in the liver and the other abdominal organs, it is particularly useful for identification and characterization of the entire body simultaneously. FDG PET can show foci of metastatic disease that may not be apparent at conventional anatomic imaging and can aid in the characterizing of indeterminate soft-tissue masses. Most abdominal cancer requires surgical management. FGD PET can improve the selection of patients for surgical treatment and thereby reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with inappropriate surgery. FDG PET is also useful for the early detection of recurrence and the monitoring of therapeutic effect. The abdominal cancers, such as gastroesophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer and pancreatic cancer, are common malignancies in Korea, and PET is one of the most promising and useful methodologies for the management of abdominal cancers

  2. Who wants cancer screening with PET?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasunaga, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Cancer screening using whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) has gradually become popular in Japan. Although some studies have reported high cancer detection rates with PET screening, the justification for such an approach is still unclear, and no evidence has been provided to indicate that PET screening reduces cancer mortality. We measured the general public's willingness to pay (WTP) for this service using a contingent valuation method, after providing them with sufficient information regarding the efficacy and limitations of the service. Methods: A computer-assisted questionnaire survey was conducted on males and females in Japan aged between 40 and 59 years. The study participants (n = 390) were provided with sufficient information about the PET procedure, the high cancer detection rate, false-negatives/false-positives and the fact that the mortality-reducing effect of PET screening has not yet been demonstrated. The participants' WTP was ascertained by a double-bound dichotomous choice approach. Results: The average WTP among all the participants was $68.0 (95% confidence interval: $56.9-79.2). A Weibull regression analysis showed that income, degree of concern about health, and family history of cancer were significant factors affecting WTP. Conclusions: The actual charge for PET screening in Japan is approximately $1000 on average, which is significantly higher than the participants' WTP for the actual benefit obtained from the service. If the Japanese healthcare consumers are well-informed, most of them would avoid purchasing such a costly service.

  3. Health Examination by PET. (1) Cancer Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    Cancer examination by positron emission tomography (PET) started in Japan in 1994 and has been rapidly popularized. This paper describes author's experience of the examination in his hospital along the recent Japanese guideline for the PET cancer examination. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is intravenously injected at 3.7 (or 4.6, for diabetic patients) MBq/kg after 4-5 hr fasting and 40 min later, imaging is conducted with additional delayed scan at 2 hr to reduce the possible false positive. Image is taken by the equipment with PET-specific camera, of which quality assurance (QA) is maintained according to the guideline, and 3D image is constructed by the ordered subset expectation maximization method. Number of examinees during 4.5 years are 18,210 (M/F=9,735/8,475), and 236 (1.3%), together with use of other test measures like ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biochemical marker and occult blood as well, are found to have cancer of thyroid, large bowel, lung, breast and others. The false negative rate by PET alone is 78/236 (33%) for cancer. PET examination has problems of image reading and specificity of organs, and tasks of informed consent, test cost, increased exchange of information and radiation exposure. However, PET cancer examination will be established as a routine diagnostic tool when the accumulated evidence of early cancer detection is shown useful for improving the survival rate and for reducing the medicare cost. (T.I.)

  4. Nutritional Sustainability of Pet Foods12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kelly S.; Carter, Rebecca A.; Yount, Tracy P.; Aretz, Jan; Buff, Preston R.

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable practices meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Applying these concepts to food and feed production, nutritional sustainability is the ability of a food system to provide sufficient energy and essential nutrients required to maintain good health in a population without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their nutritional needs. Ecological, social, and economic aspects must be balanced to support the sustainability of the overall food system. The nutritional sustainability of a food system can be influenced by several factors, including the ingredient selection, nutrient composition, digestibility, and consumption rates of a diet. Carbon and water footprints vary greatly among plant- and animal-based ingredients, production strategy, and geographical location. Because the pet food industry is based largely on by-products and is tightly interlinked with livestock production and the human food system, however, it is quite unique with regard to sustainability. Often based on consumer demand rather than nutritional requirements, many commercial pet foods are formulated to provide nutrients in excess of current minimum recommendations, use ingredients that compete directly with the human food system, or are overconsumed by pets, resulting in food wastage and obesity. Pet food professionals have the opportunity to address these challenges and influence the sustainability of pet ownership through product design, manufacturing processes, public education, and policy change. A coordinated effort across the industry that includes ingredient buyers, formulators, and nutritionists may result in a more sustainable pet food system. PMID:23493530

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Florbetapir-PET in Alzheimer's Disease: A Spanish Societal Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, John; Michalopoulos, Steven; Dai, Minghan; Andrade, Paula; Dilla, Tatiana; Happich, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The rising prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and other diseases associated with dementia, imposes significant burden to various stakeholders who care for the elderly. Management of AD is complicated by multiple factors including disease-specific features which make it difficult to diagnose accurately during milder stages. Florbetapir F18 positron emission tomography (florbetapir-PET) is an approved imaging tool used to capture beta-amyloid neuritic plaque density in brains of cognitively impaired adults undergoing evaluation for AD and other causes of cognitive impairment. It has the potential to help improve healthcare outcomes as it may help clinicians identify patients with AD early so that treatments are initiated when most effective. Evaluate the potential long-term clinical and economic outcomes of adopting florbetapir-PET--adjunctive to standard clinical evaluation (SCE)--versus SCE alone in the diagnostic assessment of cognitively impaired patients with suspected AD. A decision analysis with a ten-year time horizon was developed in compliance with Good Research Practices and CHEERS guidelines. The target population was comprised of Spanish patients who were undergoing initial assessment for cognitive impairment (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] score=20). Diagnostic accuracy, rate of cognitive decline, effect of drugs on cognition and dwelling status, economic burden (direct and indirect costs), and quality of life (QoL) were based on relevant clinical studies and published literature. Scenario analysis was applied to explore outcomes under different conditions, which included: (i) use of florbetapir-PET earlier in disease progression (MMSE score=22); and (ii) the addition of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET to SCE. Adjunctive florbetapir-PET increased quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) by 0.008 years and increased costs by 36 compared to SCE alone (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio [ICER], 4,769). Use of florbetapir-PET was dominant in alternate

  6. Imaging with 124I in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: is PET/MRI superior to PET/CT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binse, I.; Poeppel, T.D.; Ruhlmann, M.; Gomez, B.; Bockisch, A.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, S.J.; Umutlu, L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare integrated PET/CT and PET/MRI for their usefulness in detecting and categorizing cervical iodine-positive lesions in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer using 124 I as tracer. The study group comprised 65 patients at high risk of iodine-positive metastasis who underwent PET/CT (low-dose CT scan, PET acquisition time 2 min; PET/CT 2 ) followed by PET/MRI of the neck 24 h after 124 I administration. PET images from both modalities were analysed for the numbers of tracer-positive lesions. Two different acquisition times were used for the comparisons, one matching the PET/CT 2 acquisition time (2 min, PET/MRI 2 ) and the other covering the whole MRI scan time (30 min, PET/MRI 30 ). Iodine-positive lesions were categorized as metastasis, thyroid remnant or inconclusive according to their location on the PET/CT images. Morphological information provided by MRI was considered for evaluation of lesions on PET/MRI and for volume information. PET/MRI 2 detected significantly more iodine-positive metastases and thyroid remnants than PET/CT 2 (72 vs. 60, p = 0.002, and 100 vs. 80, p = 0.001, respectively), but the numbers of patients with at least one tumour lesion identified were not significantly different (21/65 vs. 17/65 patients). PET/MRI 30 tended to detect more PET-positive metastases than PET/MRI 2 (88 vs. 72), but the difference was not significant (p = 0.07). Of 21 lesions classified as inconclusive on PET/CT, 5 were assigned to metastasis or thyroid remnant when evaluated by PET/MRI. Volume information was available in 34 % of iodine-positive metastases and 2 % of thyroid remnants on PET/MRI. PET/MRI of the neck was found to be superior to PET/CT in detecting iodine-positive lesions. This was attributed to the higher sensitivity of the PET component, Although helpful in some cases, we found no substantial advantage of PET/MRI over PET/CT in categorizing iodine-positive lesions as either metastasis or thyroid remnant

  7. Imaging with {sup 124}I in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: is PET/MRI superior to PET/CT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binse, I.; Poeppel, T.D.; Ruhlmann, M.; Gomez, B.; Bockisch, A.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, S.J. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Umutlu, L. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Essen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare integrated PET/CT and PET/MRI for their usefulness in detecting and categorizing cervical iodine-positive lesions in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer using {sup 124}I as tracer. The study group comprised 65 patients at high risk of iodine-positive metastasis who underwent PET/CT (low-dose CT scan, PET acquisition time 2 min; PET/CT{sub 2}) followed by PET/MRI of the neck 24 h after {sup 124}I administration. PET images from both modalities were analysed for the numbers of tracer-positive lesions. Two different acquisition times were used for the comparisons, one matching the PET/CT{sub 2} acquisition time (2 min, PET/MRI{sub 2}) and the other covering the whole MRI scan time (30 min, PET/MRI{sub 30}). Iodine-positive lesions were categorized as metastasis, thyroid remnant or inconclusive according to their location on the PET/CT images. Morphological information provided by MRI was considered for evaluation of lesions on PET/MRI and for volume information. PET/MRI{sub 2} detected significantly more iodine-positive metastases and thyroid remnants than PET/CT{sub 2} (72 vs. 60, p = 0.002, and 100 vs. 80, p = 0.001, respectively), but the numbers of patients with at least one tumour lesion identified were not significantly different (21/65 vs. 17/65 patients). PET/MRI{sub 30} tended to detect more PET-positive metastases than PET/MRI{sub 2} (88 vs. 72), but the difference was not significant (p = 0.07). Of 21 lesions classified as inconclusive on PET/CT, 5 were assigned to metastasis or thyroid remnant when evaluated by PET/MRI. Volume information was available in 34 % of iodine-positive metastases and 2 % of thyroid remnants on PET/MRI. PET/MRI of the neck was found to be superior to PET/CT in detecting iodine-positive lesions. This was attributed to the higher sensitivity of the PET component, Although helpful in some cases, we found no substantial advantage of PET/MRI over PET/CT in categorizing iodine

  8. CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease concord with amyloid-β PET and predict clinical progression: A study of fully automated immunoassays in BioFINDER and ADNI cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Oskar; Seibyl, John; Stomrud, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Trojanowski, John Q; Bittner, Tobias; Lifke, Valeria; Corradini, Veronika; Eichenlaub, Udo; Batrla, Richard; Buck, Katharina; Zink, Katharina; Rabe, Christina; Blennow, Kaj; Shaw, Leslie M

    2018-03-01

    We studied whether fully automated Elecsys cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoassay results were concordant with positron emission tomography (PET) and predicted clinical progression, even with cutoffs established in an independent cohort. Cutoffs for Elecsys amyloid-β 1-42 (Aβ), total tau/Aβ(1-42), and phosphorylated tau/Aβ(1-42) were defined against [ 18 F]flutemetamol PET in Swedish BioFINDER (n = 277) and validated against [ 18 F]florbetapir PET in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 646). Clinical progression in patients with mild cognitive impairment (n = 619) was studied. CSF total tau/Aβ(1-42) and phosphorylated tau/Aβ(1-42) ratios were highly concordant with PET classification in BioFINDER (overall percent agreement: 90%; area under the curve: 94%). The CSF biomarker statuses established by predefined cutoffs were highly concordant with PET classification in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (overall percent agreement: 89%-90%; area under the curves: 96%) and predicted greater 2-year clinical decline in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Strikingly, tau/Aβ ratios were as accurate as semiquantitative PET image assessment in predicting visual read-based outcomes. Elecsys CSF biomarker assays may provide reliable alternatives to PET in Alzheimer's disease diagnosis. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Integrated analysis of dynamic FET PET/CT parameters, histology, and methylation profiling of 44 gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrich, Manuel; Huang, Kristin; Schrimpf, Daniel; Albert, Nathalie L; Hielscher, Thomas; von Deimling, Andreas; Schüller, Ulrich; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2018-05-07

    methylation analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed slightly greater diagnostic accuracy with methylation-based diagnosis. IDH-mutant gliomas and GBM subgroups tended to differ in their 18 F-FET PET kinetics. The status of dynamic 18 F-FET PET as a biologically and clinically relevant imaging modality is confirmed in the context of molecular glioma diagnosis.

  10. Role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis and management of vasculitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerizer, Imene; Tan, Kathryn; Khan, Sameer; Barwick, Tara [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Imperial College Healthcare, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London (United Kingdom); Marzola, Maria Cristina [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET/CT Centre, Radiology and Medical Physics, ' Santa Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Rovigo (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET/CT Centre, Radiology and Medical Physics, ' Santa Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Rovigo (Italy)], E-mail: domenico.rubello@libero.it; Al-Nahhas, Adil [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Imperial College Healthcare, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: to investigate the role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the evaluation of vasculitis. Materials and methods: a systematic revision of the papers published in PubMed/Medline until December 2009 was done. Results: FDG-PET and PET/CT have been proven to be valuable in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis, especially giant cells arteritis with sensitivity values ranging 77% to 92%, and specificity values ranging 89% to 100%. In particular, FDG-PET/CT has demonstrated the potential to non-invasively diagnose the onset of the vasculitis earlier than traditional anatomical imaging techniques, thus enabling prompt treatment. False positive results mainly occur in the differential diagnosis between vasculitis and atherosclerotic vessels in elderly patients. Another area where FDG-PET/CT is gaining wider acceptance is in monitoring response to therapy; it can reliably detect the earliest changes of disease improvement post-therapy, and persistent activity is an indicator of non-responders to therapy. A few data have been reported about medium/small vessel vasculitis. Discussion: FDG-PET and PET/CT have proven utility: (a) in the initial diagnosis of patients suspected of having vasculitis particularly in those who present with non-specific symptoms; (b) in the identification of areas of increased FDG uptake in which a biopsy should be done for obtaining a diagnosis; (c) in evaluating the extent of the disease; (d) in assessing response to treatment.

  11. Role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis and management of vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerizer, Imene; Tan, Kathryn; Khan, Sameer; Barwick, Tara; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rubello, Domenico; Al-Nahhas, Adil

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to investigate the role of FDG-PET and PET/CT in the evaluation of vasculitis. Materials and methods: a systematic revision of the papers published in PubMed/Medline until December 2009 was done. Results: FDG-PET and PET/CT have been proven to be valuable in the diagnosis of large-vessel vasculitis, especially giant cells arteritis with sensitivity values ranging 77% to 92%, and specificity values ranging 89% to 100%. In particular, FDG-PET/CT has demonstrated the potential to non-invasively diagnose the onset of the vasculitis earlier than traditional anatomical imaging techniques, thus enabling prompt treatment. False positive results mainly occur in the differential diagnosis between vasculitis and atherosclerotic vessels in elderly patients. Another area where FDG-PET/CT is gaining wider acceptance is in monitoring response to therapy; it can reliably detect the earliest changes of disease improvement post-therapy, and persistent activity is an indicator of non-responders to therapy. A few data have been reported about medium/small vessel vasculitis. Discussion: FDG-PET and PET/CT have proven utility: (a) in the initial diagnosis of patients suspected of having vasculitis particularly in those who present with non-specific symptoms; (b) in the identification of areas of increased FDG uptake in which a biopsy should be done for obtaining a diagnosis; (c) in evaluating the extent of the disease; (d) in assessing response to treatment.

  12. An update on the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khiewvan, Benjapa; Torigian, Drew A.; Emamzadehfard, Sahra; Paydary, Koosha; Salavati, Ali; Houshmand, Sina; Werner, Thomas J.; Alavi, Abass

    2017-01-01

    This review article summarizes the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer. With regard to the diagnosis of ovarian cancer, the presence of FDG uptake within the ovary of a postmenopausal woman raises the concern for ovarian cancer. Multiple studies show that FDG PET/CT can detect lymph node and distant metastasis in ovarian cancer with high accuracy and may, therefore, alter the management to obtain better clinical outcomes. Although PET/CT staging is superior for N and M staging of ovarian cancer, its role is limited for T staging. Additionally, FDG PET/CT is of great benefit in evaluating treatment response and has prognostic value in patients with ovarian cancer. FDG PET/CT also has value to detect recurrent disease, particularly in patients with elevated serum CA-125 levels and negative or inconclusive conventional imaging test results. PET/MRI may beneficial for tumor staging because MRI has higher soft tissue contrast and no ionizing radiation exposure compared to CT. Some non-FDG PET radiotracers such as 18 F-fluorothymidine (FLT) or 11 C-methionine (MET) have been studied in preclinical and clinical studies as well and may play a role in the evaluation of patients with ovarian cancer. (orig.)

  13. Imaging corn plants with PhytoPET, a modular PET system for plant biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.; Kross, B.; McKisson, J.; McKisson, J. E.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.; Bonito, G.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Crowell, A.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Topp, C.; Smith, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    PhytoPET is a modular positron emission tomography (PET) system designed specifically for plant imaging. The PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes and pixelated LYSO arrays. We have used the PhytoPET system to perform preliminary corn plant imaging studies at the Duke University Biology Department Phytotron. Initial evaluation of the PhytoPET system to image the biodistribution of the positron emitting tracer {sup 11}C in corn plants is presented. {sup 11}CO{sub 2} is loaded into corn seedlings by a leaf-labeling cuvette and translocation of {sup 11}C-sugars is imaged by a flexible arrangement of PhytoPET modules on each side. The PhytoPET system successfully images {sup 11}C within corn plants and allows for the dynamic measurement of {sup 11}C-sugar translocation from the leaf to the roots.

  14. PET motion correction in context of integrated PET/MR: Current techniques, limitations, and future projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Ashley; Smith, Jye; Thomas, Paul; Rose, Stephen; Dowson, Nicholas

    2017-12-01

    Patient motion is an important consideration in modern PET image reconstruction. Advances in PET technology mean motion has an increasingly important influence on resulting image quality. Motion-induced artifacts can have adverse effects on clinical outcomes, including missed diagnoses and oversized radiotherapy treatment volumes. This review aims to summarize the wide variety of motion correction techniques available in PET and combined PET/CT and PET/MR, with a focus on the latter. A general framework for the motion correction of PET images is presented, consisting of acquisition, modeling, and correction stages. Methods for measuring, modeling, and correcting motion and associated artifacts, both in literature and commercially available, are presented, and their relative merits are contrasted. Identified limitations of current methods include modeling of aperiodic and/or unpredictable motion, attaining adequate temporal resolution for motion correction in dynamic kinetic modeling acquisitions, and maintaining availability of the MR in PET/MR scans for diagnostic acquisitions. Finally, avenues for future investigation are discussed, with a focus on improvements that could improve PET image quality, and that are practical in the clinical environment. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. PET/CT and dedicated PET in breast cancer: Implications for classification, staging, and response monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, B.B.

    2013-01-01

    De PET-CT, een scan die gebruik maakt van radioactiviteit om tumoren in beeld te brengen, is een zinvol instrument voor beeldvorming van patiënten met borstkanker, met name van patiënten met een tumor groter dan drie centimeter of tumor-positieve lymfeklieren. De PET-CT is vooral van waarde voor de

  16. Qualification test of a MPPC-based PET module for future MRI-PET scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurei, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Kato, T.; Fujita, T.; Funamoto, H.; Tsujikawa, T.; Yamamoto, S.

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a high-resolution, compact Positron Emission Tomography (PET) module for future use in MRI-PET scanners. The module consists of large-area, 4×4 ch MPPC arrays (Hamamatsu S11827-3344MG) optically coupled with Ce:LYSO scintillators fabricated into 12×12 matrices of 1×1 mm2 pixels. At this stage, a pair of module and coincidence circuits was assembled into an experimental prototype gantry arranged in a ring of 90 mm in diameter to form the MPPC-based PET system. The PET detector ring was then positioned around the RF coil of the 4.7 T MRI system. We took an image of a point 22Na source under fast spin echo (FSE) and gradient echo (GE), in order to measure interference between the MPPC-based PET and the MRI. We only found a slight degradation in the spatial resolution of the PET image from 1.63 to 1.70 mm (FWHM; x-direction), or 1.48-1.55 mm (FWHM; y-direction) when operating with the MRI, while the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the MRI image was only degraded by 5%. These results encouraged us to develop a more advanced version of the MRI-PET gantry with eight MPPC-based PET modules, whose detailed design and first qualification test are also presented in this paper.

  17. An update on the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khiewvan, Benjapa [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mahidol University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok (Thailand); Torigian, Drew A.; Emamzadehfard, Sahra; Paydary, Koosha; Salavati, Ali; Houshmand, Sina; Werner, Thomas J.; Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    This review article summarizes the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in ovarian cancer. With regard to the diagnosis of ovarian cancer, the presence of FDG uptake within the ovary of a postmenopausal woman raises the concern for ovarian cancer. Multiple studies show that FDG PET/CT can detect lymph node and distant metastasis in ovarian cancer with high accuracy and may, therefore, alter the management to obtain better clinical outcomes. Although PET/CT staging is superior for N and M staging of ovarian cancer, its role is limited for T staging. Additionally, FDG PET/CT is of great benefit in evaluating treatment response and has prognostic value in patients with ovarian cancer. FDG PET/CT also has value to detect recurrent disease, particularly in patients with elevated serum CA-125 levels and negative or inconclusive conventional imaging test results. PET/MRI may beneficial for tumor staging because MRI has higher soft tissue contrast and no ionizing radiation exposure compared to CT. Some non-FDG PET radiotracers such as {sup 18}F-fluorothymidine (FLT) or {sup 11}C-methionine (MET) have been studied in preclinical and clinical studies as well and may play a role in the evaluation of patients with ovarian cancer. (orig.)

  18. Assess PET/MR in diagnosis of disease in comparison with PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Jianhua; Lim, Jason Chu-Chern; Loi, Hoi Yin; Totoman, John; Sinha, Arvind Kumar; Quek, Swee Titan; Townsend, David

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the performance of 18F-FDG whole body PET/MRI in comparison with PET/CT based on SUV. Anatomical location of lesion with Dixon MRI and additional value of advanced MRI technology such as diffusion weighted MR imaging in diagnosis of malignant disease will also be investigated.

  19. Guidelines for 18F-FDG PET and PET-CT imaging in paediatric oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stauss, J.; Franzius, C.; Pfluger, T.

    2008-01-01

    tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) in paediatric oncology. The Oncology Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) has published excellent procedure guidelines on tumour imaging with (18)F-FDG PET (Bombardieri et al., Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 30:BP115-24, 2003). These guidelines, published...

  20. Emerging Cardiovascular Risk Research: Impact of Pets on Cardiovascular Risk Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Pamela J

    2016-02-01

    Animals interact with humans in multiple ways, including as therapy and service animals, commercially as livestock, as wildlife, and in zoos. But the most common interaction is as companion animals in our homes, with an estimated 180 million cats and dogs living in US households. While pet ownership has been reported to have many health benefits, the findings are inconsistent. Cardiovascular risk factors such as lipids, glucose, obesity, and heart rate variability have improved, worsened, or remained the same in the limited number of studies considering companion animals. Physical activity increases have more consistently been linked with dog ownership, although whether this reflects antecedent motivation or direct benefit from the dog is unclear. Allergies and asthma also are variably linked to pet ownership and are confounded by family history of atopy and timing of exposure to pet dander. The benefits of companion animals are most likely to be through reduction in depression, anxiety, and social isolation, but these studies have been largely cross-sectional and may depend on degree of bonding of the owner with the animal. Positive relationships show measurably higher oxytocin with lower cortisol and alpha-amylase levels. Finally, pet ownership is also a marker of better socioeconomic status and family stability, and if companion animals are to provide cardiovascular risk benefit, the route should perhaps be through improved education and opportunity for ownership.

  1. PET/CT in breast carcinoma, combined with sarcoidosis, imitating mediastinal lymph node metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcheva, M.; Hadhyiska, V.; Bochev, P.

    2013-01-01

    PET/CT is a high sensitive, but low-specific method visualizing all the metabolic active processes. Fluoro-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake is high in tumors, as well as in infections, inflammations, granulomatous processes, post-radiotherapy alterations and in activated organs and tissues like brown fat, adrenals, thyroid, thymus, or bone marrow. This uptake can represent differential diagnostic problem. The clinical case is a young patient with invasive ductal and lobular breast carcinoma, after sectorial resection, without lymph node dissection. The chemotherapy was stopped after 3 courses due to thrombosis of vena cephalica. The local clinical status raises suspicion of recurrence, as the ultrasound. PET/CT was not conclusive about mediastinal lymph node involvement. The histology proves sarcoidosis, which frequently demonstrates symmetric 18F-FDG avid mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. However the biopsy is mandatory, because of the low specificity of PET/CT for discrimination of this systemic disorder from tumor involvement. Keywords: PET/CT. Differential Diagnostic Problems

  2. Status epilepticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensiek, AE; Absalom, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Status epilepticus is defined as epileptic activity that continues for more than 30 minutes as a single seizure or as recurrent seizures without inter-ictal return of consciousness. The seizure activity is usually classified as partial or generalized. Although status epilepticus is an uncommon

  3. FDG-PET identification of intraperitoneal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamez, C.; Jimenez-Hoyuelam, J.M.; Rebollo, A.C.; Gonzalez, P.; Rico, J.M.; Alba, E.; Sacchetti, A.; Lopez-Rueda, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Peritoneal metastases (PM) are usually from intra-abdominal primary neoplasms, such as carcinoma of the stomach, colon, ovary, and pancreas, or from intra-abdominal lymphoma. Metastases disseminate throughout the peritoneum in four ways: 1) direct spread along peritoneal ligaments, mesenteries and omenta; 2) via the flow of ascitis fluid. 3) lymphatic extension, and 4) embolic hematogenous spread. Although CT is quite specific in identifying PM it is not very sensitive, and peritoneal lavage or biopsy can be very useful but have sampling errors. This study assessed the clinical value of FDG-PET for the detection of PM of malignant diseases. Materials and Methods: 15 FDG-PET scans of patients referred for recurrence (mean age = 54 y/o, sex = 6M, 9F), with metabolic abnormalities suspicious findings of PM from carcinoma of the colon (7), ovary (3), lymphoma (2), pancreas (1), gastrointestinal stromal tumor (1) and melanoma (1) were reviewed. The whole-body studies were performed 50 min following the intravenous administration of 370 MBq of 18F-FDG, in a high resolution dedicated PET scanner (Advance, GEMS), with images reconstructed using a iterative algorithm with segmented attenuation correction. Visual interpretation and SUV values were correlated with CT/MRI findings and biopsy/follow-up. Results: Of the 15 patients, 7 showed <3 sites of focal uptake and 8 presented multiple foci or a diffuse hypermetabolism in the abdomen (SUVmax3.04-18.83 g/ml). 6 patients had biopsy confirmation by PET-directed surgery (6 proven PM, 0 negative biopsies). 11 FDG-PET scans had correspondence with the CT/MRI findings and 4 showed discrepancies (PET positive-CT/MRI negative in patients with isolated raising tumor markers levels or unsuspected PM). FDG-PET influenced the therapeutic management in 2 patients as presented multiple metastases leading them from surgery to chemotherapy. Conclusion: When used as a complementary imaging tool to the conventional work up, FDG-PET is

  4. PET/CT in lymphoma patients; PET-CT bei Lymphompatienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinert, H.C. [Universitaetsspital Zuerich, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin (Switzerland)

    2004-11-01

    First results of PET/CT in Hodgkin's disease (HD) and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) are reported. From March 2001 to August 2004 822 PET/CT were performed at our clinic in lymphoma patients for primary staging, restaging after therapy, and diagnosis of recurrence. For coregistration non contrast-enhanced low-dose CT were used. Due to the exact anatomic localization of {sup 18}F-FDG accumulating lesions equivocal or false positive PET findings are avoided. In comparison to contrast enhanced CT, PET/CT has a higher sensitivity and specificity in patients with HD and aggressive NHL. Integration of PET/CT in treatment planning of radiation therapy optimizes the field volume. Even in the initial phase of clinical evaluation, PET/CT has proven useful in staging and restaging of lymphoma. The exact anatomic localization of the PET findings is essential for a precise report, for treatment planning of radiation therapy, and for planning surgical biopsy. (orig.) [German] Erste Ergebnisse der PET-CT bei Morbus Hodgkin (HD) und den aggressiven Non-Hodgkin-Lymphomen (NHL) werden beschrieben. Von Maerz 2001 bis August 2004 wurden 822 PET-CT bei Lymphompatienten zum primaeren Staging, zum Restaging nach Therapie und zur Rezidivdiagnostik an unserer Klinik durchgefuehrt. Fuer die Koregistration wurde ein Low-dose-CT ohne i.v.-Kontrastmittel verwendet. Durch die exakte anatomische Zuordnung der {sup 18}F-FDG aufnehmenden Laesionen wurden unklare oder falsch-positive PET-Befunde vermieden. Die PET-CT erzielte im Vergleich zur KM-verstaerkten CT eine hoehere Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet bei Patienten mit HD und aggressiven NHL. Die Integration der PET-CT in die Planung der Strahlentherapie fuehrte zu einer Optimierung der Feldgrenzen. Die PET-CT hat sich bereits in der Phase der initialen klinischen Evaluation als wertvoll beim Staging und Restaging von Lymphomen erwiesen. Die exakte anatomische Zuordnung der PET-Informationen ist fuer eine sichere Befundung

  5. PET/CT with intravenous contrast can be used for PET attenuation correction in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthelsen, A.K.; Holm, S.; Loft, A.; Klausen, T.L.; Andersen, F.; Hoejgaard, L.

    2005-01-01

    If the CT scan of a combined PET/CT study is performed as a full diagnostic quality CT scan including intravenous (IV) contrast agent, the quality of the joint PET/CT procedure is improved and a separate diagnostic CT scan can be avoided. CT with IV contrast can be used for PET attenuation correction, but this may result in a bias in the attenuation factors. The clinical significance of this bias has not been established. Our aim was to perform a prospective clinical study where each patient had CT performed with and without IV contrast agent to establish whether PET/CT with IV contrast can be used for PET attenuation without reducing the clinical value of the PET scan. A uniform phantom study was used to document that the PET acquisition itself is not significantly influenced by the presence of IV contrast medium. Then, 19 patients referred to PET/CT with IV contrast underwent CT scans without, and then with contrast agent, followed by an 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose whole-body PET scan. The CT examinations were performed with identical parameters on a GE Discovery LS scanner. The PET data were reconstructed with attenuation correction based on the two CT data sets. A global comparison of standard uptake value (SUV) was performed, and SUVs in tumour, in non-tumour tissue and in the subclavian vein were calculated. Clinical evaluation of the number and location of lesions on all PET/CT scans was performed twice, blinded and in a different random order, by two independent nuclear medicine specialists. In all patients, the measured global SUV of PET images based on CT with IV contrast agent was higher than the global activity using non-contrast correction. The overall increase in the mean SUV (for two different conversion tables tested) was 4.5±2.3% and 1.6±0.5%, respectively. In 11/19 patients, focal uptake was identified corresponding to malignant tumours. Eight out of 11 tumours showed an increased SUV max (2.9±3.1%) on the PET images reconstructed using IV contrast

  6. Clinical Evaluation of PET Image Quality as a Function of Acquisition Time in a New TOF-PET/MRI Compared to TOF-PET/CT--Initial Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos G; Barbosa, Felipe; Hüllner, Martin; ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Delso, Gaspar

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare only the performance of the PET component between a TOF-PET/CT (henceforth noted as PET/CT) scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MRI (henceforth noted as PET/MRI) scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of standardized uptake value (SUV) as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). The CT and MR image quality were not assessed, and that is beyond the scope of this study. Five brain and five whole-body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MRI acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of the emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts, and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in the white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed strong correlation between PET/CT and PET/MRI brain SUVs. Liver correlation was good, however, with lower uptake estimation in PET/MRI, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MRI offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artifacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole-body scans while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The TOF-PET/MRI showed higher image quality compared to TOF-PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, this result accounts mainly for body imaging, while no significant differences were found in brain imaging.

  7. Erythropoietic protoporphyria and pretransplantation treatment with nonbiological liver assist devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eefsen, Martin; Rasmussen, Allan; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2007-01-01

    below 470 nm. A more unusual but very serious complication postoperatively is severe motor neuropathy, with few or no known acute available precautions. An effective treatment option is needed to manage EPP crises and to prevent complications after liver transplantation. We successfully treated...... of patients liver failure is a significant complication and liver transplantation is the only treatment option. Damage to both abdominal skin and organs occurs when exposed to operating light; however, this problem can be ameliorated by the use of filters that block the transmission of light with wavelength...

  8. Validating PET segmentation of thoracic lesions-is 4D PET necessary?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. S.; Carl, J.

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory-induced motions are prone to degrade the positron emission tomography (PET) signal with the consequent loss of image information and unreliable segmentations. This phantom study aims to assess the discrepancies relative to stationary PET segmentations, of widely used semiautomatic PET...... segmentation methods on heterogeneous target lesions influenced by motion during image acquisition. Three target lesions included dual F-18 Fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) tracer concentrations as high-and low tracer activities relative to the background. Four different tracer concentration arrangements were...... segmented using three SUV threshold methods (Max40%, SUV40% and 2.5SUV) and a gradient based method (GradientSeg). Segmentations in static 3D-PET scans (PETsta) specified the reference conditions for the individual segmentation methods, target lesions and tracer concentrations. The motion included PET...

  9. Nutritional status and hyperglycemia in the peritransplant period: a review of associations with parenteral nutrition and clinical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Verdi Schumacher

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an established treatment option for various hematological diseases. This therapy involves complex procedures and is associated with several systemic complications. Due to the toxic effects of the conditioning regimen used in allogeneic transplantations, patients frequently suffer from severe gastrointestinal complications and are unable to feed themselves properly. This complex clinical scenario often requires specialized nutritional support, and despite the increasing number of studies available, many questions remain regarding the best way to feed these patients. Parenteral nutrition has been traditionally indicated when the effects on gastrointestinal mucosa are significant; however, the true benefits of this type of nutrition in reducing clinical complications have been questioned. Hyperglycemia is a common consequence of parenteral nutrition that seems to be correlated to poor transplantation outcomes and a higher risk of infections. Additionally, nutrition-related pre-transplantation risk factors are being studied, such as impaired nutritional status, poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and obesity. This review aims to discuss some of these recent issues. A real case of allogeneic transplant was used to illustrate the scenario and to highlight the most important topics that motivated this literature review.

  10. Nutritional status and hyperglycemia in the peritransplant period: a review of associations with parenteral nutrition and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi Schumacher, Marina; Moreira Faulhaber, Gustavo Adolpho

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an established treatment option for various hematological diseases. This therapy involves complex procedures and is associated with several systemic complications. Due to the toxic effects of the conditioning regimen used in allogeneic transplantations, patients frequently suffer from severe gastrointestinal complications and are unable to feed themselves properly. This complex clinical scenario often requires specialized nutritional support, and despite the increasing number of studies available, many questions remain regarding the best way to feed these patients. Parenteral nutrition has been traditionally indicated when the effects on gastrointestinal mucosa are significant; however, the true benefits of this type of nutrition in reducing clinical complications have been questioned. Hyperglycemia is a common consequence of parenteral nutrition that seems to be correlated to poor transplantation outcomes and a higher risk of infections. Additionally, nutrition-related pre-transplantation risk factors are being studied, such as impaired nutritional status, poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and obesity. This review aims to discuss some of these recent issues. A real case of allogeneic transplant was used to illustrate the scenario and to highlight the most important topics that motivated this literature review. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical Nononcologic Applications of PET/CT and PET/MRI in Musculoskeletal, Orthopedic, and Rheumatologic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Basques, Kyle; Batouli, Ali; Matcuk, George; Alavi, Abass; Jadvar, Hossein

    2018-06-01

    With improvements in PET/CT and PET/MRI over the last decade, as well as increased understanding of the pathophysiology of musculoskeletal diseases, there is an emerging potential for PET as a primary or complementary modality in the management of rheumatologic and orthopedic conditions. We discuss the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in nononcologic musculoskeletal disorders, including inflammatory and infectious conditions and postoperative complications. There is great potential for an increased role for PET to serve as a primary or complementary modality in the management of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders.

  12. Bacteriophages safely reduce Salmonella contamination in pet food and raw pet food ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffer, Nitzan; Abuladze, Tamar; Woolston, Joelle; Li, Manrong; Hanna, Leigh Farris; Heyse, Serena; Charbonneau, Duane; Sulakvelidze, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of pet food with Salmonella is a serious public health concern, and several disease outbreaks have recently occurred due to human exposure to Salmonella tainted pet food. The problem is especially challenging for raw pet foods (which include raw meats, seafood, fruits, and vegetables). These foods are becoming increasingly popular because of their nutritional qualities, but they are also more difficult to maintain Salmonella -free because they lack heat-treatment. Among various methods examined to improve the safety of pet foods (including raw pet food), one intriguing approach is to use bacteriophages to specifically kill Salmonella serotypes. At least 2 phage preparations (SalmoFresh® and Salmonelex™) targeting Salmonella are already FDA cleared for commercial applications to improve the safety of human foods. However, similar preparations are not yet available for pet food applications. Here, we report the results of evaluating one such preparation (SalmoLyse®) in reducing Salmonella levels in various raw pet food ingredients (chicken, tuna, turkey, cantaloupe, and lettuce). Application of SalmoLyse® in low (ca. 2-4×10 6 PFU/g) and standard (ca. 9×10 6 PFU/g) concentrations significantly ( P contamination in all raw foods examined compared to control treatments. When SalmoLyse®-treated (ca. 2×10 7 PFU/g) dry pet food was fed to cats and dogs, it did not trigger any deleterious side effects in the pets. Our data suggest that the bacteriophage cocktail lytic for Salmonella can significantly and safely reduce Salmonella contamination in various raw pet food ingredients.

  13. Present and future of PET and PET/CT in gynaecologic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musto, Alessandra; Rampin, Lucia; Nanni, Cristina; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Fanti, Stefano; Rubello, Domenico

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To review the published data in literature on patients affected by gynaecological malignancies to establish the role of 18 F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT in comparison to conventional imaging (CI). Materials and methods: All papers specifically addressed to the role of 18 F-FDG PET and PET/CT in gynaecological malignancies published on PubMed/Medline, in abstracts from the principal international congresses, in the guidelines from national Societies that had appeared in literature until November 2009 were considered for the purpose of the present study. Results and conclusions: The use of 18 F-FDG PET, and even more of 18 F-FDG PET/CT, is increasing in the follow up of patients with gynaecologic malignancies and suspected recurrent disease: there is evidence in the literature that 18 F-FDG PET/CT has a higher sensitivity than CI in depicting occult metastatic spread. An interesting issue is represented by patients with ovarian cancer with an increase of the specific biomarker, CA-125, and negative/inconclusive findings at CI. The use of 18 F-FDG PET in differential diagnosis and staging is more controversial, but there is some evidence that a baseline PET examination performed before commencing therapy, for staging purpose, is also useful to evaluate the response to chemoradiation treatment. In several papers it has been suggested a relevant role of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in evaluating the entity of response to treatment and therefore to plan the subsequent therapeutic strategy.

  14. Present and future of PET and PET/CT in gynaecologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musto, Alessandra [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET Center, Policlinico Sant' Orsola Malpighi, Bologna University, Bologna (Italy); Rampin, Lucia [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET Center, Radiology, Medical Physics, Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, viale tre martiri 140, 45100 Rovigo (Italy); Nanni, Cristina [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET Center, Policlinico Sant' Orsola Malpighi, Bologna University, Bologna (Italy); Marzola, Maria Cristina [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET Center, Radiology, Medical Physics, Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, viale tre martiri 140, 45100 Rovigo (Italy); Fanti, Stefano [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET Center, Policlinico Sant' Orsola Malpighi, Bologna University, Bologna (Italy); Rubello, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.rubello@libero.it [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET Center, Radiology, Medical Physics, Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, viale tre martiri 140, 45100 Rovigo (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    Objectives: To review the published data in literature on patients affected by gynaecological malignancies to establish the role of {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT in comparison to conventional imaging (CI). Materials and methods: All papers specifically addressed to the role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET/CT in gynaecological malignancies published on PubMed/Medline, in abstracts from the principal international congresses, in the guidelines from national Societies that had appeared in literature until November 2009 were considered for the purpose of the present study. Results and conclusions: The use of {sup 18}F-FDG PET, and even more of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, is increasing in the follow up of patients with gynaecologic malignancies and suspected recurrent disease: there is evidence in the literature that {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT has a higher sensitivity than CI in depicting occult metastatic spread. An interesting issue is represented by patients with ovarian cancer with an increase of the specific biomarker, CA-125, and negative/inconclusive findings at CI. The use of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in differential diagnosis and staging is more controversial, but there is some evidence that a baseline PET examination performed before commencing therapy, for staging purpose, is also useful to evaluate the response to chemoradiation treatment. In several papers it has been suggested a relevant role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in evaluating the entity of response to treatment and therefore to plan the subsequent therapeutic strategy.

  15. PET/MRI in head and neck cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzek, Ivan; Laniado, Michael [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Matthias [Dresden University Hospital, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Gudziol, Volker [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Dresden (Germany); Langner, Jens; Schramm, Georg; Hoff, Joerg van den [Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Joerg [Dresden University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) with FDG ({sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose) for initial staging of head and neck cancer. The study group comprised 20 patients (16 men, 4 women) aged between 52 and 81 years (median 64 years) with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. The patients underwent a PET scan on a conventional scanner and a subsequent PET/MRI examination on a whole-body hybrid system. FDG was administered intravenously prior to the conventional PET scan (267-395 MBq FDG, 348 MBq on average). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the tumour and of both cerebellar hemispheres were determined for both PET datasets. The numbers of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake were compared between the two PET datasets. No MRI-induced artefacts where observed in the PET images. The tumour was detected by PET/MRI in 17 of the 20 patients, by PET in 16 and by MRI in 14. The PET/MRI examination yielded significantly higher SUV{sub max} than the conventional PET scanner for both the tumour (p < 0.0001) and the cerebellum (p = 0.0009). The number of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake detected using the PET dataset from the PET/MRI system was significantly higher the number detected by the stand-alone PET system (64 vs. 39, p = 0.001). The current study demonstrated that PET/MRI of the whole head and neck region is feasible with a whole-body PET/MRI system without impairment of PET or MR image quality. (orig.)

  16. Peritoneal carcinomatosis - the role of FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlakow, A.; Yeung, H.W.; Macapinlac, H.A.; Sanchez, A.F.; Larson, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Peritoneal carcinomatosis can be difficult to diagnose, as CT is insensitive, with peritoneal biopsy and lavage often subject to problems of sampling error. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of FDG PET in detecting peritoneal carcinomatosis in patients with biopsy-proven metastases from stomach, ovarian and adrenal cancer and mesothelioma. 92 FDG-PET scans of patients with stomach (49), ovarian (14) adrenal cancer (7) and mesothelioma (22) were reviewed. Studies were performed 45 minutes following IV injection of 10 mCi of 18 F-FDG. Of this group 15 patients had biopsy-proven findings of peritoneal disease while 14 had PET studies reported as suspicious for peritoneal metastasis. Of the 15 biopsy-positive patients, FDG PET was positive in 7, CT in 6 and either PET or CT in 10 (sensitivities 46.6,40.0 and 66.6% respectively). In a further 4 patients without biopsies, where other imaging studies confirmed peritoneal disease, PET was also positive. 2 distinct abnormal scintigraphic patterns of focal and uniform FDG uptake were identified corresponding to nodular and diffuse peritoneal disease at pathology. Our study demonstrates that FDG PET adds to conventional imaging in the staging of peritoneal carcinomatosis. It is also a useful diagnostic tool when peritoneal biopsy is either unavailable or inappropriate. We have identified 2 distinct scintigraphic patterns which appear to predict the presence of either nodular or diffuse peritoneal pathology.Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  17. Parallel ICA of FDG-PET and PiB-PET in three conditions with underlying Alzheimer's pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Laforce, Jr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between clinical phenotype, β-amyloid (Aβ deposition and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD are incompletely understood yet have important ramifications for future therapy. The goal of this study was to utilize multimodality positron emission tomography (PET data from a clinically heterogeneous population of patients with probable AD in order to: (1 identify spatial patterns of Aβ deposition measured by (11C-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB-PET and glucose metabolism measured by FDG-PET that correlate with specific clinical presentation and (2 explore associations between spatial patterns of Aβ deposition and glucose metabolism across the AD population. We included all patients meeting the criteria for probable AD (NIA–AA who had undergone MRI, PiB and FDG-PET at our center (N = 46, mean age 63.0 ± 7.7, Mini-Mental State Examination 22.0 ± 4.8. Patients were subclassified based on their cognitive profiles into an amnestic/dysexecutive group (AD-memory; n = 27, a language-predominant group (AD-language; n = 10 and a visuospatial-predominant group (AD-visuospatial; n = 9. All patients were required to have evidence of amyloid deposition on PiB-PET. To capture the spatial distribution of Aβ deposition and glucose metabolism, we employed parallel independent component analysis (pICA, a method that enables joint analyses of multimodal imaging data. The relationships between PET components and clinical group were examined using a Receiver Operator Characteristic approach, including age, gender, education and apolipoprotein E ε4 allele carrier status as covariates. Results of the first set of analyses independently examining the relationship between components from each modality and clinical group showed three significant components for FDG: a left inferior frontal and temporoparietal component associated with AD-language (area under the curve [AUC] 0.82, p = 0.011, and two components

  18. Direct comparison of [18F]FDG PET/CT with PET alone and with side-by-side PET and CT in patients with malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottaghy, Felix M.; Wohlfart, Petra; Blumstein, Norbert M.; Neumaier, Bernd; Glatting, Gerhard; Buck, Andreas K.; Reske, Sven N.; Sunderkoetter, Cord; Schubert, Roland; Oezdemir, Cueneyt; Scharfetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective, blinded study was to evaluate the additional value of [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT in comparison with PET alone and with side-by-side PET and CT in patients with malignant melanoma (MM). A total of 127 consecutive studies of patients with known MM referred for a whole-body PET/CT examination were included in this study. PET alone, side-by-side PET and CT and integrated PET/CT study were independently and separately interpreted without awareness of the clinical information. One score each was applied for certainty of lesion localisation and for certainty of lesion characterisation. Verification of the findings was subsequently performed using all available clinical, pathological (n = 30) and follow-up information. The number of lesions with an uncertain localisation was significantly (p 18 F]FDG. (orig.)

  19. MRI-assisted PET motion correction for neurologic studies in an integrated MR-PET scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Benner, Thomas; van der Kouwe, Andre; Byars, Larry; Hamm, Michael; Chonde, Daniel B; Michel, Christian J; El Fakhri, Georges; Schmand, Matthias; Sorensen, A Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Head motion is difficult to avoid in long PET studies, degrading the image quality and offsetting the benefit of using a high-resolution scanner. As a potential solution in an integrated MR-PET scanner, the simultaneously acquired MRI data can be used for motion tracking. In this work, a novel algorithm for data processing and rigid-body motion correction (MC) for the MRI-compatible BrainPET prototype scanner is described, and proof-of-principle phantom and human studies are presented. To account for motion, the PET prompt and random coincidences and sensitivity data for postnormalization were processed in the line-of-response (LOR) space according to the MRI-derived motion estimates. The processing time on the standard BrainPET workstation is approximately 16 s for each motion estimate. After rebinning in the sinogram space, the motion corrected data were summed, and the PET volume was reconstructed using the attenuation and scatter sinograms in the reference position. The accuracy of the MC algorithm was first tested using a Hoffman phantom. Next, human volunteer studies were performed, and motion estimates were obtained using 2 high-temporal-resolution MRI-based motion-tracking techniques. After accounting for the misalignment between the 2 scanners, perfectly coregistered MRI and PET volumes were reproducibly obtained. The MRI output gates inserted into the PET list-mode allow the temporal correlation of the 2 datasets within 0.2 ms. The Hoffman phantom volume reconstructed by processing the PET data in the LOR space was similar to the one obtained by processing the data using the standard methods and applying the MC in the image space, demonstrating the quantitative accuracy of the procedure. In human volunteer studies, motion estimates were obtained from echo planar imaging and cloverleaf navigator sequences every 3 s and 20 ms, respectively. Motion-deblurred PET images, with excellent delineation of specific brain structures, were obtained using these 2 MRI

  20. Diagnostic performance of FDG PET or PET/CT in prosthetic infection after arthroplasty: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, H.; Yuan, L.; Li, C.; Kan, Y.; Yang, J.; Hao, R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and perform a meta-analysis of published data regarding the diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) in prosthetic infection after arthroplasty. A comprehensive computer literature search of studies published through May 31, 2012 regarding PET or PET/CT in patients suspicious of prosthetic infection was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Scopus databases. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of PET or PET/CT in patients suspicious of prosthetic infection on a per prosthesis-based analysis were calculated. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated to measure the accuracy of PET or PET/CT in patients with suspicious of prosthetic infection. Fourteen studies comprising 838 prosthesis with suspicious of prosthetic infection after arthroplasty were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity of PET or PET/CT in detecting prosthetic infection was 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 82-90%) on a per prosthesis-based analysis. The pooled specificity of PET or PET/CT in detecting prosthetic infection was 86% (95% CI 83-89%) on a per prosthesis-based analysis. The area under the ROC curve was 0.93 on a per prosthesis-based analysis. In patients suspicious of prosthetic infection, FDG PET or PET/CT demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity. FDG PET or PET/CT are accurate methods in this setting. Nevertheless, possible sources of false positive results and influcing factors should kept in mind.

  1. Diagnostic performance of FDG PET or PET/CT in prosthetic infection after arthroplasty: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, H; Yuan, L; Li, C; Kan, Y; Hao, R; Yang, J

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and perform a meta-analysis of published data regarding the diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) in prosthetic infection after arthroplasty. A comprehensive computer literature search of studies published through May 31, 2012 regarding PET or PET/CT in patients suspicious of prosthetic infection was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Scopus databases. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of PET or PET/CT in patients suspicious of prosthetic infection on a per prosthesis-based analysis were calculated. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated to measure the accuracy of PET or PET/CT in patients with suspicious of prosthetic infection. Fourteen studies comprising 838 prosthesis with suspicious of prosthetic infection after arthroplasty were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity of PET or PET/CT in detecting prosthetic infection was 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 82-90%) on a per prosthesis-based analysis. The pooled specificity of PET or PET/CT in detecting prosthetic infection was 86% (95% CI 83-89%) on a per prosthesis-based analysis. The area under the ROC curve was 0.93 on a per prosthesis-based analysis. In patients suspicious of prosthetic infection, FDG PET or PET/CT demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity. FDG PET or PET/CT are accurate methods in this setting. Nevertheless, possible sources of false positive results and influcing factors should kept in mind.

  2. Simultaneous PET-MR acquisition and MR-derived motion fields for correction of non-rigid motion in PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoumpas, C.; Mackewn, J.E.; Halsted, P.; King, A.P.; Buerger, C.; Totman, J.J.; Schaeffter, T.; Marsden, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides an accurate measurement of radiotracer concentration in vivo, but performance can be limited by subject motion which degrades spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy. This effect may become a limiting factor for PET studies in the body as PET scanner technology improves. In this work, we propose a new approach to address this problem by employing motion information from images measured simultaneously using a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. The approach is demonstrated using an MR-compatible PET scanner and PET-MR acquisition with a purpose-designed phantom capable of non-rigid deformations. Measured, simultaneously acquired MR data were used to correct for motion in PET, and results were compared with those obtained using motion information from PET images alone. Motion artefacts were significantly reduced and the PET image quality and quantification was significantly improved by the use of MR motion fields, whilst the use of PET-only motion information was less successful. Combined PET-MR acquisitions potentially allow PET motion compensation in whole-body acquisitions without prolonging PET acquisition time or increasing radiation dose. This, to the best of our knowledge, is the first study to demonstrate that simultaneously acquired MR data can be used to estimate and correct for the effects of non-rigid motion in PET. (author)

  3. Feasibility of simultaneous PET/MR of the carotid artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus S; Knudsen, Andreas; Hag, Anne Mette F

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed at comparing PET/MR to PET/CT for imaging the carotid arteries in patients with known increased risk of atherosclerosis. Six HIV-positive men underwent sequential PET/MR and PET/CT of the carotid arteries after injection of 400 MBq of (18)F-FDG. PET/MR was performed a median of 131......) indicating that the luminal (18)F-FDG content had minimal influence on the values. The study shows for the first time that simultaneous PET/MR of the carotid arteries is feasible in patients with increased risk of atherosclerosis. Quantification of (18)F-FDG uptake correlated well between PET/MR and PET...

  4. PET imaging in pediatric neuroradiology: current and future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sunhee; Salamon, Noriko; Jackson, Hollie A.; Blueml, Stefan; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imaging with positron emitting tomography (PET) is widely accepted as an essential part of the diagnosis and evaluation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic disease processes. PET has expanded its role from the research domain into clinical application for oncology, cardiology and neuropsychiatry. More recently, PET is being used as a clinical molecular imaging tool in pediatric neuroimaging. PET is considered an accurate and noninvasive method to study brain activity and to understand pediatric neurological disease processes. In this review, specific examples of the clinical use of PET are given with respect to pediatric neuroimaging. The current use of co-registration of PET with MR imaging is exemplified in regard to pediatric epilepsy. The current use of PET/CT in the evaluation of head and neck lymphoma and pediatric brain tumors is also reviewed. Emerging technologies including PET/MRI and neuroreceptor imaging are discussed. (orig.)

  5. PET imaging in pediatric neuroradiology: current and future applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sunhee [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Salamon, Noriko [UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jackson, Hollie A.; Blueml, Stefan [Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Molecular imaging with positron emitting tomography (PET) is widely accepted as an essential part of the diagnosis and evaluation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic disease processes. PET has expanded its role from the research domain into clinical application for oncology, cardiology and neuropsychiatry. More recently, PET is being used as a clinical molecular imaging tool in pediatric neuroimaging. PET is considered an accurate and noninvasive method to study brain activity and to understand pediatric neurological disease processes. In this review, specific examples of the clinical use of PET are given with respect to pediatric neuroimaging. The current use of co-registration of PET with MR imaging is exemplified in regard to pediatric epilepsy. The current use of PET/CT in the evaluation of head and neck lymphoma and pediatric brain tumors is also reviewed. Emerging technologies including PET/MRI and neuroreceptor imaging are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Positron emission tomography (PET) for oncologic applications in oral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shozushima, Masanori; Terasaki, Kazunori

    2004-01-01

    A rapidly emerging clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) is the detection of cancer with radionuclide tracer, because it provides information unavailable by ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The most commonly used radiotracer for PET oncologic imaging is fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). Early studies show PET has potential value in viewing the region of the tumor, detecting, staging, grading, monitoring response to anticancer therapy, and differentiating recurrent or residual disease from post treatment changes. However, limitations of FDG-PET in the head and neck region, namely, physiological FDG uptake in the salivary glands and palatine tonsils, have been reported, increasing the false-positive rates in image interpretation. This review was designed to address these distinctions of oral cancer PET imaging: specialization of PET equipment, cancer cell metabolism, proliferation and tracers, clinical diagnosis of oral cancer with PET, pitfalls in oncologic diagnosis with FDG-PET imaging. (author)

  7. PET application in psychiatry and psychopharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    In the last few decades diagnostic and research tools in the medical field have made great advances, yet psychiatry has lacked sufficiently sensitive tools to measure the aberration of brain functions. Recently however, the development of Positron emission tomography (PET) techniques has made it possible to measure changes in neurochemical components in mental disorders and the effect of psychoactive drugs in living human brain. Most of the advancement in the psychiatric field has came from the development psychoactive drugs. Brain research involving identification of neurotransmission is largely based on compounds developed in psychopharmacology. Some of these compounds have been radiolabelled and used as radioligands for quantitative examination of neuroreceptors and other aspects of neurotransmission. Using PET, radioligand binding can now be examined in the human brain in vivo. PET techniques also allow examination of an unlabelled drug by examination of its interaction with a radioligand. So one potential of PET in psychiatry is to investigate the mechanism of psychoactive drugs. Antidepressants modulate serotonin transmission by inhibiting serotonin reuptake from the synaptic cleft. High affinity [{sup 3}H]imipramine binding sites in mammalian brain have been labelled to investigate serotonin transporters in living human brain by PET. Cyanoimipramine which is described as a potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was labelled with {sup 11}C. In a PET experiment with 6 healthy human subjects, a high accumulation of [{sup 11}C]cyanoimipramine was found in the thalamus and striatum and lowest accumulation was observed in the cerebellum, a region relatively void of serotonin transporters. The thalamus to cerebellum ratio was about 2 at 90 min after the injection of the tracer. Recently, [{sup 11}C]McN5652-X has been introduced as a better tracer for serotonin transporter imaging. Employing [{sup 11}C]McN5652-X in a PET study of 7 healthy human subjects, a high

  8. PET application in psychiatry and psychopharmacology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhara, Tetsuya

    1999-01-01

    In the last few decades diagnostic and research tools in the medical field have made great advances, yet psychiatry has lacked sufficiently sensitive tools to measure the aberration of brain functions. Recently however, the development of Positron emission tomography (PET) techniques has made it possible to measure changes in neurochemical components in mental disorders and the effect of psychoactive drugs in living human brain. Most of the advancement in the psychiatric field has came from the development psychoactive drugs. Brain research involving identification of neurotransmission is largely based on compounds developed in psychopharmacology. Some of these compounds have been radiolabelled and used as radioligands for quantitative examination of neuroreceptors and other aspects of neurotransmission. Using PET, radioligand binding can now be examined in the human brain in vivo. PET techniques also allow examination of an unlabelled drug by examination of its interaction with a radioligand. So one potential of PET in psychiatry is to investigate the mechanism of psychoactive drugs. Antidepressants modulate serotonin transmission by inhibiting serotonin reuptake from the synaptic cleft. High affinity [ 3 H]imipramine binding sites in mammalian brain have been labelled to investigate serotonin transporters in living human brain by PET. Cyanoimipramine which is described as a potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was labelled with 11 C. In a PET experiment with 6 healthy human subjects, a high accumulation of [ 11 C]cyanoimipramine was found in the thalamus and striatum and lowest accumulation was observed in the cerebellum, a region relatively void of serotonin transporters. The thalamus to cerebellum ratio was about 2 at 90 min after the injection of the tracer. Recently, [ 11 C]McN5652-X has been introduced as a better tracer for serotonin transporter imaging. Employing [ 11 C]McN5652-X in a PET study of 7 healthy human subjects, a high accumulation was observed

  9. Integrated boost IMRT with FET-PET-adapted local dose escalation in glioblastomas. Results of a prospective phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piroth, M.D.; Pinkawa, M.; Holy, R.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH

    2012-01-01

    Dose escalations above 60 Gy based on MRI have not led to prognostic benefits in glioblastoma patients yet. With positron emission tomography (PET) using [ 18 F]fluorethyl-L-tyrosine (FET), tumor coverage can be optimized with the option of regional dose escalation in the area of viable tumor tissue. In a prospective phase II study (January 2008 to December 2009), 22 patients (median age 55 years) received radiochemotherapy after surgery. The radiotherapy was performed as an MRI and FET-PET-based integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The prescribed dose was 72 and 60 Gy (single dose 2.4 and 2.0 Gy, respectively) for the FET-PET- and MR-based PTV-FET (72 Gy) and PTV-MR (60 Gy) . FET-PET and MRI were performed routinely for follow-up. Quality of life and cognitive aspects were recorded by the EORTC-QLQ-C30/QLQ Brain20 and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), while the therapy-related toxicity was recorded using the CTC3.0 and RTOG scores. Median overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 14.8 and 7.8 months, respectively. All local relapses were detected at least partly within the 95% dose volume of PTV-MR (60 Gy) . No relevant radiotherapy-related side effects were observed (excepted alopecia). In 2 patients, a pseudoprogression was observed in the MRI. Tumor progression could be excluded by FET-PET and was confirmed in further MRI and FET-PET imaging. No significant changes were observed in MMSE scores and in the EORTC QLQ-C30/QLQ-Brain20 questionnaires. Our dose escalation concept with a total dose of 72 Gy, based on FET-PET, did not lead to a survival benefit. Acute and late toxicity were not increased, compared with historical controls and published dose-escalation studies. (orig.)

  10. Integrated boost IMRT with FET-PET-adapted local dose escalation in glioblastomas. Results of a prospective phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piroth, M.D.; Pinkawa, M.; Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain] (and others)

    2012-04-15

    Dose escalations above 60 Gy based on MRI have not led to prognostic benefits in glioblastoma patients yet. With positron emission tomography (PET) using [{sup 18}F]fluorethyl-L-tyrosine (FET), tumor coverage can be optimized with the option of regional dose escalation in the area of viable tumor tissue. In a prospective phase II study (January 2008 to December 2009), 22 patients (median age 55 years) received radiochemotherapy after surgery. The radiotherapy was performed as an MRI and FET-PET-based integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The prescribed dose was 72 and 60 Gy (single dose 2.4 and 2.0 Gy, respectively) for the FET-PET- and MR-based PTV-FET{sub (72 Gy)} and PTV-MR{sub (60 Gy)}. FET-PET and MRI were performed routinely for follow-up. Quality of life and cognitive aspects were recorded by the EORTC-QLQ-C30/QLQ Brain20 and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), while the therapy-related toxicity was recorded using the CTC3.0 and RTOG scores. Median overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 14.8 and 7.8 months, respectively. All local relapses were detected at least partly within the 95% dose volume of PTV-MR{sub (60 Gy)}. No relevant radiotherapy-related side effects were observed (excepted alopecia). In 2 patients, a pseudoprogression was observed in the MRI. Tumor progression could be excluded by FET-PET and was confirmed in further MRI and FET-PET imaging. No significant changes were observed in MMSE scores and in the EORTC QLQ-C30/QLQ-Brain20 questionnaires. Our dose escalation concept with a total dose of 72 Gy, based on FET-PET, did not lead to a survival benefit. Acute and late toxicity were not increased, compared with historical controls and published dose-escalation studies. (orig.)

  11. [F-18]FDG imaging of head and neck tumors: comparison of hybrid PET, dedicated PET and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresel, S.; Brinkbaeumer, K.; Schmid, R.; Poepperl, G.; Hahn, K.; Szeimies, U.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: Aim of the study was to evaluate [F-18]FDG imaging of head and neck tumors using a Hybrid-PET device of the 2nd or 3rd generation. Examinations were compared to dedicated PET and Spiral-CT. Methods: 54 patients suffering from head and neck tumors were examined using dedicated PET and Hybrid-PET after injection of 185-350 MBq [F-18]FDG. Examinations were carried out on the dedicated PET first followed by a scan on the Hybrid-PET. Dedicated PET was acquired in 3D mode, Hybrid-PET was performed in list mode using an axial filter. Reconstruction of data was performed iteratively on both, dedicated PET and Hybrid-PET. All patients received a CT scan in multislice technique. All finding have been verified by the goldstandard histology or in case of negative histology by follow up. Results: Using dedicated PET the primary or recurrent lesion was correctly diagnosed in 47/48 patients, using Hybrid-PET in 46/48 patients and using CT in 25/48 patients. Metastatic disease in cervical lymph nodes was diagnosed in 17/18 patients with dedicated PET, in 16/18 patients with Hybrid-PET and in 15/18 with CT. False positive results with regard to lymph node metastasis were seen with one patient for dedicated PET and Hybrid-PET, respectively, and with 18 patients for CT. In a total of 11 patients unknown metastastic lesions were seen with dedicated PET and with Hybrid-PET elsewhere in the body. Additional malignant disease other than the head and neck tumor was found in 4 patients. Conclusion: Using Hybrid-PET for [F-18]FDG imaging reveals a loss of sensitivity and specificity of about 1-5% as compared to dedicated PET in head and neck tumors. [F-18]FDG PET with both, dedicated PET and Hybrid-PET is superior to CT in the diagnosis of primary or recurrent lesions as well as in the assessment of lymph node involvement. (orig.) [de

  12. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT evaluation of children and young adults with suspected spinal fusion hardware infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrosky, Brian M. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Hayes, Kari L.; Fenton, Laura Z. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); Koo, Phillip J. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Evaluation of the child with spinal fusion hardware and concern for infection is challenging because of hardware artifact with standard imaging (CT and MRI) and difficult physical examination. Studies using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT combine the benefit of functional imaging with anatomical localization. To discuss a case series of children and young adults with spinal fusion hardware and clinical concern for hardware infection. These people underwent FDG PET/CT imaging to determine the site of infection. We performed a retrospective review of whole-body FDG PET/CT scans at a tertiary children's hospital from December 2009 to January 2012 in children and young adults with spinal hardware and suspected hardware infection. The PET/CT scan findings were correlated with pertinent clinical information including laboratory values of inflammatory markers, postoperative notes and pathology results to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT. An exempt status for this retrospective review was approved by the Institution Review Board. Twenty-five FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 20 patients. Spinal fusion hardware infection was confirmed surgically and pathologically in six patients. The most common FDG PET/CT finding in patients with hardware infection was increased FDG uptake in the soft tissue and bone immediately adjacent to the posterior spinal fusion rods at multiple contiguous vertebral levels. Noninfectious hardware complications were diagnosed in ten patients and proved surgically in four. Alternative sources of infection were diagnosed by FDG PET/CT in seven patients (five with pneumonia, one with pyonephrosis and one with superficial wound infections). FDG PET/CT is helpful in evaluation of children and young adults with concern for spinal hardware infection. Noninfectious hardware complications and alternative sources of infection, including pneumonia and pyonephrosis, can be diagnosed. FDG PET/CT should be the first-line cross-sectional imaging study in

  13. F-18 FDG PET with coincidence detection, dual-head gamma camera, initial experience in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, J.M.G.; Pocock, N.; Quach, T.; Camden, B.M.C. [Liverpool Health Services, Liverpool, NSW (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Ultrasound

    1998-06-01

    Full text: The development of Co-incidence Detection (CD) in gamma camera technology has allowed the use of positron radiopharmaceuticals in clinical practice without dedicated PET facilities. We report our initial experience of this technology in Oncological applications. All patients were administered 200 MBq of F- 18 FDG intravenously in a fasting state, with serum glucose below 8.9 mmol/L., and hydration well maintained. Tomography was performed using an ADAC Solus Molecular Co-incidence Detection (MCD) dual-head gamma camera, 60 minutes after administration and immediately after voiding. Tomography of the torso required up to three collections depending on the length of the patient, with each collection requiring 32 steps of 40 second duration, and a 50% overlap. Tomography of the brain required a single collection with 32 steps of 80 seconds. Patients were scanned in the supine position. An iterative reconstruction algorithm was employed without attenuation correction. All patients had histologically confirmed malignancy. Scan findings were correlated with results of all conventional diagnostic imaging procedures that were pertinent to the evaluation and management of each individual patient`s disease. Correlation with tumour type and treatment status was also undertaken. F-18 FDG uptake as demonstrated by CD-PET was increased in tumour bearing sites. The degree of increased uptake varied with tumour type and with treatment status. Our initial experience with CD-PET has been very encouraging, and has led us to undertake prospective short and long term studies to define its role in oncology

  14. Association between Responsible Pet Ownership and Glycemic Control in Youths with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Maranda

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM a chronic characterized by an absolute insulin deficiency requires conscientious patient self-management to maintain glucose control within a normal range. Family cohesion and adaptability, positive coping strategies, social support and adequate self-regulatory behavior are found to favorably influence glycemic control. Our hypothesis was that the responsible care of a companion animal is associated with these positive attributes and correlated with the successful management of a chronic illness such as type 1 diabetes. We recruited 223 youths between 9 and 19 years of age from the Pediatric Diabetes clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, reviewed the status of their glycemic control (using three consecutive A1c values and asked them questions about the presence of a pet at home, and their level of involvement with its care. Multivariate analyses show that children who care actively for one or more pets at home are 2.5 times more likely to have control over their glycemic levels than children who do not care for a pet, adjusting for duration of disease, socio-economic status, age and self-management [1.1 to 5.8], pWald = 0.032. A separate model involving the care of a petdog only yielded comparable results (ORa = 2.6 [1.1 to 5.9], pWald = 0.023.

  15. Evaluation of various hepatic lesions with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chul Ju

    2000-12-01

    When a liver lesion is found in a PET image, differential diagnosis and analysis of the lesion is very important. We tried to analyze hepatic lesions found in PET. 53 patients with focal liver lesions (13 patients with HCC, 8 patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CC), 20 patients with liver metastasis, 5 patients with hemangioma, 7 patients with liver abscess, including 1 patient with liver candidiasis) were examined. Definitely high FDG uptake pattern were observed in 54% (7/13) of HCC, 100% (8/8) of CC, 95% (19/20) of metastatic liver cancer and 100% (7/7) of liver abscess. Therefore, PET was partially useful in the diagnosis of HCC, but it was very useful in the diagnosis of CC or liver metastasis or liver abscess. The contrast between lesions and surrounding liver background was very conspicuous in PET images of CC or liver metastasis or liver abscess, which suggests that PET might be used for the follow up and assessment of treatment response of these diseases.

  16. Can body volume be determined by PET?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschel, Michael; Paul, Dominik; Mix, Michael; Moser, Ernst; Brink, Ingo; Korsten-Reck, Ulrike; Mueller, Frank; Merk, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    To avoid dependence on body weight, the standardised uptake value (SUV) in positron emission tomography (PET) can instead be normalised to the lean body mass (LBM), which can be determined from body volume and mass. This study was designed to answer the following questions: Firstly, can the total body volume in principle be determined using PET? Secondly, is the precision of this measurement comparable to that achieved using an established standard method. Ten patients were examined during oncological whole-body PET examinations. The whole-body volume of the patients was determined from the transmission scan in PET. Air displacement plethysmography with BOD POD was used for comparison as the standard method of volume determination. In all patients, the whole-body volumes could be determined using PET and the standard method. Bland and Altman [23] analysis for agreement between the volumes determined by the two methods (presentation of differences vs means) revealed a very small difference of -0.14 l. With a mean patient volume of 71.81±15.93 l, the relative systematic error is only LBM ). (orig.)

  17. Fully 3D GPU PET reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L., E-mail: joaquin@nuclear.fis.ucm.es [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Cal-Gonzalez, J. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Departmento de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Desco, M. [Departmento de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Fully 3D iterative tomographic image reconstruction is computationally very demanding. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been proposed for many years as potential accelerators in complex scientific problems, but it has not been used until the recent advances in the programmability of GPUs that the best available reconstruction codes have started to be implemented to be run on GPUs. This work presents a GPU-based fully 3D PET iterative reconstruction software. This new code may reconstruct sinogram data from several commercially available PET scanners. The most important and time-consuming parts of the code, the forward and backward projection operations, are based on an accurate model of the scanner obtained with the Monte Carlo code PeneloPET and they have been massively parallelized on the GPU. For the PET scanners considered, the GPU-based code is more than 70 times faster than a similar code running on a single core of a fast CPU, obtaining in both cases the same images. The code has been designed to be easily adapted to reconstruct sinograms from any other PET scanner, including scanner prototypes.

  18. Fully 3D GPU PET reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herraiz, J.L.; Espana, S.; Cal-Gonzalez, J.; Vaquero, J.J.; Desco, M.; Udias, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Fully 3D iterative tomographic image reconstruction is computationally very demanding. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been proposed for many years as potential accelerators in complex scientific problems, but it has not been used until the recent advances in the programmability of GPUs that the best available reconstruction codes have started to be implemented to be run on GPUs. This work presents a GPU-based fully 3D PET iterative reconstruction software. This new code may reconstruct sinogram data from several commercially available PET scanners. The most important and time-consuming parts of the code, the forward and backward projection operations, are based on an accurate model of the scanner obtained with the Monte Carlo code PeneloPET and they have been massively parallelized on the GPU. For the PET scanners considered, the GPU-based code is more than 70 times faster than a similar code running on a single core of a fast CPU, obtaining in both cases the same images. The code has been designed to be easily adapted to reconstruct sinograms from any other PET scanner, including scanner prototypes.

  19. Evaluation of various hepatic lesions with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chul Ju

    2000-12-01

    When a liver lesion is found in a PET image, differential diagnosis and analysis of the lesion is very important. We tried to analyze hepatic lesions found in PET. 53 patients with focal liver lesions (13 patients with HCC, 8 patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CC), 20 patients with liver metastasis, 5 patients with hemangioma, 7 patients with liver abscess, including 1 patient with liver candidiasis) were examined. Definitely high FDG uptake pattern were observed in 54% (7/13) of HCC, 100% (8/8) of CC, 95% (19/20) of metastatic liver cancer and 100% (7/7) of liver abscess. Therefore, PET was partially useful in the diagnosis of HCC, but it was very useful in the diagnosis of CC or liver metastasis or liver abscess. The contrast between lesions and surrounding liver background was very conspicuous in PET images of CC or liver metastasis or liver abscess, which suggests that PET might be used for the follow up and assessment of treatment response of these diseases

  20. Centrifugally Spun Recycled PET: Processing and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phu Phong Vo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Centrifugal spinning, which is a high-productivity fiber fabrication technique, was used to produce a value-added product from recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate (rPET. In the present study, rPET fibers, with fiber diameters ranging from submicron to micrometer in scale, were fabricated by spinning a solution of rPET in a mixture of dichloromethane and trifluoroacetic acid. The influence of the polymer solution concentration (the viscosity, the rotational speed of the spinneret, and the inner diameter of the needles on the formation and morphology and mechanical properties of the fibers were examined through scanning electron microscopy and using a tensile testing machine. The thermal behaviors of fibrous mats with various average diameters were also investigated through differential scanning calorimetry. The smoothest and smallest fibers, with an average diameter of 619 nm, were generated using an rPET solution of 10 wt % under a rotation speed of 15,000 rpm using needles having an inner diameter of 160 μm. The fibrous mats have an average tensile strength and modulus of 4.3 MPa and 34.4 MPa, respectively. The productivity and the mechanical properties indicate that centrifugal spinning is an effective technique to fabricate high-value product from rPET.

  1. WE-G-209-03: PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, B. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Digital radiography, CT, PET, and MR are complicated imaging modalities which are composed of many hardware and software components. These components work together in a highly coordinated chain of events with the intent to produce high quality images. Acquisition, processing and reconstruction of data must occur in a precise way for optimum image quality to be achieved. Any error or unexpected event in the entire process can produce unwanted pixel intensities in the final images which may contribute to visible image artifacts. The diagnostic imaging physicist is uniquely qualified to investigate and contribute to resolution of image artifacts. This course will teach the participant to identify common artifacts found clinically in digital radiography, CT, PET, and MR, to determine the causes of artifacts, and to make recommendations for how to resolve artifacts. Learning Objectives: Identify common artifacts found clinically in digital radiography, CT, PET and MR. Determine causes of various clinical artifacts from digital radiography, CT, PET and MR. Describe how to resolve various clinical artifacts from digital radiography, CT, PET and MR.

  2. WE-G-209-03: PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, B.

    2016-01-01

    Digital radiography, CT, PET, and MR are complicated imaging modalities which are composed of many hardware and software components. These components work together in a highly coordinated chain of events with the intent to produce high quality images. Acquisition, processing and reconstruction of data must occur in a precise way for optimum image quality to be achieved. Any error or unexpected event in the entire process can produce unwanted pixel intensities in the final images which may contribute to visible image artifacts. The diagnostic imaging physicist is uniquely qualified to investigate and contribute to resolution of image artifacts. This course will teach the participant to identify common artifacts found clinically in digital radiography, CT, PET, and MR, to determine the causes of artifacts, and to make recommendations for how to resolve artifacts. Learning Objectives: Identify common artifacts found clinically in digital radiography, CT, PET and MR. Determine causes of various clinical artifacts from digital radiography, CT, PET and MR. Describe how to resolve various clinical artifacts from digital radiography, CT, PET and MR.

  3. Positron Emission Tomography (PET in Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gallamini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in the early nineties as a promising functional imaging technique in the management of neoplastic disorders, FDG-PET, and subsequently FDG-PET/CT, has become a cornerstone in several oncologic procedures such as tumor staging and restaging, treatment efficacy assessment during or after treatment end and radiotherapy planning. Moreover, the continuous technological progress of image generation and the introduction of sophisticated software to use PET scan as a biomarker paved the way to calculate new prognostic markers such as the metabolic tumor volume (MTV and the total amount of tumor glycolysis (TLG. FDG-PET/CT proved more sensitive than contrast-enhanced CT scan in staging of several type of lymphoma or in detecting widespread tumor dissemination in several solid cancers, such as breast, lung, colon, ovary and head and neck carcinoma. As a consequence the stage of patients was upgraded, with a change of treatment in 10%–15% of them. One of the most evident advantages of FDG-PET was its ability to detect, very early during treatment, significant changes in glucose metabolism or even complete shutoff of the neoplastic cell metabolism as a surrogate of tumor chemosensitivity assessment. This could enable clinicians to detect much earlier the effectiveness of a given antineoplastic treatment, as compared to the traditional radiological detection of tumor shrinkage, which usually takes time and occurs much later.

  4. Development of HM12 cyclotron for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Takuzo; Kawama, Tetsuo; Fujii, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    In Japan, there are at present more than 30 PET (Positron Emission Tomography) facilities. The movements of medical insurance application to the PET diagnosis using [ 18 F] FDG (2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose) by the Ministry of Health and Welfare are being enhanced by PET related people. Therefore, more clinical centers using PET system are expected to be built in the near future. HM12 cyclotron was developed to meet such market demands for PET, and the prototype machine has been rent to Cyclotron Radio Isotope Center (CYRIC) of Tohoku University since Oct. 1998 for their use of clinical research with positron emitters like 11 C, 13 N, 15 O and 18 F. We got many technical data of HM12 Cyclotron on the clinical base. The data was enough to establish the reliability of HM12 system operation under the clinical condition. The first commercial product of HM12 Cyclotron was delivered to National Cancer Center in March 2000. The final performance test will be finished by the end of June 2000. (author)

  5. Properties of PET/PLA Electrospun Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kevin; Cebe, Peggy

    2012-02-01

    Electrospun membranes were fabricated from poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET, co-spun with poly(lactic acid), PLA. The PLA contained 2% of the D-isomer, which served to limit the overall degree of crystallinity. Membranes were deposited from blended solutions of PET/PLA in hexafluoroisopropanol. The PET/PLA composition ranged from 0/100, 75/25, 50/50, 25/75, and 100/0. Electrospun membranes were made using either a static flat plate or a rotating wheel as the counter electrode, yielding unoriented mats or highly oriented tapes, respectively. We report on our investigation of the crystallinity, crystal perfection, and mechanical properties of these materials using differential scanning calorimetry, wide and small angle X-ray scattering, and dynamic mechanical analysis. In particular, we study the ability of one blend component (PET) to crystallize in the presence of existing crystals of the second blend component (PLA) which crystallizes first and at a lower temperature than PET.

  6. Anatomy and function: PET-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajander, Sami; Saraste, Antti; Ukkonen, Heikki; Knuuti, Juhani

    2010-05-01

    CT coronary angiography and perfusion PET form an attractive combination to study coronary artery lesions and their consequences in patients with coronary artery disease. Whereas CT provides non-invasive assessment of coronary lumen and wall, PET perfusion is a reliable method for the evaluation of myocardial flow. CT, although very capable of ruling out significant coronary artery disease, is less than satisfactory in assessing the actual significance of the detected lesions. PET imaging, despite its excellent sensitivity, fails to describe the exact anatomy of the epicardial vessels. By fusing image data from these two modalities, lesions can be accurately correlated with their physiological or anatomical counterparts. Hybrid PET-CT devices, now in wide clinical use, allow such fusion in a one-stop-shop study. Although still seeking its place in clinical scenarios, growing evidence suggests that hybrid PET-CT imaging of coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion can accurately - and non-invasively - assess the existence and degree of coronary artery disease.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallamini, Andrea, E-mail: gallamini.a@ospedale.cuneo.it [Department of Research and Medical Innovation, Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Center, Nice University, Nice Cedex 2-06189 Nice (France); Zwarthoed, Colette [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Center, Nice University, Nice Cedex 2-06189 Nice (France); Borra, Anna [Hematology Department S. Croce Hospital, Via M. Coppino 26, Cuneo 12100 (Italy)

    2014-09-29

    Since its introduction in the early nineties as a promising functional imaging technique in the management of neoplastic disorders, FDG-PET, and subsequently FDG-PET/CT, has become a cornerstone in several oncologic procedures such as tumor staging and restaging, treatment efficacy assessment during or after treatment end and radiotherapy planning. Moreover, the continuous technological progress of image generation and the introduction of sophisticated software to use PET scan as a biomarker paved the way to calculate new prognostic markers such as the metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the total amount of tumor glycolysis (TLG). FDG-PET/CT proved more sensitive than contrast-enhanced CT scan in staging of several type of lymphoma or in detecting widespread tumor dissemination in several solid cancers, such as breast, lung, colon, ovary and head and neck carcinoma. As a consequence the stage of patients was upgraded, with a change of treatment in 10%–15% of them. One of the most evident advantages of FDG-PET was its ability to detect, very early during treatment, significant changes in glucose metabolism or even complete shutoff of the neoplastic cell metabolism as a surrogate of tumor chemosensitivity assessment. This could enable clinicians to detect much earlier the effectiveness of a given antineoplastic treatment, as compared to the traditional radiological detection of tumor shrinkage, which usually takes time and occurs much later.

  8. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-07-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as 'pets' including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009-2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic 'pets' are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004-2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients.

  9. Small animal PET: aspects of performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Simone; Bauer, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Dedicated small animal positron emission tomography (PET) systems are increasingly prevalent in industry (e.g. for preclinical drug development) and biological research. Such systems permit researchers to perform animal studies of a longitudinal design characterised by repeated measurements in single animals. With the advent of commercial systems, scanners have become readily available and increasingly popular. As a consequence, technical specifications are becoming more diverse, making scanner systems less broadly applicable. The investigator has, therefore, to make a decision regarding which type of scanner is most suitable for the intended experiments. This decision should be based on gantry characteristics and the physical performance. The first few steps have been taken towards standardisation of the assessment of performance characteristics of dedicated animal PET systems, though such assessment is not yet routinely implemented. In this review, we describe current methods of evaluation of physical performance parameters of small animal PET scanners. Effects of methodologically different approaches on the results are assessed. It is underscored that particular attention has to be paid to spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction and count rate performance. Differences in performance measurement methods are described with regard to commercially available systems, namely the Concorde MicroPET systems P4 and R4 and the quad-HIDAC. Lastly, consequences of differences in scanner performance parameters are rated with respect to applications of small animal PET. (orig.)

  10. Human salmonellosis associated with exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, D L; Khakhria, R; Johnson, W M

    1997-11-01

    During the period from 1994 to 1996, an increase in the number of laboratory-confirmed cases of human salmonellosis associated with exposure to exotic pets including iguanas, pet turtles, sugar gliders, and hedgehogs was observed in Canada. Pet turtle-associated salmonellosis was recognized as a serious public health problem in the 1960s and 1970s, and in February 1975 legislation banning the importation of turtles into Canada was enacted by Agriculture Canada. Reptile-associated salmonellosis is once again being recognized as a resurgent disease. From 1993 to 1995, there were more than 20,000 laboratory-confirmed human cases of salmonellosis in Canada. The major source of Salmonella infection is food; however, an estimated 3 to 5% of all cases of salmonellosis in humans are associated with exposure to exotic pets. Among the isolates from these patients with salmonellosis, a variety of Salmonella serotypes were also associated with exotic pets and included the following: S. java, S. stanley, S. poona, S. jangwani, S. tilene, S. litchfield, S. manhattan, S. pomona, S. miami, S. rubislaw, S. marina subsp. IV, and S. wassenaar subsp. IV.

  11. Infectious threats from exotic pets: dermatological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Ted; Jablon, Jennifer

    2003-04-01

    Zoonoses are diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans. More than 250 distinct zoonoses have been described in the literature. It is estimated that 56% of United States households contain at least one pet, and although considerable research has been performed regarding the more common household animals including dogs, cats, small birds, and rodents, surprisingly little is known about the zoonotic hazards of owning the more exotic pets. According to the 1997 USPHS/IDSA Report on the Prevention of Opportunistic Infections in Persons Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, the immunocompromised patient should avoid contact with feces-laden soil, litter boxes, reptiles, most pet birds, and any animal less than 6 months old . It has also been documented that because of their inquisitive nature, children are at even higher risk for infection from animals than adolescents or immunocompetent adults. In this article the authors have reviewed the available data regarding hazards associated with the hedgehog, flying squirrel, iguana, chinchilla, and cockatoo. With the growing popularity of such exotic pets, further observation and research is warranted. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of zoonotic disease related to exotic pet ownership, and they should address this issue when obtaining a history and formulating a differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions suggestive of such illnesses.

  12. Correlation of pre-and post-induction chemotherapy 18-FDG PET findings with histopathology in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Andrea M.; Berlangieri, Sam; Ngai, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To correlate 18F-FDG PET metabolic response to therapy with histopathology and survival, in patients with locally advanced (stage IIl) non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) receiving induction chemotherapy. Methods: A retrospective review of all patients with stage III NSCLC planned for induction chemotherapy and surgical resection, in whom pre- and post-chemotherapy FDG-PET at Austin Health between 2004 and 2007 was performed. The staging and positive nodal stations as determined by PET was compared to histopathological findings after resection. The tumour response on serial FDG PET was also compared to overall outcome. Results: 9 patients were included. There was a 100 % correlation between pre- or post- chemotherapy nodal staging and final histopathological nodal stage. Ninety percent of all positive nodal stations (9/10) seen on histopathology were correctly localised by pre- or post-chemotherapy FDG PET. Only one patient with a metastatic lymph node at nodal station 9 R could not be localised by prior PET studies. Of the patients in whom a down-staging in tumour status was observed on the postchemotherapy FDG-PET, 83% (5/6) of patients were still alive (follow-up range of 8 to 40 months) as compared with 33% (1/3 ) (follow-up range of 9-13 months) for non-responders. Conclusion: There is good correlation between pre- and/or post- chemotherapy FDG PET and final histopathology for the nodal staging of stage III NSCLC. There is an overall trend for those patients in whom PET resulted in a down-staging of tumour to have a longer survival.

  13. Stock Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data inform the public of the most recent stock status for all stocks (FSSI and non-FSSI) in the fishery management unit contained in a fishery managment plan....

  14. 9 CFR 130.10 - User fees for pet birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for pet birds. 130.10... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.10 User fees for pet birds. (a) User fees for pet birds of U.S. origin returning to the United States, except pet birds of U.S. origin returning from Canada, are as follows...

  15. PET motion correction using PRESTO with ITK motion estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Melissa [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Science Faculty of University of Lisbon (Portugal); Caldeira, Liliana; Scheins, Juergen [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4), Forschungszentrum Jülich (Germany); Matela, Nuno [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Science Faculty of University of Lisbon (Portugal); Kops, Elena Rota; Shah, N Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4), Forschungszentrum Jülich (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    The Siemens BrainPET scanner is a hybrid MRI/PET system. PET images are prone to motion artefacts which degrade the image quality. Therefore, motion correction is essential. The library PRESTO converts motion-corrected LORs into highly accurate generic projection data [1], providing high-resolution PET images. ITK is an open-source software used for registering multidimensional data []. ITK provides motion estimation necessary to PRESTO.

  16. PET motion correction using PRESTO with ITK motion estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botel