WorldWideScience

Sample records for presynaptic glutamate release

  1. Monitoring single-synapse glutamate release and presynaptic calcium concentration in organised brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Thomas P; Zheng, Kaiyu; Tyurikova, Olga; Reynolds, James P; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2017-06-01

    Brain function relies in large part on Ca 2+ -dependent release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate from neuronal axons. Establishing the causal relationship between presynaptic Ca 2+ dynamics and probabilistic glutamate release is therefore a fundamental quest across neurosciences. Its progress, however, has hitherto depended primarily on the exploration of either cultured nerve cells or giant central synapses accessible to direct experimental probing in situ. Here we show that combining patch-clamp with time-resolved imaging of Ca 2+ -sensitive fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (Tornado-FLIM) enables readout of single spike-evoked presynaptic Ca 2+ concentration dynamics, with nanomolar sensitivity, in individual neuronal axons in acute brain slices. In parallel, intensity Tornado imaging of a locally expressed extracellular optical glutamate sensor iGluSnFr provides direct monitoring of single-quantum, single-synapse glutamate releases in situ. These two methods pave the way for simultaneous registration of presynaptic Ca 2+ dynamics and transmitter release in an intact brain at the level of individual synapses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Presynaptic transporter-mediated release of glutamate evoked by the protonophore FCCP increases under altered gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T. A.; Krisanova, N. V.

    2008-12-01

    High-affinity Na +-dependent glutamate transporters of the plasma membrane mediate the glutamate uptake into neurons, and thus maintain low levels of extracellular glutamate in the synaptic cleft. The study focused on the release of glutamate by reversal of Na +-dependent glutamate transporters from rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) under conditions of centrifuge-induced hypergravity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed similarity in the size and cytoplasmic granularity between synaptosomal preparations obtained from control and G-loaded animals (10 G, 1 h). The release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes was evaluated using the protonophore FCCP, which dissipated synaptic vesicle proton gradient, thus synaptic vesicles were not able to keep glutamate inside and the latter enriched cytosol. FCCP per se induced the greater release of L-[ 14C]glutamate in hypergravity as compared to control (4.8 ± 1.0% and 8.0 ± 1.0% of total label). Exocytotic release of L-[ 14C]glutamate evoked by depolarization was reduced down to zero after FCCP application under both conditions studied. Depolarization stimulated release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes preliminary treated with FCCP was considerably increased from 27.0 ± 2.2% of total label in control to 35.0 ± 2.3% in hypergravity. Non-transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporter DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate was found to significantly inhibit high-KCl and FCCP-stimulated release of L-[ 14C]glutamate, confirming the release by reversal of glutamate transporters. The enhancement of transporter-mediated release of glutamate in hypergravity was found to result at least partially from the inhibition of the activity of Na/K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. We suggested that hypergravity-induced alteration in transporter-mediated release of glutamate indicated hypoxic injury of neurons.

  3. Chronic morphine selectively sensitizes the effect of D1 receptor agonist on presynaptic glutamate release in basolateral amygdala neurons that project to prelimbic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiaojiao; Chen, Ming; Dong, Yi; Lai, Bin; Zheng, Ping

    2018-05-01

    Drug addiction is a brain disorder characterized by chronic, compulsive use of drugs. Previous studies have found a number of chronic morphine-induced changes in the brain at molecular levels. A study from our lab showed that chronic morphine-induced increase in the expression of presynaptic D1 receptors in basolateral amygdala (BLA) neurons played an important role in environmental cue-induced retrieval of morphine withdrawal memory. However, the downstream neurocircuitry of chronic morphine-induced increase presynaptic D1 receptors in the BLA remains to be elucidated. Using retrogradely labelling technique combined with whole-cell patch-clamp methods, our results showed that (1) chronic morphine sensitized the effect of D1 receptor agonist on presynaptic glutamate release in BLA neurons that projected to the prelimbic cortex (PrL), but had no influence on that in BLA neurons that projected to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) or the CA1 of the hippocampus; (2) chronic morphine sensitized the effect of D1 receptor agonist on action potential firing in BLA neurons that projected to the PrL, but without affecting the intrinsic excitability and the sensitivity of postsynaptic glutamate receptors to glutamate in BLA neurons that projected to the PrL. These results suggest that chronic morphine selectively sensitizes the effect of D1 receptor agonist on presynaptic glutamate release in BLA neurons that project to PrL and induces a sensitization of the effect of D1 receptor agonist on action potential firing in BLA neurons that project to the PrL. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rosiglitazone Suppresses In Vitro Seizures in Hippocampal Slice by Inhibiting Presynaptic Glutamate Release in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bing Wong

    Full Text Available Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a nuclear hormone receptor whose agonist, rosiglitazone has a neuroprotective effect to hippocampal neurons in pilocarpine-induced seizures. Hippocampal slice preparations treated in Mg2+ free medium can induce ictal and interictal-like epileptiform discharges, which is regarded as an in vitro model of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-mediated temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. We applied rosiglitazone in hippocampal slices treated in Mg2+ free medium. The effects of rosiglitazone on hippocampal CA1-Schaffer collateral synaptic transmission were tested. We also examined the neuroprotective effect of rosiglitazone toward NMDA excitotoxicity on cultured hippocampal slices. Application of 10 μM rosiglitazone significantly suppressed amplitude and frequency of epileptiform discharges in CA1 neurons. Pretreatment with the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not block the effect of rosiglitazone on suppressing discharge frequency, but reverse the effect on suppressing discharge amplitude. Application of rosiglitazone suppressed synaptic transmission in the CA1-Schaffer collateral pathway. By miniature excitatory-potential synaptic current (mEPSC analysis, rosiglitazone significantly suppressed presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This phenomenon can be reversed by pretreating PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Also, rosiglitazone protected cultured hippocampal slices from NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. The protective effect of 10 μM rosiglitazone was partially antagonized by concomitant high dose GW9662 treatment, indicating that this effect is partially mediated by PPARγ receptors. In conclusion, rosiglitazone suppressed NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform discharges by inhibition of presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Rosiglitazone protected hippocampal slice from NMDA excitotoxicity partially by PPARγ activation. We suggest that rosiglitazone could be a potential agent to treat patients with TLE.

  5. Stereoselectivity of presynaptic autoreceptors modulating dopamine release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbilla, S.; Langer, S.Z.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol were studied on the spontaneous and field stimulation-evoked release of total radioactivity from slices of rabbit caudate nucleus prelabelled with [ 3 H]dopamine. (S)-Sulpiride in concentrations ranging from 0.01-1μM enhanced the electrically evoked release of [ 3 H]dopamine while (R)-sulpiride was 10 times less potent than (S)-sulpiride. Exposure to (S)-butaclamol (0.1-1 μM) but not to (R)-butaclamol (0.1-10μM) enhanced the field-stimulated release of [ 3 H]dopamine. The facilitatory effects of (S)- and (R)-sulpiride and (S)-butaclamol on the stimulated release of the labelled neurotransmitter were observed under conditions in which these drugs did not modify the spontaneous outflow of radioactivity. Only the active enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol antagonized the inhibition by apomorphine (1μM) of the stimulated release of [ 3 H]dopamine. Our results indicate that the presynaptic inhibitory dopamine autoreceptors modulating the stimulation-evoked release of [ 3 H]dopamine in the caudate nucleus are, like the classical postsynaptic dopamine receptors, chemically stereoselective. (Auth.)

  6. New Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy that Target Presynaptic Transmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    and 280nm using a BioMate 5 UV- visible spectrophotometer (Thermo Spectronic, Waltham, Massachusetts, USA). The integrity of the extracted RNA was...presynaptic P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channel to reduce glutamate release. In a different study, local perfusion with LEV (10, 30 and 100M) alone...the brain was used for protein expression analysis (western blotting) as described above while the other hemisphere was used for mRNA extraction . As

  7. Glutamate release from platelets: exocytosis versus glutamate transporter reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatkina, Ludmila A; Borisova, Tatiana A

    2013-11-01

    Platelets express neuronal and glial glutamate transporters EAAT 1-3 in the plasma membrane and vesicular glutamate transporters VGLUT 1,2 in the membrane of secretory granules. This study is focused on the assessment of non-exocytotic glutamate release, that is, the unstimulated release, heteroexchange and glutamate transporter reversal in platelets. Using the glutamate dehydrogenase assay, the absence of unstimulated release of endogenous glutamate from platelets was demonstrated, even after inhibition of glutamate transporters and cytoplasmic enzyme glutamine synthetase by dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate and methionine sulfoximine, respectively. Depolarization of the plasma membrane by exposure to elevated [K(+)] did not induce the release of glutamate from platelets that was shown using the glutamate dehydrogenase assay and radiolabeled l-[(14)C]glutamate. Glutamate efflux by means of heteroexchange with transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporters dl-threo-β-hydroxyaspartate (dl-THA) was not observed. Furthermore, the protonophore cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon (FCCP) and inhibitor of V-type H(+)-ATPase bafilomycin A1 also failed to stimulate the release of glutamate from platelets. However, exocytotic release of glutamate from secretory granules in response to thrombin stimulation was not prevented by elevated [K(+)], dl-THA, FCCP and bafilomycin A1. In contrast to nerve terminals, platelets cannot release glutamate in a non-exocytotic manner. Heteroexchange, transporter-mediated and unstimulated release of glutamate are not inherent to platelets. Therefore, platelets may be used as a peripheral marker/model for the analysis of glutamate uptake by brain nerve terminals only (direct function of transporters), whereas the mechanisms of glutamate release are different in platelets and nerve terminals. Glutamate is released by platelets exclusively by means of exocytosis. Also, reverse function of vesicular glutamate transporters of platelets is

  8. Presynaptic inhibition of the release of multiple major central nervous system neurotransmitter types by the inhaled anaesthetic isoflurane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphalen, R. I.; Desai, K. M.; Hemmings, H. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Presynaptic effects of general anaesthetics are not well characterized. We tested the hypothesis that isoflurane exhibits transmitter-specific effects on neurotransmitter release from neurochemically and functionally distinct isolated mammalian nerve terminals. Methods Nerve terminals from adult male rat brain were prelabelled with [3H]glutamate and [14C]GABA (cerebral cortex), [3H]norepinephrine (hippocampus), [14C]dopamine (striatum), or [3H]choline (precursor of [3H]acetylcholine; striatum). Release evoked by depolarizing pulses of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) or elevated KCl was quantified using a closed superfusion system. Results Isoflurane at clinical concentrations (neurotransmitters tested in a concentration-dependent manner. Isoflurane was a more potent inhibitor [expressed as IC50 (sem)] of glutamate release [0.37 (0.03) mM; Pneurotransmitters with selectivity for glutamate release, consistent with both widespread inhibition and nerve terminal-specific presynaptic effects. Glutamate release was most sensitive to inhibition compared with GABA, acetylcholine, dopamine, and norepinephrine release due to presynaptic specializations in ion channel expression, regulation, and/or coupling to exocytosis. Reductions in neurotransmitter release by volatile anaesthetics could contribute to altered synaptic transmission, leading to therapeutic and toxic effects involving all major neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23213036

  9. RIM genes differentially contribute to organizing presynaptic release sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S; Deng, Lunbin; Fan, Mingming; Südhof, Thomas C

    2012-07-17

    Tight coupling of Ca(2+) channels to the presynaptic active zone is critical for fast synchronous neurotransmitter release. RIMs are multidomain proteins that tether Ca(2+) channels to active zones, dock and prime synaptic vesicles for release, and mediate presynaptic plasticity. Here, we use conditional knockout mice targeting all RIM isoforms expressed by the Rims1 and Rims2 genes to examine the contributions and mechanism of action of different RIMs in neurotransmitter release. We show that acute single deletions of each Rims gene decreased release and impaired vesicle priming but did not alter the extracellular Ca(2+)-responsiveness of release (which for Rims gene mutants is a measure of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx). Moreover, single deletions did not affect the synchronization of release (which depends on the close proximity of Ca(2+) channels to release sites). In contrast, deletion of both Rims genes severely impaired the Ca(2+) responsiveness and synchronization of release. RIM proteins may act on Ca(2+) channels in two modes: They tether Ca(2+) channels to active zones, and they directly modulate Ca(2+)-channel inactivation. The first mechanism is essential for localizing presynaptic Ca(2+) influx to nerve terminals, but the role of the second mechanism remains unknown. Strikingly, we find that although the RIM2 C(2)B domain by itself significantly decreased Ca(2+)-channel inactivation in transfected HEK293 cells, it did not rescue any aspect of the RIM knockout phenotype in cultured neurons. Thus, RIMs primarily act in release as physical Ca(2+)-channel tethers and not as Ca(2+)-channel modulators. Different RIM proteins compensate for each other in recruiting Ca(2+) channels to active zones, but contribute independently and incrementally to vesicle priming.

  10. Riluzole and gabapentinoids activate glutamate transporters to facilitate glutamate-induced glutamate release from cultured astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshizumi, Masaru; Eisenach, James. C.; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the glutamate transporter activator riluzole paradoxically enhanced glutamate-induced glutamate release from cultured astrocytes. We further showed that both riluzole and the α2δ subunit ligand gabapentin activated descending inhibition in rats by increasing glutamate receptor signaling in the locus coeruleus and hypothesized that these drugs share common mechanisms to enhance glutamate release from astrocytes. In the present study, we examined the effects o...

  11. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Su-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K + channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca 2+ ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] C ), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca v 2.2 (N-type) and Ca v 2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na + /Ca 2+ exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca 2+ entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. ► This action did

  12. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan, 320, Taiwan (China); Lu, Cheng-Wei [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng [School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); Wang, Su-Jane, E-mail: med0003@mail.fju.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub C}), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat

  13. Calcium Assists Dopamine Release by Preventing Aggregation on the Inner Leaflet of Presynaptic Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mokkila, Sini; Postila, Pekka A.; Rissanen, Sami

    2017-01-01

    . The inner leaflets of presynaptic vesicles, which are responsible for releasing neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft, are mainly composed of neutral lipids such as phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. The neutrality of the lipid head group region, enhanced by a low pH level, should limit...

  14. The effect of nucleotides and adenosine on stimulus-evoked glutamate release from rat brain cortical slices

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Gillian C; Boarder, Michael R

    2000-01-01

    Evidence has previously been presented that P1 receptors for adenosine, and P2 receptors for nucleotides such as ATP, regulate stimulus-evoked release of biogenic amines from nerve terminals in the brain. Here we investigated whether adenosine and nucleotides exert presynaptic control over depolarisation-elicited glutamate release.Slices of rat brain cortex were perfused and stimulated with pulses of 46 mM K+ in the presence of the glutamate uptake inhibitor L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxyl...

  15. The effect of nucleotides and adenosine on stimulus-evoked glutamate release from rat brain cortical slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, G C; Boarder, M R

    2000-10-01

    Evidence has previously been presented that P1 receptors for adenosine, and P2 receptors for nucleotides such as ATP, regulate stimulus-evoked release of biogenic amines from nerve terminals in the brain. Here we investigated whether adenosine and nucleotides exert presynaptic control over depolarisation-elicited glutamate release. Slices of rat brain cortex were perfused and stimulated with pulses of 46 mM K(+) in the presence of the glutamate uptake inhibitor L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (0.2 mM). High K(+) substantially increased efflux of glutamate from the slices. Basal glutamate release was unchanged by the presence of nucleotides or adenosine at concentrations of 300 microM. Adenosine, ATP, ADP and adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphoshate) at 300 microM attenuated depolarisation-evoked release of glutamate. However UTP, 2-methylthio ATP, 2-methylthio ADP, and alpha,beta-methylene ATP at 300 microM had no effect on stimulated glutamate efflux. Adenosine deaminase blocked the effect of adenosine, but left the response to ATP unchanged. The A(1) antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine antagonised the inhibitory effect of both adenosine and ATP. Cibacron blue 3GA inhibited stimulus-evoked glutamate release when applied alone. When cibacron blue 3GA was present with ATP, stimulus-evoked glutamate release was almost eliminated. However, this P2 antagonist had no effect on the inhibition by adenosine. These results show that the release of glutamate from depolarised nerve terminals of the rat cerebral cortex is inhibited by adenosine and ATP. ATP appears to act directly and not through conversion to adenosine.

  16. Acute stress increases depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the rat prefrontal/frontal cortex: the dampening action of antidepressants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Musazzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral stress is recognized as a main risk factor for neuropsychiatric diseases. Converging evidence suggested that acute stress is associated with increase of excitatory transmission in certain forebrain areas. Aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism whereby acute stress increases glutamate release, and if therapeutic drugs prevent the effect of stress on glutamate release.Rats were chronically treated with vehicle or drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (fluoxetine, desipramine, venlafaxine, agomelatine and then subjected to unpredictable footshock stress. Acute stress induced marked increase in depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex in superfusion, and the chronic drug treatments prevented the increase of glutamate release. Stress induced rapid increase in the circulating levels of corticosterone in all rats (both vehicle- and drug-treated, and glutamate release increase was blocked by previous administration of selective antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (RU 486. On the molecular level, stress induced accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complexes in synaptic membranes (both in vehicle- and drug-treated rats. Patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex revealed that stress increased glutamatergic transmission through both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and that antidepressants may normalize it by reducing release probability.Acute footshock stress up-regulated depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex. Stress-induced increase of glutamate release was dependent on stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor by corticosterone. Because all drugs employed did not block either elevation of corticosterone or accumulation of SNARE complexes, the dampening action of the drugs on glutamate release must be downstream of these processes. This novel effect of antidepressants on the response to stress

  17. Ferulic Acid Suppresses Glutamate Release Through Inhibition of Voltage-Dependent Calcium Entry in Rat Cerebrocortical Nerve Terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Huang, Shu-Kuei

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the effects and possible mechanism of ferulic acid, a naturally occurring phenolic compound, on endogenous glutamate release in the nerve terminals of the cerebral cortex in rats. Results show that ferulic acid inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effect of ferulic acid on the evoked glutamate release was prevented by chelating the extracellular Ca2+ ions, but was insensitive to the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate. Ferulic acid suppressed the depolarization-induced increase in a cytosolic-free Ca2+ concentration, but did not alter 4-AP–mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of ferulic acid on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These results show that ferulic acid inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry. PMID:23342970

  18. Glutamate and dopamine transmission from midbrain dopamine neurons share similar release properties but are differentially affected by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrover, Martín F; Shin, Jung Hoon; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2014-02-26

    Synaptic transmission between ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens (NAc) is critically involved in reward-motivated behaviors and thought to be altered in addiction. In addition to dopamine (DA), glutamate is packaged and released by a subset of mesolimbic DA neurons, eliciting EPSCs onto medium spiny neurons in NAc. Little is known about the properties and modulation of glutamate release from DA midbrain terminals and the effect of cocaine. Using an optogenetic approach to selectively activate midbrain DA fibers, we compared the properties and modulation of DA transients and EPSCs measured using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and whole-cell recordings in mouse brain slices. DA transients and EPSCs were inhibited by DA receptor D2R agonist and showed a marked paired-pulse depression that required 2 min for full recovery. Cocaine depressed EPSCs amplitude by 50% but enhanced the overall DA transmission from midbrain DA neurons. AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs were equally inhibited by cocaine, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism of action. Pharmacological blockage and genetic deletion of D2R in DA neurons prevented the cocaine-induced inhibition of EPSCs and caused a larger increase in DA transient peak, confirming the involvement of presynaptic D2R. These findings demonstrate that acute cocaine inhibits DA and glutamate release from midbrain DA neurons via presynaptic D2R but has differential overall effects on their transmissions in the NAc. We postulate that cocaine, by blocking DA reuptake, prolongs DA transients and facilitates the feedback inhibition of DA and glutamate release from these terminals.

  19. Changes in presynaptic release, but not reuptake, of bioamines induced by long-term antidepressant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolzhenko, A.T.; Komissarov, I.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation into the effect of long-term administration of antidepressants on neuronal uptake of NA and 5-HT and on their release, induced by electrical stimulation, in rat brain slices. The effects of the test substances on neuronal uptake of 14 C-NA and 3 H-5-HT by the slices was investigated. Values of IC 50 and EC 2 were found and compared in the experiments and control. The inhibitory effect of clonidine (10 -4 M) and of 5-HT (10 -5 M) on presynaptic release of 14 C-NA and 3 H-5-HT also was studied in brain slices from intact rats and rats treated for two weeks with antidepressants

  20. Relationship between presynaptic membrane potential and acetylcholine release in synaptosomes from Torpedo electric organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, F M

    1984-01-01

    The membrane potential of purely cholinergic synaptosomes isolated from Torpedo electric organ was monitored with fluorescent carbocyanine dyes. An increased fluorescence was associated with depolarization and a quenching with hyperpolarization. Fluorescence data provided evidence that Torpedo synaptosomes have a membrane potential mainly driven by a K+ diffusion potential and a membrane potential of about -50 mV could be estimated after calibration of fluorescence signals with ionophore antibiotics. The release of acetylcholine (ACh) from Torpedo synaptosomes was monitored continuously by measuring the light emitted by a chemiluminescent method (Israël & Lesbats, 1981 a). Using fluorescence data, the release of ACh was expressed as a function of membrane potential. The relationship between presynaptic potential and transmitter release as determined by biochemical methods at cholinergic nerve endings showed striking similarities to that observed at the squid giant synapse. Several substances were also tested with regard to their depolarizing and releasing properties and it was found that the toxin isolated from the venom of the annelid Glycera convoluta, which induced a large increase in quantal release of transmitter (Manaranche, Thieffry, & Israël, 1980) promoted a depolarization of Torpedo synaptosomes in addition to ACh release. PMID:6207289

  1. Distinct presynaptic control of dopamine release in striosomal and matrix areas of the cat caudate nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemel, M.L.; Desban, M.; Glowinski, J.; Gauchy, C.

    1989-01-01

    By use of a sensitive in vitro microsuperfusion method, the cholinergic presynaptic control of dopamine release was investigated in a prominent striosome (areas poor in acetylcholinesterase activity) located within the core of cat caudate nucleus and also in adjacent matrix area. The spontaneous release of [ 3 H]dopamine continuously synthesized from [ 3 H]tyrosine in the matrix area was found to be twice that in the striosomal area; the spontaneous and potassium-evoked releases of [ 3 H]dopamine were calcium-dependent in both compartments. With 10 -6 M tetrodotoxin, 5 x 10 -5 M acetylcholine stimulated [ 3 H]dopamine release in both striosomal and matrix areas, effects completely antagonized by atropine, thus showing the involvement of muscarinic receptors located on dopaminergic nerve terminals. Experiments without tetrodotoxin revealed a more complex regulation of dopamine release in the matrix: (i) in contrast to results seen in the striosome, acetylcholine induced only a transient stimulatory effect on matrix dopamine release. (ii) Although 10 -6 M atropine completely abolished the cholinergic stimulatory effect on [ 3 H]dopamine release in striosomal area, delayed and prolonged stimulation of [ 3 H] dopamine release was seen with atropine in the matrix. The latter effect was completely abolished by the nicotinic antagonist pempidine. Therefore, in the matrix, in addition to its direct (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) facilitatory action on [ 3 H]dopamine release, acetylcholine exerts two indirect (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) opposing effects: an inhibition and a stimulation of [ 3 H]dopamine release mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, respectively

  2. Presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine release induced by adenosine at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Silvana; Veggetti, Mariela; Muchnik, Salomón; Losavio, Adriana

    2004-05-01

    1. At the mouse neuromuscular junction, adenosine (AD) and the A(1) agonist 2-chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyl-adenosine (CCPA) induce presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine (ACh) release by activation of A(1) AD receptors through a mechanism that is still unknown. To evaluate whether the inhibition is mediated by modulation of the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) associated with tonic secretion (L- and N-type VDCCs), we measured the miniature end-plate potential (mepp) frequency in mouse diaphragm muscles. 2. Blockade of VDCCs by Cd(2+) prevented the effect of the CCPA. Nitrendipine (an L-type VDCC antagonist) but not omega-conotoxin GVIA (an N-type VDCC antagonist) blocked the action of CCPA, suggesting that the decrease in spontaneous mepp frequency by CCPA is associated with an action on L-type VDCCs only. 3. As A(1) receptors are coupled to a G(i/o) protein, we investigated whether the inhibition of PKA or the activation of PKC is involved in the presynaptic inhibition mechanism. Neither N-(2[p-bromocinnamylamino]-ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, a PKA inhibitor), nor 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine (H-7, a PKC antagonist), nor phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PHA, a PKC activator) modified CCPA-induced presynaptic inhibition, suggesting that these second messenger pathways are not involved. 4. The effect of CCPA was eliminated by the calmodulin antagonist N-(6-aminohexil)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W-7) and by ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester epsilon6TDelta-BM, which suggests that the action of CCPA to modulate L-type VDCCs may involve Ca(2+)-calmodulin. 5. To investigate the action of CCPA on diverse degrees of nerve terminal depolarization, we studied its effect at different external K(+) concentrations. The effect of CCPA on ACh secretion evoked by 10 mm K(+) was prevented by the P/Q-type VDCC antagonist omega-agatoxin IVA. 6. CCPA failed to

  3. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-01-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  4. Estradiol induces dendritic spines by enhancing glutamate release independent of transcription: A mechanism for organizational sex differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jaclyn M.; Liang, Shu-Ling; Thompson, Scott M.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The naturally occurring sex difference in dendritic spine number on hypothalamic neurons offers a unique opportunity to investigate mechanisms establishing synaptic patterning during perinatal sensitive periods. A major advantage of the model is the ability to treat neonatal females with estradiol to permanently induce the male phenotype. During the development of other systems, exuberant innervation is followed by activity-dependent pruning necessary for elimination of spurious synapses. In contrast, we demonstrate that estradiol-induced organization in the hypothalamus involves the induction of new synapses on dendritic spines. Activation of estrogen receptors by estradiol triggers a non-genomic activation of PI3 kinase that results in enhanced glutamate release from presynaptic neurons. Subsequent activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors activates MAP kinases inducing dendritic spine formation. These results reveal a trans-neuronal mechanism by which estradiol acts during a sensitive period to establish a profound and lasting sex difference in hypothalamic synaptic patterning. PMID:18498739

  5. Presynaptic membrane receptors in acetylcholine release modulation in the neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomàs, Josep; Santafé, Manel M; Garcia, Neus; Lanuza, Maria A; Tomàs, Marta; Besalduch, Núria; Obis, Teresa; Priego, Mercedes; Hurtado, Erica

    2014-05-01

    Over the past few years, we have studied, in the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ), the local involvement in transmitter release of the presynaptic muscarinic ACh autoreceptors (mAChRs), purinergic adenosine autoreceptors (P1Rs), and trophic factor receptors (TFRs; for neurotrophins and trophic cytokines) during development and in the adult. At any given moment, the way in which a synapse works is largely the logical outcome of the confluence of these (and other) metabotropic signalling pathways on intracellular kinases, which phosphorylate protein targets and materialize adaptive changes. We propose an integrated interpretation of the complementary function of these receptors in the adult NMJ. The activity of a given receptor group can modulate a given combination of spontaneous, evoked, and activity-dependent release characteristics. For instance, P1Rs can conserve resources by limiting spontaneous quantal leak of ACh (an A1 R action) and protect synapse function, because stimulation with adenosine reduces the magnitude of depression during repetitive activity. The overall outcome of the mAChRs seems to contribute to upkeep of spontaneous quantal output of ACh, save synapse function by decreasing the extent of evoked release (mainly an M2 action), and reduce depression. We have also identified several links among P1Rs, mAChRs, and TFRs. We found a close dependence between mAChR and some TFRs and observed that the muscarinic group has to operate correctly if the tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (trkB) is also to operate correctly, and vice versa. Likewise, the functional integrity of mAChRs depends on P1Rs operating normally. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Release properties of individual presynaptic boutons expressed during homosynaptic depression and heterosynaptic facilitation of the Aplysia sensorimotor synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eMalkinson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Much of what we know about the mechanisms underlying Homosynaptic Depression (HSD and heterosynaptic facilitation is based on intracellular recordings of integrated postsynaptic potentials. This methodological approach views the presynaptic apparatus as a single compartment rather than taking a more realistic representation reflecting the fact that it is made up of tens to hundreds of individual and independent Presynaptic Release Boutons (PRBs. Using cultured Aplysia sensorimotor synapses, we reexamined HSD and its dishabituation by imaging the release properties of individual PRBs. We find that the PRB population is heterogeneous and can be clustered into three groups: approximately 25% of the PRBs consistently release neurotransmitter throughout the entire habituation paradigm (35 stimuli, 0.05Hz and have a relatively high quantal content, 36% of the PRBs display intermittent failures only after the tenth stimulation, and 39% are low quantal-content PRBs that exhibit intermittent release failures from the onset of the habituation paradigm. 5HT-induced synaptic dishabituation by a single 5HT application was generated by the enhanced recovery of the quantal content of the habituated PRBs and did not involve the recruitment of new release boutons. The characterization of the PRB population as heterogeneous in terms of its temporal pattern of release-probability and quantal content provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying HSD and its dishabituation.

  7. Glutamate oxidation in astrocytes: Roles of glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, Mary C; Stridh, Malin H; McNair, Laura Frendrup

    2016-01-01

    to the presynaptic neurons as the nonexcitatory amino acid glutamine. The cycle was initially thought to function with a 1:1 ratio between glutamate released and glutamine taken up by neurons. However, studies of glutamate metabolism in astrocytes have shown that a considerable proportion of glutamate undergoes...... the enzymes that mediate this conversion. Methods include pharmacological tools such as the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid, studies using GDH knockout mice, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of GDH in astrocytes. Studies in brain slices incubated with [15N]glutamate demonstrated activity of GDH......The cellular distribution of transporters and enzymes related to glutamate metabolism led to the concept of the glutamate–glutamine cycle. Glutamate is released as a neurotransmitter and taken up primarily by astrocytes ensheathing the synapses. The glutamate carbon skeleton is transferred back...

  8. Phospho-dependent Accumulation of GABABRs at Presynaptic Terminals after NMDAR Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Saad; Gerrow, Kim; Triller, Antoine; Smart, Trevor G

    2016-08-16

    Here, we uncover a mechanism for regulating the number of active presynaptic GABAB receptors (GABABRs) at nerve terminals, an important determinant of neurotransmitter release. We find that GABABRs gain access to axon terminals by lateral diffusion in the membrane. Their relative accumulation is dependent upon agonist activation and the presence of the two distinct sushi domains that are found only in alternatively spliced GABABR1a subunits. Following brief activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) using glutamate, GABABR diffusion is reduced, causing accumulation at presynaptic terminals in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner that involves phosphorylation of GABABR2 subunits at Ser783. This signaling cascade indicates how synaptically released glutamate can initiate, via a feedback mechanism, increased levels of presynaptic GABABRs that limit further glutamate release and excitotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Phospho-dependent Accumulation of GABABRs at Presynaptic Terminals after NMDAR Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Hannan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we uncover a mechanism for regulating the number of active presynaptic GABAB receptors (GABABRs at nerve terminals, an important determinant of neurotransmitter release. We find that GABABRs gain access to axon terminals by lateral diffusion in the membrane. Their relative accumulation is dependent upon agonist activation and the presence of the two distinct sushi domains that are found only in alternatively spliced GABABR1a subunits. Following brief activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs using glutamate, GABABR diffusion is reduced, causing accumulation at presynaptic terminals in a Ca2+-dependent manner that involves phosphorylation of GABABR2 subunits at Ser783. This signaling cascade indicates how synaptically released glutamate can initiate, via a feedback mechanism, increased levels of presynaptic GABABRs that limit further glutamate release and excitotoxicity.

  10. Glutamate release from satellite glial cells of the murine trigeminal ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Lysann; Warwick, Rebekah A; Pannicke, Thomas; Reichenbach, Andreas; Grosche, Antje; Hanani, Menachem

    2014-08-22

    It has been proposed that glutamate serves as a mediator between neurons and satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia and that SGCs release glutamate. Using a novel method, we studied glutamate release from SGCs from murine trigeminal ganglia. Sensory neurons with adhering SGCs were enzymatically isolated from wild type and transgenic mice in which vesicular exocytosis was suppressed in glial cells. Extracellular glutamate was detected by microfluorimetry. After loading the cells with a photolabile Ca(2+) chelator, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was raised in SGCs by a UV pulse, which resulted in glutamate release. The amount of released glutamate was decreased in cells with suppressed exocytosis and after pharmacological block of hemichannels. The data demonstrate that SGCs of the trigeminal ganglion release glutamate in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synaptic glutamate release by postnatal rat serotonergic neurons in microculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M D

    1994-02-01

    Serotonergic neurons are thought to play a role in depression and obsessive compulsive disorder. However, their functional transmitter repertoire is incompletely known. To investigate this repertoire, intracellular recordings were obtained from 132 cytochemically identified rat mesopontine serotonergic neurons that had re-established synapses in microcultures. Approximately 60% of the neurons evoked excitatory glutamatergic potentials in themselves or in target neurons. Glutamatergic transmission was frequently observed in microcultures containing a solitary serotonergic neuron. Evidence for co-release of serotonin and glutamate from single raphe neurons was also obtained. However, evidence for gamma-aminobutyric acid release by serotonergic neurons was observed in only two cases. These findings indicate that many cultured serotonergic neurons form glutamatergic synapses and may explain several observations in slices and in vivo.

  12. Binding and release of glutamate from overoxidized polypyrrole via an applied potential for application as a molecular switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Hauff, Elizabeth; Meteleva-Fischer, Yulia; Parisi, Jueirgen; Weiler, Reto

    2008-01-01

    The controlled binding and release of glutamate from overoxidized polypyrrole (PPy) films via a variable potential was investigated. Glutamate-doped PPy films were electrochemically deposited from aqueous sodium glutamate electrolytes containing the pyrrole monomer. The resulting polymer films were

  13. Abnormal glutamate release in aged BTBR mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongen; Ding, Caiyun; Jin, Guorong; Yin, Haizhen; Liu, Jianrong; Hu, Fengyun

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal reciprocal social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Most of the available research on autism is focused on children and young adults and little is known about the pathological alternation of autism in older adults. In order to investigate the neurobiological alternation of autism in old age stage, we compared the morphology and synaptic function of excitatory synapses between the BTBR mice with low level sociability and B6 mice with high level sociability. The results revealed that the number of excitatory synapse colocalized with pre- and post-synaptic marker was not different between aged BTBR and B6 mice. The aged BTBR mice had a normal structure of dendritic spine and the expression of Shank3 protein in the brain as well as that in B6 mice. The baseline and KCl-evoked glutamate release from the cortical synaptoneurosome in aged BTBR mice was lower than that in aged B6 mice. Overall, the data indicate that there is a link between disturbances of the glutamate transmission and autism. These findings provide new evidences for the hypothesis of excitation/inhibition imbalance in autism. Further work is required to determine the cause of this putative abnormality.

  14. New Treatments for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy that Target Presynaptic Transmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacol 2004; 4: 18-22. [75] Flor PJ, Battaglia G, Nicoletti F, Gasparini F, Bruno V. Neuroprotective activity of metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands...slices by multiphoton excitation of the styryl FM 1-43. Biotechniques. 2006 Mar ;40(3):343-51. [111] Zakharenko SS, Zablow L, Siegelbaum SA. Altered

  15. Harmful impact on presynaptic glutamate and GABA transport by carbon dots synthesized from sulfur-containing carbohydrate precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Dekaliuk, Mariia; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Pastukhov, Artem; Dudarenko, Marina; Borysov, Arsenii; Vari, Sandor G; Demchenko, Alexander P

    2017-07-01

    Carbon nanoparticles that may be potent air pollutants with adverse effects on human health often contain heteroatoms including sulfur. In order to study in detail their effects on different physiological and biochemical processes, artificially produced carbon dots (CDs) with well-controlled composition that allows fluorescence detection may be of great use. Having been prepared from different types of organic precursors, CDs expose different atoms at their surface suggesting a broad variation of functional groups. Recently, we demonstrated neurotoxic properties of CDs synthesized from the amino acid β-alanine, and it is of importance to analyze whether CDs obtained from different precursors and particularly those exposing sulfur atoms induce similar neurotoxic effects. This study focused on synthesis of CDs from the sulfur-containing precursor thiourea-CDs (TU-CDs) with a size less than 10 nm, their characterization, and neuroactivity assessment. Neuroactive properties of TU-CDs were analyzed based on their effects on the key characteristics of glutamatergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission in isolated rat brain nerve terminals. It was observed that TU-CDs (0.5-1.0 mg/ml) attenuated the initial velocity of Na + -dependent transporter-mediated uptake and accumulation of L-[ 14 C]glutamate and [ 3 H]GABA by nerve terminals in a dose-dependent manner and increased the ambient level of the neurotransmitters. Starting from the concentration of 0.2 mg/ml, TU-CDs evoked a gradual dose-dependent depolarization of the plasma membrane of nerve terminals measured with the cationic potentiometric dye rhodamine 6G. Within the concentration range of 0.1-0.5 mg/ml, TU-CDs caused an "unphysiological" step-like increase in fluorescence intensity of the рН-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange accumulated by synaptic vesicles. Therefore, despite different surface properties and fluorescent features of CDs prepared from different starting materials

  16. Presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous acetylcholine release mediated by P2Y receptors at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, S; Veggetti, M; Muchnik, S; Losavio, A

    2006-09-29

    At the neuromuscular junction, ATP is co-released with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) and once in the synaptic space, it is degraded to the presynaptically active metabolite adenosine. Intracellular recordings were performed on diaphragm fibers of CF1 mice to determine the action of extracellular ATP (100 muM) and the slowly hydrolysable ATP analog 5'-adenylylimidodiphosphate lithium (betagamma-imido ATP) (30 muM) on miniature end-plate potential (MEPP) frequency. We found that application of ATP and betagamma-imido ATP decreased spontaneous secretion by 45.3% and 55.9% respectively. 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), a selective A(1) adenosine receptor antagonist and alpha,beta-methylene ADP sodium salt (alphabeta-MeADP), which is an inhibitor of ecto-5'-nucleotidase, did not prevent the inhibitory effect of ATP, demonstrating that the nucleotide is able to modulate spontaneous ACh release through a mechanism independent of the action of adenosine. Blockade of Ca(2+) channels by both, Cd(2+) or the combined application of nitrendipine and omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTx) (L-type and N-type Ca(2+) channel antagonists, respectively) prevented the effect of betagamma-imido ATP, indicating that the nucleotide modulates Ca(2+) influx through the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels related to spontaneous secretion. betagamma-Imido ATP-induced modulation was antagonized by the non-specific P2 receptor antagonist suramin and the P2Y receptor antagonist 1-amino-4-[[4-[[4-chloro-6-[[3(or4)-sulfophenyl] amino]-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]amino]-3-sulfophenyl] amino]-9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracenesulfonic acid (reactive blue-2), but not by pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo(benzene-2,4-disulfonic acid) tetrasodium salt (PPADS), which has a preferential antagonist effect on P2X receptors. Pertussis toxin and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), which are blockers of G(i/o) proteins, prevented the action of the nucleotide, suggesting that the effect is mediated by P2Y receptors

  17. Glutamate oxidation in astrocytes: Roles of glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Mary C; Stridh, Malin H; McNair, Laura F; Sonnewald, Ursula; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-12-01

    The cellular distribution of transporters and enzymes related to glutamate metabolism led to the concept of the glutamate-glutamine cycle. Glutamate is released as a neurotransmitter and taken up primarily by astrocytes ensheathing the synapses. The glutamate carbon skeleton is transferred back to the presynaptic neurons as the nonexcitatory amino acid glutamine. The cycle was initially thought to function with a 1:1 ratio between glutamate released and glutamine taken up by neurons. However, studies of glutamate metabolism in astrocytes have shown that a considerable proportion of glutamate undergoes oxidative degradation; thus, quantitative formation of glutamine from the glutamate taken up is not possible. Oxidation of glutamate is initiated by transamination catalyzed by an aminotransferase, or oxidative deamination catalyzed by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). We discuss methods available to elucidate the enzymes that mediate this conversion. Methods include pharmacological tools such as the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid, studies using GDH knockout mice, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of GDH in astrocytes. Studies in brain slices incubated with [ 15 N]glutamate demonstrated activity of GDH in astrocytes in situ. These results, in conjunction with reports in the literature, support the conclusion that GDH is active in astrocytes both in culture and in vivo and that this enzyme plays a significant role in glutamate oxidation. Oxidative metabolism of glutamate, primarily mediated by GDH, but also by transamination by aspartate aminotransferase, provides considerably more energy than is required to maintain the activity of the high-affinity glutamate transporters needed for efficient removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Nanoscale distribution of presynaptic Ca(2+) channels and its impact on vesicular release during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yukihiro; Harada, Harumi; Kamasawa, Naomi; Matsui, Ko; Rothman, Jason S; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Silver, R Angus; DiGregorio, David A; Takahashi, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-07

    Synaptic efficacy and precision are influenced by the coupling of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) to vesicles. But because the topography of VGCCs and their proximity to vesicles is unknown, a quantitative understanding of the determinants of vesicular release at nanometer scale is lacking. To investigate this, we combined freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling of Cav2.1 channels, local [Ca(2+)] imaging, and patch pipette perfusion of EGTA at the calyx of Held. Between postnatal day 7 and 21, VGCCs formed variable sized clusters and vesicular release became less sensitive to EGTA, whereas fixed Ca(2+) buffer properties remained constant. Experimentally constrained reaction-diffusion simulations suggest that Ca(2+) sensors for vesicular release are located at the perimeter of VGCC clusters (<30 nm) and predict that VGCC number per cluster determines vesicular release probability without altering release time course. This "perimeter release model" provides a unifying framework accounting for developmental changes in both synaptic efficacy and time course. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Spermidine Suppresses Age-Associated Memory Impairment by Preventing Adverse Increase of Presynaptic Active Zone Size and Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun K Gupta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Memories are assumed to be formed by sets of synapses changing their structural or functional performance. The efficacy of forming new memories declines with advancing age, but the synaptic changes underlying age-induced memory impairment remain poorly understood. Recently, we found spermidine feeding to specifically suppress age-dependent impairments in forming olfactory memories, providing a mean to search for synaptic changes involved in age-dependent memory impairment. Here, we show that a specific synaptic compartment, the presynaptic active zone (AZ, increases the size of its ultrastructural elaboration and releases significantly more synaptic vesicles with advancing age. These age-induced AZ changes, however, were fully suppressed by spermidine feeding. A genetically enforced enlargement of AZ scaffolds (four gene-copies of BRP impaired memory formation in young animals. Thus, in the Drosophila nervous system, aging AZs seem to steer towards the upper limit of their operational range, limiting synaptic plasticity and contributing to impairment of memory formation. Spermidine feeding suppresses age-dependent memory impairment by counteracting these age-dependent changes directly at the synapse.

  20. Glutamate released spontaneously from astrocytes sets the threshold for synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonansco, Christian; Couve, Alejandro; Perea, Gertrudis; Ferradas, Carla Á; Roncagliolo, Manuel; Fuenzalida, Marco

    2011-04-01

    Astrocytes exhibit spontaneous calcium oscillations that could induce the release of glutamate as gliotransmitter in rat hippocampal slices. However, it is unknown whether this spontaneous release of astrocytic glutamate may contribute to determining the basal neurotransmitter release probability in central synapses. Using whole-cell recordings and Ca(2+) imaging, we investigated the effects of the spontaneous astrocytic activity on neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity at CA3-CA1 hippocampal synapses. We show here that the metabolic gliotoxin fluorocitrate (FC) reduces the amplitude of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents and increases the paired-pulse facilitation, mainly due to the reduction of the neurotransmitter release probability and the synaptic potency. FC also decreased intracellular Ca(2+) signalling and Ca(2+) -dependent glutamate release from astrocytes. The addition of glutamine rescued the effects of FC over the synaptic potency; however, the probability of neurotransmitter release remained diminished. The blockage of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors mimicked the effects of FC on the frequency of miniature synaptic responses. In the presence of FC, the Ca(2+) chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N ',N '-tetra-acetate or group I metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, the excitatory postsynaptic current potentiation induced by the spike-timing-dependent plasticity protocol was blocked, and it was rescued by delivering a stronger spike-timing-dependent plasticity protocol. Taken together, these results suggest that spontaneous glutamate release from astrocytes contributes to setting the basal probability of neurotransmitter release via metabotropic glutamate receptor activation, which could be operating as a gain control mechanism that regulates the threshold of long-term potentiation. Therefore, endogenous astrocyte activity provides a novel non-neuronal mechanism that could be critical for transferring information in

  1. Frequency-dependent depression of excitatory synaptic transmission is independent of activation of MCPG-sensitive presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, R; Cummings, D D; Dichter, M A

    1995-10-01

    1. A paired-pulse paradigm, and a high-frequency train followed by a test pulse, were used to investigate the possible role of presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in frequency-dependent modulation of the amplitude of excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs). Paired whole cell patch-clamp recordings from monosynaptically connected hippocampal neurons maintained in very low-density cultures were performed, using the mGluR antagonist (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, 500 microM) and the mGluR agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid [(1S,3R)-ACPD, 100 microM]. 2. Paired-pulse depression (PPD) was observed in all the excitatory pairs recorded. The average PPD ratio (amplitude of the 2nd EPSC divided by the amplitude of the 1st EPSC) was 0.80 +/- 0.1 (SD) (n = 8). Application of the mGluR antagonist MCPG had no effect on the amplitude of the EPSCs and did not affect the ratio of the two EPSCs (PPD ratio 0.79 +/- 0.2). 3. The amplitudes of 10 successive EPSCs stimulated at a high frequency (20 Hz) decremented on average in both 4 mM extracellular Ca2+ (n = 5) and in 1 mM extracellular Ca2+ (n = 6). In all pairs tested, posttetanic depression (PTD) was observed (PTD ratio 0.7 +/- 0.2). Bath application of MCPG (500 microM) did not affect the amplitudes of the EPSCs during the train; MCPG also did not affect PTD. 4. The mGluR agonist (1S,3R)-ACPD depressed the amplitudes of the EPSCs in both the paired-pulse (1st EPSC, 35 +/- 9%; 2nd EPSC, 36 +/- 10%) and posttetanic pulse (1 and 4 mM extracellular Ca2+) paradigms. The amount of depression observed, both PPD and PTD, remained unaffected by application of (1S,3R)-ACPD. Coapplication of the antagonist MCPG (500 microM) blocked the effects of (1S,3R)-ACPD (100 microM). 5. We conclude that frequency-dependent depression of EPSC amplitudes occurs independent of endogenous activation of MCPG-sensitive mGluRs in cultured hippocampal neurons. Moreover, we demonstrate that exogenous

  2. Pharmacological or genetic orexin 1 receptor inhibition attenuates MK-801 induced glutamate release in mouse cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah eAluisio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The orexin/hypocretin neuropeptides are produced by a cluster of neurons within the lateral posterior hypothalamus and participate in neuronal regulation by activating their receptors (OX1 and OX2 receptors. The orexin system projects widely through the brain and functions as an interface between multiple regulatory systems including wakefulness, energy balance, stress, reward and emotion. Recent studies have demonstrated that orexins and glutamate interact at the synaptic level and that orexins facilitate glutamate actions. We tested the hypothesis that orexins modulate glutamate signaling via OX1 receptors by monitoring levels of glutamate in frontal cortex of freely moving mice using enzyme coated biosensors under inhibited OX1 receptor conditions. MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, was administered subcutaneously (0.178 mg/kg to indirectly disinhibit pyramidal neurons and therefore increase cortical glutamate release. In wild-type mice, pretreatment with the OX1 receptor antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg S.C. which had no effect by itself, significantly attenuated the cortical glutamate release elicited by MK-801. OX1 receptor knockout mice had a blunted glutamate release response to MK-801 and exhibited about half of the glutamate release observed in wild-type mice in agreement with the data obtained with transient blockade of OX1 receptors. These results indicate that pharmacological (transient or genetic (permanent inhibition of the OX1 receptor similarly interfere with glutamatergic function in the cortex. Selectively targeting the OX1 receptor with an antagonist may normalize hyperglutamatergic states and thus may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with hyperactive states.

  3. Glutamate-induced glutamate release: A proposed mechanism for calcium bursting in astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larter, Raima; Craig, Melissa Glendening

    2005-12-01

    Here we present a new model for the generation of complex calcium-bursting patterns in astrocytes, a type of brain cell recently implicated in a variety of neural functions including memory formation. The model involves two positive feedback processes, in which the key feedback species are calcium ion and glutamate. The latter is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and has been shown to be involved in bidirectional communication between astrocytes and nearby neurons. The glutamate feedback process considered here is shown to be critical for the generation of complex bursting oscillations in the astrocytes and to, perhaps, code for information which may be passed from neuron to neuron via the astrocyte. These processes may be involved in memory storage and formation as well as in mechanisms which lead to dynamical diseases such as epilepsy.

  4. Distinct presynaptic regulation of dopamine release through NMDA receptors in striosome- and matrix-enriched areas of the rat striatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krebs, M.O.; Trovero, F.; Desban, M.; Gauchy, C.; Glowinski, J.; Kemel, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    Striosome- and matrix-enriched striatal zones were defined in coronal and sagittal brain sections of the rat, on the basis of 3 H-naloxone binding to mu-opiate receptors (a striosome-specific marker). Then, using a new in vitro microsuperfusion device, the NMDA (50 microM)-evoked release of newly synthesized 3 H-dopamine ( 3 H-DA) was examined in these four striatal areas under Mg(2+)-free conditions. The amplitudes of the responses were different in striosomal (171 +/- 6% and 161 +/- 5% of the spontaneous release) than in matrix areas (223 +/- 6% and 248 +/- 12%), even when glycine (1 or 100 microM) was coapplied (in the presence of 1 microM strychnine). In the four areas, the NMDA-evoked release of 3 H-DA was blocked completely by Mg 2+ (1 mM) or (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801; 1 microM) and almost totally abolished by kynurenate (100 microM). Because the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant NMDA-evoked release of 3 H-DA was similar in striosome- (148 +/- 5% and 152 +/- 6%) or matrix-enriched (161 +/- 5% and 156 +/- 7%) areas, the indirect (TTX-sensitive) component of NMDA-evoked responses, which involves striatal neurons and/or afferent fibers, seems more important in the matrix- than in the striosome-enriched areas. The modulation of DA release by cortical glutamate and/or aspartate-containing inputs through NMDA receptors in the matrix appears thus to be partly distinct from that observed in the striosomes, providing some functional basis for the histochemical striatal heterogeneity

  5. Distinct presynaptic regulation of dopamine release through NMDA receptors in striosome- and matrix-enriched areas of the rat striatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebs, M.O.; Trovero, F.; Desban, M.; Gauchy, C.; Glowinski, J.; Kemel, M.L. (College de France, Paris (France))

    1991-05-01

    Striosome- and matrix-enriched striatal zones were defined in coronal and sagittal brain sections of the rat, on the basis of {sup 3}H-naloxone binding to mu-opiate receptors (a striosome-specific marker). Then, using a new in vitro microsuperfusion device, the NMDA (50 microM)-evoked release of newly synthesized {sup 3}H-dopamine ({sup 3}H-DA) was examined in these four striatal areas under Mg(2+)-free conditions. The amplitudes of the responses were different in striosomal (171 +/- 6% and 161 +/- 5% of the spontaneous release) than in matrix areas (223 +/- 6% and 248 +/- 12%), even when glycine (1 or 100 microM) was coapplied (in the presence of 1 microM strychnine). In the four areas, the NMDA-evoked release of {sup 3}H-DA was blocked completely by Mg{sup 2}{sup +} (1 mM) or (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801; 1 microM) and almost totally abolished by kynurenate (100 microM). Because the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant NMDA-evoked release of {sup 3}H-DA was similar in striosome- (148 +/- 5% and 152 +/- 6%) or matrix-enriched (161 +/- 5% and 156 +/- 7%) areas, the indirect (TTX-sensitive) component of NMDA-evoked responses, which involves striatal neurons and/or afferent fibers, seems more important in the matrix- than in the striosome-enriched areas. The modulation of DA release by cortical glutamate and/or aspartate-containing inputs through NMDA receptors in the matrix appears thus to be partly distinct from that observed in the striosomes, providing some functional basis for the histochemical striatal heterogeneity.

  6. Deep brain stimulation results in local glutamate and adenosine release: investigation into the role of astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Vivianne L; Chang, Su-Youne; Hitti, Frederick L; Roberts, David W; Leiter, James C; Jovanovic, Svetlana; Lee, Kendall H

    2010-08-01

    Several neurological disorders are treated with deep brain stimulation; however, the mechanism underlying its ability to abolish oscillatory phenomena associated with diseases as diverse as Parkinson's disease and epilepsy remain largely unknown. To investigate the role of specific neurotransmitters in deep brain stimulation and determine the role of non-neuronal cells in its mechanism of action. We used the ferret thalamic slice preparation in vitro, which exhibits spontaneous spindle oscillations, to determine the effect of high-frequency stimulation on neurotransmitter release. We then performed experiments using an in vitro astrocyte culture to investigate the role of glial transmitter release in high-frequency stimulation-mediated abolishment of spindle oscillations. In this series of experiments, we demonstrated that glutamate and adenosine release in ferret slices was able to abolish spontaneous spindle oscillations. The glutamate release was still evoked in the presence of the Na channel blocker tetrodotoxin, but was eliminated with the vesicular H-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin and the calcium chelator 2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of purified primary astrocytic cultures was able to evoke intracellular calcium transients and glutamate release, and bath application of 2-bis (2-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester inhibited glutamate release in this setting. Vesicular astrocytic neurotransmitter release may be an important mechanism by which deep brain stimulation is able to achieve clinical benefits.

  7. Tetrodotoxin effects in the stimulated acetylcholine release by agonist of glutamate in mice striatum tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda; Camillo, Maria A.P.; Rogero, Jose Roberto; Troncone, Lanfranco R.P.

    2002-01-01

    The toxins of animal venoms have been used as important tools for biochemical studies of physiological and pathological processes of diverse systems. In this work we used the action of tetrodotoxin on sodium channels to map the localization of glutamate receptors in cholinergic neurons from striatum tissue of rats. All glutamate receptors are exciting, so they promote the release of other neurotransmitters. In this work we focus on acetylcholine. The localization of glutamate receptor, on the soma or on the excitatory terminal, may contribute for a better understanding of its function. For this work we applied the in vitro method of tritiated neurotransmitter release. The agonists of glutamate receptors chosen were glutamic acid 500μM, NMDA 100μM, kainic acid 300μM, quisqualic acid 300μM and AMPA 1mM. In the first part of the assay the basal and stimulated releases were measured and in the second, the same protocol was performed in the presence of tetrodotoxin 1μM. The reductions observed in basal and stimulated release in the presence of tetrodotoxin suggested that the receptors type AMPA and NMDA were located in soma of cholinergic cell preferentially and the other ones presented a more equilibrate distribution among the axons and the soma. (author)

  8. Glutamate stimulation of (/sup 3/H)dopamine release from dissociated cell cultures of rat ventral mesencephalon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mount, H.; Welner, S.; Quirion, R.; Boksa, P.

    1989-04-01

    In dissociated cell cultures of fetal rat ventral mesencephalon preloaded with (3H)dopamine, glutamate (10(-5)-10(-3) M) stimulated the release of (3H)dopamine. Glutamate stimulation of (3H)dopamine release was Ca2+ dependent and was blocked by the glutamate antagonist, cis-2,3-piperidine dicarboxylic acid. Glutamate stimulation of (3H)dopamine release was not due to glutamate neurotoxicity because (1) glutamate did not cause release of a cytosolic marker, lactate dehydrogenase, and (2) preincubation of cultures with glutamate did not impair subsequent ability of the cells to take up or release (3H)dopamine. Thus, these dissociated cell cultures appear to provide a good model system to characterize glutamate stimulation of dopamine release. Release of (3H)dopamine from these cultures was stimulated by veratridine, an activator of voltage-sensitive Na+ channels, and this stimulation was blocked by tetrodotoxin. However, glutamate-stimulated (3H)dopamine release was not blocked by tetrodotoxin or Zn2+. Substitution of NaCl in the extracellular medium by sucrose, LiCl, or Na2SO4 had no effect on glutamate stimulation of (3H)dopamine release; however, release was inhibited when NaCl was replaced by choline chloride or N-methyl-D-glucamine HCl. Glutamate-stimulated (3H)-dopamine release was well maintained (60-82% of control) in the presence of Co2+, which blocks Ca2+ action potentials, and was unaffected by the local anesthetic, lidocaine. These results are discussed in terms of the receptor and ionic mechanisms involved in the stimulation of dopamine release by excitatory amino acids.

  9. GABA/glutamate co-release controls habenula output and is modified by antidepressant treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabel, Steven J.; Proulx, Christophe D.; Piriz, Joaquin; Malinow, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb), a key regulator of monoaminergic brain regions, is activated by negatively-valenced events. Its hyperactivity is associated with depression. While enhanced excitatory input to the LHb has been linked to depression, little is known about inhibitory transmission. We discovered that GABA is co-released with its functional opponent, glutamate, from long-range basal ganglia inputs (which signal negative events) to limit LHb activity in rodents. At this synapse, the balance of GABA/glutamate signaling is shifted towards reduced GABA in a model of depression and increased GABA by antidepressant treatment. GABA and glutamate co-release therefore controls LHb activity, and regulation of this remarkable form of transmission may be important for determining the impact of negative life events on mood and behavior. PMID:25237099

  10. Evidence for evoked release of adenosine and glutamate from cultured cerebellar granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schousboe, A.; Frandsen, A.; Drejer, J.

    1989-01-01

    Evoked release of [ 3 H]-D-aspartate which labels the neurotransmitter glutamate pool in cultured cerebellar granule cells was compared with evoked release of adenosine from similar cultures. It was found that both adenosine and [3H]-D-aspartate could be released from the neurons in a calcium dependent manner after depolarization of the cells with either 10-100 microM glutamate or 50 mM KCl. Cultures of cerebellar granule cells treated with 50 microM kainate to eliminate GABAergic neurons behaved in the same way. This together with the observation that cultured astrocytes did not exhibit a calcium dependent, potassium stimulated adenosine release strongly suggest that cerebellar granule cells release adenosine in a neurotransmitter-like fashion together with glutamate which is the classical neurotransmitter of these neurons. Studies of the metabolism of adenosine showed that in the granule cells adenosine is rapidly metabolized to ATP, ADP, and AMP, but in spite of this, adenosine was found to be released preferential to ATP

  11. Ectopic release of glutamate contributes to spillover at parallel fibre synapses in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Saju; Dobson, Katharine L; Jackson, Claire; Bellamy, Tomas C

    2014-04-01

    In the rat cerebellar molecular layer, spillover of glutamate between parallel fibre synapses can lead to activation of perisynaptic receptors that mediate short- and long-term plasticity. This effect is greatest when clusters of fibres are stimulated at high frequencies, suggesting that glutamate clearance mechanisms must be overwhelmed before spillover can occur. However, parallel fibres can also release transmitter directly into the extracellular space, from 'ectopic' release sites. Ectopic transmission activates AMPA receptors on the Bergmann glial cell processes that envelop parallel fibre synapses, but the possible contribution of this extrasynaptic release to intersynaptic communication has not been explored. We exploited long-term depression of ectopic transmission, and selective pharmacology, to investigate the impact of these release sites on the time course of Purkinje neuron excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Depletion of ectopic release pools by activity-dependent long-term depression decreased EPSC decay time, revealing a 'late' current that is present when fibres are stimulated at low frequencies. This effect was enhanced when glutamate transporters were inhibited, and reduced when extracellular diffusion was impeded. Blockade of N-type Ca(2+) channels inhibited ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia and decreased EPSC decay time. Similarly, perfusion of the Ca(2+) chelator EGTA-AM into the slice progressively eliminated ectopic transmission to glia and decreased EPSC decay time with closely similar time courses. Collectively, this evidence suggests that ectopically released glutamate contributes to spillover transmission, and that ectopic release therefore degrades the spatial precision of synapses that fire infrequently, and may make them more prone to exhibit plasticity.

  12. 5-HT2A-mGlu2/3 receptor complex in rat spinal cord glutamatergic nerve endings: A 5-HT2Ato mGlu2/3 signalling to amplify presynaptic mechanism of auto-control of glutamate exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, Guendalina; Grilli, Massimo; Vergassola, Matteo; Bonfiglio, Tommaso; Padolecchia, Cristina; Garrone, Beatrice; Di Giorgio, Francesco Paolo; Tongiani, Serena; Usai, Cesare; Marchi, Mario; Pittaluga, Anna

    2018-05-01

    Presynaptic mGlu2/3 autoreceptors exist in rat spinal cord nerve terminals as suggested by the finding that LY379268 inhibited the 15 mM KCl-evoked release of [ 3 H]D-aspartate ([ 3 H]D-Asp) in a LY341495-sensitive manner. Spinal cord glutamatergic nerve terminals also possess presynaptic release-regulating 5-HT 2A heteroreceptors. Actually, the 15 mM KCl-evoked [ 3 H]D-Asp exocytosis from spinal cord synaptosomes was reduced by the 5-HT 2A agonist (±)DOI, an effect reversed by the 5-HT 2A antagonists MDL11,939, MDL100907, ketanserin and trazodone (TZD). We investigated whether mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptors colocalize and cross-talk in these terminals and if 5-HT 2A ligands modulate the mGlu2/3-mediated control of glutamate exocytosis. Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy highlighted the presence of mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptor proteins in spinal cord VGLUT1 positive synaptosomes, where mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptor immunoreactivities largely colocalize. Furthermore, mGlu2/3 immunoprecipitates from spinal cord synaptosomes were also 5-HT 2A immunopositive. Interestingly, the 100 pM LY379268-induced reduction of the 15 mM KCl-evoked [ 3 H]D-Asp overflow as well as its inhibition by 100 nM (±)DOI became undetectable when the two agonists were concomitantly added. Conversely, 5-HT 2A antagonists (MDL11,939, MDL100907, ketanserin and TZD) reinforced the release-regulating activity of mGlu2/3 autoreceptors. Increased expression of mGlu2/3 receptor proteins in synaptosomal plasmamembranes paralleled the gain of function of the mGlu2/3 autoreceptors elicited by 5-HT 2A antagonists. Based on these results, we propose that in spinal cord glutamatergic terminals i) mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptors colocalize and interact one each other in an antagonist-like manner, ii) 5-HT 2A antagonists are indirect positive allosteric modulator of mGlu2/3 autoreceptors controlling glutamate exocytosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dual effect of beta-amyloid on α7 and α4β2 nicotinic receptors controlling the release of glutamate, aspartate and GABA in rat hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Mura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously showed that beta-amyloid (Aβ, a peptide considered as relevant to Alzheimer's Disease, is able to act as a neuromodulator affecting neurotransmitter release in absence of evident sign of neurotoxicity in two different rat brain areas. In this paper we focused on the hippocampus, a brain area which is sensitive to Alzheimer's Disease pathology, evaluating the effect of Aβ (at different concentrations on the neurotransmitter release stimulated by the activation of pre-synaptic cholinergic nicotinic receptors (nAChRs, α4β2 and α7 subtypes. Particularly, we focused on some neurotransmitters that are usually involved in learning and memory: glutamate, aspartate and GABA. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: WE USED A DUAL APPROACH: in vivo experiments (microdialysis technique on freely moving rats in parallel to in vitro experiments (isolated nerve endings derived from rat hippocampus. Both in vivo and in vitro the administration of nicotine stimulated an overflow of aspartate, glutamate and GABA. This effect was greatly inhibited by the highest concentrations of Aβ considered (10 µM in vivo and 100 nM in vitro. In vivo administration of 100 nM Aβ (the lowest concentration considered potentiated the GABA overflow evoked by nicotine. All these effects were specific for Aβ and for nicotinic secretory stimuli. The in vitro administration of either choline or 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (α7 and α4β2 nAChRs selective agonists, respectively elicited the hippocampal release of aspartate, glutamate, and GABA. High Aβ concentrations (100 nM inhibited the overflow of all three neurotransmitters evoked by both choline and 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride. On the contrary, low Aβ concentrations (1 nM and 100 pM selectively acted on α7 subtypes potentiating the choline-induced release of both aspartate and glutamate, but not the one of GABA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results reinforce the concept that Aβ has relevant

  14. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) mediates L-glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release via swelling-activated anion channels in cultured neonatal rodent astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Darius J R; Lawen, Alfons

    2013-03-01

    Vitamin C (ascorbate) plays important neuroprotective and neuromodulatory roles in the mammalian brain. Astrocytes are crucially involved in brain ascorbate homeostasis and may assist in regenerating extracellular ascorbate from its oxidised forms. Ascorbate accumulated by astrocytes can be released rapidly by a process that is stimulated by the excitatory amino acid, L-glutamate. This process is thought to be neuroprotective against excitotoxicity. Although of potential clinical interest, the mechanism of this stimulated ascorbate-release remains unknown. Here, we report that primary cultures of mouse and rat astrocytes release ascorbate following initial uptake of dehydroascorbate and accumulation of intracellular ascorbate. Ascorbate-release was not due to cellular lysis, as assessed by cellular release of the cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, and was stimulated by L-glutamate and L-aspartate, but not the non-excitatory amino acid L-glutamine. This stimulation was due to glutamate-induced cellular swelling, as it was both attenuated by hypertonic and emulated by hypotonic media. Glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release was also sensitive to inhibitors of volume-sensitive anion channels, suggesting that the latter may provide the conduit for ascorbate efflux. Glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release was not recapitulated by selective agonists of either ionotropic or group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, but was completely blocked by either of two compounds, TFB-TBOA and UCPH-101, which non-selectively and selectively inhibit the glial Na(+)-dependent excitatory amino acid transporter, GLAST, respectively. These results suggest that an impairment of astrocytic ascorbate-release may exacerbate neuronal dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders and acute brain injury in which excitotoxicity and/or GLAST deregulation have been implicated.

  15. Glutamate may be an efferent transmitter that elicits inhibition in mouse taste buds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijen A Huang

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that l-glutamate may be an efferent transmitter released from axons innervating taste buds. In this report, we determined the types of ionotropic synaptic glutamate receptors present on taste cells and that underlie this postulated efferent transmission. We also studied what effect glutamate exerts on taste bud function. We isolated mouse taste buds and taste cells, conducted functional imaging using Fura 2, and used cellular biosensors to monitor taste-evoked transmitter release. The findings show that a large fraction of Presynaptic (Type III taste bud cells (∼50% respond to 100 µM glutamate, NMDA, or kainic acid (KA with an increase in intracellular Ca(2+. In contrast, Receptor (Type II taste cells rarely (4% responded to 100 µM glutamate. At this concentration and with these compounds, these agonists activate glutamatergic synaptic receptors, not glutamate taste (umami receptors. Moreover, applying glutamate, NMDA, or KA caused taste buds to secrete 5-HT, a Presynaptic taste cell transmitter, but not ATP, a Receptor cell transmitter. Indeed, glutamate-evoked 5-HT release inhibited taste-evoked ATP secretion. The findings are consistent with a role for glutamate in taste buds as an inhibitory efferent transmitter that acts via ionotropic synaptic glutamate receptors.

  16. GABA/glutamate co-release controls habenula output and is modified by antidepressant treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Shabel, Steven J.; Proulx, Christophe D.; Piriz, Joaquin; Malinow, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb), a key regulator of monoaminergic brain regions, is activated by negatively-valenced events. Its hyperactivity is associated with depression. While enhanced excitatory input to the LHb has been linked to depression, little is known about inhibitory transmission. We discovered that GABA is co-released with its functional opponent, glutamate, from long-range basal ganglia inputs (which signal negative events) to limit LHb activity in rodents. At this synapse, the bala...

  17. Inhibition of breast cancer-cell glutamate release with sulfasalazine limits cancer-induced bone pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungard, Robert G; Seidlitz, Eric P; Singh, Gurmit

    2014-01-01

    Cancer in bone is frequently a result of metastases from distant sites, particularly from the breast, lung, and prostate. Pain is a common and often severe pathological feature of cancers in bone, and is a significant impediment to the maintenance of quality of life of patients living with bone metastases. Cancer cell lines have been demonstrated to release significant amounts of the neurotransmitter and cell-signalling molecule l-glutamate via the system xC(-) cystine/glutamate antiporter. We have developed a novel mouse model of breast cancer bone metastases to investigate the impact of inhibiting cancer cell glutamate transporters on nociceptive behaviour. Immunodeficient mice were inoculated intrafemorally with the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231, then treated 14days later via mini-osmotic pumps inserted intraperitoneally with sulfasalazine, (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine, or vehicle. Both sulfasalazine and (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine attenuated in vitro cancer cell glutamate release in a dose-dependent manner via the system xC(-) transporter. Animals treated with sulfasalazine displayed reduced nociceptive behaviours and an extended time until the onset of behavioural evidence of pain. Animals treated with a lower dose of (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine did not display this reduction in nociceptive behaviour. These results suggest that a reduction in glutamate secretion from cancers in bone with the system xC(-) inhibitor sulfasalazine may provide some benefit for treating the often severe and intractable pain associated with bone metastases. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. NMDAR-mediated calcium transients elicited by glutamate co-release at developing inhibitory synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Kalmbach

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Before hearing onset, the topographic organization of the inhibitory sound localization pathway from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB to the lateral superior olive (LSO is refined by means of synaptic silencing and strengthening. During this refinement period MNTB-LSO synapses not only release GABA and glycine but also release glutamate. This co-released glutamate can elicit postsynaptic currents that are predominantly mediated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs. To gain a better understanding of how glutamate contributes to synaptic signaling at developing MNTB-LSO inhibitory synapse, we investigated to what degree and under what conditions NMDARs contribute to postsynaptic calcium responses. Our results demonstrate that MNTB-LSO synapses can elicit compartmentalized calcium responses along aspiny LSO dendrites. These responses are significantly attenuated by the NMDARs antagonist APV. APV, however, has no effect on somatically recorded electrical postsynaptic responses, indicating little, if any, contribution of NMDARs to spike generation. Small NMDAR-mediated calcium responses were also observed under physiological levels of extracellular magnesium concentrations indicating that MNTB-LSO synapses activate magnesium sensitive NMDAR on immature LSO dendrites. In Fura-2 AM loaded neurons, blocking GABAA and glycine receptors decreased NMDAR contribution to somatic calcium responses suggesting that GABA and glycine, perhaps by shunting backpropagating action potentials, decrease the level of NMDAR activation under strong stimulus conditions.

  19. Neuronal Glud1 (glutamate dehydrogenase 1) over-expressing mice: increased glutamate formation and synaptic release, loss of synaptic activity, and adaptive changes in genomic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, E K; Wang, X; Pal, R; Bao, X; Hascup, K N; Wang, Y; Wang, W-T; Hui, D; Agbas, A; Choi, I-Y; Belousov, A; Gerhardt, G A

    2011-09-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GLUD1) is a mitochondrial enzyme expressed in all tissues, including brain. Although this enzyme is expressed in glutamatergic pathways, its function as a regulator of glutamate neurotransmitter levels is still not well defined. In order to gain an understanding of the role of GLUD1 in the control of glutamate levels and synaptic release in mammalian brain, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice that over-express this enzyme in neurons of the central nervous system. The Tg mice have increased activity of GLUD, as well as elevated levels and increased synaptic and depolarization-induced release of glutamate. These mice suffer age-associated losses of dendritic spines, nerve terminals, and neurons. The neuronal losses and dendrite structural changes occur in select regions of the brain. At the transcriptional level in the hippocampus, cells respond by increasing the expression of genes related to neurite growth and synapse formation, indications of adaptive or compensatory responses to the effects of increases in the release and action of glutamate at synapses. Because these Tg mice live to a relatively old age they are a good model of the effects of a "hyperglutamatergic" state on the aging process in the nervous system. The mice are also useful in defining the molecular pathways affected by the over-activation of GLUD in glutamatergic neurons of the brain and spinal cord. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Potentiation of insulin release in response to amino acid methyl esters correlates to activation of islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Hans; Lernmark, A; Hedeskov, C J

    1986-01-01

    Column perifusion of mouse pancreatic islets was used to study the ability of amino acids and their methyl esters to influence insulin release and activate islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity. In the absence of L-glutamine, L-serine and the methyl ester of L-phenylalanine, but neither L...... glutamate dehydrogenase activity showed that only the two methyl esters of L-phenylalanine and L-serine activated the enzyme. It is concluded that the mechanism by which methyl esters of amino acids potentiate insulin release is most likely to be mediated by the activation of pancreatic beta-cell glutamate...

  1. Soluble ectodomain of neuroligin 1 decreases synaptic activity by activating metabotropic glutamate receptor 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørlund, Michelle D.; Carlsen, Eva Maria Meier; Kønig, Andreas Bay

    2017-01-01

    -dependent manner, releasing a soluble extracellular fragment and membrane-tethered C-terminal fragment. The cleavage of NL1 depresses synaptic transmission, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) are located primarily at the periphery of presynaptic terminals......, where they inhibit the formation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and consequently suppress the release of glutamate and decrease synaptic transmission. In the present study, we found that the soluble ectodomain of NL1 binds to and activates mGluR2 in both neurons and heterologous cells......, resulting in a decrease in cAMP formation. In a slice preparation from the hippocampus of mice, NL1 inhibited the release of glutamate from mossy fibers that project to CA3 pyramidal neurons. The presynaptic effect of NL1 was abolished in the presence of a selective antagonist for mGluR2. Thus, our data...

  2. Methods for antagonizing glutamate neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D W

    1990-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that glutamate-induced neuronal damage may contribute importantly to neuronal death in several neurological diseases, including cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. This review outlines a range of measures that might be used to protect neurons from such excitotoxic damage. The organizing thesis is a speculative consideration of glutamate neurotoxicity as a sequential three-stage process--induction, amplification, and expression--each perhaps specifically amenable to therapeutic interference. Overstimulation of glutamate receptors likely induces the intracellular accumulation of several substances, including Ca2+, Na+, inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate, and diacylglycerol. Blockade of this induction might be accomplished most easily by antagonizing postsynaptic glutamate receptors, but also might be accomplished by reducing glutamate release from presynaptic terminals, or improving glutamate clearance from synaptic clefts. Following induction, several steps may importantly amplify the resultant rise in intracellular free Ca2+, and promote the spread of excessive excitation to other circuit neurons. Protective strategies operative at this level might include blockade of additional Ca2+ influx, blockade of Ca2+ release from intracellular stores, and interference with the mechanisms coupling glutamate receptor stimulation to lasting enhancements of excitatory synaptic efficacy. Following amplification, toxic levels of intracellular free Ca2+ might trigger destructive cascades bearing direct responsibility for resultant neuronal degeneration--the expression of excitotoxicity. The most important cascades to block may be those related to the activation of catabolic enzymes, and the generation of free radicals. Broad consideration of possible methods for antagonizing glutamate neurotoxicity may be needed to develop therapies with the greatest efficacy, and least adverse consequences for brain function.

  3. L-glutamate released from activated microglia downregulates astrocytic L-glutamate transporter expression in neuroinflammation: the 'collusion' hypothesis for increased extracellular L-glutamate concentration in neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Junpei; Fujimori, Koki; Miura, Marie; Suzuki, Takeshi; Sekino, Yuko; Sato, Kaoru

    2012-12-23

    In the central nervous system, astrocytic L-glutamate (L-Glu) transporters maintain extracellular L-Glu below neurotoxic levels, but their function is impaired with neuroinflammation. Microglia become activated with inflammation; however, the correlation between activated microglia and the impairment of L-Glu transporters is unknown. We used a mixed culture composed of astrocytes, microglia, and neurons. To quantify L-Glu transporter function, we measured the extracellular L-Glu that remained 30 min after an application of L-Glu to the medium (the starting concentration was 100 μM). We determined the optimal conditions of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment to establish an inflammation model without cell death. We examined the predominant subtypes of L-Glu transporters and the changes in the expression levels of these transporters in this inflammation model. We then investigated the role of activated microglia in the changes in L-Glu transporter expression and the underlying mechanisms in this inflammation model. Because LPS (10 ng/mL, 72 h) caused a significant increase in the levels of L-Glu remaining but did not affect cell viability, we adopted this condition for our inflammation model without cell death. GLAST was the predominant L-Glu transporter subtype, and its expression decreased in this inflammation model. As a result of their release of L-Glu, activated microglia were shown to be essential for the significant decrease in L-Glu uptake. The serial application of L-Glu caused a significant decrease in L-Glu uptake and GLAST expression in the astrocyte culture. The hemichannel inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) inhibited L-Glu release from activated microglia and ameliorated the decrease in GLAST expression in the inflammation model. In addition, the elevation of the astrocytic intracellular L-Glu itself caused the downregulation of GLAST. Our findings suggest that activated microglia trigger the elevation of extracellular L-Glu through their own release of L

  4. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release and changes in the concentration of intracellular free calcium ([Ca++]i) were studied in cultured GABAergic cerebral cortical neurons, from mice, upon depolarization with either an unphysiologically high potassium concentration (55 mM) or the physiological excitatory...... neurotransmitter glutamate (100 microM). Both depolarizing stimuli exerted prompt increases in the release of preloaded [3H]GABA as well as in [Ca++]i. However, the basic properties of transmitter release and the increase in [Ca++]i under a variety of conditions were different during stimulation with K...... in nature whereas that induced by the neurotransmitter glutamate is not....

  5. Localization of Presynaptic Plasticity Mechanisms Enables Functional Independence of Synaptic and Ectopic Transmission in the Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine L. Dobson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the cerebellar molecular layer parallel fibre terminals release glutamate from both the active zone and from extrasynaptic “ectopic” sites. Ectopic release mediates transmission to the Bergmann glia that ensheathe the synapse, activating Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors and glutamate transporters. Parallel fibre terminals exhibit several forms of presynaptic plasticity, including cAMP-dependent long-term potentiation and endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression, but it is not known whether these presynaptic forms of long-term plasticity also influence ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia. Stimulation of parallel fibre inputs at 16 Hz evoked LTP of synaptic transmission, but LTD of ectopic transmission. Pharmacological activation of adenylyl cyclase by forskolin caused LTP at Purkinje neurons, but only transient potentiation at Bergmann glia, reinforcing the concept that ectopic sites lack the capacity to express sustained cAMP-dependent potentiation. Activation of mGluR1 caused depression of synaptic transmission via retrograde endocannabinoid signalling but had no significant effect at ectopic sites. In contrast, activation of NMDA receptors suppressed both synaptic and ectopic transmission. The results suggest that the signalling mechanisms for presynaptic LTP and retrograde depression by endocannabinoids are restricted to the active zone at parallel fibre synapses, allowing independent modulation of synaptic transmission to Purkinje neurons and ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia.

  6. Metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate the modulation of acetylcholine release at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsentsevitsky, Andrei; Nurullin, Leniz; Nikolsky, Evgeny; Malomouzh, Artem

    2017-07-01

    There is some evidence that glutamate (Glu) acts as a signaling molecule at vertebrate neuromuscular junctions where acetylcholine (ACh) serves as a neurotransmitter. In this study, performed on the cutaneous pectoris muscle of the frog Rana ridibunda, Glu receptor mechanisms that modulate ACh release processes were analyzed. Electrophysiological experiments showed that Glu reduces both spontaneous and evoked quantal secretion of ACh and synchronizes its release in response to electrical stimulation. Quisqualate, an agonist of ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic receptors and metabotropic Group I mGlu receptors, also exerted Glu-like inhibitory effects on the secretion of ACh but had no effect on the kinetics of quantal release. Quisqualate's inhibitory effect did not occur when a blocker of Group I mGlu receptors (LY 367385) or an inhibitor of phospholipase C (U73122) was present. An increase in the degree of synchrony of ACh quantal release, such as that produced by Glu, was obtained after application of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA). The presence of Group I mGlu and NMDA receptors in the neuromuscular synapse was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Thus, the data suggest that both metabotropic Group I mGlu receptors and ionotropic NMDA receptors are present at the neuromuscular synapse of amphibians, and that the activation of these receptors initiates different mechanisms for the regulation of ACh release from motor nerve terminals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Potentiation of insulin release in response to amino acid methyl esters correlates to activation of islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Hans; Lernmark, A; Hedeskov, C J

    1986-01-01

    Column perifusion of mouse pancreatic islets was used to study the ability of amino acids and their methyl esters to influence insulin release and activate islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity. In the absence of L-glutamine, L-serine and the methyl ester of L-phenylalanine, but neither L......-phenylalanine nor L-serine methyl ester, stimulate insulin secretion. In the presence of L-glutamine, however, the effect of L-serine was additive, while the methyl esters of L-serine and L-phenylalanine as well as native L-phenylalanine, potentiated the glucose-stimulated release of insulin. Measurements of islet...... glutamate dehydrogenase activity showed that only the two methyl esters of L-phenylalanine and L-serine activated the enzyme. It is concluded that the mechanism by which methyl esters of amino acids potentiate insulin release is most likely to be mediated by the activation of pancreatic beta-cell glutamate...

  8. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kilbride, Sean M

    2011-07-26

    Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2) and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1) are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington\\'s disease and Alzheimer\\'s disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  9. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilbride Seán M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2 and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1 are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  10. High t-PA release by neonate brain microvascular endothelial cells under glutamate exposure affects neuronal fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Vincent Jean; Lecointre, Maryline; Laudenbach, Vincent; Ali, Carine; Macrez, Richard; Jullienne, Amandine; Berezowski, Vincent; Carmeliet, Peter; Vivien, Denis; Marret, Stéphane; Gonzalez, Bruno José; Leroux, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity is a consolidated hypothesis in neonatal brain injuries and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) participates in the processes through proteolytic and receptor mediated effects. In brain microvascular endothelial cell (nBMEC) cultures from neonates, t-PA content and release upon glutamate are higher than in adult (aBMECs) cultures. Owing to the variety of t-PA substrates and receptor targets, the study was aimed at determining the putative roles of endothelial t-PA in the neonatal brain parenchyma under glutamate challenge. Basal t-PA release was 4.4 fold higher in nBMECs vs aBMECs and glutamate was 20 fold more potent to allow Evans blue vascular permeability in neonate microvessels indicating that, under noxious glutamate (50 μM) exposure, high amounts of endothelial t-PA stores may be mobilized and may access the nervous parenchyma. Culture media from nBMECS or aBMECs challenged by excitotoxic glutamate were applied to neuron cultures at DIV 11. While media from adult cells did not evoke more LDH release in neuronal cultures that under glutamate alone, media from nBMECs enhanced 2.2 fold LDH release. This effect was not observed with media from t-PA(-/-) nBMECs and was inhibited by hr-PAI-1. In Cortical slices from 10 day-old mice, hrt-PA associated with glutamate evoked neuronal necrosis in deeper (more mature) layers, an effect reversed by NMDA receptor GluN1 amino-terminal domain antibody capable of inhibiting t-PA potentiation of the receptor. In superficial layers (less mature), hrt-PA alone inhibited apoptosis, an effect reversed by the EGF receptor antagonist AG1478. Applied to immature neurons in culture (DIV5), media from nBMEC rescued 85.1% of neurons from cell death induced by serum deprivation. In cortical slices, the anti-apoptotic effect of t-PA fitted with age dependent localization of less mature neurons. These data suggest that in the immature brain, propensity of vessels to release high amounts of t-PA may not only

  11. Cocaine serves as a peripheral interoceptive conditioned stimulus for central glutamate and dopamine release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy A Wise

    Full Text Available Intravenous injections of cocaine HCl are habit-forming because, among their many actions, they elevate extracellular dopamine levels in the terminal fields of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. This action, thought to be very important for cocaine's strong addiction liability, is believed to have very short latency and is assumed to reflect rapid brain entry and pharmacokinetics of the drug. However, while intravenous cocaine HCl has almost immediate effects on behavior and extracellular dopamine levels, recent evidence suggests that its central pharmacological effects are not evident until 10 or more seconds after IV injection. Thus the immediate effects of a given intravenous cocaine injection on extracellular dopamine concentration and behavior appear to occur before there is sufficient time for cocaine to act centrally as a dopamine uptake inhibitor. To explore the contribution of peripheral effects of cocaine to the early activation of the dopamine system, we used brain microdialysis to measure the effects of cocaine methiodide (MI--a cocaine analogue that does not cross the blood brain barrier--on glutamate (excitatory input to the dopamine cells. IP injections of cocaine MI were ineffective in cocaine-naïve animals but stimulated ventral tegmental glutamate release in rats previously trained to lever-press for cocaine HCl. This peripherally triggered glutamate input was sufficient to reinstate cocaine-seeking in previously trained animals that had undergone extinction of the habit. These findings offer an explanation for short-latency behavioral responses and immediate dopamine elevations seen following cocaine injections in cocaine-experienced but not cocaine-naïve animals.

  12. Regulated Release of BDNF by Cortical Oligodendrocytes is Mediated Through Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and the PLC Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa P Bagayogo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies suggest that OLGs (oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, are also a source of trophic molecules, such as neurotrophins that may influence survival of proximate neurons. What is less clear is how the release of these molecules may be regulated. The present study investigated the effects of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor derived from cortical OLGs on proximate neurons, as well as regulatory mechanisms mediating BDNF release. Initial work determined that BDNF derived from cortical OLGs increased the numbers of VGLUT1 (vesicular glutamate transporter 1-positive glutamatergic cortical neurons. Furthermore, glutamate acting through metabotropic, and not AMPA/kainate or NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate, receptors increased BDNF release. The PLC (phospholipase C pathway is a key mediator of metabotropic actions to release BDNF in astrocytes and neurons. Treatment of OLGs with the PLC activator m-3M3FBS [N-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl-2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfonamide] induced robust release of BDNF. Moreover, release elicited by the metabotropic receptor agonist ACPD [trans-(1S,3R-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid] was inhibited by the PLC antagonist U73122, the IP3 (inositol triphosphate 3 receptor inhibitor 2-APB (2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane and the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA/AM [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxyethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester]. Taken together, these results suggest that OLG lineage cells release BDNF, a molecule trophic for proximate neurons. BDNF release is regulated by glutamate acting through mGluRs (metabotropic glutamate receptors and the PLC pathway. Thus glutamate and BDNF may be molecules that support neuron–OLG interactions in the cortex.

  13. Presynaptic nicotinic α7 and non-α7 receptors stimulate endogenous GABA release from rat hippocampal synaptosomes through two mechanisms of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Zappettini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although converging evidence has suggested that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR play a role in the modulation of GABA release in rat hippocampus, the specific involvement of different nAChR subtypes at presynaptic level is still a matter of debate. In the present work we investigated, using selective α7 and α4β2 nAChR agonists, the presence of different nAChR subtypes on hippocampal GABA nerve endings to assess to what extent and through which mechanisms they stimulate endogenous GABA release. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: All agonists elicited GABA overflow. Choline (Ch-evoked GABA overflow was dependent to external Ca(2+, but unaltered in the presence of Cd(2+, tetrodotoxin (TTX, dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE and 1-(4,4-Diphenyl-3-butenyl-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride SKF 89976A. The effect of Ch was blocked by methyllycaconitine (MLA, α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX, dantrolene, thapsigargin and xestospongin C, suggesting that GABA release might be triggered by Ca(2+ entry into synaptosomes through the α7 nAChR channel with the involvement of calcium from intracellular stores. Additionally, 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (5IA85380 elicited GABA overflow, which was Ca(2+ dependent, blocked by Cd(2+, and significantly inhibited by TTX and DHβE, but unaffected by MLA, SKF 89976A, thapsigargin and xestospongin C and dantrolene. These findings confirm the involvement of α4β2 nAChR in 5IA85380-induced GABA release that seems to occur following membrane depolarization and opening calcium channels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Rat hippocampal synaptosomes possess both α7 and α4β2 nAChR subtypes, which can modulate GABA release via two distinct mechanisms of action. The finding that GABA release evoked by the mixture of sub-maximal concentration of 5IA85380 plus sub-threshold concentrations of Ch was significantly larger than that elicited by the sum of the effects of the two agonists is compatible with the possibility that

  14. Differential levels of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GLUD1) in Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice and the effects of overexpression of the Glud1 gene on glutamate release in striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hascup, Kevin N; Bao, Xiaodong; Hascup, Erin R; Hui, Dongwei; Xu, Wenhao; Pomerleau, Francois; Huettl, Peter; Michaelis, Mary L; Michaelis, Elias K; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2011-04-21

    We have previously shown that overexpression of the Glud1 (glutamate dehydrogenase 1) gene in neurons of C57BL/6 mice results in increased depolarization-induced glutamate release that eventually leads to selective neuronal injury and cell loss by 12 months of age. However, it is known that isogenic lines of Tg (transgenic) mice produced through back-crossing with one strain may differ in their phenotypic characteristics from those produced using another inbred mouse strain. Therefore, we decided to introduce the Glud1 transgene into the Balb/c strain that has endogenously lower levels of GLUD1 (glutamate dehydrogenase 1) enzyme activity in the brain as compared with C57BL/6. Using an enzyme-based MEA (microelectrode array) that is selective for measuring glutamate in vivo, we measured depolarization-induced glutamate release. Within a discrete layer of the striatum, glutamate release was significantly increased in Balb/c Tg mice compared with wt (wild-type) littermates. Furthermore, Balb/c mice released approx. 50-60% of the amount of glutamate compared with C57BL/6 mice. This is similar to the lower levels of endogenous GLUD1 protein in Balb/c compared with C57BL/6 mice. The development of these Glud1-overexpressing mice may allow for the exploration of key molecular events produced by chronic exposure of neurons to moderate, transient increases in glutamate release, a process hypothesized to occur in neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Sensory Neurons Arouse C. elegans Locomotion via Both Glutamate and Neuropeptide Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwon Choi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available C. elegans undergoes periods of behavioral quiescence during larval molts (termed lethargus and as adults. Little is known about the circuit mechanisms that establish these quiescent states. Lethargus and adult locomotion quiescence is dramatically reduced in mutants lacking the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1. Here, we show that the aroused locomotion of npr-1 mutants results from the exaggerated activity in multiple classes of sensory neurons, including nociceptive (ASH, touch sensitive (ALM and PLM, and stretch sensing (DVA neurons. These sensory neurons accelerate locomotion via both neuropeptide and glutamate release. The relative contribution of these sensory neurons to arousal differs between larval molts and adults. Our results suggest that a broad network of sensory neurons dictates transitions between aroused and quiescent behavioral states.

  16. Sensory Neurons Arouse C. elegans Locomotion via Both Glutamate and Neuropeptide Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzigeorgiou, Marios; Hu, Zhitao; Schafer, William R.; Kaplan, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    C. elegans undergoes periods of behavioral quiescence during larval molts (termed lethargus) and as adults. Little is known about the circuit mechanisms that establish these quiescent states. Lethargus and adult locomotion quiescence is dramatically reduced in mutants lacking the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1. Here, we show that the aroused locomotion of npr-1 mutants results from the exaggerated activity in multiple classes of sensory neurons, including nociceptive (ASH), touch sensitive (ALM and PLM), and stretch sensing (DVA) neurons. These sensory neurons accelerate locomotion via both neuropeptide and glutamate release. The relative contribution of these sensory neurons to arousal differs between larval molts and adults. Our results suggest that a broad network of sensory neurons dictates transitions between aroused and quiescent behavioral states. PMID:26154367

  17. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    differences in the mode of action of the two depolarizing stimuli were reflected in the properties of the increase in [Ca++]i elicited by 55 mM K+ and 100 microM glutamate, respectively. The K(+)-induced increase in [Ca++]i was reduced by both verapamil and Ca(++)-free media whereas the corresponding...... neurotransmitter glutamate (100 microM). Both depolarizing stimuli exerted prompt increases in the release of preloaded [3H]GABA as well as in [Ca++]i. However, the basic properties of transmitter release and the increase in [Ca++]i under a variety of conditions were different during stimulation with K...... was also reduced by organic (verapamil) and inorganic (Co++) Ca++ channel blockers but was insensitive to the GABA transport inhibitor SKF 89976A. In contrast, the second phase was less sensitive to nocodazole and Ca++ channel antagonists but could be inhibited by SKF 89976A. The glutamate-induced [3H...

  18. Presynaptic Glycine Receptors Increase GABAergic Neurotransmission in Rat Periaqueductal Gray Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwi-Hyung Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The periaqueductal gray (PAG is involved in the central regulation of nociceptive transmission by affecting the descending inhibitory pathway. In the present study, we have addressed the functional role of presynaptic glycine receptors in spontaneous glutamatergic transmission. Spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs were recorded in mechanically dissociated rat PAG neurons using a conventional whole-cell patch recording technique under voltage-clamp conditions. The application of glycine (100 µM significantly increased the frequency of sEPSCs, without affecting the amplitude of sEPSCs. The glycine-induced increase in sEPSC frequency was blocked by 1 µM strychnine, a specific glycine receptor antagonist. The results suggest that glycine acts on presynaptic glycine receptors to increase the probability of glutamate release from excitatory nerve terminals. The glycine-induced increase in sEPSC frequency completely disappeared either in the presence of tetrodotoxin or Cd2+, voltage-gated Na+, or Ca2+ channel blockers, suggesting that the activation of presynaptic glycine receptors might depolarize excitatory nerve terminals. The present results suggest that presynaptic glycine receptors can regulate the excitability of PAG neurons by enhancing glutamatergic transmission and therefore play an important role in the regulation of various physiological functions mediated by the PAG.

  19. Depolarization-induced release of [(3)H]D-aspartate from GABAergic neurons caused by reversal of glutamate transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Pickering, D S; Schousboe, A

    2000-01-01

    Cultured neocortical neurons, which predominantly consist of GABAergic neurons exhibit a pronounced stimulus-coupled GABA release. Since the cultures may contain a small population of glutamatergic neurons and the GABAergic neurons have a high content of glutamate it was of interest to examine...... if glutamate in addition to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) could be released from these cultures. The neurons were preloaded with [(3)H]D-aspartate and subsequently its release was followed during depolarization induced by a high potassium concentration or the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4......-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonists, AMPA and kainate. Depolarization of the neurons with 55 mM potassium increased the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate by more than 10-fold. When the non-specific calcium-channel blockers cobalt or lanthanum were included in the stimulation buffer with potassium...

  20. Group I mGlu receptors potentiate synaptosomal [3H]glutamate release independently of exogenously applied arachidonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, M.E.; Toms, N.J.; Bedingfield, J.S.; Roberts, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    In the current study, we have characterized group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor enhancement of 4-aminopyridine (4AP)-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. The broad spectrum mGlu receptor agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid ((1S,3R)-ACPD, 10 μM) increased 4AP-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release (143.32±2.73% control) only in the presence of exogenously applied arachidonic acid; an effect reversed by the inclusion of bovine serum albumin (BSA, fatty acid free). In contrast, the selective group I mGlu receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) potentiated (EC 50 =1.60±0.25 μM; E max =147.61±10.96% control) 4AP-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release, in the absence of arachidonic acid. This potentiation could be abolished by either the selective mGlu 1 receptor antagonist (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA, 1 mM) or the selective PKC inhibitor (Ro 31-8220, 10 μM) and was BSA-insensitive. The selective mGlu 5 receptor agonist (R,S)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG, 300μM) was without effect. DHPG (100 μM) also potentiated both 30 mM and 50 mM K + -evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release (121.60±12.77% and 121.50±4.45% control, respectively). DHPG (100 μM) failed to influence both 4AP-stimulated 45 Ca 2+ influx and 50 mM K + -induced changes in synaptosomal membrane potential. Possible group I mGlu receptor suppression of tonic adenosine A 1 receptor, group II/III mGlu receptors or GABA B receptor activity is unlikely since 4AP-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release was insensitive to the selective inhibitory receptor antagonists 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine, (R,S)-α-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine or CGP55845A, respectively. These data suggest an 'mGlu 1 receptor-like' receptor potentiates [ 3 H]glutamate release from cerebrocortical synaptosomes in the absence of exogenously applied arachidonic acid. This PKC dependent effect is unlikely to be via modulation of synaptosomal membrane

  1. Maturation of calcium-dependent GABA, glycine, and glutamate release in the glycinergic MNTB-LSO pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Alamilla

    Full Text Available The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB is a key nucleus in high-fidelity temporal processing that underlies sound localization in the auditory brainstem. While the glycinergic principal cells of the MNTB project to all primary nuclei of the superior olive, during development the projection from MNTB to the lateral superior olive (LSO is of interest because this immature inhibitory projection is known to undergo tonotopic refinement during an early postnatal period, and because during this period individual MNTB terminals in the LSO transiently release glycine GABA and glutamate. Developmental changes in calcium-dependent release are understood to be required to allow various auditory nuclei to follow high frequency activity; however, little is known about maturation of calcium-dependent release in the MNTB-LSO pathway, which has been presumed to have less stringent requirements for high-fidelity temporal following. In acute brainstem slices of rats age postnatal day 1 to 15 we recorded whole-cell responses in LSO principal neurons to electrical stimulation in the MNTB in order to measure sensitivity to external calcium, the contribution of different voltage-gated calcium channel subtypes to vesicular release, and the maturation of these measures for both GABA/glycine and glutamate transmission. Our results establish that release of glutamate at MNTB-LSO synapses is calcium-dependent. Whereas no significant developmental changes were evident for glutamate release, GABA/glycine release underwent substantial changes over the first two postnatal weeks: soon after birth L-type, N-type, and P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs together mediated release, but after hearing onset P/Q-type VGCCs predominated. Blockade of P/Q-type VGCCs reduced the estimated quantal number for GABA/gly and glutamate transmission at P5-8 and the frequency of evoked miniature glycinergic events at P12-15, without apparent effects on spontaneous release of

  2. Prophylactic versus Therapeutic Fingolimod: Restoration of Presynaptic Defects in Mice Suffering from Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Bonfiglio

    Full Text Available Fingolimod, the first oral, disease-modifying therapy for MS, has been recently proposed to modulate glutamate transmission in the central nervous system (CNS of mice suffering from Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE and in MS patients. Our study aims at investigating whether oral fingolimod recovers presynaptic defects that occur at different stages of disease in the CNS of EAE mice. In vivo prophylactic (0.3 mg/kg for 14 days, from the 7th day post immunization, d.p.i, the drug dissolved in the drinking water fingolimod significantly reduced the clinical symptoms and the anxiety-related behaviour in EAE mice. Spinal cord inflammation, demyelination and glial cell activation are markers of EAE progression. These signs were ameliorated following oral fingolimod administration. Glutamate exocytosis was shown to be impaired in cortical and spinal cord terminals isolated from EAE mice at 21 ± 1 d.p.i., while GABA alteration emerged only at the spinal cord level. Prophylactic fingolimod recovered these presynaptic defects, restoring altered glutamate and GABA release efficiency. The beneficial effect occurred in a dose-dependent, region-specific manner, since lower (0.1-0.03 mg/kg doses restored, although to a different extent, synaptic defects in cortical but not spinal cord terminals. A delayed reduction of glutamate, but not of GABA, exocytosis was observed in hippocampal terminals of EAE mice at 35 d.p.i. Therapeutic (0.3 mg/kg, from 21 d.p.i. for 14 days fingolimod restored glutamate exocytosis in the cortex and in the hippocampus of EAE mice at 35 ± 1 d.p.i. but not in the spinal cord, where also GABAergic defects remained unmodified. These results improve our knowledge of the molecular events accounting for the beneficial effects elicited by fingolimod in demyelinating disorders.

  3. A neuroprotective role for microRNA miR-1000 mediated by limiting glutamate excitotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, Pushpa; Augustine, George J; Ammar, Mohamed-Raafet

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has begun to emerge for microRNAs as regulators of synaptic signaling, specifically acting to control postsynaptic responsiveness during synaptic transmission. In this report, we provide evidence that Drosophila melanogaster miR-1000 acts presynaptically to regulate glutamate release at ...... a neuroprotective function in the brains of flies and mice. Drosophila miR-1000 showed activity-dependent expression, which might serve as a mechanism to allow neuronal activity to fine-tune the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission....

  4. Clozapine, but not haloperidol, enhances glial D-serine and L-glutamate release in rat frontal cortex and primary cultured astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Shunske; Yamamura, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Masanori; Motomura, Eishi; Okada, Motohiro

    2012-03-01

    Deficient transmission at the glutamate NMDA receptor is considered a key component of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the effects of antipsychotic drugs on the release of the endogenous NMDA receptor partial agonist, D-serine, remain to be clarified. We determined the interaction between antipsychotic drugs (clozapine and haloperidol) and transmission-modulating toxins (tetanus toxin, fluorocitrate, tetrodotoxin) on the release of L-glutamate and D-serine in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of freely moving rats, using microdialysis, and primary cultures of astrocytes using extreme high-pressure liquid chromatography. Release of L-glutamate and D-serine in the mPFC and in cultured astrocytes was inhibited by tetanus toxin (a synaptobrevin inhibitor) and fluorocitrate (a glial toxin), whereas tetrodotoxin (a voltage-sensitive Na(+) blocker) inhibited depolarization-induced L-glutamate release in the mPFC without affecting that of D-serine. Clozapine (1 and 5 mg·kg(-1)), but not haloperidol (0.5 and 1 mg·kg(-1)), dose-dependently increased L-glutamate and D-serine release from both astrocytes and mPFC. Clozapine-induced release of L-glutamate and D-serine was also reduced by tetanus toxin and fluorocitrate. Tetrodotoxin reduced clozapine-induced mPFC L-glutamate release but not that of D-serine. Clozapine-induced L-glutamate release preceded clozapine-induced D-serine release. MK-801 (a NMDA receptor antagonist) inhibited the delayed clozapine-induced L-glutamate release without affecting that of D-serine. Clozapine predominantly activated glial exocytosis of D-serine, and this clozapine-induced D-serine release subsequently enhances neuronal L-glutamate release via NMDA receptor activation. The enhanced D-serine associated glial transmission seems a novel mechanism of action of clozapine but not haloperidol. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Nanofiber mat spinal cord dressing-released glutamate impairs blood-spinal cord barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Sulejczak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An excessive glutamate level can result in excitotoxic damage and death of central nervous system (CNS cells, and is involved in the pathogenesis of many CNS diseases. It may also be related to a failure of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB. This study was aimed at examining the effects of extended administration of monosodium glutamate on the BSCB and spinal cord cells in adult male Wistar rats. The glutamate was delivered by subarachnoidal application of glutamate-carrying electrospun nanofiber mat dressing at the lumbar enlargement level. Half of the rats with the glutamate-loaded mat application were treated systemically with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid. A group of intact rats and a rat group with subarachnoidal application of an ‘empty’ (i.e., carrying no glutamate nanofiber mat dressing served as controls. All the rats were euthanized three weeks later and lumbar fragments of their spinal cords were harvested for histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies. The samples from controls revealed normal parenchyma and BSCB morphology, whereas those from rats with the glutamate-loaded nanofiber mat dressing showed many intraparenchymal microhemorrhages of variable sizes. The capillaries in the vicinity of the glutamate-carrying dressing (in the meninges and white matter alike were edematous and leaky, and their endothelial cells showed degenerative changes: extensive swelling, enhanced vacuo­lization and the presence of vascular intraluminal projections. However, endothelial tight junctions were generally well preserved. Some endothelial cells were dying by necrosis or apoptosis. The adjacent parenchyma showed astrogliosis with astrocytic hypertrophy and swelling of perivascular astrocytic feet. Neurons in the parenchyma revealed multiple symptoms of degeneration, including, inter alia, perikaryal, dendritic and axonal swelling, and destruction of organelles. All the damage symptoms were slightly less

  6. Nanofiber mat spinal cord dressing-released glutamate impairs blood-spinal cord barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulejczak, Dorota; Taraszewska, Anna; Chrapusta, Stanisław J; Dziewulska, Dorota; Nakielski, Paweł; Rafałowska, Janina

    2016-01-01

    An excessive glutamate level can result in excitotoxic damage and death of central nervous system (CNS) cells, and is involved in the pathogenesis of many CNS diseases. It may also be related to a failure of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB). This study was aimed at examining the effects of extended administration of monosodium glutamate on the BSCB and spinal cord cells in adult male Wistar rats. The glutamate was delivered by subarachnoidal application of glutamate-carrying electrospun nanofiber mat dressing at the lumbar enlargement level. Half of the rats with the glutamate-loaded mat application were treated systemically with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid. A group of intact rats and a rat group with subarachnoidal application of an 'empty' (i.e., carrying no glutamate) nanofiber mat dressing served as controls. All the rats were euthanized three weeks later and lumbar fragments of their spinal cords were harvested for histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies. The samples from controls revealed normal parenchyma and BSCB morphology, whereas those from rats with the glutamate-loaded nanofiber mat dressing showed many intraparenchymal microhemorrhages of variable sizes. The capillaries in the vicinity of the glutamate-carrying dressing (in the meninges and white matter alike) were edematous and leaky, and their endothelial cells showed degenerative changes: extensive swelling, enhanced vacuo-lization and the presence of vascular intraluminal projections. However, endothelial tight junctions were generally well preserved. Some endothelial cells were dying by necrosis or apoptosis. The adjacent parenchyma showed astrogliosis with astrocytic hypertrophy and swelling of perivascular astrocytic feet. Neurons in the parenchyma revealed multiple symptoms of degeneration, including, inter alia, perikaryal, dendritic and axonal swelling, and destruction of organelles. All the damage symptoms were slightly less severe in the rats

  7. Loss of Local Astrocyte Support Disrupts Action Potential Propagation and Glutamate Release Synchrony from Unmyelinated Hippocampal Axon Terminals In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieski, Courtney; Jiang, Xiaoping; Crawford, Devon C; Mennerick, Steven

    2015-08-05

    Neuron-astrocyte interactions are critical for proper CNS development and function. Astrocytes secrete factors that are pivotal for synaptic development and function, neuronal metabolism, and neuronal survival. Our understanding of this relationship, however, remains incomplete due to technical hurdles that have prevented the removal of astrocytes from neuronal circuits without changing other important conditions. Here we overcame this obstacle by growing solitary rat hippocampal neurons on microcultures that were comprised of either an astrocyte bed (+astrocyte) or a collagen bed (-astrocyte) within the same culture dish. -Astrocyte autaptic evoked EPSCs, but not IPSCs, displayed an altered temporal profile, which included increased synaptic delay, increased time to peak, and severe glutamate release asynchrony, distinct from previously described quantal asynchrony. Although we observed minimal alteration of the somatically recorded action potential waveform, action potential propagation was altered. We observed a longer latency between somatic initiation and arrival at distal locations, which likely explains asynchronous EPSC peaks, and we observed broadening of the axonal spike, which likely underlies changes to evoked EPSC onset. No apparent changes in axon structure were observed, suggesting altered axonal excitability. In conclusion, we propose that local astrocyte support has an unappreciated role in maintaining glutamate release synchrony by disturbing axonal signal propagation. Certain glial cell types (oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) facilitate the propagation of neuronal electrical signals, but a role for astrocytes has not been identified despite many other functions of astrocytes in supporting and modulating neuronal signaling. Under identical global conditions, we cultured neurons with or without local astrocyte support. Without local astrocytes, glutamate transmission was desynchronized by an alteration of the waveform and arrival time of axonal

  8. Glutamate signalling and secretory phospholipase A2 modulate the release of arachidonic acid from neuronal membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez De Turco, Elena B; Jackson, Fannie R; DeCoster, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    and secretory PLA(2) (sPLA(2)) from bee venom (bv sPLA(2)) and Taipan snake venom (OS2) elicit synergy in inducing neuronal cell death. Low concentrations of sPLA(2) are selective ligands of cell-surface sPLA(2) receptors. We investigated which neuronal arachidonoyl phospholipids are targeted by glutamate...

  9. Fast inhibition of glutamate-activated currents by caffeine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P Vyleta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caffeine stimulates calcium-induced calcium release (CICR in many cell types. In neurons, caffeine stimulates CICR presynaptically and thus modulates neurotransmitter release. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique we found that caffeine (20 mM reversibly increased the frequency and decreased the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs in neocortical neurons. The increase in mEPSC frequency is consistent with a presynaptic mechanism. Caffeine also reduced exogenously applied glutamate-activated currents, confirming a separate postsynaptic action. This inhibition developed in tens of milliseconds, consistent with block of channel currents. Caffeine (20 mM did not reduce currents activated by exogenous NMDA, indicating that caffeine block is specific to non-NMDA type glutamate receptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Caffeine-induced inhibition of mEPSC amplitude occurs through postsynaptic block of non-NMDA type ionotropic glutamate receptors. Caffeine thus has both pre and postsynaptic sites of action at excitatory synapses.

  10. Release of [3H]GABA formed from [3H]glutamate in rat hippocampal slices: comparison with endogenous and exogenous labeled GABA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szerb, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    To compare the storage and release of endogenous GABA, of [ 3 H]GABA formed endogenously from glutamate, and of exogenous [ 14 C]GABA, hippocampal slices were incubated with 5 microCi/ml [3,4- 3 H]1-glutamate and 0.5 microCi/ml [U- 14 C]GABA and then were superfused in the presence or absence of Ca + with either 50 mM K + or 50 microM veratridine. Exogenous [ 14 C]GABA content of the slices declined spontaneously while endogenous GABA and endogenously formed [ 3 H]GABA stayed constant over a 48 min period. In the presence of Ca + 50 mM K + and in the presence or absence of Ca2 + veratridine released exogenous [ 14 C]GABA more rapidly than endogenous or endogenously formed [ 3 H]GABA, the release of the latter two occurring always in parallel. The initial specific activity of released exogenous [ 14 C]GABA was three times, while that of endogenously formed [ 3 H]GABA was only 50% higher than that in the slices. The observation that endogenous GABA and [ 3 H]GABA formed endogenously from glutamate are stored and released in parallel but differently from exogenous labelled GABA, suggests that exogenous [ 3 H] glutamate can enter a glutamate pool that normally serves as precursor of GABA

  11. Presynaptic molecular determinants of quantal size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo eTakamori

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The quantal hypothesis for the release of neurotransmitters at the chemical synapse has gained wide acceptance since it was first worked out at the motor endplate in frog skeletal muscle in the 1950s. Considering the morphological identification of synaptic vesicles at the nerve terminals that appeared to be homogeneous in size, the hypothesis proposed that signal transduction at synapses is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters packed in synaptic vesicles that are individually uniform in size; the amount of transmitter in a synaptic vesicle is called a quantum. Although quantal size – the amplitude of the postsynaptic response elicited by the release of neurotransmitters from a single vesicle – clearly depends on the number and sensitivity of the postsynaptic receptors, accumulating evidence has also indicated that the amount of neurotransmitters stored in synaptic vesicles can be altered by various presynaptic factors. Here, I provide an overview of the concepts and underlying presynaptic molecular underpinnings that may regulate quantal size.

  12. No release of interstitial glutamate in experimental human model of muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, M.; Jørgensen, M.; Stallknecht, Bente

    2005-01-01

    concentration of glutamate before, during and after acute pain of trapezius muscle in humans using the microdialysis technique. In addition, we examined the nutritive skeletal muscle blood flow and the interstitial concentrations of lactate, glucose, glycerol, pyruvate and urea. Experimental pain and tenderness...... were induced by intramuscular infusion of a chemical mixture consisting of bradykinin, prostaglandin E(2), histamine and serotonin. One EMG-needle and one microdialysis catheter were inserted into non-dominant and dominant trapezius muscles on a standard anatomical point in 19 healthy subjects...

  13. Tanshinone IIA Inhibits Glutamate-Induced Oxidative Toxicity through Prevention of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Suppression of MAPK Activation in SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate excitotoxicity is associated with many neurological diseases, including cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative diseases. Tanshinone IIA, a diterpenoid naphthoquinone from Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been shown to suppress presynaptic glutamate release, but its protective mechanism against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity is lacking. Using SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, we show here that excessive glutamate exposure decreases cell viability and proliferation and increases LDH release. Pretreatment with tanshinone IIA, however, prevents the decrease in cell viability and proliferation and the increase in LDH release induced by glutamate. Tanshinone IIA also attenuates glutamate-induced oxidative stress by reducing reactive oxygen species level and malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents and by enhancing activities and protein levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase. We then show that tanshinone IIA prevents glutamate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction by increasing mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content and by reducing mitochondrial protein carbonyl content. Moreover, tanshinone IIA can inhibit glutamate-induced apoptosis through regulation of apoptosis-related protein expression and MAPK activation, including elevation of Bcl-2 protein level, decrease in Bax and cleaved caspase-3 levels, and suppression of JNK and p38 MAPK activation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that tanshinone IIA protects SH-SY5Y cells against glutamate toxicity by reducing oxidative stress and regulating apoptosis and MAPK pathways.

  14. Neuroprotective effects of the novel glutamate transporter inhibitor (-)-3-hydroxy-4,5,6,6a-tetrahydro-3aH-pyrrolo[3,4-d]-isoxazole-4-carboxylic acid, which preferentially inhibits reverse transport (glutamate release) compared with glutamate reuptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colleoni, Simona; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Landucci, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    of glutamate uptake. In organotypic rat hippocampal slices and mixed mouse brain cortical cultures, TBOA, but not (-)-HIP-A, had toxic effects. Under ischemic conditions, a neuroprotective effect was found with 10 to 30 microM (-)-HIP-A, but not with 10 to 30 microM TBOA or 100 microM (-)-HIP-A. The effect...... of (-)-HIP-A suggests that, under ischemia, EAATs mediate both release (reverse transport) and uptake of glutamate. The neuroprotection with the lower (-)-HIP-A concentrations may indicate a selective inhibition of the reverse transport confirming the data obtained in synaptosomes. The selective interference...... with glutamate-induced glutamate release might offer a new strategy for neuroprotective action....

  15. Glutamate-induced apoptosis in primary cortical neurons is inhibited by equine estrogens via down-regulation of caspase-3 and prevention of mitochondrial cytochrome c release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YueMei

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptosis plays a key role in cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases marked by a progressive loss of neurons as seen in Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact cause of apoptosis is not known, a number of factors such as free radicals, insufficient levels of nerve growth factors and excessive levels of glutamate have been implicated. We and others, have previously reported that in a stable HT22 neuronal cell line, glutamate induces apoptosis as indicated by DNA fragmentation and up- and down-regulation of Bax (pro-apoptotic, and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic genes respectively. Furthermore, these changes were reversed/inhibited by estrogens. Several lines of evidence also indicate that a family of cysteine proteases (caspases appear to play a critical role in neuronal apoptosis. The purpose of the present study is to determine in primary cultures of cortical cells, if glutamate-induced neuronal apoptosis and its inhibition by estrogens involve changes in caspase-3 protease and whether this process is mediated by Fas receptor and/or mitochondrial signal transduction pathways involving release of cytochrome c. Results In primary cultures of rat cortical cells, glutamate induced apoptosis that was associated with enhanced DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, and up-regulation of pro-caspase-3. Exposure of cortical cells to glutamate resulted in a time-dependent cell death and an increase in caspase-3 protein levels. Although the increase in caspase-3 levels was evident after 3 h, cell death was only significantly increased after 6 h. Treatment of cells for 6 h with 1 to 20 mM glutamate resulted in a 35 to 45% cell death that was associated with a 45 to 65% increase in the expression of caspase-3 protein. Pretreatment with caspase-3-protease inhibitor z-DEVD or pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD significantly decreased glutamate-induced cell death of cortical cells. Exposure of cells to glutamate for 6 h in the presence or

  16. Activity-dependent volume transmission by transgene NPY attenuates glutamate release and LTP in the subiculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Lin, En-Ju D

    2008-01-01

    governing the release and action of transgene NPY in neuronal circuitries. Using whole-cell recordings from subicular neurons, we show that in animals transduced by recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vector carrying the NPY gene, transgene NPY is released during high-frequency activation of CA1...

  17. Involvement of medial septal glutamate and GABA(A) receptors in behaviour-induced acetylcholine release in the hippocampus : A dual probe microdialysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, E; Schirm, E; Jacso, J; Westerink, BHC

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, the role of medial septal receptors in behaviour-induced increase in acetylcholine (ACh) release in hippocampus was investigated using dual-probe microdialysis in combination with a simple behavioural procedure, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate receptor agonists and

  18. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors; Aspectos das liberacoes de dopamina e acetilcolina mediadas por receptores de glutamato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-07-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  19. Sexual attraction enhances glutamate transmission in mammalian anterior cingulate cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Functional human brain imaging studies have indicated the essential role of cortical regions, such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, in romantic love and sex. However, the neurobiological basis of how the ACC neurons are activated and engaged in sexual attraction remains unknown. Using transgenic mice in which the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP is controlled by the promoter of the activity-dependent gene c-fos, we found that ACC pyramidal neurons are activated by sexual attraction. The presynaptic glutamate release to the activated neurons is increased and pharmacological inhibition of neuronal activities in the ACC reduced the interest of male mice to female mice. Our results present direct evidence of the critical role of the ACC in sexual attraction, and long-term increases in glutamate mediated excitatory transmission may contribute to sexual attraction between male and female mice.

  20. Synapse-specific and compartmentalized expression of presynaptic homeostatic potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiling; Goel, Pragya; Chen, Catherine; Angajala, Varun; Chen, Xun; Dickman, Dion K

    2018-04-05

    Postsynaptic compartments can be specifically modulated during various forms of synaptic plasticity, but it is unclear whether this precision is shared at presynaptic terminals. Presynaptic Homeostatic Plasticity (PHP) stabilizes neurotransmission at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, where a retrograde enhancement of presynaptic neurotransmitter release compensates for diminished postsynaptic receptor functionality. To test the specificity of PHP induction and expression, we have developed a genetic manipulation to reduce postsynaptic receptor expression at one of the two muscles innervated by a single motor neuron. We find that PHP can be induced and expressed at a subset of synapses, over both acute and chronic time scales, without influencing transmission at adjacent release sites. Further, homeostatic modulations to CaMKII, vesicle pools, and functional release sites are compartmentalized and do not spread to neighboring pre- or post-synaptic structures. Thus, both PHP induction and expression mechanisms are locally transmitted and restricted to specific synaptic compartments. © 2018, Li et al.

  1. Interplay between presynaptic and postsynaptic activities is required for dendritic plasticity and synaptogenesis in the supraoptic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevaleyre, Vivien; Moos, Francoise C; Desarménien, Michel G

    2002-01-01

    Developing oxytocin and vasopressin (OT/AVP) supraoptic nucleus (SON) neurons positively autocontrol their electrical activity via dendritic release of their respective peptide. The effects of this autocontrol are maximum during the second postnatal week (PW2), when the dendritic arbor transiently increases and glutamatergic postsynaptic potentials appear. Here, we studied the role and interaction of dendritic OT/AVP release and glutamate release in dendritic plasticity and synaptogenesis in SON. In vivo treatment with the peptides antagonists or with an NMDA antagonist suppressed the transient increase in dendritic arbor of SON neurons at the beginning of PW2. Incubation of acute slices with these compounds decreased the dendritic arbor on a short time scale (3-8 hr) in slices of postnatal day 7 (P7) to P9 rats. Conversely, application of OT/AVP or NMDA increased dendritic branches in slices of P3-P6 rats. Their effects were inhibited by blockade of electrical activity, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, or intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. They were also interdependent because both OT/AVP and NMDA (but not AMPA) receptor activation were required for increasing the dendritic arbor. Part of this interdependence probably results from a retrograde action of the peptides facilitating glutamate release. Finally, blocking OT/AVP receptors by in vivo treatment with the peptides antagonists during development decreased spontaneous glutamatergic synaptic activity recorded in young adults. These results show that an interplay between postsynaptic dendritic peptide release and presynaptic glutamate release is involved in the transient increase in dendritic arbor of SON neurons and indicate that OT/AVP are required for normal synaptogenesis of glutamatergic inputs in SON.

  2. The interaction of mammalian Class C Vps with nSec-1/Munc18-a and syntaxin 1A regulates pre-synaptic release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Yoon; Sahara, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Kominami, Eiki; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2006-01-01

    Membrane docking and fusion in neurons is a highly regulated process requiring the participation of a large number of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) and SNARE-interacting proteins. We found that mammalian Class C Vps protein complex associated specifically with nSec-1/Munc18-a, and syntaxin 1A both in vivo and in vitro. In contrast, VAMP2 and SNAP-25, other neuronal core complex proteins, did not interact. When co-transfected with the human growth hormone (hGH) reporter gene, mammalian Class C Vps proteins enhanced Ca 2+ -dependent exocytosis, which was abolished by the Ca 2+ -channel blocker nifedipine. In hippocampal primary cultures, the lentivirus-mediated overexpression of hVps18 increased asynchronous spontaneous synaptic release without changing mEPSCs. These results indicate that mammalian Class C Vps proteins are involved in the regulation of membrane docking and fusion through an interaction with neuronal specific SNARE molecules, nSec-1/Munc18-a and syntaxin 1A

  3. Subtype-Selective Small Molecule Inhibitors Reveal a Fundamental Role for Nav1.7 in Nociceptor Electrogenesis, Axonal Conduction and Presynaptic Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristos J Alexandrou

    Full Text Available Human genetic studies show that the voltage gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7 is a key molecular determinant of pain sensation. However, defining the Nav1.7 contribution to nociceptive signalling has been hampered by a lack of selective inhibitors. Here we report two potent and selective arylsulfonamide Nav1.7 inhibitors; PF-05198007 and PF-05089771, which we have used to directly interrogate Nav1.7's role in nociceptor physiology. We report that Nav1.7 is the predominant functional TTX-sensitive Nav in mouse and human nociceptors and contributes to the initiation and the upstroke phase of the nociceptor action potential. Moreover, we confirm a role for Nav1.7 in influencing synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord as well as peripheral neuropeptide release in the skin. These findings demonstrate multiple contributions of Nav1.7 to nociceptor signalling and shed new light on the relative functional contribution of this channel to peripheral and central noxious signal transmission.

  4. Depolarization by K*O+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in gabaergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of gaba

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, Bo; Hansen, G.H.; Schousboe, Arne

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures......Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures...

  5. Striatal Synaptosomes from Hdh140Q/140Q Knock-in Mice have Altered Protein Levels, Novel Sites of Methionine Oxidation, and Excess Glutamate Release after Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Antonio; Sapp, Ellen; Kimm, Jeffrey S.; McClory, Hollis; Ansong, Kwadwo A.; Yohrling, George; Kwak, Seung; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Green, Karin M.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Aronin, Neil; DiFiglia, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Synaptic connections are disrupted in patients with Huntington’s disease (HD). Synaptosomes from postmortem brain are ideal for synaptic function studies because they are enriched in pre- and post-synaptic proteins important in vesicle fusion, vesicle release, and neurotransmitter receptor activation. Objective: To examine striatal synaptosomes from 3, 6 and 12 month old WT and Hdh140Q/140Q knock-in mice for levels of synaptic proteins, methionine oxidation, and glutamate release. Methods: We used Western blot analysis, glutamate release assays, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results: Striatal synaptosomes of 6 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice had less DARPP32, syntaxin 1 and calmodulin compared to WT. Striatal synaptosomes of 12 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice had lower levels of DARPP32, alpha actinin, HAP40, Na+/K+-ATPase, PSD95, SNAP-25, TrkA and VAMP1, VGlut1 and VGlut2, increased levels of VAMP2, and modifications in actin and calmodulin compared to WT. More glutamate released from vesicles of depolarized striatal synaptosomes of 6 month old Hdh140Q/140Q than from age matched WT mice but there was no difference in glutamate release in synaptosomes of 3 and 12 month old WT and Hdh140Q/140Q mice. LC-MS/MS of 6 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice striatal synaptosomes revealed that about 4% of total proteins detected (>600 detected) had novel sites of methionine oxidation including proteins involved with vesicle fusion, trafficking, and neurotransmitter function (synaptophysin, synapsin 2, syntaxin 1, calmodulin, cytoplasmic actin 2, neurofilament, and tubulin). Altered protein levels and novel methionine oxidations were also seen in cortical synaptosomes of 12 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice. Conclusions: Findings provide support for early synaptic dysfunction in Hdh140Q/140Q knock-in mice arising from altered protein levels, oxidative damage, and impaired glutamate neurotransmission and suggest that study of synaptosomes could be of

  6. Glycolysis selectively shapes the presynaptic action potential waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Brendan; Kushmerick, Christopher; Banerjee, Tania Das; Dagda, Ruben K; Renden, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are major suppliers of cellular energy in neurons; however, utilization of energy from glycolysis vs. mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in the presynaptic compartment during neurotransmission is largely unknown. Using presynaptic and postsynaptic recordings from the mouse calyx of Held, we examined the effect of acute selective pharmacological inhibition of glycolysis or mitochondrial OxPhos on multiple mechanisms regulating presynaptic function. Inhibition of glycolysis via glucose depletion and iodoacetic acid (1 mM) treatment, but not mitochondrial OxPhos, rapidly altered transmission, resulting in highly variable, oscillating responses. At reduced temperature, this same treatment attenuated synaptic transmission because of a smaller and broader presynaptic action potential (AP) waveform. We show via experimental manipulation and ion channel modeling that the altered AP waveform results in smaller Ca 2+ influx, resulting in attenuated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). In contrast, inhibition of mitochondria-derived ATP production via extracellular pyruvate depletion and bath-applied oligomycin (1 μM) had no significant effect on Ca 2+ influx and did not alter the AP waveform within the same time frame (up to 30 min), and the resultant EPSC remained unaffected. Glycolysis, but not mitochondrial OxPhos, is thus required to maintain basal synaptic transmission at the presynaptic terminal. We propose that glycolytic enzymes are closely apposed to ATP-dependent ion pumps on the presynaptic membrane. Our results indicate a novel mechanism for the effect of hypoglycemia on neurotransmission. Attenuated transmission likely results from a single presynaptic mechanism at reduced temperature: a slower, smaller AP, before and independent of any effect on synaptic vesicle release or receptor activity. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. The neuroprotective properties of the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol correlate with its ability to reduce pathological glutamate release in a rodent model of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohare, Preeti; Hyzinski-García, María C; Vipani, Aarshi; Bowens, Nicole H; Nalwalk, Julia W; Feustel, Paul J; Keller, Richard W; Jourd'heuil, David; Mongin, Alexander A

    2014-12-01

    The contribution of oxidative stress to ischemic brain damage is well established. Nevertheless, for unknown reasons, several clinically tested antioxidant therapies have failed to show benefits in human stroke. Based on our previous in vitro work, we hypothesized that the neuroprotective potency of antioxidants is related to their ability to limit the release of the excitotoxic amino acids glutamate and aspartate. We explored the effects of two antioxidants, tempol and edaravone, on amino acid release in the brain cortex, in a rat model of transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAo). Amino acid levels were quantified using a microdialysis approach, with the probe positioned in the ischemic penumbra as verified by a laser Doppler technique. Two-hour MCAo triggered a dramatic increase in the levels of glutamate, aspartate, taurine, and alanine. Microdialysate delivery of 10mM tempol reduced the amino acid release by 60-80%, whereas matching levels of edaravone had no effect. In line with these data, an intracerebroventricular injection of tempol but not edaravone (500 nmol each, 15 min before MCAo) reduced infarction volumes by ~50% and improved neurobehavioral outcomes. In vitro assays showed that tempol was superior at removing superoxide anion, whereas edaravone was more potent at scavenging hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, and peroxynitrite. Overall, our data suggest that the neuroprotective properties of tempol are probably related to its ability to reduce tissue levels of the superoxide anion and pathological glutamate release and, in such a way, limit progression of brain infarction within ischemic penumbra. These new findings may be instrumental in developing new antioxidant therapies for treatment of stroke. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayal Lavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level.

  9. A presynaptic role for PKA in synaptic tagging and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Alan Jung; Havekes, Robbert; Choi, Jennifer Hk; Luczak, Vince; Nie, Ting; Huang, Ted; Abel, Ted

    2014-10-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling molecules are spatially restricted within neurons by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Although studies on compartmentalized PKA signaling have focused on postsynaptic mechanisms, presynaptically anchored PKA may contribute to synaptic plasticity and memory because PKA also regulates presynaptic transmitter release. Here, we examine this issue using genetic and pharmacological application of Ht31, a PKA anchoring disrupting peptide. At the hippocampal Schaffer collateral CA3-CA1 synapse, Ht31 treatment elicits a rapid decay of synaptic responses to repetitive stimuli, indicating a fast depletion of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. The interaction between PKA and proteins involved in producing this pool of synaptic vesicles is supported by biochemical assays showing that synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2), Rim1, and SNAP25 are components of a complex that interacts with cAMP. Moreover, acute treatment with Ht31 reduces the levels of SV2. Finally, experiments with transgenic mouse lines, which express Ht31 in excitatory neurons at the Schaffer collateral CA3-CA1 synapse, highlight a requirement for presynaptically anchored PKA in pathway-specific synaptic tagging and long-term contextual fear memory. These results suggest that a presynaptically compartmentalized PKA is critical for synaptic plasticity and memory by regulating the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Glutamate transporters EAAT4 and EAAT5 are expressed in vestibular hair cells and calyx endings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Dalet

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the neurotransmitter released from hair cells. Its clearance from the synaptic cleft can shape neurotransmission and prevent excitotoxicity. This may be particularly important in the inner ear and in other sensory organs where there is a continually high rate of neurotransmitter release. In the case of most cochlear and type II vestibular hair cells, clearance involves the diffusion of glutamate to supporting cells, where it is taken up by EAAT1 (GLAST, a glutamate transporter. A similar mechanism cannot work in vestibular type I hair cells as the presence of calyx endings separates supporting cells from hair-cell synapses. Because of this arrangement, it has been conjectured that a glutamate transporter must be present in the type I hair cell, the calyx ending, or both. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we demonstrate that a glutamate-activated anion current, attributable to a high-affinity glutamate transporter and blocked by DL-TBOA, is expressed in type I, but not in type II hair cells. Molecular investigations reveal that EAAT4 and EAAT5, two glutamate transporters that could underlie the anion current, are expressed in both type I and type II hair cells and in calyx endings. EAAT4 has been thought to be expressed almost exclusively in the cerebellum and EAAT5 in the retina. Our results show that these two transporters have a wider distribution in mice. This is the first demonstration of the presence of transporters in hair cells and provides one of the few examples of EAATs in presynaptic elements.

  11. Glutamate transporters EAAT4 and EAAT5 are expressed in vestibular hair cells and calyx endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalet, Antoine; Bonsacquet, Jérémie; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Calin-Jageman, Irina; Chidavaenzi, Robstein L; Venteo, Stephanie; Desmadryl, Gilles; Goldberg, Jay M; Lysakowski, Anna; Chabbert, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate is the neurotransmitter released from hair cells. Its clearance from the synaptic cleft can shape neurotransmission and prevent excitotoxicity. This may be particularly important in the inner ear and in other sensory organs where there is a continually high rate of neurotransmitter release. In the case of most cochlear and type II vestibular hair cells, clearance involves the diffusion of glutamate to supporting cells, where it is taken up by EAAT1 (GLAST), a glutamate transporter. A similar mechanism cannot work in vestibular type I hair cells as the presence of calyx endings separates supporting cells from hair-cell synapses. Because of this arrangement, it has been conjectured that a glutamate transporter must be present in the type I hair cell, the calyx ending, or both. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we demonstrate that a glutamate-activated anion current, attributable to a high-affinity glutamate transporter and blocked by DL-TBOA, is expressed in type I, but not in type II hair cells. Molecular investigations reveal that EAAT4 and EAAT5, two glutamate transporters that could underlie the anion current, are expressed in both type I and type II hair cells and in calyx endings. EAAT4 has been thought to be expressed almost exclusively in the cerebellum and EAAT5 in the retina. Our results show that these two transporters have a wider distribution in mice. This is the first demonstration of the presence of transporters in hair cells and provides one of the few examples of EAATs in presynaptic elements.

  12. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-07-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction.

  13. Intra-axonal Synthesis of SNAP25 Is Required for the Formation of Presynaptic Terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia F.R. Batista

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Localized protein synthesis is a mechanism for developing axons to react acutely and in a spatially restricted manner to extracellular signals. As such, it is important for many aspects of axonal development, but its role in the formation of presynapses remains poorly understood. We found that the induced assembly of presynaptic terminals required local protein synthesis. Newly synthesized proteins were detectable at nascent presynapses within 15 min of inducing synapse formation in isolated axons. The transcript for the t-SNARE protein SNAP25, which is required for the fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane, was recruited to presynaptic sites and locally translated. Inhibition of intra-axonal SNAP25 synthesis affected the clustering of SNAP25 and other presynaptic proteins and interfered with the release of synaptic vesicles from presynaptic sites. This study reveals a critical role for the axonal synthesis of SNAP25 in the assembly of presynaptic terminals.

  14. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    was also reduced by organic (verapamil) and inorganic (Co++) Ca++ channel blockers but was insensitive to the GABA transport inhibitor SKF 89976A. In contrast, the second phase was less sensitive to nocodazole and Ca++ channel antagonists but could be inhibited by SKF 89976A. The glutamate-induced [3H...

  15. Presynaptic Dopamine D2 Receptors Modulate [3H]GABA Release at StriatoPallidal Terminals via Activation of PLC → IP3 → Calcineurin and Inhibition of AC → cAMP → PKA Signaling Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jijón-Lorenzo, Rafael; Caballero-Florán, Isaac Hiram; Recillas-Morales, Sergio; Cortés, Hernán; Avalos-Fuentes, José Arturo; Paz-Bermúdez, Francisco Javier; Erlij, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2018-02-21

    Striatal dopamine D2 receptors activate the PLC → IP3 → Calcineurin-signaling pathway to modulate the neural excitability of En+ Medium-sized Spiny GABAergic neurons (MSN) through the regulation of L-type Ca 2+ channels. Presynaptic dopaminergic D2 receptors modulate GABA release at striatopallidal terminals through L-type Ca 2+ channels as well, but their signaling pathway is still undetermined. Since D2 receptors are Gi/o-coupled and negatively modulate adenylyl cyclase (AC), we investigated whether presynaptic D2 receptors modulate GABA release through the same signaling cascade that controls excitability in the striatum or by the inhibition of AC and decreased PKA activity. Activation of D2 receptors stimulated formation of [ 3 H]IP 1 and decreased Forskolin-stimulated [ 3 H]cAMP accumulation in synaptosomes from rat Globus Pallidus. D2 receptor activation with Quinpirole in the presence of L 745,870 decreased, in a dose-dependent manner, K + -induced [ 3 H]GABA release in pallidal slices. The effect was prevented by the pharmacological blockade of Gi/o βγ subunit effects with Gallein, PLC with U 73122, IP3 receptor activation with 4-APB, Calcineurin with FK506. In addition, when release was stimulated with Forskolin to activate AC, D2 receptors also decreased K + -induced [ 3 H]GABA release, an effect occluded with the effect of the blockade of PKA with H89 or stimulation of release with the cAMP analog 8-Br-cAMP. These data indicate that D2 receptors modulate [ 3 H]GABA release at striatopallidal terminals by activating the PLC → IP3 → Calcineurin-signaling cascade, the same one that modulates excitability in soma. Additionally, D2 receptors inhibit release when AC is active. Both mechanisms appear to converge to regulate the activity of presynaptic L-type Ca 2+ channels. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid glucocorticoid-induced activation of TRP and CB1 receptors causes biphasic modulation of glutamate release in gastric-related hypothalamic preautonomic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carie R. Boychuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids rapidly regulate synaptic input to neuroendocrine cells in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN by inducing the retrograde release of endogenous messengers. Here we investigated the rapid effects of dexamethasone (DEX on excitatory synaptic input to feeding-related, preautonomic PVN neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. In ~50% of identified gastric-related preautonomic PVN neurons, DEX elicited a biphasic synaptic response characterized by an initial rapid and transient increase in the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs, followed by a decrease in mEPSC frequency within 9 min; remaining cells displayed only a decrease in mEPSC frequency. The late-phase decrease in mEPSC frequency was mimicked by the cannabinoid receptor agonists anandamide and WIN 55,212-2, and it was blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251. The biphasic DEX effect was mimicked by anandamide (AEA. The early increase in mEPSCs was mimicked by activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 receptors with capsaicin and by activation of TRPV4 receptors with 4-α-PDD. The increase was reduced, but not blocked, by selective TRPV1 antagonists and in TRPV1-knockout mice; it was blocked completely by the broad-spectrum TRPV antagonist ruthenium red and by combined application of selective TRPV1 and TRPV4 antagonists. The DEX effects were prevented entirely by intracellular infusion of the G-protein inhibitor, GDPβS. Thus, DEX biphasically modulates synaptic glutamate onto a subset of gastric-related PVN neurons, which is likely mediated by induction of a retrograde messenger. The effect includes a TRPV1/4 receptor-mediated transient increase and subsequent CB1 receptor-mediated suppression of glutamate release. Multiphasic modulation of glutamate input to PVN neurons represents a previously unappreciated complexity of control of autonomic output by glucocorticoids and eCBs.

  17. PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE MODULATION BY STIMULANT SELF ADMINISTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is an essential participant in the initiation and modulation of various forms of goal-directed behavior, including drug reinforcement and addiction processes. Dopamine neurotransmission is increased by acute administration of all drugs of abuse, including the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Chronic exposure to these drugs via voluntary self-administration provides a model of stimulant abuse that is useful in evaluating potential behavioral and neurochemical adaptations that occur during addiction. This review describes commonly used methodologies to measure dopamine and baseline parameters of presynaptic dopamine regulation, including exocytotic release and reuptake through the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as dramatic adaptations in dopamine neurotransmission and drug sensitivity that occur with acute non-contingent and chronic, contingent self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine. PMID:23277050

  18. Blood glutamate scavenging: Insight into neuro protection

    OpenAIRE

    Leibowitz, A; Boyko, M; Shapira, Y; Zlotnik, A

    2012-01-01

    Brain insults are characterized by a multitude of complex processes, of which glutamate release plays a major role. Deleterious excess of glutamate in the brain's extracellular fluids stimulates glutamate receptors, which in turn lead to cell swelling, apoptosis, and neuronal death. These exacerbate neurological outcome. Approaches aimed at antagonizing the astrocytic and glial glutamate receptors have failed to demonstrate clinical benefit. Alternatively, eliminating excess glutamate from br...

  19. Blood Glutamate Scavenging: Insight into Neuroprotection

    OpenAIRE

    Leibowitz, Akiva; Boyko, Matthew; Shapira, Yoram; Zlotnik, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Brain insults are characterized by a multitude of complex processes, of which glutamate release plays a major role. Deleterious excess of glutamate in the brain’s extracellular fluids stimulates glutamate receptors, which in turn lead to cell swelling, apoptosis, and neuronal death. These exacerbate neurological outcome. Approaches aimed at antagonizing the astrocytic and glial glutamate receptors have failed to demonstrate clinical benefit. Alternatively, eliminating excess glutamate from br...

  20. Tetrodotoxin effects in the stimulated acetylcholine release by agonist of glutamate in mice striatum tissue; Efeito da tetrodotoxina na liberacao de acetilcolina estimulada por agonistas glutamatergicos em tecido estriatal de ratos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda; Camillo, Maria A.P.; Rogero, Jose Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Biologia Molecular; Troncone, Lanfranco R.P. [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Farmacologia

    2002-07-01

    The toxins of animal venoms have been used as important tools for biochemical studies of physiological and pathological processes of diverse systems. In this work we used the action of tetrodotoxin on sodium channels to map the localization of glutamate receptors in cholinergic neurons from striatum tissue of rats. All glutamate receptors are exciting, so they promote the release of other neurotransmitters. In this work we focus on acetylcholine. The localization of glutamate receptor, on the soma or on the excitatory terminal, may contribute for a better understanding of its function. For this work we applied the in vitro method of tritiated neurotransmitter release. The agonists of glutamate receptors chosen were glutamic acid 500{mu}M, NMDA 100{mu}M, kainic acid 300{mu}M, quisqualic acid 300{mu}M and AMPA 1mM. In the first part of the assay the basal and stimulated releases were measured and in the second, the same protocol was performed in the presence of tetrodotoxin 1{mu}M. The reductions observed in basal and stimulated release in the presence of tetrodotoxin suggested that the receptors type AMPA and NMDA were located in soma of cholinergic cell preferentially and the other ones presented a more equilibrate distribution among the axons and the soma. (author)

  1. 3H-D-aspartate release from cerebellar granule neurons is differentially regulated by glutamate- and K(+)-stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Rehder, V; Hansen, Gert Helge

    1992-01-01

    transmitter release was dependent on an intact cytoskeleton or not, the colchicine-like drug Nocodazole, which also blocks transport of vesicles, was used. K(+)-stimulated transmitter release consisted for the major part (around 70%) of a Ca(2+)-dependent, Nocodazole sensitive release component and this K...

  2. Glutamate acts as a neurotransmitter for gastrin releasing peptide-sensitive and insensitive itch-related synaptic transmission in mammalian spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Jennifer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Itch sensation is one of the major sensory experiences of human and animals. Recent studies have proposed that gastrin releasing peptide (GRP is a key neurotransmitter for itch in spinal cord. However, no direct evidence is available to indicate that GRP actually mediate responses between primary afferent fibers and dorsal horn neurons. Here we performed integrative neurobiological experiments to test this question. We found that a small population of rat dorsal horn neurons responded to GRP application with increases in calcium signaling. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed that a part of superficial dorsal horn neurons responded to GRP application with the increase of action potential firing in adult rats and mice, and these dorsal horn neurons received exclusively primary afferent C-fiber inputs. On the other hands, few Aδ inputs receiving cells were found to be GRP positive. Finally, we found that evoked sensory responses between primary afferent C fibers and GRP positive superficial dorsal horn neurons are mediated by glutamate but not GRP. CNQX, a blocker of AMPA and kainate (KA receptors, completely inhibited evoked EPSCs, including in those Fos-GFP positive dorsal horn cells activated by itching. Our findings provide the direct evidence that glutamate is the principal excitatory transmitter between C fibers and GRP positive dorsal horn neurons. Our results will help to understand the neuronal mechanism of itch and aid future treatment for patients with pruritic disease.

  3. Coupling of exocytosis and endocytosis at the presynaptic active zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritzen, Tanja; Haucke, Volker

    2018-02-01

    Brain function depends on the ability of neurons to communicate with each other via the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitter-containing synaptic vesicles (SVs) at specialized presynaptic release sites termed active zones (AZs). The presynaptic AZ comprises an assembly of large multidomain proteins that link the machinery for vesicle fusion to sites of voltage-dependent Ca 2+ entry. Following SV fusion at AZ release sites SV membranes are retrieved by compensatory endocytosis, and SVs are reformed. Recent data suggest that Ca 2+ -triggered SV exocytosis at AZs and endocytic retrieval of SVs may be functionally and physically linked. Here we discuss the evidence supporting such exo-endocytic coupling as well as possible modes and mechanisms that may underlie coupling of exocytosis and endocytosis at and around AZs in presynaptic nerve terminals. As components of the exo-endocytic machinery at synapses have been linked to neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, understanding the mechanisms that couple exocytosis and endocytosis at AZs may be of importance for developing novel therapies to treat these diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  4. DYSFUNCTIONAL PRESYNAPTIC ALPHA-2-ADRENOCEPTORS EXPOSE FACILITATORY BETA-2-ADRENOCEPTORS IN THE VASCULATURE OF SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    REMIE, R; VANROSSUM, JXM; COPPES, RP; ZAAGSMA, J

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies on spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) have yielded inconsistent information about functional aberrations of the presynaptic alpha(2)- and beta(2)-adrenoceptor-mediated modulation of sympathetic neurotransmitter release. In the present investigation we studied the capacity of

  5. MAM-2201, a synthetic cannabinoid drug of abuse, suppresses the synaptic input to cerebellar Purkinje cells via activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Tomohiko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Usami, Makoto; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Goda, Yukihiro; Sekino, Yuko

    2015-08-01

    Herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids-initially sold as legal alternatives to marijuana-have become major drugs of abuse. Among the synthetic cannabinoids, [1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](4-methyl-1-naphthalenyl)-methanone (MAM-2201) has been recently detected in herbal products and has psychoactive and intoxicating effects in humans, suggesting that MAM-2201 alters brain function. Nevertheless, the pharmacological actions of MAM-2201 on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and neuronal functions have not been elucidated. We found that MAM-2201 acted as an agonist of human CB1Rs expressed in AtT-20 cells. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings made from Purkinje cells (PCs) in slice preparations of the mouse cerebellum, we also found that MAM-2201 inhibited glutamate release at parallel fiber-PC synapses via activation of presynaptic CB1Rs. MAM-2201 inhibited neurotransmitter release with an inhibitory concentration 50% of 0.36 μM. MAM-2201 caused greater inhibition of neurotransmitter release than Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol within the range of 0.1-30 μM and JWH-018, one of the most popular and potent synthetic cannabinoids detected in the herbal products, within the range of 0.03-3 μM. MAM-2201 caused a concentration-dependent suppression of GABA release onto PCs. Furthermore, MAM-2201 induced suppression of glutamate release at climbing fiber-PC synapses, leading to reduced dendritic Ca(2+) transients in PCs. These results suggest that MAM-2201 is likely to suppress neurotransmitter release at CB1R-expressing synapses in humans. The reduction of neurotransmitter release from CB1R-containing synapses could contribute to some of the symptoms of synthetic cannabinoid intoxication including impairments in cerebellum-dependent motor coordination and motor learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Presynaptic G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Gatekeepers of Addiction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari A Johnson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse and addiction cause widespread social and public health problems, and the neurobiology underlying drug actions and drug use and abuse is an area of intensive research. Drugs of abuse alter synaptic transmission, and these actions contribute to acute intoxication as well as the chronic effects of abused substances. Transmission at most mammalian synapses involves neurotransmitter activation of two receptor subtypes, ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast synaptic responses, and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs that have slower neuromodulatory actions. The GPCRs represent a large proportion of neurotransmitter receptors involved in almost all facets of nervous system function. In addition, these receptors are targets for many pharmacotherapeutic agents. Drugs of abuse directly or indirectly affect neuromodulation mediated by GPCRs, with important consequences for intoxication, drug taking and responses to prolonged drug exposure, withdrawal and addiction. Among the GPCRs are several subtypes involved in presynaptic inhibition, most of which are coupled to the Gi/o class of G protein. There is increasing evidence that these presynaptic Gi/o-coupled GPCRs have important roles in the actions of drugs of abuse, as well as behaviors related to these drugs. This topic will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on receptors for three neurotransmitters, dopamine (D1- and D2-like receptors, endocannabinoids (CB1 receptors and glutamate (group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu receptors. The focus is on recent evidence from laboratory animal models (and some evidence in humans implicating these receptors in the acute and chronic effects of numerous abused drugs, as well as in the control of drug seeking and taking. The ability of drugs targeting these receptors to modify drug seeking behavior has raised the possibility of using compounds targeting these receptors for addiction pharmacotherapy. This topic is also discussed, with emphasis on

  7. Mechanistic study of competitive releases of H2O, NH3 and CO2 from deprotonated aspartic and glutamic acids: Role of conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier Saint Hilaire, Pierre; Warnet, Anna; Gimbert, Yves; Hohenester, Ulli Martin; Giorgi, Gianluca; Olivier, Marie-Françoise; Fenaille, François; Colsch, Benoît; Junot, Christophe; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2017-03-15

    The aims of this study were to highlight the impact of minor structural differences (e.g. an aminoacid side chain enlargement by one methylene group), on ion dissociation under collision-induced dissociation conditions, and to determine the underlying chemical mechanisms. Therefore, we compared fragmentations of deprotonated aspartic and glutamic acids generated in negative electrospray ionization. Energy-resolved mass spectrometry breakdown curves were recorded and MS 3 experiments performed on an Orbitrap Fusion for high-resolution and high-mass accuracy measurements. Activated fragmentations were performed using both the resonant and non-resonant excitation modes (i.e., CID and HCD, respectively) in order to get complementary information on the competitive and consecutive dissociative pathways. These experiments showed a specific loss of ammonia from the activated aspartate but not from the activated glutamate. We mainly focused on this specific observed loss from aspartate. Two different mechanisms based on intramolecular reactions (similar to those occurring in organic chemistry) were proposed, such as intramolecular elimination (i.e. Ei-like) and nucleophilic substitution (i.e. SNi-like) reactions, respectively, yielding anions as fumarate and α lactone from a particular conformation with the lowest steric hindrance (i.e. with antiperiplanar carboxyl groups). The detected deaminated aspartate anion can then release CO 2 as observed in the MS 3 experimental spectra. However, quantum calculations did not indicate the formation of such a deaminated aspartate product ion without loss of carbon dioxide. Actually, calculations displayed the double neutral (NH 3 +CO 2 ) loss as a concomitant pathway (from a particular conformation) with relative high activation energy instead of a consecutive process. This disagreement is apparent since the concomitant pathway may be changed into consecutive dissociations according to the collision energy i.e., at higher collision

  8. Effects of propofol and pentobarbital on calcium concentration in presynaptic boutons on a rat hippocampal neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shinichi; Sugiyama, Hitomi; Kitahara, Seiko; Ikemoto, Yoshimi; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2011-10-01

    Numerous reports suggest that intravenously administered (IV) anesthetics affect postsynaptic events in the central nervous system. However, there is little evidence about how general anesthetics influence the presynaptic processes. The level of presynaptic calcium (Ca(2+)) concentration ([Ca(2+)](pre)) regulates neurotransmitter release. In this study, we investigated the effects of anesthetic propofol IV and the barbiturate pentobarbital on neurotransmitter release by measuring [Ca(2+)](pre) in the presynaptic nerve terminals (boutons) on a dissociated single hippocampal rat neuron. Sprague-Dawley rats 10-14 days old were decapitated under pentobarbital anesthesia, and brain slices were prepared. The hippocampal CA1 area was touched with a fire-polished glass pipette, which vibrated horizontally, and neurons were dissociated, along with the attached presynaptic boutons. The presynaptic boutons were visualized under a confocal laser-scanning microscope after staining with FM1-43 dye, and [Ca(2+)](pre) was measured with acetoxymethyl ester of fluo-3 (fluo-3 AM). High potassium (K(+)) (15-90 mM) increased the [Ca(2+)](pre) in the Ca(2+)-containing solution in a concentration-dependent manner. Whereas propofol (10 μM) and pentobarbital (300 μM) suppressed the high K(+) (60 mM)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](pre) in the boutons attached to the dendrite, they did not affect [Ca(2+)](pre) in the boutons attached to the soma or dendrite base. As a large majority of excitatory synapses are located on dendritic spines, these agents may affect Ca(2+) mobilization in the excitatory presynaptic boutons. Propofol and pentobarbital may affect neurotransmitter release from the excitatory presynaptic nerve terminals due to inhibition of increase in [Ca(2+)](pre).

  9. RIM determines Ca2+ channel density and vesicle docking at the presynaptic active zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yunyun; Kaeser, Pascal S.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    At presynaptic active zones, neurotransmitter release is initiated by the opening of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels close to docked vesicles. The mechanisms that enrich Ca2+ channels at active zones are, however, largely unknown, possibly because of the limited presynaptic accessibility of most synapses. Here, we have established a Cre-lox based conditional knock-out approach at a presynaptically accessible CNS synapse, the calyx of Held, to directly study the functions of RIM proteins. Removal of all RIM1/2 isoforms strongly reduced the presynaptic Ca2+ channel density, revealing a new role of RIM proteins in Ca2+ channel targeting. Removal of RIMs also reduced the readily-releasable pool, paralleled by a similar reduction of the number of docked vesicles, and the Ca2+ channel - vesicle coupling was decreased. Thus, RIM proteins co-ordinately regulate key functions for fast transmitter release: enabling a high presynaptic Ca2+ channel density, and vesicle docking at the active zone. PMID:21262468

  10. Presynaptic Active Zone Density during Development and Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Gwenaëlle L; Chen, Jie; Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Neural circuits transmit information through synapses, and the efficiency of synaptic transmission is closely related to the density of presynaptic active zones, where synaptic vesicles are released. The goal of this review is to highlight recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the number of active zones per presynaptic terminal (active zone density) during developmental and stimulus-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy. At the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), the active zone density is preserved across species, remains constant during development, and is the same between synapses with different activities. However, the NMJ active zones are not always stable, as exemplified by the change in active zone density during acute experimental manipulation or as a result of aging. Therefore, a mechanism must exist to maintain its density. In the central nervous system (CNS), active zones have restricted maximal size, exist in multiple numbers in larger presynaptic terminals, and maintain a constant density during development. These findings suggest that active zone density in the CNS is also controlled. However, in contrast to the NMJ, active zone density in the CNS can also be increased, as observed in hippocampal synapses in response to synaptic plasticity. Although the numbers of known active zone proteins and protein interactions have increased, less is known about the mechanism that controls the number or spacing of active zones. The following molecules are known to control active zone density and will be discussed herein: extracellular matrix laminins and voltage-dependent calcium channels, amyloid precursor proteins, the small GTPase Rab3, an endocytosis mechanism including synaptojanin, cytoskeleton protein spectrins and β-adducin, and a presynaptic web including spectrins. The molecular mechanisms that organize the active zone density are just beginning to be elucidated.

  11. Presynaptic active zone density during development and synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenaëlle L Clarke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits transmit information through synapses, and the efficiency of synaptic transmission is closely related to the density of presynaptic active zones, where synaptic vesicles are released. The goal of this review is to highlight recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the number of active zones per presynaptic terminal (active zone density during developmental and stimulus-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy. At the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs, the active zone density is preserved across species, remains constant during development, and is the same between synapses with different activities. However, the NMJ active zones are not always stable, as exemplified by the change in active zone density during acute experimental manipulation or as a result of aging. Therefore, a mechanism must exist to maintain its density. In the central nervous system (CNS, active zones have restricted maximal size, exist in multiple numbers in larger presynaptic terminals, and maintain a constant density during development. These findings suggest that active zone density in the CNS is also controlled. However, in contrast to the NMJ, active zone density in the CNS can also be increased, as observed in hippocampal synapses in response to synaptic plasticity. Although the numbers of known active zone proteins and protein interactions have increased, less is known about the mechanism that controls the number or spacing of active zones. The following molecules are known to control active zone density and will be discussed herein: extracellular matrix laminins and voltage-dependent calcium channels, amyloid precursor proteins, the small GTPase Rab3, an endocytosis mechanism including synaptojanin, cytoskeleton protein spectrins and β-adducin, and a presynaptic web including spectrins. The molecular mechanisms that organize the active zone density are just beginning to be elucidated.

  12. Deficits in the activity of presynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptors contribute to altered neuronal excitability in fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji-Yong; Chadchankar, Jayashree; Vien, Thuy N; Mighdoll, Michelle I; Hyde, Thomas M; Mather, Robert J; Deeb, Tarek Z; Pangalos, Menelas N; Brandon, Nicholas J; Dunlop, John; Moss, Stephen J

    2017-04-21

    The behavioral and anatomical deficits seen in fragile X syndrome (FXS) are widely believed to result from imbalances in the relative strengths of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Although modified neuronal excitability is thought to be of significance, the contribution that alterations in GABAergic inhibition play in the pathophysiology of FXS are ill defined. Slow sustained neuronal inhibition is mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA B ) receptors, which are heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors constructed from R1a and R2 or R1b and R2 subunits. Via the activation of G i/o , they limit cAMP accumulation, diminish neurotransmitter release, and induce neuronal hyperpolarization. Here we reveal that selective deficits in R1a subunit expression are seen in Fmr1 knock-out mice (KO) mice, a widely used animal model of FXS, but the levels of the respective mRNAs were unaffected. Similar trends of R1a expression were seen in a subset of FXS patients. GABA B receptors (GABA B Rs) exert powerful pre- and postsynaptic inhibitory effects on neurotransmission. R1a-containing GABA B Rs are believed to mediate presynaptic inhibition in principal neurons. In accordance with this result, deficits in the ability of GABA B Rs to suppress glutamate release were seen in Fmr1-KO mice. In contrast, the ability of GABA B Rs to suppress GABA release and induce postsynaptic hyperpolarization was unaffected. Significantly, this deficit contributes to the pathophysiology of FXS as the GABA B R agonist ( R )-baclofen rescued the imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission evident in Fmr1-KO mice. Collectively, our results provided evidence that selective deficits in the activity of presynaptic GABA B Rs contribute to the pathophysiology of FXS. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. APP Homodimers Transduce an Amyloid-β-Mediated Increase in Release Probability at Excitatory Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilla Fogel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ, the proteolytic products of the amyloid precursor protein (APP, induces a variety of synaptic dysfunctions ranging from hyperactivity to depression that are thought to cause cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease. While depression of synaptic transmission has been extensively studied, the mechanisms underlying synaptic hyperactivity remain unknown. Here, we show that Aβ40 monomers and dimers augment release probability through local fine-tuning of APP-APP interactions at excitatory hippocampal boutons. Aβ40 binds to the APP, increases the APP homodimer fraction at the plasma membrane, and promotes APP-APP interactions. The APP activation induces structural rearrangements in the APP/Gi/o-protein complex, boosting presynaptic calcium flux and vesicle release. The APP growth-factor-like domain (GFLD mediates APP-APP conformational changes and presynaptic enhancement. Thus, the APP homodimer constitutes a presynaptic receptor that transduces signal from Aβ40 to glutamate release. Excessive APP activation may initiate a positive feedback loop, contributing to hippocampal hyperactivity in Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. The glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2006-01-01

    or GABA from neurons and subsequent uptake into astrocytes. In return, astrocytes release glutamine to be taken up into neurons for use as neurotransmitter precursor. In this review, the basic properties of the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle will be discussed, including aspects of transport and metabolism...... of intercellular transfer of ammonia produced in neurons (when glutamine is deamidated to glutamate) and utilized in astrocytes (for amidation of glutamate) when the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle is operating. A main objective of this review is to endorse the view that the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle must...

  15. Neonatal Nicotine Exposure Increases Excitatory Synaptic Transmission and Attenuates Nicotine-stimulated GABA release in the Adult Rat Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damborsky, Joanne C.; Griffith, William H.; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental exposure to nicotine has been linked to long-lasting changes in synaptic transmission which may contribute to behavioral abnormalities seen in offspring of women who smoke during pregnancy. Here, we examined the long-lasting effects of developmental nicotine exposure on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission, and on acute nicotine-induced glutamate and GABA release in the adult hippocampus, a structure important in cognitive and emotional behaviors. We utilized a chronic neonatal nicotine treatment model to administer nicotine (6 mg/kg/day) to rat pups from postnatal day (P) 1–7, a period that falls developmentally into the third human trimester. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices, we measured excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents in neonatally control- and nicotine-treated young adult males. Neonatal nicotine exposure significantly increased AMPA receptor-mediated spontaneous and evoked excitatory signaling, with no change in glutamate release probability in adults. Conversely, there was no increase in spontaneous GABAergic neurotransmission in nicotine-males. Chronic neonatal nicotine treatment had no effect on acute nicotine-stimulated glutamate release in adults, but acute nicotine-stimulated GABA release was significantly attenuated. Thus, neonatal nicotine exposure results in a persistent net increase in excitation and a concurrent loss of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated regulation of presynaptic GABA but not glutamate release, which would exacerbate excitation following endogenous or exogenous nAChR activation. Our data underscore an important role for nAChRs in hippocampal excitatory synapse development, and suggest selective long-term changes at specific presynaptic nAChRs which together could explain some of the behavioral abnormalities associated with maternal smoking. PMID:24950455

  16. pH modulation of glial glutamate transporters regulates synaptic transmission in the nucleus of the solitary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrimmon, Donald R.; Martina, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is the major site for termination of visceral sensory afferents contributing to homeostatic regulation of, for example, arterial pressure, gastric motility, and breathing. Whereas much is known about how different neuronal populations influence these functions, information about the role of glia remains scant. In this article, we propose that glia may contribute to NTS functions by modulating excitatory neurotransmission. We found that acidification (pH 7.0) depolarizes NTS glia by inhibiting K+-selective membrane currents. NTS glia also showed functional expression of voltage-sensitive glutamate transporters, suggesting that extracellular acidification regulates synaptic transmission by compromising glial glutamate uptake. To test this hypothesis, we evoked glutamatergic slow excitatory potentials (SEPs) in NTS neurons with repetitive stimulation (20 pulses at 10 Hz) of the solitary tract. This SEP depends on accumulation of glutamate following repetitive stimulation, since it was potentiated by blocking glutamate uptake with dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) or a glia-specific glutamate transport blocker, dihydrokainate (DHK). Importantly, extracellular acidification (pH 7.0) also potentiated the SEP. This effect appeared to be mediated through a depolarization-induced inhibition of glial transporter activity, because it was occluded by TBOA and DHK. In agreement, pH 7.0 did not directly alter d-aspartate-induced responses in NTS glia or properties of presynaptic glutamate release. Thus acidification-dependent regulation of glial function affects synaptic transmission within the NTS. These results suggest that glia play a modulatory role in the NTS by integrating local tissue signals (such as pH) with synaptic inputs from peripheral afferents. PMID:23615553

  17. Degeneracy in the regulation of short-term plasticity and synaptic filtering by presynaptic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukunda, Chinmayee L; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2017-04-15

    We develop a new biophysically rooted, physiologically constrained conductance-based synaptic model to mechanistically account for short-term facilitation and depression, respectively through residual calcium and transmitter depletion kinetics. We address the specific question of how presynaptic components (including voltage-gated ion channels, pumps, buffers and release-handling mechanisms) and interactions among them define synaptic filtering and short-term plasticity profiles. Employing global sensitivity analyses (GSAs), we show that near-identical synaptic filters and short-term plasticity profiles could emerge from disparate presynaptic parametric combinations with weak pairwise correlations. Using virtual knockout models, a technique to address the question of channel-specific contributions within the GSA framework, we unveil the differential and variable impact of each ion channel on synaptic physiology. Our conclusions strengthen the argument that parametric and interactional complexity in biological systems should not be viewed from the limited curse-of-dimensionality standpoint, but from the evolutionarily advantageous perspective of providing functional robustness through degeneracy. Information processing in neurons is known to emerge as a gestalt of pre- and post-synaptic filtering. However, the impact of presynaptic mechanisms on synaptic filters has not been quantitatively assessed. Here, we developed a biophysically rooted, conductance-based model synapse that was endowed with six different voltage-gated ion channels, calcium pumps, calcium buffer and neurotransmitter-replenishment mechanisms in the presynaptic terminal. We tuned our model to match the short-term plasticity profile and band-pass structure of Schaffer collateral synapses, and performed sensitivity analyses to demonstrate that presynaptic voltage-gated ion channels regulated synaptic filters through changes in excitability and associated calcium influx. These sensitivity analyses

  18. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could......Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX......)-sensitive fast Na(+) spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers...

  19. Closing the gap: long-term presynaptic plasticity in brain function and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monday, Hannah R; Castillo, Pablo E

    2017-08-01

    Synaptic plasticity is critical for experience-dependent adjustments of brain function. While most research has focused on the mechanisms that underlie postsynaptic forms of plasticity, comparatively little is known about how neurotransmitter release is altered in a long-term manner. Emerging research suggests that many of the features of canonical 'postsynaptic' plasticity, such as associativity, structural changes and bidirectionality, also characterize long-term presynaptic plasticity. Recent studies demonstrate that presynaptic plasticity is a potent regulator of circuit output and function. Moreover, aberrant presynaptic plasticity is a convergent factor of synaptopathies like schizophrenia, addiction, and Autism Spectrum Disorders, and may be a potential target for treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of the Wnt receptor Frizzled-1 in presynaptic differentiation and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez Alejandra R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wnt signaling pathway regulates several fundamental developmental processes and recently has been shown to be involved in different aspects of synaptic differentiation and plasticity. Some Wnt signaling components are localized at central synapses, and it is thus possible that this pathway could be activated at the synapse. Results We examined the distribution of the Wnt receptor Frizzled-1 in cultured hippocampal neurons and determined that this receptor is located at synaptic contacts co-localizing with presynaptic proteins. Frizzled-1 was found in functional synapses detected with FM1-43 staining and in synaptic terminals from adult rat brain. Interestingly, overexpression of Frizzled-1 increased the number of clusters of Bassoon, a component of the active zone, while treatment with the extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD of Frizzled-1 decreased Bassoon clustering, suggesting a role for this receptor in presynaptic differentiation. Consistent with this, treatment with the Frizzled-1 ligand Wnt-3a induced presynaptic protein clustering and increased functional presynaptic recycling sites, and these effects were prevented by co-treatment with the CRD of Frizzled-1. Moreover, in synaptically mature neurons Wnt-3a was able to modulate the kinetics of neurotransmitter release. Conclusion Our results indicate that the activation of the Wnt pathway through Frizzled-1 occurs at the presynaptic level, and suggest that the synaptic effects of the Wnt signaling pathway could be modulated by local activation through synaptic Frizzled receptors.

  1. Glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Geballe, Matthew T; Snyder, James P

    2006-01-01

    Fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS relies almost entirely on the neurotransmitter glutamate and its family of ion channel receptors. An appreciation of the coupling between agonist binding and channel opening has advanced rapidly during the past five years, largely as a result of ne...

  2. Exocytosis: using amperometry to study presynaptic mechanisms of neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.

    2004-01-01

    The development of carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry enabled detailed investigation of the presynaptic response at the single cell level with single vesicle resolution. Consequently, amperometry allowed for detailed studies into the presynaptic mechanisms underlying neurotoxicity. This review

  3. Multivesicular release underlies short term synaptic potentiation independent of release probability change in the supraoptic nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle E Quinlan

    Full Text Available Magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus receive glutamatergic excitatory inputs that regulate the firing activity and hormone release from these neurons. A strong, brief activation of these excitatory inputs induces a lingering barrage of tetrodotoxin-resistant miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs that lasts for tens of minutes. This is known to accompany an immediate increase in large amplitude mEPSCs. However, it remains unknown how long this amplitude increase can last and whether it is simply a byproduct of greater release probability. Using in vitro patch clamp recording on acute rat brain slices, we found that a brief, high frequency stimulation (HFS of afferents induced a potentiation of mEPSC amplitude lasting up to 20 min. This amplitude potentiation did not correlate with changes in mEPSC frequency, suggesting that it does not reflect changes in presynaptic release probability. Nonetheless, neither postsynaptic calcium chelator nor the NMDA receptor antagonist blocked the potentiation. Together with the known calcium dependency of HFS-induced potentiation of mEPSCs, our results imply that mEPSC amplitude increase requires presynaptic calcium. Further analysis showed multimodal distribution of mEPSC amplitude, suggesting that large mEPSCs were due to multivesicular glutamate release, even at late post-HFS when the frequency is no longer elevated. In conclusion, high frequency activation of excitatory synapses induces lasting multivesicular release in the SON, which is independent of changes in release probability. This represents a novel form of synaptic plasticity that may contribute to prolonged excitatory tone necessary for generation of burst firing of magnocellular neurons.

  4. Transient inactivation of the ventral hippocampus in neonatal rats impairs the mesolimbic regulation of prefrontal glutamate release in adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortz, D M; Jørgensen, Christinna Vangsgaard; Mikkelsen, J D

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in schizophrenia (SZ) reflect maturational disruptions within a neural system that includes the ventral hippocampus (VH), nucleus accumbens (NAc), basal forebrain, and prefrontal cortex (PFC). A better understanding of these changes may reveal drug targets for more efficacious...... male Wistar rats that had received saline (Sal) or tetrodotoxin (TTX) as neonates (PD7) or as adolescents (PD32). The nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh) was activated by NMDA infusions (0.05-0.30 μg/0.5 μL). Basal and evoked glutamate levels were measured amperometrically using a glutamate...

  5. Effects of presynaptic mutations on a postsynaptic Cacna1s calcium channel colocalized with mGluR6 at mouse photoreceptor ribbon synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Dana; Wu, Shu-Biao; Turner, Paul; Dearden, Peter; Koentgen, Frank; Wolfrum, Uwe; Maw, Marion; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut; tom Dieck, Susanne

    2009-02-01

    Photoreceptor ribbon synapses translate light-dependent changes of membrane potential into graded transmitter release via L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) activity. Functional abnormalities (e.g., a reduced electroretinogram b-wave), arising from mutations of presynaptic proteins, such as Bassoon and the VDCCalpha1 subunit Cacna1f, have been shown to altered transmitter release. L-type VDCCalpha1 subtype expression in wild-type and mutant mice was examined, to investigate the underlying pathologic mechanism. Two antisera against Cacna1f, and a Cacna1f mouse mutant (Cacna1fDeltaEx14-17) were generated. Immunocytochemistry for L-type VDCCalpha1 subunits and additional synaptic marker proteins was performed in wild-type, BassoonDeltaEx4-5 and Cacna1fDeltaEx14-17 mice. Active zone staining at photoreceptor ribbon synapses with a panalpha1 antibody colocalized with staining for Cacna1f in wild-type mouse retina. Similarly, in the BassoonDeltaEx4-5 mouse, residual mislocalized staining for panalpha1 and Cacna1f showed colocalization. Unlike the presynaptic location of Cacna1f and panalpha1 antibody staining, the skeletal muscle VDCCalpha1 subunit Cacna1s was present postsynaptically at ON-bipolar cell dendrites, where it colocalized with metabotropic glutamate receptor 6 (mGluR6). Surprisingly, Cacna1s labeling was severely downregulated in the BassoonDeltaEx4-5 and Cacna1fDeltaEx14-17 mutants. Subsequent analyses revealed severely reduced ON-bipolar cell dendritic expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase Serca2 in both mouse mutants and of mGluR6 in the Cacna1fDeltaEx14-17 mutant. Presynaptic mutations leading to reduced photoreceptor-to-bipolar cell signaling are associated with disturbances in protein expression within postsynaptic dendrites. Moreover, detection of Cacna1s and Serca2 in ON-bipolar cell dendrites in wild-type animals suggests a putative role in regulation of postsynaptic Ca(2+) flux.

  6. Axonal and presynaptic RNAs are locally transcribed in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Chun, Jong Tai; Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Crispino, Marianna

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, the long-standing opinion that axonal and presynaptic proteins are exclusively derived from the neuron cell body has been substantially modified by the demonstration that active systems of protein synthesis are present in axons and nerve terminals. These observations have raised the issue of the cellular origin of the involved RNAs, which has been generally attributed to the neuron soma. However, data gathered in a number of model systems indicated that axonal RNAs are synthesized in the surrounding glial cells. More recent experiments on the perfused squid giant axon have definitively proved that axoplasmic RNAs are transcribed in periaxonal glia. Their delivery to the axon occurs by a modulatory mechanism based on the release of neurotransmitters from the stimulated axon and on their binding to glial receptors. In additional experiments on squid optic lobe synaptosomes, presynaptic RNA has been also shown to be synthesized locally, presumably in nearby glia. Together with a wealth of literature data, these observations indicate that axons and nerve terminals are endowed with a local system of gene expression that supports the maintenance and plasticity of these neuronal domains.

  7. SNAP-25, a known presynaptic protein with emerging postsynaptic functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia eAntonucci

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of synaptic specializations is their dependence on highly organized complexes of proteins that interact with each other. The loss or modification of key synaptic proteins directly affects the properties of such networks, ultimately impacting synaptic function. SNAP-25 is a component of the SNARE complex, which is central to synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and, by directly interacting with different calcium channels subunits, it negatively modulates neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels, thus regulating intracellular calcium dynamics. The SNAP-25 gene has been associated with distinct brain diseases, including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, indicating that the protein may act as a shared biological substrate among different synaptopathies. The mechanisms by which alterations in SNAP-25 may concur to these psychiatric diseases are still undefined, although alterations in neurotransmitter release have been indicated as potential causative processes. This review summarizes recent work showing that SNAP-25 not only controls exo/endocytic processes at the presynaptic terminal, but also regulates postsynaptic receptor trafficking, spine morphogenesis and plasticity, thus opening the possibility that SNAP-25 defects may contribute to psychiatric diseases by impacting not only presynaptic but also postsynaptic functions.

  8. High glucose increases action potential firing of catecholamine neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract by increasing spontaneous glutamate inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brandon L; Zhu, Mingyan; Zhao, Huan; Dillon, Crystal; Appleyard, Suzanne M

    2017-09-01

    Glucose is a crucial substrate essential for cell survival and function. Changes in glucose levels impact neuronal activity and glucose deprivation increases feeding. Several brain regions have been shown to respond to glucoprivation, including the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in the brain stem. The NTS is the primary site in the brain that receives visceral afferent information from the gastrointestinal tract. The catecholaminergic (CA) subpopulation within the NTS modulates many homeostatic functions including cardiovascular reflexes, respiration, food intake, arousal, and stress. However, it is not known if they respond to changes in glucose. Here we determined whether NTS-CA neurons respond to changes in glucose concentration and the mechanism involved. We found that decreasing glucose concentrations from 5 mM to 2 mM to 1 mM, significantly decreased action potential firing in a cell-attached preparation, whereas increasing it back to 5 mM increased the firing rate. This effect was dependent on glutamate release from afferent terminals and required presynaptic 5-HT 3 Rs. Decreasing the glucose concentration also decreased both basal and 5-HT 3 R agonist-induced increase in the frequency of spontaneous glutamate inputs onto NTS-CA neurons. Low glucose also blunted 5-HT-induced inward currents in nodose ganglia neurons, which are the cell bodies of vagal afferents. The effect of low glucose in both nodose ganglia cells and in NTS slices was mimicked by the glucokinase inhibitor glucosamine. This study suggests that NTS-CA neurons are glucosensing through a presynaptic mechanism that is dependent on vagal glutamate release, 5-HT 3 R activity, and glucokinase. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 enhances interleukin (IL)-1beta-stimulated release of IL-6 in cultured human astrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aronica, E.; Gorter, J. A.; Rozemuller, A. J.; Yankaya, B.; Troost, D.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that human astrocytes express mRNA and receptor protein for group I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Whether these receptors can influence the inflammatory and immune response and can modulate the capacity of astrocytes to produce inflammatory

  10. Effects of spinal transection on presynaptic markers for glutamatergic neurons in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, H.S.; Coyle, J.T.; Frangia, J.; Price, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that glutamic acid may be the neurotransmitter of descending, excitatory supraspinal pathways, the uptake and release of L-[3H] glutamate and the levels of endogenous glutamate were measured in preparations from rat lumbar spinal cord following complete mid-thoracic transection. Following transection, the activity of the synaptosomal high-affinity glutamate uptake process was increased in both dorsal and ventral halves of lumbar cord between 1 and 14 days after transection and returned to control levels by 21 days posttransection. At 7 days, the increased activity of the uptake process for L-[3H]glutamate resulted in elevation of Vmax with no significant alteration in KT as compared to age-matched controls. Depolarization-induced release of L-[3H]glutamate from prelabeled slices did not differ significantly from control in the lesioned rat except at 21 days after lesion when the amount of tritium release was significantly greater in the transected preparations than in control. Amino acid analysis of the lumbar cord from control and transected rats indicated only a 10% decrease in the level of endogenous glutamate and no alterations in the concentration of GABA and glycine 7 days after lesion. These findings do not support the hypothesis that glutamate serves as a major excitatory neurotransmitter in supraspinal pathways innervating the lumbar cord of the rat

  11. Local synthesis of axonal and presynaptic RNA in squid model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Ferrara, Eugenia; De Stefano, Rosanna; Lavina, Zeno Scotto; Crispino, Marianna; Squillace, Angela; van Minnen, Jan; Kaplan, Barry B; Giuditta, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The presence of active systems of protein synthesis in axons and nerve endings raises the question of the cellular origin of the corresponding RNAs. Our present experiments demonstrate that, besides a possible derivation from neuronal cell bodies, axoplasmic RNAs originate in periaxonal glial cells and presynaptic RNAs derive from nearby cells, presumably glial cells. Indeed, in perfused squid giant axons, delivery of newly synthesized RNA to the axon perfusate is strongly stimulated by axonal depolarization or agonists of glial glutamate and acetylcholine receptors. Likewise, incubation of squid optic lobe slices with [3H]uridine leads to a marked accumulation of [3H]RNA in the large synaptosomes derived from the nerve terminals of retinal photoreceptor neurons. As the cell bodies of these neurons lie outside the optic lobe, the data demonstrate that presynaptic RNA is locally synthesized, presumably by perisynaptic glial cells. Overall, our results support the view that axons and presynaptic regions are endowed with local systems of gene expression which may prove essential for the maintenance and plasticity of these extrasomatic neuronal domains.

  12. Regarding the unitary theory of agonist and antagonist action at presynaptic adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsner, S; Abdali, S A

    2001-06-01

    1. The linkage between potentiation of field stimulation-induced noradrenaline release and blockade of the presynaptic inhibitory effect of exogenous noradrenaline by a presynaptic antagonist was examined in superfused rabbit aorta preparations. 2. Rauwolscine clearly potentiated the release of noradrenaline in response to 100 pulses at 2 Hz but reduced the capacity of noradrenaline to inhibit transmitter release to a questionable extent, and then only when comparisons were made with untreated, rather then to rauwolscine-treated, controls. 3. Aortic preparations exposed for 60 min to rauwolscine followed by superfusion with antagonist-free Krebs for 60 min retained the potentiation of stimulation-induced transmitter release but no antagonism of the noradrenaline-induced inhibition could be detected at either of two noradrenaline concentrations when comparisons were made with rauwolscine treated controls. 4. Comparisons of the inhibitory effect of exogenous noradrenaline (1.8 x 10-6 M) on transmitter efflux in the presence and absence of rauwolscine pretreatment revealed that the antagonist enhanced rather than antagonized the presynaptic inhibition by noradrenaline. 5 It is concluded that the unitary hypothesis that asserts that antagonist enhancement of transmitter release and its blockade of noradrenaline induced inhibition are manifestations of a unitary event are not supportable.

  13. The Influence of Glutamate on Axonal Compound Action Potential In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelela, Ahmed; Wieraszko, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background  Our previous experiments demonstrated modulation of the amplitude of the axonal compound action potential (CAP) by electrical stimulation. To verify assumption that glutamate released from axons could be involved in this phenomenon, the modification of the axonal CAP induced by glutamate was investigated. Objectives  The major objective of this research is to verify the hypothesis that axonal activity would trigger the release of glutamate, which in turn would interact with specific axonal receptors modifying the amplitude of the action potential. Methods  Segments of the sciatic nerve were exposed to exogenous glutamate in vitro, and CAP was recorded before and after glutamate application. In some experiments, the release of radioactive glutamate analog from the sciatic nerve exposed to exogenous glutamate was also evaluated. Results  The glutamate-induced increase in CAP was blocked by different glutamate receptor antagonists. The effect of glutamate was not observed in Ca-free medium, and was blocked by antagonists of calcium channels. Exogenous glutamate, applied to the segments of sciatic nerve, induced the release of radioactive glutamate analog, demonstrating glutamate-induced glutamate release. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that axolemma contains components necessary for glutamatergic neurotransmission. Conclusion  The proteins of the axonal membrane can under the influence of electrical stimulation or exogenous glutamate change membrane permeability and ionic conductance, leading to a change in the amplitude of CAP. We suggest that increased axonal activity leads to the release of glutamate that results in changes in the amplitude of CAPs.

  14. RIM proteins tether Ca2+-channels to presynaptic active zones via a direct PDZ-domain interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S.; Deng, Lunbin; Wang, Yun; Dulubova, Irina; Liu, Xinran; Rizo, Josep; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY At a synapse, fast synchronous neurotransmitter release requires localization of Ca2+-channels to presynaptic active zones. How Ca2+-channels are recruited to active zones, however, remains unknown. Using unbiased yeast two-hybrid screens, we here identify a direct interaction of the central PDZ-domain of the active-zone protein RIM with the C-termini of presynaptic N- and P/Q-type Ca2+-channels, but not L-type Ca2+-channels. To test the physiological significance of this interaction, we generated conditional knockout mice lacking all presynaptic RIM isoforms. Deletion of all RIMs ablated most neurotransmitter release by simultaneously impairing the priming of synaptic vesicles and by decreasing the presynaptic localization of Ca2+-channels. Strikingly, rescue of the decreased Ca2+-channel localization required the RIM PDZ-domain, whereas rescue of vesicle priming required the RIM N-terminus. We propose that RIMs tether N- and P/Q-type Ca2+-channels to presynaptic active zones via a direct PDZ-domain mediated interaction, thereby enabling fast, synchronous triggering of neurotransmitter release at a synapse. PMID:21241895

  15. Cav2.1 channels control multivesicular release by relying on their distance from exocytotic Ca2+ sensors at rat cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Shin'Ichiro; Imoto, Keiji

    2014-01-22

    The concomitant release of multiple numbers of synaptic vesicles [multivesicular release (MVR)] in response to a single presynaptic action potential enhances the flexibility of synaptic transmission. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying MVR at a single CNS synapse remain unclear. Here, we show that the Cav2.1 subtype (P/Q-type) of the voltage-gated calcium channel is specifically responsible for the induction of MVR. In the rat cerebellar cortex, paired-pulse activation of granule cell (GC) ascending fibers leads not only to a facilitation of the peak amplitude (PPFamp) but also to a prolongation of the decay time (PPPdecay) of the EPSCs recorded from molecular layer interneurons. PPFamp is elicited by a transient increase in the number of released vesicles. PPPdecay is highly dependent on MVR and is caused by dual mechanisms: (1) a delayed release and (2) an extrasynaptic spillover of the GC transmitter glutamate and subsequent pooling of the glutamate among active synapses. PPPdecay was specifically suppressed by the Cav2.1 channel blocker ω-agatoxin IVA, while PPFamp responded to Cav2.2/Cav2.3 (N-type/R-type) channel blockers. The membrane-permeable slow Ca(2+) chelator EGTA-AM profoundly reduced the decay time constant (τdecay) of the second EPSC; however, it only had a negligible impact on that of the first, thereby eliminating PPPdecay. These results suggest that the distance between presynaptic Cav2.1 channels and exocytotic Ca(2+) sensors is a key determinant of MVR. By transducing presynaptic action potential firings into unique Ca(2+) signals and vesicle release profiles, Cav2.1 channels contribute to the encoding and processing of neural information.

  16. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The term 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' was coined several decades ago based on the observation that using certain (14)C-labeled precursors for studies of brain metabolism the specific radioactivity of glutamine generated from glutamate was higher than that of glutamate, its immediate precursor....... This is metabolically impossible unless it is assumed that at least two distinct pools of these amino acids exist. This combined with the finding that the enzyme synthesizing glutamine from glutamate was expressed in astrocytes but not in neurons formed the basis of the notion that a cycle must exist in which glutamate...... released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion...

  17. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    . This is metabolically impossible unless it is assumed that at least two distinct pools of these amino acids exist. This combined with the finding that the enzyme synthesizing glutamine from glutamate was expressed in astrocytes but not in neurons formed the basis of the notion that a cycle must exist in which glutamate......The term 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' was coined several decades ago based on the observation that using certain (14)C-labeled precursors for studies of brain metabolism the specific radioactivity of glutamine generated from glutamate was higher than that of glutamate, its immediate precursor...... released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion...

  18. A-995662 [(R)-8-(4-methyl-5-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)oxazol-2-ylamino)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-ol], a novel, selective TRPV1 receptor antagonist, reduces spinal release of glutamate and CGRP in a rat knee joint pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttfarcken, Pamela S; Han, Ping; Joshi, Shailen K; Neelands, Torben R; Gauvin, Donna M; Baker, Scott J; Lewis, La Geisha R; Bianchi, Bruce R; Mikusa, Joseph P; Koenig, John R; Perner, Richard J; Kort, Michael E; Honore, Prisca; Faltynek, Connie R; Kym, Philip R; Reilly, Regina M

    2010-08-01

    The TRPV1 antagonist A-995662 demonstrates analgesic efficacy in monoiodoacetate-induced osteoarthritic (OA) pain in rat, and repeated dosing results in increased in vivo potency and a prolonged duration of action. To identify possible mechanism(s) underlying these observations, release of neuropeptides and the neurotransmitter glutamate from isolated spinal cord was measured. In OA rats, basal release of glutamate, bradykinin and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was significantly elevated compared to naïve levels, whereas substance P (SP) levels were not changed. In vitro studies showed that capsaicin-evoked TRPV1-dependent CGRP release was 54.7+/-7.7% higher in OA, relative to levels measured for naïve rats, suggesting that TRPV1 activity was higher under OA conditions. The efficacy of A-995662 in OA corresponded with its ability to inhibit glutamate and CGRP release from the spinal cord. A single, fully efficacious dose of A-995662, 100 micromol/kg, reduced spinal glutamate and CGRP release, while a single sub-efficacious dose of A-995662 (25 micromol/kg) was ineffective. Multiple dosing with A-995662 increased the potency and duration of efficacy in OA rats. Changes in efficacy did not correlate with plasma concentrations of A-995662, but were accompanied with reductions in spinal glutamate release. These findings suggest that repeated dosing of TRPV1 antagonists enhances therapeutic potency and duration of action against OA pain, at least in part, by the sustained reduction in release of glutamate and CGRP from the spinal cord. Copyright (c) 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Presynaptic mechanisms of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: the findings, the debate, the therapeutic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Angela eCenci

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dopamine precursor L-DOPA has been the most effective treatment for Parkinson´s disease (PD for over 40 years. However, the response to this treatment changes during the progression of PD, and most patients develop dyskinesias (abnormal involuntary movements and motor fluctuations within a few years of L-DOPA therapy. There is wide consensus that these motor complications depend on both pre- and post-synaptic disturbances of nigrostriatal dopamine transmission. Several presynaptic mechanisms converge to generate large dopamine swings in the brain concomitant with the peaks-and-troughs of plasma L-DOPA levels, while post-synaptic changes engender abnormal functional responses in dopaminoceptive neurons. While this general picture is well-accepted, the relative contribution of different factors remains a matter of debate. A particularly animated debate has been growing around putative players on the presynaptic side of the cascade. To what extent do presynaptic disturbances in dopamine transmission depend on deficiency/dysfunction of the dopamine transporter, aberrant release of dopamine from serotonin neurons, or gliovascular mechanisms? And does noradrenaline (which is synthetized from dopamine play a role? This review article will summarize key findings, controversies, and pending questions regarding the presynaptic mechanisms of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Intriguingly, the debate around these mechanisms has spurred research into previously unexplored facets of brain plasticity that have far-reaching implications to the treatment of neuropsychiatric disease.

  20. Metabotropic glutamate receptors as a strategic target for the treatment of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Georgia M; Godwin, Dwayne W

    2006-09-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder that has many known types, including generalized epilepsies that involve cortical and subcortical structures. A proportion of patients have seizures that are resistant to traditional anti-epilepsy drugs, which mainly target ion channels or postsynaptic receptors. This resistance to conventional therapies makes it important to identify novel targets for the treatment of epilepsy. Given the involvement of the neurotransmitter glutamate in the etiology of epilepsy, targets that control glutamatergic neurotransmission are of special interest. The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are of a family of eight G-protein-coupled receptors that serve unique regulatory functions at synapses that use the neurotransmitter glutamate. Their distribution within the central nervous system provides a platform for both presynaptic control of glutamate release, as well as postsynaptic control of neuronal responses to glutamate. In recent years, substantial efforts have been made towards developing selective agonists and antagonists which may be useful for targeting specific receptor subtypes in an attempt to harness the therapeutic potential of these receptors. We examine the possibility of intervening at these receptors by considering the specific example of absence seizures, a form of generalized, non-convulsive seizure that involves the thalamus. Views of the etiology of absence seizures have evolved over time from the "centrencephalic" concept of a diffuse subcortical pacemaker toward the "cortical focus" theory in which cortical hyperexcitability leads the thalamus into the 3-4 Hz rhythms that are characteristic of absence seizures. Since the cortex communicates with the thalamus via a massive glutamatergic projection, ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) blockade has held promise, but the global nature of iGluR intervention has precluded the clinical effectiveness of drugs that block iGluRs. In contrast, mGluRs, because they

  1. Role of spinal cord glutamate transporter during normal sensory transmission and pathological pain states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephens Robert L

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glutamate is a neurotransmitter critical for spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and for generation and maintenance of spinal states of pain hypersensitivity via activation of glutamate receptors. Understanding the regulation of synaptically and non-synaptically released glutamate associated with pathological pain is important in exploring novel molecular mechanisms and developing therapeutic strategies of pathological pain. The glutamate transporter system is the primary mechanism for the inactivation of synaptically released glutamate and the maintenance of glutamate homeostasis. Recent studies demonstrated that spinal glutamate transporter inhibition relieved pathological pain, suggesting that the spinal glutamate transporter might serve as a therapeutic target for treatment of pathological pain. However, the exact function of glutamate transporter in pathological pain is not completely understood. This report will review the evidence for the role of the spinal glutamate transporter during normal sensory transmission and pathological pain conditions and discuss potential mechanisms by which spinal glutamate transporter is involved in pathological pain.

  2. Facilitation of glutamate and GABA release by P2X receptor activation in supraoptic neurons from freshly isolated rat brain slices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vávra, Vojtěch; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Zemková, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 188, - (2011), s. 1-12 ISSN 0306-4522 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110910; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GD305/08/H037; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : ATP * purinergic P2X receptors * GABA * glutamate * supraoptic nucleus * patch clamp Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.380, year: 2011

  3. Acute desensitization of presynaptic GABA(B)-mediated inhibition and induction of epileptiform discharges in the neonatal rat hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tosetti, P; Bakels, R; Colin-Le Brun, [No Value; Ferrand, N; Gaiarsa, JL; Caillard, O

    The consequences of sustained activation of GABA(B) receptors on GABA(B)-mediated inhibition and network activity were investigated in the neonatal rat hippocampus using whole-cell and extracellular field recordings. GABA(B)-mediated presynaptic control of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release

  4. Presynaptic inhibition of synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus by activation of muscarinic receptors: involvement of presynaptic calcium influx

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Jing; Saggau, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Modulation of presynaptic voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) by muscarinic receptors at the CA3–CA1 synapse of rat hippocampal slices was investigated by using the calcium indicator fura-2. Stimulation-evoked presynaptic calcium transients ([Capre]t) and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fe.p.s.ps) were simultaneously recorded. The relationship between presynaptic calcium influx and synaptic transmission was studied.Activation of muscarinic receptors inhibited [Capre]t, thereb...

  5. Glycine receptors support excitatory neurotransmitter release in developing mouse visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Portia A; Burette, Alain C; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2012-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are found in most areas of the brain, and their dysfunction can cause severe neurological disorders. While traditionally thought of as inhibitory receptors, presynaptic-acting GlyRs (preGlyRs) can also facilitate glutamate release under certain circumstances, although the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. In the current study, we sought to better understand the role of GlyRs in the facilitation of excitatory neurotransmitter release in mouse visual cortex. Using whole-cell recordings, we found that preGlyRs facilitate glutamate release in developing, but not adult, visual cortex. The glycinergic enhancement of neurotransmitter release in early development depends on the high intracellular to extracellular Cl− gradient maintained by the Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter and requires Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The glycine transporter 1, localized to glial cells, regulates extracellular glycine concentration and the activation of these preGlyRs. Our findings demonstrate a developmentally regulated mechanism for controlling excitatory neurotransmitter release in the neocortex. PMID:22988142

  6. Presynaptic adenosine receptor-mediated regulation of diverse thalamocortical short-term plasticity in the mouse whisker pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eFerrati

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In driver thalamocortical (TC synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors, modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release.

  7. Evidence against the unitary hypothesis of agonist and antagonist action at presynaptic adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsner, S.

    1982-01-01

    1 The concept that presynaptic receptors regulate noradrenergic transmitter release via a system of inhibitory receptors mediating negative feedback relies on a supposed association between increases in stimulation-induced efflux of [3H]-noradrenaline by antagonists and blockade by them of the inhibitory effects of exogenous noradrenaline. 2 It was shown in guinea-pig ureter, that yohimbine (3 X 10(-7)M), a presumed selective presynaptic antagonist, increased transmitter efflux substantially at 1 Hz and 5 Hz with 100 pulses, purportedly representing antagonism of the inhibitory effect of locally released noradrenaline but did not reduce the inhibitory effect of exogenous noradrenaline (1.8 X 10(-6)M or 1.8 X 10(-7)M) except in one case. 3 Additionally, the inhibitory effect of oxymetazoline (1.0 X 10(-7)M or 1.0 X 10(-8)M) on stimulation-induced efflux was in no way antagonized by yohimbine (3 X 10(-7)M). 4 It is concluded that the increased efflux of [3H]-noradrenaline produced by antagonists and the decreased efflux produced by exogenous agonists may represent actions at different loci and that the hypothesis of presynaptic feedback regulatory sites is still not substantiated. PMID:6128040

  8. Optogenetic probing and manipulation of the calyx-type presynaptic terminal in the embryonic chick ciliary ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Ryo; Hososhima, Shoko; Hou, Xubin; Katow, Hidetaka; Ishizuka, Toru; Nakamura, Harukazu; Yawo, Hiromu

    2013-01-01

    The calyx-type synapse of chick ciliary ganglion (CG) has been intensively studied for decades as a model system for the synaptic development, morphology and physiology. Despite recent advances in optogenetics probing and/or manipulation of the elementary steps of the transmitter release such as membrane depolarization and Ca(2+) elevation, the current gene-manipulating methods are not suitable for targeting specifically the calyx-type presynaptic terminals. Here, we evaluated a method for manipulating the molecular and functional organization of the presynaptic terminals of this model synapse. We transfected progenitors of the Edinger-Westphal (EW) nucleus neurons with an EGFP expression vector by in ovo electroporation at embryonic day 2 (E2) and examined the CG at E8-14. We found that dozens of the calyx-type presynaptic terminals and axons were selectively labeled with EGFP fluorescence. When a Brainbow construct containing the membrane-tethered fluorescent proteins m-CFP, m-YFP and m-RFP, was introduced together with a Cre expression construct, the color coding of each presynaptic axon facilitated discrimination among inter-tangled projections, particularly during the developmental re-organization period of synaptic connections. With the simultaneous expression of one of the chimeric variants of channelrhodopsins, channelrhodopsin-fast receiver (ChRFR), and R-GECO1, a red-shifted fluorescent Ca(2+)-sensor, the Ca(2+) elevation was optically measured under direct photostimulation of the presynaptic terminal. Although this optically evoked Ca(2+) elevation was mostly dependent on the action potential, a significant component remained even in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). It is suggested that the photo-activation of ChRFR facilitated the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular Ca(2+) stores directly or indirectly. The above system, by facilitating the molecular study of the calyx-type presynaptic terminal, would provide an experimental platform for unveiling

  9. Optogenetic probing and manipulation of the calyx-type presynaptic terminal in the embryonic chick ciliary ganglion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Egawa

    Full Text Available The calyx-type synapse of chick ciliary ganglion (CG has been intensively studied for decades as a model system for the synaptic development, morphology and physiology. Despite recent advances in optogenetics probing and/or manipulation of the elementary steps of the transmitter release such as membrane depolarization and Ca(2+ elevation, the current gene-manipulating methods are not suitable for targeting specifically the calyx-type presynaptic terminals. Here, we evaluated a method for manipulating the molecular and functional organization of the presynaptic terminals of this model synapse. We transfected progenitors of the Edinger-Westphal (EW nucleus neurons with an EGFP expression vector by in ovo electroporation at embryonic day 2 (E2 and examined the CG at E8-14. We found that dozens of the calyx-type presynaptic terminals and axons were selectively labeled with EGFP fluorescence. When a Brainbow construct containing the membrane-tethered fluorescent proteins m-CFP, m-YFP and m-RFP, was introduced together with a Cre expression construct, the color coding of each presynaptic axon facilitated discrimination among inter-tangled projections, particularly during the developmental re-organization period of synaptic connections. With the simultaneous expression of one of the chimeric variants of channelrhodopsins, channelrhodopsin-fast receiver (ChRFR, and R-GECO1, a red-shifted fluorescent Ca(2+-sensor, the Ca(2+ elevation was optically measured under direct photostimulation of the presynaptic terminal. Although this optically evoked Ca(2+ elevation was mostly dependent on the action potential, a significant component remained even in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+. It is suggested that the photo-activation of ChRFR facilitated the release of Ca(2+ from intracellular Ca(2+ stores directly or indirectly. The above system, by facilitating the molecular study of the calyx-type presynaptic terminal, would provide an experimental platform for

  10. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of new 2,4-syn-functionalized (S)-glutamate analogues and structure-activity relationship studies at ionotropic glutamate receptors and excitatory amino acid transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Zeinab; Larsen, Anja P; Venskutonytė, Raminta; Han, Liwei; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Nielsen, Birgitte; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S; Jensen, Anders A; Pickering, Darryl S; Frydenvang, Karla; Gefflaut, Thierry; Bunch, Lennart

    2013-02-28

    In the mammalian central nervous system, (S)-glutamate (Glu) is released from the presynaptic neuron where it activates a plethora of pre- and postsynaptic Glu receptors. The fast acting ionotropic Glu receptors (iGluRs) are ligand gated ion channels and are believed to be involved in a vast number of neurological functions such as memory and learning, synaptic plasticity, and motor function. The synthesis of 14 enantiopure 2,4-syn-Glu analogues 2b-p is accessed by a short and efficient chemoenzymatic approach starting from readily available cyclohexanone 3. Pharmacological characterization at the iGluRs and EAAT1-3 subtypes revealed analogue 2i as a selective GluK1 ligand with low nanomolar affinity. Two X-ray crystal structures of the key analogue 2i in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of GluA2 and GluK3 were determined. Partial domain closure was seen in the GluA2-LBD complex with 2i comparable to that induced by kainate. In contrast, full domain closure was observed in the GluK3-LBD complex with 2i, similar to that of GluK3-LBD with glutamate bound.

  11. AMPK Activation Affects Glutamate Metabolism in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Caroline Marie; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    acid (TCA) cycle was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis supplemented with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technology. It was found that AMPK activation had profound effects on the pathways involved in glutamate metabolism since the entrance of the glutamate carbon...... skeleton into the TCA cycle was reduced. On the other hand, glutamate uptake into the astrocytes as well as its conversion to glutamine catalyzed by glutamine synthetase was not affected by AMPK activation. Interestingly, synthesis and release of citrate, which are hallmarks of astrocytic function, were...

  12. APP and APLP2 interact with the synaptic release machinery and facilitate transmitter release at hippocampal synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanutza, Tomas; Del Prete, Dolores; Ford, Michael J; Castillo, Pablo E; D’Adamio, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP), whose mutations cause familial Alzheimer’s disease, interacts with the synaptic release machinery, suggesting a role in neurotransmission. Here we mapped this interaction to the NH2-terminal region of the APP intracellular domain. A peptide encompassing this binding domain -named JCasp- is naturally produced by a γ-secretase/caspase double-cut of APP. JCasp interferes with the APP-presynaptic proteins interaction and, if linked to a cell-penetrating peptide, reduces glutamate release in acute hippocampal slices from wild-type but not APP deficient mice, indicating that JCasp inhibits APP function.The APP-like protein-2 (APLP2) also binds the synaptic release machinery. Deletion of APP and APLP2 produces synaptic deficits similar to those caused by JCasp. Our data support the notion that APP and APLP2 facilitate transmitter release, likely through the interaction with the neurotransmitter release machinery. Given the link of APP to Alzheimer’s disease, alterations of this synaptic role of APP could contribute to dementia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09743.001 PMID:26551565

  13. Astrocyte-neuron interaction in the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal cord dorsal horn via P2X7 receptor-mediated release of glutamate and reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficker, Christoph; Rozmer, Katalin; Kató, Erzsébet; Andó, Rómeó D; Schumann, Luisa; Krügel, Ute; Franke, Heike; Sperlágh, Beáta; Riedel, Thomas; Illes, Peter

    2014-10-01

    The substantia gelatinosa (SG) of the spinal cord processes incoming painful information to ascending projection neurons. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from SG spinal cord slices documented that in a low Ca(2+) /no Mg(2+) (low X(2+) ) external medium adenosine triphosphate (ATP)/dibenzoyl-ATP, Bz-ATP) caused inward current responses, much larger in amplitude than those recorded in a normal X(2+) -containing bath medium. The effect of Bz-ATP was antagonized by the selective P2X7 receptor antagonist A-438079. Neuronal, but not astrocytic Bz-ATP currents were strongly inhibited by a combination of the ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists AP-5 and CNQX. In fact, all neurons and some astrocytes responded to NMDA, AMPA, and muscimol with inward current, demonstrating the presence of the respective receptors. The reactive oxygen species H2 O2 potentiated the effect of Bz-ATP at neurons but not at astrocytes. Hippocampal CA1 neurons exhibited a behavior similar to, but not identical with SG neurons. Although a combination of AP-5 and CNQX almost abolished the effect of Bz-ATP, H2 O2 was inactive. A Bz-ATP-dependent and A-438079-antagonizable reactive oxygen species production in SG slices was proven by a microelectrode biosensor. Immunohistochemical investigations showed the colocalization of P2X7-immunoreactivity with microglial (Iba1), but not astrocytic (GFAP, S100β) or neuronal (MAP2) markers in the SG. It is concluded that SG astrocytes possess P2X7 receptors; their activation leads to the release of glutamate, which via NMDA- and AMPA receptor stimulation induces cationic current in the neighboring neurons. P2X7 receptors have a very low density under resting conditions but become functionally upregulated under pathological conditions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Presynaptic active zones of mammalian neuromuscular junctions: Nanoarchitecture and selective impairments in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Yomna; Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    Neurotransmitter release occurs at active zones, which are specialized regions of the presynaptic membrane. A dense collection of proteins at the active zone provides a platform for molecular interactions that promote recruitment, docking, and priming of synaptic vesicles. At mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), muscle-derived laminin β2 interacts with presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels to organize active zones. The molecular architecture of presynaptic active zones has been revealed using super-resolution microscopy techniques that combine nanoscale resolution and multiple molecular identification. Interestingly, the active zones of adult NMJs are not stable structures and thus become impaired during aging due to the selective degeneration of specific active zone proteins. This review will discuss recent progress in the understanding of active zone nanoarchitecture and the mechanisms underlying active zone organization in mammalian NMJs. Furthermore, we will summarize the age-related degeneration of active zones at NMJs, and the role of exercise in maintaining active zones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Alternative Splicing of P/Q-Type Ca2+ Channels Shapes Presynaptic Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Thalhammer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is prominent in the mammalian brain, where it is thought to expand proteome diversity. For example, alternative splicing of voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGCC α1 subunits can generate thousands of isoforms with differential properties and expression patterns. However, the impact of this molecular diversity on brain function, particularly on synaptic transmission, which crucially depends on VGCCs, is unclear. Here, we investigate how two major splice isoforms of P/Q-type VGCCs (Cav2.1[EFa/b] regulate presynaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons. We find that the efficacy of P/Q-type VGCC isoforms in supporting synaptic transmission is markedly different, with Cav2.1[EFa] promoting synaptic depression and Cav2.1[EFb] synaptic facilitation. Following a reduction in network activity, hippocampal neurons upregulate selectively Cav2.1[EFa], the isoform exhibiting the higher synaptic efficacy, thus effectively supporting presynaptic homeostatic plasticity. Therefore, the balance between VGCC splice variants at the synapse is a key factor in controlling neurotransmitter release and presynaptic plasticity.

  16. Effective Mechanism for Synthesis of Neurotransmitter Glutamate and its Loading into Synaptic Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kouji; Ueda, Tetsufumi

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate accumulation into synaptic vesicles is a pivotal step in glutamate transmission. This process is achieved by a vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) coupled to v-type proton ATPase. Normal synaptic transmission, in particular during intensive neuronal firing, would demand rapid transmitter re-filling of emptied synaptic vesicles. We have previously shown that isolated synaptic vesicles are capable of synthesizing glutamate from α-ketoglutarate (not from glutamine) by vesicle-bound aspartate aminotransferase for immediate uptake, in addition to ATP required for uptake by vesicle-bound glycolytic enzymes. This suggests that local synthesis of these substances, essential for glutamate transmission, could occur at the synaptic vesicle. Here we provide evidence that synaptosomes (pinched-off nerve terminals) also accumulate α-ketoglutarate-derived glutamate into synaptic vesicles within, at the expense of ATP generated through glycolysis. Glutamine-derived glutamate is also accumulated into synaptic vesicles in synaptosomes. The underlying mechanism is discussed. It is suggested that local synthesis of both glutamate and ATP at the presynaptic synaptic vesicle would represent an efficient mechanism for swift glutamate loading into synaptic vesicles, supporting maintenance of normal synaptic transmission.

  17. A presynaptic role for PKA in synaptic tagging and memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Alan Jung; Havekes, Robbert; Choi, Jennifer H K; Luczak, Vincent; Nie, Ting; Huang, Ted; Abel, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling molecules are spatially restricted within neurons by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Although studies on compartmentalized PKA signaling have focused on postsynaptic mechanisms, presynaptically anchored PKA may contribute to synaptic plasticity and

  18. Signal regulatory proteins (SIRPS) are secreted presynaptic organizing molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemori, Hisashi; Sanes, Joshua R

    2008-12-05

    Formation of chemical synapses requires exchange of organizing signals between the synaptic partners. Using synaptic vesicle aggregation in cultured neurons as a marker of presynaptic differentiation, we purified candidate presynaptic organizers from mouse brain. A major bioactive species was the extracellular domain of signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRP-alpha), a transmembrane immunoglobulin superfamily member concentrated at synapses. The extracellular domain of SIRP-alpha is cleaved and shed in a developmentally regulated manner. The presynaptic organizing activity of SIRP-alpha is mediated in part by CD47. SIRP-alpha homologues, SIRP-beta and -gamma also have synaptic vesicle clustering activity. The effects of SIRP-alpha are distinct from those of another presynaptic organizer, FGF22: the two proteins induced vesicle clusters of different sizes, differed in their ability to promote neurite branching, and acted through different receptors and signaling pathways. SIRP family proteins may act together with other organizing molecules to pattern synapses.

  19. The structure and function of presynaptic endosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jähne, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.jaehne1@stud.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Göttingen Medical Center, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Humboldtallee 23, 37073 Göttingen (Germany); International Max Planck Research School for Neurosciences, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Rizzoli, Silvio O. [Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Göttingen Medical Center, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Humboldtallee 23, 37073 Göttingen (Germany); Helm, Martin S., E-mail: martin.helm@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuro- and Sensory Physiology, University of Göttingen Medical Center, Cluster of Excellence Nanoscale Microscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Humboldtallee 23, 37073 Göttingen (Germany); International Max Planck Research School for Molecular Biology, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    The function of endosomes and of endosome-like structures in the presynaptic compartment is still controversial. This is in part due to the absence of a consensus on definitions and markers for these compartments. Synaptic endosomes are sometimes seen as stable organelles, permanently present in the synapse. Alternatively, they are seen as short-lived intermediates in synaptic vesicle recycling, arising from the endocytosis of large vesicles from the plasma membrane, or from homotypic fusion of small vesicles. In addition, the potential function of the endosome is largely unknown in the synapse. Some groups have proposed that the endosome is involved in the sorting of synaptic vesicle proteins, albeit others have produced data that deny this possibility. In this review, we present the existing evidence for synaptic endosomes, we discuss their potential functions, and we highlight frequent technical pitfalls in the analysis of this elusive compartment. We also sketch a roadmap to definitely determine the role of synaptic endosomes for the synaptic vesicle cycle. Finally, we propose a common definition of synaptic endosome-like structures.

  20. Some Properties of Glutamate Dehydrogenase from the Marine Red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: ammonia assimilation, glutamate dehydrogenase, GDH, Gracilaria sordida, red alga, enzyme activity. Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH, EC ... Anabolic functions could be assimilation of ammonia released during photorespiration and synthesis of N-rich transport compounds. Western Indian Ocean Journal of ...

  1. Deformation of attractor landscape via cholinergic presynaptic modulations: a computational study using a phase neuron model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kanamaru

    Full Text Available Corticopetal acetylcholine (ACh is released transiently from the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM into the cortical layers and is associated with top-down attention. Recent experimental data suggest that this release of ACh disinhibits layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons (PYRs via muscarinic presynaptic effects on inhibitory synapses. Together with other possible presynaptic cholinergic effects on excitatory synapses, this may result in dynamic and temporal modifications of synapses associated with top-down attention. However, the system-level consequences and cognitive relevance of such disinhibitions are poorly understood. Herein, we propose a theoretical possibility that such transient modifications of connectivity associated with ACh release, in addition to top-down glutamatergic input, may provide a neural mechanism for the temporal reactivation of attractors as neural correlates of memories. With baseline levels of ACh, the brain returns to quasi-attractor states, exhibiting transitive dynamics between several intrinsic internal states. This suggests that top-down attention may cause the attention-induced deformations between two types of attractor landscapes: the quasi-attractor landscape (Q-landscape, present under low-ACh, non-attentional conditions and the attractor landscape (A-landscape, present under high-ACh, top-down attentional conditions. We present a conceptual computational model based on experimental knowledge of the structure of PYRs and interneurons (INs in cortical layers 1 and 2/3 and discuss the possible physiological implications of our results.

  2. Synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents in Spinal Dorsal Horn Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougherty Patrick M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Removing and sequestering synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space is carried out by specific plasma membrane transporters that are primarily located in astrocytes. Glial glutamate transporter function can be monitored by recording the currents that are produced by co-transportation of Na+ ions with the uptake of glutamate. The goal of this study was to characterize glutamate transporter function in astrocytes of the spinal cord dorsal horn in real time by recording synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents. Results Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from astrocytes in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG area in spinal slices of young adult rats. Glutamate transporter currents were evoked in these cells by electrical stimulation at the spinal dorsal root entry zone in the presence of bicuculline, strychnine, DNQX and D-AP5. Transporter currents were abolished when synaptic transmission was blocked by TTX or Cd2+. Pharmacological studies identified two subtypes of glutamate transporters in spinal astrocytes, GLAST and GLT-1. Glutamate transporter currents were graded with stimulus intensity, reaching peak responses at 4 to 5 times activation threshold, but were reduced following low-frequency (0.1 – 1 Hz repetitive stimulation. Conclusion These results suggest that glutamate transporters of spinal astrocytes could be activated by synaptic activation, and recording glutamate transporter currents may provide a means of examining the real time physiological responses of glial cells in spinal sensory processing, sensitization, hyperalgesia and chronic pain.

  3. Hypocretin (orexin) regulates glutamate input to fast-spiking interneurons in layer V of the Fr2 region of the murine prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aracri, Patrizia; Banfi, Daniele; Pasini, Maria Enrica; Amadeo, Alida; Becchetti, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    We studied the effect of hypocretin 1 (orexin A) in the frontal area 2 (Fr2) of the murine neocortex, implicated in the motivation-dependent goal-directed tasks. In layer V, hypocretin stimulated the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) on fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. The effect was accompanied by increased frequency of miniature EPSCs, indicating that hypocretin can target the glutamatergic terminals. Moreover, hypocretin stimulated the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) on pyramidal neurons, with no effect on miniature IPSCs. This action was prevented by blocking 1) the ionotropic glutamatergic receptors; 2) the hypocretin receptor type 1 (HCRTR-1), with SB-334867. Finally, hypocretin increased the firing frequency in FS cells, and the effect was blocked when the ionotropic glutamate transmission was inhibited. Immunolocalization confirmed that HCRTR-1 is highly expressed in Fr2, particularly in layer V-VI. Conspicuous labeling was observed in pyramidal neuron somata and in VGLUT1+ glutamatergic terminals, but not in VGLUT2+ fibers (mainly thalamocortical afferents). The expression of HCRTR-1 in GABAergic structures was scarce. We conclude that 1) hypocretin regulates glutamate release in Fr2; 2) the effect presents a presynaptic component; 3) the peptide control of FS cells is indirect, and probably mediated by the regulation of glutamatergic input onto these cells. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Homocysteine aggravates ROS-induced depression of transmitter release from motor nerve terminals: potential mechanism of peripheral impairment in motor neuron diseases associated with hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellya eBukharaeva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (HCY is a pro-inflammatory sulphur-containing redox active endogenous amino acid, which concentration increases in neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. A widely held view suggests that HCY could contribute to neurodegeneration via promotion of oxidative stress. However, the action of HCY on motor nerve terminals has not been investigated so far. We previously reported that oxidative stress inhibited synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction, targeting primarily the motor nerve terminals. In the current study, we investigated the effect of HCY on oxidative stress-induced impairment of transmitter release at the mouse diaphragm muscle. The mild oxidant H2O2 decreased the intensity of spontaneous quantum release from nerve terminals (measured as the frequency of miniature endplate potentials, MEPPs without changes in the amplitude of MEPPs, indicating a presynaptic effect. Pre-treatment with HCY for 2 h only slightly affected both amplitude and frequency of MEPPs but increased the inhibitory potency of H2O2 almost two fold. As HCY can activate certain subtypes of glutamate NMDA receptors we tested the role of NMDA receptors in the sensitizing action of HCY. Remarkably, the selective blocker of NMDA receptors, AP-5 completely removed the sensitizing effect of HCY on the H2O2-induced presynaptic depressant effect. Thus, at the mammalian neuromuscular junction HCY largely increases the inhibitory effect of oxidative stress on transmitter release, via NMDA receptors activation. This combined effect of HCY and local oxidative stress can specifically contribute to the damage of presynaptic terminals in neurodegenerative motoneuron diseases, including ALS.

  5. Quantal analysis reveals a functional correlation between presynaptic and postsynaptic efficacy in excitatory connections from rat neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardingham, Neil R; Read, Jenny C A; Trevelyan, Andrew J; Nelson, J Charmaine; Jack, J Julian B; Bannister, Neil J

    2010-01-27

    At many central synapses, the presynaptic bouton and postsynaptic density are structurally correlated. However, it is unknown whether this correlation extends to the functional properties of the synapses. To investigate this, we made recordings from synaptically coupled pairs of pyramidal neurons in rat visual cortex. The mean peak amplitude of EPSPs recorded from pairs of L2/3 neurons ranged between 40 microV and 2.9 mV. EPSP rise times were consistent with the majority of the synapses being located on basal dendrites; this was confirmed by full anatomical reconstructions of a subset of connected pairs. Over a third of the connections could be described using a quantal model that assumed simple binomial statistics. Release probability (P(r)) and quantal size (Q), as measured at the somatic recording site, showed considerable heterogeneity between connections. However, across the population of connections, values of P(r) and Q for individual connections were positively correlated with one another. This correlation also held for inputs to layer 5 pyramidal neurons from both layer 2/3 and neighboring layer 5 pyramidal neurons, suggesting that during development of cortical connections presynaptic and postsynaptic strengths are dependently scaled. For 2/3 to 2/3 connections, mean EPSP amplitude was correlated with both Q and P(r) values but uncorrelated with N, the number of functional release sites mediating the connection. The efficacy of a cortical connection is thus set by coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic strength.

  6. The amyloid precursor protein – a novel player within the molecular array of presynaptic nanomachines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eLassek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 20 years ago the amyloid precursor protein (APP was identified as the precursor protein of the Aβ peptide, the main component of senile plaques in brains affected by Alzheimer´s disease. The pathophysiology of AD, characterized by a massive loss of synapses, cognitive decline, and behavioral changes was in principle attributed to the accumulation of Aβ. Within the last decades, much effort has gone into understanding the molecular basis of the progression of Alzheimer´s disease. However, little is known about the actual physiological function of amyloid precursor proteins. Allocating APP to the proteome of the structurally and functionally dynamic presynaptic active zone highlights APP as a hitherto unknown player within the setting of the presynapse. The molecular array of presynaptic nanomachines comprising the life cycle of synaptic vesicles, exo- and endocytosis, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and mitochondrial activity provides a balance between structural and functional maintenance and diversity. The generation of genetically designed mouse models further deciphered APP as an essential player in synapse formation and plasticity. Deletion of APP causes an age-dependent phenotype: while younger mice revealed almost no physiological impairments, this condition was changed in the elderly mice. Interestingly, the proteomic composition of neurotransmitter release sites already revealed substantial changes at young age. These changes point to a network that incorporates APP into a cluster of nanomachines. Currently, the underlying mechanism of how APP acts within these machines is still elusive. Within the scope of this review, we shall construct a network of APP interaction partners within the presynaptic active zone. Furthermore, we intend to outline how deletion of APP affects this network during space and time leading to impairments in learning and memory. These alterations may provide a molecular link to the pathogenesis of

  7. Rat odontoblasts may use glutamate to signal dentin injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yi Sul; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Won, Jong Hwa; Vang, Hue; Oh, Seog Bae; Ro, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul

    2016-10-29

    Accumulating evidence indicates that odontoblasts act as sensor cells, capable of triggering action potentials in adjacent pulpal nociceptive axons, suggesting a paracrine signaling via a currently unknown mediator. Since glutamate can mediate signaling by non-neuronal cells, and peripheral axons may express glutamate receptors (GluR), we hypothesized that the expression of high levels of glutamate, and of sensory receptors in odontoblasts, combined with an expression of GluR in adjacent pulpal axons, is the morphological basis for odontoblastic sensory signaling. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the expression of glutamate, the thermo- and mechanosensitive ion channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and TWIK-1-related K+channel (TREK-1), and the glutamate receptor mGluR5, in a normal rat dental pulp, and following dentin injury. We also examined the glutamate release from odontoblast in cell culture. Odontoblasts were enriched with glutamate, at the level as high as in adjacent pulpal axons, and showed immunoreactivity for TRPV1, TRPA1, and TREK-1. Pulpal sensory axons adjacent to odontoblasts expressed mGluR5. Both the levels of glutamate in odontoblasts, and the expression of mGluR5 in nearby axons, were upregulated following dentin injury. The extracellular glutamate concentration was increased significantly after treating of odontoblast cell line with calcium permeable ionophore, suggesting glutamate release from odontoblasts. These findings lend morphological support to the hypothesis that odontoblasts contain glutamate as a potential neuroactive substance that may activate adjacent pulpal axons, and thus contribute to dental pain and hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate [(S)-Glu] is responsible for most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effect of (S)-Glu is mediated by both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate receptor agonists are generally a-amino acids with one or more...... stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  9. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2002-01-01

    ]Arachidonic acid release induced by both sPLA and glutamate was partially blocked by MK-801, indicating that the glutamate-NMDA-cPLA pathway contributes to sPLA -induced arachidonic acid release. Systemic administration of MK-801 to rats that had sPLA injected into the right striatum significantly decreased...

  10. Astrocytes revisited: concise historic outlook on glutamate homeostasis and signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpura, Vladimir; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2012-01-01

    Astroglia is a main type of brain neuroglia, which includes many cell sub-types that differ in their morphology and physiological properties and yet are united by the main function, which is the maintenance of brain homeostasis. Astrocytes employ a variety of mechanisms for communicating with neuronal networks. The communication mediated by neurotransmitter glutamate has received a particular attention. Glutamate is de novo synthesized exclusively in astrocytes; astroglia-derived glutamine is the source of glutamate for neurons. Glutamate is released from both neurons and astroglia through exocytosis, although various other mechanisms may also play a role. Glutamate-activated specific receptors trigger excitatory responses in neurons and astroglia. Here we overview main properties of glutamatergic transmission in neuronal-glial networks and identify some future challenges facing the field. PMID:23275317

  11. Increased gene dosage of Ube3a results in autism traits and decreased glutamate synaptic transmission in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen E P; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Zhang, Guangping; Jin, Zhe; Stoppel, David C; Anderson, Matthew P

    2011-10-05

    People with autism spectrum disorder are characterized by impaired social interaction, reduced communication, and increased repetitive behaviors. The disorder has a substantial genetic component, and recent studies have revealed frequent genome copy number variations (CNVs) in some individuals. A common CNV that occurs in 1 to 3% of those with autism--maternal 15q11-13 duplication (dup15) and triplication (isodicentric extranumerary chromosome, idic15)--affects several genes that have been suggested to underlie autism behavioral traits. To test this, we tripled the dosage of one of these genes, the ubiquitin protein ligase Ube3a, which is expressed solely from the maternal allele in mature neurons, and reconstituted the three core autism traits in mice: defective social interaction, impaired communication, and increased repetitive stereotypic behavior. The penetrance of these autism traits depended on Ube3a gene copy number. In animals with increased Ube3a gene dosage, glutamatergic, but not GABAergic, synaptic transmission was suppressed as a result of reduced presynaptic release probability, synaptic glutamate concentration, and postsynaptic action potential coupling. These results suggest that Ube3a gene dosage may contribute to the autism traits of individuals with maternal 15q11-13 duplication and support the idea that increased E3A ubiquitin ligase gene dosage results in reduced excitatory synaptic transmission.

  12. Effects of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, streptomycin and neomycin, on neuromuscular transmission. I. Presynaptic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiekers, J F

    1983-06-01

    The effects of two aminoglycoside antibiotics, streptomycin and neomycin, were studied in voltage-clamped transected twitch fibers of the costocutaneous muscles of garter snakes (species Thamnophis). The concentration-dependent effects of each antibiotic were quantitated by measuring miniature end-plate currents (mepcs) and evoked end-plate currents (epcs) in a single fiber before and in the presence of a wide range of concentrations of each antibiotic. The amplitude and the kinetics of these currents were studied and estimates of the quantal content of evoked transmitter release determined by the direct method of mean ratios, epc/mepc. A distinct separation was obtained between the concentrations of each antibiotic which demonstrated either pre- or postsynaptic actions. Both streptomycin and neomycin produced a concentration-dependent reduction in epc amplitude at concentrations which did not reduce mepc amplitude. Thus, the primary site of action for these antibiotics was considered of presynaptic origin. Streptomycin was approximately one-tenth as active as neomycin in reducing quantal release of acetylcholine. The marked depression in epc amplitude and quantal content produced by high concentrations of each antibiotic were reversed by elevating the external calcium concentration. Double logarithmic plots of the relationship between external calcium concentration and epc amplitude yielded a slope of approximately 3.8 in control physiological solution. In the presence of blocking concentrations of each antibiotic, increasing the external calcium concentration caused a parallel shift to the right of this relationship. These results suggest that the major mechanism for the neuromuscular depression produced by these aminoglycoside antibiotics is a competitive antagonism with calcium for a common presynaptic site required for evoked transmitter release.

  13. [Preparation of leucine-methyl glutamate-glutamic acid copolymers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, S; Shi, F; Huang, L; Zhou, Q; Lin, Z; Yi, W

    1997-06-01

    The method for preparing leucine-methyl glutamate-glutamic acid copolymer was studied. In the first place benzyl glutamate and methyl glutamate were synthesized respectively. Then N-carboxy anhydrides (NCA) of leucine, benzyl glutamate or methyl glutamate were prepared in a closed container by phosgene-toluene solution method. After copolymerization the copolymers were debenzylated and demethylated by anhydrous hydrogen bromide. The free carboxyl group mole content in side chains of the copolymer was controlled by various standing periods following bubbling HBr. Analysis of infrared spectrogram and ultraviolet asorbance of copolymers indicated that this procedure resulted in the loss of almost all benzyl groups and some methyl groups.

  14. Glutamate receptors in glia: new cells, new inputs and new functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, V; Ghiani, C A

    2000-07-01

    Functional glutamate receptors are expressed on the majority of glial cell types in the developing and mature brain. Although glutamate receptors on glia are activated by glutamate released from neurons, their physiological role remains largely unknown. Potential roles for these receptors in glia include regulation of proliferation and differentiation, and modulation of synaptic efficacy. Recent anatomical and functional evidence indicates that glutamate receptors on immature glia are activated through direct synaptic inputs. Therefore, glutamate and its receptors appear to be involved in a continuous crosstalk between neurons and glia during development and also in the mature brain.

  15. Presynaptic Adenosine Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Diverse Thalamocortical Short-Term Plasticity in the Mouse Whisker Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Giovanni; Martini, Francisco J.; Maravall, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) sets the sensitivity of a synapse to incoming activity and determines the temporal patterns that it best transmits. In “driver” thalamocortical (TC) synaptic populations, STP is dominated by depression during stimulation from rest. However, during ongoing stimulation, lemniscal TC connections onto layer 4 neurons in mouse barrel cortex express variable STP. Each synapse responds to input trains with a distinct pattern of depression or facilitation around its mean steady-state response. As a result, in common with other synaptic populations, lemniscal TC synapses express diverse rather than uniform dynamics, allowing for a rich representation of temporally varying stimuli. Here, we show that this STP diversity is regulated presynaptically. Presynaptic adenosine receptors of the A1R type, but not kainate receptors (KARs), modulate STP behavior. Blocking the receptors does not eliminate diversity, indicating that diversity is related to heterogeneous expression of multiple mechanisms in the pathway from presynaptic calcium influx to neurotransmitter release. PMID:26941610

  16. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2–mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  17. Evidence for glutamate as a neuroglial transmitter within sensory ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Ling-Hsuan; Gong, Kerui; Adedoyin, Mary; Ng, Johnson; Bhargava, Aditi; Ohara, Peter T; Jasmin, Luc

    2013-01-01

    This study examines key elements of glutamatergic transmission within sensory ganglia of the rat. We show that the soma of primary sensory neurons release glutamate when depolarized. Using acute dissociated mixed neuronal/glia cultures of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or trigeminal ganglia and a colorimetric assay, we show that when glutamate uptake by satellite glial cells (SGCs) is inhibited, KCl stimulation leads to simultaneous increase of glutamate in the culture medium. With calcium imaging we see that the soma of primary sensory neurons and SGCs respond to AMPA, NMDA, kainate and mGluR agonists, and selective antagonists block this response. Using whole cell patch-clamp technique, inward currents were recorded from small diameter (ganglion preparation) in response to local application of the above glutamate receptor agonists. Following a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of either the inferior orbital nerve or the sciatic nerve, glutamate expression increases in the trigeminal ganglia and DRG respectively. This increase occurs in neurons of all diameters and is present in the somata of neurons with injured axons as well as in somata of neighboring uninjured neurons. These data provides additional evidence that glutamate can be released within the sensory ganglion, and that the somata of primary sensory neurons as well as SGCs express functional glutamate receptors at their surface. These findings, together with our previous gene knockdown data, suggest that glutamatergic transmission within the ganglion could impact nociceptive threshold.

  18. Glutamate and Neurotrophic Factors in Neuronal Plasticity and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate’s role as a neurotransmitter at synapses has been known for 40 years, but glutamate has since been shown to regulate neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis and neuron survival in the developing and adult mammalian nervous system. Cell surface glutamate receptors are coupled to Ca2+ influx and release from endoplasmic reticulum stores which causes rapid (kinase- and protease-mediated) and delayed (transcription-dependent) responses that change the structure and function of neurons. Neurotrophic factors and glutamate interact to regulate developmental and adult neuroplasticity. For example, glutamate stimulates the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) which, in turn, modifies neuronal glutamate sensitivity, Ca2+ homeostasis and plasticity. Neurotrophic factors may modify glutamate signalling directly, by changing the expression of glutamate receptor subunits and Ca2+-regulating proteins, and also indirectly by inducing the production of antioxidant enzymes, energy-regulating proteins and anti-apoptotic Bcl2 family members. Excessive activation of glutamate receptors, under conditions of oxidative and metabolic stress, may contribute to neuronal dysfunction and degeneration in diseases ranging from stroke and Alzheimer’s disease to psychiatric disorders. By enhancing neurotrophic factor signalling, environmental factors such as exercise and dietary energy restriction, and chemicals such as antidepressants may optimize glutamatergic signalling and protect against neurological disorders. PMID:19076369

  19. A review of glutamate's role in traumatic brain injury mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Cameron H.

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter used by the central nervous system (CNS) for synaptic communication, and its extracellular concentration is tightly regulated by glutamate transporters located on nearby astrocytes. Both animal models and human clinical studies have demonstrated elevated glutamate levels immediately following a traumatic brain event, with the duration and severity of the rise corresponding to prognosis. This rise in extracellular glutamate likely results from a combination of excessive neurotransmitter release from damaged neurons and down regulation of uptake mechanisms in local astrocytes. The immediate results of a traumatic event can lead to necrotic tissue in severely injured regions, while prolonged increases in excitatory transmission can cause secondary excitotoxic injury through activation of delayed apoptotic pathways. Initial TBI animal studies utilized a variety of broad glutamate receptor antagonists to successfully combat secondary injury mechanisms, but unfortunately this same strategy has proven inconclusive in subsequent human trials due to deleterious side effects and heterogeneity of injuries. More recent treatment strategies have utilized specific glutamate receptor subunit antagonists in an effort to minimize side effects and have shown promising results. Future challenges will be detecting the concentration and kinetics of the glutamate rise following injury, determining which patient populations could benefit from antagonist treatment based on their extracellular glutamate concentrations and when drugs should be administered to maximize efficacy.

  20. Binding thermodynamics of a glutamate transporter homologue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Nicolas; Oh, SeCheol; Boudker, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate transporters catalyze concentrative uptake of the neurotransmitter into glial cells and neurons. Their transport cycle involves binding and release of the substrate on the extra- and intracellular sides of the plasma membranes, and translocation of the substrate-binding site across the lipid bilayers. The energy of the ionic gradients, mainly sodium, fuels the cycle. Here, we used a cross-linking approach to trap a glutamate transporter homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii in key conformational states with substrate-binding site facing either the extracellular or intracellular sides of the membrane to study their binding thermodynamics. We show that the chemical potential of sodium ions in solution is exclusively coupled to substrate binding and release, and not to substrate translocation. Despite the structural symmetry, the binding mechanisms are distinct on the opposite sides of the membrane and more complex than the current models suggest. PMID:23563139

  1. Mutations in STX1B, encoding a presynaptic protein, cause fever-associated epilepsy syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, J.; Siekierska, A.; Langlois, M.

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures affect 2-4% of all children(1) and have a strong genetic component(2). Recurrent mutations in three main genes (SCN1A, SCN1B and GABRG2)(3-5) have been identified that cause febrile seizures with or without epilepsy. Here we report the identification of mutations in STX1B, encoding...... syntaxin-1B(6), that are associated with both febrile seizures and epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing in independent large pedigrees(7,8) identified cosegregating STX1B mutations predicted to cause an early truncation or an in-frame insertion or deletion. Three additional nonsense or missense mutations....... Wild-type human syntaxin-1B but not a mutated protein rescued the effects of stx1b knockdown in zebrafish. Our results thus implicate STX1B and the presynaptic release machinery in fever-associated epilepsy syndromes....

  2. Morphine Protects Spinal Cord Astrocytes from Glutamate-Induced Apoptosis via Reducing Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is not only a neurotransmitter but also an important neurotoxin in central nervous system (CNS. Chronic elevation of glutamate induces both neuronal and glial cell apoptosis. However, its effect on astrocytes is complex and still remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether morphine, a common opioid ligand, could affect glutamate-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Primary cultured astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence/absence of morphine. It was found that morphine could reduce glutamate-induced apoptosis of astrocytes. Furthermore, glutamate activated Ca2+ release, thereby inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect. Using siRNA to reduce the expression of κ-opioid receptor, morphine could not effectively inhibit glutamate-stimulated Ca2+ release in astrocytes, the protective effect of morphine on glutamate-injured astrocytes was also suppressed. These results suggested that morphine could protect astrocytes from glutamate-induced apoptosis via reducing Ca2+ overload and ER stress pathways. In conclusion, this study indicated that excitotoxicity participated in the glutamate mediated apoptosis in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect via regulating Ca2+ release and ER stress.

  3. Sepsis causes presynaptic histamine H3 and alpha2-adrenergic dysfunction in canine myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zao-Qin; Bose, Deepak; Jacobs, Han; Light, R Bruce; Mink, Steven N

    2002-11-01

    Histamine H3 receptors and alpha2-adrenoceptors are presynaptic receptors that modulate norepinephrine (NE) release from sympathetic nerves innervating the cardiovascular system. We previously showed that cardiac H3 receptors are activated in sepsis, and that this activation leads to a decrease in the adrenergic response (AR) [J. Appl. Physiol. 85 (1998) 1693-1701] H3-receptors and alpha2-receptors appear to be coupled to GTP binding regulatory proteins (G) that modulate transmitter release by reducing calcium current into the nerve terminals through neuronal calcium channels. There may also be interaction between H3-receptors and alpha2-receptors on AR that may occur either at the receptor or a more downstream level. In the present study, we examined the effect of septic plasma on AR in a canine ventricular preparation in which field stimulation was used to produce AR. We determined whether there was interaction between H(3)-receptors and alpha2-adrenoceptors and tested whether H3 activation would attenuate the alpha2-agonist and alpha2-antagonist effects of clonidine and yohimbine, respectively. We also determined whether the mechanism by which septic plasma decreases the adrenergic response involves inactivation of an inhibitory G protein and used pertussis toxin (PTX) to assess this effect. We found that septic plasma attenuated AR produced by field stimulation, and that this decrease was mediated by a PTX sensitive inhibitory G protein. H3 activation also attenuated the alpha2-agonist and alpha2-antagonist effects on adrenergic activation as compared with nonseptic plasma. We conclude that presynaptic sympathetic dysfunction may contribute to cardiovascular collapse in sepsis.

  4. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  5. Single cocaine exposure does not alter striatal pre-synaptic dopamine function in mice: an [18 F]-FDOPA PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsall, David R; Kokkinou, Michelle; Veronese, Mattia; Coello, Christopher; Wells, Lisa A; Howes, Oliver D

    2017-12-01

    Cocaine is a recreational drug of abuse that binds to the dopamine transporter, preventing reuptake of dopamine into pre-synaptic terminals. The increased presence of synaptic dopamine results in stimulation of both pre- and post-synaptic dopamine receptors, considered an important mechanism by which cocaine elicits its reinforcing properties. However, the effects of acute cocaine administration on pre-synaptic dopamine function remain unclear. Non-invasive imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography have revealed impaired pre-synaptic dopamine function in chronic cocaine users. Similar impairments have been seen in animal studies, with microdialysis experiments indicating decreased basal dopamine release. Here we use micro positron emission tomography imaging techniques in mice to measure dopamine synthesis capacity and determine the effect of acute cocaine administration of pre-synaptic dopamine function. We show that a dose of 20 mg/kg cocaine is sufficient to elicit hyperlocomotor activity, peaking 15-20 min post treatment (p cocaine treatment (KiCer: 0.0097 per min vs. 0.0112 per min in vehicle controls, p > 0.05). Furthermore, expression levels of two key enzymes related to dopamine synthesis, tyrosine hydroxylase and aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase, within the striatum of scanned mice were not significantly affected by acute cocaine pre-treatment (p > 0.05). Our findings suggest that while the regulation of dopamine synthesis and release in the striatum have been shown to change with chronic cocaine use, leading to a reduced basal tone, these adaptations to pre-synaptic dopaminergic neurons are not initiated following a single exposure to the drug. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Xanomeline quasi-irreversibly bound to an ectopic site can stimulate presynaptic M2 receptors via the orthosteric binding site

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. S2 (2005), s. 90-90 ISSN 0022-3042. [Biennial Meeting of the International Society for Neurochemistry and the European Society for Neurochemistry /20./. 21.08.2005-26.08.2005, Innsbruck] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011206; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : xanomeline * presynaptic M2 receptor * acetylcholine release * brain cortex * wash-resistant binding Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  7. Comparative effects of pentobarbital on spontaneous and evoked transmitter release from inhibitory and excitatory nerve terminals in rat CA3 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min-Chul; Wakita, Masahito; Iwata, Satomi; Nonaka, Kiku; Kotani, Naoki; Akaike, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Pentobarbital (PB) modulates GABA(A) receptor-mediated postsynaptic responses through various mechanisms, and can directly activate the channel at higher doses. These channels exist both pre- and postsynaptically, and on the soma outside the synapse. PB also inhibits voltage-dependent Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ channels to decrease excitatory synaptic transmission. Just how these different sites of action combine to contribute to the overall effects of PB on inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission is less clear. To compare these pre- and postsynaptic actions of PB, we used a 'synaptic bouton' preparation of isolated rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons where we could measure in single neurons the effects of PB on spontaneous and single bouton evoked GABAergic inhibitory and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs, sEPSCs, eIPSCs and eEPSCs), respectively. Low (sedative) concentrations (3-10 μM) of PB increased the frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs and sEPSCs, and also presynaptically increased the amplitude of both eIPSCs and eEPSCs. There was no change in current kinetics at this low concentration. At higher concentrations (30-300 μM), PB decreased the frequency, and increased the amplitude of sIPSCs, and presynaptically decreased the amplitude of eIPSCs. The current decay phase of sIPSCs and eIPSCs was increased. An increase in both frequency and amplitude was seen for sEPSCs, while the eIPSCs was also decreased by a bicuculline-sensitive presynaptic effect. The results confirm the multiple sites of action of PB on inhibitory and excitatory transmission and demonstrate that the most sensitive site of action is on transmitter release, via effects on presynaptic GABA(A) receptors. At low concentrations, however, both glutamate and GABA release is similarly enhanced, making the final effects on neuronal excitability difficult to predict and dependent on the particular systems involved and/or on subtle differences in susceptibility amongst

  8. Glutamate/glutamine metabolism coupling between astrocytes and glioma cells: neuroprotection and inhibition of glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Pei-Sen; Kang, De-Zhi; Lin, Ru-Ying; Ye, Bing; Wang, Wei; Ye, Zu-Cheng

    2014-07-18

    Glioma glutamate release has been shown to promote the growth of glioma cells and induce neuronal injuries from epilepsy to neuronal death. However, potential counteractions from normal astrocytes against glioma glutamate release have not been fully evaluated. In this study, we investigated the glutamate/glutamine cycling between glioma cells and astrocytes and their impact on neuronal function. Co-cultures of glioma cells with astrocytes (CGA) in direct contact were established under different mix ratio of astrocyte/glioma. Culture medium conditioned in these CGAs were sampled for HPLC measurement, for neuronal ratiometric calcium imaging, and for neuronal survival assay. We found: (1) High levels of glutaminase expression in glioma cells, but not in astrocytes, glutaminase enables glioma cells to release large amount of glutamate in the presence of glutamine. (2) Glutamate levels in CGAs were directly determined by the astrocyte/glioma ratios, indicating a balance between glioma glutamate release and astrocyte glutamate uptake. (3) Culture media from CGAs of higher glioma/astrocyte ratios induced stronger neuronal Ca(2+) response and more severe neuronal death. (4) Co-culturing with astrocytes significantly reduced the growth rate of glioma cells. These results indicate that normal astrocytes in the brain play pivotal roles in glioma growth inhibition and in reducing neuronal injuries from glioma glutamate release. However, as tumor growth, the protective role of astrocytes gradually succumb to glioma cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Bee Venom on Glutamate-Induced Toxicity in Neuronal and Glial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Min; Yang, Eun Jin; Choi, Sun-Mi; Kim, Seon Hwy; Baek, Myung Gi; Jiang, Jing Hua

    2012-01-01

    Bee venom (BV), which is extracted from honeybees, is used in traditional Korean medical therapy. Several groups have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of BV in osteoarthritis both in vivo and in vitro. Glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Changes in glutamate release and uptake due to alterations in the activity of glutamate transporters have been reported in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzh...

  10. N-Acetyl-cysteine causes analgesia by reinforcing the endogenous activation of type-2 metabotropic glutamate receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabucci Matteo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacological activation of type-2 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu2 receptors causes analgesia in experimental models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Presynaptic mGlu2 receptors are activated by the glutamate released from astrocytes by means of the cystine/glutamate antiporter (System xc- or Sxc-. We examined the analgesic activity of the Sxc- activator, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, in mice developing inflammatory or neuropathic pain. Results A single injection of NAC (100 mg/kg, i.p. reduced nocifensive behavior in the second phase of the formalin test. NAC-induced analgesia was abrogated by the Sxc- inhibitor, sulphasalazine (8 mg/kg, i.p. or by the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495 (1 mg/kg, i.p.. NAC still caused analgesia in mGlu3−/− mice, but was inactive in mGlu2−/− mice. In wild-type mice, NAC retained the analgesic activity in the formalin test when injected daily for 7 days, indicating the lack of tolerance. Both single and repeated injections of NAC also caused analgesia in the complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA model of chronic inflammatory pain, and, again, analgesia was abolished by LY341495. Data obtained in mice developing neuropathic pain in response to chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve were divergent. In this model, a single injection of NAC caused analgesia that was reversed by LY341495, whereas repeated injections of NAC were ineffective. Thus, tolerance to NAC-induced analgesia developed in the CCI model, but not in models of inflammatory pain. The CFA and CCI models differed with respect to the expression levels of xCT (the catalytic subunit of Sxc- and activator of G-protein signaling type-3 (AGS3 in the dorsal portion of the lumbar spinal cord. CFA-treated mice showed no change in either protein, whereas CCI mice showed an ipislateral reduction in xCT levels and a bilateral increase in AGS3 levels in the spinal cord. Conclusions These data demonstrate that

  11. Fabrication of Implantable, Enzyme-Immobilized Glutamate Sensors for the Monitoring of Glutamate Concentration Changes in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina T.-C. Tseng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate sensors based on the immobilization of glutamate oxidase (GlutOx were prepared by adsorption on electrodeposited chitosan (Method 1 and by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde (Method 2 on micromachined platinum microelectrodes. It was observed that glutamate sensors prepared by Method 1 have faster response time (<2 s and lower detection limit (2.5 ± 1.1 μM compared to that prepared by Method 2 (response time: <5 sec and detection limit: 6.5 ± 1.7 μM; glutamate sensors prepared by Method 2 have a larger linear detection range (20–352 μM and higher sensitivity (86.8 ± 8.8 nA·μM−1·cm−2, N = 12 compared to those prepared by Method 1 (linear detection range: 20–217 μM and sensitivity: 34.9 ± 4.8 nA·μM−1·cm−2, N = 8. The applicability of the glutamate sensors in vivo was also demonstrated. The glutamate sensors were implanted into the rat brain to monitor the stress-induced extracellular glutamate release in the hypothalamus of the awake, freely moving rat.

  12. Glutamate Transport: A New Bench to Bedside Mechanism for Treating Drug Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Sade; Kalivas, Peter W

    2017-10-01

    Drug addiction has often been described as a "hijacking" of the brain circuits involved in learning and memory. Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, and its contribution to synaptic plasticity and learning processes is well established in animal models. Likewise, over the past 20 years the addiction field has ascribed a critical role for glutamatergic transmission in the development of addiction. Chronic drug use produces enduring neuroadaptations in corticostriatal projections that are believed to contribute to a maladaptive deficit in inhibitory control over behavior. Much of this research focuses on the role played by ionotropic glutamate receptors directly involved in long-term potentiation and depression or metabotropic receptors indirectly modulating synaptic plasticity. Importantly, the balance between glutamate release and clearance tightly regulates the patterned activation of these glutamate receptors, emphasizing an important role for glutamate transporters in maintaining extracellular glutamate levels. Five excitatory amino acid transporters participate in active glutamate reuptake. Recent evidence suggests that these glutamate transporters can be modulated by chronic drug use at a variety of levels. In this review, we synopsize the evidence and mechanisms associated with drug-induced dysregulation of glutamate transport. We then summarize the preclinical and clinical data suggesting that glutamate transporters offer an effective target for the treatment of drug addiction. In particular, we focus on the role that altered glutamate transporters have in causing drug cues and contexts to develop an intrusive quality that guides maladaptive drug seeking behaviors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  13. The presynaptic Munc13-1 binds alcohol and modulates alcohol self-administration in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Joydip; Xu, Shiyu; Pany, Satyabrata; Guillory, Ashley; Shah, Vrutant; Roman, Gregg W.

    2013-01-01

    Munc13-1 is a presynaptic active-zone protein essential for neurotransmitter release and involved in presynaptic plasticity in brain. Ethanol, butanol and octanol quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of the C1 domain of Munc13-1 with EC50s of 52 mM, 26 mM and 0.7 mM, respectively. Photoactive azialcohols photolabeled Munc13-1 C1 exclusively at Glu-582, which was identified by mass spectrometry. Mutation of Glu-582 to alanine, leucine and histidine reduced the alcohol binding two- to five-fold. Circular dichroism studies suggested that binding of alcohol increased the stability of the wild type Munc13-1 compared with the mutants. If Munc13-1 plays some role in the neural effects of alcohol in vivo, changes in the activity of this protein should produce differences in the behavioral responses to ethanol. We tested this prediction with a loss-of-function mutation in the conserved Dunc-13 in Drosophila melanogaster. The Dunc-13P84200/+ heterozygotes have 50% wild type levels of Dunc-13 mRNA and display a very robust increase in ethanol self-administration. This phenotype is reversed by the expression of the rat Munc13-1 protein within the Drosophila nervous system. The present studies indicate that Munc13-1 C1 has binding site(s) for alcohols and Munc13-1 activity is sufficient to restore normal self-administration to Drosophila mutants deficient in Dunc-13 activity. PMID:23692447

  14. Paired-pulse facilitation and depression at unitary synapses in rat hippocampus: quantal fluctuation affects subsequent release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debanne, D; Guérineau, N C; Gähwiler, B H; Thompson, S M

    1996-01-01

    1. Excitatory synaptic transmission between pairs of monosynaptically coupled pyramidal cells was examined in rat hippocampal slice cultures. Action potentials were elicited in single CA3 pyramidal cells impaled with microelectrodes and unitary excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded in whole-cell voltage-clamped CA1 or CA3 cells. 2. The amplitude of successive unitary EPSCs in response to single action potentials varied. The amplitude of EPSCs was altered by adenosine or changes in the [Mg2+]/[CA2+] ratio. We conclude that single action potentials triggered the release of multiple quanta of glutamate. 3. When two action potentials were elicited in the presynaptic cell, the amplitude of the second EPSC was inversely related to the amplitude of the first. Paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) was observed when the first EPSC was small, i.e. the second EPSC was larger than the first, whereas paired-pulse depression (PPD) was observed when the first EPSC was large. 4. The number of trials displaying PPD was greater when release probability was increased, and smaller when release probability was decreased. 5. PPD was not postsynaptically mediated because it was unaffected by decreasing ionic flux with 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) or receptor desensitization with aniracetam. 6. PPF was maximal at an interstimulus interval of 70 ms and recovered within 500 ms. Recovery from PPD occurred within 5 s. 7. We propose that multiple release sites are formed by the axon of a CA3 pyramidal cell and a single postsynaptic CA1 or CA3 cell. PPF is observed if the first action potential fails to release transmitter at most release sites. PPD is observed if the first action potential successfully triggers release at most release sites. 8. Our observations of PPF are consistent with the residual calcium hypothesis. We conclude that PPD results from a decrease in quantal content, perhaps due to short-term depletion of readily releasable vesicles. PMID:9011608

  15. Glucose replaces glutamate as energy substrate to fuel glutamate uptake in glutamate dehydrogenase-deficient astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nissen, Jakob D; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-07-01

    Cultured astrocytes treated with siRNA to knock down glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were used to investigate whether this enzyme is important for the utilization of glutamate as an energy substrate. By incubation of these cells in media containing different concentrations of glutamate (range 100-500 µM) in the presence or in the absence of glucose, the metabolism of these substrates was studied by using tritiated glutamate or 2-deoxyglucose as tracers. In addition, the cellular contents of glutamate and ATP were determined. The astrocytes were able to maintain physiological levels of ATP regardless of the expression level of GDH and the incubation condition, indicating a high degree of flexibility with regard to regulatory mechanisms involved in maintaining an adequate energy level in the cells. Glutamate uptake was found to be increased in these cells when exposed to increasing levels of extracellular glutamate independently of the GDH expression level. Moreover, increased intracellular glutamate content was observed in the GDH-deficient cells after a 2-hr incubation in the presence of 100 µM glutamate. It is significant that GDH-deficient cells exhibited an increased utilization of glucose in the presence of 250 and 500 µM glutamate, monitored as an increase in the accumulation of tritiated 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate. These findings underscore the importance of the expression level of GDH for the ability to utilize glutamate as an energy source fueling its own energy-requiring uptake. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Evidence for synergistic control of glutamate biosynthesis by glutamate dehydrogenases and glutamate in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannek, Lorena; Thiele, Martin J; Ischebeck, Till; Gunka, Katrin; Hammer, Elke; Völker, Uwe; Commichau, Fabian M

    2015-09-01

    In the Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis glutamate is synthesized by the glutamine synthetase and the glutamate synthase (GOGAT). During growth with carbon sources that exert carbon catabolite repression, the rocG glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) gene is repressed and the transcription factor GltC activates the expression of the GOGAT encoding gltAB genes. In the presence of amino acids of the glutamate family, the GDH RocG is synthesized and the enzyme prevents GltC from binding to DNA. The dual control of glutamate biosynthesis allows the efficient utilization of the available nutrients. Here we provide genetic and biochemical evidence that, like RocG, also the paralogous GDH GudB can inhibit the transcription factor GltC, thereby controlling glutamate biosynthesis. Contradictory previous observations show that high level of GDH activity does not result in permanent inhibition of GltC. By controlling the intracellular levels of glutamate through feeding with exogenous arginine, we observed that the GDH-dependent control of GltC and thus expression of the gltAB genes inversely correlates with the glutamate pool. These results suggest that the B. subtilis GDHs RocG and GudB in fact act as glutamate sensors. In conclusion, the GDH-mediated control of glutamate biosynthesis seems to depend on the intracellular glutamate concentration. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Microdialysis of GABA and glutamate : Analysis, interpretation and comparison with microsensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zeyden, Miranda; Denziel, Weite H.; Rea, Kieran; Cremers, Thomas I.; Westerink, Ben H.

    GABA and glutamate sampled from the brain by microdialysis do not always fulfill the classic criteria for exocytotic release. In this regard the origin (neuronal vs. astroglial, synaptic vs. extrasynaptic) of glutamate and GABA collected by microdialysis as well as in the ECIF itself, is still a

  18. Homeostatic Presynaptic Plasticity Is Specifically Regulated by P/Q-type Ca2+ Channels at Mammalian Hippocampal Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander F. Jeans

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VGCC represent the principal source of Ca2+ ions driving evoked neurotransmitter release at presynaptic boutons. In mammals, presynaptic Ca2+ influx is mediated mainly via P/Q-type and N-type VGCC, which differ in their properties. Changes in their relative contributions tune neurotransmission both during development and in Hebbian plasticity. However, whether this represents a functional motif also present in other forms of activity-dependent regulation is unknown. Here, we study the role of VGCC in homeostatic plasticity (HSP in mammalian hippocampal neurons using optical techniques. We find that changes in evoked Ca2+ currents specifically through P/Q-type, but not N-type, VGCC mediate bidirectional homeostatic regulation of both neurotransmitter release efficacy and the size of the major synaptic vesicle pools. Selective dependence of HSP on P/Q-type VGCC in mammalian terminals has important implications for phenotypes associated with P/Q-type channelopathies, including migraine and epilepsy.

  19. Bortezomib induces neuropathic pain through protein kinase C-mediated activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing-Dun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Chen, Hong; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2017-09-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs, including bortezomib, often cause painful peripheral neuropathy, which is a severe dose-limiting adverse effect experienced by many cancer patients. The glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) at the spinal cord level are critically involved in the synaptic plasticity associated with neuropathic pain. In this study, we determined whether treatment with bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, affects the NMDAR activity of spinal dorsal horn neurons. Systemic treatment with bortezomib in rats did not significantly affect postsynaptic NMDAR currents elicited by puff application of NMDA directly to dorsal horn neurons. Bortezomib treatment markedly increased the baseline frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), which was completely normalized by the NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5). AP5 also reduced the amplitude of monosynaptic EPSCs evoked by dorsal root stimulation in bortezomib-treated, but not vehicle-treated, rats. Furthermore, inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with chelerythrine fully reversed the increased frequency of miniature EPSCs and the amplitude of evoked EPSCs in bortezomib-treated rats. Intrathecal injection of AP5 and chelerythrine both profoundly attenuated mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by systemic treatment with bortezomib. In addition, treatment with bortezomib induced striking membrane translocation of PKC-βII, PKC-δ, and PKC-ε in the dorsal root ganglion. Our findings indicate that bortezomib treatment potentiates nociceptive input from primary afferent nerves via PKC-mediated tonic activation of presynaptic NMDARs. Targeting presynaptic NMDARs and PKC at the spinal cord level may be an effective strategy for treating chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Does human presynaptic striatal dopamine function predict social conformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Paul R A; Benecke, Aaf; Puraite, Julita; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Shotbolt, Paul; Reeves, Suzanne J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Howes, Oliver; Egerton, Alice

    2014-03-01

    Socially desirable responding (SDR) is a personality trait which reflects either a tendency to present oneself in an overly positive manner to others, consistent with social conformity (impression management (IM)), or the tendency to view one's own behaviour in an overly positive light (self-deceptive enhancement (SDE)). Neurochemical imaging studies report an inverse relationship between SDR and dorsal striatal dopamine D₂/₃ receptor availability. This may reflect an association between SDR and D₂/₃ receptor expression, synaptic dopamine levels or a combination of the two. In this study, we used a [¹⁸F]-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET) image database to investigate whether SDR is associated with presynaptic dopamine function. Striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA uptake, (k(i)(cer), min⁻¹), was determined in two independent healthy participant cohorts (n=27 and 19), by Patlak analysis using a cerebellar reference region. SDR was assessed using the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R) Lie scale, and IM and SDE were measured using the Paulhus Deception Scales. No significant associations were detected between Lie, SDE or IM scores and striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA k(i)(cer). These results indicate that presynaptic striatal dopamine function is not associated with social conformity and suggests that social conformity may be associated with striatal D₂/₃ receptor expression rather than with synaptic dopamine levels.

  1. Glucose replaces glutamate as energy substrate to fuel glutamate uptake in glutamate dehydrogenase-deficient astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nissen, Jakob D; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    Cultured astrocytes treated with siRNA to knock down glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were used to investigate whether this enzyme is important for the utilization of glutamate as an energy substrate. By incubation of these cells in media containing different concentrations of glutamate (range 100......-500 µM) in the presence or in the absence of glucose, the metabolism of these substrates was studied by using tritiated glutamate or 2-deoxyglucose as tracers. In addition, the cellular contents of glutamate and ATP were determined. The astrocytes were able to maintain physiological levels of ATP...... regardless of the expression level of GDH and the incubation condition, indicating a high degree of flexibility with regard to regulatory mechanisms involved in maintaining an adequate energy level in the cells. Glutamate uptake was found to be increased in these cells when exposed to increasing levels...

  2. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  3. Immunochemical characterization of the brain glutamate binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.

    1986-01-01

    A glutamate binding protein (GBP) was purified from bovine and rat brain to near homogeneity. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against this protein. An enzyme-linked-immunosorbent-assay was used to quantify and determine the specificity of the antibody response. The antibodies were shown to strongly react with bovine brain GBP and the analogous protein from rat brain. The antibodies did not show any crossreactivity with the glutamate metabolizing enzymes, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase and glutamyl transpeptidase, however it crossreacted moderately with glutamate decarboxylase. The antibodies were also used to define the possible physiologic activity of GBP in synaptic membranes. The antibodies were shown: (i) to inhibit the excitatory amino-acid stimulation of thiocyanate (SCN)flux, (ii) had no effect on transport of L-Glutamic acid across the synaptic membrane, and (iii) had no effect on the depolarization-induced release of L-glutamate. When the anti-GBP antibodies were used to localize and quantify the GBP distribution in various subcellular fractions and in brain tissue samples, it was found that the hippocampus had the highest immunoreactivity followed by the cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex and caudate-putamen. The distribution of immunoreactivity in the subcellular fraction were as follows: synaptic membranes > crude mitochondrial fraction > homogenate > myelin. In conclusion these studies suggest that: (a) the rat brain GBP and the bovine brain GBP are immunologically homologous protein, (b) there are no structural similarities between the GBP and the glutamate metabolizing enzymes with the exception of glutamate decarboxylase and (c) the subcellular and regional distribution of the GBP immunoreactivity followed a similar pattern as observed for L-[ 3 H]-binding

  4. Delineation of glutamate pathways and secretory responses in pancreatic islets with β-cell-specific abrogation of the glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetterli, Laurène; Carobbio, Stefania; Pournourmohammadi, Shirin; Martin-Del-Rio, Rafael; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Tamarit-Rodriguez, Jorge; Maechler, Pierre

    2012-10-01

    In pancreatic β-cells, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) modulates insulin secretion, although its function regarding specific secretagogues is unclear. This study investigated the role of GDH using a β-cell-specific GDH knockout mouse model, called βGlud1(-/-). The absence of GDH in islets isolated from βGlud1(-/-) mice resulted in abrogation of insulin release evoked by glutamine combined with 2-aminobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid or l-leucine. Reintroduction of GDH in βGlud1(-/-) islets fully restored the secretory response. Regarding glucose stimulation, insulin secretion in islets isolated from βGlud1(-/-) mice exhibited half of the response measured in control islets. The amplifying pathway, tested at stimulatory glucose concentrations in the presence of KCl and diazoxide, was markedly inhibited in βGlud1(-/-) islets. On glucose stimulation, net synthesis of glutamate from α-ketoglutarate was impaired in GDH-deficient islets. Accordingly, glucose-induced elevation of glutamate levels observed in control islets was absent in βGlud1(-/-) islets. Parallel biochemical pathways, namely alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, could not compensate for the lack of GDH. However, the secretory response to glucose was fully restored by the provision of cellular glutamate when βGlud1(-/-) islets were exposed to dimethyl glutamate. This shows that permissive levels of glutamate are required for the full development of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and that GDH plays an indispensable role in this process.

  5. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. I...

  6. Glutamate mechanisms underlying opiate memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.; de Vries, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    As the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, glutamate plays an undisputable integral role in opiate addiction. This relates, in part, to the fact that addiction is a disorder of learning and memory, and glutamate is required for most types of memory formation. As opiate addiction

  7. Substrate and Cation Binding Mechanism of Glutamate Transporter Homologs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate transporters and their homologs are membrane proteins that transport glutamate and aspartate together with sodium ions and/or protons. Human glutamate transporters remove the neurotransmitter glutamate after signal transmission. Therefore, glutamate transporters play a great role in

  8. Pharmacological treatments inhibiting levodopa-induced dyskinesias in MPTP-lesioned monkeys: brain glutamate biochemical correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eMorin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Antiglutamatergic drugs can relieve Parkinson’s disease (PD symptoms and decrease L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID. This review reports relevant studies investigating glutamate receptor subtypes in relation to motor complications in PD patients and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP-lesioned monkeys. Antagonists of the ionotropic glutamate receptors, such as NMDA and AMPA receptors, display antidyskinetic activity in PD patients and animal models such as the MPTP monkey. Metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5 receptor antagonists were shown to reduce the severity of LID in PD patients as well as in already dyskinetic non-human primates and to prevent the development of LID in de novo treatments in non-human primates. An increase in striatal post-synaptic NMDA, AMPA and mGlu5 receptors is documented in PD patients and MPTP monkeys with LID. This increase can be prevented in MPTP monkeys with the addition of a specific glutamate receptor antagonist to the L-DOPA treatment and also with drugs of various pharmacological specificities suggesting multiple receptor interactions. This is yet to be well documented for presynaptic mGlu4 and mGlu2/3 and offers additional new promising avenues.

  9. Calcium microdomains at presynaptic active zones of vertebrate hair cells unmasked by stochastic deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolozzi, Mario; Lelli, Andrea; Mammano, Fabio

    2008-08-01

    Signal transduction by auditory and vestibular hair cells involves an impressive ensemble of finely tuned control mechanisms, strictly dependent on the local intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). The study of Ca(2+) dynamics in hair cells typically combines Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent indicators (dyes), patch clamp and optical microscopy to produce images of the patterns of fluorescence of a Ca(2+) indicator following various stimulation protocols. Here we describe a novel method that combines electrophysiological recordings, fluorescence imaging and numerical simulations to effectively deconvolve Ca(2+) signals within cytoplasmic microdomains that would otherwise remain inaccessible to direct observation. The method relies on the comparison of experimental data with virtual signals derived from a Monte Carlo reaction-diffusion model based on a realistic reconstruction of the relevant cell boundaries in three dimensions. The model comprises Ca(2+) entry at individual presynaptic active zones followed by diffusion, buffering, extrusion and release of Ca(2+). Our results indicate that changes of the hair cell [Ca(2+)](i) during synaptic transmission are primarily controlled by the Ca(2+) endogenous buffers both at short (hair cell endogenous Ca(2+) buffers and Ca(2+)-ATPases. We finally show that experimental fluorescence data collected during Ca(2+) influx are not interpreted correctly if the [Ca(2+)](i) is estimated by assuming that Ca(2+) equilibrates instantly with its reactants. In our opinion, this approach is of potentially general interest as it can be easily adapted to the study of Ca(2+) dynamics in diverse biological systems.

  10. Unique presynaptic alpha 2-receptor selectivity and specificity of the antihypertensive agent moxonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, B I

    1988-10-01

    The characteristics of the alpha-receptor activating property of the new antihypertensive agent moxonidine (4-chloro-N-(4, 5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-methyl-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinamine, BDF 5895) was studied using peripheral vasculature and brain membranes of various animals. Moxonidine exerted a full agonist effect in elevating diastolic blood pressure in the pithed rat. Activation of postsynaptic alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors contribute to the vasoconstrictory effect in rats. In the vasculature of the rabbit, moxonidine was a full agonist at presynaptic alpha 2-receptors in inhibiting transmitter release induced by electrical stimulation of pulmonary artery strips. At postsynaptic sites, exogenously applied moxonidine was a full agonist at alpha 1-receptors in the isolated aorta, pulmonary artery and vena cava of the rabbit. Selectivity for alpha 2-receptors in the pulmonary artery was 106-fold. In rat brain membranes, moxonidine showed 288-fold greater selectivity for alpha 2-receptors, when the displacement of [3H]-rauwolscine was compared with the displacement of [3H]-prazosin. On the whole, clonidine exhibited greater potency than moxonidine on both alpha-receptor subtypes, but moxonidine consistently showed greater alpha 2-receptor selectivity than clonidine. In the guinea pig myocardium, moxonidine caused neither bradycardia nor tachycardia in the isolated right atrium and produced a negligible positive inotropic effect at 100 mumol/l in the isolated papillary muscle.

  11. Metabotropic glutamate receptors in glial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Antoni, Simona; Berretta, Antonio; Bonaccorso, Carmela Maria; Bruno, Valeria; Aronica, Eleonora; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Catania, Maria Vincenza

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) and exerts its actions via a number of ionotropic glutamate receptors/channels and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. In addition to being expressed in neurons, glutamate receptors are expressed in

  12. fMRI study of the role of glutamate NMDA receptor in the olfactory adaptation in rats: Insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms of olfactory adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fuqiang; Wang, Xiaohai; Zariwala, Hatim A; Uslaner, Jason M; Houghton, Andrea K; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L; Hostetler, Eric; Winkelmann, Christopher T; Hines, Catherine D G

    2017-04-01

    Olfactory adaptation, characterized by attenuation of response to repeated odor stimulations or continuous odor exposure, is an intrinsic feature of olfactory processing. Adaptation can be induced by either "synaptic depression" due to depletion of neurotransmitters, or "enhanced inhibition" onto principle neurons by local inhibitory interneurons in olfactory structures. It is not clear which mechanism plays a major role in olfactory adaptation. More importantly, molecular sources of enhanced inhibition have not been identified. In this study, olfactory responses to either repeated 40-s stimulations with interstimulus intervals (ISI) of 140-s or 30-min, or a single prolonged 200-s stimulus were measured by fMRI in different naïve rats. Olfactory adaptations in the olfactory bulb (OB), anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), and piriform cortex (PC) were observed only with repeated 40-s odor stimulations, and no olfactory adaptations were detected during the prolonged 200-s stimulation. Interestingly, in responses to repeated 40-s odor stimulations in the PC, the first odor stimulation induced positive activations, and odor stimulations under adapted condition induced negative activations. The negative activations suggest that "sparse coding" and "global inhibition" are the characteristics of olfactory processing in PC, and the global inhibition manifests only under an adapted condition, not a naïve condition. Further, we found that these adaptations were NMDA receptor dependent; an NMDA receptor antagonist (MK801) blocked the adaptations. Based on the mechanism that glutamate NMDA receptor plays a role in the inhibition onto principle neurons by interneurons, our data suggest that the olfactory adaptations are caused by enhanced inhibition from interneurons. Combined with the necessity of the interruption of odor stimulation to observe the adaptations, the molecular source for the enhanced inhibition is most likely an increased glutamate release from presynaptic

  13. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  14. Regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, J F; Wakim, J; Fischer, R S

    1981-01-01

    The activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase in Bacillus subtilis was influenced by the carbon source, but not the nitrogen source, in the growth medium. The highest specific activity for this enzyme was found when B. subtilis was grown in a minimal or rich medium that contained glutamate as the carbon source. It is proposed that glutamate dehydrogenase serves a catabolic function in the metabolism of glutamate, is induced by glutamate, and is subjec...

  15. Regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, J F; Wakim, J; Fischer, R S

    1981-01-01

    The activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase in Bacillus subtilis was influenced by the carbon source, but not the nitrogen source, in the growth medium. The highest specific activity for this enzyme was found when B. subtilis was grown in a minimal or rich medium that contained glutamate as the carbon source. It is proposed that glutamate dehydrogenase serves a catabolic function in the metabolism of glutamate, is induced by glutamate, and is subject to catabolite repression. PMID:6118356

  16. Presynaptic pH and vesicle fusion in Drosophila larvae neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Lesley; Harries, Peter; Sydlik, Sebastian; Schwiening, Christof J

    2013-11-01

    Both intracellular pH (pHi) and synaptic cleft pH change during neuronal activity yet little is known about how these pH shifts might affect synaptic transmission by influencing vesicle fusion. To address this we imaged pH- and Ca(2+) -sensitive fluorescent indicators (HPTS, Oregon green) in boutons at neuromuscular junctions. Electrical stimulation of motor nerves evoked presynaptic Ca(2+) i rises and pHi falls (∼0.1 pH units) followed by recovery of both Ca(2+) i and pHi. The plasma-membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) inhibitor, 5(6)-carboxyeosin diacetate, slowed both the calcium recovery and the acidification. To investigate a possible calcium-independent role for the pHi shifts in modulating vesicle fusion we recorded post-synaptic miniature end-plate potential (mEPP) and current (mEPC) frequency in Ca(2+) -free solution. Acidification by propionate superfusion, NH(4)(+) withdrawal, or the inhibition of acid extrusion on the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) induced a rise in miniature frequency. Furthermore, the inhibition of acid extrusion enhanced the rise induced by propionate addition and NH(4)(+) removal. In the presence of NH(4)(+), 10 out of 23 cells showed, after a delay, one or more rises in miniature frequency. These findings suggest that Ca(2+) -dependent pHi shifts, caused by the PMCA and regulated by NHE, may stimulate vesicle release. Furthermore, in the presence of membrane permeant buffers, exocytosed acid or its equivalents may enhance release through positive feedback. This hitherto neglected pH signalling, and the potential feedback role of vesicular acid, could explain some important neuronal excitability changes associated with altered pH and its buffering. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Reactive oxygen species contribute to the presynaptic action of extracellular ATP at the frog neuromuscular junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giniatullin, AR; Grishin, SN; Sharifullina, ER; Petrov, AM; Zefirov, AL; Giniatullin, RA

    2005-01-01

    During normal cell metabolism the production of intracellular ATP is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which appear to be important signalling molecules. Both ATP and ROS can be released extracellularly by skeletal muscle during intense activity. Using voltage clamp recording combined with imaging and biochemical assay of ROS, we tested the hypothesis that at the neuromuscular junction extracellular ATP generates ROS to inhibit transmitter release from motor nerve endings. We found that ATP produced the presynaptic inhibitory action on multiquantal end-plate currents. The inhibitory action of ATP (but not that of adenosine) was significantly reduced by several antioxidants or extracellular catalase, which breaks down H2O2. Consistent with these data, the depressant effect of ATP was dramatically potentiated by the pro-oxidant Fe2+. Exogenous H2O2 reproduced the depressant effects of ATP and showed similar sensitivity to anti- and pro-oxidants. While NO also inhibited synaptic transmission, inhibitors of the NO-producing cascade did not prevent the depressant action of ATP. The ferrous oxidation in xylenol orange assay showed the increase of ROS production by ATP and 2-MeSADP but not by adenosine. Suramin, a non-selective antagonist of P2 receptors, and pertussis toxin prevented the action of ATP on ROS production. Likewise, imaging with the ROS-sensitive dye carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein revealed increased production of ROS in the muscle treated with ATP or ADP while UTP or adenosine had no effect. Thus, generation of ROS contributed to the ATP-mediated negative feedback mechanism controlling quantal secretion of ACh from the motor nerve endings. PMID:15774519

  18. In vivo impact of presynaptic calcium channel dysfunction on motor axons in episodic ataxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Susan E; Tan, S Veronica; Burke, David; Labrum, Robyn W; Haworth, Andrea; Gibbons, Vaneesha S; Sweeney, Mary G; Griggs, Robert C; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Bostock, Hugh; Hanna, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    Ion channel dysfunction causes a range of neurological disorders by altering transmembrane ion fluxes, neuronal or muscle excitability, and neurotransmitter release. Genetic neuronal channelopathies affecting peripheral axons provide a unique opportunity to examine the impact of dysfunction of a single channel subtype in detail in vivo. Episodic ataxia type 2 is caused by mutations in CACNA1A, which encodes the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated calcium channel Cav2.1. In peripheral motor axons, this channel is highly expressed at the presynaptic neuromuscular junction where it contributes to action potential-evoked neurotransmitter release, but it is not expressed mid-axon or thought to contribute to action potential generation. Eight patients from five families with genetically confirmed episodic ataxia type 2 underwent neurophysiological assessment to determine whether axonal excitability was normal and, if not, whether changes could be explained by Cav2.1 dysfunction. New mutations in the CACNA1A gene were identified in two families. Nerve conduction studies were normal, but increased jitter in single-fibre EMG studies indicated unstable neuromuscular transmission in two patients. Excitability properties of median motor axons were compared with those in 30 age-matched healthy control subjects. All patients had similar excitability abnormalities, including a high electrical threshold and increased responses to hyperpolarizing (P ataxia type 2 thus has unexpected effects on axon excitability, which may reflect an indirect effect of abnormal calcium current fluxes during development. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved.

  19. N-cadherin induces partial differentiation of cholinergic presynaptic terminals in heterologous cultures of brainstem neurons and CHO cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Flannery

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available N-cadherin is a calcium-sensitive cell adhesion molecule commonly expressed at synaptic junctions and contributes to formation and maturation of synaptic contacts. This study used heterologous cell cultures of brainstem cholinergic neurons and transfected Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cells to examine whether N-cadherin is sufficient to induce differentiation of cholinergic presynaptic terminals. Brainstem nuclei isolated from transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of choline acetyltransferase transcriptional regulatory elements (ChATBACEGFP were cultured as tissue explants for five days and cocultured with transfected CHO cells for an additional two days. Immunostaining for synaptic vesicle proteins SV2 and synapsin I revealed a ~3-fold increase in the area of SV2 immunolabeling over N-cadherin expressing CHO cells, and this effect was enhanced by coexpression of p120-catenin. Synapsin I immunolabeling per axon length was also increased on N-cadherin expressing CHO cells but required coexpression of p120-catenin. To determine whether N-cadherin induces formation of neurotransmitter release sites, whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings of CHO cells expressing alpha-3 and beta-4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR subunits in contact with cholinergic axons were used to monitor excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs and miniature EPSPs (mEPSPs. EPSPs and mEPSPs were not detected in both, control and in N-cadherin expressing CHO cells in the absence or presence of tetrodotoxin. These results indicate that expression of N-cadherin in non-neuronal cells is sufficient to initiate differentiation of presynaptic cholinergic terminals by inducing accumulation of synaptic vesicles; however, development of readily detectable mature cholinergic release sites and/or clustering of postsynaptic nAChR may require expression of additional synaptogenic proteins.

  20. Presynaptic localization of histamine H3-receptors in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, K.; Mizuguchi, H.; Fukui, H.; Wada, H. (Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1991-06-28

    The localization of histamine H3-receptors in subcellular fractions from the rat brain was examined in a (3H) (R) alpha-methylhistamine binding assay and compared with those of histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors. Major (3H)(R) alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities ((3H)ligand binding vs. protein amount) were recovered from the P2 fraction by differential centrifugation. Minor (3H)(R)alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities were also detected in the P3 fraction. Further subfractionation of the P2 fraction by discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed major recoveries of (3H)(R)alpha-methylhistamine binding in myelin (MYE) and synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) fractions. A further increase in specific activity was observed in the MYE fraction, but the SPM fraction showed no significant increase in specific activity. Adrenaline alpha 2-receptors, the pre-synaptic autoreceptors, in a (3H) yohimbine binding assay showed distribution patterns similar to histamine H3-receptors. On the other hand, post-synaptic histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1-receptors were closely localized and distributed mainly in the SPM fraction with increased specific activity. Only a negligible amount was recovered in the MYE fraction, unlike the histamine H3- and adrenaline alpha 2-receptors.

  1. Dishevelled proteins are associated with olfactory sensory neuron presynaptic terminals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J Rodriguez-Gil

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs project their axons from the olfactory epithelium toward the olfactory bulb (OB in a heterogeneous and unsorted arrangement. However, as the axons approach the glomerular layer of the OB, axons from OSNs expressing the same odorant receptor (OR sort and converge to form molecularly homogeneous glomeruli. Axon guidance cues, cell adhesion molecules, and OR induced activity have been implicated in the final targeting of OSN axons to specific glomeruli. Less understood, and often controversial, are the mechanisms used by OSN axons to initially navigate from the OE toward the OB. We previously demonstrated a role for Wnt and Frizzled (Fz molecules in OSN axon extension and organization within the olfactory nerve. Building on that we now turned our attention to the downstream signaling cascades from Wnt-Fz interactions. Dishevelled (Dvl is a key molecule downstream of Fz receptors. Three isoforms of Dvl with specific as well as overlapping functions are found in mammals. Here, we show that Dvl-1 expression is restricted to OSNs in the dorsal recess of the nasal cavity, and labels a unique subpopulation of glomeruli. Dvl-2 and Dvl-3 have a widespread distribution in both the OE and OB. Both Dvl-1 and Dvl-2 are associated with intra-glomerular pre-synaptic OSN terminals, suggesting a role in synapse formation/stabilization. Moreover, because Dvl proteins were observed in all OSN axons, we hypothesize that they are important determinants of OSN cell differentiation and axon extension.

  2. The presynaptic machinery at the synapse of C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahorro, Fernando; Izquierdo, Patricia G

    2018-03-12

    Synapses are specialized contact sites that mediate information flow between neurons and their targets. Important physical interactions across the synapse are mediated by synaptic adhesion molecules. These adhesions regulate formation of synapses during development and play a role during mature synaptic function. Importantly, genes regulating synaptogenesis and axon regeneration are conserved across the animal phyla. Genetic screens in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have identified a number of molecules required for synapse patterning and assembly. C. elegans is able to survive even with its neuronal function severely compromised. This is in comparison with Drosophila and mice where increased complexity makes them less tolerant to impaired function. Although this fact may reflect differences in the function of the homologous proteins in the synapses between these organisms, the most likely interpretation is that many of these components are equally important, but not absolutely essential, for synaptic transmission to support the relatively undemanding life style of laboratory maintained C. elegans. Here, we review research on the major group of synaptic proteins, involved in the presynaptic machinery in C. elegans, showing a strong conservation between higher organisms and highlight how C. elegans can be used as an informative tool for dissecting synaptic components, based on a simple nervous system organization.

  3. Presynaptic localization of histamine H3-receptors in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, K.; Mizuguchi, H.; Fukui, H.; Wada, H.

    1991-01-01

    The localization of histamine H3-receptors in subcellular fractions from the rat brain was examined in a [3H] (R) alpha-methylhistamine binding assay and compared with those of histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors. Major [3H](R) alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities ([3H]ligand binding vs. protein amount) were recovered from the P2 fraction by differential centrifugation. Minor [3H](R)alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities were also detected in the P3 fraction. Further subfractionation of the P2 fraction by discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed major recoveries of [3H](R)alpha-methylhistamine binding in myelin (MYE) and synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) fractions. A further increase in specific activity was observed in the MYE fraction, but the SPM fraction showed no significant increase in specific activity. Adrenaline alpha 2-receptors, the pre-synaptic autoreceptors, in a [3H] yohimbine binding assay showed distribution patterns similar to histamine H3-receptors. On the other hand, post-synaptic histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1-receptors were closely localized and distributed mainly in the SPM fraction with increased specific activity. Only a negligible amount was recovered in the MYE fraction, unlike the histamine H3- and adrenaline alpha 2-receptors

  4. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA...... or slightly lower potencies than (S)-AA [e.g., EC(50) = 76 microM for (2S,4S)-4-methyl-AA (5a) as compared to EC(50) = 35 microM for (S)-AA]. The position of the methyl substituent had a profound effect on the observed pharmacology, whereas the absolute stereochemistry at the methylated carbon atom had a very......) analogs, and the synthesis, stereochemistry, and enantiopharmacology of 3-methyl-AA (4a-d), 4-methyl-AA (5a-d), 5-methyl-AA (6a-d), and (E)-Delta(4)-5-methyl-AA (7a and 7b) are reported. The compounds were resolved using chiral HPLC and the configurational assignments of the enantiomers were based on X...

  5. Genotoxicity of monosodium glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataseven, Nazmiye; Yüzbaşıoğlu, Deniz; Keskin, Ayten Çelebi; Ünal, Fatma

    2016-05-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is one of the most widely used flavor enhancers throughout the world. The aim of this study is to investigate the genotoxic potential of MSG by using chromosome aberrations (CAs), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs), cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN), and random amplified polymorphic DNA-polimerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) in cultured human lymphocytes and alkaline comet assays in isolated human lymphocytes, which were incubated with six concentrations (250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000 and 8000 μg/mL) of MSG. The result of this study indicated that MSG significantly and dose dependently increased the frequencies of CAs, SCE and MN in all treatments and times, compared with control. However, the replication (RI) and nuclear division indices (NDI) were not affected. In this paper, in vitro genotoxic effects of the MSG was also investigated on human peripheral lymphocytes by analysing the RAPD-PCR with arbitrary 10-mer primers. The changes occurring in RAPD profiles after MSG treatment include increase or decrease in band intensity and gain or loss of bands. In the comet assay, this additive caused DNA damage at all concentrations in isolated human lymphocytes after 1-h in vitro exposure. Our results demonstrate that MSG is genotoxic to the human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Evidence for a role of glutamate as an efferent transmitter in taste buds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Catherine B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate has been proposed as a transmitter in the peripheral taste system in addition to its well-documented role as an umami taste stimulus. Evidence for a role as a transmitter includes the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptors in nerve fibers and taste cells, as well as the expression of the glutamate transporter GLAST in Type I taste cells. However, the source and targets of glutamate in lingual tissue are unclear. In the present study, we used molecular, physiological and immunohistochemical methods to investigate the origin of glutamate as well as the targeted receptors in taste buds. Results Using molecular and immunohistochemical techniques, we show that the vesicular transporters for glutamate, VGLUT 1 and 2, but not VGLUT3, are expressed in the nerve fibers surrounding taste buds but likely not in taste cells themselves. Further, we show that P2X2, a specific marker for gustatory but not trigeminal fibers, co-localizes with VGLUT2, suggesting the VGLUT-expressing nerve fibers are of gustatory origin. Calcium imaging indicates that GAD67-GFP Type III taste cells, but not T1R3-GFP Type II cells, respond to glutamate at concentrations expected for a glutamate transmitter, and further, that these responses are partially blocked by NBQX, a specific AMPA/Kainate receptor antagonist. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry confirm the presence of the Kainate receptor GluR7 in Type III taste cells, suggesting it may be a target of glutamate released from gustatory nerve fibers. Conclusions Taken together, the results suggest that glutamate may be released from gustatory nerve fibers using a vesicular mechanism to modulate Type III taste cells via GluR7.

  7. Levodopa and pramipexole effects on presynaptic dopamine PET markers and estimated dopamine release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sossi, Vesna; Fuente-Fernandez, Raul de la [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Dinelle, Katherine; Doudet, Doris J. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Schulzer, Michael; Mak, Edwin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    Levodopa and dopamine (DA) agonist therapy are two common treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD). There is controversy about the effects of these treatments on disease progression and imaging markers. Here we used multi-tracer positron emission tomography imaging and a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD to evaluate in vivo the effects of chronic levodopa and pramipexole treatments on measurements of vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2), dopamine transporter (DAT) levels, and on levodopa-induced changes in synaptic DA levels [{delta}(DA)]. Twenty-three unilaterally 6-OHDA lesioned rats underwent an {sup 11}C-dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ, VMAT2 marker), an {sup 11}C-methylphenidate (MP, DAT marker), and a double {sup 11}C-raclopride (RAC, D{sub 2}-type receptor marker) scan. They were assigned to three treatment groups: saline (N = 7), pramipexole (N = 8), and levodopa (N = 8). After 4 weeks of treatment, imaging was repeated. Results showed (1) a significant treatment effect on DTBZ, with pramipexole decreasing DTBZ binding compared to levodopa, (2) significant side and treatment-striatal side interaction effects for MP, indicating that levodopa tends to decrease MP binding compared to pramipexole, and (3) no treatment effect on {delta}(DA). These data indicate that while chronic dopaminergic pharmacological treatment affects DTBZ and MP binding, it does not affect levodopa-induced changes in synaptic DA level. (orig.)

  8. Experience-Dependent Regulation of Presynaptic NMDARs Enhances Neurotransmitter Release at Neocortical Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Wen, Jing A.; Parekh, Puja K.; Barth, Alison L.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory experience can selectively alter excitatory synaptic strength at neocortical synapses. The rapid increase in synaptic strength induced by selective whisker stimulation (single-row experience/SRE, where all but one row of whiskers has been removed from the mouse face) is due, at least in part, to the trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs)…

  9. Modulation of vesicular catecholamine release from rat PC12 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, R.H.S.

    2002-01-01

    Intercellular communication is of vital importance for the nervous system, since the nervous system is the main coordinating system in animals. Nerve cell communication is initiated by the release of chemical messengers, neurotransmitters, from the presynaptic nerve cell. The neurotransmitters, such

  10. Whereas Short-Term Facilitation Is Presynaptic, Intermediate-Term Facilitation Involves Both Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Protein Kinases and Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Iksung; Kandel, Eric R.; Hawkins, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Whereas short-term plasticity involves covalent modifications that are generally restricted to either presynaptic or postsynaptic structures, long-term plasticity involves the growth of new synapses, which by its nature involves both pre- and postsynaptic alterations. In addition, an intermediate-term stage of plasticity has been identified that…

  11. Inflammation, Glutamate, and Glia: A Trio of Trouble in Mood Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroon, Ebrahim; Miller, Andrew H; Sanacora, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Increasing data indicate that inflammation and alterations in glutamate neurotransmission are two novel pathways to pathophysiology in mood disorders. The primary goal of this review is to illustrate how these two pathways may converge at the level of the glia to contribute to neuropsychiatric disease. We propose that a combination of failed clearance and exaggerated release of glutamate by glial cells during immune activation leads to glutamate increases and promotes aberrant extrasynaptic signaling through ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors, ultimately resulting in synaptic dysfunction and loss. Furthermore, glutamate diffusion outside the synapse can lead to the loss of synaptic fidelity and specificity of neurotransmission, contributing to circuit dysfunction and behavioral pathology. This review examines the fundamental role of glia in the regulation of glutamate, followed by a description of the impact of inflammation on glial glutamate regulation at the cellular, molecular, and metabolic level. In addition, the role of these effects of inflammation on glia and glutamate in mood disorders will be discussed along with their translational implications.

  12. Inhibitory mechanism of l-glutamic acid on spawning of the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Masatoshi

    2017-03-01

    l-Glutamic acid was previously identified as an inhibitor of spawning in the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera; this study examined how l-glutamic acid works. Oocyte release from ovaries of P. pectinifera occurred after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and follicular envelope breakdown (FEBD) when gonads were incubated ex vivo with either relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP) or 1-methyladenine (1-MeAde). l-Glutamic acid blocked this spawning phenotype, causing the mature oocytes to remain within the ovaries. Neither RGP-induced 1-MeAde production in ovarian follicle cells nor 1-MeAde-induced GVBD and FEBD was affected by l-glutamic acid. l-Glutamic acid may act through metabotropic receptors in the ovaries to inhibit spawning, as l-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid, an agonist for metabotropic glutamate receptors, also inhibited spawning induced by 1-MeAde. Application of acetylcholine (ACH) to ovaries under inhibitory conditions with l-glutamic acid, however, brought about spawning, possibly by inducing contraction of the ovarian wall to discharge mature oocytes from the ovaries concurrently with GVBD and FEBD. Thus, l-glutamic acid may inhibit ACH secretion from gonadal nerve cells in the ovary. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 84: 246-256, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Inflammation, Glutamate, and Glia: A Trio of Trouble in Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroon, Ebrahim; Miller, Andrew H; Sanacora, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Increasing data indicate that inflammation and alterations in glutamate neurotransmission are two novel pathways to pathophysiology in mood disorders. The primary goal of this review is to illustrate how these two pathways may converge at the level of the glia to contribute to neuropsychiatric disease. We propose that a combination of failed clearance and exaggerated release of glutamate by glial cells during immune activation leads to glutamate increases and promotes aberrant extrasynaptic signaling through ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors, ultimately resulting in synaptic dysfunction and loss. Furthermore, glutamate diffusion outside the synapse can lead to the loss of synaptic fidelity and specificity of neurotransmission, contributing to circuit dysfunction and behavioral pathology. This review examines the fundamental role of glia in the regulation of glutamate, followed by a description of the impact of inflammation on glial glutamate regulation at the cellular, molecular, and metabolic level. In addition, the role of these effects of inflammation on glia and glutamate in mood disorders will be discussed along with their translational implications. PMID:27629368

  14. Availability of neurotransmitter glutamate is diminished when beta-hydroxybutyrate replaces glucose in cultured neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Trine Meldgaard; Risa, Øystein; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    ,4-(13)C]beta-hydroxybutyrate to that of [1,6-(13)C]glucose in cultured glutamatergic neurons and investigated the effect of neuronal activity focusing on the aspartate-glutamate homeostasis, an essential component of the excitatory activity in the brain. The amount of (13)C incorporation and cellular...... reduced malate-aspartate shuttle activity in neurons using beta-hydroxybutyrate. In the presence of glucose, the glutamate content decreased significantly upon activation of neurotransmitter release, whereas in the presence of only beta-hydroxybutyrate, no decrease in the glutamate content was observed...

  15. Green Tea Polyphenols Attenuated Glutamate Excitotoxicity via Antioxidative and Antiapoptotic Pathway in the Primary Cultured Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Lin; Cao, Chang; Cheng, Yong; Qin, Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Green tea polyphenols are a natural product which has antioxidative and antiapoptotic effects. It has been shown that glutamate excitotoxicity induced oxidative stress is linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In this study we explored the neuroprotective effect of green teen polyphenols against glutamate excitotoxicity in the primary cultured cortical neurons. We found that green tea polyphenols protected against glutamate induced neurotoxicity in the cortical neurons as measured by MTT and TUNEL assays. Green tea polyphenols were then showed to inhibit the glutamate induced ROS release and SOD activity reduction in the neurons. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that green tea polyphenols restored the dysfunction of mitochondrial pro- or antiapoptotic proteins Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3 caused by glutamate. Interestingly, the neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols was abrogated when the neurons were incubated with siBcl-2. Taken together, these results demonstrated that green tea polyphenols protected against glutamate excitotoxicity through antioxidative and antiapoptotic pathways.

  16. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Julie Ladeby; Blaabjerg, Morten; Bogetofte Thomasen, Helle

    2015-01-01

    is, however, needed to realise their therapeutic potential. Glutamate and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) affect proliferation and survival of rodent NSCs both during embryonic and postnatal development. To investigate the role of group I mGluRs (mGluR1 and mGluR5) on human NSCs, we...... differentiated an immortalized, forebrain-derived stem cell line in the presence or absence of glutamate and with addition of either the group I mGluR agonist DHPG or the selective antagonists; MPEP (mGluR5) and LY367385 (mGluR1). Characterization of differentiated cells revealed that both mGluR1 and mGluR5 were...... present on the cells. Addition of glutamate to the growth medium significantly increased cell proliferation and reduced cell death, resulting in increased cell numbers. In the presence of glutamate, selective activation of group I mGluRs reduced gliogenesis, whereas selective inhibition of group I m...

  17. Nitrogen in dietary glutamate is utilized exclusively for the synthesis of amino acids in the rat intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Kawamata, Yasuko; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Torii, Kunio; Sakai, Ryosei

    2013-01-01

    Although previous studies have shown that virtually the entire carbon skeleton of dietary glutamate (glutamate-C) is metabolized in the gut for energy production and amino acid synthesis, little is known regarding the fate of dietary glutamate nitrogen (glutamate-N). In this study, we hypothesized that dietary glutamate-N is an effective nitrogen source for amino acid synthesis and investigated the fate of dietary glutamate-N using [(15)N]glutamate. Fischer male rats were given hourly meals containing [U-(13)C]- or [(15)N]glutamate. The concentration and isotopic enrichment of several amino acids were measured after 0-9 h of feeding, and the net release of each amino acid into the portal vein was calculated. Most of the dietary glutamate-C was metabolized into CO(2), lactate, or alanine (56, 13, and 12% of the dietary input, respectively) in the portal drained viscera (PDV). Most of the glutamate-N was utilized for the synthesis of other amino acids such as alanine and citrulline (75 and 3% of dietary input, respectively) in the PDV, and only minor amounts were released into the portal vein in the form of ammonia and glutamate (2 and 3% of the dietary input, respectively). Substantial incorporation of (15)N into systemic amino acids such as alanine, glutamine, and proline, amino acids of the urea cycle, and branched-chain amino acids was also evident. These results provide quantitative evidence that dietary glutamate-N distributes extensively to amino acids synthesized in the PDV and, consequently, to circulating amino acids.

  18. Presynaptic plasticity as a hallmark of rat stress susceptibility and antidepressant response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Nieto-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Two main questions are important for understanding and treating affective disorders: why are certain individuals susceptible or resilient to stress, and what are the features of treatment response and resistance? To address these questions, we used a chronic mild stress (CMS rat model of depression. When exposed to stress, a fraction of rats develops anhedonic-like behavior, a core symptom of major depression, while another subgroup of rats is resilient to CMS. Furthermore, the anhedonic-like state is reversed in about half the animals in response to chronic escitalopram treatment (responders, while the remaining animals are resistant (non-responder animals. Electrophysiology in hippocampal brain slices was used to identify a synaptic hallmark characterizing these groups of animals. Presynaptic properties were investigated at GABAergic synapses onto single dentate gyrus granule cells. Stress-susceptible rats displayed a reduced probability of GABA release judged by an altered paired-pulse ratio of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs (1.48 ± 0.25 compared with control (0.81 ± 0.05 and stress-resilient rats (0.78 ± 0.03. Spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs occurred less frequently in stress-susceptible rats compared with control and resilient rats. Finally, a subset of stress-susceptible rats responding to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI treatment showed a normalization of the paired-pulse ratio (0.73 ± 0.06 whereas non-responder rats showed no normalization (1.2 ± 0.2. No changes in the number of parvalbumin-positive interneurons were observed. Thus, we provide evidence for a distinct GABAergic synaptopathy which associates closely with stress-susceptibility and treatment-resistance in an animal model of depression.

  19. Tetanus Toxin Action : Inhibition of Neurotransmitter Release Linked to Synaptobrevin Proteolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Link, Egenhard; Edelmann, Lambert; Chou, Judy H.; Binz, Thomas; Yamasaki, Shinji; Eisel, Uli; Baumert, Marion; Südhof, Thomas C.; Niemann, Heiner; Jahn, Reinhard

    1992-01-01

    Tetanus toxin is a potent neurotoxin that inhibits the release of neurotransmitters from presynaptic nerve endings. The mature toxin is composed of a heavy and a light chain that are linked via a disulfide bridge. After entry of tetanus toxin into the cytoplasm, the released light chain causes block

  20. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plesa, C.; Van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate

  1. Gastrin-releasing peptide facilitates glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus and effectively prevents vascular dementia induced cognitive and synaptic plasticity deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiajia; Yao, Yang; Wang, Ling; Yang, Chunxiao; Wang, Faqi; Guo, Jie; Wang, Zhiyun; Yang, Zhuo; Ming, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) has been proved to be an important neuromodulator in the brain and involved in a variety of neurological diseases. Whether GRP could attenuate cognition impairment induced by vascular dementia (VD) in rats, and the mechanism of synaptic plasticity and GRP's action on synaptic efficiency are still poorly understood. In this study, we first investigated the effects of GRP on glutamatergic transmission with patch-clamp recording. We found that acute application of GRP enhanced the excitatory synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 neurons via GRPR in a presynaptic mechanism. Secondly, we examined whether exogenous GRP or its analogue neuromedin B (NMB) could prevent VD-induced cognitive deficits and the mechanism of synaptic plasticity. By using Morris water maze, long-term potentiation (LTP) recording, western blot assay and immunofluorescent staining, we verified for the first time that GRP or NMB substantially improved the spatial learning and memory abilities in VD rats, restored the impaired synaptic plasticity and was able to elevate the expression of synaptic proteins, synaptophysin (SYP) and CaMKII, which play pivotal roles in synaptic plasticity. These results suggest that the facilitatory effects of GRP on glutamate release may contribute to its long-term action on synaptic efficacy which is essential in cognitive function. Our findings present a new entry point for a better understanding of physiological function of GRP and raise the possibility that GRPR agonists might ameliorate cognitive deficits associated with neurological diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 21 CFR 582.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monopotassium glutamate. 582.1516 Section 582.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of use...

  3. 21 CFR 182.1516 - Monopotassium glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Monopotassium glutamate. 182.1516 Section 182.1516 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1516 Monopotassium glutamate. (a) Product. Monopotassium glutamate. (b) Conditions of use...

  4. 21 CFR 182.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Monoammonium glutamate. 182.1500 Section 182.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Substances § 182.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of use...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1500 - Monoammonium glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monoammonium glutamate. 582.1500 Section 582.1500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1500 Monoammonium glutamate. (a) Product. Monoammonium glutamate. (b) Conditions of use...

  6. Glutamate esters as agents for cholescintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombetti, L.

    1976-01-01

    Several sup(99m)Tc-labelled aldehyde glutamate complexes having similar pharmacological properties as sup(99m)Tc-pyridoxylidene glutamate have been prepared. The dynamic behaviour of these compounds in dogs and rabbits was studied using a digital computer and scintillation camera. The aldehyde-glutamate complex promises to be a useful agent for the dynamic study of hepatic and biliary function

  7. Ciprofloxacin triggered glutamate production by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, Dorit; Wendisch, Volker F

    2016-10-07

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is a well-studied bacterium which naturally overproduces glutamate when induced by an elicitor. Glutamate production is accompanied by decreased 2-oxoglutatate dehydrogenase activity. Elicitors of glutamate production by C. glutamicum analyzed to molecular detail target the cell envelope. Ciprofloxacin, an inhibitor of bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, was shown to inhibit growth of C. glutamicum wild type with concomitant excretion of glutamate. Enzyme assays showed that 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity was decreased due to ciprofloxacin addition. Transcriptome analysis revealed that this inhibitor of DNA gyrase increased RNA levels of genes involved in DNA synthesis, repair and modification. Glutamate production triggered by ciprofloxacin led to glutamate titers of up to 37 ± 1 mM and a substrate specific glutamate yield of 0.13 g/g. Even in the absence of the putative glutamate exporter gene yggB, ciprofloxacin effectively triggered glutamate production. When C. glutamicum wild type was cultivated under nitrogen-limiting conditions, 2-oxoglutarate rather than glutamate was produced as consequence of exposure to ciprofloxacin. Recombinant C. glutamicum strains overproducing lysine, arginine, ornithine, and putrescine, respectively, secreted glutamate instead of the desired amino acid when exposed to ciprofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin induced DNA synthesis and repair genes, reduced 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity and elicited glutamate production by C. glutamicum. Production of 2-oxoglutarate could be triggered by ciprofloxacin under nitrogen-limiting conditions.

  8. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) [Reserved] (c) Limitations, restrictions, or...

  9. The glutamate/neutral amino acid transporter family SLC1: molecular, physiological and pharmacological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Hediger, Matthias A

    2004-02-01

    The solute carrier family 1 (SLC1) includes five high-affinity glutamate transporters, EAAC1, GLT-1, GLAST, EAAT4 and EAAT5 (SLC1A1, SLC1A2, SLC1A3, SLC1A6, and SLC1A7, respectively) as well as the two neutral amino acid transporters, ASCT1 and ASCT2 (SLC1A4 and ALC1A5, respectively). Although each of these transporters have similar predicted structures, they exhibit distinct functional properties which are variations of a common transport mechanism. The high-affinity glutamate transporters mediate transport of l-Glu, l-Asp and d-Asp, accompanied by the cotransport of 3 Na(+) and 1 H(+), and the countertransport of 1 K(+), whereas ASC transporters mediate Na(+)-dependent exchange of small neutral amino acids such as Ala, Ser, Cys and Thr. The unique coupling of the glutamate transporters allows uphill transport of glutamate into cells against a concentration gradient. This feature plays a crucial role in protecting neurons against glutamate excitotoxicity in the central nervous system. During pathological conditions, such as brain ischemia (e.g. after a stroke), however, glutamate exit can occur due to "reversed glutamate transport", which is caused by a reversal of the electrochemical gradients of the coupling ions. Selective inhibition of the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 (SLC1A1) may be of therapeutic interest to block glutamate release from neurons during ischemia. On the other hand, upregulation of the glial glutamate transporter GLT1 (SLC1A2) may help protect motor neurons in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), since loss of function of GLT1 has been associated with the pathogenesis of certain forms of ALS.

  10. Cutaneous and electrically evoked glutamate signaling in the adult rat somatosensory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onifer, Stephen M; Quintero, Jorge E; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2012-07-15

    Glutamate neurotransmission plays critical roles in normal central nervous system (CNS) function, neurodegenerative diseases, and neurotrauma. We determined whether glutamate signaling could be evoked within the anesthetized normal adult rat CNS with clinically relevant peripheral stimulation and recorded (at >1Hz) with glutamate-sensitive, ceramic microelectrode arrays (MEAs). Basal glutamate levels and both forelimb cutaneous and electrical stimulation-evoked glutamate release were measured within the cuneate nucleus, a relay of the mammalian dorsal columns somatosensory system. The MEAs with triangular, sharp-point tips were more effective at tissue penetration than the flat, blunt tips. Basal glutamate levels of 2.1±4.4μM (mean±SD, n=10 animals) were detected from 150μm to 1200μm below the brainstem dorsal surface. Cutaneous evoked glutamate signals showed an amplitude of 1.1±1.1μM and a duration of 7.3±6.5s (26 signals, n=6). Electrically evoked signals, like cutaneous ones, were both rapid and slowly rising. Electrically evoked signals, especially those evoked by stimulation trains, were more reproducible and had an amplitude of 1.2±1.4μM, duration of 19.4±17.3s, and latency from stimulus onset of 21.3±21.5s (25 signals, n=4). In contrast to cutaneous stimulation, glutamate signals evoked by electrical stimulation had longer durations and were recorded primarily in the middle and ventral cuneate nuclei. Importantly, both cutaneous and electrical stimulation of the contralateral forelimb and hindlimbs did not evoke glutamate signaling. With the use of MEAs, these results show, for the first time, somatosensory-pathway specific changes in glutamate levels during peripheral cutaneous and electrical stimulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection of marine neurotoxins and characterization of the presynaptic activity of iotrochotin from the sponge Iotrochota birotulata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.V.

    1987-01-01

    In order to detect novel presynaptic neurotoxins, a total of 766 extracts from marine organisms collected during expeditions of the research vessel Alpha Helix around the peninsula of Baja Mexico in 1974 and through the Caribbean in 1978 were tested for activity in a synaptosomal assay for the release of acetylcholine (ACh). To eliminate from consideration sample extracts which lysed the synaptosomal membrane, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was measured as a cytoplasmic marker. On the basis of the screening studies the extract of the sponge lotrochota birotulata was chosen for more detailed characterization. The active factor, iotrochotin (IOT), was sensitive to thermal inactivation, was partially activated by trypsin treatment and had a molecular weight of 12,000-13,000. The activity of IOT was found to be complete by one minute. The maximal release of radioactivity from synaptosomes preloaded with [ 3 H]choline was found to be dependent on the concentration of IOT irrespective of the time of further incubation. The concentration-response curve of IOT activity showed a sigmoid shape which did not fit the Hill equation. IOT caused release of both ACh and choline. Of the radioactivity released by IOT from synaptosomes preloaded with [ 3 H]choline, 50-60% was [ 3 H]ACh. IOT also released [ 3 H]GABA and [ 3 H]norepinephrine from synaptosomes preincubated with these labeled neurotransmitters. The activity of IOT was only minimally sensitive to reduction in Na + or Ca 2+ levels, and was not sensitive to tetrodotoxin. IOT did not dramatically change the fluorescence of synaptosomes incubated with a depolarization-indicating dye. However, depolarization of synaptosomes with high concentrations of K + was still detectable by this method in the presence of IOT

  12. Muscle Contraction Regulates BDNF/TrkB Signaling to Modulate Synaptic Function through Presynaptic cPKCα and cPKCβI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Hurtado

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF acts via tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (TrkB to regulate synapse maintenance and function in the neuromuscular system. The potentiation of acetylcholine (ACh release by BDNF requires TrkB phosphorylation and Protein Kinase C (PKC activation. BDNF is secreted in an activity-dependent manner but it is not known if pre- and/or postsynaptic activities enhance BDNF expression in vivo at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ. Here, we investigated whether nerve and muscle cell activities regulate presynaptic conventional PKC (cPKCα and βI via BDNF/TrkB signaling to modulate synaptic strength at the NMJ. To differentiate the effects of presynaptic activity from that of muscle contraction, we stimulated the phrenic nerve of rat diaphragms (1 Hz, 30 min with or without contraction (abolished by μ-conotoxin GIIIB. Then, we performed ELISA, Western blotting, qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence and electrophysiological techniques. We found that nerve-induced muscle contraction: (1 increases the levels of mature BDNF protein without affecting pro-BDNF protein or BDNF mRNA levels; (2 downregulates TrkB.T1 without affecting TrkB.FL or p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75 levels; (3 increases presynaptic cPKCα and cPKCβI protein level through TrkB signaling; and (4 enhances phosphorylation of cPKCα and cPKCβI. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cPKCβI, which is exclusively located in the motor nerve terminals, increases activity-induced acetylcholine release. Together, these results show that nerve-induced muscle contraction is a key regulator of BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway, retrogradely activating presynaptic cPKC isoforms (in particular cPKCβI to modulate synaptic function. These results indicate that a decrease in neuromuscular activity, as occurs in several neuromuscular disorders, could affect the BDNF/TrkB/PKC pathway that links pre- and postsynaptic activity to maintain neuromuscular function.

  13. [Glutamate signaling and neural plasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-07-01

    Proper functioning of the nervous system relies on the precise formation of neural circuits during development. At birth, neurons have redundant synaptic connections not only to their proper targets but also to other neighboring cells. Then, functional neural circuits are formed during early postnatal development by the selective strengthening of necessary synapses and weakening of surplus connections. Synaptic connections are also modified so that projection fields of active afferents expand at the expense of lesser ones. We have studied the molecular mechanisms underlying these activity-dependent prunings and the plasticity of synaptic circuitry using gene-engineered mice defective in the glutamatergic signaling system. NMDA-type glutamate receptors are critically involved in the establishment of the somatosensory pathway ascending from the brainstem trigeminal nucleus to the somatosensory cortex. Without NMDA receptors, whisker-related patterning fails to develop, whereas lesion-induced plasticity occurs normally during the critical period. In contrast, mice lacking the glutamate transporters GLAST or GLT1 are selectively impaired in the lesion-induced critical plasticity of cortical barrels, although whisker-related patterning itself develops normally. In the developing cerebellum, multiple climbing fibers initially innervating given Purkinje cells are eliminated one by one until mono-innervation is achieved. In this pruning process, P/Q-type Ca2+ channels expressed on Purkinje cells are critically involved by the selective strengthening of single main climbing fibers against other lesser afferents. Therefore, the activation of glutamate receptors that leads to an activity-dependent increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration plays a key role in the pruning of immature synaptic circuits into functional circuits. On the other hand, glutamate transporters appear to control activity-dependent plasticity among afferent fields, presumably through adjusting

  14. Silicon Wafer-Based Platinum Microelectrode Array Biosensor for Near Real-Time Measurement of Glutamate in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel T. Maidment

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS technologies, we have developed silicon wafer-based platinum microelectrode arrays (MEAs modified with glutamate oxidase (GluOx for electroenzymatic detection of glutamate in vivo. These MEAs were designed to have optimal spatial resolution for in vivo recordings. Selective detection of glutamate in the presence of the electroactive interferents, dopamine and ascorbic acid, was attained by deposition of polypyrrole and Nafion. The sensors responded to glutamate with a limit of detection under 1μM and a sub-1-second response time in solution. In addition to extensive in vitro characterization, the utility of these MEA glutamate biosensors was also established in vivo. In the anesthetized rat, these MEA glutamate biosensors were used for detection of cortically-evoked glutamate release in the ventral striatum. The MEA biosensors also were applied to the detection of stress-induced glutamate release in the dorsal striatum of the freely-moving rat.

  15. Expression of presynaptic markers in a neurodevelopmental animal model with relevance to schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Anna S; Kaalund, Sanne Simone; Møller, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) to rat pups at postnatal day (PND) 7, 9, and 11 [neonatal PCP (neoPCP) model] induces cognitive deficits similar to those observed in schizophrenia. Expression of presynaptic SNARE protein, synaptosomal......-associated protein of 25 kDa (Snap25), has been shown to be downregulated in postmortem brains from patients with schizophrenia. The present study was designed to investigate the long-term effects of neoPCP administration on expression of presynaptic markers altered in schizophrenia. Using radioactive in...

  16. Axonal and presynaptic protein synthesis: new insights into the biology of the neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Kaplan, Barry B; van Minnen, Jan; Alvarez, Jaime; Koenig, Edward

    2002-08-01

    The presence of a local mRNA translation system in axons and terminals was proposed almost 40 years ago. Over the ensuing period, an impressive body of evidence has grown to support this proposal -- yet the nerve cell body is still considered to be the only source of axonal and presynaptic proteins. To dispel this lingering neglect, we now present the wealth of recent observations bearing on this central idea, and consider their impact on our understanding of the biology of the neuron. We demonstrate that extrasomatic translation sites, which are now well recognized in dendrites, are also present in axonal and presynaptic compartments.

  17. Synergy by secretory phospholipase A2 and glutamate on inducing cell death and sustained arachidonic acid metabolic changes in primary cortical neuronal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; DeCoster, M A; de Turco, E B

    1996-01-01

    glutamate and sPLA2 from bee venom. sPLA2, at concentrations eliciting low neurotoxicity (..., from Taipan snake venom. The NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 blocked glutamate effects and partially inhibited sPLA2 OS2 but not sPLA2 from bee venom-induced arachidonic acid release. Thus, the synergy with glutamate and very low concentrations of exogenously added sPLA2 suggests a potential role...

  18. Excretion and intestinal absorption of tritiated glutamic acid by carp, Cyprinus Carpio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Terushia; Kistner, G.

    1986-01-01

    Excretion and intestinal absorption of tritiated glutamic acid by carp was investigated. Approximately 80% of orally administered tritium was excreted at a half life value of 1.4 h and an observed slower excretion of 7 days for the remainder. Tritium incorporated in glutamic acid was efficiently retained at the site of absorption, i.e. intestine, liver, gill, kidney, blood and muscle. A dual marking experiment using tritiated glutamic acid and 14 C-market glutamic acid showed higher excretion of tritium by factors 2.0 to 4.9 than that of 14 C. Tritiated glutamic acid is considered to be mainly incorporated in the citric acid cycle soon after administration and the release of tritium in tritiated water through the cycle is assumed as causing the initial rapid excretion of tritium in carp. The intestinal absorption of glutamic acid was likely to depend on its concentration in the administered solution. The maximum level of absorption is estimated to be 0.1 m mol/0.5 h for one year old carp. The results obtained here would make it possible to estimate the tritium contamination of fish due to tritiated glutamic acid entering the food chain. (orig.)

  19. Effects of Bee Venom on Glutamate-Induced Toxicity in Neuronal and Glial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Min Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bee venom (BV, which is extracted from honeybees, is used in traditional Korean medical therapy. Several groups have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of BV in osteoarthritis both in vivo and in vitro. Glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS. Changes in glutamate release and uptake due to alterations in the activity of glutamate transporters have been reported in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. To assess if BV can prevent glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity, we examined cell viability and signal transduction in glutamate-treated neuronal and microglial cells in the presence and absence of BV. We induced glutamatergic toxicity in neuronal cells and microglial cells and found that BV protected against cell death. Furthermore, BV significantly inhibited the cellular toxicity of glutamate, and pretreatment with BV altered MAP kinase activation (e.g., JNK, ERK, and p38 following exposure to glutamate. These findings suggest that treatment with BV may be helpful in reducing glutamatergic cell toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Bacterial cytolysin during meningitis disrupts the regulation of glutamate in the brain, leading to synaptic damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Wippel

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal meningitis is a common bacterial infection of the brain. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin represents a key factor, determining the neuropathogenic potential of the pneumococci. Here, we demonstrate selective synaptic loss within the superficial layers of the frontal neocortex of post-mortem brain samples from individuals with pneumococcal meningitis. A similar effect was observed in mice with pneumococcal meningitis only when the bacteria expressed the pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin. Exposure of acute mouse brain slices to only pore-competent pneumolysin at disease-relevant, non-lytic concentrations caused permanent dendritic swelling, dendritic spine elimination and synaptic loss. The NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 and D-AP5 reduced this pathology. Pneumolysin increased glutamate levels within the mouse brain slices. In mouse astrocytes, pneumolysin initiated the release of glutamate in a calcium-dependent manner. We propose that pneumolysin plays a significant synapto- and dendritotoxic role in pneumococcal meningitis by initiating glutamate release from astrocytes, leading to subsequent glutamate-dependent synaptic damage. We outline for the first time the occurrence of synaptic pathology in pneumococcal meningitis and demonstrate that a bacterial cytolysin can dysregulate the control of glutamate in the brain, inducing excitotoxic damage.

  1. Computational design of glutamate dehydrogenase in Bacillus subtilis natto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Li; Wang, Jia-Le; Hu, Yu; Qian, Bing-Jun; Yao, Xiao-Min; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Jian-Hua

    2013-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis natto is widely used in industry to produce natto, a traditional and popular Japanese soybean food. However, during its secondary fermentation, high amounts of ammonia are released to give a negative influence on the flavor of natto. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a key enzyme for the ammonia produced and released, because it catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate using NAD(+) or NADP(+) as co-factor during carbon and nitrogen metabolism processes. To solve this problem, we employed multiple computational methods model and re-design GDH from Bacillus subtilis natto. Firstly, a structure model of GDH with cofactor NADP(+) was constructed by threading and ab initio modeling. Then the substrate glutamate were flexibly docked into the structure model to form the substrate-binding mode. According to the structural analysis of the substrate-binding mode, Lys80, Lys116, Arg196, Thr200, and Ser351 in the active site were found could form a significant hydrogen bonding network with the substrate, which was thought to play a crucial role in the substrate recognition and position. Thus, these residues were then mutated into other amino acids, and the substrate binding affinities for each mutant were calculated. Finally, three single mutants (K80A, K116Q, and S351A) were found to have significant decrease in the substrate binding affinities, which was further supported by our biochemical experiments.

  2. Differing effects of transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by nerve terminals before and after exposure of rats to artificial gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Subsequent to its release from glutamatergic neurons and activation of receptors, it is removed from extracellular space by high affinity Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters, which utilize the Na^+/K^+ electrochemical gradient as a driving force and located in nerve terminals and astrocytes. The glutamate transporters may modify the time course of synaptic events. Like glutamate itself, glutamate transporters are somehow involved in almost all aspects of normal and abnormal brain activity (e.g. cerebral ischemia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy and schizophrenia). The present study assessed transporter inhibitor for the ability to inhibit glutamate uptake by synaptosomes at the normal and hypergravity conditions (rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period). DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA) is a newly developed competitive inhibitor of the high-affinity, Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters. As a potent, non- transported inhibitor of glutamate transporters, DL-TBOA promises to be a valuable new compound for the study of glutamatergic mechanisms. We demonstrated that DL-TBOA inhibited glutamate uptake ( 100 μM glutamate, 30 sec incubation period) in dose-dependent manner as in control as in hypergravity. The effect of this transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by control synaptosomes and synaptosomes prepared of animals exposed to hypergravity was different. IC50 values calculated on the basis of curves of non-linear regression kinetic analysis was 18±2 μM and 11±2 μM ((P≤0,05) before and after exposure to artificial gravity, respectively. Inhibition caused by 10 μM DL-TBOA was significantly increased from 38,0±3,8 % in control group to 51,0±4,1 % in animals, exposed to hypergravity (P≤0,05). Thus, DL-TBOA had complex effect on glutamate uptake process and perhaps, became more potent under

  3. Glutamate transporter activity promotes enhanced Na+/K+-ATPase-mediated extracellular K+ management during neuronal activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Roland; Holm, Rikke; Vilsen, Bente

    2016-01-01

    , in addition, Na+/K+-ATPase-mediated K+ clearance could be governed by astrocytic [Na+]i. During most neuronal activity, glutamate is released in the synaptic cleft and is re-absorbed by astrocytic Na+-coupled glutamate transporters, thereby elevating [Na+]i. It thus remains unresolved whether the different Na......+/K+-ATPase isoforms are controlled by [K+]o or [Na+]i during neuronal activity. Hippocampal slice recordings of stimulus-induced [K+]o transients with ion-sensitive microelectrodes revealed reduced Na+/K+-ATPase-mediated K+ management upon parallel inhibition of the glutamate transporter. The apparent intracellular...... isoforms than the β2 isoform. In summary, enhanced astrocytic Na+/K+-ATPase-dependent K+ clearance was obtained with parallel glutamate transport activity. The astrocytic Na+/K+-ATPase isoform constellation α2β1 appeared to be specifically geared to respond to the [Na+]i transients associated with activity...

  4. Axonal and presynaptic protein synthesis: new insights into the biology of the neuron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giuditta, A.; Kaplan, B.B.; van Minnen, J.; Alvarez, J.; Koenig, E.

    2002-01-01

    The presence of a local mRNA translation system in axons and terminals was proposed almost 40 years ago. Over the ensuing period, an impressive body of evidence has grown to support this proposal - yet the nerve cell body is still considered to be the only source of axonal and presynaptic proteins.

  5. Neto Auxiliary Subunits Regulate Interneuron Somatodendritic and Presynaptic Kainate Receptors to Control Network Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan S. Wyeth

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although Netos are considered auxiliary subunits critical for kainate receptor (KAR function, direct evidence for their regulation of native KARs is limited. Because Neto KAR regulation is GluK subunit/Neto isoform specific, such regulation must be determined in cell-type-specific contexts. We demonstrate Neto1/2 expression in somatostatin (SOM-, cholecystokinin/cannabinoid receptor 1 (CCK/CB1-, and parvalbumin (PV-containing interneurons. KAR-mediated excitation of these interneurons is contingent upon Neto1 because kainate yields comparable effects in Neto2 knockouts and wild-types but fails to excite interneurons or recruit inhibition in Neto1 knockouts. In contrast, presynaptic KARs in CCK/CB1 interneurons are dually regulated by both Neto1 and Neto2. Neto association promotes tonic presynaptic KAR activation, dampening CCK/CB1 interneuron output, and loss of this brake in Neto mutants profoundly increases CCK/CB1 interneuron-mediated inhibition. Our results confirm that Neto1 regulates endogenous somatodendritic KARs in diverse interneurons and demonstrate Neto regulation of presynaptic KARs in mature inhibitory presynaptic terminals.

  6. Delineation of glutamate pathways and secretory responses in pancreatic islets with β-cell-specific abrogation of the glutamate dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vetterli, Laurène; Carobbio, Stefania; Pournourmohammadi, Shirin

    2012-01-01

    In pancreatic β-cells, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) modulates insulin secretion, although its function regarding specific secretagogues is unclear. This study investigated the role of GDH using a β-cell-specific GDH knockout mouse model, called βGlud1(-/-). The absence of GDH in islets isolated...... from βGlud1(-/-) mice resulted in abrogation of insulin release evoked by glutamine combined with 2-aminobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-carboxylic acid or l-leucine. Reintroduction of GDH in βGlud1(-/-) islets fully restored the secretory response. Regarding glucose stimulation, insulin secretion in islets...... isolated from βGlud1(-/-) mice exhibited half of the response measured in control islets. The amplifying pathway, tested at stimulatory glucose concentrations in the presence of KCl and diazoxide, was markedly inhibited in βGlud1(-/-) islets. On glucose stimulation, net synthesis of glutamate from α...

  7. Fate of glutamate carbon and nitrogen in isolated guinea-pig kidney-cortex tubules. Evidence for involvement of glutamate dehydrogenase in glutamine sythesis from glutamate.

    OpenAIRE

    Baverel, G; Genoux, C; Forissier, M; Pellet, M

    1980-01-01

    1. The pathways and the fate of glutamate carbon and nitrogen were investigated in isolated guinea-pig kidney-cortex tubules. 2. At low glutamate concentration (1 mM), the glutamate carbon skeleton was either completely oxidized or converted into glutamine. At high glutamate concentration (5 mM), glucose, lactate and alanine were additional products of glutamate metabolism. 3. At neither concentration of glutamate was there accumulation of ammonia. 4. Nitrogen-balance calculations and the rel...

  8. Intersession reliability of Hoffmann reflex gain and presynaptic inhibition in the human soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Bradley T; Hicks-Little, Charlie A; Harter, Rod A; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Hoffman, Mark A

    2009-12-01

    Hayes BT, Hicks-Little CA, Harter RA, Widrick JJ, Hoffman MA. Intersession reliability of Hoffmann reflex gain and presynaptic inhibition in the human soleus muscle. To determine the day-to-day reliability of Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) gain and presynaptic inhibition of spinal reflexes in the human soleus muscle. Controlled trial. Research laboratory. Volunteers (N=30; mean +/- SD age, 23.4+/-3.9y; height, 175.64+/-10.87cm; mass, 84.50+/-24.18kg) with no history of lower extremity pathology and/or injury participated. Subjects lay prone with the head, shoulders, arms, and hips supported in a static position by a massage body pillow and the ankle positioned at 90 degrees . Recording electrodes were placed over the soleus and tibialis anterior muscle bellies, and the stimulating electrodes were positioned over the tibial nerve in the popliteal space and the common peroneal nerve near the fibular head. The H-reflex and motor wave recruitment curves were then measured and recorded. Presynaptic inhibition was also assessed in the soleus muscle, and a conditioning stimulation of the common peroneal nerve (1 x motor threshold = motor threshold) was used prior to soleus H-reflex measurement. Two testing sessions took place between 2 and 7 days, and each session occurred at the same time of day. Assessments of H-reflex gain and presynaptic inhibition yielded test-retest reliability of R equal to . 95 and .91, respectively. Measures of presynaptic inhibition and H-reflex gain (H slope/M slope) in the human soleus muscle are consistent and reliable day to day.

  9. Abnormal glutamate release in aged BTBR mouse model of autism

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Hongen; Ding, Caiyun; Jin, Guorong; Yin, Haizhen; Liu, Jianrong; Hu, Fengyun

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal reciprocal social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Most of the available research on autism is focused on children and young adults and little is known about the pathological alternation of autism in older adults. In order to investigate the neurobiological alternation of autism in old age stage, we compared the morphology and synaptic function of excitatory synapses betw...

  10. The presynaptic microtubule cytoskeleton in physiological and pathological conditions: lessons from Fragile X Syndrome and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Bodaleo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of the nervous system to generate neuronal networks relies on the establishment and maintenance of synaptic contacts. Synapses are composed of functionally different presynaptic and postsynaptic compartments. An appropriate synaptic architecture is required to provide the structural basis that supports synaptic transmission, a process involving changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin microfilaments are the main cytoskeletal components present at both presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals in glutamatergic synapses. However, in the last few years it has been demonstrated that microtubules (MTs transiently invade dendritic spines, promoting their maturation. Nevertheless, the presence and functions of MTs at the presynaptic site are still a matter of debate. Early electron microscopy (EM studies revealed that MTs are present in the presynaptic terminals of the central nervous system (CNS where they interact with synaptic vesicles (SVs and reach the active zone. These observations have been reproduced by several EM protocols; however, there is empirical heterogeneity in detecting presynaptic MTs, since they appear to be both labile and unstable. Moreover, increasing evidence derived from studies in the fruit fly neuromuscular junction proposes different roles for MTs in regulating presynaptic function in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the main findings that support the presence and roles of MTs at presynaptic terminals, integrating descriptive and biochemical analyses, and studies performed in invertebrate genetic models.

  11. Evidence for an inhibitory presynaptic component of neuroleptic drug action.

    OpenAIRE

    de Belleroche, J. S.; Bradford, H. F.

    1981-01-01

    1 The action of five neuroleptic drugs (haloperidol, cis-flupenthixol, chlorpromazine, fluphenazine and thioridazine) was studied on the synthesis and release of dopamine from rat striatal synaptosomes. 2. In vitro application of the drugs induced an inhibition of synthesis of [14C]-dopamine from L-[U-14C]-tyrosine and a decrease in the tissue content of [14-C]-dopamine, with IC50 values for the latter effect ranging from 3.6 x 10(-7) to 5.9 x 10(-5) M. The rank of their potency was similar t...

  12. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J.; Verwer, R.W.H.; van Wamelen, D.J.; Qi, X.R.; Gao, S.F.; Lucassen, P.J.; Swaab, D.F.

    2016-01-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the

  13. Auditory hindbrain atrophy and anomalous calcium binding protein expression after neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Lindsey; Blackburn, Kaitlyn; Kulesza, Randy J

    2017-03-06

    Glutamate is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and is stored and released by both neurons and astrocytes. Despite the important role of glutamate as a neurotransmitter, elevated extracellular glutamate can result in excitotoxicity and apoptosis. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a naturally occurring sodium salt of glutamic acid that is used as a flavor enhancer in many processed foods. Previous studies have shown that MSG administration during the early postnatal period results in neurodegenerative changes in several forebrain regions, characterized by neuronal loss and neuroendocrine abnormalities. Systemic delivery of MSG during the neonatal period and induction of glutamate neurotoxicity in the cochlea have both been shown to result in fewer neurons in the spiral ganglion. We hypothesized that an MSG-induced loss of neurons in the spiral ganglion would have a significant impact on the number of neurons in the cochlear nuclei and superior olivary complex (SOC). Indeed, we found that exposure to MSG from postnatal days 4 through 10 resulted in significantly fewer neurons in the cochlear nuclei and SOC and significant dysmorphology in surviving neurons. Moreover, we found that neonatal MSG exposure resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of both calretinin and calbindin. These results suggest that neonatal exposure to MSG interferes with early development of the auditory brainstem and impacts expression of calcium binding proteins, both of which may lead to diminished auditory function. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intertissue differences for the role of glutamate dehydrogenase in metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treberg, Jason R; Banh, Sheena; Pandey, Umesh; Weihrauch, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) plays an important role in integrating mitochondrial metabolism of amino acids and ammonia. Glutamate may function as a respiratory substrate in the oxidative deamination direction of GDH, which also yields α-ketoglutarate. In the reductive amination direction GDH produces glutamate, which can then be used for other cellular needs such as amino acid synthesis via transamination. The production or removal of ammonia by GDH is also an important consequence of flux through this enzyme. However, the abundance and role of GDH in cellular metabolism varies by tissue. Here we discuss the different roles the house-keeping form of GDH has in major organs of the body and how GDH may be important to regulating aspects of intermediary metabolism. The near-equilibrium poise of GDH in liver and controversy over cofactor specificity and regulation is discussed, as well as, the role of GDH in regulation of renal ammoniagenesis, and the possible importance of GDH activity in the release of nitrogen carriers by the small intestine.

  15. Chitosan glutamate hydrogels with local anesthetic activity for buccal application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatello, R; Basile, L; Puglisi, G

    2009-04-01

    Hydrogels for the buccal application of the anesthetic drug lidocaine hydrochloride (LDC) were prepared using chitosan glutamate (CHG), a soluble salt of chitosan, or a binary mixture of CHG and glycerin, at different weight ratios. The in vitro drug release was studied at the pH value of saliva to assess the effect of the different formulations on drug delivery. The anesthetic activity of mucoadhesive LDC-CHG hydrogels was assessed in vivo after application on the buccal mucosa, compared to commercial semisolid formulations containing the same drug. LDC-loaded hydrogels can be proposed for the symptom relief of aphthosis or other painful mouth diseases.

  16. Desensitization of metabotropic glutamate receptors in neuronal cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catania, M. V.; Aronica, E.; Sortino, M. A.; Canonico, P. L.; Nicoletti, F.

    1991-01-01

    Preexposure of cultured cerebellar neurons to glutamate reduced the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide (PPI) hydrolysis induced by subsequent addition of glutamate without affecting the response to the muscarinic receptor agonist carbamylcholine. Desensitization of glutamate-stimulated PPI

  17. Effects of handling on extracellular levels of glutamate and other amino acids in various areas of the brain measured by microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, W; Cisci, G; Nap, A; de Vries, J B; Westerink, B H

    1999-07-03

    Upon a physiological and pharmacological challenge, the responsiveness of extracellular glutamate levels in the prefrontal cortex, ventral tegmental area and locus coeruleus were studied using microdialysis. A 10-min handling period was used as a mild stressful stimulus. In all three brain areas, handling induced an immediate and short-lasting increase in glutamate levels, but the responses were highly variable. Only in the ventral tegmental area and the locus coeruleus, but not in the prefrontal cortex, the increases were significantly different from basal values. In rats with relatively low basal glutamate levels, both in the ventral tegmental area and locus coeruleus, handling had a more pronounced effect on glutamate levels than in rats with high basal levels, although in some rats with relatively low basal levels of glutamate, handling had hardly any effect. Potassium stimulation also induced variable responses in all three brain areas. Again, relatively low basal glutamate levels were more responsive to the stimulation than higher basal values, although there appeared to be a lower limit. These data suggest that relatively high basal levels contain sources of glutamate that mask the neuronal pool of glutamate and are therefore less responsive to physiological or pharmacological stimulation. However, this interpretation was questioned by the findings that basal levels and handling-induced increases in glutamate levels were found to be (partly) TTX-independent. As carrier-mediated release as a possible non-exocytotic release mechanism has only been described in vivo under pathological conditions, it seems plausible to ascribe TTX-independent glutamate increases to aspecific, non-neuronal processes. This interpretation was further supported by the observation that in all three brain areas, other amino acids, i.e., aspartate, taurine, glutamine, serine, alanine and glycine also increased upon handling in a very similar way as glutamate did. Thus, these results

  18. Glutamate synthase: An archaeal horizontal gene transfer?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (GOGAT) which is a key enzyme in ammonia assimilation in bacteria, algae and plants. It catalyzes the reductive transamidation of amido nitrogen from glutamine to 2-oxoglutarate to form two molecules of glutamate (Temple et al 1998). Glutamate synthases differ according to their molecular weights, subunit compositions, ...

  19. Modeling of glutamate-induced dynamical patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurby-Bentzen, Christian Krefeld; Zhabotinsky, A.M.; Laugesen, Jakob Lund

    2009-01-01

    Based on established physiological mechanisms, the paper presents a detailed computer model, which supports the hypothesis that temporal lobe epilepsy may be caused by failure of glutamate reuptake from the extracellular space. The elevated glutamate concentration causes an increased activation o...

  20. Presynaptic Ionotropic Receptors Controlling and Modulating the Rules for Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthijs B. Verhoog

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout life, activity-dependent changes in neuronal connection strength enable the brain to refine neural circuits and learn based on experience. In line with predictions made by Hebb, synapse strength can be modified depending on the millisecond timing of action potential firing (STDP. The sign of synaptic plasticity depends on the spike order of presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons. Ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors, such as NMDA receptors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, are intimately involved in setting the rules for synaptic strengthening and weakening. In addition, timing rules for STDP within synapses are not fixed. They can be altered by activation of ionotropic receptors located at, or close to, synapses. Here, we will highlight studies that uncovered how network actions control and modulate timing rules for STDP by activating presynaptic ionotropic receptors. Furthermore, we will discuss how interaction between different types of ionotropic receptors may create “timing” windows during which particular timing rules lead to synaptic changes.

  1. Immobilization induces changes in presynaptic control of group Ia afferents in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2008-01-01

    Neural plasticity occurs throughout adult life in response to maturation, use and disuse. Recent studies have documented that H-reflex amplitudes increase following a period of immobilization. To elucidate the mechanisms contributing to the increase in H-reflex size following immobilization we...... immobilized the left foot and ankle joint for 2 weeks in 12 able-bodied subjects. Disynaptic reciprocal inhibition of soleus (SOL) motoneurones and presynaptic control of SOL group Ia afferents was measured before and after the immobilization as well as following 2 weeks of recovery. Following immobilization...... inhibition of SOL Ia afferents and taken together suggest that GABAergic presynaptic inhibition of the SOL Ia afferents is decreased following 2 weeks of immobilization. The depression of the SOL H-reflex when evoked at intervals shorter than 10 s (homosynaptic post-activation depression) also decreased...

  2. Glutamate Fermentation-2: Mechanism of L-Glutamate Overproduction in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasawa, Takashi; Wachi, Masaaki

    The nonpathogenic coryneform bacterium, Corynebacterium glutamicum, was isolated as an L-glutamate-overproducing microorganism by Japanese researchers and is currently utilized in various amino acid fermentation processes. L-Glutamate production by C. glutamicum is induced by limitation of biotin and addition of fatty acid ester surfactants and β-lactam antibiotics. These treatments affect the cell surface structures of C. glutamicum. After the discovery of C. glutamicum, many researchers have investigated the underlying mechanism of L-glutamate overproduction with respect to the cell surface structures of this organism. Furthermore, metabolic regulation during L-glutamate overproduction by C. glutamicum, particularly, the relationship between central carbon metabolism and L-glutamate biosynthesis, has been investigated. Recently, the role of a mechanosensitive channel protein in L-glutamate overproduction has been reported. In this chapter, mechanisms of L-glutamate overproduction by C. glutamicum have been reviewed.

  3. HDAC6 Is a Bruchpilot Deacetylase that Facilitates Neurotransmitter Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Miskiewicz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Presynaptic densities are specialized structures involved in synaptic vesicle tethering and neurotransmission; however, the mechanisms regulating their function remain understudied. In Drosophila, Bruchpilot is a major constituent of the presynaptic density that tethers vesicles. Here, we show that HDAC6 is necessary and sufficient for deacetylation of Bruchpilot. HDAC6 expression is also controlled by TDP-43, an RNA-binding protein deregulated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Animals expressing TDP-43 harboring pathogenic mutations show increased HDAC6 expression, decreased Bruchpilot acetylation, larger vesicle-tethering sites, and increased neurotransmission, defects similar to those seen upon expression of HDAC6 and opposite to hdac6 null mutants. Consequently, reduced levels of HDAC6 or increased levels of ELP3, a Bruchpilot acetyltransferase, rescue the presynaptic density defects in TDP-43-expressing flies as well as the decreased adult locomotion. Our work identifies HDAC6 as a Bruchpilot deacetylase and indicates that regulating acetylation of a presynaptic release-site protein is critical for maintaining normal neurotransmission.

  4. Deletion of glutamate delta-1 receptor in mouse leads to aberrant emotional and social behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopali Yadav

    Full Text Available The delta family of ionotropic glutamate receptors consists of glutamate δ1 (GluD1 and glutamate δ2 (GluD2 receptors. While the role of GluD2 in the regulation of cerebellar physiology is well understood, the function of GluD1 in the central nervous system remains elusive. We demonstrate for the first time that deletion of GluD1 leads to abnormal emotional and social behaviors. We found that GluD1 knockout mice (GluD1 KO were hyperactive, manifested lower anxiety-like behavior, depression-like behavior in a forced swim test and robust aggression in the resident-intruder test. Chronic lithium rescued the depression-like behavior in GluD1 KO. GluD1 KO mice also manifested deficits in social interaction. In the sociability test, GluD1 KO mice spent more time interacting with an inanimate object compared to a conspecific mouse. D-Cycloserine (DCS administration was able to rescue social interaction deficits observed in GluD1 KO mice. At a molecular level synaptoneurosome preparations revealed lower GluA1 and GluA2 subunit expression in the prefrontal cortex and higher GluA1, GluK2 and PSD95 expression in the amygdala of GluD1 KO. Moreover, DCS normalized the lower GluA1 expression in prefrontal cortex of GluD1 KO. We propose that deletion of GluD1 leads to aberrant circuitry in prefrontal cortex and amygdala owing to its potential role in presynaptic differentiation and synapse formation. Furthermore, these findings are in agreement with the human genetic studies suggesting a strong association of GRID1 gene with several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism spectrum disorders and major depressive disorder.

  5. Presynaptic CaV2.1 calcium channels carrying familial hemiplegic migraine mutation R192Q allow faster recovery from synaptic depression in mouse calyx of Held.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchauspe, Carlota González; Urbano, Francisco J; Di Guilmi, Mariano N; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Forsythe, Ian D; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2012-12-01

    Ca(V)2.1 Ca(2+) channels have a dominant and specific role in initiating fast synaptic transmission at central excitatory synapses, through a close association between release sites and calcium sensors. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is an autosomal-dominant subtype of migraine with aura, caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the α(1A) pore-forming subunit of Ca(V)2.1 channel. We used knock-in (KI) transgenic mice harboring the FHM-1 mutation R192Q to study the consequences of this mutation in neurotransmission at the giant synapse of the auditory system formed by the presynaptic calyx of Held terminal and the postsynaptic neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). Although synaptic transmission seems unaffected by low-frequency stimulation in physiological Ca(2+) concentration, we observed that with low Ca(2+) concentrations (transmitter release. In addition, when EPSCs were evoked by broadened presynaptic action potentials (achieved by inhibition of K(+) channels) via Ca(v)2.1-triggered exocytosis, R192Q KI mice exhibited further enhancement of EPSC amplitude and charge compared with WT mice. Repetitive stimulation of afferent axons to the MNTB at different frequencies caused short-term depression of EPSCs that recovered significantly faster in R192Q KI mice than in WT mice. Faster recovery in R192Q KI mice was prevented by the calcium chelator EGTA-AM, pointing to enlarged residual calcium as a key factor in accelerating the replenishment of synaptic vesicles.

  6. Competitive inhibition of glutamate dehydrogenase reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Punekar, Narayan S

    2007-06-12

    Irrespective of their pyridine nucleotide specificity, all glutamate dehydrogenases share a common chemical mechanism that involves an enzyme bound 'iminoglutarate' intermediate. Three compounds, structurally related to this intermediate, were tested for the inhibition of purified NADP-glutamate dehydrogenases from two Aspergilli, as also the bovine liver NAD(P)-glutamate dehydrogenase. 2-Methyleneglutarate, closely resembling iminoglutarate, was a potent competitive inhibitor of the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. This is the first report of a non-aromatic structure with a better glutamate dehydrogenase inhibitory potency than aryl carboxylic acids such as isophthalate. A suitably located 2-methylene group to mimic the iminium ion could be exploited to design inhibitors of other amino acid dehydrogenases.

  7. 123-I ioflupane (Datscan) presynaptic nigrostriatal imaging in patients with movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soriano Castrejon, Angel; Garcia Vicente, Ana Maria; Cortes Romera, Montserrat; Rodado Marina, Sonia; Poblete Garcia, Victor Manuel; Ruiz Solis, Sebastian Ruiz; Talavera Rubio, Maria del Prado; Vaamonde Cano, Julia

    2005-01-01

    123-I Ioflupane (Datscan) presynaptic imaging has been shown to have a significant utility in the assessment of patients with movement disorders 123 I Ioflupane SPECT is able to distinguish between Parkinson's disease (PD) and other forms of parkinsonism without degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway, including a common movement disorder such as essential tremor, and to assess disease progression in PD and other neuro degenerative disorders involving the substantia nigra. (author)

  8. No consistent bioenergetic defects in presynaptic nerve terminals isolated from mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sung W.; Gerencser, Akos A.; Ng, Ryan; Flynn, James M.; Melov, Simon; Danielson, Steven R.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Nicholls, David G.; Bredesen, Dale E.; Brand, Martin D.

    2012-01-01

    Depressed cortical energy supply and impaired synaptic function are predominant associations of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To test the hypothesis that presynaptic bioenergetic deficits are associated with the progression of AD pathogenesis, we compared bioenergetic variables of cortical and hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) from commonly used mouse models with AD-like phenotypes (J20 age 6 months, Tg2576 age 16 months and APP/PS age 9 and 14 months) to ag...

  9. Functional and structural remodeling of glutamate synapses in prefrontal and frontal cortex induced by behavioral stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eMusazzi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence has shown that the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders, including mood disorders, is associated with abnormal function and regulation of the glutamatergic system. Consistently, preclinical studies on stress-based animal models of pathology showed that glucocorticoids and stress exert crucial effects on neuronal excitability and function, especially in cortical and limbic areas. In prefrontal and frontal cortex, acute stress was shown to induce enhancement of glutamate release/transmission dependent on activation of corticosterone receptors. Although the mechanisms whereby stress affects glutamate transmission have not yet been fully understood, it was shown that synaptic, non-genomic action of corticosterone is required to increase the readily releasable pool of glutamate vesicles but is not sufficient to enhance transmission in prefrontal and frontal cortex. Slower, partly genomic mechanisms are probably necessary for the enhancement of glutamate transmission induced by stress.Combined evidence has suggested that the changes in glutamate release and transmission are responsible for the dendritic remodeling and morphological changes induced by stress and it has been argued that sustained alterations of glutamate transmission may play a key role in the long-term structural/functional changes associated with mood disorders in patients. Intriguingly, modifications of the glutamatergic system induced by stress in the prefrontal cortex seem to be biphasic. Indeed, while the fast response to stress suggests an enhancement in the number of excitatory synapses, synaptic transmission and working memory, long-term adaptive changes -including those consequent to chronic stress- induce opposite effects. Better knowledge of the cellular effectors involved in this biphasic effect of stress may be useful to understand the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders, and open new paths for the development of therapeutic approaches.

  10. Protein synthesizing units in presynaptic and postsynaptic domains of squid neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R; Vaida, B; Bleher, R; Crispino, M; Giuditta, A

    1998-11-01

    Putative protein synthesizing domains, called plaques, are characterized in the squid giant synapse and axon and in terminals of squid photoreceptor neurons. Plaques are oval-shaped formations of about 1 microm in size, which (1) generate signals that have spectroscopic electron energy loss characteristics of ribosomes, (2) exhibit ribonuclease-sensitive binding of YOYO-1, a fluorescent RNA/DNA dye, and (3) in part hybridize with a poly(dT) oligonucleotide. In the giant synapse plaques are abundant in the postsynaptic area, but are absent in the presynaptic terminal. In the cortical layer of the optic lobes, plaques are localized in the large carrot-shaped presynaptic terminals of photoreceptor neurons, where they are surrounded by synaptic vesicles and mitochondria. Biochemical and autoradiographic data have documented that the protein synthetic activity of squid optic lobe synaptosomes is largely due to the presynaptic terminals of the photoreceptor neurons. The identification of ribosomes and poly(A+)-mRNA in the plaques indicates that these structures are sites of local protein synthesis in synaptic domains.

  11. No consistent bioenergetic defects in presynaptic nerve terminals isolated from mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung W; Gerencser, Akos A; Ng, Ryan; Flynn, James M; Melov, Simon; Danielson, Steven R; Gibson, Bradford W; Nicholls, David G; Bredesen, Dale E; Brand, Martin D

    2012-11-21

    Depressed cortical energy supply and impaired synaptic function are predominant associations of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To test the hypothesis that presynaptic bioenergetic deficits are associated with the progression of AD pathogenesis, we compared bioenergetic variables of cortical and hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) from commonly used mouse models with AD-like phenotypes (J20 age 6 months, Tg2576 age 16 months, and APP/PS age 9 and 14 months) to age-matched controls. No consistent bioenergetic deficiencies were detected in synaptosomes from the three models; only APP/PS cortical synaptosomes from 14-month-old mice showed an increase in respiration associated with proton leak. J20 mice were chosen for a highly stringent investigation of mitochondrial function and content. There were no significant differences in the quality of the synaptosomal preparations or the mitochondrial volume fraction. Furthermore, respiratory variables, calcium handling, and membrane potentials of synaptosomes from symptomatic J20 mice under calcium-imposed stress were not consistently impaired. The recovery of marker proteins during synaptosome preparation was the same, ruling out the possibility that the lack of functional bioenergetic defects in synaptosomes from J20 mice was due to the selective loss of damaged synaptosomes during sample preparation. Our results support the conclusion that the intrinsic bioenergetic capacities of presynaptic nerve terminals are maintained in these symptomatic AD mouse models.

  12. Distribution of radiolabeled L-glutamate and D-aspartate from blood into peripheral tissues in naive rats: Significance for brain neuroprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klin, Yael; Zlotnik, Alexander; Boyko, Matthew; Ohayon, Sharon; Shapira, Yoram; Teichberg, Vivian I.

    2010-01-01

    and serves as an origin for glutamate metabolites that redistribute into skeletal muscle and gut. The findings of this study suggest now that pharmacological manipulations that reduce the liver glutamate release rate or cause a boosting of the skeletal muscle glutamate pumping rate are likely to cause brain neuroprotection.

  13. Control of Amygdala Circuits by 5-HT Neurons via 5-HT and Glutamate Cotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Ayesha; Bocchio, Marco; Bannerman, David M; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2017-02-15

    The serotonin (5-HT) system and the amygdala are key regulators of emotional behavior. Several lines of evidence suggest that 5-HT transmission in the amygdala is implicated in the susceptibility and drug treatment of mood disorders. Therefore, elucidating the physiological mechanisms through which midbrain 5-HT neurons modulate amygdala circuits could be pivotal in understanding emotional regulation in health and disease. To shed light on these mechanisms, we performed patch-clamp recordings from basal amygdala (BA) neurons in brain slices from mice with channelrhodopsin genetically targeted to 5-HT neurons. Optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals at low frequencies (≤1 Hz) evoked a short-latency excitation of BA interneurons (INs) that was depressed at higher frequencies. Pharmacological analysis revealed that this effect was mediated by glutamate and not 5-HT because it was abolished by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists. Optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals at higher frequencies (10-20 Hz) evoked both slow excitation and slow inhibition of INs. These effects were mediated by 5-HT because they were blocked by antagonists of 5-HT 2A and 5-HT 1A receptors, respectively. These fast glutamate- and slow 5-HT-mediated responses often coexisted in the same neuron. Interestingly, fast-spiking and non-fast-spiking INs displayed differential modulation by glutamate and 5-HT. Furthermore, optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals did not evoke glutamate release onto BA principal neurons, but inhibited these cells directly via activation of 5-HT 1A receptors and indirectly via enhanced GABA release. Collectively, these findings suggest that 5-HT neurons exert a frequency-dependent, cell-type-specific control over BA circuitry via 5-HT and glutamate co-release to inhibit the BA output. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The modulation of the amygdala by serotonin (5-HT) is important for emotional regulation and is implicated in the pathogenesis and treatment of affective disorders

  14. Endophilin mutations block clathrin-mediated endocytosis but not neurotransmitter release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verstreken, Patrik; Kjaerulff, Ole; Lloyd, Thomas E

    2002-01-01

    We have identified mutations in Drosophila endophilin to study its function in vivo. Endophilin is required presynaptically at the neuromuscular junction, and absence of Endophilin dramatically impairs endocytosis in vivo. Mutant larvae that lack Endophilin fail to take up FM1-43 dye in synaptic...... boutons, indicating an inability to retrieve synaptic membrane. This defect is accompanied by an expansion of the presynaptic membrane, and a depletion of vesicles from the bouton lumen. Interestingly, mutant larvae are still able to sustain release at 15%-20% of the normal rate during high...

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with nitric oxide pathways in glutamate neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manucha, Walter

    Multiple mechanisms underlying glutamate-induced neurotoxicity have recently been discussed. Likewise, a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This article highlights nitric oxide, an atypical neurotransmitter synthesized and released on demand by the post-synaptic neurons, and has many important implications for nerve cell survival and differentiation. Consequently, synaptogenesis, synapse elimination, and neurotransmitter release, are nitric oxide-modulated. Interesting, an emergent role of nitric oxide pathways has been discussed as regards neurotoxicity from glutamate-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that nitric oxide pathways modulation could prevent oxidative damage to neurons through apoptosis inhibition. This review aims to highlight the emergent aspects of nitric oxide-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to neurotoxicity, as well as the development of neurodegenerative diseases development. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Activity of the lactate-alanine shuttle is independent of glutamate-glutamine cycle activity in cerebellar neuronal-astrocytic cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Sickmann, Helle M; Schousboe, Arne

    2004-01-01

    The glutamate-glutamine cycle describes the neuronal release of glutamate into the synaptic cleft, astrocytic uptake, and conversion into glutamine, followed by release for use as a neuronal glutamate precursor. This only explains the fate of the carbon atoms, however, and not that of the ammonia....... Recently, a role for alanine has been proposed in transfer of ammonia between glutamatergic neurons and astrocytes, denoted the lactate-alanine shuttle (Waagepetersen et al. [ 2000] J. Neurochem. 75:471-479). The role of alanine in this context has been studied further using cerebellar neuronal cultures...... and corresponding neuronal-astrocytic cocultures. A superfusion paradigm was used to induce repetitively vesicular glutamate release by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in the neurons, allowing the relative activity dependency of the lactate-alanine shuttle to be assessed. [(15)N]Alanine (0.2 mM), [2-(15)N]/[5-(15)N...

  17. A radiometric microassay for glutamic acid decarboxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maderdrut, J.L.; North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill

    1979-01-01

    A simple method for purifying L-[ 3 H] glutamic acid and incubation conditions suitable for estimating L-glutamic acid decarboxylase activity are described. Routine and recycled cation-exchange procedure for separating γ-aminobutyric acid from L-glutamate are outlined and compared. Recycling increases the sensitivity of the cation-exchange method by 6-7 fold. L-Glutamate decarboxylase activity can be measured reliably in samples of embryonic neural tissue having wet-weights of approximately 1 μg. The cation-exchange method is compared with the anion-exchange and CO 2 -trapping methods. L-Glutamate decarboxylase activity has been detected in the lumbar spinal cord of the chick embryo at Day 21/4 (stage 14) using the cation-exchange method. This is 5-6 days earlier than L-glutamate decarboxylase activity has been detected in embryonic neural tissue by previous investigators. L-Glutamate decarboxylase is present in the lumbar spinal cord at least as early as the birth of the first lumbar spinal cord neurons and at least 1-2 days before the initiation of synaptogenesis. (author)

  18. Downregualtion of dynamin-related protein 1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity via regulating mitochondrial function in a calcium dependent manner in HT22 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chi; Yuan, Xian-rui; Li, Hao-yu; Zhao, Zi-jin; Liao, Yi-wei; Wang, Xiang-yu; Su, Jun; Sang, Shu-shan; Liu, Qing, E-mail: xiangyaliuqing@163.com

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Downregulation of Drp-1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. •Downregulation of Drp-1 inhibits glutamate-induced apoptosis. •Downregulation of Drp-1 reduces glutamate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. •Downregulation of Drp-1 preserves intracellular calcium homeostasis. -- Abstract: Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is involved in many acute and chronic brain diseases. Dynamin related protein 1 (Drp-1), one of the GTPase family of proteins that regulate mitochondrial fission and fusion balance, is associated with apoptotic cell death in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we investigated the effect of downregulating Drp-1 on glutamate excitotoxicity-induced neuronal injury in HT22 cells. We found that downregulation of Drp-1 with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased cell viability and inhibited lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release after glutamate treatment. Downregulation of Drp-1 also inhibited an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Drp-1 siRNA transfection preserved the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reduced cytochrome c release, enhanced ATP production, and partly prevented mitochondrial swelling. In addition, Drp-1 knockdown attenuated glutamate-induced increases of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+}, and preserved the mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} buffering capacity after excitotoxicity. Taken together, these results suggest that downregulation of Drp-1 protects HT22 cells against glutamate-induced excitatory damage, and this neuroprotection may be dependent at least in part on the preservation of mitochondrial function through regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis.

  19. Glutamate modulators as novel interventions for mood disorders Moduladores de glutamato como novas intervenções em transtornos do humor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay J Mathew

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that critical molecules in neurotrophic signaling cascades are long-term targets for currently available monoaminergic antidepressants. As chronic and severe mood disorders are characterized by impairments in neuronal resilience, pharmacological strategies that subserve a neuroprotective function might alter disorder pathophysiology and modify disease progression. Several promising approaches involve modulation of the glutamate neurotransmitter system, via post-synaptic receptor blockade or potentiation and presynaptic vesicular release inhibition. A focused review of the extant scientific literature was conducted, with a discussion of 3 compounds or classes of drugs currently undergoing clinical investigation: ketamine, riluzole, and AMPA receptor potentiators. Recent investigations in mood disordered patients suggest that the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine might demonstrate rapid antidepressant properties. Riluzole has been shown to reverse glutamate-mediated impairments in neuronal plasticity and to stimulate the synthesis of brain derived neurotrophic factor. Open-label trials in treatment-resistant depression have yielded promising results. Likewise, AMPA receptor potentiators favorably impact neurotrophic factors as well as enhance cognition. CONCLUSIONS: Pharmacological approaches that modulate components of the glutamate system offer novel targets for severe, recurrent mood disorders. Controlled studies are necessary.Recentes evidências sugerem que as moléculas críticas nas cascatas de sinalização neurotrófica são alvos de longo prazo dos antidepressivos monoaminérgicos disponíveis atualmente. Na medida em que transtornos graves e crônicos são caracterizados por deficiências na resiliência neuronal, estratégias farmacológicas que sejam úteis para uma função neuroprotetora talvez possam alterar a fisiopatologia e modificar a progressão da doença. Vários enfoques promissores envolvem a

  20. NMDA-Type Glutamate Receptor Activation Promotes Vascular Remodeling and Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Sébastien J; Bru-Mercier, Gilles; Courboulin, Audrey; Quatredeniers, Marceau; Rücker-Martin, Catherine; Antigny, Fabrice; Nakhleh, Morad K; Ranchoux, Benoit; Gouadon, Elodie; Vinhas, Maria-Candida; Vocelle, Matthieu; Raymond, Nicolas; Dorfmüller, Peter; Fadel, Elie; Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2018-02-14

    Background -Excessive proliferation and apoptosis resistance in pulmonary vascular cells underlie vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Specific treatments for PAH exist, mostly targeting endothelial dysfunction, but high pulmonary arterial pressure still causes heart failure and death. Pulmonary vascular remodeling may be driven by metabolic reprogramming of vascular cells to increase glutaminolysis and glutamate production. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), a major neuronal glutamate receptor, is also expressed on vascular cells, but its role in PAH is unknown. Methods -We assessed the status of the glutamate-NMDAR axis in the pulmonary arteries of PAH patients and controls, through mass spectrometry imaging, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. We measured the glutamate release from cultured pulmonary vascular cells using enzymatic assays, and analyzed NMDAR regulation/phosphorylation through western blot experiments. The effect of NMDAR blockade on human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (hPASMC) proliferation was determined using a BrdU incorporation assay. We assessed the role of NMDARs in vascular remodeling associated to pulmonary hypertension (PH), both in smooth muscle-specific NMDAR knockout mice exposed to chronic hypoxia and in the monocrotaline rat model of PH using NMDAR blockers. Results -We report glutamate accumulation, upregulation of the NMDAR, and NMDAR engagement reflected by increases in GluN1-subunit phosphorylation, in the pulmonary arteries of human PAH patients. K v channel inhibition and ETAR activation amplified calcium-dependent glutamate release from hPASMCs, and ETAR and PDGFR activation led to NMDAR engagement, highlighting crosstalk between the glutamate-NMDAR axis and major PAH-associated pathways. The PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of hPASMCs involved NMDAR activation and phosphorylated GluN1 subunit localization to cell-cell contacts, consistent with glutamatergic communication between

  1. Glutamate transporters combine transporter- and channel-like features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotboom, DJ; Konings, WN; Lolkema, JS

    2001-01-01

    Glutamate transporters in the mammalian central nervous system have a unique position among secondary transport proteins as they exhibit glutamate-gated chloride-channel activity in addition to glutamate-transport activity. In this article, the available data on the structure of the glutamate

  2. Metabolic fate and function of dietary glutamate in the gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutamate is a major constituent of dietary protein and is also consumed in many prepared foods as an additive in the form of monosodium glutamate. Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that glutamate is a major oxidative fuel for the gut and that dietary glutamate is extensively metabol...

  3. Emerging aspects of dietary glutamate metabolism in the developing gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glutamate is a major constituent of dietary protein and is also consumed in many prepared foods as a flavour additive in the form of monosodium glutamate (MSG). Evidence from human and animal studies indicates that glutamate is the major oxidative fuel for the gut and that dietary glutamate is exten...

  4. Effects of blockade of sodium-dependent glutamate transporters on brain metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, C.E.-H.; Rae, C.; Bubb, W.A.; Blacar, V.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: L-Glutamic acid is the major excitatory amino acid in the CNS. Termination of the glutamatergic transmission and the clearance of excessive and neurotoxic glutamate are achieved by high affinity Na + -dependent uptake transporters. A number of neurodegenerative diseases have been imputed to failure of the Na + -dependent transport system, including motor neuron disease. In this study we examined the effects of blockade of glutamate transporters on the metabolism of guinea pig cortical brain slices (350 μm thickness). 13 C-NMR spectroscopy revealed a significant decrease (p 13 C label (flux) into individual isotopomers in the presence of LCCGIII (50 μM), a transportable glutamate uptake inhibitor. However, a significant increase in metabolic flux and fractional enrichment of metabolites was observed in the presence of 5 μM LCCG III. This is indicative of a mild stimulatory effect on metabolism due to inhibition of the transporters. A non-transportable blocker of glutamate transport, a,e-MPDC, produced a significant increase in metabolic fluxes and fractional enrichment of isotopomers, but had no effects on total metabolite pool sizes, in the presence of both 5 μM and 50 μM a,e-MPDC. Both 5 μM and 50 μM Lt-PDC increased the total metabolite pool sizes and the metabolic flux. These results suggest that blockade of glutamate transport lead to an increase of metabolic rate, which in turn may increase the rate of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neurotransmitter release and, thus, produce neurotoxicity. Copyright (2002) Australian Neuroscience Society

  5. Dried Rehmannia root protects against glutamate-induced cytotoxity to PC12 cells through energy metabolism-related pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehmannia has been shown to be clinically effective in treating neurodegenerative diseases; however, the neuroprotective mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we established a model of neurodegenerative disease using PC12 cytotoxic injury induced by glutamate. The cells were treated with 20 mM glutamate in the absence or presence of water extracts of dried Rehmannia root of varying concentrations (70%, 50% and 30%. The different concentrations of Rehmannia water extract significantly increased the activity of glutamate-injured cells, reduced the release of lactate dehydrogenase, inhibited apoptosis, increased the concentrations of NADH, NAD and ATP in cells, ameliorated mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduced the levels of light chain 3. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Rehmannia water extracts exert a cytoprotective effect against glutamate-induced PC12 cell injury via energy metabolism-related pathways.

  6. Glutamate Receptor Stimulation Up-Regulates Glutamate Uptake in Human Müller Glia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Colomé, Ana María; López, Edith; Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-07-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the vertebrate retina, is a well know activator of numerous signal transduction pathways, and has been critically involved in long-term synaptic changes acting through ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. However, recent findings underlining the importance of intensity and duration of glutamate stimuli for specific neuronal responses, including excitotoxicity, suggest a crucial role for Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters, responsible for the removal of this neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft, in the regulation of glutamate-induced signaling. Transporter proteins are expressed in neurons and glia cells, albeit most of glutamate uptake occurs in the glial compartment. Within the retina, Müller glia cells are in close proximity to glutamatergic synapses and participate in the recycling of glutamate through the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. In this context, we decided to investigate a plausible role of glutamate as a regulatory signal for its own transport in human retinal glia cells. To this end, we determined [(3)H]-D-aspartate uptake in cultures of spontaneously immortalized human Müller cells (MIO-M1) exposed to distinct glutamatergic ligands. A time and dose-dependent increase in the transporter activity was detected. This effect was dependent on the activation of the N-methyl D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors, due to a dual effect: an increase in affinity and an augmented expression of the transporter at the plasma membrane, as established via biotinylation experiments. Furthermore, a NMDA-dependent association of glutamate transporters with the cystoskeletal proteins ezrin and glial fibrillary acidic protein was also found. These results add a novel mediator of the glutamate transporter modulation and further strengthen the notion of the critical involvement of glia cells in synaptic function.

  7. Short-term and long-term control of synaptic strength by light activatable glutamate receptors at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    OpenAIRE

    Kauwe, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) exhibit structural and physiological homeostasis during larval development in which the number of boutons and the amount of neurotransmitter released increases in coordination with larval muscle size growth. The Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling pathway, including Glass bottom-boat (Gbb), a BMP ligand, and Wishful thinking (Wit), its presynaptic BMP receptor, are important for regulating this homeostatic growth in larvae. Genetic analysis o...

  8. Construction of a potentiometric glutamate biosensor for determination of glutamate in some real samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Lmaz, Demet; Karaku, Emine

    2011-12-01

    The potentiometric glutamate biosensor based on ammonium-selective poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) membrane electrode was constructed by chemically immobilizing glutamate oxidase. Ammonium ions produced after an enzymatic reaction were determined potentiometrically. We determined the optimum working conditions of the biosensor such as buffer concentration, buffer pH, lifetime, response time, linear working range, kinetic constants (K(m) and V(max)) of glutamate oxidase enzyme used for biosensor construction values, and other response characteristics. Additionally, glutamate assay in some real samples such as chicken bullion, healthy human serum, and commercial multipower amino acid mixture were also successfully carried out. The results showed good agreement with previously reported values.

  9. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase enables anaplerotic refilling of TCA cycle intermediates in stroke-affected brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Cameron; Gnyawali, Surya; Stewart, Richard; Teplitsky, Seth; Harris, Hallie; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K; Khanna, Savita

    2017-04-01

    Ischemic stroke results in excessive release of glutamate, which contributes to neuronal cell death. Here, we test the hypothesis that otherwise neurotoxic glutamate can be productively metabolized by glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) to maintain cellular energetics and protect the brain from ischemic stroke injury. The GOT-dependent metabolism of glutamate was studied in primary neural cells and in stroke-affected C57-BL6 mice using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and GC-MS. Extracellular Glu sustained cell viability under hypoglycemic conditions and increased GOT-mediated metabolism in vitro Correction of stroke-induced hypoxia using supplemental oxygen in vivo lowered Glu levels as measured by 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. GOT knockdown abrogated this effect and caused ATP loss in the stroke-affected brain. GOT overexpression increased anaplerotic refilling of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates in mouse brain during ischemic stroke. Furthermore, GOT overexpression not only reduced ischemic stroke lesion volume but also attenuated neurodegeneration and improved poststroke sensorimotor function. Taken together, our results support a new paradigm that GOT enables metabolism of otherwise neurotoxic extracellular Glu through a truncated tricarboxylic acid cycle under hypoglycemic conditions.-Rink, C., Gnyawali, S., Stewart, R., Teplitsky, S., Harris, H., Roy, S., Sen, C. K., Khanna, S. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase enables anaplerotic refilling of TCA cycle intermediates in stroke-affected brain. © FASEB.

  10. Modelling vesicular release at hippocampal synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhita Nadkarni

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We study local calcium dynamics leading to a vesicle fusion in a stochastic, and spatially explicit, biophysical model of the CA3-CA1 presynaptic bouton. The kinetic model for vesicle release has two calcium sensors, a sensor for fast synchronous release that lasts a few tens of milliseconds and a separate sensor for slow asynchronous release that lasts a few hundred milliseconds. A wide range of data can be accounted for consistently only when a refractory period lasting a few milliseconds between releases is included. The inclusion of a second sensor for asynchronous release with a slow unbinding site, and thereby a long memory, affects short-term plasticity by facilitating release. Our simulations also reveal a third time scale of vesicle release that is correlated with the stimulus and is distinct from the fast and the slow releases. In these detailed Monte Carlo simulations all three time scales of vesicle release are insensitive to the spatial details of the synaptic ultrastructure. Furthermore, our simulations allow us to identify features of synaptic transmission that are universal and those that are modulated by structure.

  11. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  12. Biobased synthesis of acrylonitrile from glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notre, le J.E.L.; Scott, E.L.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamic acid was transformed into acrylonitrile in a two step procedure involving an oxidative decarboxylation in water to 3-cyanopropanoic acid followed by a decarbonylation-elimination reaction using a palladium catalyst

  13. Temperature-sensitive glutamate dehydrogenase mutants of Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Dendinger, S M; Brenchley, J E

    1980-01-01

    Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium defective in glutamate dehydrogenase activity were isolated in parent strains lacking glutamate synthase activity by localizcd mutagenesis or by a general mutagenesis combined with a cycloserine enrichment for glutamate auxotrophs. Two mutants with temperature-sensitive phenotypes had glutamate dehydrogenase activities that were more thermolabile than that of an isogenic control strain. Eight other mutants had less than 10% of the wild-type glutamate dehydrog...

  14. Decreased expression of vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and complexin II mRNAs in schizophrenia: further evidence for a synaptic pathology affecting glutamate neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, S L; Harrison, P J

    2005-03-01

    Synaptic protein gene expression is altered in schizophrenia. In the hippocampal formation there may be particular involvement of glutamatergic neurons and their synapses, but overall the profile remains unclear. In this in situ hybridization histochemistry (ISHH) study, we examined four informative synaptic protein transcripts: vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 1, VGLUT2, complexin I, and complexin II, in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DPFC), superior temporal cortex (STC), and hippocampal formation, in 13 subjects with schizophrenia and 18 controls. In these areas, VGLUT1 and complexin II are expressed primarily by excitatory neurons, whereas complexin I is mainly expressed by inhibitory neurons. In schizophrenia, VGLUT1 mRNA was decreased in hippocampal formation and DPFC, complexin II mRNA was reduced in DPFC and STC, and complexin I mRNA decreased in STC. Hippocampal VGLUT1 mRNA declined with age selectively in the schizophrenia group. VGLUT2 mRNA was not quantifiable due to its low level. The data provide additional evidence for a synaptic pathology in schizophrenia, in terms of a reduced expression of three synaptic protein genes. In the hippocampus, the loss of VGLUT1 mRNA supports data indicating that glutamatergic presynaptic deficits are prominent, whereas the pattern of results in temporal and frontal cortex suggests broadly similar changes may affect inhibitory and excitatory neurons. The impairment of synaptic transmission implied by the synaptic protein reductions may contribute to the dysfunction of cortical neural circuits that characterises the disorder.

  15. Serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline adjust actions of myelinated afferents via modulation of presynaptic inhibition in the mouse spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramírez, David L; Calvo, Jorge R; Hochman, Shawn; Quevedo, Jorge N

    2014-01-01

    Gain control of primary afferent neurotransmission at their intraspinal terminals occurs by several mechanisms including primary afferent depolarization (PAD). PAD produces presynaptic inhibition via a reduction in transmitter release. While it is known that descending monoaminergic pathways complexly regulate sensory processing, the extent these actions include modulation of afferent-evoked PAD remains uncertain. We investigated the effects of serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) on afferent transmission and PAD. Responses were evoked by stimulation of myelinated hindlimb cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord. Monosynaptic responses were examined in the deep dorsal horn either as population excitatory synaptic responses (recorded as extracellular field potentials; EFPs) or intracellular excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). The magnitude of PAD generated intraspinally was estimated from electrotonically back-propagating dorsal root potentials (DRPs) recorded on lumbar dorsal roots. 5HT depressed the DRP by 76%. Monosynaptic actions were similarly depressed by 5HT (EFPs 54%; EPSCs 75%) but with a slower time course. This suggests that depression of monosynaptic EFPs and DRPs occurs by independent mechanisms. DA and NA had similar depressant actions on DRPs but weaker effects on EFPs. IC50 values for DRP depression were 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 µM for 5HT, DA and NA, respectively. Depression of DRPs by monoamines was nearly-identical in both muscle and cutaneous afferent-evoked responses, supporting a global modulation of the multimodal afferents stimulated. 5HT, DA and NA produced no change in the compound antidromic potentials evoked by intraspinal microstimulation indicating that depression of the DRP is unrelated to direct changes in the excitability of intraspinal afferent fibers, but due to metabotropic receptor activation. In summary, both myelinated afferent-evoked DRPs and monosynaptic transmission in the

  16. Serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline adjust actions of myelinated afferents via modulation of presynaptic inhibition in the mouse spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L García-Ramírez

    Full Text Available Gain control of primary afferent neurotransmission at their intraspinal terminals occurs by several mechanisms including primary afferent depolarization (PAD. PAD produces presynaptic inhibition via a reduction in transmitter release. While it is known that descending monoaminergic pathways complexly regulate sensory processing, the extent these actions include modulation of afferent-evoked PAD remains uncertain. We investigated the effects of serotonin (5HT, dopamine (DA and noradrenaline (NA on afferent transmission and PAD. Responses were evoked by stimulation of myelinated hindlimb cutaneous and muscle afferents in the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord. Monosynaptic responses were examined in the deep dorsal horn either as population excitatory synaptic responses (recorded as extracellular field potentials; EFPs or intracellular excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs. The magnitude of PAD generated intraspinally was estimated from electrotonically back-propagating dorsal root potentials (DRPs recorded on lumbar dorsal roots. 5HT depressed the DRP by 76%. Monosynaptic actions were similarly depressed by 5HT (EFPs 54%; EPSCs 75% but with a slower time course. This suggests that depression of monosynaptic EFPs and DRPs occurs by independent mechanisms. DA and NA had similar depressant actions on DRPs but weaker effects on EFPs. IC50 values for DRP depression were 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 µM for 5HT, DA and NA, respectively. Depression of DRPs by monoamines was nearly-identical in both muscle and cutaneous afferent-evoked responses, supporting a global modulation of the multimodal afferents stimulated. 5HT, DA and NA produced no change in the compound antidromic potentials evoked by intraspinal microstimulation indicating that depression of the DRP is unrelated to direct changes in the excitability of intraspinal afferent fibers, but due to metabotropic receptor activation. In summary, both myelinated afferent-evoked DRPs and monosynaptic

  17. Acute and sustained effects of methylphenidate on cognition and presynaptic dopamine metabolism: an [18F]FDOPA PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabram, Ina; Henkel, Karsten; Mohammadkhani Shali, Siamak; Dietrich, Claudia; Schmaljohann, Jörn; Winz, Oliver; Prinz, Susanne; Rademacher, Lena; Neumaier, Bernd; Felzen, Marc; Kumakura, Yoshitaka; Cumming, Paul; Mottaghy, Felix M; Gründer, Gerhard; Vernaleken, Ingo

    2014-10-29

    Methylphenidate (MPH) inhibits the reuptake of dopamine and noradrenaline. PET studies with MPH challenge show increased competition at postsynaptic D2/3-receptors, thus indirectly revealing presynaptic dopamine release. We used [(18)F]fluorodopamine ([(18)F]FDOPA)-PET in conjunction with the inlet-outlet model (IOM) of Kumakura et al. (2007) to investigate acute and long-term changes in dopamine synthesis capacity and turnover in nigrostriatal fibers of healthy subjects with MPH challenge. Twenty healthy human females underwent two dynamic [(18)F]FDOPA PET scans (124 min; slow bolus-injection; arterial blood sampling), with one scan in untreated baseline condition and the other after MPH administration (0.5 mg/kg, p.o.), in randomized order. Subjects underwent cognitive testing at each PET session. Time activity curves were obtained for ventral putamen and caudate and were analyzed according to the IOM to obtain the regional net-uptake of [(18)F]FDOPA (K; dopamine synthesis capacity) as well as the [(18)F]fluorodopamine washout rate (kloss, index of dopamine turnover). MPH substantially decreased kloss in putamen (-22%; p = 0.003). In the reversed treatment order group (MPH/no drug), K was increased by 18% at no drug follow-up. The magnitude of K at the no drug baseline correlated with cognitive parameters. Furthermore, individual kloss changes correlated with altered cognitive performance under MPH. [(18)F]FDOPA PET in combination with the IOM detects an MPH-evoked decrease in striatal dopamine turnover, in accordance with the known acute pharmacodynamics of MPH. Furthermore, the scan-ordering effect on K suggested that a single MPH challenge persistently increased striatal dopamine synthesis capacity. Attenuation of dopamine turnover by MPH is linked to enhanced cognitive performance in healthy females. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414769-08$15.00/0.

  18. Histamine H3 receptors mediate inhibition of noradrenaline release from intestinal sympathetic nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Blandizzi, Corrado; Tognetti, Martina; Colucci, Rocchina; Tacca, Mario Del

    2000-01-01

    The present study investigates whether presynaptic histamine receptors regulate noradrenaline release from intestinal sympathetic nerves. The experiments were performed on longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations of guinea-pig ileum, preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline.In the presence of rauwolscine, electrically-induced [3H]-noradrenaline release was inhibited by histamine or R-α-methylhistamine, whereas it was unaffected by pyridylethylamine, impromidine, pyrilamine, cimetidine, t...

  19. Development of paradigm for the study of amino acid neurotransmitter release in human autopsy brain samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, K.-W.; Dodd, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: This study attempted to establish a release protocol to characterize both the vesicular and cytoplasmic components of amino acid transmitter release in human synaptosomes. Experiments with rat synaptosomes showed that, with depolarizing concentrations of K + ions, vesicular release could be successfully differentiated from cytoplasmic release for preloaded L-[ 3 H ]glutamate and [ 14 C ]GABA. However, human tissue studies did not give clear-cut results. Experiments were carried out to optimize the release paradigm as well as to improve the vesicular uptake of labeled transmitters. A 'pulse- chase' protocol, with an unlabelled D-aspartate chase, was performed in human tissue samples in order to enhance the L-[ 3 H ] glutamate release signal derived from exocytosis by removing the cytoplasmic pool of L-[ 3 H ] glutamate first. However, the results showed that total release was not enhanced effectively in comparison with the non-pulse-chase protocol. In brief, the pulse-chase protocol did not build up the vesicular pool of L-[ 3 H ]glutamate, though the cytoplasmic L- [ 3 H ] glutamate pool was effectively depressed by D-aspartate. Further studies applied 4- aminopyridine (4-AP) to trigger release, to circumvent the problem of the reversal of plasma membrane transporters caused by raised K + ion concentrations. The results showed that the application of 4-AP elicited the release of amino acid transmitters from rat synaptosomes, but failed to produce successful release signals in the human tissue experiments. Our findings suggest that the vesicular compartment may be impaired by freezing and affected by post-mortem delay (PMD). Rat studies showed that the freezing step had a major effect on Ca 2+-dependent release, as less L- [3 H ]glutamate and [ 14 C ]GABA were released from the frozen rat tissue preparations. Moreover, there was an indication of a decline in L-[ 3 H ]glutamate release with increasing PMD. Copyright (2001) Australian Neuroscience Society

  20. Secretin and its C-terminal hexapeptide potentiates insulin release in mouse islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Hans; Hansen, B; Lernmark, A

    1986-01-01

    no stimulatory effect on islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity. In fact, S-(23-27), S-(24-27), and S-(25-27) inhibited the islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity, the activation by which amino acids and amino acid derivatives are known to elicit a potentiation of insulin release. Our results suggest that the C...

  1. Greater ethanol-induced locomotor activation in DBA/2J versus C57BL/6J mice is not predicted by presynaptic striatal dopamine dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie H Rose

    Full Text Available A large body of research has aimed to determine the neurochemical factors driving differential sensitivity to ethanol between individuals in an attempt to find predictors of ethanol abuse vulnerability. Here we find that the locomotor activating effects of ethanol are markedly greater in DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice, although it is unclear as to what neurochemical differences between strains mediate this behavior. Dopamine elevations in the nucleus accumbens and caudate-putamen regulate locomotor behavior for most drugs, including ethanol; thus, we aimed to determine if differences in these regions predict strain differences in ethanol-induced locomotor activity. Previous studies suggest that ethanol interacts with the dopamine transporter, potentially mediating its locomotor activating effects; however, we found that ethanol had no effects on dopamine uptake in either strain. Ex vivo voltammetry allows for the determination of ethanol effects on presynaptic dopamine terminals, independent of drug-induced changes in firing rates of afferent inputs from either dopamine neurons or other neurotransmitter systems. However, differences in striatal dopamine dynamics did not predict the locomotor-activating effects of ethanol, since the inhibitory effects of ethanol on dopamine release were similar between strains. There were differences in presynaptic dopamine function between strains, with faster dopamine clearance in the caudate-putamen of DBA/2J mice; however, it is unclear how this difference relates to locomotor behavior. Because of the role of the dopamine system in reinforcement and reward learning, differences in dopamine signaling between the strains could have implications for addiction-related behaviors that extend beyond ethanol effects in the striatum.

  2. Reciprocal regulation between taurine and glutamate response via Ca2+- dependent pathways in retinal third-order neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulley Simon

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although taurine and glutamate are the most abundant amino acids conducting neural signals in the central nervous system, the communication between these two neurotransmitters is largely unknown. This study explores the interaction of taurine and glutamate in the retinal third-order neurons. Using specific antibodies, both taurine and taurine transporters were localized in photoreceptors and Off-bipolar cells, glutamatergic neurons in retinas. It is possible that Off-bipolar cells release juxtaposed glutamate and taurine to activate the third-order neurons in retina. The interaction of taurine and glutamate was studied in acutely dissociated third-order neurons in whole-cell patch-clamp recording and Ca2+ imaging. We find that taurine effectively reduces glutamate-induced Ca2+ influx via ionotropic glutamate receptors and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in the neurons, and the effect of taurine was selectively inhibited by strychnine and picrotoxin, but not GABA receptor antagonists, although GABA receptors are present in the neurons. A CaMKII inhibitor partially reversed the effect of taurine, suggesting that a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent pathway is involved in taurine regulation. On the other hand, a rapid influx of Ca2+ through ionotropic glutamate receptors could inhibit the amplitude and kinetics of taurine-elicited currents in the third-order neurons, which could be controlled with intracellular application of BAPTA a fast Ca2+ chelator. This study indicates that taurine is a potential neuromodulator in glutamate transmission. The reciprocal inhibition between taurine and glutamate in the postsynaptic neurons contributes to computation of visual signals in the retinal neurons.

  3. Role of Na,K-ATPase α1 and α2 isoforms in the support of astrocyte glutamate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina B Illarionova

    Full Text Available Glutamate released during neuronal activity is cleared from the synaptic space via the astrocytic glutamate/Na(+ co-transporters. This transport is driven by the transmembrane Na(+ gradient mediated by Na,K-ATPase. Astrocytes express two isoforms of the catalytic Na,K-ATPase α subunits; the ubiquitously expressed α1 subunit and the α2 subunit that has a more specific expression profile. In the brain α2 is predominantly expressed in astrocytes. The isoforms differ with regard to Na+ affinity, which is lower for α2. The relative roles of the α1 and α2 isoforms in astrocytes are not well understood. Here we present evidence that the presence of the α2 isoform may contribute to a more efficient restoration of glutamate triggered increases in intracellular sodium concentration [Na(+]i. Studies were performed on primary astrocytes derived from E17 rat striatum expressing Na,K-ATPase α1 and α2 and the glutamate/Na(+ co-transporter GLAST. Selective inhibition of α2 resulted in a modest increase of [Na(+]i accompanied by a disproportionately large decrease in uptake of aspartate, an indicator of glutamate uptake. To compare the capacity of α1 and α2 to handle increases in [Na(+]i triggered by glutamate, primary astrocytes overexpressing either α1 or α2 were used. Exposure to glutamate 200 µM caused a significantly larger increase in [Na(+]i in α1 than in α2 overexpressing cells, and as a consequence restoration of [Na(+]i, after glutamate exposure was discontinued, took longer time in α1 than in α2 overexpressing cells. Both α1 and α2 interacted with astrocyte glutamate/Na(+ co-transporters via the 1st intracellular loop.

  4. A novel reagentless glutamate microband biosensor for real-time cell toxicity monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, G.; Pemberton, R.M. [Centre for Research in Biosciences, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Fielden, P.R. [Department of Chemistry, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Hart, J.P., E-mail: john.hart@uwe.ac.uk [Centre for Research in Biosciences, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-24

    A reagentless glutamate biosensor was applied to the determination of glutamate released from liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) in response to toxic challenge from various concentrations of paracetamol. A screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) containing the electrocatalyst Meldola's Blue (MB-SPCE) served as the electron mediator for the oxidation of NADH. A mixture of the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) and the biopolymer chitosan (CHIT) were drop-coated onto the surface of the transducer (MB-SPCE) in a simple one step fabrication process. The reagentless biosensor was used with amperometry in stirred solution at an applied potential of +0.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). All experiments were carried out at the following conditions: pH 7, temperature 37 °C, atmosphere 5% CO{sub 2}. The linear range of the device was found to be 25–125 μM in phosphate buffer (75 mM, containing 0.05 M NaCl) and 25–150 μM in cell culture medium. The limits of detection (LOD) were found to be 1.2 μM and 4.2 μM based on three times signal to noise, using PBS and culture medium respectively. The sensitivity was calculated to be 106 nA μM{sup −1} cm{sup −2} and 210 nA μM{sup −1} cm{sup −2} in PBS and cell medium respectively. The response time was ∼60 s in an agitated solution. HepG2 cells were exposed to various concentrations of paracetamol (1 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM) in order to investigate the drug-induced release of glutamate into the culture medium in real time. Two toxicity studies were investigated using different methods of exposure and analysis. The first method consisted of a single measurement of the glutamate concentration, using the method of standard addition, after 24 h incubation. The concentrations of glutamate were found to be 52 μM, 93 μM and 177 μM, released on exposure to 1 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM paracetamol respectively. The second method involved the

  5. Intracellular synthesis of glutamic acid in Bacillus methylotrophicus SK19.001, a glutamate-independent poly(γ-glutamic acid)-producing strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yingyun; Zhang, Tao; Mu, Wanmeng; Miao, Ming; Jiang, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Bacillus methylotrophicus SK19.001 is a glutamate-independent strain that produces poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA), a polymer of D- and L-glutamic acids that possesses applications in food, the environment, agriculture, etc. This study was undertaken to explore the synthetic pathway of intracellular L- and D-glutamic acid in SK19.001 by investigating the effects of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and different amino acids as metabolic precursors on the production of γ-PGA and analyzing the activities of the enzymes involved in the synthesis of L- and D-glutamate. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and amino acids could participate in the synthesis of γ-PGA via independent pathways in SK19.001. L-Aspartate aminotransferase, L-glutaminase and L-glutamate synthase were the enzymatic sources of L-glutamate. Glutamate racemase was responsible for the formation of D-glutamate for the synthesis of γ-PGA, and the synthetase had stereoselectivity for glutamate substrate. The enzymatic sources of L-glutamate were investigated for the first time in the glutamate-independent γ-PGA-producing strain, and multiple enzymatic sources of L-glutamate were verified in SK19.001, which will benefit efforts to improve production of γ-PGA with metabolic engineering strategies. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Local synthesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins in the presynaptic nerve terminal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioio, A E; Eyman, M; Zhang, H; Lavina, Z S; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    2001-06-01

    One of the central tenets in neuroscience has been that the protein constituents of distal compartments of the neuron (e.g., the axon and nerve terminal) are synthesized in the nerve cell body and are subsequently transported to their ultimate sites of function. In contrast to this postulate, we have established previously that a heterogeneous population of mRNAs and biologically active polyribosomes exist in the giant axon and presynaptic nerve terminals of the photoreceptor neurons in squid. We report that these mRNA populations contain mRNAs for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to include: cytochrome oxidase subunit 17, propionyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.3), dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (EC 1.8.1.4), and coenzyme Q subunit 7. The mRNA for heat shock protein 70, a chaperone protein known to be involved in the import of proteins into mitochondria, has also been identified. Electrophoretic gel analysis of newly synthesized proteins in the synaptosomal fraction isolated from the squid optic lobe revealed that the large presynaptic terminals of the photoreceptor neuron contain a cytoplasmic protein synthetic system. Importantly, a significant amount of the cycloheximide resistant proteins locally synthesized in the terminal becomes associated with mitochondria. PCR analysis of RNA from synaptosomal polysomes establishes that COX17 and CoQ7 mRNAs are being actively translated. Taken together, these findings indicate that proteins required for the maintenance of mitochondrial function are synthesized locally in the presynaptic nerve terminal, and call attention to the intimacy of the relationship between the terminal and its energy generating system. J. Neurosci. Res. 64:447-453, 2001. Published 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Control of autophagosome axonal retrograde flux by presynaptic activity unveiled using botulinum neurotoxin type a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Martin, Sally; Papadopulos, Andreas; Harper, Callista B; Mavlyutov, Timur A; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Glass, Nick R; Cooper-White, Justin J; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Davletov, Bazbek; Meunier, Frédéric A

    2015-04-15

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that elicits flaccid paralysis by enzymatic cleavage of the exocytic machinery component SNAP25 in motor nerve terminals. However, recent evidence suggests that the neurotoxic activity of BoNT/A is not restricted to the periphery, but also reaches the CNS after retrograde axonal transport. Because BoNT/A is internalized in recycling synaptic vesicles, it is unclear which compartment facilitates this transport. Using live-cell confocal and single-molecule imaging of rat hippocampal neurons cultured in microfluidic devices, we show that the activity-dependent uptake of the binding domain of the BoNT/A heavy chain (BoNT/A-Hc) is followed by a delayed increase in retrograde axonal transport of BoNT/A-Hc carriers. Consistent with a role of presynaptic activity in initiating transport of the active toxin, activity-dependent uptake of BoNT/A in the terminal led to a significant increase in SNAP25 cleavage detected in the soma chamber compared with nonstimulated neurons. Surprisingly, most endocytosed BoNT/A-Hc was incorporated into LC3-positive autophagosomes generated in the nerve terminals, which then underwent retrograde transport to the cell soma, where they fused with lysosomes both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking autophagosome formation or acidification with wortmannin or bafilomycin A1, respectively, inhibited the activity-dependent retrograde trafficking of BoNT/A-Hc. Our data demonstrate that both the presynaptic formation of autophagosomes and the initiation of their retrograde trafficking are tightly regulated by presynaptic activity. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/356179-16$15.00/0.

  8. Pancreatic and snake venom presynaptically active phospholipases A2 inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfius, Catherine A; Kasheverov, Igor E; Kryukova, Elena V; Spirova, Ekaterina N; Shelukhina, Irina V; Starkov, Vladislav G; Andreeva, Tatyana V; Faure, Grazyna; Zouridakis, Marios; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2017-01-01

    Phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are enzymes found throughout the animal kingdom. They hydrolyze phospholipids in the sn-2 position producing lysophospholipids and unsaturated fatty acids, agents that can damage membranes. PLA2s from snake venoms have numerous toxic effects, not all of which can be explained by phospholipid hydrolysis, and each enzyme has a specific effect. We have earlier demonstrated the capability of several snake venom PLA2s with different enzymatic, cytotoxic, anticoagulant and antiproliferative properties, to decrease acetylcholine-induced currents in Lymnaea stagnalis neurons, and to compete with α-bungarotoxin for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and acetylcholine binding protein. Since nAChRs are implicated in postsynaptic and presynaptic activities, in this work we probe those PLA2s known to have strong presynaptic effects, namely β-bungarotoxin from Bungarus multicinctus and crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus. We also wished to explore whether mammalian PLA2s interact with nAChRs, and have examined non-toxic PLA2 from porcine pancreas. It was found that porcine pancreatic PLA2 and presynaptic β-bungarotoxin blocked currents mediated by nAChRs in Lymnaea neurons with IC50s of 2.5 and 4.8 μM, respectively. Crotoxin competed with radioactive α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo and human α7 nAChRs and to the acetylcholine binding protein. Pancreatic PLA2 interacted similarly with these targets; moreover, it inhibited radioactive α-bungarotoxin binding to the water-soluble extracellular domain of human α9 nAChR, and blocked acetylcholine induced currents in human α9α10 nAChRs heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These and our earlier results show that all snake PLA2s, including presynaptically active crotoxin and β-bungarotoxin, as well as mammalian pancreatic PLA2, interact with nAChRs. The data obtained suggest that this interaction may be a general property of all PLA2s, which should be proved by

  9. Pancreatic and snake venom presynaptically active phospholipases A2 inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Vulfius

    Full Text Available Phospholipases A2 (PLA2s are enzymes found throughout the animal kingdom. They hydrolyze phospholipids in the sn-2 position producing lysophospholipids and unsaturated fatty acids, agents that can damage membranes. PLA2s from snake venoms have numerous toxic effects, not all of which can be explained by phospholipid hydrolysis, and each enzyme has a specific effect. We have earlier demonstrated the capability of several snake venom PLA2s with different enzymatic, cytotoxic, anticoagulant and antiproliferative properties, to decrease acetylcholine-induced currents in Lymnaea stagnalis neurons, and to compete with α-bungarotoxin for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs and acetylcholine binding protein. Since nAChRs are implicated in postsynaptic and presynaptic activities, in this work we probe those PLA2s known to have strong presynaptic effects, namely β-bungarotoxin from Bungarus multicinctus and crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus. We also wished to explore whether mammalian PLA2s interact with nAChRs, and have examined non-toxic PLA2 from porcine pancreas. It was found that porcine pancreatic PLA2 and presynaptic β-bungarotoxin blocked currents mediated by nAChRs in Lymnaea neurons with IC50s of 2.5 and 4.8 μM, respectively. Crotoxin competed with radioactive α-bungarotoxin for binding to Torpedo and human α7 nAChRs and to the acetylcholine binding protein. Pancreatic PLA2 interacted similarly with these targets; moreover, it inhibited radioactive α-bungarotoxin binding to the water-soluble extracellular domain of human α9 nAChR, and blocked acetylcholine induced currents in human α9α10 nAChRs heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These and our earlier results show that all snake PLA2s, including presynaptically active crotoxin and β-bungarotoxin, as well as mammalian pancreatic PLA2, interact with nAChRs. The data obtained suggest that this interaction may be a general property of all PLA2s, which

  10. The oxidative stress-inducible cystine/glutamate antiporter, system x (c) (-) : cystine supplier and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Marcus; Sato, Hideyo

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative stress-inducible cystine/glutamate exchange system, system x (c) (-) , transports one molecule of cystine, the oxidized form of cysteine, into cells and thereby releases one molecule of glutamate into the extracellular space. It consists of two protein components, the 4F2 heavy chain, necessary for membrane location of the heterodimer, and the xCT protein, responsible for transport activity. Previously, system x (c) (-) has been regarded to be a mere supplier of cysteine to cells for the synthesis of proteins and the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). In that sense, oxygen, electrophilic agents, and bacterial lipopolysaccharide trigger xCT expression to accommodate with increased oxidative stress by stimulating GSH biosynthesis. However, emerging evidence established that system x (c) (-) may act on its own as a GSH-independent redox system by sustaining a redox cycle over the plasma membrane. Hallmarks of this cycle are cystine uptake, intracellular reduction to cysteine and secretion of the surplus of cysteine into the extracellular space. Consequently, increased levels of extracellular cysteine provide a reducing microenvironment required for proper cell signaling and communication, e.g. as already shown for the mechanism of T cell activation. By contrast, the enhanced release of glutamate in exchange with cystine may trigger neurodegeneration due to glutamate-induced cytotoxic processes. This review aims to provide a comprehensive picture from the early days of system x (c) (-) research up to now.

  11. Long-term hippocampal glutamate synapse and astrocyte dysfunctions underlying the altered phenotype induced by adolescent THC treatment in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamberletti, Erica; Gabaglio, Marina; Grilli, Massimo; Prini, Pamela; Catanese, Alberto; Pittaluga, Anna; Marchi, Mario; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Cannabis use has been frequently associated with sex-dependent effects on brain and behavior. We previously demonstrated that adult female rats exposed to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) during adolescence develop long-term alterations in cognitive performances and emotional reactivity, whereas preliminary evidence suggests the presence of a different phenotype in male rats. To thoroughly depict the behavioral phenotype induced by adolescent THC exposure in male rats, we treated adolescent animals with increasing doses of THC twice a day (PND 35-45) and, at adulthood, we performed a battery of behavioral tests to measure affective- and psychotic-like symptoms as well as cognition. Poorer memory performance and psychotic-like behaviors were present after adolescent THC treatment in male rats, without alterations in the emotional component. At cellular level, the expression of the NMDA receptor subunit, GluN2B, as well as the levels of the AMPA subunits, GluA1 and GluA2, were significantly increased in hippocampal post-synaptic fractions from THC-exposed rats compared to controls. Furthermore, increases in the levels of the pre-synaptic marker, synaptophysin, and the post-synaptic marker, PSD95, were also present. Interestingly, KCl-induced [(3)H]D-ASP release from hippocampal synaptosomes, but not gliosomes, was significantly enhanced in THC-treated rats compared to controls. Moreover, in the same brain region, adolescent THC treatment also resulted in a persistent neuroinflammatory state, characterized by increased expression of the astrocyte marker, GFAP, increased levels of the pro-inflammatory markers, TNF-α, iNOS and COX-2, as well as a concomitant reduction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. Notably, none of these alterations was observed in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Together with our previous findings in females, these data suggest that the sex-dependent detrimental effects induced by adolescent THC exposure on adult behavior may rely on its

  12. The application of glutamic acid alpha-decarboxylase for the valorization of glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, T.M.; Biase, De Daniela; Franssen, M.C.R.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamic acid is an important constituent of waste streams from biofuels production. It is an interesting starting material for the synthesis of nitrogen containing bulk chemicals, thereby decreasing the dependency on fossil fuels. On the pathway from glutamic acid to a range of molecules, the

  13. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  14. Key modulatory role of presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in cortical neurotransmission to the striatal direct pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Rosin, Diane L; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-11-18

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  15. Key Modulatory Role of Presynaptic Adenosine A2A Receptors in Cortical Neurotransmission to the Striatal Direct Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Quiroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  16. A Novel Amperometric Glutamate Biosensor Based on Glutamate Oxidase Adsorbed on Silicalite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatkina, O. V.; Soldatkin, O. O.; Kasap, B. Ozansoy; Kucherenko, D. Yu.; Kucherenko, I. S.; Kurc, B. Akata; Dzyadevych, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we developed a new amperometric biosensor for glutamate detection using a typical method of glutamate oxidase (GlOx) immobilization via adsorption on silicalite particles. The disc platinum electrode ( d = 0.4 mm) was used as the amperometric sensor. The procedure of biosensor preparation was optimized. The main parameters of modifying amperometric transducers with a silicalite layer were determined along with the procedure of GlOx adsorption on this layer. The biosensors based on GlOx adsorbed on silicalite demonstrated high sensitivity to glutamate. The linear range of detection was from 2.5 to 450 μM, and the limit of glutamate detection was 1 μM. It was shown that the proposed biosensors were characterized by good response reproducibility during hours of continuous work and operational stability for several days. The developed biosensors could be applied for determination of glutamate in real samples.

  17. Protein synthesis in presynaptic endings from squid brain: modulation by calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benech, J C; Crispino, M; Kaplan, B B; Giuditta, A

    1999-03-15

    Previous biochemical, autoradiographic, and ultrastructural data have shown that, in the synaptosomal fraction of the squid optic lobe, protein synthesis is largely due to the presynaptic terminals of the retinal photoreceptor neurons (Crispino et al. [1993a] Mol. Cell. Neurosci. 4:366-374; Crispino et al. [1993b] J. Neurochem. 61:1144-1146; Crispino et al. [1997] J. Neurosci. 17:7694-7702). We now report that this process is close to its maximum at the basal concentration of cytosolic Ca++, and is markedly inhibited when the concentration of this ion is either decreased or increased. This conclusion is supported by the results of experiments with: 1) compounds known to increase the level of cytosolic Ca++, such as A23187, ionomycin, thapsigargin, and caffeine; 2) compounds sequestering cytosolic calcium ions such as BAPTA-AM; and 3) agents that block the role of Ca++ as second messenger, such as TFP and W7, which inhibit calmodulin, and calphostin, which inhibits protein kinase C. We conclude that variations in the level of cytosolic Ca++ induced in presynaptic terminals by neuronal activity may contribute to the modulation of the local synthesis of protein.

  18. Presynaptic serotonin 2A receptors modulate thalamocortical plasticity and associative learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, Alexander; Berthoux, Coralie; De Bundel, Dimitri; Valjent, Emmanuel; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Bécamel, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Higher-level cognitive processes strongly depend on a complex interplay between mediodorsal thalamus nuclei and the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Alteration of thalamofrontal connectivity has been involved in cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Prefrontal serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors play an essential role in cortical network activity, but the mechanism underlying their modulation of glutamatergic transmission and plasticity at thalamocortical synapses remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that 5-HT2A receptor activation enhances NMDA transmission and gates the induction of temporal-dependent plasticity mediated by NMDA receptors at thalamocortical synapses in acute PFC slices. Expressing 5-HT2A receptors in the mediodorsal thalamus (presynaptic site) of 5-HT2A receptor-deficient mice, but not in the PFC (postsynaptic site), using a viral gene-delivery approach, rescued the otherwise absent potentiation of NMDA transmission, induction of temporal plasticity, and deficit in associative memory. These results provide, to our knowledge, the first physiological evidence of a role of presynaptic 5-HT2A receptors located at thalamocortical synapses in the control of thalamofrontal connectivity and the associated cognitive functions. PMID:26903620

  19. Presynaptic GABAB Receptors Regulate Hippocampal Synapses during Associative Learning in Behaving Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Teresa Jurado-Parras

    Full Text Available GABAB receptors are the G-protein-coupled receptors for GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Pharmacological activation of GABAB receptors regulates neurotransmission and neuronal excitability at pre- and postsynaptic sites. Electrophysiological activation of GABAB receptors in brain slices generally requires strong stimulus intensities. This raises the question as to whether behavioral stimuli are strong enough to activate GABAB receptors. Here we show that GABAB1a-/- mice, which constitutively lack presynaptic GABAB receptors at glutamatergic synapses, are impaired in their ability to acquire an operant learning task. In vivo recordings during the operant conditioning reveal a deficit in learning-dependent increases in synaptic strength at CA3-CA1 synapses. Moreover, GABAB1a-/- mice fail to synchronize neuronal activity in the CA1 area during the acquisition process. Our results support that activation of presynaptic hippocampal GABAB receptors is important for acquisition of a learning task and for learning-associated synaptic changes and network dynamics.

  20. Pre-synaptic control of remote fear extinction in the neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisella eVetere

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Consolidation of remote memory enhances immediate early genes induction (IEGs, augments the expression of the presynaptic growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43, and increases the density and size of dendritic spines in anterior cingulate (aCC and infra-limbic (ILC cortices. Remote memory extinction, however, does not uniformly alter consolidation-induced structural changes. In the aCC, the density, but not the size, of spines is reset to pseudo-conditioning levels while novel thin spines are formed in the ILC. Whether IEGs and GAP-43 also undergo region-specific changes upon remote memory extinction is undetermined. Here we confirm in the same batch of mice that c-Fos induction and GAP-43 expression are increased in both the aCC and the ILC 36 days after contextual fear conditioning. We then show that, in both regions, remote memory extinction is associated with decrease of c-Fos induction but no change in GAP-43 expression thus revealing similar, although protein-specific, pre-synaptic adaptations in aCC and ILC neurons. These observations, in addition to our previous report of region-specific post-synaptic structural changes, disclose a complex pattern of extinction-driven neocortical alterations suitable to support erasure or reinstatement of fear according to the environment demand.

  1. Xanomeline wash-resistantly bound to presynaptic M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors decreases the evoked release of acetylcholine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 101, Suppl.1 (2007), s. 52-53 ISSN 0022-3042. [ESN - meeting /17./ - Conference on Advances in Molecular Mechanims and Disorders /3./. 19.05.2007-22.05.2007, Salamanca] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452 Grant - others:NIH(US) NS25732 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpo1 * xanomeline * muscarinic receptor Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  2. Pre-Ischemic Treadmill Training for Prevention of Ischemic Brain Injury via Regulation of Glutamate and Its Transporter GLT-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchun Guo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pre-ischemic treadmill training exerts cerebral protection in the prevention of cerebral ischemia by alleviating neurotoxicity induced by excessive glutamate release following ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of this process remains unclear. Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was observed in a rat model after 2 weeks of pre-ischemic treadmill training. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected using the microdialysis sampling method, and the concentration of glutamate was determined every 40 min from the beginning of ischemia to 4 h after reperfusion with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-fluorescence detection. At 3, 12, 24, and 48 h after ischemia, the expression of the glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 protein in brain tissues was determined by Western blot respectively. The effect of pre-ischemic treadmill training on glutamate concentration and GLT-1 expression after cerebral ischemia in rats along with changes in neurobehavioral score and cerebral infarct volume after 24 h ischemia yields critical information necessary to understand the protection mechanism exhibited by pre-ischemic treadmill training. The results demonstrated that pre-ischemic treadmill training up-regulates GLT-1 expression, decreases extracellular glutamate concentration, reduces cerebral infarct volume, and improves neurobehavioral score. Pre-ischemic treadmill training is likely to induce neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia by regulating GLT-1 expression, which results in re-uptake of excessive glutamate.

  3. Anorexigenic Lipopeptides Ameliorate Central Insulin Signaling and Attenuate Tau Phosphorylation in Hippocampi of Mice with Monosodium Glutamate-Induced Obesity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špolcová, Andrea; Mikulášková, Barbora; Holubová, Martina; Nagelová, Veronika; Pirník, Zdenko; Zemenová, Jana; Haluzík, M.; Železná, Blanka; Galas, M. C.; Maletínská, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2015), s. 823-835 ISSN 1387-2877 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/12/0576 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Alzheimer's disease * insulin signaling * liraglutide * monosodium glutamate-obese mice * obesity * pre- diabetes * prolactin-releasing peptide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.920, year: 2015

  4. Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate results in dysmorphology of orofacial lower motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Lindsey; Kupelian, Chloe; Laroia, Swati; Esper, Jeffrey; Kulesza, Randy Joseph

    2017-06-14

    Glutamate is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and is stored and released by both neurons and astrocytes. Despite the important role of glutamate as a neurotransmitter, high levels of extracellular glutamate can result in excitotoxicity and apoptosis. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a naturally occurring sodium salt of glutamic acid that is used as a flavor enhancer in many processed foods. Neonatal exposure to MSG has been shown to result in neurodegeneration in several forebrain regions, characterized by neuronal loss and neuroendocrine abnormalities. However, the brainstem effects of neonatal monosodium glutamate exposure have not been investigated. It is therefore hypothesized that MSG exposure during the early postnatal period would impact brainstem lower motor neurons involved in feeding behavior. The effect of neonatal MSG exposure on brainstem lower motor neurons was investigated by exposing rat pups to either 4mg/g MSG or saline from postnatal day (P) 4 through 10. On P28, brains were preserved by vascular perfusion with fixative, frozen sectioned and stained for Nïssl substance. The number, size and shape of brainstem motor neurons were compared between MSG and saline-exposed animals. MSG exposure had no impact on the total number of neurons in the nuclei examined. However, MSG exposure was associated with a significant increase in the number of round somata in both the trigeminal and facial nuclei. Furthermore, MSG exposure resulted in significantly smaller neurons in all motor nuclei examined. These results suggest that neonatal exposure to MSG impacts the development of brainstem lower motor neurons which may impact feeding and swallowing behaviors in young animals.

  5. NLP-12 engages different UNC-13 proteins to potentiate tonic and evoked release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhitao; Vashlishan-Murray, Amy B; Kaplan, Joshua M

    2015-01-21

    A neuropeptide (NLP-12) and its receptor (CKR-2) potentiate tonic and evoked ACh release at Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular junctions. Increased evoked release is mediated by a presynaptic pathway (egl-30 Gαq and egl-8 PLCβ) that produces DAG, and by DAG binding to short and long UNC-13 proteins. Potentiation of tonic ACh release persists in mutants deficient for egl-30 Gαq and egl-8 PLCβ and requires DAG binding to UNC-13L (but not UNC-13S). Thus, NLP-12 adjusts tonic and evoked release by distinct mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351038-05$15.00/0.

  6. Ligand-induced changes in the conformational stability and flexibility of glutamate dehydrogenase and their role in catalysis and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Sarah A; Bradley, Michael J; Marion, Jimmy; Bell, Ellis

    2010-10-01

    Bovine glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is allosterically regulated and requires substrate-induced subunit interactions for maximum catalytic activity. Steady-state and presteady-state kinetics indicate that the rate-limiting step depends on the nature of the substrate and are likely associated with conformational fluctuations necessary for optimal hydride transfer. Deuterated glutamate shows a steady-state isotope effect but no effect on the presteady-state burst rate, demonstrating that conformational effects are rate limiting for hydride transfer while product release is overall rate limiting for glutamate. Guanidine hydrochloride unfolding, heat inactivation, and differential scanning calorimetry demonstrate the effects of alternative substrates, glutamate and norvaline, on conformational stability. Glutamate has little effect on overall stability, whereas norvaline markedly stabilizes the protein. Limited proteolysis demonstrates that glutamate had a variety of effects on local flexibility, whereas norvaline significantly decreased conformational fluctuations that allow protease cleavage. Dynamic light scattering suggests that norvaline stabilizes all interfaces in the hexamer, whereas glutamate had little effect on trimer-trimer interactions. The substrate glutamate exhibits negative cooperativity and complex allosteric regulation but has only minor effects on global GDH stability, while promoting certain local conformational fluctuations. In contrast, the substrate norvaline does not show negative cooperativity or allow allosteric regulation. Instead, norvaline significantly stabilizes the enzyme and markedly slows or prevents local conformational fluctuations that are likely to be important for cooperative effects and to determine the overall rate of hydride transfer. This suggests that homotropic allosteric regulation by the enzymatic substrate involves changes in both global stability and local flexibility of the protein.

  7. Conformational Plasticity in the Transsynaptic Neurexin-Cerebellin-Glutamate Receptor Adhesion Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Shouqiang; Seven, Alpay B.; Wang, Jing; Skiniotis, Georgios; Özkan, Engin (UC); (Michigan)

    2016-12-01

    Synaptic specificity is a defining property of neural networks. In the cerebellum, synapses between parallel fiber neurons and Purkinje cells are specified by the simultaneous interactions of secreted protein cerebellin with pre-synaptic neurexin and post-synaptic delta-type glutamate receptors (GluD). Here, we determined the crystal structures of the trimeric C1q-like domain of rat cerebellin-1, and the first complete ectodomain of a GluD, rat GluD2. Cerebellin binds to the LNS6 domain of α- and β-neurexin-1 through a high-affinity interaction that involves its highly flexible N-terminal domain. In contrast, we show that the interaction of cerebellin with isolated GluD2 ectodomain is low affinity, which is not simply an outcome of lost avidity when compared with binding with a tetrameric full-length receptor. Rather, high-affinity capture of cerebellin by post-synaptic terminals is likely controlled by long-distance regulation within this transsynaptic complex. Altogether, our results suggest unusual conformational flexibility within all components of the complex.

  8. Monosodium glutamate for simple photometric iron analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, E.

    2018-01-01

    Simple photometric method for iron analysis using monosodium glutamate (MSG) was proposed. The method could be used as an alternative method, which was technically simple, economic, quantitative, readily available, scientifically sound and environmental friendly. Rapid reaction of iron (III) with glutamate in sodium chloride-hydrochloric acid buffer (pH 2) to form red-brown complex was served as a basis in the photometric determination, which obeyed the range of iron (III) concentration 1.6 – 80 µg/ml. This method could be applied to determine iron concentration in soil with satisfactory results (accuracy and precision) compared to other photometric and atomic absorption spectrometry results.

  9. The structure of glutamate transporters shows channel-like features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotboom, DJ; Konings, WN; Lolkema, JS

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal and glial glutamate transporters remove the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate from the synaptic cleft and thus prevent neurotoxicity, The proteins belong to a large family of secondary transporters, which includes transporters from a variety of bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic

  10. Intracellular levels of glutamate in swollen astrocytes are preserved via neurotransmitter reuptake and de novo synthesis: implications for hyponatremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Alexandra L; Mongin, Alexander A

    2015-10-01

    Hyponatremia and several other CNS pathologies are associated with substantial astrocytic swelling. To counteract cell swelling, astrocytes lose intracellular osmolytes, including l-glutamate and taurine, through volume-regulated anion channel. In vitro, when swollen by exposure to hypo-osmotic medium, astrocytes lose endogenous taurine faster, paradoxically, than l-glutamate or l-aspartate. Here, we explored the mechanisms responsible for differences between the rates of osmolyte release in primary rat astrocyte cultures. In radiotracer assays, hypo-osmotic efflux of preloaded [(14) C]taurine was indistinguishable from d-[(3) H]aspartate and only 30-40% faster than l-[(3) H]glutamate. However, when we used HPLC to measure the endogenous intracellular amino acid content, hypo-osmotic loss of taurine was approximately fivefold greater than l-glutamate, and no loss of l-aspartate was detected. The dramatic difference between loss of endogenous taurine and glutamate was eliminated after inhibition of both glutamate reuptake [with 300 μM dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA)] and glutamate synthesis by aminotransferases [with 1 mM aminooxyacetic acid (AOA)]. Treatment with TBOA+AOA made reductions in the intracellular taurine and l-glutamate levels approximately equal. Taken together, these data suggest that swollen astrocytes actively conserve intracellular glutamate via reuptake and de novo synthesis. Our findings likely also explain why in animal models of acute hyponatremia, extracellular levels of taurine are dramatically elevated with minimal impact on extracellular l-glutamate. We identified mechanisms that allow astrocytes to conserve intracellular l-glutamate (Glu) upon exposure to hypo-osmotic environment. Cell swelling activates volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) and triggers loss of Glu, taurine (Tau), and other cytosolic amino acids. Glu is conserved via reuptake by Na(+) -dependent transporters and de novo synthesis in the reactions of

  11. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission by Ambient Extracellular Glutamate

    OpenAIRE

    FEATHERSTONE, DAVID E.; SHIPPY, SCOTT A.

    2007-01-01

    Many neuroscientists assume that ambient extracellular glutamate concentrations in the nervous system are biologically negligible under nonpathological conditions. This assumption is false. Hundreds of studies over several decades suggest that ambient extracellular glutamate levels in the intact mammalian brain are ~0.5 to ~5 μM. This has important implications. Glutamate receptors are desensitized by glutamate concentrations significantly lower than needed for receptor activation; 0.5 to 5 μ...

  12. Learning and retrieval behavior in recurrent neural networks with pre-synaptic dependent homeostatic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizusaki, Beatriz E. P.; Agnes, Everton J.; Erichsen, Rubem; Brunnet, Leonardo G.

    2017-08-01

    The plastic character of brain synapses is considered to be one of the foundations for the formation of memories. There are numerous kinds of such phenomenon currently described in the literature, but their role in the development of information pathways in neural networks with recurrent architectures is still not completely clear. In this paper we study the role of an activity-based process, called pre-synaptic dependent homeostatic scaling, in the organization of networks that yield precise-timed spiking patterns. It encodes spatio-temporal information in the synaptic weights as it associates a learned input with a specific response. We introduce a correlation measure to evaluate the precision of the spiking patterns and explore the effects of different inhibitory interactions and learning parameters. We find that large learning periods are important in order to improve the network learning capacity and discuss this ability in the presence of distinct inhibitory currents.

  13. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b...

  14. Neuroexcitatory amino acids: 4-methylene glutamic acid derivatives : Short Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Receveur, J M; Roumestant, M L; Viallefont, P

    1995-12-01

    A short synthesis of 4-methylene glutamic acid was achieved. Under thermal conditions the corresponding anhydride reacted with 2,3 dimethylbutadiene to afford the corresponding DIELS-ALDER adduct in good yield. L-4-methylene glutamic acid essentially acts on glutamate metabotropic receptors and is as potent as L-Glu in producing IPs.

  15. Lipoic acid effects on glutamate and taurine concentrations in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilocarpine-induced seizures can be mediated by increases in oxidative stress and by cerebral amino acid changes. The present research suggests that antioxidant compounds may afford some level of neuroprotection against the neurotoxicity of seizures in cellular level. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the lipoic acid (LA effects in glutamate and taurine contents in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures. Wistar rats were treated intraperitoneally (i.p. with 0.9% saline (Control, pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, Pilocarpine, LA (10 mg/kg, LA, and the association of LA (10 mg/kg plus pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, that was injected 30 min before of administration of LA (LA plus pilocarpine. Animals were observed during 24 h. The amino acid concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC. In pilocarpine group, it was observed a significant increase in glutamate content (37% and a decrease in taurine level (18% in rat hippocampus, when compared to control group. Antioxidant pretreatment significantly reduced the glutamate level (28% and augmented taurine content (32% in rat hippocampus, when compared to pilocarpine group. Our findings strongly support amino acid changes in hippocampus during seizures induced by pilocarpine, and suggest that glutamate-induced brain damage plays a crucial role in pathogenic consequences of seizures, and imply that strong protective effect could be achieved using lipoic acid through the release or decrease in metabolization rate of taurine amino acid during seizures.

  16. Microglia PACAP and glutamate: Friends or foes in seizure-induced autonomic dysfunction and SUDEP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandare, Amol M; Kapoor, Komal; Farnham, Melissa M J; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2016-06-01

    Seizure-induced cardiorespiratory autonomic dysfunction is a major cause of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Seizures lead to increased synthesis, and release of glutamate, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), and other neurotransmitters, and cause extensive activation of microglia at multiple regions in the brain including central autonomic cardiorespiratory brainstem nuclei. Glutamate contributes to neurodegeneration, and inflammation in epilepsy. PACAP has neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties, whereas microglia are key players in inflammatory responses in CNS. Seizure-induced increase in PACAP is neuroprotective. PACAP produces neuroprotective effects acting on microglial PAC1 and VPAC1 receptors. Microglia also express glutamate transporters, and their expression can be increased by PACAP in response to harmful or stressful situations such as seizures. Here we discuss the mechanism of autonomic cardiorespiratory dysfunction in seizure, and the role of PACAP, glutamate and microglia in regulating cardiorespiratory brainstem neurons in their physiological state that could provide future therapeutic options for SUDEP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrical receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells: Influence of presynaptic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Matias I; Apollo, Nicholas V; Garrett, David J; Kameneva, Tatiana; Cloherty, Shaun L; Grayden, David B; Burkitt, Anthony N; Ibbotson, Michael R; Meffin, Hamish

    2018-02-01

    Implantable retinal stimulators activate surviving neurons to restore a sense of vision in people who have lost their photoreceptors through degenerative diseases. Complex spatial and temporal interactions occur in the retina during multi-electrode stimulation. Due to these complexities, most existing implants activate only a few electrodes at a time, limiting the repertoire of available stimulation patterns. Measuring the spatiotemporal interactions between electrodes and retinal cells, and incorporating them into a model may lead to improved stimulation algorithms that exploit the interactions. Here, we present a computational model that accurately predicts both the spatial and temporal nonlinear interactions of multi-electrode stimulation of rat retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The model was verified using in vitro recordings of ON, OFF, and ON-OFF RGCs in response to subretinal multi-electrode stimulation with biphasic pulses at three stimulation frequencies (10, 20, 30 Hz). The model gives an estimate of each cell's spatiotemporal electrical receptive fields (ERFs); i.e., the pattern of stimulation leading to excitation or suppression in the neuron. All cells had excitatory ERFs and many also had suppressive sub-regions of their ERFs. We show that the nonlinearities in observed responses arise largely from activation of presynaptic interneurons. When synaptic transmission was blocked, the number of sub-regions of the ERF was reduced, usually to a single excitatory ERF. This suggests that direct cell activation can be modeled accurately by a one-dimensional model with linear interactions between electrodes, whereas indirect stimulation due to summated presynaptic responses is nonlinear.

  18. Presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic synaptic transmission by adenosine in mouse hypothalamic hypocretin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J X; Xiong, J X; Wang, H K; Duan, S M; Ye, J N; Hu, Z A

    2012-01-10

    Hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, a new wakefulness-promoting center, have been recently regarded as an important target involved in endogenous adenosine-regulating sleep homeostasis. The GABAergic synaptic transmissions are the main inhibitory afferents to hypocretin neurons, which play an important role in the regulation of excitability of these neurons. The inhibitory effect of adenosine, a homeostatic sleep-promoting factor, on the excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmissions in hypocretin neurons has been well documented, whether adenosine also modulates these inhibitory GABAergic synaptic transmissions in these neurons has not been investigated. In this study, the effect of adenosine on inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in hypocretin neurons was examined by using perforated patch-clamp recordings in the acute hypothalamic slices. The findings demonstrated that adenosine suppressed the amplitude of evoked IPSCs in a dose-dependent manner, which was completely abolished by 8-cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT), a selective antagonist of adenosine A1 receptor but not adenosine A2 receptor antagonist 3,7-dimethyl-1-(2-propynyl) xanthine. A presynaptic origin was suggested as following: adenosine increased paired-pulse ratio as well as reduced GABAergic miniature IPSC frequency without affecting the miniature IPSC amplitude. Further findings demonstrated that when the frequency of electrical stimulation was raised to 10 Hz, but not 1 Hz, a time-dependent depression of evoked IPSC amplitude was detected in hypocretin neurons, which could be partially blocked by CPT. However, under a higher frequency at 100 Hz stimulation, CPT had no action on the depressed GABAergic synaptic transmission induced by such tetanic stimulation in these hypocretin neurons. These results suggest that endogenous adenosine generated under certain stronger activities of synaptic transmissions exerts an inhibitory effect on GABAergic synaptic transmission in hypocretin

  19. Presynaptic selectivity of a ligand for serotonin 1A receptors revealed by in vivo PET assays of rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeaki Saijo

    Full Text Available A novel investigational antidepressant with high affinity for the serotonin transporter and the serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A receptor, called Wf-516 (structural formula: (2S-1-[4-(3,4-dichlorophenylpiperidin-1-yl]-3-[2-(5-methyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-ylbenzo[b]furan-4-yloxy]propan-2-ol monohydrochloride, has been found to exert a rapid therapeutic effect, although the mechanistic basis for this potential advantage remains undetermined. We comparatively investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Wf-516 and pindolol by positron emission tomographic (PET and autoradiographic assays of rat brains in order to elucidate their molecular interactions with presynaptic and postsynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors. In contrast to the full receptor occupancy by pindolol in PET measurements, the binding of Wf-516 to 5-HT(1A receptors displayed limited capacity, with relatively high receptor occupancy being achieved in regions predominantly containing presynaptic receptors. This selectivity was further proven by PET scans of neurotoxicant-treated rats deficient in presynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors. In addition, [(35S]guanosine 5'-O-[γ-thio]triphosphate autoradiography indicated a partial agonistic ability of Wf-516 for 5-HT(1A receptors. This finding has lent support to reports that diverse partial agonists for 5-HT(1A receptors exert high sensitivity for presynaptic components. Thus, the present PET data suggest a relatively high capacity of presynaptic binding sites for partial agonists. Since our in vitro and ex vivo autoradiographies failed to illustrate these distinct features of Wf-516, in vivo PET imaging is considered to be, thus far, the sole method capable of pharmacokinetically demonstrating the unique actions of Wf-516 and similar new-generation antidepressants.

  20. Super-resolution microscopy reveals presynaptic localization of the ALS / FTD related protein FUS in hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSchoen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fused in Sarcoma (FUS is a multifunctional RNA- / DNA-binding protein, which is involved in the pathogenesis of the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD. A common hallmark of these disorders is the abnormal accumulation of mutated FUS protein in the cytoplasm. Under normal conditions FUS is confined to the nuclear compartment, in neurons however, additional somatodendritic localization can be observed. In this study, we carefully analyzed the subcellular localization of endogenous FUS at synaptic sites of hippocampal neurons which are among the most affected cell types in frontotemporal dementia with FUS pathology. We could confirm a strong nuclear localization of FUS as well as its prominent and widespread neuronal expression throughout the adult and developing rat brain, particularly in the hippocampus, the cerebellum and the outer layers of the cortex. Intriguingly, FUS was also consistently observed at synaptic sites as detected by neuronal subcellular fractionation as well as by immunolabeling. To define a pre- and / or postsynaptic localization of FUS, we employed super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy. FUS was found to be localized within the axon terminal in close proximity to the presynaptic vesicle protein Synaptophysin1 and adjacent to the active zone protein Bassoon, but well separated from the postsynaptic protein PSD-95. Having shown the presynaptic localization of FUS in the nervous system, a novel extranuclear role of FUS at neuronal contact sites has to be considered. Since there is growing evidence that local presynaptic translation might also be an important mechanism for plasticity, FUS - like the fragile X mental retardation protein FMRP - might act as one of the presynaptic RNA-binding proteins regulating this machinery. Our observation of presynaptic FUS should foster further investigations to determine its role in neurodegenerative diseases such as

  1. Influence of Glutamic Acid on the Properties of Poly(xylitol glutamate sebacate Bioelastomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifu Dong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to further improve the biocompatibility of xylitol based poly(xylitol sebacate (PXS bioelastomer, a novel kind of amino acid based poly(xylitol glutamate sebacate (PXGS has been successfully prepared in this work by melt polycondensation of xylitol, N-Boc glutamic acid and sebacic acid. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results indicated the glass-transition temperatures could be decreased by feeding N-Boc glutamic acid. In comparison to PXS, PXGS exhibited comparable tensile strength and much higher elongation at break at the same ratio of acid/xylitol. The introduction of glutamic acid increased the hydrophilicity and in vitro degradation rate of the bioelastomer. It was found that PXGS exhibited excellent properties, such as tensile properties, biodegradability and hydrophilicity, which could be easily tuned by altering the feeding monomer ratios. The amino groups in the PXGS polyester side chains are readily functionalized, thus the biomelastomers can be considered as potential biomaterials for biomedical application.

  2. the effect of monosodium glutamate (msg)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uwaifoh

    2012-03-30

    Mar 30, 2012 ... Neuronal vulnerability in mouse models of Huntington's disease: Membrane channel protein changes. J Neurosci Res; 80: 634 - 645. Ashaolu, J.O., Ukwenya, V.O., Okonoboh, A.B., Ghazal, O.K. and Jimoh A.A.G. (2011). Effect of monosodium glutamate on hematological parameters in Wistar rats.

  3. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  4. Monosodium glutamate: Potentials at inducing prostate pathologies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The health implication of the alteration could be compounded by the opposing response elicited by increasing the concentration of either MSG or DW. Key words: Monosodium glutamate, total acid phosphatase, prostatic acid phosphatase, prostate cancer, prostatitis, benign prostate hyperplasia, infertility. African Journal of ...

  5. Glutamate mediated astrocytic filtering of neuronal activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilad Wallach

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity.

  6. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  7. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Bo [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Shu [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Lang, Qiaolin [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Liu, Aihua, E-mail: liuah@qibebt.ac.cn [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-07-16

    Highlights: • E. coli surface-dispalyed Gldh exhibiting excellent enzyme activity and stability. • Sensitive amperometric biosensor for glutamate using Gldh-bacteria and MWNTs. • The glutamate biosensor exhibited high specificity and stability. - Abstract: A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP{sup +}-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP{sup +} involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current–time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM–1 mM and 2–10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N = 3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection.

  8. Strontium D-Glutamate Hexahydrate and Strontium Di(hydrogen L-glutamate) Pentahydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, Stephan; Odderhede, Jette; Stahl, Kenny

    2005-01-01

    Sr(C5H7NO4)] center dot 6H(2)O, ( I), and [Sr(C5H8NO4)(2)] center dot 5H(2)O, (II), both crystallize with similar strontium - glutamate - water layers. In ( I), the neutral layers are connected through hydrogen bonds by water molecules, while in ( II), the positively charged layers are connected...... through hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions by interleaving layers of hydrogen glutamate anions and water molecules....

  9. ¹³C-metabolic enrichment of glutamate in glutamate dehydrogenase mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yijin; Sieg, Alex; Trotter, Pamela J

    2011-10-20

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH) interconvert α-ketoglutarate and glutamate. In yeast, NADP-dependent enzymes, encoded by GDH1 and GDH3, are reported to synthesize glutamate from α-ketoglutarate, while an NAD-dependent enzyme, encoded by GDH2, catalyzes the reverse. Cells were grown in acetate/raffinose (YNAceRaf) to examine the role(s) of these enzymes during aerobic metabolism. In YNAceRaf the doubling time of wild type, gdh2Δ, and gdh3Δ cells was comparable at ∼4 h. NADP-dependent GDH activity (Gdh1p+Gdh3p) in wild type, gdh2Δ, and gdh3Δ was decreased ∼80% and NAD-dependent activity (Gdh2p) in wild type and gdh3Δ was increased ∼20-fold in YNAceRaf as compared to glucose. Cells carrying the gdh1Δ allele did not divide in YNAceRaf, yet both the NADP-dependent (Gdh3p) and NAD-dependent (Gdh2p) GDH activity was ∼3-fold higher than in glucose. Metabolism of [1,2-(13)C]-acetate and analysis of carbon NMR spectra were used to examine glutamate metabolism. Incorporation of (13)C into glutamate was nearly undetectable in gdh1Δ cells, reflecting a GDH activity at glutamate carbons indicates a decreased rate of glutamate biosynthesis from acetate in gdh2Δ and gdh3Δ strains as compared to wild type. Further, the relative complexity of (13)C-isotopomers at early time points was noticeably greater in gdh3Δ as compared to wild type and gdh2Δ cells. These in vivo data show that Gdh1p is the primary GDH enzyme and Gdh2p and Gdh3p play evident roles during aerobic glutamate metabolism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Systemic administration of monosodium glutamate elevates intramuscular glutamate levels and sensitizes rat masseter muscle afferent fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Brian E; Dong, Xudong; Mann, Mandeep K; Svensson, Peter; Sessle, Barry J; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; McErlane, Keith M

    2007-11-01

    There is evidence that elevated tissue concentrations of glutamate may contribute to pain and sensitivity in certain musculoskeletal pain conditions. In the present study, the food additive monosodium glutamate (MSG) was injected intravenously into rats to determine whether it could significantly elevate interstitial concentrations of glutamate in the masseter muscle and whether MSG administration could excite and/or sensitize slowly conducting masseter afferent fibers through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation. The interstitial concentration of glutamate after systemic injection of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline (control) or MSG (10 and 50mg/kg) was measured with a glutamate-selective biosensor. The pre-injection baseline interstitial concentration of glutamate in the rat masseter muscle was 24+/-11 microM. Peak interstitial concentration after injection of 50mg/kg MSG was 63+/-18 microM and remained elevated above baseline for approximately 18 min. In vivo single unit recording experiments were undertaken to assess the effect of MSG (50mg/kg) on masseter afferent fibers. Injection of MSG evoked a brief discharge in one afferent fiber, and significantly decreased ( approximately 25%) the average afferent mechanical threshold (n=10) during the first 5 min after injection of MSG. Intravenous injection of ketamine (1mg/kg), 5 min prior to MSG, prevented the MSG-induced decreases in the mechanical threshold of masseter afferent fibers. The present results indicate that a 2- to 3-fold elevation in interstitial glutamate levels in the masseter muscle is sufficient to excite and induce afferent mechanical sensitization through NMDA receptor activation. These findings suggest that modest elevations of interstitial glutamate concentration could alter musculoskeletal pain sensitivity in humans.

  11. Deletion of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Glud1) in the central nervous system affects glutamate handling without altering synaptic transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigerio, Francesca; Karaca, Melis; De Roo, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), encoded by GLUD1, participates in the breakdown and synthesis of glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter. In the CNS, besides its primary signaling function, glutamate is also at the crossroad of metabolic and neurotransmitter pathways. Importance of brain G...

  12. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Microbial production of poly-γ-glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote; Cao, Mingfeng; Kongklom, Nuttawut; Chuensangjun, Chaniga; Shi, Zhongping; Chisti, Yusuf

    2017-09-05

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a natural, biodegradable and water-soluble biopolymer of glutamic acid. This review is focused on nonrecombinant microbial production of γ-PGA via fermentation processes. In view of its commercial importance, the emphasis is on L-glutamic acid independent producers (i.e. microorganisms that do not require feeding with the relatively expensive amino acid L-glutamic acid to produce γ-PGA), but glutamic acid dependent production is discussed for comparison. Strategies for improving production, reducing costs and using renewable feedstocks are discussed.

  14. ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for glycyrrhizic acid-mediated neuroprotection against glutamate-induced toxicity in differentiated PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); The State Engineering Laboratory of AIDS Vaccine, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Guo, T.Q. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Wang, Z.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Lu, J.H.; Liu, D.P.; Meng, Q.F.; Xie, J. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Zhang, X.L. [Faculty of ScienceNational University of Singapore (Singapore); Liu, Y. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Teng, L.S. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); The State Engineering Laboratory of AIDS Vaccine, Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2014-07-25

    The present study focuses on the neuroprotective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA, a major compound separated from Glycyrrhiza Radix, which is a crude Chinese traditional drug) against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in differentiated PC12 (DPC12) cells. The results showed that GA treatment improved cell viability and ameliorated abnormal glutamate-induced alterations in mitochondria in DPC12 cells. GA reversed glutamate-suppressed B-cell lymphoma 2 levels, inhibited glutamate-enhanced expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, and reduced cytochrome C (Cyto C) release. Exposure to glutamate strongly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT (protein kinase B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); however, GA pretreatment enhanced activation of ERKs but not AKT. The presence of PD98059 (a mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase [MEK] inhibitor) but not LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase [PI3K] inhibitor) diminished the potency of GA for improving viability of glutamate-exposed DPC12 cells. These results indicated that ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for the neuroprotective effect of GA against glutamate-induced toxicity in DPC12 cells. The present study provides experimental evidence supporting GA as a potential therapeutic agent for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. TiO2 nanoparticle-induced neurotoxicity may be involved in dysfunction of glutamate metabolism and its receptor expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ze, Xiao; Su, Mingyu; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Jiang, Hao; Hong, Jie; Yu, Xiaohong; Liu, Dong; Xu, Bingqing; Sheng, Lei; Zhou, Qiuping; Zhou, Junling; Cui, Jingwen; Li, Kai; Wang, Ling; Ze, Yuguan; Hong, Fashui

    2016-06-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have been used in environmental management, food, medicine, and industry. But TiO2 NPs have been demonstrated to cross the blood-brain barrier and store up in the brain organization, leading to glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity. However, the neurotoxicity in the brain is not well understood. In this study, mice were exposed to 1.25, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg body weight TiO2 NPs for 9 months, and the glutamate-glutamine cyclic pathway and expressions of glutamate receptors associated with the hippocampal neurotoxicity were investigated. Our findings showed elevations of glutamate release and phosphate-activated glutaminase activity, and reductions in glutamine and glutamine synthetase in the hippocampus following exposure to TiO2 NPs. Furthermore, TiO2 NPs significantly inhibited the expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunits (including NR1, NR2A, and NR2B) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 in mouse hippocampus. These findings suggest that the imbalance of glutamate metabolism triggered inhibitions of glutamate receptor expression in the TiO2 NP-exposed hippocampus. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 655-662, 2016. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for glycyrrhizic acid-mediated neuroprotection against glutamate-induced toxicity in differentiated PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; Guo, T.Q.; Wang, Z.Y.; Lu, J.H.; Liu, D.P.; Meng, Q.F.; Xie, J.; Zhang, X.L.; Liu, Y.; Teng, L.S.

    2014-01-01

    The present study focuses on the neuroprotective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA, a major compound separated from Glycyrrhiza Radix, which is a crude Chinese traditional drug) against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in differentiated PC12 (DPC12) cells. The results showed that GA treatment improved cell viability and ameliorated abnormal glutamate-induced alterations in mitochondria in DPC12 cells. GA reversed glutamate-suppressed B-cell lymphoma 2 levels, inhibited glutamate-enhanced expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, and reduced cytochrome C (Cyto C) release. Exposure to glutamate strongly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT (protein kinase B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); however, GA pretreatment enhanced activation of ERKs but not AKT. The presence of PD98059 (a mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase [MEK] inhibitor) but not LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase [PI3K] inhibitor) diminished the potency of GA for improving viability of glutamate-exposed DPC12 cells. These results indicated that ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for the neuroprotective effect of GA against glutamate-induced toxicity in DPC12 cells. The present study provides experimental evidence supporting GA as a potential therapeutic agent for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

  17. Inhibitors of glutamate dehydrogenase block sodium-dependent glutamate uptake in rat brain membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan S Whitelaw

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We recently found evidence for anatomic and physical linkages between the astroglial Na+-dependent glutamate transporters (GLT-1/EAAT2 and GLAST/EAAT1 and mitochondria. In these same studies, we found that the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH inhibitor, epigallocatechin-monogallate (EGCG, inhibits both glutamate oxidation and Na+-dependent glutamate uptake in astrocytes. In the present study, we extend this finding by exploring the effects of EGCG on Na+-dependent L-[3H]-glutamate (Glu uptake in crude membranes (P2 prepared from rat brain cortex. In this preparation, uptake is almost exclusively mediated by GLT-1. EGCG inhibited L-[3H]-Glu uptake in cortical membranes with an IC50 value of 230 µM. We also studied the effects of two additional inhibitors of GDH, hexachlorophene (HCP and bithionol (BTH. Both of these compounds also caused concentration-dependent inhibition of glutamate uptake in cortical membranes. Pre-incubating with HCP for up to 15 min had no greater effect than that observed with no pre-incubation, showing that the effects occur rapidly. HCP decreased the Vmax for glutamate uptake without changing the Km, consistent with a non-competitive mechanism of action. EGCG, HCP, and BTH also inhibited Na+-dependent transport of D-[3H]-aspartate (Asp, a non-metabolizable substrate, and [3H]-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA. In contrast to the forebrain, glutamate uptake in crude cerebellar membranes (P2 is likely mediated by GLAST (EAAT1. Therefore, the effects of these compounds were examined in cerebellar membranes. In this region, none of these compounds had any effect on uptake of either L-[3H]-Glu or D-[3H]-Asp, but they all inhibited [3H]-GABA uptake. Together these studies suggest that GDH is preferentially required for glutamate uptake in forebrain as compared to cerebellum, and GDH may be required for GABA uptake as well. They also provide further evidence for a functional linkage between glutamate transport and mitochondria.

  18. Microsensors for in vivo Measurement of Glutamate in Brain Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda van der Zeyden

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Several immobilized enzyme-based electrochemical biosensors for glutamate detection have been developed over the last decade. In this review, we compare first and second generation sensors. Structures, working mechanisms, interference prevention, in vitro detection characteristics and in vivo performance are summarized here for those sensors that have successfully detected brain glutamate in vivo. In brief, first generation sensors have a simpler structure and are faster in glutamate detection. They also show a better sensitivity to glutamate during calibration in vitro. For second generation sensors, besides their less precise detection, their fabrication is difficult to reproduce, even with a semi-automatic dip-coater. Both generations of sensors can detect glutamate levels in vivo, but the reported basal levels are different. In general, second generation sensors detect higher basal levels of glutamate compared with the results obtained from first generation sensors. However, whether the detected glutamate is indeed from synaptic sources is an issue that needs further attention.

  19. Glutamate Efflux at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederberg-Helms, Hans Christian; Uhd-Nielsen, Carsten; Brodin, Birger

    2014-01-01

    L-Glutamate is considered the most important excitatory amino acid in the mammalian brain. Strict control of its concentration in the brain interstitial fluid is important to maintain neurotransmission and avoid excitotoxicity. The role of astrocytes in handling L-glutamate transport and metabolism...... is well known, however endothelial cells may also play an important role through mediating brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux. Expression of excitatory amino acid transporters has been demonstrated in brain endothelial cells of bovine, human, murine, rat and porcine origin. These can account for high...... affinity concentrative uptake of L-glutamate from the brain interstitial fluid into the capillary endothelial cells. The mechanisms in between L-glutamate uptake in the endothelial cells and L-glutamate appearing in the blood are still unclear and may involve a luminal transporter for L-glutamate...

  20. Agmatine protects against cell damage induced by NMDA and glutamate in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Ping; Iyo, Abiye H; Miguel-Hidalgo, Javier; Regunathan, Soundar; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2006-04-21

    Agmatine is a polyamine and has been considered as a novel neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the central nervous system. In the present study, the neuroprotective effect of agmatine against cell damage caused by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and glutamate was investigated in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity assay, beta-tubulin III immunocytochemical staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay were conducted to detect cell damage. Exposure of 12-day neuronal cultures of rat hippocampus to NMDA or glutamate for 1 h caused a concentration-dependent neurotoxicity, as indicated by the significant increase in released LDH activities. Addition of 100 microM agmatine into media ablated the neurotoxicity induced by NMDA or glutamate, an effect also produced by the specific NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine hydrogen maleate (MK801). Arcaine, an analog of agmatine with similar structure as agmatine, fully prevented the NMDA- or glutamate-induced neuronal damage. Spermine and putrescine, the endogenous polyamine and metabolic products of agmatine without the guanidine moiety of agmatine, failed to show this effect, indicating a structural relevance for this neuroprotection. Immunocytochemical staining and TUNEL assay confirmed the findings in the LDH measurement. That is, agmatine and MK801 markedly attenuated NMDA-induced neuronal death and significantly reduced TUNEL-positive cell numbers induced by exposure of cultured hippocampal neurons to NMDA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that agmatine can protect cultured hippocampal neurons from NMDA- or glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, through a possible blockade of the NMDA receptor channels or a potential anti-apoptotic property.

  1. Glutamate and GABA as rapid effectors of hypothalamic peptidergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia eSchöne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Vital hypothalamic neurons regulating hunger, wakefulness, reward-seeking, and body weight are often defined by unique expression of hypothalamus-specific neuropeptides. Gene-ablation studies show that some of these peptides, notably orexin/hypocretin (hcrt/orx, are themselves critical for stable states of consciousness and metabolic health. However, neuron-ablation studies often reveal more severe phenotypes, suggesting key roles for co-expressed transmitters. Indeed, most hypothalamic neurons, including hcrt/orx cells, contain fast transmitters glutamate and GABA, as well as several neuropeptides. What are the roles and relations between different transmitters expressed by the same neuron? Here, we consider signaling codes for releasing different transmitters in relation to transmitter and receptor diversity in behaviorally-defined, widely-projecting peptidergic neurons, such as hcrt/orx cells. We then discuss latest optogenetic studies of endogenous transmitter release from defined sets of axons in situ, which suggest that recently-characterized vital peptidergic neurons (e.g. hcrt/orx, proopiomelanocortin , and agouti-related peptide cells, as well as classical modulatory neurons (e.g. dopamine and acetylcholine cells, all use fast transmitters to control their postsynaptic targets. These optogenetic insights are complemented by recent observations of behavioral deficiencies caused by genetic ablation of fast transmission from specific neuropeptidergic and aminergic neurons. Powerful and fast (millisecond-scale GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling from neurons previously considered to be primarily modulatory raises new questions about the roles of slower co-transmitters they co-express.

  2. Glutamate alteration of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in GABAergic neurons: the role of cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnerie, Hubert; Le Roux, Peter D

    2008-09-01

    Brain cell vulnerability to neurologic insults varies greatly, depending on their neuronal subpopulation. Among cells that survive a pathological insult such as ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that could compromise brain function. We previously reported that surviving cortical GABAergic neurons exposed to glutamate in vitro displayed an NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated alteration in the levels of the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67) [Monnerie, H., Le Roux, P., 2007. Reduced dendrite growth and altered glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65- and 67-kDa isoform protein expression from mouse cortical GABAergic neurons following excitotoxic injury in vitro. Exp. Neurol. 205, 367-382]. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which glutamate excitotoxicity caused a change in cortical GABAergic neurons' GAD protein levels. Removing extracellular calcium prevented the NMDAR-mediated decrease in GAD protein levels, measured using Western blot techniques, whereas inhibiting calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels had no effect. Glutamate's effect on GAD protein isoforms was significantly attenuated by preincubation with the cysteine protease inhibitor N-Acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-norleucinal (ALLN). Using class-specific protease inhibitors, we observed that ALLN's effect resulted from the blockade of calpain and cathepsin protease activities. Cell-free proteolysis assay confirmed that both proteases were involved in glutamate-induced alteration in GAD protein levels. Together these results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic stimulation of NMDAR in cultured cortical neurons leads to altered GAD protein levels from GABAergic neurons through intracellular calcium increase and protease activation including calpain and cathepsin. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered balance between excitation

  3. Neuronal Activity and Glutamate Uptake Decrease Mitochondrial Mobility in Astrocytes and Position Mitochondria Near Glutamate Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Joshua G.; O'Donnell, John C.; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Within neurons, mitochondria are nonuniformly distributed and are retained at sites of high activity and metabolic demand. Glutamate transport and the concomitant activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase represent a substantial energetic demand on astrocytes. We hypothesized that mitochondrial mobility within astrocytic processes might be regulated by neuronal activity and glutamate transport. We imaged organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of rat, in which astrocytes maintain their highly branched morphologies and express glutamate transporters. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, the mobility of mitochondria within individual astrocytic processes and neuronal dendrites was tracked. Within neurons, a greater percentage of mitochondria were mobile than in astrocytes. Furthermore, they moved faster and farther than in astrocytes. Inhibiting neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX) increased the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Mitochondrial movement in astrocytes was inhibited by vinblastine and cytochalasin D, demonstrating that this mobility depends on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Inhibition of glutamate transport tripled the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Conversely, application of the transporter substrate d-aspartate reversed the TTX-induced increase in the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Inhibition of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange also increased the percentage of mitochondria that were mobile. Last, we demonstrated that neuronal activity increases the probability that mitochondria appose GLT-1 particles within astrocyte processes, without changing the proximity of GLT-1 particles to VGLUT1. These results imply that neuronal activity and the resulting clearance of glutamate by astrocytes regulate the movement of astrocytic mitochondria and suggest a mechanism by which glutamate transporters might retain mitochondria at sites of glutamate uptake. PMID:24478345

  4. Modafinil attenuates reinstatement of cocaine seeking: role for cystine-glutamate exchange and metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Stephen V; Hensley-Simon, Megan; Tahsili-Fahadan, Pouya; LaLumiere, Ryan T; Thomas, Charles; Fallon, Rebecca V; Kalivas, Peter W; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Modafinil may be useful for treating stimulant abuse, but the mechanisms by which it acts to do so are unknown. Indeed, a primary effect of modafinil is to inhibit dopamine transport, which typically promotes rather than inhibits motivated behavior. Therefore, we examined the role of nucleus accumbens extracellular glutamate and the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) in modafinil effects. One group of rats was trained to self-administer cocaine for 10 days and extinguished, then given priming injections of cocaine to elicit reinstatement. Modafinil (300 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) inhibited reinstated cocaine seeking (but did not alter extinction responding by itself), and this effect was prevented by pre-treatment with bilateral microinjections of the mGluR2/3 antagonist LY-341495 (LY) into nucleus accumbens core. No reversal of modafinil effects was seen after unilateral accumbens core LY, or bilateral LY in the rostral pole of accumbens. Next, we sought to explore effects of modafinil on extracellular glutamate levels in accumbens after chronic cocaine. Separate rats were administered non-contingent cocaine, and after 3 weeks of withdrawal underwent accumbens microdialysis. Modafinil increased extracellular accumbens glutamate in chronic cocaine, but not chronic saline-pre-treated animals. This increase was prevented by reverse dialysis of cystine-glutamate exchange or voltage-dependent calcium channel antagonists. Voltage-dependent sodium channel blockade partly attenuated the increase in glutamate, but mGluR1 blockade did not. We conclude that modafinil increases extracellular glutamate in nucleus accumbens from glial and neuronal sources in cocaine-exposed rats, which may be important for its mGluR2/3-mediated antirelapse properties. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Developmental expression of glutamate transporters and glutamate dehydrogenase in astrocytes of the postnatal rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Peter; Schleyer, Verena

    2004-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the CNS and plays distinct roles in a number of developmental events. Its extracellular concentration, which mediates these activities, is regulated by glutamate transporters in glial cells and neurons. In the present study, we have used nonradioactive in situ hybridization, immunocytochemistry, and immunoblotting to show the cellular and regional expression of the high-affinity glutamate transporters GLAST (EAAT1) and generic GLT1 (EAAT2; glial form of GLT1) in the rat hippocampus during postnatal development (P1-60). The results of transporter expression were compared with the localization and activity pattern of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), an important glutamate-metabolizing enzyme. The study showed that both transporters and GDH were demonstrable at P1 (day of birth). The expression of GLAST (detected by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry) in the early postnatal development was higher than GLT1. Thereafter, the expression of both transporters increased, showing adult levels at between P20 and P30 (detected by in situ hybridization and immunoblotting). At these time points, the expression of GLT1 appeared to be significantly higher than the GLAST expression. GLT1 and GLAST proteins were demonstrable only in astrocytes. The increase of GDH activities (steepest increase from P5-P8), which were localized preferentially in astrocytes, was in agreement with the increase of transporter expression, preferentially with that of GLT1. These observations suggest that the extent of glutamate transporter expression and of glutamate-metabolizing GDH activity in astrocytes is intimately correlated with the formation of glutamatergic synapses in the developing hippocampus. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Intracellular Na+ concentration influences short-term plasticity of glutamate transporter-mediated currents in neocortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unichenko, Petr; Myakhar, Olga; Kirischuk, Sergei

    2012-04-01

    Fast synaptic transmission requires a rapid clearance of the released neurotransmitter from the extracellular space. Glial glutamate transporters (excitatory amino acid transporters, EAATs) strongly contribute to glutamate removal. In this work, we investigated the paired-pulse plasticity of synaptically activated, glutamate transporter-mediated currents (STCs) in cortical layer 2/3 astrocytes. STCs were elicited by local electrical stimulation in layer 4 in the presence of ionotropic glutamate (AMPA and NMDA), GABAA, and GABAB receptor antagonists. In experiments with low [Na(+)]i (5 mM) intrapipette solution, STCs elicited by paired-pulse stimulation demonstrated paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) at short (astrocytic [Na(+)]i, reduced the mean STC amplitude, decreased PPF at short ISIs, and slowed STC kinetics. All GABA-induced changes were blocked by NO-711 and SNAP-5114, GABA transporter (GATs) antagonists. In experiments with the low intrapipette solution, GAT blockade under control conditions decreased PPF at short ISIs both at room and at near physiological temperatures. Dialysis of single astrocyte with low [Na(+)]i solution increased the amplitude and reduced PPR of evoked field potentials recorded in the vicinity of the astrocyte. We conclude that (1) endogenous GABA via GATs may influence EAAT functioning and (2) astrocytic [Na(+)]i modulates the short-term plasticity of STCs and in turn the efficacy of glutamate removal. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Dynamic transition of neuronal firing induced by abnormal astrocytic glutamate oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun; Du, Mengmeng; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2016-08-01

    The gliotransmitter glutamate released from astrocytes can modulate neuronal firing by activating neuronal N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. This enables astrocytic glutamate(AG) to be involved in neuronal physiological and pathological functions. Based on empirical results and classical neuron-glial “tripartite synapse” model, we propose a practical model to describe extracellular AG oscillation, in which the fluctuation of AG depends on the threshold of calcium concentration, and the effect of AG degradation is considered as well. We predict the seizure-like discharges under the dysfunction of AG degradation duration. Consistent with our prediction, the suppression of AG uptake by astrocytic transporters, which operates by modulating the AG degradation process, can account for the emergence of epilepsy.

  8. Excitatory amino acid neurotoxicity and modulation of glutamate receptor expression in organotypic brain slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, J; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Jakobsen, B

    2000-01-01

    Using organotypic slice cultures of hippocampus and cortex-striatum from newborn to 7 day old rats, we are currently studying the excitotoxic effects of kainic acid (KA), AMPA and NMDA and the neuroprotective effects of glutamate receptor blockers, like NBQX. For detection and quantitation...... of the induced neurodegeneration, we have developed standardized protocols, including--a) densitometric measurements of the cellular uptake of propidium iodide (PI), --b) histological staining by Flouro-Jade, --c) lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release to the culture medium, --d) immunostaining for microtubulin......-induced excitotoxicity and KA-glutamate receptor subunit mRNA expression after long-term exposure to low, non-toxic doses of KA and NBQX. We conclude that organotypic brain slice cultures, combined with standardized procedures for quantitation of cell damage and receptor subunit changes is of great potential use...

  9. The Glutamine-Glutamate/GABA Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne B; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    The operation of a glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle in the brain consisting of the transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons and neurotransmitter glutamate or GABA from neurons to astrocytes is a well-known concept. In neurons, glutamine is not only used for energy production and protein...... synthesis, as in other cells, but is also an essential precursor for biosynthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters. An excellent tool for the study of glutamine transfer from astrocytes to neurons is [(14)C]acetate or [(13)C]acetate and the glial specific enzyme inhibitors, i.e. the glutamine synthetase...... inhibitor methionine sulfoximine and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitase) inhibitors fluoro-acetate and -citrate. Acetate is metabolized exclusively by glial cells, and [(13)C]acetate is thus capable when used in combination with magnetic resonance spectroscopy or mass spectrometry, to provide...

  10. Molecular machines regulating the release probability of synaptic vesicles at the active zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eKoerber

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs with the plasma membrane of the active zone (AZ upon arrival of an action potential (AP at the presynaptic compartment is a tightly regulated probabil-istic process crucial for information transfer. The probability of a SV to release its transmitter content in response to an AP, termed release probability (Pr, is highly diverse both at the level of entire synapses and individual SVs at a given synapse. Differences in Pr exist between different types of synapses, between synapses of the same type, synapses originating from the same axon and even between different SV subpopulations within the same presynaptic terminal. The Pr of SVs at the AZ is set by a complex interplay of different presynaptic properties including the availability of release-ready SVs, the location of the SVs relative to the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs at the AZ, the magnitude of calcium influx upon arrival of the AP, the buffer-ing of calcium ions as well as the identity and sensitivity of the calcium sensor. These properties are not only interconnected, but can also be regulated dynamically to match the requirements of activity patterns mediated by the synapse. Here, we review recent advances in identifying mole-cules and molecular machines taking part in the determination of vesicular Pr at the AZ.

  11. Glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in Bacillus licheniformis WX-02: Enzymatic properties and specific functions in glutamic acid synthesis for poly-γ-glutamic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guangming; Wang, Qin; Wei, Xuetuan; Ma, Xin; Chen, Shouwen

    2017-04-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA), a natural biopolymer, is widely used in cosmetics, medicine, food, water treatment, and agriculture owing to its features of moisture sequestration, cation chelation, non-toxicity and biodegradability. Intracellular glutamic acid, the substrate of γ-PGA, is a limiting factor for high yield in γ-PGA production. Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis are both important γ-PGA producing strains, and B. subtilis synthesizes glutamic acid in vivo using the unique GOGAT/GS pathway. However, little is known about the glutamate synthesis pathway in B. licheniformis. The aim of this work was to characterize the glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in glutamic acid synthesis from B. licheniformis with both in vivo and in vitro experiments. By re-directing the carbon flux distribution, the rocG gene deletion mutant WX-02ΔrocG produced intracellular glutamic acid with a concentration of 90ng/log(CFU), which was only 23.7% that of the wild-type WX-02 (380ng/log(CFU)). Furthermore, the γ-PGA yield of mutant WX-02ΔrocG was 5.37g/L, a decrease of 45.3% compared to the wild type (9.82g/L). In vitro enzymatic assays of RocG showed that RocG has higher affinity for 2-oxoglutarate than glutamate, and the glutamate synthesis rate was far above degradation. This is probably the first study to reveal the glutamic acid synthesis pathway and the specific functions of RocG in B. licheniformis. The results indicate that γ-PGA production can be enhanced through improving intracellular glutamic acid synthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Potentiation of lead-induced cell death in PC12 cells by glutamate: Protection by N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a novel thiol antioxidant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penugonda, Suman; Mare, Suneetha; Lutz, P.; Banks, William A.; Ercal, Nuran

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated as an important factor in many neurological diseases. Oxidative toxicity in a number of these conditions is induced by excessive glutamate release and subsequent glutamatergic neuronal stimulation. This, in turn, causes increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and neuronal damage. Recent studies indicate that the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system is involved in lead-induced neurotoxicity. Therefore, this study aimed to (1) investigate the potential effects of glutamate on lead-induced PC12 cell death and (2) elucidate whether the novel thiol antioxidant N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA) had any protective abilities against such cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that glutamate (1 mM) potentiates lead-induced cytotoxicity by increased generation of ROS, decreased proliferation (MTS), decreased glutathione (GSH) levels, and depletion of cellular adenosine-triphosphate (ATP). Consistent with its ability to decrease ATP levels and induce cell death, lead also increased caspase-3 activity, an effect potentiated by glutamate. Exposure to glutamate and lead elevated the cellular malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and phospholipase-A 2 (PLA 2 ) activity and diminished the glutamine synthetase (GS) activity. NACA protected PC12 cells from the cytotoxic effects of glutamate plus lead, as evaluated by MTS assay. NACA reduced the decrease in the cellular ATP levels and restored the intracellular GSH levels. The increased levels of ROS and MDA in glutamate-lead treated cells were significantly decreased by NACA. In conclusion, our data showed that glutamate potentiated the effects of lead-induced PC12 cell death by a mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP depletion) and oxidative stress. NACA had a protective role against the combined toxic effects of glutamate and lead by inhibiting lipid peroxidation and scavenging ROS, thus preserving intracellular GSH

  13. Use of primary deuterium and 15N isotope effects to deduce the relative rates of steps in the mechanisms of alanine and glutamate dehydrogenases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, P.M.; Chen, C.Y.; Cleland, W.W.; Cook, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have used deuterium and 15 N isotope effects to study the relative rates of the steps in the mechanisms of alanine and glutamate dehydrogenases. The proposed chemical mechanisms for these enzymes involve carbinolamine formation, imine formation, and reduction of the imine to the amino acid. These steps are almost equally rate limiting for V/K/sub ammonia/ with alanine dehydrogenase, while with glutamate dehydrogenase carbinolamine formation, imine formation, and release of glutamate after hydride transfer provide most of the rate limitation of V/K/sub ammonia/. Release of oxidized nucleotide is largely rate limiting for V/sub max/ for both enzymes. When β-hydroxypyruvate replaces pyruvate, or 3-acetylpyridine NADH (Acpyr-NADH) or thio-NADH replaces NADH with alanine dehydrogenase, nucleotide release no longer limits V/sub max/, and hydride transfer becomes more rate limiting. With glutamate dehydrogenase, replacement of α-ketoglutarate by α-ketovalerate makes hydride transfer more rate limiting. Use of Acpyr-NADPH has a minimal effect with α-ketoglutarate but causes an 8-fold decrease in V/sub max/ with α-ketovalerate, with hydride transfer the major rate-limiting step. In contrast, thio-NADPH with either α-keto acid causes carbinolamide formation to become almost completely rate limiting. These studies show the power of multiple isotope effects in deducing details of the chemistry and changes in rate-limiting step(s) in complicated reaction mechanisms such as those of alanine and glutamate dehydrogenases

  14. Glutamine and glutamate as vital metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newsholme P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is widely accepted as the primary nutrient for the maintenance and promotion of cell function. This metabolite leads to production of ATP, NADPH and precursors for the synthesis of macromolecules such as nucleic acids and phospholipids. We propose that, in addition to glucose, the 5-carbon amino acids glutamine and glutamate should be considered to be equally important for maintenance and promotion of cell function. The functions of glutamine/glutamate are many, i.e., they are substrates for protein synthesis, anabolic precursors for muscle growth, they regulate acid-base balance in the kidney, they are substrates for ureagenesis in the liver and for hepatic and renal gluconeogenesis, they act as an oxidative fuel for the intestine and cells of the immune system, provide inter-organ nitrogen transport, and act as precursors of neurotransmitter synthesis, of nucleotide and nucleic acid synthesis and of glutathione production. Many of these functions are interrelated with glucose metabolism. The specialized aspects of glutamine/glutamate metabolism of different glutamine-utilizing cells are discussed in the context of glucose requirements and cell function.

  15. Presynaptic control of group Ia afferents in relation to acquisition of a visuo-motor skill in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Monica A.; Lungholt, Bjarke K.S.; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2005-01-01

    Sensory information continuously converges on the spinal cord during a variety of motor behaviours. Here, we examined presynaptic control of group Ia afferents in relation to acquisition of a novel motor skill. We tested whether repetition of two motor tasks with different degrees of difficulty...... of the monosynaptic Ia facilitation of the soleus H-reflex evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. The D1 inhibition was increased and the femoral nerve facilitation was decreased following the visuo-motor skill task, suggesting an increase in presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents. No changes were observed...... in the disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibition. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve (TN) were also unchanged, suggesting that transmission in ascending pathways was unaltered following the visuo-motor skill task. Together these observations suggest that a selective...

  16. Intra-Amniotic LPS Induced Region-Specific Changes in Presynaptic Bouton Densities in the Ovine Fetal Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Strackx

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Chorioamnionitis has been associated with increased risk for fetal brain damage. Although, it is now accepted that synaptic dysfunction might be responsible for functional deficits, synaptic densities/numbers after a fetal inflammatory challenge have not been studied in different regions yet. Therefore, we tested in this study the hypothesis that LPS-induced chorioamnionitis caused profound changes in synaptic densities in different regions of the fetal sheep brain. Material and Methods. Chorioamnionitis was induced by a 10 mg intra-amniotic LPS injection at two different exposure intervals. The fetal brain was studied at 125 days of gestation (term = 150 days either 2 (LPS2D group or 14 days (LPS14D group after LPS or saline injection (control group. Synaptophysin immunohistochemistry was used to quantify the presynaptic density in layers 2-3 and 5-6 of the motor cortex, somatosensory cortex, entorhinal cortex, and piriforme cortex, in the nucleus caudatus and putamen and in CA1/2, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Results. There was a significant reduction in presynaptic bouton densities in layers 2-3 and 5-6 of the motor cortex and in layers 2-3 of the entorhinal and the somatosensory cortex, in the nucleus caudate and putamen and the CA1/2 and CA3 of the hippocampus in the LPS2D compared to control animals. Only in the motor cortex and putamen, the presynaptic density was significantly decreased in the LPS14 D compared to the control group. No changes were found in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the piriforme cortex. Conclusion. We demonstrated that LPS-induced chorioamnionitis caused a decreased density in presynaptic boutons in different areas in the fetal brain. These synaptic changes seemed to be region-specific, with some regions being more affected than others, and seemed to be transient in some regions.

  17. Glutamate production from ammonia via glutamate dehydrogenase 2 activity supports cancer cell proliferation under glutamine depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yukiko; Nakayama, Yasumune; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Irino, Yasuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Cancer cells rapidly consume glutamine as a carbon and nitrogen source to support proliferation, but the cell number continues to increase exponentially after glutamine is nearly depleted from the medium. In contrast, cell proliferation rates are strongly depressed when cells are cultured in glutamine-free medium. How cancer cells survive in response to nutrient limitation and cellular stress remains poorly understood. In addition, rapid glutamine catabolism yields ammonia, which is a potentially toxic metabolite that is secreted into the extracellular space. Here, we show that ammonia can be utilized for glutamate production, leading to cell proliferation under glutamine-depleted conditions. This proliferation requires glutamate dehydrogenase 2, which synthesizes glutamate from ammonia and α-ketoglutarate and is expressed in MCF7 and T47D cells. Our findings provide insight into how cancer cells survive under glutamine deprivation conditions and thus contribute to elucidating the mechanisms of tumor growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 123-I ioflupane (Datscan® presynaptic nigrostriatal imaging in patients with movement disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Soriano Castrejón

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available 123-I Ioflupane (Datscan® presynaptic imaging has been shown to have a significant utility in the assessment of patients with movement disorders 123-I Ioflupane SPECT is able to distinguish between Parkinson’s disease (PD and other forms of parkinsonism without degeneration of the nigrostriatal pathway, including a common movement disorder such as essential tremor, and to assess disease progression in PD and other neurodegenerative disorders involving the substantia nigra.A imagem pré-sináptica através de 123-I Ioflupane (Datscan® tem mostrado um papel significante na avaliação de pacientes com distúrbios do movimento. 123-I Ioflupane SPECT é capaz de distinguir entre Mal de Parkinson (MP e outras formas de parkinsonismo sem degenerações da via nigroestriatal incluindo um distúrbio comum de movimento parecido com o tremor essencial e para medir a evolução da doença no Mal de Parkinson e outros distúrbios neurodegenerativos envolvendo a substantia nigra.

  19. A postsynaptic PI3K-cII dependent signaling controller for presynaptic homeostatic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, Anna G; Ford, Kevin J; Wang, Tingting; Fetter, Richard D; Tong, Amy

    2018-01-01

    Presynaptic homeostatic plasticity stabilizes information transfer at synaptic connections in organisms ranging from insect to human. By analogy with principles of engineering and control theory, the molecular implementation of PHP is thought to require postsynaptic signaling modules that encode homeostatic sensors, a set point, and a controller that regulates transsynaptic negative feedback. The molecular basis for these postsynaptic, homeostatic signaling elements remains unknown. Here, an electrophysiology-based screen of the Drosophila kinome and phosphatome defines a postsynaptic signaling platform that includes a required function for PI3K-cII, PI3K-cIII and the small GTPase Rab11 during the rapid and sustained expression of PHP. We present evidence that PI3K-cII localizes to Golgi-derived, clathrin-positive vesicles and is necessary to generate an endosomal pool of PI(3)P that recruits Rab11 to recycling endosomal membranes. A morphologically distinct subdivision of this platform concentrates postsynaptically where we propose it functions as a homeostatic controller for retrograde, trans-synaptic signaling. PMID:29303480

  20. Sensory transduction channel subunits, tax-4 and tax-2, modify presynaptic molecular architecture in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Andrew B; Shen, Kang

    2011-01-01

    During development, neural activity is important for forming proper connections in neural networks. The effect of activity on the gross morphology and synaptic strength of neurons has been well documented, but little is known about how activity affects different molecular components during development. Here, we examine the localization of four fluorescently-tagged presynaptic proteins, RAB-3, SNG-1/synaptogyrin, SYD-2/Liprin-α, and SAD-1/SAD kinase, in the C. elegans thermosensory neuron AFD. We show that tax-4 and tax-2, two genes that encode the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel necessary for sensory transduction in AFD, disrupt the localization of all four proteins. In wild-type animals, the synaptic vesicle (SV) markers RAB-3 and SNG-1 and the active zone markers SYD-2 and SAD-1 localize in a stereotyped, punctate pattern in the AFD axon. In tax-4 and tax-2 mutants, SV and SYD-2 puncta are more numerous and less intense. Interestingly, SAD-1 puncta are also less intense but do not increase in number. The change in puncta number can be rescued cell-autonomously in AFD. These results suggest that sensory transduction genes tax-4 and tax-2 are necessary for the proper assembly of presynapses.

  1. Sensory transduction channel subunits, tax-4 and tax-2, modify presynaptic molecular architecture in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B Hellman

    Full Text Available During development, neural activity is important for forming proper connections in neural networks. The effect of activity on the gross morphology and synaptic strength of neurons has been well documented, but little is known about how activity affects different molecular components during development. Here, we examine the localization of four fluorescently-tagged presynaptic proteins, RAB-3, SNG-1/synaptogyrin, SYD-2/Liprin-α, and SAD-1/SAD kinase, in the C. elegans thermosensory neuron AFD. We show that tax-4 and tax-2, two genes that encode the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel necessary for sensory transduction in AFD, disrupt the localization of all four proteins. In wild-type animals, the synaptic vesicle (SV markers RAB-3 and SNG-1 and the active zone markers SYD-2 and SAD-1 localize in a stereotyped, punctate pattern in the AFD axon. In tax-4 and tax-2 mutants, SV and SYD-2 puncta are more numerous and less intense. Interestingly, SAD-1 puncta are also less intense but do not increase in number. The change in puncta number can be rescued cell-autonomously in AFD. These results suggest that sensory transduction genes tax-4 and tax-2 are necessary for the proper assembly of presynapses.

  2. Phagocytic clearance of presynaptic dystrophies by reactive astrocytes in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Arboledas, Angela; Davila, Jose C; Sanchez-Mejias, Elisabeth; Navarro, Victoria; Nuñez-Diaz, Cristina; Sanchez-Varo, Raquel; Sanchez-Mico, Maria Virtudes; Trujillo-Estrada, Laura; Fernandez-Valenzuela, Juan Jose; Vizuete, Marisa; Comella, Joan X; Galea, Elena; Vitorica, Javier; Gutierrez, Antonia

    2018-03-01

    Reactive astrogliosis, a complex process characterized by cell hypertrophy and upregulation of components of intermediate filaments, is a common feature in brains of Alzheimer's patients. Reactive astrocytes are found in close association with neuritic plaques; however, the precise role of these glial cells in disease pathogenesis is unknown. In this study, using immunohistochemical techniques and light and electron microscopy, we report that plaque-associated reactive astrocytes enwrap, engulf and may digest presynaptic dystrophies in the hippocampus of amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 (APP/PS1) mice. Microglia, the brain phagocytic population, was apparently not engaged in this clearance. Phagocytic reactive astrocytes were present in 35% and 67% of amyloid plaques at 6 and 12 months of age, respectively. The proportion of engulfed dystrophic neurites was low, around 7% of total dystrophies around plaques at both ages. This fact, along with the accumulation of dystrophic neurites during disease course, suggests that the efficiency of the astrocyte phagocytic process might be limited or impaired. Reactive astrocytes surrounding and engulfing dystrophic neurites were also detected in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's patients by confocal and ultrastructural analysis. We posit that the phagocytic activity of reactive astrocytes might contribute to clear dysfunctional synapses or synaptic debris, thereby restoring impaired neural circuits and reducing the inflammatory impact of damaged neuronal parts and/or limiting the amyloid pathology. Therefore, potentiation of the phagocytic properties of reactive astrocytes may represent a potential therapy in Alzheimer's disease. © 2017 The Authors GLIA Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A novel glutamate transport system in poly(γ-glutamic acid)-producing strain Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qun; Xu, Hong; Zhang, Dan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2011-08-01

    Bacillus subtilis CGMCC 0833 is a poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA)-producing strain. It has the capacity to tolerate high concentration of extracellular glutamate and to utilize glutamate actively. Such a high uptake capacity was owing to an active transport system for glutamate. Therefore, a specific transport system for L-glutamate has been observed in this strain. It was a novel transport process in which glutamate was symported with at least two protons, and an inward-directed sodium gradient had no stimulatory effect on it. K(m) and V(m) for glutamate transport were estimated to be 67 μM and 152 nmol⁻¹ min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ of protein, respectively. The transport system showed structural specificity and stereospecificity and was strongly dependent on extracellular pH. Moreover, it could be stimulated by Mg²⁺, NH₄⁺, and Ca²⁺. In addition, the glutamate transporter in this strain was studied at the molecular level. As there was no important mutation of the transporter protein, it appeared that the differences of glutamate transporter properties between this strain and other B. subtilis strains were not due to the differences of the amino acid sequence and the structure of transporter protein. This is the first extensive report on the properties of glutamate transport system in γ-PGA-producing strain.

  4. siRNA knock down of glutamate dehydrogenase in astrocytes affects glutamate metabolism leading to extensive accumulation of the neuroactive amino acids glutamate and aspartate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skytt, Dorte M; Klawonn, Anna M; Stridh, Malin H; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Patruss, Yasar; Quintana-Cabrera, Ruben; Bolaños, Juan P; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-09-01

    Glutamate is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and astrocytes are key players in sustaining glutamate homeostasis. Astrocytes take up the predominant part of glutamate after neurotransmission and metabolism of glutamate is necessary for a continuous efficient removal of glutamate from the synaptic area. Glutamate may either be amidated by glutamine synthetase or oxidatively metabolized in the mitochondria, the latter being at least to some extent initiated by oxidative deamination by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). To explore the particular importance of GDH for astrocyte metabolism we have knocked down GDH in cultured cortical astrocytes employing small interfering RNA (siRNA) achieving a reduction of the enzyme activity by approximately 44%. The astrocytes were incubated for 2h in medium containing either 1.0mM [(15)NH(4)(+)] or 100 μM [(15)N]glutamate. For those exposed to [(15)N]glutamate an additional 100 μM was added after 1h. Metabolic mapping was performed from isotope incorporation measured by mass spectrometry into relevant amino acids of cell extracts and media. The contents of the amino acids were measured by HPLC. The (15)N incorporation from [(15)NH(4)(+)] into glutamate, aspartate and alanine was decreased in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. However, the reduced GDH activity had no effect on the cellular contents of these amino acids. This supports existing in vivo and in vitro studies that GDH is predominantly working in the direction of oxidative deamination and not reductive amination. In contrast, when exposing the astrocytes to [(15)N]glutamate, the reduced GDH activity led to an increased (15)N incorporation into glutamate, aspartate and alanine and a large increase in the content of glutamate and aspartate. Surprisingly, this accumulation of glutamate and net-synthesis of aspartate were not reflected in any alterations in either the glutamine content or labeling, but a slight increase in mono labeling of

  5. Tolerance to LSD and DOB induced shaking behaviour: differential adaptations of frontocortical 5-HT(2A) and glutamate receptor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchborn, Tobias; Schröder, Helmut; Dieterich, Daniela C; Grecksch, Gisela; Höllt, Volker

    2015-03-15

    Serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and dimethoxy-bromoamphetamine (DOB), provoke stereotype-like shaking behaviour in rodents, which is hypothesised to engage frontocortical glutamate receptor activation secondary to serotonin2A (5-HT2A) related glutamate release. Challenging this hypothesis, we here investigate whether tolerance to LSD and DOB correlates with frontocortical adaptations of 5-HT2A and/or overall-glutamate binding sites. LSD and DOB (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) induce a ketanserin-sensitive (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., 30-min pretreatment) increase in shaking behaviour (including head twitches and wet dog shakes), which with repeated application (7× in 4 ds) is undermined by tolerance. Tolerance to DOB, as indexed by DOB-sensitive [(3)H]spiroperidol and DOB induced [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S binding, is accompanied by a frontocortical decrease in 5-HT2A binding sites and 5-HT2 signalling, respectively; glutamate-sensitive [(3)H]glutamate binding sites, in contrast, remain unchanged. As to LSD, 5-HT2 signalling and 5-HT2A binding, respectively, are not or only marginally affected, yet [(3)H]glutamate binding is significantly decreased. Correlation analysis interrelates tolerance to DOB to the reduced 5-HT2A (r=.80) as well as the unchanged [(3)H]glutamate binding sites (r=.84); tolerance to LSD, as opposed, shares variance with the reduction in [(3)H]glutamate binding sites only (r=.86). Given that DOB and LSD both induce tolerance, one correlating with 5-HT2A, the other with glutamate receptor adaptations, it might be inferred that tolerance can arise at either level. That is, if a hallucinogen (like LSD in our study) fails to induce 5-HT2A (down-)regulation, glutamate receptors (activated postsynaptic to 5-HT2A related glutamate release) might instead adapt and thus prevent further overstimulation of the cortex. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  7. Glutamate Transporters in the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby

    2017-01-01

    The amino acid L-glutamate serves a number of roles in the central nervous system, being an excitatory neurotransmitter, metabolite, and building block in protein synthesis. During pathophysiological events, where L-glutamate homeostasis cannot be maintained, the increased brain interstitial fluid...... studies have demonstrated blood-to-brain transport of L-glutamate, at least during pathological events. A number of studies have shown that brain endothelial cells express excitatory amino acid transporters, which may account for abluminal concentrative uptake of L-glutamate into the capillary endothelial...... concentration of L-glutamate causes excitotoxicity. A tight control of the brain interstitial fluid L-glutamate levels is therefore imperative, in order to maintain optimal neurotransmission and to avoid such excitotoxicity. The blood-brain barrier, i.e., the endothelial lining of the brain capillaries...

  8. [Determination of glutamic acid in biological material by capillary electrophoresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narezhnaya, E; Krukier, I; Avrutskaya, V; Degtyareva, A; Igumnova, E A

    2015-01-01

    The conditions for the identification and determination of Glutamic acid by capillary zone electrophoresis without their preliminary derivatization have been optimized. The effect of concentration of buffer electrolyte and pH on determination of Glutamic acid has been investigated. It is shown that the 5 Mm borate buffer concentration and a pH 9.15 are optimal. Quantitative determination of glutamic acid has been carried out using a linear dependence between the concentration of the analyte and the area of the peak. The accuracy and reproducibility of the determination are confirmed by the method "introduced - found". Glutamic acid has been determined in the placenta homogenate. The duration of analysis doesn't exceed 30 minutes. The results showed a decrease in the level of glutamic acid in cases of pregnancy complicated by placental insufficiency compared with the physiological, and this fact allows to consider the level of glutamic acid as a possible marker of complicated pregnancy.

  9. Bidirectional regulation of thermotaxis by glutamate transmissions in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Noriyuki; Kuhara, Atsushi; Nakamura, Fumiya; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Mori, Ikue

    2011-04-06

    In complex neural circuits of the brain, massive information is processed with neuronal communication through synaptic transmissions. It is thus fundamental to delineate information flows encoded by various kinds of transmissions. Here, we show that glutamate signals from two distinct sensory neurons bidirectionally affect the same postsynaptic interneuron, thereby producing the opposite behaviours. EAT-4/VGLUT (vesicular glutamate transporter)-dependent glutamate signals from AFD thermosensory neurons inhibit the postsynaptic AIY interneurons through activation of GLC-3/GluCl inhibitory glutamate receptor and behaviourally drive migration towards colder temperature. By contrast, EAT-4-dependent glutamate signals from AWC thermosensory neurons stimulate the AIY neurons to induce migration towards warmer temperature. Alteration of the strength of AFD and AWC signals led to significant changes of AIY activity, resulting in drastic modulation of behaviour. We thus provide an important insight on information processing, in which two glutamate transmissions encoding opposite information flows regulate neural activities to produce a large spectrum of behavioural outputs.

  10. Muscarinic receptor modulation of acetylcholine release from rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, M G; Pepeu, G

    1995-04-28

    An attempt to identify the muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine (ACh) release from cortical and hippocampal slices was made by means of several muscarinic antagonists. Cortical and hippocampal slices prepared from adult rats were superfused with Krebs solution containing physostigmine; ACh content of the superfusate at rest and after electrical stimulation (1 Hz) was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography. The antagonists were added to the Krebs at the concentration of 1 microM. ACh release at rest was enhanced only in the cortex by (+/-)-5,11-dihydro-11-([(2-[2-[(dipropylamino)methyl]-1- piperidinyl)ethyl)amino]carbonyl)-6H-pyrido[2,3-b](1,4)- benzodiazepine-6-one (AFDX384), an M2/M4 selective antagonist. The evoked ACh release from the cerebral cortex was significantly increased by AFDX384, methoctramine, pirenzepine, M2/M4, M2 and M1 selective antagonists, respectively, and scopolamine. This finding suggests that M1, M2 and M4 presynaptic receptor subtypes could regulate evoked ACh release in the cortex. In hippocampal slices, the evoked ACh release was enhanced by AFDX384, pirenzepine and scopolamine but not by methoctramine. In this region ACh release seems therefore regulated only by M1 and M4 receptor subtypes. The M3 antagonist (+/-)-p-fluorohexahydro-sila-difenidol hydrochloride did not affect ACh release.

  11. Alleviation of glutamate mediated neuronal insult by piroxicam in rodent model of focal cerebral ischemia: a possible mechanism of GABA agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Pandey, Anand Kumar; Paul, Sudip; Patnaik, Ranjana

    2014-12-01

    Neurotransmitter imbalance is an inevitable outcome in cerebral ischemia that leads to neuronal death. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of piroxicam, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on extracellular brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release, survival time, and neuronal cell death. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in male Charles Foster rat led to neuronal infarction and compromised intrinsic antioxidant status. Thirty-minute preadministration of piroxicam (10 mg/kg b.w.) showed a significant (P piroxicam administration in stroke rat significantly reduced (P piroxicam attenuates extracellular glutamate release and also reduces neuronal cell death due to reduction in oxidative stress in cerebral ischemia. Our results also indicate a consequent increase of extracellular GABA in brain regions administered with piroxicam, which hints that piroxicam alleviates glutamate excitotoxicity possibly by GABA agonism.

  12. Relationship between Increase in Astrocytic GLT-1 Glutamate Transport and Late-LTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; Zou, Shengwei; Colbert, Costa M.; Eskin, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Na[superscript +]-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters have important roles in the maintenance of basal levels of glutamate and clearance of glutamate during synaptic transmission. Interestingly, several studies have shown that basal glutamate transport displays plasticity. Glutamate uptake increases in hippocampal slices during early…

  13. Bidirectional regulation of thermotaxis by glutamate transmissions in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Ohnishi, Noriyuki; Kuhara, Atsushi; Nakamura, Fumiya; Okochi, Yoshifumi; Mori, Ikue

    2011-01-01

    In complex neural circuits of the brain, massive information is processed with neuronal communication through synaptic transmissions. It is thus fundamental to delineate information flows encoded by various kinds of transmissions. Here, we show that glutamate signals from two distinct sensory neurons bidirectionally affect the same postsynaptic interneuron, thereby producing the opposite behaviours. EAT-4/VGLUT (vesicular glutamate transporter)-dependent glutamate signals from AFD thermosenso...

  14. Pharmacological Treatment of Glutamate Excitotoxicity Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-14

    In 1969, Olney found that subcutaneous injection of monosodium glutamate resulted in necrotic brain lesions in the hypothalamus of newborn mice...Thesis: "Pharmacological Treatment of Glutamate Excitotoxicity Following Traumatic Brain Injury" Name of Candidate: Michael Doh Molecular & Cell...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pharmacological Treatment Of Glutamate Excitotoxicity Following Traumatic

  15. Glutamate monitoring in vitro and in vivo: recent progress in the field of glutamate biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieben, Nathalie Ines; Rose, Nadia Cherouati; Martinez, Karen Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. It is involved in numerous important brain functions such as learning, memory and cognition, as well as the development and plasticity of the central nervous system. In order to ensure efficient signal...... transmission, glutamate is highly compartmentalized. Prolonged elevated extracellular levels of glutamate have been shown to be excitotoxic with the result of neuronal cell death ultimately. Furthermore, alterations in glutamate levels have been shown to be linked to several neurodegenerative disorders...... such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, as well as ischemic stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Accurate measurement of glutamate levels in vitro and in vivo for a better understanding of the physiological and pathological role of glutamate in neurotransmission has remained challenging...

  16. Differential expression of metabotropic glutamate and GABAB receptors at neocortical glutamatergic and GABAergic axon terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eBragina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs and GABAB receptors are highly expressed at presynaptic sites. To verify the possibility that the two classes of metabotropic receptors contribute to axon terminals heterogeneity, we studied the localization of mGluR1α, mGluR5, mGluR2/3, mGluR7 and GABAB1 in VGLUT1-, VGLUT2- and VGAT-positive terminals in the cerebral cortex of adult rats. VGLUT1-positive puncta expressed mGluR1α (~5%, mGluR5 (~6%, mGluR2/3 (~22%, mGluR7 (~17%, and GABAB1 (~40%; VGLUT2-positive terminals expressed mGluR1α (~10%, mGluR5 (~11%, mGluR2/3 (~20%, mGluR7 (~28%, and GABAB1 (~25%; whereas VGAT-positive puncta expressed mGluR1α (~27%, mGluR5 (~24%, mGluR2/3 (~38%, mGluR7 (~31%, and GABAB1 (~19%. Control experiments ruled out the possibility that post-synaptic mGluRs and GABAB1 might have significantly biased our results. We also performed functional assays in synaptosomal preparations, and showed that all agonists modify Glu and GABA levels, which return to baseline upon exposure to antagonists.Overall, these findings indicate that mGluR1α, mGluR5, mGluR2/3, mGluR7 and GABAB1 expression differ significantly between glutamatergic and GABAergic axon terminals, and that the robust expression of heteroreceptors may contribute to the homeostatic regulation of the balance between excitation and inhibition.

  17. Gene expression patterns in the hippocampus during the development and aging of Glud1 (Glutamate Dehydrogenase 1) transgenic and wild type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinkun; Patel, Nilam D; Hui, Dongwei; Pal, Ranu; Hafez, Mohamed M; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Al-Yahya, Abdulaziz A; Michaelis, Elias K

    2014-03-04

    Extraneuronal levels of the neurotransmitter glutamate in brain rise during aging. This is thought to lead to synaptic dysfunction and neuronal injury or death. To study the effects of glutamate hyperactivity in brain, we created transgenic (Tg) mice in which the gene for glutamate dehydrogenase (Glud1) is over-expressed in neurons and in which such overexpression leads to excess synaptic release of glutamate. In this study, we analyzed whole genome expression in the hippocampus, a region important for learning and memory, of 10 day to 20 month old Glud1 and wild type (wt) mice. During development, maturation and aging, both Tg and wt exhibited decreases in the expression of genes related to neurogenesis, neuronal migration, growth, and process elongation, and increases in genes related to neuro-inflammation, voltage-gated channel activity, and regulation of synaptic transmission. Categories of genes that were differentially expressed in Tg vs. wt during development were: synaptic function, cytoskeleton, protein ubiquitination, and mitochondria; and, those differentially expressed during aging were: synaptic function, vesicle transport, calcium signaling, protein kinase activity, cytoskeleton, neuron projection, mitochondria, and protein ubiquitination. Overall, the effects of Glud1 overexpression on the hippocampus transcriptome were greater in the mature and aged than the young. Glutamate hyperactivity caused gene expression changes in the hippocampus at all ages. Some of these changes may result in premature brain aging. The identification of these genomic expression differences is important in understanding the effects of glutamate dysregulation on neuronal function during aging or in neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Effect of Low Level Laser Irradiation at Wavelengths 488 and 515 nm on Glutamate Neurotransmitter in Mitochondria of Visual Brain Cortex in Albino Rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omran, M.F.; El-Ahdal, M.A.; El-Kady, M.H.; Yousri, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of glutamate in the visual cortex and mitochondria could be used as a measure for the argon laser effect having wavelengths 488 and 515 nm, on the mitochondria. A comparative response for the bound and free glutamate was found. Irradiation with different energies 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 J for both wavelengths were accomplished. This study makes us to recommend the advantage of using argon laser having wavelength 515 nm to enhance the blocking of glutamate and hence the reduction of brain toxicity. Most of the energy required for cellular functions comes from mitochondria (Shepherd, 1994). Glutamate, which is present in central nervous system at very high level is essential for brain intermediary metabolism (Frazer et al., 1994; Meldrum et al., 2000 and Blumcke et al., 2000). Glutamate is enriched in synaptic vesicles, the subcellular organelles, which are associated with the storage and release of neurotransmitters. Also, biochemical evidence for glutamate as neurotransmitter in fibers from the visual cortex to the subcortical visual relay nuclei has been indicated (Fose and Fonnum, 1987 and George, 1998)

  19. Kinemage of action - Proposed reaction mechanism of glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminomutase at an atomic level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, John L., E-mail: John_Sorensen@umanitoba.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada); Stetefeld, Joerg, E-mail: stetefel@cc.umanitoba.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} Inhibitors of tetrapyrrole cofactor biosynthesis may be useful antibiotics. {yields} Mechanism of critical enzyme, glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminomutase, is presented. {yields} Unique vitamin B6-dependant enzyme traps intermediate in active site. {yields} Molecular dynamics show that a re-orientation of the substrate is required. -- Abstract: Glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminomutase (GSAM), a key enzyme in tetrapyrrole cofactor biosynthesis, performs a unique transamination on a single substrate. The substrate, glutamate-1-semialdehyde (GSA), undergoes a reaction that exchanges the position of an amine and a carbonyl group to produce 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). This transamination reaction is unique in the fact that is does not require an external cofactor to act as a nitrogen donor or acceptor in this transamination reaction. One of the other remarkable features of the catalytic mechanism is the release free in the enzyme active site of the intermediate 4,5-diaminovaleric acid (DAVA). The action of a gating loop prevents the escape of DAVA from the active site. In a MD simulation approach, using snapshots provided by X-ray crystallography and protein crystal absorption spectrometry data, the individual catalytic steps in this unique intramolecular transamination have been elucidated.

  20. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-04-25

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (L-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane.

  1. GABA and glutamate pathways are spatially and developmentally affected in the brain of Mecp2-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita El-Khoury

    Full Text Available Proper brain functioning requires a fine-tuning between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission, a balance maintained through the regulation and release of glutamate and GABA. Rett syndrome (RTT is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2 gene affecting the postnatal brain development. Dysfunctions in the GABAergic and glutamatergic systems have been implicated in the neuropathology of RTT and a disruption of the balance between excitation and inhibition, together with a perturbation of the electrophysiological properties of GABA and glutamate neurons, were reported in the brain of the Mecp2-deficient mouse. However, to date, the extent and the nature of the GABA/glutamate deficit affecting the Mecp2-deficient mouse brain are unclear. In order to better characterize these deficits, we simultaneously analyzed the GABA and glutamate levels in Mecp2-deficient mice at 2 different ages (P35 and P55 and in several brain areas. We used a multilevel approach including the quantification of GABA and glutamate levels, as well as the quantification of the mRNA and protein expression levels of key genes involved in the GABAergic and glutamatergic pathways. Our results show that Mecp2-deficient mice displayed regional- and age-dependent variations in the GABA pathway and, to a lesser extent, in the glutamate pathway. The implication of the GABA pathway in the RTT neuropathology was further confirmed using an in vivo treatment with a GABA reuptake inhibitor that significantly improved the lifespan of Mecp2-deficient mice. Our results confirm that RTT mouse present a deficit in the GABAergic pathway and suggest that GABAergic modulators could be interesting therapeutic agents for this severe neurological disorder.

  2. Presynaptic Inputs to Any CNS Projection Neuron Identified by Dual Recombinant Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bráz, João M; Wang, Fan; Basbaum, Allan I

    2015-01-01

    Although neuroanatomical tracing studies have defined the origin and targets of major projection neurons (PN) of the central nervous system (CNS), there is much less information about the circuits that influence these neurons. Recently, genetic approaches that use Cre recombinase-dependent viral vectors have greatly facilitated such circuit analysis, but these tracing approaches are limited by the availability of Cre-expressing mouse lines and the difficulty in restricting Cre expression to discrete regions of the CNS. Here, we illustrate an alternative approach to drive Cre expression specifically in defined subsets of CNS projection neurons, so as to map both direct and indirect presynaptic inputs to these cells. The method involves a combination of Cre-dependent transneuronal viral tracers that can be used in the adult and that does not require genetically modified mice. To trigger Cre-expression we inject a Cre-expressing adenovirus that is retrogradely transported to the projection neurons of interest. The region containing the retrogradely labeled projection neurons is next injected with Cre-dependent pseudorabies or rabies vectors, which results in labeling of poly- and monosynaptic neuronal inputs, respectively. In proof-of-concept experiments, we used this novel tracing system to study the circuits that engage projection neurons of the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, neurons of the parabrachial nucleus of the dorsolateral pons that project to the amygdala and cortically-projecting neurons of the lateral geniculate nucleus. Importantly, because this dual viral tracing method does not require genetically derived Cre-expressing mouse lines, inputs to almost any projection system can be studied and the analysis can be performed in larger animals, such as the rat.

  3. Presynaptic Inputs to Any CNS Projection Neuron Identified by Dual Recombinant Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M Bráz

    Full Text Available Although neuroanatomical tracing studies have defined the origin and targets of major projection neurons (PN of the central nervous system (CNS, there is much less information about the circuits that influence these neurons. Recently, genetic approaches that use Cre recombinase-dependent viral vectors have greatly facilitated such circuit analysis, but these tracing approaches are limited by the availability of Cre-expressing mouse lines and the difficulty in restricting Cre expression to discrete regions of the CNS. Here, we illustrate an alternative approach to drive Cre expression specifically in defined subsets of CNS projection neurons, so as to map both direct and indirect presynaptic inputs to these cells. The method involves a combination of Cre-dependent transneuronal viral tracers that can be used in the adult and that does not require genetically modified mice. To trigger Cre-expression we inject a Cre-expressing adenovirus that is retrogradely transported to the projection neurons of interest. The region containing the retrogradely labeled projection neurons is next injected with Cre-dependent pseudorabies or rabies vectors, which results in labeling of poly- and monosynaptic neuronal inputs, respectively. In proof-of-concept experiments, we used this novel tracing system to study the circuits that engage projection neurons of the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, neurons of the parabrachial nucleus of the dorsolateral pons that project to the amygdala and cortically-projecting neurons of the lateral geniculate nucleus. Importantly, because this dual viral tracing method does not require genetically derived Cre-expressing mouse lines, inputs to almost any projection system can be studied and the analysis can be performed in larger animals, such as the rat.

  4. Active polysomes are present in the large presynaptic endings of the synaptosomal fraction from squid brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, M; Kaplan, B B; Martin, R; Alvarez, J; Chun, J T; Benech, J C; Giuditta, A

    1997-10-15

    Previous data have suggested that the large nerve terminals present in the synaptosomal fraction from squid optic lobe are capable of protein synthesis (Crispino et al., 1993a,b). We have further examined this issue by comparing the translation products of synaptosomal and microsomal polysomes. Both preparations programmed an active process of translation, which was completely abolished by their previous treatment with EDTA. After immunoabsorption of the newly synthesized neurofilament (NF) proteins, the labeling ratio of the 60 and 70 kDa NF proteins was found to differ, in agreement with comparable differences obtained with intact synaptosomes. These observations indicate that the set of mRNAs translated by synaptosomes differs from that translated by nerve cell bodies. Hence, because NF proteins are neuron-specific, they support the view that the active synaptosomal polysomes are mostly localized in the large nerve terminals that represent the most abundant neuronal component of the fraction. This hypothesis was confirmed (1) by electron spectroscopic data demonstrating the presence of ribosomes and polysomes within the large nerve endings of the synaptosomal fraction, as well as in the carrot-like nerve endings of the retinal photoreceptors that constitute the only large terminals in the optic lobe, and (2) by light and high resolution autoradiography of synaptosomal samples incubated with [3H]leucine, showing that most labeled proteins are associated with the large nerve endings. This response was abolished by cycloheximide. Taken together, the data provide the first unequivocal demonstration that presynaptic nerve terminals are capable of protein synthesis.

  5. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS): a rare autoimmune presynaptic disorder often associated with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoser, Benedikt; Eymard, Bruno; Datt, Joe; Mantegazza, Renato

    2017-09-01

    Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is a rare autoimmune neuromuscular junction disorder that is related to the loss of functional P/Q-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) on presynaptic nerve terminals. Up to 60% of cases occur as a paraneoplastic disorder (SCLC-LEMS), most commonly in association with small cell lung cancer. The remaining cases have an idiopathic non-tumor etiology but are associated with underlying autoimmune disease (NT-LEMS). Patients with LEMS invariably experience progressive proximal muscle weakness, often accompanied by general fatigue and autonomic symptoms. Some LEMS clinical symptoms overlap with those of other myasthenic syndromes, most commonly myasthenia gravis, which can contribute to misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis. Prognosis is related to the presence of cancer or autoimmune disease and the severity/distribution of muscle weakness. Cause of death in patients with SCLC-LEMS is typically tumor progression, whereas NT-LEMS does not reduce life expectancy. LEMS diagnosis is supported by a threefold approach: clinical features, electromyography, and anti-VGCC antibody serology. LEMS is a clinically important early indicator of possible cancer; therefore, a LEMS diagnosis should immediately prompt rigorous oncological screening and surveillance. Symptomatic treatment of LEMS typically involves medications that improve neurotransmission (e.g., the potassium channel blocker amifampridine [3,4-diaminopyridine]), with addition of immunosuppressants/modulators (e.g., prednisone plus azathioprine) in individuals with persistent symptoms. Where a tumor is identified, oncological treatment should take priority. It should be remembered, however, that LEMS has a significant impact on a patient's quality of life and ability to perform daily activities, and therefore warrants timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment in and of itself.

  6. Presynaptic [Ca2+] and GCAPs: aspects on the structure and function of photoreceptor ribbon synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eSchmitz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in intracellular calcium ions [Ca2+] play important roles in photoreceptor signalling. Consequently, intracellular [Ca2+] levels need to be tightly controlled. In the light-sensitive outer segments (OS of photoreceptors, Ca2+ regulates the activity of retinal guanylate cyclases (ret-GCs thus playing a central role in phototransduction and light-adaptation by restoring light-induced decreases in cGMP. In the synaptic terminals, changes of intracellular Ca2+ trigger various aspects of neurotransmission. Photoreceptors employ tonically active ribbon synapses that encode light-induced, graded changes of membrane potential into different rates of synaptic vesicle exocytosis. The active zones of ribbon synapses contain large electron-dense structures, synaptic ribbons, that are associated with large numbers of synaptic vesicles. Synaptic coding at ribbon synapses differs from synaptic coding at conventional (phasic synapses. Recent studies revealed new insights how synaptic ribbons are involved in this process. This review focuses on the regulation of [Ca2+] in presynaptic photoreceptor terminals and on the function of a particular Ca2+-regulated protein, the neuronal calcium sensor protein GCAP2 (guanylate cyclase-activating protein-2 in the photoreceptor ribbon synapse. GCAP2, an EF hand-containing protein plays multiple roles in the OS and in the photoreceptor synapse. In the OS, GCAP2 works as a Ca2+-sensor within a Ca2+-regulated feedback loop that adjusts cGMP levels. In the photoreceptor synapse, GCAP2 binds to RIBEYE, a component of synaptic ribbons, and mediates Ca2+-dependent plasticity at that site. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  7. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Laßek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network.

  8. In situ measurement of glutamate concentrations in the periportal, intermediate, and pericentral zones of rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, W. J.; Jonker, A.; Boon, L.; Meijer, A. J.; Charles, R.; van Noorden, C. J.; Lamers, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    We developed a quantitative histochemical assay for measurement of local glutamate concentrations in cryostat sections of rat liver. Deamination of glutamate by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was coupled to the production of formazan and formazan precipitation was used for colorimetric visualization.

  9. Identification and characterization of a bacterial glutamic peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Østergaard, Peter R; Wilting, Reinhard; Lassen, Søren F

    2010-12-01

    Glutamic peptidases, from the MEROPS family G1, are a distinct group of peptidases characterized by a catalytic dyad consisting of a glutamate and a glutamine residue, optimal activity at acidic pH and insensitivity towards the microbial derived protease inhibitor, pepstatin. Previously, only glutamic peptidases derived from filamentous fungi have been characterized. We report the first characterization of a bacterial glutamic peptidase (pepG1), derived from the thermoacidophilic bacteria Alicyclobacillus sp. DSM 15716. The amino acid sequence identity between pepG1 and known fungal glutamic peptidases is only 24-30% but homology modeling, the presence of the glutamate/glutamine catalytic dyad and a number of highly conserved motifs strongly support the inclusion of pepG1 as a glutamic peptidase. Phylogenetic analysis places pepG1 and other putative bacterial and archaeal glutamic peptidases in a cluster separate from the fungal glutamic peptidases, indicating a divergent and independent evolution of bacterial and fungal glutamic peptidases. Purification of pepG1, heterologously expressed in Bacillus subtilis, was performed using hydrophobic interaction chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. The purified peptidase was characterized with respect to its physical properties. Temperature and pH optimums were found to be 60°C and pH 3-4, in agreement with the values observed for the fungal members of family G1. In addition, pepG1 was found to be pepstatin-insensitive, a characteristic signature of glutamic peptidases. Based on the obtained results, we suggest that pepG1 can be added to the MEROPS family G1 as the first characterized bacterial member.

  10. Identification and characterization of a bacterial glutamic peptidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamic peptidases, from the MEROPS family G1, are a distinct group of peptidases characterized by a catalytic dyad consisting of a glutamate and a glutamine residue, optimal activity at acidic pH and insensitivity towards the microbial derived protease inhibitor, pepstatin. Previously, only glutamic peptidases derived from filamentous fungi have been characterized. Results We report the first characterization of a bacterial glutamic peptidase (pepG1, derived from the thermoacidophilic bacteria Alicyclobacillus sp. DSM 15716. The amino acid sequence identity between pepG1 and known fungal glutamic peptidases is only 24-30% but homology modeling, the presence of the glutamate/glutamine catalytic dyad and a number of highly conserved motifs strongly support the inclusion of pepG1 as a glutamic peptidase. Phylogenetic analysis places pepG1 and other putative bacterial and archaeal glutamic peptidases in a cluster separate from the fungal glutamic peptidases, indicating a divergent and independent evolution of bacterial and fungal glutamic peptidases. Purification of pepG1, heterologously expressed in Bacillus subtilis, was performed using hydrophobic interaction chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. The purified peptidase was characterized with respect to its physical properties. Temperature and pH optimums were found to be 60°C and pH 3-4, in agreement with the values observed for the fungal members of family G1. In addition, pepG1 was found to be pepstatin-insensitive, a characteristic signature of glutamic peptidases. Conclusions Based on the obtained results, we suggest that pepG1 can be added to the MEROPS family G1 as the first characterized bacterial member.

  11. Lycium chinensis Mill attenuates glutamate induced oxidative toxicity in PC12 cells by increasing antioxidant defense enzymes and down regulating ROS and Ca(2+) generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Opeyemi J; Chen, Hongxia; Zhou, Yifeng

    2016-03-11

    Lycium chinensis Mill is a famous traditional Chinese medicine which displays several medicinal activities including antioxidant and neuroprotective activities. However, the mechanism of action towards the neuroprotective action has not been fully elucidated. This work was aimed at investigating the neuroprotective effects of L. chinensis Mill against glutamate-induced oxidative neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. Oxidative cell death was induced with 5mM glutamate in PC12 cells. Cell viability, LDH release, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, GSH-Px, CAT and SOD antioxidant enzyme levels were measured. Our results indicated that pretreatment of PC12 cells with L. chinensis Mill extracts markedly attenuated the loss of cell viability, the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Ca(2+) overload, ROS generation, and cell apoptosis induced by glutamate toxicity. Furthermore, L. chinensis Mill extracts also significantly increased the levels of innate antioxidant enzymes GSH-Px, SOD and CAT in glutamate-induced PC12 cells. Conclusively, our results provided substantial evidence that L. chinensis Mill protected PC12 cells against glutamate-induced cell death by attenuating ROS generation, Ca(2+) influx, and increased the antioxidant defense capacity of PC12 cells against oxidative stress damages, suggesting the possible potential of extracts from the plant as sources of bioactive molecules in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of glutamate regulated calcium entry into leukemic megakaryoblasts reduces cell proliferation and supports differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Tania; Green, Taryn N; Morel-Kopp, Marie-Christine; Ward, Christopher M; McGregor, Ailsa L; McGlashan, Susan R; Bohlander, Stefan K; Browett, Peter J; Teague, Lochie; During, Matthew J; Skerry, Timothy M; Josefsson, Emma C; Kalev-Zylinska, Maggie L

    2015-09-01

    Human megakaryocytes release glutamate and express glutamate-gated Ca(2+)-permeable N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) that support megakaryocytic maturation. While deregulated glutamate pathways impact oncogenicity in some cancers, the role of glutamate and NMDARs in megakaryocytic malignancies remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDARs participate in Ca(2+) responses in leukemic megakaryoblasts and if so, whether modulating NMDAR activity could influence cell growth. Three human cell lines, Meg-01, Set-2 and K-562 were used as models of leukemic megakaryoblasts. NMDAR components were examined in leukemic cells and human bone marrow, including in megakaryocytic disease. Well-established NMDAR modulators (agonists and antagonists) were employed to determine NMDAR effects on Ca(2+) flux, cell viability, proliferation and differentiation. Leukemic megakaryoblasts contained combinations of NMDAR subunits that differed from normal bone marrow and the brain. NMDAR agonists facilitated Ca(2+) entry into Meg-01 cells, amplified Ca(2+) responses to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and promoted growth of Meg-01, Set-2 and K-562 cells. Low concentrations of NMDAR inhibitors (riluzole, memantine, MK-801 and AP5; 5-100μM) were weakly cytotoxic but mainly reduced cell numbers by suppressing proliferation. The use-dependent NMDAR inhibitor, memantine (100μM), reduced numbers and proliferation of Meg-01 cells to less than 20% of controls (IC50 20μM and 36μM, respectively). In the presence of NMDAR inhibitors cells acquired morphologic and immunophenotypic features of megakaryocytic differentiation. In conclusion, NMDARs provide a novel pathway for Ca(2+) entry into leukemic megakaryoblasts that supports cell proliferation but not differentiation. NMDAR inhibitors counteract these effects, suggesting a novel opportunity to modulate growth of leukemic megakaryoblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel Inhibitors Complexed with Glutamate Dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Smith, Christopher J.; Walker, Matthew T.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate using NAD(P)+ as coenzyme. Unlike its counterparts from other animal kingdoms, mammalian GDH is regulated by a host of ligands. The recently discovered hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia disorder showed that the loss of allosteric inhibition of GDH by GTP causes excessive secretion of insulin. Subsequent studies demonstrated that wild-type and hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia forms of GDH are inhibited by the green tea polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate. This was followed by high throughput studies that identified more stable inhibitors, including hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol. Shown here are the structures of GDH complexed with these three compounds. Hexachlorophene forms a ring around the internal cavity in GDH through aromatic stacking interactions between the drug and GDH as well as between the drug molecules themselves. In contrast, GW5074 and bithionol both bind as pairs of stacked compounds at hexameric 2-fold axes between the dimers of subunits. The internal core of GDH contracts when the catalytic cleft closes during enzymatic turnover. None of the drugs cause conformational changes in the contact residues, but all bind to key interfaces involved in this contraction process. Therefore, it seems likely that the drugs inhibit enzymatic turnover by inhibiting this transition. Indeed, this expansion/contraction process may play a major role in the inter-subunit communication and allosteric regulation observed in GDH. PMID:19531491

  14. Glutamate Receptors in Neuroinflammatory Demyelinating Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system (CNS. The condition predominantly affects young adults and is characterised by immunological and inflammatory changes in the periphery and CNS that contribute to neurovascular disruption, haemopoietic cell invasion of target tissues, and demyelination of nerve fibres which culminate in neurological deficits that relapse and remit or are progressive. The main features of MS can be reproduced in the inducible animal counterpart, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. The search for new MS treatments invariably employs EAE to determine drug activity and provide a rationale for exploring clinical efficacy. The preclinical development of compounds for MS has generally followed a conventional, immunotherapeutic route. However, over the past decade, a group of compounds that suppress EAE but have no apparent immunomodulatory activity have emerged. These drugs interact with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA and α -amino-3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA/kainate family of glutamate receptors reported to control neurovascular permeability, inflammatory mediator synthesis, and resident glial cell functions including CNS myelination. The review considers the importance of the glutamate receptors in EAE and MS pathogenesis. The use of receptor antagonists to control EAE is also discussed together with the possibility of therapeutic application in demyelinating disease.

  15. Influence of the glutamic acid content of the diet on the catabolic rate of labelled glutamic acid in rats. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, O.; Wilke, A.; Bergner, H.

    1984-01-01

    Mal rats received during a 8 days experimental feeding period diets with different contents in glutamic acid. The daily feed intake was restricted to the energy maintenance level of 460 kJ/kg/sup 0.75/. The diet contained a mixture of L-amino acids corresponding to the pattern of egg protein except glutamic acid. Glutamic acid was added successively at 10 levels (0 to 14.8 % of dry matter) and the resulting diets were fed to groups of 4 animals each. At the end of the experimental feeding period 14 C- and 15 N-labelled glutamic acid were applied by intragastric infusion. CO 2 and 14 CO 2 excretion was measured during the following 4 hours and the urinary N and 15 N excretion during the following 24 hours. The CO 2 excretion decreased from 53 to 44 mmol CO 2 /100g body weight with increasing levels of dietary glutamic acid. This change seems to result from the increasing proportion of amino acids as an energetic fuel. While the amount of oxidized glutamic acid increased with increasing supplements of glutamic acid the relative 14 CO 2 excretion decreased from 57 to 48 % of the applied radioactivity. The urinary 15 N excretion during 24 hours was 31 % of the given amount of 15 N if no glutamic acid was included in the diet. This proportion increased successively up to 52 % in the case of the highest supply of glutamic acid. Because the total N excretion increased at the same extent as the 15 N excretion a complete mixing of the NH 2 groups resulting from glutamic acid due to desamination with the ammonia pool was assumed. No correlation between glutamic acid content of the diet and specific radioactivity of CO 2 or atom-% 15 N excess of urinary N was observed. (author)

  16. Application of a glutamate microsensor to brain tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenziel, Weite Hendrik

    2006-01-01

    The amino acid l-glutamate is one of the most important neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS). It is involved in many physiological processes and consequently in the pathophysiology of several psychiatric, neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, glutamate is an

  17. Histochemical Studies of the Effects of Monosodium Glutamate on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a commonly used food additive and there is growing concern that excitotoxins such as MSG play a critical role in the development of several hepatic disorders. Objectives: The histochemical effect of monosodium glutamate was investigated on the liver of adult Wistar rats.

  18. probing the cob(ii)alamin conductor hypothesis with glutamate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    Glutamate mutase activity was also demonstrated upon incubation of GlmS and E with 3',5'- ... overproduced in E.coli (Huhta et al. 2001,. Huhta et ..... Biochemistry. 37: 9704-9715. Buckel W 2001 Unusual enzymes involved in five pathways of glutamate fermentation. Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 57: 263-273. Buckel W and ...

  19. Microscopic picture of the aqueous solvation of glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, E.J.M.; Bolhuis, P.G.; Meijer, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of glutamic acid and glutamate solvated in water, using both density functional theory (DFT) and the Gromos96 force field. We focus on the microscopic aspects of the solvation−particularly on the hydrogen bond structures and dynamics−and investigate the

  20. Surface grafting of poly(L-glutamates). 3. Block copolymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, RH; Siesling, EA; Werkman, PJ; Vorenkamp, EJ; Schouten, AJ

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes for the first time the synthesis of surface-grafted AB-block copolypeptides, consisting of poly(gamma -benzyl L-glutamate) (PBLG) as the A-block and poly(gamma -methyl L-glutamate) (PMLG) as the B-block. Immobilized primary amine groups of (,gamma -aminopropyl)triethoxysilane

  1. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13...

  2. Electrochemical Synthesis of Polypyrrole Layers Doped with Glutamic Ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meteleva-Fischer, Yulia V.; Von Hauff, Elizabeth; Parisi, Juergen

    2009-01-01

    Electrochemically synthesized polypyrrole thin films doped with glutamic ions were investigated as interesting materials for potential use as molecularly selective surfaces. Pyrrole and glutamate interact in aqueous solution, resulting in the formation of a prominent band at 240 nm in the absorption

  3. Dietary glutamate will not affect pain in fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geenen, R.; Janssens, E.L.; Jacobs, J.W.G.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2004-01-01

    Injection of glutamate into the masseter muscle has been suggested-to evoke an increase in intensity of and sensitivity to pain. A case study showed that a diet low in monosodium glutamate (MSG) might accomplish pain relief in fibromyalgia (FM). To clarify the possible pain-modulating effect of

  4. Histological Studies of the Effects of Monosodium Glutamate on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a commonly used food additive and there is growing concern that this may play a critical role in the aethiopathogenesis of anovulatory infertility. Objectives: The effect of monosodium glutamate (MSG) used as food additive on the ovaries of adult Wistar rat was investigated.

  5. N-Ethylmaleimide Dissociates α7 ACh Receptor from a Complex with NSF and Promotes Its Delivery to the Presynaptic Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2016-08-01

    N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM)-sensitive factor (NSF) associates with soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP), that binds to SNAP receptors (SNAREs) including syntaxin, SNAP25, and synaptobrevin. The complex of NSF/SNAP/SNAREs plays a critical role in the regulation of vesicular traffic. The present study investigated NEM-regulated α7 ACh receptor translocation. NSF associated with β-SNAP and the SNAREs syntaxin 1 and synaptobrevin 2 in the rat hippocampus. NSF also associated with the α7 ACh receptor subunit, the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA2, and the γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor γ2 subunit. NEM, an inhibitor of NSF, significantly dissociated the α7 ACh receptor subunit from a complex with NSF and increased cell surface localization of the receptor subunit, but such effect was not obtained with the GluA1, GluA2 or γ2 subunits. NEM, alternatively, dissociated synaptobrevin 2 from an assembly of NSF/β-SNAP/syntaxin 1/synaptobrevin 2. NEM significantly increased the rate of nicotine-triggered AMPA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, without affecting the amplitude, in rat hippocampal slices. The results of the present study indicate that NEM releases the α7 ACh receptor subunit and synaptobrevin 2 from an assembly of α7 ACh receptor subunit/NSF/β-SNAP/syntaxin 1/synaptobrevin 2, thereby promoting delivery of the α7 ACh receptor subunit to presynaptic membrane.

  6. The determination of presynaptic pA2 values of yohimbine and phentolamine on the perfused rat heart under conditions of negligible autoinhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuder, H.; Muscholl, E.; Spemann, R.

    1983-01-01

    1 Rat isolated perfused hearts with the right sympathetic nerves attached were loaded with [3H]-(-)-noradrenaline. The nerves were stimulated with up to 40 trains of 10 pulses every min at 1 Hz, and the evoked increases of [3H-]noradrenaline overflow into the perfusate, of right atrial tension development and ventricular beating frequency were measured. 2 Oxymetazoline inhibited the evoked transmitter overflow (IC50: 10 nM) and decreased the postsynaptic responses in a concentration-dependent manner. It behaved as a full against in abolishing the evoked transmitter overflow. 3 Yohimbine up to 1 microM neither enhanced the evoked [3H]-noradrenaline overflow nor the postsynaptic parameters. Phentolamine (1 microM) caused a transient, minor (less than 30%) increase in [3H]-noradrenaline overflow. 4 Yohimbine (0.03-1.0 microM) and phentolamine (0.1-5.0 microM) shifted to the right the concentration-response curve of oxymetazoline for the inhibition of [3H]-noradrenaline overflow in response to nerve stimulation without depressing the maxima. The pA2 values were 7.82 and 7.52, respectively. 5 Yohimbine (0.1 microM) also antagonized the decrease induced by oxymetazoline in the postsynaptic responses to nerve stimulation. 6 The results confirm the existence of presynaptic inhibitory alpha 2-adrenoceptors at the adrenergic nerve fibres of the rat heart in vitro. Under the stimulation and perfusion conditions selected, the released endogenous transmitter apparently does not activate a negative feedback mechanism, thus permitting the determination of pA2 values. PMID:6307450

  7. Role for voltage gated calcium channels in calcitonin gene-related peptide release in the rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amrutkar, D V; Ploug, K B; Olesen, J

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons and are i......Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons...... and are involved in the release of these peptides to different stimuli. We have examined the presence and importance of VGCCs in controlling the CGRP release from rat dura mater, freshly isolated trigeminal ganglion (TG) and trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Each of the four VGCCs, P/Q-, N-, and L- and T...... the potassium induced CGRP release. In the absence of calcium ions (Ca2+) and in the presence of a cocktail of blockers, the stimulated CGRP release from dura mater was reduced almost to the same level as basal CGRP release. In the TG ¿-conotoxin GVIA inhibited the potassium induced CGRP release significantly...

  8. Role for voltage gated calcium channels in calcitonin gene-related peptide release in the rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amrutkar, D V; Ploug, K B; Olesen, J

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons and are i......Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons...... and are involved in the release of these peptides to different stimuli. We have examined the presence and importance of VGCCs in controlling the CGRP release from rat dura mater, freshly isolated trigeminal ganglion (TG) and trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Each of the four VGCCs, P/Q-, N-, and L- and T...... the potassium induced CGRP release. In the absence of calcium ions (Ca2+) and in the presence of a cocktail of blockers, the stimulated CGRP release from dura mater was reduced almost to the same level as basal CGRP release. In the TG ω-conotoxin GVIA inhibited the potassium induced CGRP release significantly...

  9. Production of poly-γ-glutamic acid by a thermotolerant glutamate-independent strain and comparative analysis of the glutamate dependent difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Chen, Guiguang; Guo, Ye; Zhang, Bin; Dong, Mengna; Wu, Yange; Wang, Jun; Che, Zhiqun; Liang, Zhiqun

    2017-11-25

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a promising microbial polymer with wide applications in industry, agriculture and medicine. In this study, a novel glutamate-independent γ-PGA producing strain with thermotolerant characteristics was isolated and identified as Bacillus subtilis GXG-5, then its product was also characterized. The fermentation process was optimized by single-factor tests, and results showed that high temperature (50 °C) was especially suitable for the γ-PGA production by GXG-5. The γ-PGA yield reached 19.50 ± 0.75 g/L with substrate conversion efficiency of 78% at 50 °C in 10 L fermentor. Comparison of GXG-5 and GXA-28 (glutamate-dependent strain) under respective optimal fermentation conditions, the γ-PGA yield of GXG-5 was 19.0% higher than that of GXA-28, and GXG-5 was also superior to GXA-28 in the availability of carbon sources and substrates. Furthermore, the glutamate dependent difference between GXA-28 and GXG-5 was analyzed by genomic sequencing, results indicated that genes related to the glutamate dependent difference mainly involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism and amino acid metabolism, and 13 genes related to γ-PGA synthesis were mutated in GXG-5. This study provided a potential glutamate-independent strain to replace glutamate-dependent strain for γ-PGA production, and shared novel information for understanding the glutamate dependent difference at the genomic level.

  10. The Role of Cysteine String Protein α Phosphorylation at Serine 10 and 34 by Protein Kinase Cγ for Presynaptic Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirafuji, Toshihiko; Ueyama, Takehiko; Adachi, Naoko; Yoshino, Ken-Ichi; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Uwada, Junsuke; Kaneoka, Azumi; Ueda, Taro; Tanaka, Shigeru; Hide, Izumi; Saito, Naoaki; Sakai, Norio

    2018-01-10

    Protein kinase Cγ (PKCγ) knock-out (KO) animals exhibit symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), including dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra. However, the PKCγ substrates responsible for the survival of dopaminergic neurons in vivo have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we found 10 potent substrates in the striatum of PKCγ-KO mice. Here, we focused on cysteine string protein α (CSPα), a protein from the heat shock protein (HSP) 40 cochaperone families localized on synaptic vesicles. We found that in cultured cells, PKCγ phosphorylates CSPα at serine (Ser) 10 and Ser34. Additionally, apoptosis was found to have been enhanced by the overexpression of a phosphorylation-null mutant of CSPα, CSPα(S10A/S34A). Compared with wild-type (WT) CSPα, the CSPα(S10A/S34A) mutant had a weaker interaction with HSP70. However, in sharp contrast, a phosphomimetic CSPα(S10D/S34D) mutant, compared with WT CSPα, had a stronger interaction with HSP70. In addition, total levels of synaptosomal-associated protein (SNAP) 25, a main downstream target of the HSC70/HSP70 chaperone complex, were found to have decreased by the CSPα(S10A/S34A) mutant through increased ubiquitination of SNAP25 in PC12 cells. In the striatum of 2-year-old male PKCγ-KO mice, decreased phosphorylation levels of CSPα and decreased SNAP25 protein levels were observed. These findings indicate the phosphorylation of CSPα by PKCγ may protect the presynaptic terminal from neurodegeneration. The PKCγ-CSPα-HSC70/HSP70-SNAP25 axis, because of its role in protecting the presynaptic terminal, may provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cysteine string protein α (CSPα) is a protein belonging to the heat shock protein (HSP) 40 cochaperone families localized on synaptic vesicles, which maintain the presynaptic terminal. However, the function of CSPα phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) for neuronal cell survival remains unclear. The experiments

  11. Effects of phenolic constituents of daylily flowers on corticosterone- and glutamate-treated PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huan; Yang, Fei-Fei; Liu, Chun-Yu; Liu, Xin-Min; Pan, Rui-Le; Chang, Qi; Zhang, Ze-Sheng; Liao, Yong-Hong

    2017-01-21

    Daylily flowers, the flower and bud parts of Hemerocallis citrina or H. fulva, are well known as Wang-You-Cao in Chinese, meaning forget-one's sadness plant. However, the major types of active constituents responsible for the neurological effects remain unclear. This study was to examine the protective effects of hydroalcoholic extract and fractions and to identify the active fractions. The extract of daylily flowers was separated with AB-8 resin into different fractions containing non-phenolic compounds, phenolic acid derivatives and flavonoids as determined using UPLC-DAD chromatograms. The neuroprotective activity was measured by evaluating the cell viability and lactate dehydrogenase release using PC12 cell damage models induced by corticosterone and glutamate. The neurological mechanisms were explored by determining their effect on the levels of dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), noradrenaline (NE) and acetylcholine (ACh) in the cell culture medium measured using an LC-MS/MS method. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with the extract and phenolic fractions of daylily flowers at concentrations ranging from 0.63 to 5 mg raw material/mL significantly reversed corticosterone- and glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner. The fractions containing phenolic acid derivatives (0.59% w/w in the flowers) and/or flavonoids (0.60% w/w) exerted similar dose-dependent neuroprotective effect whereas the fractions with non-phenolic compounds exhibited no activity. The presence of phenolic acid derivatives in the corticosterone- and glutamate-treated PC12 cells elevated the DA level in the cell culture medium whereas flavonoids resulted in increased ACH and 5-HT levels. Phenolic acid derivatives and flavonoids were likely the active constituents of daylily flowers and they conferred a similar extent of neuroprotection, but affected the release of neurotransmitters in a different manner.

  12. Mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity induced by glyphosate-based herbicide in immature rat hippocampus: Involvement of glutamate excitotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattani, Daiane; Oliveira Cavalli, Liz Vera Lúcia de; Heinz Rieg, Carla Elise; Domingues, Juliana Tonietto; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Tasca, Carla Inês; Mena Barreto Silva, Fátima Regina; Zamoner, Ariane

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Roundup ® induces Ca 2+ influx through L-VDCC and NMDA receptor activation. • The mechanisms underlying Roundup ® neurotoxicity involve glutamatergic excitotoxicity. • Kinase pathways participate in Roundup ® -induced neural toxicity. • Roundup ® alters glutamate uptake, release and metabolism in hippocampal cells. - Abstract: Previous studies demonstrate that glyphosate exposure is associated with oxidative damage and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the mechanism of glyphosate-induced neurotoxic effects needs to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Roundup ® (a glyphosate-based herbicide) leads to neurotoxicity in hippocampus of immature rats following acute (30 min) and chronic (pregnancy and lactation) pesticide exposure. Maternal exposure to pesticide was undertaken by treating dams orally with 1% Roundup ® (0.38% glyphosate) during pregnancy and lactation (till 15-day-old). Hippocampal slices from 15 day old rats were acutely exposed to Roundup ® (0.00005–0.1%) during 30 min and experiments were carried out to determine whether glyphosate affects 45 Ca 2+ influx and cell viability. Moreover, we investigated the pesticide effects on oxidative stress parameters, 14 C-α-methyl-amino-isobutyric acid ( 14 C-MeAIB) accumulation, as well as glutamate uptake, release and metabolism. Results showed that acute exposure to Roundup ® (30 min) increases 45 Ca 2+ influx by activating NMDA receptors and voltage-dependent Ca 2+ channels, leading to oxidative stress and neural cell death. The mechanisms underlying Roundup ® -induced neurotoxicity also involve the activation of CaMKII and ERK. Moreover, acute exposure to Roundup ® increased 3 H-glutamate released into the synaptic cleft, decreased GSH content and increased the lipoperoxidation, characterizing excitotoxicity and oxidative damage. We also observed that both acute and chronic exposure to Roundup ® decreased 3 H-glutamate uptake and

  13. Modulation of neurotransmitter release in the region of the caudate nucleus by diet and neurotoxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurstjens, N.P.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis the effects of dietary manipulation, ethanol and neurotoxins on the basal and electrically evoked release of dopamine and acetylcholine from the caudate nucleus of mature animals are presented together with an evaluation of the presynaptic acetylcholine and dopamine receptors controlling acetylcholine and dopamine release. A standardised superfusion technique was used to monitor the effect of apomorphine, in the presence of (R-S)- sulpiride or haloperidol, on the electrically induced release of ( 3 H)-acetylcholine in slices of rat corpus striatum. The effect of ethanol and dietary manipulation on the basal and electrically evoke release of ( 3 H)-acetylfholine from rat striatal slices, in the presence of specific agonists and antagonists was evaluated. From this study it is possible to deduce that diet and neurotoxins exerted a measurable effect on the mechanisms controlling release of neurotransmitters in the region of the caudate nucleus. These changes were determined in mature animals previously considered to have cerebral activity, which was not subject to dietary fluctuaations. No changes in the activity of the presynaptic dopamine receptor of the acetylcholine nerve terminals of the striatal slice could be measured

  14. Calcium regulates glutamate dehydrogenase and poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis in Bacillus natto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yonghong; Dong, Guiru; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yuling; Chen, Weifeng

    2016-04-01

    To study the effect of Ca(2+) on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and its role in poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) synthesis in Bacillus natto HSF 1410. When the concentration of Ca(2+) varied from 0 to 0.1 g/l in the growth medium of B. natto HSF 1410, γ-PGA production increased from 6.8 to 9.7 g/l, while GDH specific activity and NH4Cl consumption improved from 183 to 295 U/mg and from 0.65 to 0.77 g/l, respectively. GDH with α-ketoglutarate as substrate primarily used NADPH as coenzyme with a K m of 0.08 mM. GDH was responsible for the synthesis of endogenous glutamate. The specific activity of GDH remained essentially unchanged in the presence of CaCl2 (0.05-0.2 g/l) in vitro. However, the specific activity of GDH and its expression was significantly increased by CaCl2 in vivo. Therefore, the regulation of GDH and PGA synthesis by Ca(2+) is an intracellular process. Calcium regulation may be an effective approach for producing γ-PGA on an industrial scale.

  15. Glutamate and GABA in appetite regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)<