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Sample records for presurgical orthodontic treatment

  1. Early orthognathic surgery with three-dimensional image simulation during presurgical orthodontics in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Moon-Key; Park, Sun-Yeon; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Park, Wonse; Lee, Sang-Hwy

    2011-03-01

    To correct dentofacial deformities, three-dimensional skeletal analysis and computerized orthognathic surgery simulation are used to facilitate accurate diagnoses and surgical plans. Computed tomography imaging of dental occlusion can inform three-dimensional facial analyses and orthognathic surgical simulations. Furthermore, three-dimensional laser scans of a cast model of the predetermined postoperative dental occlusion can be used to increase the accuracy of the preoperative surgical simulation. In this study, we prepared cast models of planned postoperative dental occlusions from 12 patients diagnosed with skeletal class III malocclusions with mandibular prognathism and facial asymmetry that had planned to undergo bimaxillary orthognathic surgery during preoperative orthodontic treatment. The data from three-dimensional laser scans of the cast models were used in three-dimensional surgical simulations. Early orthognathic surgeries were performed based on three-dimensional image simulations using the cast images in several presurgical orthodontic states in which teeth alignment, leveling, and space closure were incomplete. After postoperative orthodontic treatments, intraoral examinations revealed that no patient had a posterior open bite or space. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional skeletal analyses showed that no mandibular deviations occurred between the immediate and final postoperative states of orthodontic treatment. These results showed that early orthognathic surgery with three-dimensional computerized simulations based on cast models of predetermined postoperative dental occlusions could provide early correction of facial deformities and improved efficacy of preoperative orthodontic treatment. This approach can reduce the decompensation treatment period of the presurgical orthodontics and contribute to efficient postoperative orthodontic treatments.

  2. [Preprosthetic orthodontic treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prahl-Andersen, B.; Prahl, C.; Baat, C. de; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of a preprosthetic orthodontic treatment is to position the teeth in such a way that a treatment with (fixed) dental prostheses is made possible or simplified or to affect the result of this treatment positively. Conceivable preprosthetic orthodontic treatments are: correcting primary

  3. [Accelerated orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, A M L; Hoogeveen, E J; Jansma, J; Ren, Y

    2015-11-01

    An orthodontic treatment usually involves a long process which often represents an obstacle for patients. To overcome this problem, surgical techniques have been developed to support and accelerate the orthodontic treatment. Two systematic reviews of the literature on clinical research and animal experiments were carried out in order to draw reliable conclusions about the effectiveness of the various surgical techniques. A total of 18 clinical studies and 22 animal experimental studies were analysed. In both reviews of the literature, a study was made of whether the surgical techniques resulted in an accelerated rate of tooth movement and which complications may be observed. In addition, which biological mechanisms take place during surgically facilitated orthodontics was investigated. Both reviews reported accelerated tooth movement with minimal complications after surgical procedures in comparison to conventional orthodontics. An increase in catabolic and anabolic activities was observed. It has to be concluded that based on the quality of the current literature there is still insufficient information for general conclusions and that more standardised prospective research is necessary for a reliable conclusion about the optimal method of treatment.

  4. Oral health: orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Improper tooth alignment due to crowding, malocclusion, and missing teeth can cause difficulties with eating and speech, and premature wear. It is estimated that more than 20% of children would benefit from orthodontic treatment to correct these conditions, many of which will persist into adulthood if not corrected. Orthodontic care is gaining popularity among adults for similar concerns, as well as for correction of cosmetic issues. The psychological effects of malocclusion should not be ignored. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that all children undergo evaluation at the first recognition of an orthodontic condition and no later than age 7 years. Some children will need early treatment to help eliminate developing conditions and improve the foundations of the bite, which can ease later treatment in adolescence. For others, treatment in adolescence without early treatment is recommended. Standard cemented braces or clear, removable aligners may be used, depending on the patient's corrective needs. Average treatment time is approximately 2 years; this may be shortened by the use of accelerative techniques. Routine preventive dental care should be continued during the treatment period. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  5. [Class III surgical patients facilitated by accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia-qi; Xu, Li; Liang, Cheng; Zou, Wei; Bai, Yun-yang; Jiang, Jiu-hui

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the treatment time and the anterior and posterior teeth movement pattern as closing extraction space for the Class III surgical patients facilitated by accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatment. There were 10 skeletal Class III patients in accelerated osteogenic orthodontic group (AOO) and 10 patients in control group. Upper first premolars were extracted in all patients. After leveling and alignment (T2), corticotomy was performed in the area of maxillary anterior teeth to accelerate space closing.Study models of upper dentition were taken before orthodontic treatment (T1) and after space closing (T3). All the casts were laser scanned, and the distances of the movement of incisors and molars were digitally measured. The distances of tooth movement in two groups were recorded and analyzed. The alignment time between two groups was not statistically significant. The treatment time in AOO group from T2 to T3 was less than that in the control group (less than 9.1 ± 4.1 months). The treatment time in AOO group from T1 to T3 was less than that in the control group (less than 6.3 ± 4.8 months), and the differences were significant (P 0.05). Accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatment could accelerate space closing in Class III surgical patients and shorten preoperative orthodontic time. There were no influence on the movement pattern of anterior and posterior teeth during pre-surgical orthodontic treatment.

  6. Adjunctive orthodontic treatment with lingual orthodontic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, D; Humagain, M; Upadhaya, C

    2011-01-01

    The lingual orthodontic therapy though started in 1972, could not be popular till the beginning of 1990. In Nepal it does not have a history of more than a year. It is started in Dhulikhel Hospital for the first time in Nepal. Usually orthodontic therapy is meant for putting braces on the labial surface of the teeth which is called labial orthodontic system. Lingual orthodontic system is a purely invisible kind of orthodontic therapy in which braces are placed behind the teeth. The advantages of lingual orthodontic therapy are: invisibility, better biomechanics and improved patient compliance. On the other hand it is difficult to master and costlier than labial orthodontics. We have presented six adjunctive orthodontic cases treated by lingual system with the same end result comparable to labial orthodontic system.

  7. Clear aligners in orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, T

    2017-03-01

    Since the introduction of the Tooth Positioner (TP Orthodontics) in 1944, removable appliances analogous to clear aligners have been employed for mild to moderate orthodontic tooth movements. Clear aligner therapy has been a part of orthodontic practice for decades, but has, particularly since the introduction of Invisalign appliances (Align Technology) in 1998, become an increasingly common addition to the orthodontic armamentarium. An internet search reveals at least 27 different clear aligner products currently on offer for orthodontic treatment. The present paper will highlight the increasing popularity of clear aligner appliances, as well as the clinical scope and the limitations of aligner therapy in general. Further, the paper will outline the differences between the various types of clear aligner products currently available. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Difference in the Surgical Outcome of Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients with and without Pre-Alveolar Bone Graft Orthodontic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Shin; Wallace, Christopher Glenn; Hsiao, Yen-Chang; Chiu, Yu-Ting; Pai, Betty Chien-Jung; Chen, I.-Ju; Liao, Yu-Fang; Liou, Eric Jen-Wein; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Chen, Jyh-Ping; Noordhoff, M. Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Presurgical orthodontic treatment before secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) is widely performed for cleft lip/palate patients. However, no randomized controlled trial has been published comparing SABG outcomes in patients with, and without, presurgical orthodontic treatment. This randomized, prospective, single-blinded trial was conducted between January 2012 and April 2015 to compare ABG volumes 6 months postoperatively between patients with and without presurgical orthodontic treatment. Twenty-four patients were enrolled and randomized and 22 patients completed follow-up. Patients who had presurgical orthodontics before SABG had significantly improved inclination (p < 0.001) and rotation (p < 0.001) of the central incisor adjacent to the defect, significantly improved ABG fill volume (0.81 ± 0.26 cm3 at 6 months compared to 0.59 ± 0.22 cm3 p < 0.05) and less residual alveolar bone defect (0.31 ± 0.08 cm3 at 6 months compared to s 0.55 ± 0.14 cm3 p < 0.001) compared to patients who did not have presurgical orthodontic treatment. In conclusion, orthodontic treatment combined with SABG results in superior bone volume when compared with conventional SABG alone.

  9. Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ali H.; Al-Saeed, Samar H.; Al-Maghlouth, Basma A.; Bahammam, Maha A.; Linjawi, Amal I.; El-Bialy, Tarek H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically review the literature to assess the quality of evidence related to corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment (CAOT) as adjunctive treatment in orthodontics. Methods: The study was conducted in the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between 2013 and 2014. Various electronic databases were searched and abstracts were retrieved. Defined inclusion criteria were then applied to the obtained original articles for further evaluation by 2 examiners independently. The criteria of selection included human, or animal studies, which assessed some aspects of CAOT and/or the biological principles behind it. Case reports and series were excluded. The quality of the studies was evaluated by the methodological score for clinical trials developed. Results: Fourteen articles were retrieved initially, but only 12 articles were finally selected for the study. The CAOT was found to accelerate tooth movement by 2-2.5 folds when compared with conventional orthodontic tooth movement. The CAOT was found safe on periodontal health and exhibits no or little risk of root resorption. A localized turnover of alveolar spongiosa and the absence of a hyalinized zone was the acceptable biological explanation of CAOT. There is no evidence to support that CAOT enhances the movement of ankylosed teeth, closing old extraction sites, post-orthodontic stability, or transverse expansion. Conclusions: Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment should be considered with caution. Long term randomized clinical trials are still needed. PMID:26108582

  10. [Iatrogenic risks in orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, G; D'Andria, A

    1991-09-01

    This first task of a dentist, regardless of his speciality, is to maintain de dentoperiodontal unit in the best of conditions and prevent possible iatrogenic damage. Particularly in orthodontic treatment, a sort of scaling of the dental crown in the debanding phase is advisable.

  11. Facial soft tissue changes after orthodontic treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-09

    Sep 9, 2013 ... Conclusion: There were significant changes in facial soft tissue esthetics after orthodontic treatment for class II and. III cases. ... Departments of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, 1Mevlana University, Konya ,Turkey. Access this ..... after functional appliance treatment.

  12. Need for orthodontic treatment among Tanzanian children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: This study provides baseline data on the need for orthodontic treatment among Tanzanian children that may be useful for the public oral health service to determine priority for orthodontic treatment as part of comprehensive child oral health care in Tanzania. East African Medical Journal Vol.81(1) 2004: 10-15 ...

  13. [Orthodontic treatment possibilities of allergic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitályos, Géza; Török, Judit; Márton, Ildikó; Szepesi, Marta; Radics, Tonde; Hegedus, Csaba

    2007-04-01

    During the past two decades the incidence of allergies against dental materials has been rising. The most common allergens are nickel, mercury, benzoxyl-peroxide, formaldehyde, MMA, HEMA, EGDMA and TEGDMA. Contact allergy develops in predisposed individuals as a consequence of environmental exposures to allergens. Although the relatively high frequency of contact allergies in children is well documented, its importance during orthodontic treatments is still often underestimated. The most common metal to cause dental allergic reactions is nickel. Nickel-containing metal alloys, such as nickel-titanium, are widely used in orthodontics because of their favorable physical properties. Coated wires (epoxi coating, teflon, etc.) are not only more aesthetic, but can play a role in the orthodontic treatment of patients with nickel allergy. In our case report we present two patients with nickel allergy, and their treatment with alternative orthodontic appliances. During the orthodontic treatment our patients did not have any objective or subjective allergy-related symptoms.

  14. [Does orthodontic treatment contribute to oral health?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, H

    2008-09-01

    The first part of this article is an edited Dutch summary of the paper "Oral-health-related benefits of orthodontic treatment" by Donald J. Burden in the special issue''Orthodontics: quality of care, quality of life'' in Seminars in Orthodontics (June 2007). Burden carried out a systematic review of the literature on some, historically claimed, beneficial influences of orthodontic treatment, such as reduced susceptibility to dental caries, periodontal disease, temporomandibular dysfunction, and traumatic injury. Based on the results of this review, Burden concludes that the oral health benefits of orthodontic intervention have not been demonstrated. The second part is a critical and balanced commentary on the content of the paper and on Burden's conclusions.

  15. Orthodontic Treatment Consideration in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadih, Ahmed; Al-Zayer, Maryam; Dabel, Sukainh; Alkhalaf, Ahmed; Al Mayyad, Ali; Bardisi, Wajdi; Alshammari, Shouq; Alsihati, Zainab

    2018-02-01

    Although orthodontic treatment is commonly indicated for young healthy individuals, recent trends showed an increase in number of older individuals undergoing orthodontic interventions. The increased age resulted in a proportionate increase in the prevalence of systemic diseases facing dentists during orthodontic procedures, especially diabetes mellitus. This necessitates that dentists should be aware of the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and its early signs particularly in teeth and oral cavity. It is also essential for them to understand the implications of diabetes on orthodontic treatment and the measures to be considered during managing those patients. In this review, we focused on the impact of diabetes mellitus on orthodontic treatment. We also summarized the data from previous studies that had explained the measures required to be taken into consideration during managing those patients. We included both human and animal studies to review in depth the pathophysiological mechanisms by which diabetes affects orthodontic treatment outcome. In conclusion, this review emphasizes the need to carefully identify early signs and symptoms of diabetes mellitus in patients demanding orthodontic treatment and to understand the considerations to be adopted before and during treating these patients.

  16. Accelerated orthodontic treatment - what's the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, P

    2017-03-01

    The demand and accessibility of orthodontic care has increased but has also been accompanied by patient requests for shorter treatment times. Longer orthodontic treatment increases the risk of decalcification, gingival recession, and root resorption and so shorter treatment times have multiple advantages as well as appealing to patient's desires. Numerous techniques and materials have been suggested to reduce treatment times but, in most cases, are based upon selected case reports with no prospective clinical trials to validate claims. The present review examines many of the current options purported to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement and the level of evidence presently available. There is some evidence to suggest that low-level laser therapy and a corticotomy involving the raising of a muco-periosteal flap are associated with accelerated orthodontic tooth movement; however, the current level of evidence is low to moderate in quality. For this reason, further research is required before routine application could be recommended. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Monitoring growth during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafari, J G; Shofer, F S; Laster, L L; Markowitz, D L; Silverton, S; Katz, S H

    1995-09-01

    The relationship between somatic growth and orthodontic treatment has been limited to the evaluation of body height and skeletal age relative to craniofacial development. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of anthropometric and biochemical measures of general growth with facial and occlusal changes during the early treatment of Class II Division 1 malocclusion. Findings are reported from 46 children, ages 7.20 to 12.85 years (skeletal ages, 5.75 to 12.75 years), who are enrolled in a prospective clinical trial. Body and knee heights were measured monthly, with a Holtain stadiometer and a Knee Height Measuring Device, respectively. Every three months, serum levels were measured of the hormone dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), an androgen associated with growth in midchildhood, and osteocalcin, an indicator of bone turnover. Significant correlations existed between knee height and various occlusal measurements, but mandibular length was not significantly correlated with knee height and DHEAS levels. Knee height correlated significantly (P osteocalcin only in 46% and 37% of the children, respectively. The results indicate that the evaluated biochemical measures, at the time intervals considered, may not increase the accuracy of growth depiction by physical measures alone (height and skeletal maturation).

  18. In-Office Bleaching During Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Mauricio Neves; Dutra, Hélio; Morais, Alexandre; Sgura, Ricardo; Devito-Moraes, André Guaraci

    2017-04-01

    To demonstrate that it is possible to pursue teeth whitening treatment protocols during orthodontic treatment with no esthetic loss. Many patients undergoing orthodontic treatment desire to have a straight and well aligned dentition, but also whiter teeth. For many years, it was believed that carrying out a whitening treatment with positioned orthodontic brackets in place would result in localized spots on the enamel labial surfaces of teeth. However, a deeper understanding of the bleaching process suggests that the oxidation caused by products, which results from hydrogen peroxide decomposition, are able to diffuse peripherally into the tooth structure and reach even that under the cemented brackets. Two in-office-bleaching treatments were performed in patients using orthodontic fixed braces in two or three 40-minute sessions using a 35% hydrogen peroxide. In-office bleaching is possible and effective, even with orthodontic brackets in position. The teeth were successfully bleached despite the presence of brackets. All biological criteria have been fulfilled satisfying patients' expectations of aligned and whitened teeth in less time than if treatments had been performed separately, with satisfactory results and no esthetic loss. The whitening of teeth is possible during orthodontic treatment with fixed braces without any esthetic loss. The in-office bleaching treatment with brackets in position also may act as a motivation factor, preventing patient withdrawal or treatment interruption. Therefore, at the end of the orthodontic treatment, the patient is able to display an aligned, functional and whitened smile. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:83-92, 2017). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Clear aligners for orthodontic treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidi, Hanieh; Graham, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    PubMed/Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical trials (CENTRAL), Web of Knowledge, SCOPUS, Google Scholar and LILACS databases. Clinical prospective and retrospective studies of orthodontic treatment with clear aligners on patients over the age of 15 that included clear descriptions of the materials and applied technique were included. Selection was undertaken independently by two reviewers. Two reviewers extracted data independently with study quality being assessed using the grading system described by the Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). A narrative summary of the findings was presented. Eleven studies involving a total of 480 patients were included consisting of two randomised controlled trials, five prospective studies and four retrospective studies. Six studies were considered to be of moderate quality, the remainder of limited quality. Most of the studies presented with methodological problems: small sample size, bias and confounding variables, lack of method error analysis, blinding in measurements, and deficient or missing statistical methods. The quality level of the studies was not sufficient to draw any evidence-based conclusions.

  20. Patients' and parents' concerns and decisions about orthodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kazanc?, Fatih; Aydo?an, Cihan; Alkan, ?zer

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients' and parents' expectations are important in orthodontic treatment decision making. The literature generally demonstrates the perceived benefits of orthodontic treatment, but patients' and their parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment have not been investigated comprehensively. The aim of this study was to identify patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment and compare them according to sex, age, and treatment demand level. Methods One hundred and eigh...

  1. [The impact of bisphosphonates on orthodontic treatment].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelmans, S.; Carels, C.E.L.

    2012-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are used in the treatment of various diseases which are associated with a disturbance of the balance between bone apposition and degradation. The most important complication of bisphosphonate use is osteonecrosis of the jaw. Certain components of an orthodontic treatment plan, such

  2. Delayed bracket placement in orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Wigati

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Beside bracket position, the timing of bracket placement is one of the most essential in orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. Even it seems simple the timing of bracket placement can be crucial and significantly influence the result of orthodontic treatment. However it is often found brackets are placed without complete understanding of its purpose and effects, which could be useless and even detrimental for the case. Purpose: The aim of this case report is to show that the timing of bracket placement could be different depending on the cases. Case: Five different cases are presented here with different timing of bracket placement. Case management: On these cases, brackets were placed on the upper arch first, on the lower arch first, or even only on some teeth first. Good and efficient orthodontic treatment results were achieved. Conclusion: For every orthodontic case, from the very beginning of treatment, bracket should be placed with the end result in mind. If brackets are correctly placed at a correct time, better treatment result could be achieved without unnecessary round tripping tooth movement.

  3. Surgically facilitated orthodontic treatment : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, Eelke J.; Jansma, Johan; Ren, Yijin

    INTRODUCTION: Corticotomy and dental distraction have been proposed as effective and safe methods to shorten orthodontic treatment duration in adolescent and adult patients. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the evidence supporting these claims. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane

  4. Piezosurgery®-assisted periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhare, Vikas Vilas; Khandait, Chinmay Harishchandra; Shrivastav, Sunita Satish; Dhadse, Prasad Vijayrao; Baliga, Vidya Sudhindhra; Seegavadi, Vasudevan Dwarkanathan

    2017-01-01

    Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontic procedure has become useful adjunct to reduce orthodontic treatment time as compared with conventional orthodontics. This case demonstrates the use of Piezosurgery ® to facilitate rapid tooth movement with relatively shorter treatment time. A 23-year-old male with Angles Class I malocclusion having spaced anterior teeth and protrusion requested orthodontic treatment with reduced time period. Before surgery, presurgical orthodontic treatment was done to do initial alignment of the teeth. This was followed by piezosurgical corticotomy and final space closure was achieved by active orthodontic tooth movement. The total treatment time required to complete the orthodontic treatment was 5 months. 1-year follow-up revealed no evidence of any adverse periodontal effects or relapse. Thus, Piezosurgery ® -assisted corticotomy may prove to be a noble and effective treatment approach to decrease the orthodontic treatment time.

  5. Piezosurgery®-assisted periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Vilas Pakhare

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontic procedure has become useful adjunct to reduce orthodontic treatment time as compared with conventional orthodontics. This case demonstrates the use of Piezosurgery® to facilitate rapid tooth movement with relatively shorter treatment time. A 23-year-old male with Angles Class I malocclusion having spaced anterior teeth and protrusion requested orthodontic treatment with reduced time period. Before surgery, presurgical orthodontic treatment was done to do initial alignment of the teeth. This was followed by piezosurgical corticotomy and final space closure was achieved by active orthodontic tooth movement. The total treatment time required to complete the orthodontic treatment was 5 months. 1-year follow-up revealed no evidence of any adverse periodontal effects or relapse. Thus, Piezosurgery®-assisted corticotomy may prove to be a noble and effective treatment approach to decrease the orthodontic treatment time.

  6. Adult orthodontics: multi- or interdisciplinary treatment approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melsen, Birte

    2007-01-01

    An increasing number of adult patients seen in the orthodontic offices are presenting with an ongoing degeneration caused either by loss of one or more teeth and/or progressing periodontal disease. The treatment of these patients can rarely stand alone and both diagnosis and treatment planning...... of the conservative approach practiced in many places within periodontology, it should be appreciated that any orthodontic tooth movement involving intrusive components should not be performed in the presence of pathological pockets. New regenerative periodontal treatment procedures have improved the prognosis...... for treatment of tooth movement even of teeth with vertical defects. The appliances should be selected taking the periodontal status and the eventual metabolic factors into consideration. The importance of the correct biomechanical system has a crucial influence on long-term prognosis for the dentition. Animal...

  7. Current status of presurgical infant orthopaedic treatment for cleft lip and palate patients: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjane, P. Priyanka; Kamble, R. H.; Diagavane, S. Pallavi; Shrivastav, S. Sunita; Batra, Puneet; Vasudevan, S. D.; Patil, Pushkar

    2014-01-01

    Rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients is a challenge for all the concerned members of the cleft team, and various treatment modalities have been attempted to obtain aesthetic results. Presurgical infant orthopaedics (PSIO) was introduced to reshape alveolar and nasal segments prior to surgical repair of cleft lip. However, literature reports lot of controversy regarding the use of PSIO in patients with CLP. Evaluation of long-term results of PSIO can provide scientific evidence on the efficacy and usefulness of PSIO in CLP patients. The aim was to assess the scientific evidence on the efficiency of PSIO appliances in patients with CLP and to critically analyse the current status of PSIO. A PubMed search was performed using the terms PSIO, presurgical nasoalveolar moulding and its long-term results and related articles were selected for the review. The documented studies report no beneficial effect of PSIO on maxillary arch dimensions, facial aesthetics and in the subsequent development of dentition and occlusion in CLP patients. Nasal moulding seems to be more beneficial and effective in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients with better long-term results. PMID:25593413

  8. Current status of presurgical infant orthopaedic treatment for cleft lip and palate patients: A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Priyanka Niranjane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate (CLP patients is a challenge for all the concerned members of the cleft team, and various treatment modalities have been attempted to obtain aesthetic results. Presurgical infant orthopaedics (PSIO was introduced to reshape alveolar and nasal segments prior to surgical repair of cleft lip. However, literature reports lot of controversy regarding the use of PSIO in patients with CLP. Evaluation of long-term results of PSIO can provide scientific evidence on the efficacy and usefulness of PSIO in CLP patients. The aim was to assess the scientific evidence on the efficiency of PSIO appliances in patients with CLP and to critically analyse the current status of PSIO. A PubMed search was performed using the terms PSIO, presurgical nasoalveolar moulding and its long-term results and related articles were selected for the review. The documented studies report no beneficial effect of PSIO on maxillary arch dimensions, facial aesthetics and in the subsequent development of dentition and occlusion in CLP patients. Nasal moulding seems to be more beneficial and effective in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients with better long-term results.

  9. Patients' and parents' concerns and decisions about orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazancı, Fatih; Aydoğan, Cihan; Alkan, Özer

    2016-01-01

    Patients' and parents' expectations are important in orthodontic treatment decision making. The literature generally demonstrates the perceived benefits of orthodontic treatment, but patients' and their parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment have not been investigated comprehensively. The aim of this study was to identify patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment and compare them according to sex, age, and treatment demand level. One hundred and eighty-nine children and their parents were interviewed about concerns related to orthodontic treatment. Patients and parents were asked about orthodontic treatment decisions. Answers were recorded as "yes," "no," or "don't know." Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare concerns between age groups, sexes, and treatment demand levels. Kappa statistics were used to assess agreement between patients and their parents. Concerns about orthodontic treatment were gathered under 10 items as follows: "feeling pain," "the appearance of braces," "being teased," "avoiding smiling," "speech problems," "dietary changes," "problems with transportation," "economic problems," "long treatment duration," and "missing school." There was no statistically significant difference in concerns between the sexes or age groups. Some concern items and treatment demand were inversely related in patients. The results of this study demonstrate patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment. Differences between the concerns of patients with different treatment demands imply that children might reject orthodontic treatment because of their concerns. Appropriate consultation of patients addressing their concerns may help reduce anxiety and improve the acceptance of treatment.

  10. Dental students perception of orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baswaraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The relationship between physical appearance and perception of an esthetic deviation, and the impact of such deviation on self-esteem and body image are important issues in determining the benefits of orthodontic treatment. Aim: To assess dental students′ perception of orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: A total of 230 undergraduate dental students of Government Dental College and Research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka formed the study group. Each classroom of the participants was visited, and self-administered questionnaire was given. An analysis of variance was done between the groups to test for statistical difference. Categorical variables were evaluated using a Chi-square test with the level of significance of P < 0.001. Results: About 75% of the students were aware of their dental esthetics. About 75% of females were satisfied with the attractiveness of their teeth when compared to 69% in males. House surgeons had more positive attitude compared to the 1 st year students. Conclusion: The dental students had good knowledge about the orthodontic treatment and had a positive attitude toward it. Females had very good knowledge, satisfaction and positive attitude compared to the males regarding dental esthetics and treatment. House surgeons were much more aware, very much satisfied and had a more positive attitude than 1 st year students.

  11. Orthodontic treatment of a patient with hypoglossia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Takuya; Sato, Chiemi; Kawakubo, Naomi; Moriyama, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case study was to provide a detailed report of the orthodontic approach used in treating a Japanese patient with congenital hypoglossia. The patient was a 6-year-old girl with hypoglossia, micrognathia, congenital absence of three incisors, and a telescopic occlusion accompanied by an extremely narrow lower arch. She had no limb anomalies, and her speech was normal. Bite opening and mandibular widening from the early mixed dentition dramatically improved the extremely constricted mandible and telescopic occlusion. Cephalometric tracings taken from the beginning to the end of active treatment revealed substantial forward and downward growth in the mandible over time, which may have contributed to correction of the intermaxillary relationship. Treatment of telescopic occlusion by bite opening and mandibular widening from the early mixed dentition may be effective in facilitating mandibular growth acceleration. An acceptable intermaxillary occlusal relationship and improvement of profile were achieved by an orthodontic approach in this case.

  12. Orthodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Incisor Extraction Case with Invisalign

    OpenAIRE

    Zawawi, Khalid H.

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction for orthodontic treatment is considered an unusual treatment option because of the limited number of patients that meet the criteria for such treatment. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning is essential to achieve the desired results. Adult orthodontic patients are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations and reject the idea of conventional fixed appliances. In recent years, Invisalign appliances have gained tremendous attention for orthodontic trea...

  13. An Intelligibility Assessment of Toddlers with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Received and Did Not Receive Presurgical Infant Orthopedic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konst, Emmy M.; Weersink-Braks, Hanny; Rietveld, Toni; Peters, Herman

    2000-01-01

    The influence of presurgical infant orthopedic treatment (PIO) on speech intelligibility was evaluated with 10 toddlers who used PIO during the first year of life and 10 who did not. Treated children were rated as exhibiting greater intelligibility, however, transcription data indicated there were not group differences in actual intelligibility.…

  14. Surgical-orthodontic treatment of Class III malocclusion with agenesis of lateral incisor and unerupted canine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Boaventura Vieira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Orthodontic-surgical treatment was performed in patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion due to exceeding mandibular growth. Patient also presented upper and lower dental protrusion, overjet of -3.0 mm, overbite of -1.0 mm, congenital absence of tooth #22, teeth #13 and supernumerary impaction, tooth #12 with conoid shape and partly erupted in supraversion, prolonged retention of tooth #53, tendency to vertical growth of the face and facial asymmetry. The discrepancy on the upper arch was -2.0 mm and -5.0 mm on the lower arch. METHODS: The pre-surgical orthodontic treatment was performed with extractions of the teeth #35 and #45. On the upper arch, teeth #53, #12 and supernumerary were extracted to accomplish the traction of the impacted canine. The spaces of the lower extractions were closed with mesialization of posterior segment. After aligning and leveling the teeth, extractions spaces closure and correct positioning of teeth on the bone bases, the correct intercuspation of the dental arch, with molars and canines in Angle's Class I, coincident midline, normal overjet and overbite and ideal torques, were evaluated through study models. The patient was submitted to orthognathic surgery and then the post-surgical orthodontic treatment was finished. RESULTS: The Class III malocclusion was treated establishing occlusal and facial normal standards.

  15. Orthodontic treatment in patients with reduced periodontal insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Labayle Couhat Carraro; Cristina Jimenez-Pellegrin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review to investigate orthodontic treatment in periodontal patients. Periodontal disease causes loss of attachment that results in pathological dental migration Periodontal disease can affect young persons and adults, with a higher incidence in adults, so that the number of adults seeking orthodontic treatment has increased significantly. The periodontal disease must be controlled before the orthodontic treatment begins, and during the treatme...

  16. Pros and cons in endocrine practice: pre-surgical treatment with somatostatin analogues in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Marco; Bollerslev, Jens

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this commentary is to balance the pros and cons for pre-surgical SSA treatment in a modern perspective ending up with a pragmatic recommendation for treatment based on the current evidence and expertise of the authors. Even though prospective and randomized studies in this particular area are hampered by obvious limitations, the interpretation of the four published trials has in general been in favor of pre-treatment with SSA, showing a better outcome following surgery. However, major drawbacks of these studies, such as non-optimal diagnostic criteria for cure, potential selection bias, and timing of the postoperative evaluation in SSA pre-treated patients, limit their overall interpretation. Three matched-controlled studies showed remarkably similar results with no apparent beneficial effect of SSA pre-treatment on surgical outcome. Both prospective, randomized studies and retrospective studies did not find any significant difference in the rate of endocrine and non-endocrine complications related to surgery, despite the beneficial clinical effects of SSA treatment in most acromegalic patients. The newly diagnosed patient with acromegaly should be carefully evaluated in the trans-disciplinary neuroendocrine team and treatment individualized accordingly. The issue of SSA pre-treatment to improve surgical outcome is yet to be settled and further methodologically sound studies are probably necessary to clarify this point.

  17. Surgically facilitated orthodontic treatment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeveen, Eelke J; Jansma, Johan; Ren, Yijin

    2014-04-01

    Corticotomy and dental distraction have been proposed as effective and safe methods to shorten orthodontic treatment duration in adolescent and adult patients. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the evidence supporting these claims. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched until April 2013 for randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, and case series with 5 or more subjects that focused on velocity of tooth movement, reduction of treatment duration, or complications with various surgical protocols. There were no language restrictions during the search phase. Publications were systematically assessed for eligibility, and 2 observers graded the methodologic quality of the included studies with a predefined scoring system. Eighteen articles met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies were clinical trials, with small investigated groups. Only studies of moderate and low values of evidence were found. Surgically facilitated treatment was indicated for various clinical problems. All publications reported temporarily accelerated tooth movement after surgery. No deleterious effects on the periodontium, no vitality loss, and no severe root resorption were found in any studies. However, the level of evidence to support these findings is limited owing to shortcomings in research methodologies and small treated groups. No research concerning long-term stability could be included. Evidence based on the currently available studies of low-to-moderate quality showed that surgically facilitated orthodontics seems to be safe for the oral tissues and is characterized by a temporary phase of accelerated tooth movement. This can effectively shorten the duration of orthodontic treatment. However, to date, no prospective studies have compared overall treatment time and treatment outcome with those of a control group. Well-conducted, prospective research is still needed to draw valid conclusions. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists

  18. Orthodontic treatment considerations in Down syndrome patients

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    Sianiwati Goenharto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Down syndrome is an easily recognized congenital disease anomaly, a common autosomal chromosomal anomaly with high prevalence of malocclusion. Orthodontic treatment demand should be high but it seems difficult to be done because of specific condition of disability. Purpose: The purpose of this literature review was to discribe the orthodontic problems found in Down syndrome patients and several consideration that shoud be done to treat them. Reviews: Many studies report the high prevalence of malocclusion among people with Down syndrome. There is a greater frequency of clas III relationship, crossbite, crowding and also open bite. Several problems might appear in the treatment because of dental, medical, mental, and behavioural factor. Conclusion: It is concluded that orthodonic treatment can be performed in Down syndrome patient, although several difficulties may appear. Good consideration in mental, behavior, medical and also dental condition will influence whether the treatment will success or not. Special care and facilities will support the orthodontic treatment.Latar belakang: Sindroma Down adalah suatu kelainan congenital yang mudah dikenali, merupakan kelaian kromosom autosomal yang cukup banyak terjadi, dengan prevalensi maloklusi cukup tinggi. Seharusnya permintaan akan perawatan ortodonti juga tinggi meskipun tampaknya sulit dilakukan karena adanya kondisi ketidakmampuan/cacat yang spesifik. Tujuan: Tujuan studi pustaka ini adalah untuk menggambarkan problem perawatan ortodonti pada penderita sindroma Down dan pertimbangan apa yang sebaiknya diambil untuk mengatasi masalah tersebut. Tinjauan pustaka: Banyak penelitian melaporkan tentang prevalensi maloklusi yang tinggi pada penderita sindroma Down. Maloklusi yang sering dijumpai adalah relasi klas III, gigitan silang, berdesakan dan juga gigitan terbuka. Problem dapat terjadi saat perawatan ortodonti karena adanya faktor dental, medis, mental dan tingkah laku penderita

  19. Ethnic variations in orthodontic treatment need in London schoolchildren

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    Jopanputra Pooja

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study was carried out to determine the prevalence of orthodontic treatment need in children from minority ethnic groups and compare the need to the white population. The second objective was to explore variations in agreement between subjective and objective treatment need in a multiethnic context using the aesthetic component of Orthodontic Treatment Need Index (IOTN AC. Methods A cross-sectional study in North West London, 14 schools were randomly selected from the 27 schools in the two boroughs of Harrow and Hillingdon. Comparison between objective and subjective treatment need was carried out using IOTN AC index. Clinical orthodontic treatment need was also recorded using the dental health component of Orthodontic Treatment Need Index (IOTN DHC. Results 2,788 children were examined and completed the questionnaire. 16% of the study population were already wearing appliances or had finished orthodontic treatment. Of the remaining children; 15% had definite need for treatment using the dental health component of the IOTN. There was no significant variation in the need for orthodontic treatment between different ethnic backgrounds (P > 0.05 whether using the AC or DHC components of the IOTN index. However, poor agreement was detected between professional and subjective assessment of ethnic minority of orthodontic treatment need using IOTN AC index. Conclusion Orthodontic treatment need in children of ethnic minorities does not differ significantly from the vast majority of white children. However treatment need based on aesthetic index continues to vary in all ethnic groups from the professional aesthetic assessment

  20. Paradigm shifts in orthodontic treatment with mini-implant anchorage

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    Johnny Joung-Lin Liaw

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available After the applications of mini-implant anchorage, the envelope of orthodontic treatment was expanded and some treatment modes were changed because of more predictable tooth movement with empowered anchorage. The author tried to share his experience of TADs applications for clarifying the paradigm shifts of orthodontic treatment assisted with the mini-implant anchorage.

  1. The effect of photobiomodulation on root resorption during orthodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Nimeri G; Kau CH; Corona R; Shelly J

    2014-01-01

    Ghada Nimeri, Chung H Kau, Rachel Corona, Jeffery Shelly Department of Orthodontics, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Photobiomodulation is used to accelerate tooth movement during orthodontic treatments. The changes in root morphology in a group of orthodontic patients who received photobiomodulation were evaluated using the cone beam computed tomography technique. The device used is called OrthoPulse, which produces low levels of light with a near infrared wavelength of...

  2. Presurgical cleft lip and palate orthopedics: an overview

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    Alzain I

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ibtesam Alzain,1 Waeil Batwa,2 Alex Cash,3 Zuhair A Murshid2 1Pediatric Dentistry, 2Orthodontic Department, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 3Cleft Lip and Palate Orthodontics, Queen Victoria NHS Foundation Trust, South Thames Cleft Service, London, UK Abstract: Patients with cleft lip and/or palate go through a lifelong journey of multidisciplinary care, starting from before birth and extending until adulthood. Presurgical orthopedic (PSO treatment is one of the earliest stages of this care plan. In this paper we provide a review of the PSO treatment. This review should help general and specialist dentists to better understand the cleft patient care path and to be able to answer patient queries more efficiently. The objectives of this paper were to review the basic principles of PSO treatment, the various types of techniques used in this therapy, and the protocol followed, and to critically evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of some of these techniques. In conclusion, we believe that PSO treatment, specifically nasoalveolar molding, does help to approximate the segments of the cleft maxilla and does reduce the intersegment space in readiness for the surgical closure of cleft sites. However, what we remain unable to prove equivocally at this point is whether the reduction in the dimensions of the cleft presurgically and the manipulation of the nasal complex benefit our patients in the long term. Keywords: presurgical orthopedic, nasoalveolar molding, cleft lip and palate

  3. Orthodontic treatment in adults: restoring smile esthetics

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    Leopoldino Capelozza Filho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The search for orthodontic treatment by adult patients is increasing. This demand may be explained by many reasons, but the most important was the change in the concept of normality, allowing the selection of simpler and more conservative and consistent therapeutic objectives. This conceptual evolution, combined with the technological advances allowed an improvement in orthodontic management, making it more effective, fast and comfortable. The promotion of awareness of the society on the advantages of this treatment and the increase in esthetic demands, with an increasingly longer and active social, affective and professional life, creates a context in which the need for Orthodontics is absolutely established for the adult individuals. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to report the nuances in diagnosis and orthodontic treatment of an adult patient, in a different perspective. Within this approach, the objective is to recover the shape, i.e. to establish occlusal conditions that would probably be present if the patient had been assisted at the proper time, namely during growth and tooth irruption.INTRODUÇÃO: a procura de tratamento ortodôntico por pacientes adultos é cada vez maior. Essa demanda pode ser justificada por vários fatores, mas o mais relevante foi a mudança do conceito de normal, permitindo a opção por metas terapêuticas mais conservadoras, simples e consistentes. Essa evolução conceitual, mais os avanços tecnológicos, permitiram melhora no manejo ortodôntico, tornando-o mais efetivo, rápido e confortável. A conscientização, por parte da sociedade, das vantagens desse tratamento e o aumento da exigência estética entre os adultos, com uma vida social, afetiva e profissional cada vez mais longa e ativa, cria um contexto onde fica absolutamente estabelecida a necessidade de uma Ortodontia para os indivíduos adultos. OBJETIVO: o objetivo desse artigo foi relatar as nuances de diagnóstico e

  4. Acceleration of tooth movement during orthodontic treatment - a frontier in Orthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Nimeri, Ghada; Kau, Chung H; Abou-Kheir, Nadia S; Corona, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, there is an increased tendency for researches to focus on accelerating methods for tooth movement due to the huge demand for adults for a shorter orthodontic treatment time. Unfortunately, long orthodontic treatment time poses several disadvantages like higher predisposition to caries, gingival recession, and root resorption. This increases the demand to find the best method to increase tooth movement with the least possible disadvantages. The purpose of this study is to view the su...

  5. Surgical-orthodontic correction of a Class III dentofacial deformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu Devanna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the surgical-orthodontic treatment of a 26-year-old post-pubertal male patient with a Class III dentofacial deformity. In the pre-surgical orthodontic phase of treatment, a reverse overjet of 5.5 mm was created and arch compatibility was obtained. A mandibualr set back with BSSO was performed during surgery to restore ideal overjet, overbite, occlusion and optimal esthetics. After 1 year of treatment, the results remained stable.

  6. Dental pulp stone formation during orthodontic treatment: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-21

    Jun 21, 2015 ... Abstract. Objective: The aim of this study was two‑fold: (1) To assess the incidence of dental pulp stone formation during orthodontic ... Conclusion: Orthodontic treatment may trigger the formation of dental pulp stones. However, further ..... Oral Health Dent Manage Black Sea Ctries 2004;3:38‑41. 25. al‑Hadi ...

  7. [Effect of body image in adolescent orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minghui, Peng; Jing, Kang; Xiao, Deng

    2017-10-01

    This study was designed to probe the psychological factors adolescent orthodontic patients, the role of body image and self-esteem in the whole process of orthodontic treatment and the impact on the efficacy and satisfaction of orthodontic. Five hundred and twenty-eight patients were selected in this study. The Aesthetic Component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN-AC) , Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES), Negative Physical Self-General (NPS-G) and other body analysis scale study after orthodontic lasted 18-24 months were used to investigate the role of body image in adolescent orthodontic treatment. Esthetic evaluation of patients teeth after correction had been significantly improved, patient self-evaluation difference IOTN-AC doctor evaluation, Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire-tooth confidence, aesthetic concerns, psychological impact and social function were significantly improved. The improvement of the dental aesthetics component (T2 when doctors evaluate IOTN-AC) was positively correlated with the evaluation of the efficacy, and was significantly negatively correlated with the negative emotions of patients at baseline. Negative body image-dental dissatisfied-cognitive component and the affective component, the overall negative body image and negative emotions can predict patient satisfaction with treatment efficacy. Orthodontic treatment not only improves the self-aesthetic evaluation of adolescent patients, but also has a positive effect on the mental health of adolescent patients.

  8. Clinical Considerations in Orthodontic Treatment of Teeth with Dentoalveolar Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Restrepo, Adriana María; Preciado Sánchez, José Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Dentoalveolar trauma is a very common public health problem. Its influence goes beyond accidents and their impact on teeth, because in the future it becomes a decisive factor if orthodontic treatment is required, because these traumas tend to lead to complications such as root resorption and pulp necrosis. Proper treatment of teeth with a medical history of trauma is essential for successful orthodontic treatment. Los traumas dentoalveolares son un problema de salud pública muy común. La i...

  9. Lingual orthodontics as an aesthetic resource in the preparation of orthodontic/surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairalla, Silvana Allegrini; Galiano, Aluísio; Paranhos, Luiz Renato

    2014-01-01

    The lingual technique was introduced in the late '70s and, just like orthodontics, it has developed significantly in the past few years. Adult and young adult have been attracted to such alternative aesthetic treatment. Despite their need of orthodontic treatment, they want to have an aesthetic alternative, as "invisible" as possible--something that can be achieved with the lingual technique. Nevertheless, many treatment or re-treatment cases also demand correction through orthognathic surgery, a process which is nowadays much simpler and considered an effective auxiliary method for the malocclusion correction. Having posed that, this study aims to show correction of malocclusion and discrepancy between dental arches through lingual orthodontic technique associated to orthognathic surgery. This study shows that it is possible to provide the patient who suffers frJom malocclusion with proper correction, achieving the desired aesthetics by using lingual braces and pe?forming lingual orthognathic surgery.

  10. The effect of photobiomodulation on root resorption during orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimeri G

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghada Nimeri, Chung H Kau, Rachel Corona, Jeffery Shelly Department of Orthodontics, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Photobiomodulation is used to accelerate tooth movement during orthodontic treatments. The changes in root morphology in a group of orthodontic patients who received photobiomodulation were evaluated using the cone beam computed tomography technique. The device used is called OrthoPulse, which produces low levels of light with a near infrared wavelength of 850 nm and an intensity of 60 mW/cm2 continuous wave. Twenty orthodontic patients were recruited for these experiments, all with class 1 malocclusion and with Little's Irregularity Index (>2 mm in either of the arches. Root resorption was detected by measuring changes in tooth length using cone beam computed tomography. These changes were measured before the orthodontic treatment and use of low-level laser therapy and after finishing the alignment level. Little's Irregularity Index for all the patients was calculated in both the maxilla and mandible and patients were divided into three groups for further analysis, which were then compared to the root resorption measurements. Our results showed that photobiomodulation did not cause root resorption greater than the normal range that is commonly detected in orthodontic treatments. Furthermore, no correlation between Little's Irregularity Index and root resorption was detected. Keywords: photobiomodulation, root resorption, accelerate tooth movement, orthodontics, cone beam computed tomography

  11. Experiense with remineraling means in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment

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    Stepanova Ye.A.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In patients undergoing orthodontic treatment using bracket-technology a high risk of caries development. The algorithm of preventive interventions for the prevention of hair demineralization of enamel of the teeth

  12. Articulation and oromyofunctional behavior in children seeking orthodontic treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Fonteyne; E. D'haeseleer; Anke Luyten; G. Becue; K. van Lierde; G. van Maele; G. de Pauw; P. Corthals

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this controlled study is to document articulation and oromyofunctional behavior in children seeking orthodontic treatment. In addition, relations between malocclusions, articulation, and oromyofunctional behavior are studied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 56

  13. The influence of cephalometrics on orthodontic treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, P.G.; Habets, L.L.M.H.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Zentner, A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Since its introduction, cephalometrics, i.e. cephalometric radiography and analysis, has been used for orthodontic treatment planning. However, the effectiveness of this diagnostic method remains questionable. A randomized crossover study was designed to assess the infl uence of

  14. Treatment with active orthodontic appliance in adult patient

    OpenAIRE

    Radeska, Ana; Radeski, Josif; Zlatanovska, Katerina; Papakoca, Kiro; Zarkova, Julija

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Showing the efficiency of orthodontic mobile appliance in treatment of adult patient Case summary: The patient A.K. Age 25 years whit forced progenia, bilateral hypodontia of the maxillary incisors and cross bite of 2 mm in front. The patient was treated with active orthodontic appliance whit bitten ridge and down labial arch. The treatment lasted 18 months after which periods is reached normal occlusion with normal overlap in front and closed diastema mediana. The hypodontia of the m...

  15. Orthodontic treatment in patients with reduced periodontal insertion

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    Fernanda Labayle Couhat Carraro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review to investigate orthodontic treatment in periodontal patients. Periodontal disease causes loss of attachment that results in pathological dental migration Periodontal disease can affect young persons and adults, with a higher incidence in adults, so that the number of adults seeking orthodontic treatment has increased significantly. The periodontal disease must be controlled before the orthodontic treatment begins, and during the treatment it is important to keep the patient motivated as regards control of oral hygiene, with periodical reviews by the periodontist. With regard to assembly of the fixed appliance, special care is required not to place the accessories close to the gingival margin, in addition to using light forces porportional to the amount of periodontal attachment, and kept within the biological limits of movement. Correction of the poorly positioned teeth and controlled orthodontic movement can favor remodeling of the alveolar process in all directions. After orthodontic treatment it is important plan containment individually. Integrated orthodontic-periodontal teamwork is essential for reestablishing a healthy periodontium and satisfactory occlusion.

  16. Orthodontic evolution: an update for the general dental practitioner. Part 2: psychosocial aspects of orthodontic treatment, stability of treatment, and the TMJ-orthodontic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Niall J P

    2008-01-01

    As a result of recent innovations and improvements, orthodontic treatment has become easier and more efficient to carry out, allowing greater numbers of patients to receive treatment. The main result of orthodontic treatment is improved dental alignment and aesthetics. Treatment has no effect on caries or periodontal disease, and the dental health gain is modest, apart from a very small percentage of destructive malocclusions. Psychological improvements using different psychological parameters show differing results and it is not clear that any psychological gains are long lasting. Social gain (greater willingness to smile, feeling good about oneself, satisfaction with dental appearance, etc.), and reported improved quality of life (QoL measures), are now becoming more important as consumer-related outcomes and may, ultimately, contribute to psychosocial and psychological status. Stability of orthodontic treatment results cannot be guaranteed and all patients need to be informed of this, and of the need for long-term retention. Malocclusion has little or no relationship to temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction and orthodontic treatment neither causes nor cures such problems. Extractions as part of orthodontic treatment do not cause TMD, nor do they cause collapse of the vertical dimension. The major improvements in dental health in the last 40 years have been accompanied by a great increase in demand for treatment. In any public health service that is free at the point of use, demand for treatment invariably exceeds the ability of resources to supply this. Indices of treatment need are widely used to determine treatment need and eligibility for treatment in public health systems. Demand for orthodontic treatment among adolescents can be as high as 60% in the general population, while the professionally-assessed need for treatment is approximately half this figure. Age, sex, socio-economic status, perceived unattractiveness of dental appearance, and availability of

  17. Class III Malocclusion Surgical-Orthodontic Treatment

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    Bruna Alves Furquim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present case report is to describe the orthodontic-surgical treatment of a 17-year-and-9-month-old female patient with a Class III malocclusion, poor facial esthetics, and mandibular and chin protrusion. She had significant anteroposterior and transverse discrepancies, a concave profile, and strained lip closure. Intraorally, she had a negative overjet of 5 mm and an overbite of 5 mm. The treatment objectives were to correct the malocclusion, and facial esthetic and also return the correct function. The surgical procedures included a Le Fort I osteotomy for expansion, advancement, impaction, and rotation of the maxilla to correct the occlusal plane inclination. There was 2 mm of impaction of the anterior portion of the maxilla and 5 mm of extrusion in the posterior region. A bilateral sagittal split osteotomy was performed in order to allow counterclockwise rotation of the mandible and anterior projection of the chin, accompanying the maxillary occlusal plane. Rigid internal fixation was used without any intermaxillary fixation. It was concluded that these procedures were very effective in producing a pleasing facial esthetic result, showing stability 7 years posttreatment.

  18. Definitive Presurgical CAD/CAM-Guided Implant-Supported Crown in an Esthetic Area

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, Vinicius de Magalhães; Costa, Natália Rafaela de Assis; Martins, Paulo Henrique Fonseca; Vasconcellos, Walison Arthuso; Discacciati, José Augusto César; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the digital workflow from cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) to the installation of a definitive presurgical zirconium individual crown in a 19-year-old woman requiring implant replacement of a maxillary right lateral incisor. The patient had agenesis of this tooth and had completed the orthodontic treatment. CBCT was conducted and diagnostic casts were digitized. Virtual planning was completed by defining a prosthetically driven implant and a stereolithographic surgica...

  19. Patient-specific three-dimensional printing for pre-surgical planning in hepatocellular carcinoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perica, Elizabeth; Sun, Zhonghua

    2017-12-01

    Recently, three-dimensional (3D) printing has shown great interest in medicine, and 3D printed models may be rendered as part of the pre-surgical planning process in order to better understand the complexities of an individual's anatomy. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of utilising 3D printed liver models as clinical tools in pre-operative planning for resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions. High-resolution contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images were acquired and utilized to generate a patient-specific 3D printed liver model. Hepatic structures were segmented and edited to produce a printable model delineating intrahepatic anatomy and a resectable HCC lesion. Quantitative assessment of 3D model accuracy compared measurements of critical anatomical landmarks acquired from the original CT images, standard tessellation language (STL) files, and the 3D printed liver model. Comparative analysis of surveys completed by two radiologists investigated the clinical value of 3D printed liver models in radiology. The application of utilizing 3D printed liver models as tools in surgical planning for resectable HCC lesions was evaluated through kappa analysis of questionnaires completed by two abdominal surgeons. A scaled down multi-material 3D liver model delineating patient-specific hepatic anatomy and pathology was produced, requiring a total production time of 25.25 hours and costing a total of AUD $1,250. A discrepancy was found in the total mean of measurements at each stage of production, with a total mean of 18.28±9.31 mm for measurements acquired from the original CT data, 15.63±8.06 mm for the STL files, and 14.47±7.71 mm for the 3D printed liver model. The 3D liver model did not enhance the radiologists' perception of patient-specific anatomy or pathology. Kappa analysis of the surgeon's responses to survey questions yielded a percentage agreement of 80%, and a κ value of 0.38 (P=0.24) indicating fair agreement. Study

  20. Orthodontic-surgical treatment of bilateral maxillary canine impaction

    OpenAIRE

    Sumitra

    2012-01-01

    A 13-year-old female patient reported with the chief complaint of irregular front teeth. She had a skeletal Class III and Angle's Class I malocclusion with hyperdivergent growth pattern and bilateral impaction of maxillary canines. Surgical exposure of the impacted teeth and orthodontic alignment was planned. The surgical exposure was done by a minimally invasive modified window technique. Orthodontic treatment of impacted canines without causing significant morbidity to the adjacent teeth an...

  1. Angulation change of the third molar tooth in orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardiansyah S. Pawinru

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Impaction of the third molar tooth mandibular is often found in patients with orthodontic treatment. In orthodontic treatment, extraction cases of impaction of the third molar tooth are usually performed, but the patients often refuse this extraction. Extraction of premolar has a good effect on the third molar mandibular angulation during treatment. Material and Methods : This study is a retrospective clinical study with descriptive analytic to find out the effect of the first mandibular premolar tooth extraction to angulation change of the third molar mandibular in orthodontic treatment with a standard edgewise method. Angulation change was performed by comparing the third molar mandibular angulation before and after orthodontic treatment with panoramic radiographs. Angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular was calculated from the angle formed between the long axis of the tooth with the reference line infraorbita. Results : The sample comprised 60 of impacted mandibular third molar region of the left and right regions of 30 patients who had been treated declared cured in clinic of orthodontic specialist of Dentistry Faculty Padjadjaran University. The sample was divided into three (3 groups of patients before treatment angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular under 300, 300 to 600 and above 60o, then measured change of angulation and observed whether it increased, fixed or decreased. Results were analyzed by T- test and Wilcoxon test showed that there was a significant change in angulation of the third molar mandibular in orthodontic treatment with the first premolar tooth mandibular extraction. Conclusion : This study is that the first premolar tooth mandibular extraction affects the angulation of the third molar tooth mandibular after orthodontic treatment.

  2. Extraction protocols for orthodontic treatment: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishnevi N Thirunavukkarasu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Various extraction protocols have been followed for successful orthodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extraction protocols in patients who had previously undergone orthodontic treatment and also who had reported for continuing orthodontic treatment from other clinics. Materials and Methods: One hundred thirty eight patients who registered for orthodontic treatment at the Faculty of Dentistry were divided into 10 extraction protocols based on the Orthodontic treatment protocol given by Janson et al. and were evaluated for statistical significance. Results: The descriptive statistics of the study revealed a total of 40 (29% patients in protocol 1, 43 (31.2% in protocol 2, 18 (13% in protocol 3, 16 (11.6% in protocol 5, and 12 (8.7% in Type 3 category of protocol 9. The Type 3 category in protocol 9 was statistically significant compared to other studies. Midline shift and collapse of the arch form were noticed in these individuals. Conclusion: Extraction of permanent teeth such as canine and lateral incisors without rational reasons could have devastating consequences on the entire occlusion. The percentage of cases wherein extraction of permanent teeth in the crowded region was adopted as a treatment option instead of orthodontic treatment is still prevalent in dental practice. The shortage of orthodontists in Malaysia, the long waiting period, and lack of subjective need for orthodontic treatment at an earlier age group were the reasons for the patient's to choose extraction of the mal-aligned teeth such as the maxillary canine or maxillary lateral incisors.

  3. Orthodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Incisor Extraction Case with Invisalign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid H. Zawawi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular incisor extraction for orthodontic treatment is considered an unusual treatment option because of the limited number of patients that meet the criteria for such treatment. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning is essential to achieve the desired results. Adult orthodontic patients are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations and reject the idea of conventional fixed appliances. In recent years, Invisalign appliances have gained tremendous attention for orthodontic treatment of adult patients to meet their esthetic demands. In this case report, a case of Class I malocclusion was treated with mandibular incisor extraction using the Invisalign appliance system. Successful tooth alignment of both arches was achieved. The use of Invisalign appliance is an effective treatment option in adult patients with Class I malocclusion that requires incisor extraction due to moderate to severe mandibular anterior crowding.

  4. Orthodontic treatment of a mandibular incisor extraction case with invisalign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, Khalid H

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction for orthodontic treatment is considered an unusual treatment option because of the limited number of patients that meet the criteria for such treatment. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning is essential to achieve the desired results. Adult orthodontic patients are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations and reject the idea of conventional fixed appliances. In recent years, Invisalign appliances have gained tremendous attention for orthodontic treatment of adult patients to meet their esthetic demands. In this case report, a case of Class I malocclusion was treated with mandibular incisor extraction using the Invisalign appliance system. Successful tooth alignment of both arches was achieved. The use of Invisalign appliance is an effective treatment option in adult patients with Class I malocclusion that requires incisor extraction due to moderate to severe mandibular anterior crowding.

  5. Allergic reactions seen in orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hande Görücü Coşkuner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergy can be defined as inappropriate and harmful response to harmless and ordinary materials. Allergic reactions, like in other fields of dentistry, can also be seen in the field of orthodontics. The reactions that occur against orthodontic materials can be seen as irritant or hypersensitivity reactions. The main reason of the irritant reactions is friction between soft tissues and orthodontic appliances. However, the reason of the hypersensitivity reactions is usually the antigenicity of the materials. Hypersensitivity reactions are usually seen as allergic contact dermatitis on face and neck; the occurrence of mucosal-gingival reactions and dermal and systemic reactions are rare. Latex, metal and acrylic resins are the most common allergens in orthodontics. Apart from these materials, allergic reactions can occur against bonding materials, extraoral appliances, disinfectants and antimicrobial agents. The reactions that occur against extraoral appliances usually result from metallic and elastic parts of the appliances or the appliance parts that are in contact with skin. Orthodontists should be aware of the allergic reactions to protect their patients’ health. The aim of this review was to evaluate the allergic reactions seen in orthodontic patients and discuss the cautions that orthodontists can take.

  6. Photobiomodulation accelerates orthodontic alignment in the early phase of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kau, Chung How; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Shaughnessy, Tim; Vachiramon, Amornpong; Santiwong, Peerapong; de la Fuente, Alvaro; Skrenes, Darya; Ma, Dennis; Brawn, Peter

    2013-09-19

    Numerous strategies have been proposed to decrease the treatment time a patient requires in orthodontic treatment. Recently, a number of device-accelerated therapies have emerged in orthodontics. Photobiomodulation is an emerging area of science that has clinical applications in a number of human biological processes. The aim of this study was to determine if photobiomodulation reduces the treatment time in the alignment phase of orthodontic treatment. This multicenter clinical trial was performed on 90 subjects (73 test subjects and 17 controls), and Little's Index of Irregularity (LII) was used as a measure of the rate of change of tooth movement. Subjects requiring orthodontic treatment were recruited into the study, and the LII was measured at regular time intervals. Test subjects used a device which produced near-infrared light with a continuous 850-nm wavelength. The surface of the cheek was irradiated with a power density of 60 mW/cm2 for 20 or 30 min/day or 60 min/week to achieve total energy densities of 72, 108, or 216 J/cm2, respectively. All subjects were fitted with traditional orthodontic brackets and wires. The wire sequences for each site were standardized to an initial round alignment wire (014 NiTi or 016 NiTi) and then advanced through a progression of stiffer arch wires unit alignment occurred (LIIorthodontic treatment.

  7. Invisible orthodontics part 2: lingual appliance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullin, Ailbhe; Waring, David; Malik, Ovais

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this second article of the three part series is to sum up the current developments in lingual orthodontics. This article attempts to review the development, advantages and disadvantages, bonding techniques, bracket mechanics, patient factors and types of lingual appliance systems available. In addition, the article shows examples of treated cases with lingual appliances. Lingual appliances are a useful addition to the armamentarium of invisible orthodontic appliances, with significant developments over the last few years. Clinicians need to be aware of the advances and predictable results achievable with lingual appliances.

  8. Temporomandibular disorders and orthodontic treatment need in orthodontically untreated children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špalj, Stjepan; Šlaj, Martina; Athanasiou, Athanasios E; Žak, Irena; Šimunović, Martina; Šlaj, Mladen

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and orthodontic treatment need in orthodontically untreated children and adolescents. One thousand five hundred and ninety-seven subjects aged 11-19 years, without previous orthodontic history, from sixteen randomly selected public schools in Zagreb, Croatia, were examined. Malocclusion characteristics were assessed by using the criteria proposed by Bjork et al., the Dental Aesthetic Index, and the Aesthetic Component of Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. Data on TMD signs/symptoms and parafunctional behaviour were obtained by means of questionnaire and clinical examination, respectively. Multiple logistic regression models were used for analysis. Twenty-two percent of children and young adolescents had one or more signs of TMD, ranging from 17% in age of 11 years up to 24% in age of 19. There was poor correlation between presence of TMD and orthodontic treatment need. Multiple logistic regression models showed that Class III, crowding and spacing were related to mandibular deflection on opening. Ectopic eruption was related to TMJ clicking, and severely tipped teeth with reduced mouth opening. Headaches presented a positive relationship with reverse overjet and severe rotations, and tooth wear with crowding, spacing and lateral openbite. Age, female gender and parafunctional habits were related to several TMD signs. Although logistic regression models were statistically significant (p < 0.05) malocclusions, parafunctional behaviours, age and gender accounted for less than 20% of the variability in TMD signs/symptoms. TMD signs and symptoms seemed to be poorly related to malocclusions or treatment needs.

  9. Adults seeking orthodontic treatment: expectations, periodontal and TMD issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, L; Luther, F

    2015-02-16

    The growth in adult orthodontics presents new challenges to both the general dental practitioner and the orthodontist. Although many of the main objectives of orthodontic treatment are similar for adults, young adults and children, adult patients frequently bring significant challenges in several areas not often seen in the younger patient group. In areas such as planning realistic treatment outcomes, it is paramount that the patient's expectations are identified, respected and managed where appropriate. The adult patient's dental health often dictates deviation from the ideal treatment plan and periodontal problems are a common example. Based on current evidence, this paper presents an overview of some of the difficulties in the management of these issues, as well as highlighting developments with regard to pain conditions and their relevance to orthodontic treatment and its effects on temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) management.

  10. Dental root periapical resorption caused by orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinandi Sri Pudyani

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental root resorption especially in maxillary incisive region almost always happens simultaneously with orthodontic treatment, and it gained researchers attention, in particular after the use of periapical radiography. However, the fundamental etiology of dental root resorption is still dubious. Multifactoral causes are mentioned, among others are hormonal, nutritition, trauma, dental root form and dental root structure anomalies, genetic, while from treatment side are duration, types, strength scale and dental movement types. Based on these findings, orthodontic treatment was proven to cause dental root resorption in maxillary incisive teeth.

  11. Orthodontic treatment for oral rehabilitation after multiple maxillofacial bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiki; Ogino, Tomoko Kuroiwa; Hirashita, Ayao

    2008-09-01

    We present the orthodontic treatment of a patient with occlusal dysfunction after plastic surgery for multiple maxillofacial bone fractures caused by a traffic accident. The patient had mandibular deviation to the right because of inappropriate repositioning and fixation of the fractured bone and complete avulsion of both mandibular central incisors. The bilateral mandibular incisors, canines, and premolars were also suspected of partial avulsion or alveolar bone fracture. Several tests, including percussion and dental computed tomography, were performed on these teeth to rule out ankylosis and confirm tooth movement. Camouflage orthodontic treatment was carried out with expansion of the maxillary arch, alignment of both arches, and space closure between the mandibular lateral incisors to improve the occlusion. Good occlusion and interdigitation were obtained. Orthodontic treatment is useful for the rehabilitation of occlusal dysfunction caused by multiple maxillofacial bone fractures.

  12. Sequential piezocision: a novel approach to accelerated orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Elif I; Dibart, Serge

    2013-12-01

    Piezocision-assisted orthodontic treatment is an innovative, minimally invasive surgical technique designed to help achieve rapid orthodontic tooth movement. Microsurgical interproximal openings are made in the buccal gingivae to let the piezoelectric knife create the bone injury that will lead to transient demineralization and subsequent accelerated tooth movement. When this procedure was first described, cuts were made simultaneously at the maxilla and the mandible. In recent years, the technique has evolved to a more staged approach, with selected areas or segments of the arch demineralized at different times during orthodontic treatment to help achieve specific results. The purpose of this article was to report the use of sequential piezocision in the correction of a Class III malocclusion, in a total treatment time of 8 months. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Research on Chinese orthodontic specialists' subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guang-ying; Zhao, Zhi-he; Ding, Yin; Bai, Yu-xing; Wang, Lin; He, Hong; Qian, Yu-fen; Li, Wei-ran; Xu, Tian-min

    2012-03-01

    To analyze the results of multiple Chinese orthodontic specialists' subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment outcome, to investigate the relevance of different experiment items and to explore the weight of each monomial material. As a randomized clinical trial, with six orthodontic treatment centers and Angle's classification being regarded as two stratification factors, it contained 108 cases with integrity data, which was random extracted from 2383 cases that received orthodontic treatment in six orthodontic treatment centers during the past five years, gathering post-treatment study casts, cephalometrics and photographs of 48 cases as the research subject. Similarly taking Angle's classification as a stratification factor, 108 cases were randomly divided into 9 groups. The randomization of sampling and grouping were both generated by a pseudo-random number generator. According to the monomial and combined subjects, 69 orthodontic specialists were regarded as the raters to rank the 12 cases in each group, and to judge whether the case was qualified. Correlation analysis: the Spearman r between Post-M + C and Post-M + C + P and the Spearman r between Post-M + P and Post-M + C + P were both greater than 0.950. The Spearman r between Post-M and Post-P and the Spearman r between Post-M and Post-C were about 0.300. The Spearman r between Post-P and Post-C was 0.505. Regression analysis: the linear regression results: M + C = 0.782M + 0.308C - 0.150, M + P = 0.804M + 0.233P - 0.091, M + C + P = 0.764M + 0.243P + 0.131C - 0.291. The r(2) of above three models was greater than 0.9. It was applicable to use M + C and M + P instead of M + C + P. Study casts could not replace cephalometrics or photographs when doing subjective evaluation. Cephalometrics and photographs could not substitute for each other either. In the combined materials evaluation, model accounted for the largest percentage. Based on the regression model, for the greater part, the integration of

  14. Combined Periodontal, Orthodontic, and Prosthetic Treatment in an Adult Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Vinicius Sabatoski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year-old man had a significant loss of bone and supporting tissues with pathologic migration of several teeth and several missing teeth. He was treated with an interdisciplinary therapeutic protocol that included nonsurgical periodontal therapy based on strict control of supragingival plaque, subgingival periodontal therapy, orthodontic and endodontic treatment, and replacement of restorations. The orthodontic therapy was performed in a severely reduced bone support and the presence of pathological tooth migration after periodontal disease control. The interdisciplinary treatment protocol was the key to achieve a significant improvement in his facial and dental esthetics, masticatory function, and quality of life.

  15. [Application of three-dimensional digital technology in the diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y X

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional(3D)digital technology has been widely used in the field of orthodontics in clinical examination, diagnosis, treatment and curative effect evaluation. 3D digital technology greatly improves the accuracy of diagnosis and treatment, and provides effective means for personalized orthodontic treatment. This review focuses on the application of 3D digital technology in the field of orthodontics.

  16. Treatment outcomes in 4 modes of orthodontic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Donald; Vlaskalic, Vicki; Baumrind, Sheldon

    2005-03-01

    This study is a continuation of a previously published report on the outcome of orthodontic treatment provided in offices representing different modes of practice. The sample consisted of duplicate pretreatment (T1) and posttreatment (T2) dental casts of 348 patients from traditional private orthodontic practices (5 offices, 134 patients), company-owned practices (5 offices, 107 patients), offices associated with practice-management organizations (2 offices, 60 patients), and general dental practices (2 offices, 47 patients). Methods were used to obtain random, representative samples from each office, starting with lists of patients who were treated consecutively with full fixed orthodontic appliances. The dental casts were measured by 2 independent judges who used the unweighted PAR score. Good interjudge agreement was shown on the initial casts, but the agreement was not as strong on the final casts. The measurements showed that treatment outcomes were generally satisfactory, although some significant differences between offices and management modes were shown.

  17. Orthodontic treatment of Class II malocclusion with miniscrew implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Moschos A

    2008-11-01

    Orthodontic treatment of patients with Class II malocclusion who show poor compliance with conventional treatment modalities such as extraoral headgear, functional orthopedic appliances, or conventional fixed appliances with intermaxillary elastics, can be challenging. Noncompliance approaches can be used, but they often pose anchorage problems. This article describes the orthodontic treatment of a girl, aged 11.5 years, with a Class II malocclusion, a deep bite, and increased overjet. Initially, an intraoral miniscrew implant supported distalization system (MISDS) was used to distalize the maxillary first molars. Temporary stationary anchorage was provided by 2 miniscrew implants that were placed paramedian in the anterior region of the palate. After distalization, the system was modified slightly by a chair-side procedure and then used to provide the desired stationary anchorage for subsequent anterior tooth retraction in conjunction with conventional full fixed orthodontic appliances. After 18 months of treatment, a Class I molar relationship was achieved, and the deep bite, overjet, posterior intercuspation, and facial esthetics were improved. Biomechanical considerations, clinical efficacy, and the advantages and potential complications of MISDS treatment are discussed. This case report illustrates the use of MISDS to distalize the maxillary molars and retract the anterior teeth, providing noncompliance, nonextraction, and efficient approach for the orthodontic treatment of patients with Class II malocclusion, which is initially invisible.

  18. Understanding the basis of space closure in Orthodontics for a more efficient orthodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Gerson Luiz Ulema; Jacob, Helder B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Space closure is one of the most challenging processes in Orthodontics and requires a solid comprehension of biomechanics in order to avoid undesirable side effects. Understanding the biomechanical basis of space closure better enables clinicians to determine anchorage and treatment options. In spite of the variety of appliance designs, space closure can be performed by means of friction or frictionless mechanics, and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages...

  19. Media advertising effects on consumer perception of orthodontic treatment quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Daenya T; Shroff, Bhavna; Lindauer, Steven J; Fowler, Chad E; Tufekci, Eser

    2008-09-01

    To determine the effect of media advertising on consumer perception of orthodontic treatment quality. A survey instrument was designed to evaluate factors influencing consumer selection of an orthodontist and consumer perception of different forms of media advertising (radio, television, newspaper, magazine, direct mail, and billboard) by orthodontic practices. The surveys were distributed by eight orthodontic offices in and around the Richmond, Virginia area. The survey return rate was 97%. Respondents most often cited dentist and patient referrals as how they learned of the orthodontic practices they visited (50% to 57%). A caring attitude and good practitioner reputation were the top reasons influencing actual selection of an orthodontist (53% and 49%, respectively). Of respondents, 14% to 24% felt that advertising orthodontists would offer a lower quality of care than nonadvertising orthodontists. Newspaper, magazine, and direct mail advertisements were viewed more favorably than radio, television, and billboard advertisements. Chi-square analyses revealed few statistically significant differences in perception between different income and education groups. The majority of patients do not perceive advertising to reflect poorly on the quality of orthodontic care. However, patients with different income and education levels perceive media advertising differently.

  20. Some comments on clinical studies in orthodontics and their applications to orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S

    1999-06-01

    This article indicates the origins and background of the current series of National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research-funded, university-based clinical studies of orthodontic treatment. It suggests that future studies should be less focused on refining our estimates of mean changes during treatment and concentrate research on the systematic analysis of individual differences among patients' responses to treatment, and study how skilled clinicians make in-course corrections in response to unexpected changes in treatment conditions. Finally, some suggestions are made concerning optimization of decision making in the presence of uncertainty.

  1. Autotransplantation of cryopreserved tooth in connection with orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, O; Rank, C P

    1986-07-01

    In orthodontic treatment of certain cases of tooth loss, aplasia, or ectopia, autotransplantation is sometimes a valid treatment alternative and often provides an improved result, compared to conventional orthodontic treatment, if an appropriate donor tooth is available and the anatomic circumstances permit it. However, in some cases autotransplantation is not immediately possible as a one-step procedure. In such cases cryopreservation provides a clinically useful technique when an extraoral storage period of months or years is needed to orthodontically prepare the recipient region. In the present case a mature upper first left premolar was stored for 18 months. During this period sufficient space was achieved in the contralateral recipient region between the upper left first and second premolars. The thawed graft was autotransplanted to this position. Endodontic treatment was initiated 4 weeks after transplantation. Four years after transplantation, the periodontal healing of the grafted tooth appeared clinically and radiographically normal without any signs of root resorption. The presented case demonstrates the capacity of a cryopreserved tooth to regenerate what seems to be a normal periodontium after transplantation. If these findings are confirmed in further clinical trials, the technique could be a valuable tool in future orthodontic treatment planning.

  2. Congenitally missing mandibular second premolar: treatment outcome with orthodontic space closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fines, Casey D; Rebellato, Joe; Saiar, Maryam

    2003-06-01

    Orthodontic treatment for patients with congenitally missing mandibular second premolars can be challenging. Treatment options include keeping the deciduous second molar, extracting the molars and allowing the space to close spontaneously, autotransplantation, prosthetic replacement, and orthodontic space closure. Space closure with orthodontic appliances is demonstrated in this case report.

  3. Understanding the basis of space closure in Orthodontics for a more efficient orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Gerson Luiz Ulema; Jacob, Helder B

    2016-01-01

    Space closure is one of the most challenging processes in Orthodontics and requires a solid comprehension of biomechanics in order to avoid undesirable side effects. Understanding the biomechanical basis of space closure better enables clinicians to determine anchorage and treatment options. In spite of the variety of appliance designs, space closure can be performed by means of friction or frictionless mechanics, and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. Friction mechanics or sliding mechanics is attractive because of its simplicity; the space site is closed by means of elastics or coil springs to provide force, and the brackets slide on the orthodontic archwire. On the other hand, frictionless mechanics uses loop bends to generate force to close the space site, allowing differential moments in the active and reactive units, leading to a less or more anchorage control, depending on the situation. This article will discuss various theoretical aspects and methods of space closure based on biomechanical concepts.

  4. Understanding the basis of space closure in Orthodontics for a more efficient orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Luiz Ulema Ribeiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Space closure is one of the most challenging processes in Orthodontics and requires a solid comprehension of biomechanics in order to avoid undesirable side effects. Understanding the biomechanical basis of space closure better enables clinicians to determine anchorage and treatment options. In spite of the variety of appliance designs, space closure can be performed by means of friction or frictionless mechanics, and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. Friction mechanics or sliding mechanics is attractive because of its simplicity; the space site is closed by means of elastics or coil springs to provide force, and the brackets slide on the orthodontic archwire. On the other hand, frictionless mechanics uses loop bends to generate force to close the space site, allowing differential moments in the active and reactive units, leading to a less or more anchorage control, depending on the situation. Objective: This article will discuss various theoretical aspects and methods of space closure based on biomechanical concepts.

  5. Facial soft tissue changes after orthodontic treatment | Aksakalli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To successfully meet expectations on facial esthetics, it is important to understand normal craniofacial growth and the impact of orthodontic treatment thereon. To date, there have been few studies documenting changes in facial esthetics through photography. The objective of this study was to compare facial soft ...

  6. [Orthodontics in general practice. 2. Treatment of eruption failures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, R.J.; Kiekens, R.M.A.; Berge, S.J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of composites and bonding in orthodontics, the possibilities of aligning impacted teeth into the dental arch after a surgical intervention, have remarkably increased. There are 4 important treatment techniques. The closed-eruption technique includes bracket-bonding to and

  7. Perception of orthodontic treatment need: opinion comparisons of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The self-assessment by patients and the recording by parents and orthodontists were carried out using the Aesthetic (AC) and Dental Health (DHC) Components of Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) as applicable. Results: The results showed a strong association in the perception of dental appearance by patients ...

  8. Normative and Subjective Need for Orthodontic Treatment within ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... Objective: To evaluate and compare the normative and subjective need for orthodontic treatment within different age groups in Turkey. Methods: One thousand and sixteen patients from seven different demographic regions of Turkey. (Marmara, Black Sea, East Anatolia, Southeastern Anatolia, ...

  9. Normative and Subjective Need for Orthodontic Treatment within ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the normative and subjective need for orthodontic treatment within different age groups in Turkey. Methods: One thousand and sixteen patients from seven different demographic regions of Turkey (Marmara, Black Sea, East Anatolia, Southeastern Anatolia, Mediterranean, Aegean,

  10. Prevalence of orthodontic treatment need in southern Italian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillo, Letizia; Masucci, Caterina; Ferro, Fabrizia; Apicella, Davide; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-02-01

    The present survey was performed to determine orthodontic treatment need in a large sample (n = 703) of 12-year-old schoolchildren from the southern part of Italy. The sample comprised 331 males (47 per cent) and 372 females (53 per cent), all orthodontically untreated. Two examiners, who had been previously trained in the use of occlusal indices, screened all the schoolchildren. The prevalence rates for the Dental Health Component (DHC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) as well as for occlusal features (Angle Class, overjet, overbite, crowding, posterior crossbite) were calculated for the total sample. The IOTN grades were statistically compared in the two genders using the chi-square test. The findings indicated that this southern Italian school population showed a rather low prevalence rate for objective need for treatment (grades 4 and 5; 27.3 per cent of the total sample). This prevalence rate is generally lower than those reported in northern and central European countries (Sweden, Germany, and UK) but slightly greater than those in France. No significant differences in the DHC grades of the IOTN were found between genders. Among the occlusal features diagnosed in the subjects examined, a high prevalence rate was found for crowding (45.9 per cent). Moreover, posterior crossbites and Class III malocclusions, which would presumably have benefited from early orthodontic intervention, were still present in 14.2 and 4.3 per cent of the students, respectively.

  11. Craniomandibular Disorders and Mandibular Reference Position in Orthodontic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Bourzgui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to bring into focus the literature on the choice of the mandibular reference position in orthodontic treatment; of a particular reference to this paper is intercuspal position, centric relation position, or therapeutic position. To give a comprehensive account of the literature review on craniomandibular disorders (CMD, we have relied on books and articles using both Google Scholar and PubMed. Selection criteria included a combination of Mesh and type of article. Article classification was made by two authors, using the following structure outline: prevalence of craniomandibular disorders, its etiology and pathophysiology, occlusion and craniomandibular disorders, orthodontic treatment and CMD, and the mandibular reference position in orthodontics. An important conclusion that emerged from the present literature review is that CMD do not seem to be directly related to orthodontic treatment, and their appearance cannot be predicted or prevented by any means. Therefore, orthodontists must adopt a mandibular reference suitable to their patients and which best respects the balance existing in the stomatognathic system.

  12. Prevention and treatment of white spot lesions in orthodontic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Decalcification of enamel, appearing as white spot lesions (WSLs, around fixed orthodontic appliances is a major challenge during and after fixed orthodontic treatment by considering the fact that the goal of orthodontic treatment is to enhance facial and dental esthetic appearance. Banded or bonded teeth exhibit a significantly higher rate of WSLs compared to the controls with no braces as fixed appliances and the bonding materials promote retention of biofilms. These lesions are managed in the first step by establishing good oral hygiene habits and prophylaxis with topical fluorides, including high-fluoride toothpastes, fluoride mouthwashes, gels, varnishes, fluoride-containing bonding materials, and elastic ligatures. Recently, other materials and methods have been recommended, including the application of casein phosphopeptides-amorphous calcium phosphate, antiseptics, probiotics, polyols, sealants, laser, tooth bleaching agents, resin infiltration, and microabrasion. This article reviews the currently used methods to manage enamel demineralization during and after orthodontic treatment and the risk factors and preventive measures based on the latest evidence.

  13. Integrated Surgical and Orthodontic Treatment: A Twinned Teeth Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema D Bargale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Twinned or geminated teeth may cause spacing, caries, aesthetic and periodontal problems which are usually seen in the anterior region. Various treatment methods can be used for correction of double teeth according to the demands of the condition. This article reports bilateral fused maxillary incisor teeth. The fused right side incisor was separated by hemisection and remaining mesial incisal margin was built using composite. Further, comprehensive orthodontic treatment was done to align the anterior maxillary teeth.

  14. Integrated Surgical and Orthodontic Treatment: A Twinned Teeth Dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Seema D Bargale; D P Shital Kiran; KVR Anuradha; Smit Sikligar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Twinned or geminated teeth may cause spacing, caries, aesthetic and periodontal problems which are usually seen in the anterior region. Various treatment methods can be used for correction of double teeth according to the demands of the condition. This article reports bilateral fused maxillary incisor teeth. The fused right side incisor was separated by hemisection and remaining mesial incisal margin was built using composite. Further, comprehensive orthodontic treatment was done ...

  15. 3D Image Modelling and Specific Treatments in Orthodontics Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Goularas, Dionysis; Djemal, Khalifa; Mannoussakis, Yannis

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we present a 3D specific dental plaster treatment system for orthodontics. From computer tomography scanner images, we propose first a 3D image modelling and reconstruction method of the Mandible and Maxillary based on an adaptive triangulation allowing management of contours meant for the complex topologies. Secondly, we present two specific treatment methods directly achieved on obtained 3D model allowing the automatic correction for the setting in occlusion of the Mandible...

  16. Radiographic evaluation of apical root resorption following fixed orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Haghanifar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Apical root resorption is an adverse side effect of fixed orthodontic treatment which cannot be repaired. The aim of this study was to use panoramic radiographs to compare the root resorption before and after the orthodontic treatment with standard edgewise .018 appliance.Materials and Methods: The before and after treatment panoramic views of sixty-three patients needed fixed orthodontic treatment included 1520 teeth were categorized into 3 Grades (G0: without resorption, G1: mild resorption with blunt roots or ≤ 1/4 of root length, G2: moderate to severe resorption or > 1/4 to 1/2 of root length. Relationship between root resorption and sex and treatment duration was analyzed with Mann-whitney and Spearman's correlation coefficient, respectively.Results: The findings showed that 345 teeth were categorized as Grade 1. Grade 2 of root resorption was not found in this study. The highest amount of root resorption was recorded for the mandibular lateral incisor. In both gender, the root resorption of the mandible was more than that of the maxilla. The males showed significantly higher rate of resorption than the females (P0.05.Conclusion: The mandible and male patients showed higher amount of root resorption. In addition, root resorption was not related to the treatment duration and the side of the jaws.

  17. Implementation of post treatment critical evaluation improved the quality of orthodontic care in postgraduate orthodontic clinic: A 10 years comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rashmi; Utreja, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Satinder Pal; Jena, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of post- treatment critical evaluation on the quality of orthodontic care in a postgraduate orthodontic clinic. Orthodontic treatment outcome of 109 consecutively treated cases was evaluated in Phase-I evaluation. Following Phase-I evaluation, PTCE of each case was made mandatory. After 6-years of implementation of compulsory PTCE for each case, orthodontic treatment outcome of all consecutively treated cases (n = 126) was evaluated (Phase-II). The treatment outcome was evaluated by American Board of Orthodontics Model Grading System (ABO MGS) and Subjective evaluation (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS). Based on the ABO scores, the cases were divided into three grades, that is, Grade-I, Grade-II, and Grade-III. The mean total ABO score was improved significantly in Phase-II evaluation (P evaluation (P quality of orthodontic care in a postgraduate orthodontic clinic. Grading one's own treatment improves the quality of future treatment.

  18. RapidNAM: generative manufacturing approach of nasoalveolar molding devices for presurgical cleft lip and palate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Franz Xaver; Schönberger, Markus; Gattinger, Johannes; Eblenkamp, Markus; Wintermantel, Erich; Rau, Andrea; Güll, Florian Dieter; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Loeffelbein, Denys J

    2017-08-28

    Nasoalveolar molding (NAM) is an accepted treatment strategy in presurgical cleft therapy. The major drawbacks of the treatment listed in the literature relate to the time of the treatment and the coordination of the required interdisciplinary team of therapists, parents, and patients. To overcome these limitations, we present the automated RapidNAM concept that facilitates the design and manufacturing process of NAM devices, and that allows the virtual modification and subsequent manufacture of the devices in advance, with a growth prediction factor adapted to the patient's natural growth. The RapidNAM concept involves (i) the prediction of three trajectories that envelope the fragmented alveolar segments with the goal to mimic a harmonic arch, (ii) the extrusion from the larger toward the smaller alveolar segment along the envelope curves toward the harmonic upper alveolar arch, and (iii) the generation of the NAM device with a ventilation hole, fixation pin, and fixation points for the nasal stents. A feasibility study for a vector-based approach was successfully conducted for unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients. A comparison of the modified target models with the reference target models showed similar results. For further improvement, the number of landmarks used to modify the models was increased by a curve-based approach.

  19. Does orthodontic treatment affect patients' quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyak, H Asuman

    2008-08-01

    The oral-facial region is usually an area of significant concern for the individual because it draws the most attention from other people in interpersonal interactions and is the primary source of vocal, physical, and emotional communication. As a result, patients who seek orthodontic treatment are concerned with improving their appearance and social acceptance, often more than they are with improving their oral function or health. Enhancing these aspects of quality of life is an important motive for undergoing orthodontic treatment. Regardless of age, patients' and their parents' or caregivers' expectations about improvements in oral function, esthetics, social acceptance, and body image are important for both general dentists and orthodontists to consider when advising patients about these procedures and during the treatment process. This review of research on the impact of conventional and surgical orthodontics on quality of life examines the association between oral health-related quality of life and severity and type of malocclusion, as well as the impact of treatment and patient characteristics on quality of life. The article will emphasize the importance of clinicians' having a clear understanding, before initiating treatment, of their patients' quality of life and their expectations about improvements in specific domains of quality of life.

  20. Non-pharmacological interventions for alleviating pain during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Padhraig S; Strydom, Hardus; Katsaros, Christos; MacDonald, Lci; Curatolo, Michele; Fudalej, Piotr; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2016-12-23

    Pain is prevalent during orthodontics, particularly during the early stages of treatment. To ensure patient comfort and compliance during treatment, the prevention or management of pain is of major importance. While pharmacological means are the first line of treatment for alleviation of orthodontic pain, a range of non-pharmacological approaches have been proposed recently as viable alternatives. To assess the effects of non-pharmacological interventions to alleviate pain associated with orthodontic treatment. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 6 October 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2016, Issue 9), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 6 October 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 6 October 2016) and EThOS (to 6 October 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing a non-pharmacological orthodontic pain intervention to a placebo, no intervention or another non-pharmacological pain intervention were eligible for inclusion. We included any type of orthodontic treatment but excluded trials involving the use of pre-emptive analgesia or pain relief following orthognathic (jaw) surgery or dental extractions in combination with orthodontic treatment. We excluded split-mouth trials (in which each participant receives two or more treatments, each to a separate section of the mouth) and cross-over trials. At least two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We used the random-effects model and expressed results as mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We investigated heterogeneity with reference to both clinical and methodological factors. We included 14

  1. Special considerations for orthodontic treatment in patients with root resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haru S. Anggani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthodontic treatment needs good consideration especially when there are unfavorable conditions for orthodontic treatment, such as periodontal diseases or tooth with root resorption. Root resorption should not become worse due to orthodontic treatment., All risk factors should be eliminated before orthodontic treatment is started. Otherwise, the goal of orthodontic treatment could be difficult to achieve because of poor dental and or oral health. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to learn more about mechanical factors that could worsen the root resorption that has already been there or even provoke root resorption to develop during orthodontic treatment. Reviews: Resorption of dental root surface is the condition in which cementum is depraved and the damage could also include dentin of dental root. It can occur either physiologically or pathologically due to some causes. The occurrence of the root resorption is suspected because of the biological factor, the tooth condition, the supportive tissue and the mechanical factors. Panoramic x-ray which routinely used to support diagnose in orthodontic cases, can detect root resorption in general, although sometimes periapical x-ray with parallel technique is needed to enhance the diagnosis. Before starting a treatment, the risk factors that suspected as the causes of root resorption should be eliminated, thus the mechanical treatment can be calculated. Conclusion: Orthodontic treatment in patient with root resorption should not escalate the root resorption which already occurs. The treatment should be done effectively by using optimal forces. Giving discontinued forces and avoiding intrusion and torque movements could reduce the risk factors of root resorption.Latar belakang: Keadaan gigi dan jaringan pendukung yang kurang menguntungkan bagi perawatan ortodontik hendaknya membutuhkan perhatian ekstra para klinisi. Kondisi tersebut misalnya adanya penyakit periodontal ataupun adanya

  2. Orthodontics treatment open byte with fixed Damon technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Jasna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the open bite is attributed to the combination of the skeletal, dental and soft tissue elements. Depending on the etiology there are different approaches in their solution from conventional to surgical orthodontic treatment. In boys, aged 15 years, was found anterior open bite. After diagnostic procedures and growth assessment, the Demon nonsurgical orthodontic treatment technique was performed. The use of mild force, low friction and early use of intraoral elastics, arterior vertikal and class II in the area of the side teeth, have enabled us to take advantage of favorable growth type maxillofacial complex by which we have achieved a satisfactory therapeutic effect and close the open bite.

  3. Orthodontic-surgical treatment of bilateral maxillary canine impaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old female patient reported with the chief complaint of irregular front teeth. She had a skeletal Class III and Angle′s Class I malocclusion with hyperdivergent growth pattern and bilateral impaction of maxillary canines. Surgical exposure of the impacted teeth and orthodontic alignment was planned. The surgical exposure was done by a minimally invasive modified window technique. Orthodontic treatment of impacted canines without causing significant morbidity to the adjacent teeth and periodontium is a challenge. The bilaterally impacted maxillary canines were successfully aligned and leveled. The depth of the gingival sulcus and clinical crown heights of disimpacted teeth were normal post-treatment and after 1 year of retention.

  4. Morphological changes in palatal rugae patterns following orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Ayman G; Allouh, Mohammed Z; Alshehab, Rawan M

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the morphometric changes that occur in palatal rugae during orthodontic treatment. The potential impact of these changes on the individuality of the palatal rugae patterns and on the use of palatal rugae patterns in human identification was also explored. Fifty pairs of pre- and post-orthodontic treatment dental casts were used. The palatal rugae patterns were compared between each pre-treatment cast and its post-treatment counterpart to reveal any morphometric changes. In addition, the individuality of the pre- and post-treatment sets of the casts was evaluated. Finally, a matching test of the palatal rugae patterns was performed in which the ability to match each post-treatment cast with its duplicate was compared with the ability to match that post-treatment cast with its pre-treatment counterpart. Statistical analysis of the results revealed the incidence of several morphometric changes, including segmentation (22%); unification (20%); changes in orientation (6%), shape (6%), and length (28%); anteroposterior displacement of the medial (54%) and lateral (60%) end of the ruga; and mediolateral displacement of the medial end of ruga (20%). The individuality of the palatal rugae patterns was confirmed in both pre- and post-treatment sets of casts. Finally, the mean percentage of correct matches was found to be significantly higher when the post-treatment casts were matched with their duplicates compared to when they were matched with their pre-treatment counterparts. The study revealed that Orthodontic treatment induces various morphometric changes in the palatal rugae patterns. These changes may potentially complicate palatal rugae-based human identification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. [Sequence orthodontic treatment of impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Pang, Xuannai; Nan, Lan; Mo, Shuixue

    2012-06-01

    To explore an effective orthodontic method for treating impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors. 12 impacted teeth of 11 cases were chosen. The position of the impacted teeth and the relations with neighbour tissues were assessed by X-ray images, oral examination and plaster model, etc. The impacted teeth were induced to erupt with the closed-eruption technique and fixed orthodontic appliances, root canal therapy, apicoectomy and prosthetic treatment. 12 impacted teeth were moved into arches, and the occlusal relationship was normal. There were no root resorption or conglutination in those impacted teeth. The labial impacted teeth of nine cases had bigger labial crown torsion. The root apexes of four impacted teeth were palpable under mucosa of the labial sulcus and operated by root canal therapy and apicoectomy. One of them received prosthetic treatment. Others (five cases) hadn't accepted root canal therapy, and were observed temporarily. The effects of two palatal impacted teeth was stable. It was a good method to expand indication with sequence orthodontic treatment. The impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors could be aligned with good esthetical and functional effect.

  6. 3D Image Modelling and Specific Treatments in Orthodontics Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionysis Goularas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present a 3D specific dental plaster treatment system for orthodontics. From computer tomography scanner images, we propose first a 3D image modelling and reconstruction method of the Mandible and Maxillary based on an adaptive triangulation allowing management of contours meant for the complex topologies. Secondly, we present two specific treatment methods directly achieved on obtained 3D model allowing the automatic correction for the setting in occlusion of the Mandible and the Maxillary, and the teeth segmentation allowing more specific dental examinations. Finally, these specific treatments are presented via a client/server application with the aim of allowing a telediagnosis and treatment.

  7. Orthodontic treatment with skeletal anchorage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Brahmanta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Correction of class I malocclusion with bimaxillary dental protrusion and unilateral free end right upper ridge in adult patient is one of difficult biomechanical case in orthodontics. Due to this case that needs proper anchorage for upper incisor retraction with missing teeth in the right posterior segment. Purpose: The aim of this study to find an effective therapy for correction of bimaxillary protrusion with unilateral free and ridge. Case: A female patient, 36 year old complaining for the difficulty of lip closure due to severe bimaxillary protrusion with incompetence lip. Case management: Firstly correction of the maxillary and mandibular incisor proclination were done by extraction of the mandibular first premolar, the maxillary second premolar on left side and finally placement of miniplates implant in the zygomatic process on right side as an absolut anchorage. Conclusion: Skeletal anchorage system (SAS can be considered as an effective therapy for corection of bimaxillary protrusion with unilateral free end ridge.Latar belakang: Koreksi dari maloklusi klas I dari penderita dewasa yang disertai protrusi bimaksiler dengan kehilangan gigi posterior pada regio kanan atas merupakan salah satu kasus sulit untuk dikerjakan terutama berhubungan dengan biomekanik pergerakan giginya dalam perawatan ortodonti. Tujuan: Tujuan dari penulisan artikel ini adalah untuk menemukan terapi yang efektif untuk perbaikan protrusi bimaksiler dan kehilangan gigi posterior pada satu sisi. Kasus: Seorang penderita wanita usia 35 tahun datang dengan keluhan utama kesulitan untuk menutup mulut oleh karena gigi rahang atas dan rahang bawahnya maju dan bibirnya tidak kompeten. Tatalaksana kasus: Koreksi pada gigi insisivus rahang atas dan insisivus rahang bawah yang protrusi dilakukan dengan melakukan pencabutan terlebih dahulu pada gigi premolar pertama dirahang bawah sisi kanan dan sisi kiri serta pencabutan pada gigi premolar kedua di rahang atas sisi

  8. Combined orthodontic and periodontic treatment in a child with Papillon Lefèvre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSarheed, Maha A; Al-Sehaibany, Fares S

    2015-08-01

    A 9-year-old girl with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) was treated orthodontically 24 months after the start of mechanical and antibiotic therapy in adjunct with periodontal treatment every 6 weeks. After achieving stable periodontal conditions, orthodontic treatment was commenced to correct the teeth position, facial profile, and maxillary protraction. Following the combination therapy and a failure to detect Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from any site in the oral cavity, orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance was performed aside from creating space for eruption of permanent teeth. We found that combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment of PLS may be successful with a complex interdisciplinary regimen and close follow up. This is a 2-year follow-up case report of a girl with PLS. Orthodontic and periodontic therapy were offered using combined treatments of orthodontic and periodontal with the benefit of prosthodontic consultation, resulting in a treatment plan.

  9. Factors related to orthodontic treatment time in adult patients

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    Ana Camila Esteves de Oliveira Melo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The length of time that it takes an orthodontist to treat adult patients varies widely. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate how different variables influence treatment time. METHODS: Seventy clinical case reports of successfully treated adult patients were examined. The patients were selected from 4,723 records held by three experienced orthodontists. The influence exerted by the following variables on treatment time was assessed: age, sex, facial pattern, severity of malocclusion (measured by the PAR index, sagittal relationship of canines, type of brackets (ceramic or metal, tooth extractions, missed appointments and orthodontic appliance issues/breakages, the latter being the dependent variable. Assessment was performed by multiple linear regression analysis, followed by the stepwise method with P < 0.05. RESULTS: The number of times a patient missed their appointment (no-show (R² = 14.4%, p < 0.0001 and the number of appliance issues/breakages (R² = 29.71%, p = 0.0037 significantly affected variability in treatment time, and these two variables together can predict 43.75% (R² total of the overall variability in treatment time. Other factors, such as canine relationship at the beginning of treatment, bracket type (metal or ceramic, tooth extractions, age at start of treatment, severity of the initial malocclusion, sex and facial pattern had no significant bearing on treatment time. CONCLUSIONS: The duration of orthodontic treatment in adults, when performed by experienced orthodontists, is mainly influenced by factors related to patient compliance. However, several factors which were not included in this study may contribute to variability in orthodontic treatment time.

  10. Healing of gingival recession following orthodontic treatment: a 30-year case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini-Prato, Giovan Paolo; Cozzani, Giuseppe; Magnani, Cristina; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2012-02-01

    This case report describes the healing of gingival recessions on mandibular incisors resulting from orthodontic treatment of a deep bite malocclusion at a 30-year follow-up observation. The marked improvement in the severe recessions was a consequence of the elimination of the direct trauma, orthodontic intrusion of the affected teeth, and subsequent creeping attachment over time. No periodontal treatment was performed before or after orthodontic treatment.

  11. Epidemiology of Malocclusion and Assessment of Orthodontic Treatment Need for Nepalese Children

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Varun Pratap; Sharma, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment needs among 12- to 15-year-old schoolchildren in eastern Nepal and compare the findings with those of other populations. Methods. Two thousand seventy-four children (1149 males and 925 females) aged between 12 and 15 years were evaluated. Their orthodontic treatment need was assessed using the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Needs (IOTN) (dental health component (DHC)). Angle’s classes of malocclusion were also eva...

  12. Surgery-first accelerated orthognathic surgery: orthodontic guidelines and setup for model surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Eric J W; Chen, Po-Hsung; Wang, Yu-Chih; Yu, Chung-Chih; Huang, C S; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2011-03-01

    The surgery-first approach indicates that the orthognathic surgery precedes the orthodontic treatment, whereas the orthodontics-first approach indicates that the orthodontic treatment precedes the orthognathic surgery. The conventional approach is an orthodontics-first approach. The purposes of this article are to introduce the concept of the surgery-first approach and to report the guidelines for orthodontic management and model surgery without presurgical orthodontic decompensation. The surgery-first approach treats facial esthetics first and then occlusion, whereas the conventional approach treats occlusion first and then facial esthetics. The surgery-first approach uses osteotomy to solve both skeletal problems and dental compensation, and a "transitional" occlusion is set up postoperatively. Orthodontics in the surgery-first approach is a postoperatively adjunctive treatment to transfigure the transitional occlusion into the solid final occlusion. The advantages of the surgery-first approach are that 1) the patient's chief complaint, dental function, and facial esthetics are achieved and improved in the beginning of the treatment; 2) the entire treatment period is shortened to 1 to 1.5 years or fewer depending on the complexity of orthodontic treatment; and 3) the phenomenon of postoperatively accelerated orthodontic tooth movement reduces the difficulty and treatment time of orthodontic management in the surgery-first approach. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pharmacological interventions for pain relief during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Aoife B; Harrison, Jayne E; Worthington, Helen V; Teague, Annabel

    2017-11-28

    Pain is a common side effect of orthodontic treatment. It increases in proportion to the amount of force applied to the teeth, and the type of orthodontic appliance used can affect the intensity of the pain. Pain during orthodontic treatment has been shown to be the most common reason for people wanting to discontinue treatment, and has been ranked as the worst aspect of treatment. Although pharmacological methods of pain relief have been investigated, there remains some uncertainty among orthodontists about which painkillers are most suitable and whether pre-emptive analgesia is beneficial. We conducted this Cochrane Review to assess and summarize the international evidence relating to the effectiveness of analgesics for preventing this unwanted side effect associated with orthodontic treatment. The objectives of this review are to determine:- the effectiveness of drug interventions for pain relief during orthodontic treatment; and- whether there is a difference in the analgesic effect provided by different types, forms and doses of analgesia taken during orthodontic treatment. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Trials Register (to 19 June 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL;the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 7), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 19 June 2017), Embase Ovid (1980 to 19 June 2017) and CINAHL EBSCO (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; 1937 to 19 June 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched on the 19 June 2017 for ongoing studies. We placed no restrictions on language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) relating to pain control during orthodontic treatment. Pain could be measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS), numerical

  14. Nickel allergy: blood and periodontal evaluation after orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzini, Camila A; Pereira, Luciano J; Peconick, Ana P; Marques, Leandro S; Paiva, Saul M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess periodontal status and blood parameters in orthodontic patients with nickel allergy one month after removal of brackets. Ninety-six randomly selected patients were initially evaluated. Allergy to nickel was diagnosed using a patch test. After determining the prevalence of subjects allergic to nickel, two groups were formed: 16 allergic (experimental) and 16 non-allergic (control) patients. Their periodontal status was determined regularly by a single, blinded, duly calibrated examiner using the Löe Index (GI) and their blood was tested (complete blood test, including nickel and IgE levels) after nine months of orthodontic treatment and again one month after removing the orthodontic appliances. Statistical analyses included paired and non-paired t-tests, Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon, McNemar and linear trend chi-square tests (p≤0.05). Comparison of the values recorded during orthodontic treatment and one month after removing the appliances showed that in the allergic group there was significant increase in eosinophils (p=0.046), basophils (p=0.001) and monocytes (p=0.002), and decrease in number of bands (p=0.000), while in the control group, there was increase in lymphocytes (p=0.039) and decrease in segmented neutrophils (p=0.030) and IgE levels (p=0.001). In both groups, plasma nickel levels increased (p=0.010; p=0.039) and GI scores decreased. One month after removing the brackets, blood and periodontal parameters from patients with and without nickel allergy were similar. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  15. Invasive cervical resorption following orthodontic treatment: Two cases involving the same patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshpe, Margarita; Kaufman, Arieh; Lin, Shaul; Gabay, Eran; Einy, Shmuel

    2016-01-01

    Invasive cervical resorption (ICR), a destructive form of external root resorption, is characterized by invasion of the fibrovascular tissue. This phenomenon is very rare and appears in 0.02% of the general population where the leading factors are orthodontics in addition to trauma, restorations, and bleaching. Heavy orthodontic force may increase the incidence to 1%. One of the main concerns regarding ICR is that it is often misdiagnosed with conventional diagnostic tools. In recent decades, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging technique has become more common and can lead to a more accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. This case report describes a possible association between orthodontic treatment and ICR of a 14-year-old male, 18 months post orthodontic treatment. ICR in the mandibular right canine was diagnosed and verified by CBCT, and underwent combined endodontic-periodontal treatment. However, after orthodontic forced eruption was performed on this tooth to improve the bone defect, ICR was diagnosed on the mandibular right second premolar. The possible association between orthodontic treatment and ICR is discussed, as ICR was noted following orthodontic treatment on both occasions. This case report stresses the importance of ICR early detection by close attention to periodic radiographic checkups during orthodontic treatment. The use of modern diagnostic tools is highly recommended in suspicious cases. A case is described in which the patient underwent two types of orthodontic treatment in the mandible at different time periods and developed ICR in two different teeth.

  16. [Orthodontic treatment need in school-age children in the Leningrad region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnenko, N M; Bagnenko, A S; Grebnev, G A; Madai, D Y

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiology of dentoalveolar anomalies is undoubtedly important, but in terms of the organization of orthodontic care, greater interest are data on the needs in this type of treatment. In a situation of limited manpower and resources for the provision of orthodontic care information about needs in orthodontic treatment allows you to define a group of patients with the primary need for orthodontic treatment, and to identify priorities to optimize the organization of orthodontic care in the region. Such data can be obtained by using the Dental Aesthetics Index (DAI) and Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). The aim of the study was to analyze the epidemiology of various forms of dentoalveolar anomalies school-age children of Kirishi district of Leningrad region, as well as their needs in orthodontic treatment in accordance with objective evaluation indices. The study involved 734 pupils of Kirishi lyceum №1 of Leningrad region. Analysis of the prevalence of dentoalveolar anomalies, as well as needs in the orthodontic treatment was conducted in three age groups: I mixed dentition period (6-9 years), II mixed dentition period (10-13 years), and permanent dentition (14-17). To determine the needs in the orthodontic treatment were used two most common international index (DAI and IOTN). In Kirishi district of Leningrad region dentoalveolar anomalies were found in 88.8% of children of school age, which is in accordance with the indices and IOTN DAI needs in orthodontic treatment is 38.8% and 54.5%, respectively. In order to reduce unnecessarily high load volume medical institutions orthodontic profile, optimize utilization of financial resources, as well as reducing social tension it is recommended to introduce the practice of doctors-orthodontists methodology for determining the needs in orthodontic treatment by objective indices.

  17. The treatment effects of Invisalign orthodontic aligners: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagravère, Manuel O; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2005-12-01

    The authors conducted a systematic review of the literature to determine the treatment effects of the Invisalign orthodontic system (Align Technology), Santa Clara, Calif.). The authors reviewed clinical trials that assessed Invisalign's treatment effects in nongrowing patients. They did not consider trials involving surgical or other simultaneous fixed or removable orthodontic treatment interventions. The authors searched electronic databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, EMBASE Excerpta Medica, Thomsen's ISI Web of Science and LILACS) with the help of a senior health sciences librarian. They used "Invisalign" as the sole search term, and 22 documents appeared in the combined search. Thereafter, they used "clinical trials," "humans" and "Invisalign treatment effects" as abstract selection criteria. Only two published articles met these inclusion criteria, though after reading the actual articles, the authors determined that they did not adequately evaluate Invisalign treatment effects. Both articles identified methodological issues. The inadequately designed studies the authors found represented only a lower level of evidence (level II). Therefore, the authors found that no strong conclusions could be made regarding the treatment effects of Invisalign appliances. Future prospective randomized clinical trials are required to support, with sound scientific evidence, the claims about Invisalign's treatment effects. Clinicians will have to rely on their Invisalign clinical experience, the opinions of experts and the limited published evidence when using Invisalign appliances.

  18. Psychosocial predictors of affect in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñacoba, Cecilia; González, M José; Santos, Noelia; Romero, Martín

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we propose to study the role of psychosocial variables in affect in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, considering that affect is a key variable in treatment adherence. Seventy-four patients (average age 33,24 ± 10,56) with metal multibracket-fixed orthodontic treatment were included. Patients were assessed twice. The first stage, at the beginning of treatment, included assessment of dental impact (Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire), trait anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), self-esteem (Rosenberg's self-esteem scale), and self-efficacy (General Self-efficacy Scale). In the second stage, 6 months later, positive and negative affect towards treatment was assessed using the Positive and Negative Affect Scale. Dental social impact differentiates between patients with high and low negative affect, while self-efficacy differentiates between patients with high and low positive affect. Trait anxiety and self-esteem differentiate between both types of affect (positive and negative). Trait anxiety and self-esteem (when trait anxiety weight is controlled) are significant predictor variables of affective balance. These results have important practical implications, because it seems essential to adopt a bio-psychosocial model incorporating assessment methods focusing on day-to-day changes in mood and well-being.

  19. A Survey of Orthodontic Treatment in Team Care for Patients With Syndromic Craniosynostosis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susami, Takafumi; Fukawa, Toshihiko; Miyazaki, Haruyo; Sakamoto, Teruo; Morishita, Tadashi; Sato, Yoshiaki; Kinno, Yoshiaki; Kurata, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Keiichiro; Asahito, Toshikazu; Saito, Isao

    2018-04-01

    To understand the actual condition of orthodontic treatment in team care for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis (SCS) in Japan. A nationwide collaborative survey. Twenty-four orthodontic clinics in Japan. A total of 246 patients with SCS. Treatment history was examined based on orthodontic records using common survey sheets. Most patients first visited the orthodontic clinic in the deciduous or mixed dentition phase. Midface advancement was performed without visiting the orthodontic clinic in about a quarter of the patients, and more than a half of the patients underwent "surgery-first" midface advancement. First-phase orthodontic treatment was carried out in about a half of the patients, and maxillary expansion and protraction were performed. Tooth extraction was required in about two-thirds of patients, and the extraction of maxillary teeth was required in most patients. Tooth abnormalities were found in 37.8% of patients, and abnormalities of maxillary molars were frequently (58.3%) found in patients who had undergone midface surgery below the age of 6 years. Many patients underwent "surgery-first" midface advancement, and visiting the orthodontic clinic at least before advancement was considered desirable. First-phase orthodontic treatment should be performed considering the burden of care. Midface advancement below the age of 6 years had a high risk of injury to the maxillary molars. This survey is considered useful for improving orthodontic treatment in team care of patients with SCS.

  20. Guidelines for periodontal care and follow-up during orthodontic treatment in adolescents and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran Levin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive periodontitis is characterized by non-contributory medical history, rapid attachment loss and bone destruction and familial aggregation of cases. Aggressive periodontitis (both localized and generalized is usually diagnosed in a young population. This is frequently the age that an orthodontic care is provided to this population. The aim of the present paper is to draw guidelines for periodontal evaluation and monitoring prior to and during active orthodontic treatment. Strict adherence to these guidelines as a routine protocol for periodontal examination prior, during and following orthodontic treatment may dramatically decrease the severity and improve the prognosis of patients with aggressive periodontitis in orthodontic clinics.

  1. [Fibrous dysplasia of maxilla and the orthodontic treatment. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syryńska, Maria; Szyszka, Liliana; Kowalczyk, Robert; Wedrychowska-Szulc, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Patients who have malocclusions caused by bone diseases come to see the dentist for the orthodontic treatment. One of these diseases is fibrous dysplasia. The aim of this study was to present the patient with the active form of fibrous dysplasia who reported to the Orthodontic Department of Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin for treatment. We used the patient's own documentation, photos, radiological view and histopathological investigations. The extraoral, clinical examination revealed the asymmetry of the face on the left side, while the intraoral examination showed the convex lesion similar to an egg on the palate which crosses the medial line and clear "distension" of the alveolar bone in the direction of the oral vestibule. The dysplastic lesions are extensive and cause numerous malocclusions and disorders of the symmetry. The radiological and histopathological examinations were added to the clinical examination. The panoramic radiographs have shown the asymmetry and heterogenic structure of the bone with areas of"ground glass". Computer tomography demonstrated bumpy thickening of the zygomatic bone, maxilla, and a great wing of the sphenoid bone and almost completely filled maxillary sinus. The histopathological examination is the confirmation of the diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia. It demonstrates immature bone. The diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia commands the periodic observation and the postponement of the orthodontic treatment in the stage of active development of lesions, but when the overgrowth impairs the function, there is the necessity to use surgical and radical excision to remove lesions. We must pay particular attention to the possibility of malignant transformation of these lesions.

  2. Pre-surgical treatment planning of maxillary canine impactions using panoramic vs cone beam CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqerban, A; Hedesiu, M; Baciut, M; Nackaerts, O; Jacobs, R; Fieuws, S; Willems, G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to compare the impact of using two-dimensional (2D) panoramic radiographs and three-dimensional (3D) cone beam CT for the surgical treatment planning of impacted maxillary canines. This study consisted of 32 subjects (19 females, 13 males) with a mean age of 25 years, referred for surgical intervention of 39 maxillary impacted canines. Initial 2D panoramic radiography was available, and 3D cone beam CT imaging was obtained upon clinical indication. Both 2D and 3D pre-operative radiographic diagnostic sets were subsequently analysed by six observers. Perioperative evaluations were conducted by the treating surgeon. McNemar tests, hierarchical logistic regression and linear mixed models were used to explore the differences in evaluations between imaging modalities. Significantly higher confidence levels were observed for 3D image-based treatment plans than for 2D image-based plans (p panoramic and cone beam CT images.

  3. EXTRACTION, ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT, AND CRANIOMANDIBULAR DYSFUNCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIBBETS, JMH; VANDERWEELE, LT

    Signs and symptoms attributed to craniomandibular dysfunction (CMD) were registered in the Groningen longitudinal prospective study over a 15-year period. It is concluded that none of the three treatment types-removable appliances, Begg mechanics, and chin cups-should be considered causal factors

  4. PATHOLOGICAL CONDITION AND ABNORMALITY FOUND ON PANORAMIC RADIOGRAPHIC EXAMINATION BEFORE ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Barunawaty Yunus

    2015-01-01

    Radiography is very useful as diagnostic aids and is widely used in dentistry. Panoramic radiography, as an inherent part of orthodontic examination, is a very useful in evaluating the condition of the jaw. This paper will discuss the role of panoramic radiography examination in pathologic condition and abnormalities of teeth and jaw to support the treatment planning of orthodontic treatment.

  5. Plaque, caries level and oral hygiene habits in young patients receiving orthodontic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martignon, S; Ekstrand, K R; Lemos, M I

    2010-01-01

    To assess plaque, caries, and oral hygiene habits amongst patients receiving fixed-orthodontic treatment at the Dental-Clinic, Universidad-El-Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia.......To assess plaque, caries, and oral hygiene habits amongst patients receiving fixed-orthodontic treatment at the Dental-Clinic, Universidad-El-Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia....

  6. Multiple congenitally missing teeth: treatment outcome with autologous transplantation and orthodontic space closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vecchione, Pietro

    2007-11-01

    Treatment for patients with congenitally missing teeth can be challenging. The treatment options include retaining the deciduous teeth, extracting the deciduous teeth and allowing the space to close spontaneously, implant replacement, autotransplantation, prosthetic replacement, and orthodontic space closure. Autologous transplantation and space closure with orthodontic appliances are demonstrated in this case report.

  7. Malocclusion severity in Asian men in relation to malocclusion type and orthodontic treatment need

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soh, J; Sandham, John; Chin, Yeen

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the severity of malocclusion in young Asian men in relation to types of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need. Methods: Study models of 339 male army recruits (age, 17-22 years) with no history of orthodontic treatment were assessed. The peer assessment

  8. Demand for orthodontic treatment among 9-18 year-olds seeking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate the demand for orthodontic treatment among 9-18 olds seeking dental care in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. Design: Case-control, interview and clinical study. Settings: Children seeking dental care. Main outcome measures: Demand for orthodontic treatment. Results: Most of the children (85%) in the ...

  9. An evaluation of willingness to pay for orthodontic treatments in patients of Shiraz Dental School Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Moshkelgosha DDS, MSc 1

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM:Estimation of need and demand for orthodontic treatment is important for both healthprofessionals and health policymakers. Need assessment is traditionally done using experts’ opinions;however, patient-centered evaluation can provide a bigger picture ofpatient’s esthetic and psychological needs. The willingness to pay(WTP technique is a potentially valid tool for assessing the patient views on their needs and for market research inhealthcare.The aim of this study was to evaluate the need anddemand for orthodontic treatment with a patient-centeredapproach using economic analysis.METHODS:A cross-sectional study was designed. Two hundred people attending Shiraz Dental School Clinic wereinterviewed. Their views on the importance and costs of orthodontic treatments and the maximum amountthat theywould pay for such treatments were obtained along with their demographic and socioeconomic factors. Their WTP wasused to elicit values for orthodontic treatment using contingent valuation method (CVM and econometric techniques.RESULTS:The response rate was 95%. Although 53.5% of respondents felt they needed orthodontic treatment, only33.7% had expressed their need, and just 17.5% hadactually gone for such treatment. The main reason for not takingthe treatment was its cost (56.5%. More than 60% of respondents viewed orthodontics as only a luxurytreatment and70% considered beauty and elegant smile as the most, or one of the most, benefit(s of orthodontic treatments. WTPresults showed that orthodontic services have highdemand elasticity. Assuming fixed monthly income of8 millionRials, 61% of subjects were ready to pay 20 millionRials for a course of orthodontic treatment.CONCLUSIONS:The result showed that esthetics and high cost of treatment were respectively the most intriguing andthemain inhibiting factors for getting orthodontic treatment. Economic evaluation showed a high elastic estimation fororthodontic treatment.

  10. Patients' perceptions, treatment need, and complexity of orthodontic re-treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Yijin; Boxum, Christo; Sandham, John

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the subjective perception and objective treatment need and complexity of patients seeking orthodontic re-treatment. One hundred subjects (66 females, 34 males, age 26.7+/-8.2 years) seeking re-treatment were asked to complete a questionnaire which was

  11. Quality of life and psychosocial outcomes after fixed orthodontic treatment: a 17-year observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrow, Peter; Brennan, David; Spencer, A John

    2011-12-01

    There is little evidence to suggest that orthodontic treatment can prevent or reduce the likelihood of dental caries or of periodontal disease or dental trauma and temporomandibular disorders, but there is a modest association between the presence of malocclusion/orthodontic treatment need and quality of life. However, little is known of the long-term outcomes of orthodontic treatment. This study reports on the longitudinal follow-up of quality of life and psychosocial outcomes of orthodontic treatment among a cohort of adults who were examined as adolescents in 1988/1989. Children who were examined in 1988/1989 were invited to a follow-up in 2005/2006. Respondents completed a questionnaire, which collected information on quality of life, receipt of orthodontic treatment and psychosocial factors, and were invited for a clinical examination. Oral health conditions including occlusal status using the Dental Aesthetic Index were recorded. Analysis of variance and multiple linear regression were used to examine the relationship between the measured factors. There was no statistically significant association between occlusal status at adolescence and quality of life at adulthood. Those individuals who had orthodontic treatment but did not need orthodontic treatment had higher self-esteem (23.1, SD 5.2) and were more satisfied with life (18.5, SD 3.7) than other treatment groups (self-esteem range, 20.0-22.7; life satisfaction range, 16.4-18.1), anovaP life, P life. Orthodontic treatment was negatively associated with psychosocial factors (life satisfaction; fixed orthodontic treatment (FOT) β = -0.91, P = 0.02 and self-esteem; FOT β = -1.39, P life and psychosocial factors. Receipt of fixed orthodontic treatment does not appear to be associated with oral health-related quality of life but appears to be negatively associated with self-esteem and satisfaction with life. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Treatment outcomes in 3 modes of orthodontic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Donald R; Baumrind, Sheldon; Vlaskalic, Vicki

    2002-02-01

    This study examined differences in pretreatment severity and treatment outcome among orthodontic patients treated in 3 different practice-management modes. Samples of pretreatment (T1) and end of treatment (T2) study casts were selected from traditional private practices (TPP, 3 offices, 81 cases), a dental corporation (COMP, 2 offices, 53 cases), and a dental management service organization (DMSO, 1 office, 36 cases). Orthodontic specialists had treated all patients. Cases were initially selected on a consecutive start basis. From each practice, the first 30 cases satisfying the study criteria were included in the sample. The T1 and T2 study casts were evaluated with the PAR and HLD indexes. The PAR and HLD indexes showed a high level of agreement on T1 cast scores but not on the T2 casts. Mean T1 scores were highest in the COMP cases, followed by the DMSO and the TPP cases. T2 scores were lowest in the TPP cases, followed by the DMSO and the COMP cases. The percentage of PAR score reduction showed that, in all 3 modes, patients were treated to a high standard.

  13. Compensatory orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion with anterior crossbite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Valladares Neto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of an adult patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion and anterior crossbite. A short cranial base led to difficulties in establishing a cephalometric diagnosis. The patient's main complaint comprised esthetics of his smile and difficulties in mastication. METHODS: The patient did not have the maxillary first premolars and refused orthognathic surgery. Therefore, the treatment chosen was orthodontic camouflage and extraction of mandibular first premolars. For maxillary retraction, the vertical dimension was temporarily increased to avoid obstacles to orthodontic movement. RESULTS: At the end of the treatment, ideal overjet and overbite were achieved. CONCLUSION: Examination eight years after orthodontic treatment revealed adequate clinical stability. This case report was submitted to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as part of the requirements to become a BBO diplomate.

  14. Factors correlated with developing caries during orthodontic treatment: Changes in saliva and behavioral risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Lara-Carrillo

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: The multiple caries-related factors examined in this study changed during orthodontic treatment, but many of these stayed within normal values. Saliva is an important protector of oral mucosal tissues and teeth, and its constant role is supported even in adverse conditions, such as the presence of orthodontic appliances in the mouth.

  15. Orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and biofilm formation-a potential public health threat?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Yijin; Jongsma, Marije A.; Mei, Li; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    OBJECTIVES: Orthodontic treatment is highly popular for restoring functional and facial esthetics in juveniles and adults. As a downside, prevalence of biofilm-related complications is high. Objectives of this review are to (1) identify special features of biofilm formation in orthodontic patients

  16. Records needed for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rischen, R.J.; Breuning, K.H.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditionally, dental models, facial and intra-oral photographs and a set of two-dimensional radiographs are used for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. As evidence is lacking, the discussion is ongoing which specific records are needed for the process of making an orthodontic

  17. Anterior tooth wear and retention type until 5 years after orthodontic treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, M.A.R.; Kiliaridis, S.; Renkema, A.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study occlusal wear of anterior teeth in orthodontic patients retained with different retainers until 5 years post-treatment, and to investigate whether type of retention influences occlusal wear. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Orthodontic patients (n=222), aged 15 years maximally at the start

  18. The prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment needs in school going children of Nalagarh, Himachal Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarabjeet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: There seems a discrepancy in the proportion of children needing orthodontic treatment on esthetic and dental health grounds. This study provides baseline data on the need and demand for orthodontic treatment among the sample which is important for planning public orthodontic and dental services.

  19. Management of periodontally compromised patient by orthodontic treatment: Does it help esthetically and biologically?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adults are always keen to know whether they can still opt for orthodontic treatment and they often ask the same question to the orthodontist and the orthodontist replies, it primarily depends on the health of the bone supporting the teeth. Yes, it is the bone health which is of prime importance to undergo orthodontic treatment. Here is a case report of a patient who underwent orthodontic treatment because of lower midline spacing and protrusion of the upper anteriors. The bone health of the upper and lower anteriors was compromised. At the end of the treatment, there was marked improvement in the bone level and the profile of the patient.

  20. Orthodontic treatment reduces the impact on children and adolescents' oral health-related quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eluza Piassi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Malocclusions treatment reduces the impact on children and adolescents' OHRQoL based on evidence assessed in the literature. The level of evidence was moderate to high to detect changes in the impact after orthodontic treatment.

  1. Psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics and desire for orthodontic treatment among Chinese undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Song Yi,1 Chuqin Zhang,2 Chulei Ni,1 Ying Qian,3 Jun Zhang4 1Department of Orthodontics, School and Hospital of Stomatology, 2Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology Department, The Second Affiliated Hospital & Yuying Children’s Hospital, 3Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, 4Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics in undergraduate students in the People’s Republic of China and to investigate the association between normal orthodontic treatment needs, psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics, and desire for orthodontic treatment.Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in two universities in a city of the People’s Republic of China with 374 young adults aged between 19 years and 24 years. The students answered a Chinese version of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ and addressed their desire for orthodontic treatment. Objective malocclusion severity was assessed with the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN. Statistical analysis was performed by the SPSS software (Version 15.0.Results: There was no statistical sex difference in relation to the dental health component of IOTN (P=0.893 and PIDAQ scores (P=0.06, but it was found that the desire for orthodontic treatment was significantly stronger among females. The total and subscale PIDAQ scores and malocclusion severity differed significantly among the five grades of desire (P<0.01. Significant positive correlation was found among desire for orthodontic treatment, IOTN-dental health component grades, and total or subscale PIDAQ scores (P<0.01. High correlation was found between desire and PIDAQ score (r=0.93.Conclusion: The desire for orthodontic treatment is higher among female young

  2. Effect of Fixed Orthodontic Treatment on Salivary Flow, pH and Microbial Count

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    Sepideh Arab

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was designed to evaluate the changes in saliva properties and oral microbial flora in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment.Materials and Methods: Two important saliva properties namely the salivary flow rate and pH as well as oral microbial flora were assessed in 30 orthodontic patients before starting fixed orthodontic treatment and after six, 12 and 18 weeks of treatment. Selective media, Sabouraud dextrose agar, Mitis salivarius agar and Rogosa agar were used for isolation of Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using Friedman and Dunn’s tests. P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: After six, 12 and 18 weeks of commencing fixed orthodontic treatment, the total colony counts of Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus showed a significant increase. The saliva pH decreased during the orthodontic treatment (P< 0.05 while the salivary flow did not change significantly. Conclusions: Fixed orthodontic treatment causes major changes in the saliva properties. The changes in oral microflora and saliva properties show the importance of caries preventive measures during orthodontic treatment.

  3. Clarifications, guidelines and questions about the dental bleaching "associated" with orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Consolaro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With regard to the best moment for carrying out or recommending dental bleaching to orthodontic patients, some explanations and orientations are given in order to answers the following questions: 1 Why orthodontic treatment completion is considered the best opportunity for carrying out the procedure? 2 Why dental bleaching should not be performed immediately before orthodontic treatment? 3 If that would be possible at any special case, what would that be? 4 Why dental bleaching should not be performed during orthodontic treatment? 5 If that would be possible at any special case, what would that be? This article highlights why it is essential to protect both the mucosa and the cervical region, regardless of the moment when dental bleaching is performed, whether associated with orthodontic treatment or not. The "how", "why" and "if" of whether or not it is convenient to perform dental bleaching before orthodontic treatment are still a matter of clinical suggestion, as it is a procedure that is under analysis, empirical knowledge waiting for scientific proof or disproof! Although tooth enamel has adamantine fluid flowing within it, providing a specific metabolism that is peculiar to its own and which could scientifically explain and base the option of carrying out teeth whitening before and during orthodontic treatment, we must still be very careful.

  4. Mathematical formulation of biomechanical parameters used in orthodontic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishna, A.; Vamsi, Ch. Raghu; Rao, V. D. Prasad; Swamy, Ch. Kishore; Kuladeep, B.

    2015-05-01

    Orthodontic Treatment is being widely practiced around the world for teeth straightening and extraction to improve alignment of remaining teeth. Here, forces are applied to correct the position of teeth. The force applied on the teeth isn't calibrated and applied arbitrarily based on the recommendations from scientific research and experience of the orthodontist. The number of settings and the total time required for the completion of treatment also remains arbitrary. So, there is a need for determining the force which is actually acting on the teeth and determining the optimal force required for the treatment of each and every individual case. In this paper a mathematical relation is derived between the force applied on the tooth and tooth displacement by considering a 2nd order non-homogeneous linear differential equation. As the tooth displacement is not a direct function of force applied, Biomechanical parameters like mass of tooth, stiffness and damping coefficient of periodontal ligament & alveolar bone are involved in the differential equation. By solving the equation, tooth displacement thereby, tooth velocity can be obtained for a particular force. On the other hand, based on the dimensions of the model, orthodontist could determine the total tooth displacement required for each setting of the treatment, so that, the total displacement is covered. The orthodontist uses the data and applies the required force on to the teeth, based on which the orthodontist can plan his treatment procedure and reduce the number of settings, total treatment time and also increases the success rate of the treatment.

  5. [Conservative treatment of upper anterior dental discrepancy during orthodontic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, G; Verzì, P; Pappalardo, S

    1999-06-01

    The orthodontic therapeutic sequence used in cases with dento-dental discrepancy for reduced mesiodistal size and congenital absent lateral upper incisors, is described. The importance of correct conoid tooth replacement in the programmed space between the other teeth and its restorative treatment in order to obtain the best biomechanical control is stressed. The contemporaneous presence of the form and volume anomaly of the 12th and the missing 22nd due to agenesia demanded an interdisciplinary approach. For the restoration of the conoid tooth the authors used a microhybrid composite for the alloy properties with the grain size of the inorganic particles. In fact this type of composite responds well to mechanical stress and has a high shining capacity and good aesthetical rendering. Meanwhile the temporary dental prothesis solution of the 22nd in this case has suggested the application of the artificial element on the superior Hawley holding plaque.

  6. Revised version of quality guidelines for presurgical epilepsy evaluation and surgical epilepsy therapy issued by the Austrian, German, and Swiss working group on presurgical epilepsy diagnosis and operative epilepsy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, Felix; Bast, Thomas; Czech, Thomas; Feucht, Martha; Hans, Volkmar H; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Noachtar, Soheyl; Oltmanns, Frank; Polster, Tilman; Seeck, Margitta; Trinka, Eugen; Wagner, Kathrin; Strzelczyk, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The definition of minimal standards remains pivotal as a basis for a high standard of care and as a basis for staff allocation or reimbursement. Only limited publications are available regarding the required staffing or methodologic expertise in epilepsy centers. The executive board of the working group (WG) on presurgical epilepsy diagnosis and operative epilepsy treatment published the first guidelines in 2000 for Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. In 2014, revised guidelines were published and the WG decided to publish an unaltered English translation in this report. Because epilepsy surgery is an elective procedure, quality standards are particularly high. As detailed in the first edition of these guidelines, quality control relates to seven different domains: (1) establishing centers with a sufficient number of sufficiently and specifically trained personnel, (2) minimum technical standards and equipment, (3) continuous medical education of employees, (4) surveillance by trained personnel during video electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring (VEM), (5) systematic acquisition of clinical and outcome data, (6) the minimum number of preoperative evaluations and epilepsy surgery procedures, and (7) the cooperation of epilepsy centers. These standards required the certification of the different professions involved and minimum numbers of procedures. In the subsequent decade, quite a number of colleagues were certified by the trinational WG; therefore, the executive board of the WG decided in 2013 to make these standards obligatory. This revised version is particularly relevant given that the German procedure classification explicitly refers to the guidelines of the WG with regard to noninvasive/invasive preoperative video-EEG monitoring and invasive intraoperative diagnostics in epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Wilckodontics--an alternative adult orthodontic treatment method: rational and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einy, Shmuel; Horwitz, Jacob; Aizenbud, Dror

    2011-01-01

    Adult orthodontics poses a challenge for practitioners as it involves unique biomechanical considerations due to biologic age related changes and lack of skeletal growth potential. Dental risks in adult orthodontics include, amongst others, root resorption and periodontal complications. As modern life calls for quick and efficient orthodontic treatments, a novel orthodontic modality was developed utilizing adjunctive periodontal surgery that includes bone corticotomy combined with bone augmentation. This multidisciplinary team approach: Periodontally Accelerated Osteogenic Orthodontics (PAOO) or Wilckodontics seems to be promising not only for reducing orthodontic treatment duration, but also for biological aspects during and after orthodontic treatment. PAOO enhances bone remodeling and augmentation, accelerates tooth movement and significantly reduces the duration of treatment. The presented cases manifest the biologic benefit of profound enlargement in the envelope of motion reducing the need for extraction and eliminating the need for aggressive intervention of surgically-assisted rapid maxillary expansion. PAOO serves as a reasonable and safe option for the growing demand of shortened treatment duration of adult teeth movement in three dimensions. Further research is recommended for an in depth evaluation of the long-term stability claimed to be advantageous in this modality.

  8. Lingual orthodontic treatment and absolute anchorage to correct an impacted maxillary canine in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaushu, Stella; Becker, Adrian; Chaushu, Gavriel

    2008-12-01

    There are 2 major drawbacks to the classic orthodontic-surgical approach for resolution of impacted teeth in adults: appearance and duration of treatment. This case report illustrates the lingual orthodontic treatment of an adult with an impacted maxillary canine; absolute anchorage was achieved with a miniscrew placed in the palate. The combination of invisible appliances and a nondental anchorage system is particularly useful in adults and should make treatment available to more patients.

  9. Reliability assessment and correlation analysis of evaluating orthodontic treatment outcome in Chinese patients

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Guang-Ying; Zhao, Zhi-He; Ding, Yin; Bai, Yu-Xing; Wang, Lin; He, Hong; Shen, Gang; Li, Wei-Ran; Baumrind, Sheldon; Geng, Zhi; Xu, Tian-Min

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the reliability of experienced Chinese orthodontists in evaluating treatment outcome and to determine the correlations between three diagnostic information sources. Sixty-nine experienced Chinese orthodontic specialists each evaluated the outcome of orthodontic treatment of 108 Chinese patients. Three different information sources: study casts (SC), lateral cephalometric X-ray images (LX) and facial photographs (PH) were generated at the end of treatment for 108 pat...

  10. The extended tentacles of laser - From diagnosis to treatment in orthodontics: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milling Tania, S D; Sathiasekar, Cynthia; Anison, Job Jacob; Samyukta Reddy, B V

    2015-08-01

    Since the introduction of lasers in dentistry in the mid-1990's, research in laser supported dental therapies is progressing at a rapid pace. Orthodontics is no exception. In orthodontics, lasers have many diagnostic, therapeutic, and biomodulating applications. To update the various applications of lasers in orthodontics. Lasers work by delivering energy in the form of light. Laser, striking the biological tissues can either get reflected, absorbed or scattered depending on several factors. Depending on the fate of the emitted laser, it can be applied for different diagnostic, therapeutic and surgical procedures. The knowledge and understanding of different types of lasers and its specific applications is a prerequisite before it can be applied beneficially. In Orthodontics, the versatility of laser has expanded into bonding, curing, debonding, imaging, growth modification, pain reduction, etc. Definitely laser has extended its tentacles from diagnosis to treatment in orthodontics.

  11. Nonextraction Treatment of Severe Crowding with the Aid of Corticotomy-Assisted Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljhani, Ali S.; Zawawi, Khalid H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper illustrates the combined nonextraction orthodontic treatment with the corticotomy technique in an adult patient (age: 25 years and 3 months) with severely crowded arches to accelerate tooth movement and shorten the treatment time. Both her upper lateral incisors were congenitally absent and both upper central incisors' roots were short. Initial fixed orthodontic appliances (bidimensional) were bonded and one week later buccal and lingual corticotomy with alveolar augmentation procedure in the maxilla and mandible was performed. Orthodontic activation to level and align and unravel the crowding was performed every two weeks. The total treatment time was 8 months with no adverse effects observed at the end of active treatment. The addition of the decortication procedure to the conventional orthodontic therapy decreased the duration of treatment significantly. Successful alignment of both arches with ideal overbite and overjet as well as adequate occlusion was achieved. PMID:22848854

  12. Nonextraction Treatment of Severe Crowding with the Aid of Corticotomy-Assisted Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali S. Aljhani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates the combined nonextraction orthodontic treatment with the corticotomy technique in an adult patient (age: 25 years and 3 months with severely crowded arches to accelerate tooth movement and shorten the treatment time. Both her upper lateral incisors were congenitally absent and both upper central incisors’ roots were short. Initial fixed orthodontic appliances (bidimensional were bonded and one week later buccal and lingual corticotomy with alveolar augmentation procedure in the maxilla and mandible was performed. Orthodontic activation to level and align and unravel the crowding was performed every two weeks. The total treatment time was 8 months with no adverse effects observed at the end of active treatment. The addition of the decortication procedure to the conventional orthodontic therapy decreased the duration of treatment significantly. Successful alignment of both arches with ideal overbite and overjet as well as adequate occlusion was achieved.

  13. Tratamiento ortopédico con moldeador nasoalveolar prequirúrgico en la fisura labiopalatina unilateral Orthopaedic treatment with presurgical nasoalveolar moulding in unilateral cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio José España-López

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describen 2 casos de niños con fisura labiopalatina unilateral total con gran separación de procesos alveolares, remitidos a nuestra unidad. Tras valoración por el equipo multidisciplinar se procede a realizar tratamiento ortopédico mediante moldeamiento nasoalveolar prequirúrgico durante 3,5 meses en un caso y 2 meses en el otro. A los 9 meses se mantiene la coalescencia de ambos procesos alveolares y la simetría nasal en ambos pacientes, existiendo una buena proyección de la punta nasal y longitud de la columela.We present two cases of children with total unilateral cleft lip and palate with a marked separation of alveolar segments. After evaluation by a multidisciplinart team, he children were treated with a presurgical nasoalveolar moulding for 2 months in one of them and 3.5 months in the other. At 9 months after the presurgical nasoalveolar moulding treatment, there was improved dental arch form, the cleft edges moved closer to each other, and improved symmetry of the nose in width, height, and columella lengths in both patients.

  14. Factors associated with the desire for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents and their parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background In the period of adolescence physical appearance takes on significant importance in the construction of personal identity, including one's relationship with one's own body. A variety of social, cultural, psychological and personal factors influences the self-perception of dental appearance and the decision to undergo orthodontic treatment. Adolescents who seek orthodontic treatment are concerned with improving their appearance and social acceptance. The aim of the present study was to determine factors associated to the desire for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents and their parents. Methods The sample consisted of 403 subjects aged 14 to 18 years, selected randomly from a population of 182,291 schoolchildren in the same age group. The outcome variable "desire for orthodontic treatment" was assessed through a questionnaire. Self-perception of dental aesthetics was assessed using the Oral Aesthetic Subjective Impact Scale (OASIS) and the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI) was used for clinical assessment. Statistical analysis involved the chi-square test as well as both simple and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results The majority (78%) of the Brazilian adolescents desired orthodontic treatment and 69% of the parents reported that their children were not in orthodontic treatment due to the high costs involved. There was significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between the desire for orthodontic treatment and most types of malocclusion. However, there was no significant association between the desire for orthodontic treatment and the variables gender and age. Conclusions The following were considered factors associated to the desire for treatment: upper anterior crowding ≥ 2 mm and parents' perception of their child's need for treatment. PMID:20021649

  15. Factors associated with the desire for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents and their parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filogônio Cintia B

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the period of adolescence physical appearance takes on significant importance in the construction of personal identity, including one's relationship with one's own body. A variety of social, cultural, psychological and personal factors influences the self-perception of dental appearance and the decision to undergo orthodontic treatment. Adolescents who seek orthodontic treatment are concerned with improving their appearance and social acceptance. The aim of the present study was to determine factors associated to the desire for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents and their parents. Methods The sample consisted of 403 subjects aged 14 to 18 years, selected randomly from a population of 182,291 schoolchildren in the same age group. The outcome variable "desire for orthodontic treatment" was assessed through a questionnaire. Self-perception of dental aesthetics was assessed using the Oral Aesthetic Subjective Impact Scale (OASIS and the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI was used for clinical assessment. Statistical analysis involved the chi-square test as well as both simple and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results The majority (78% of the Brazilian adolescents desired orthodontic treatment and 69% of the parents reported that their children were not in orthodontic treatment due to the high costs involved. There was significant association (p ≤ 0.05 between the desire for orthodontic treatment and most types of malocclusion. However, there was no significant association between the desire for orthodontic treatment and the variables gender and age. Conclusions The following were considered factors associated to the desire for treatment: upper anterior crowding ≥ 2 mm and parents' perception of their child's need for treatment.

  16. [Arguments and counter-arguments about the orthodontic treatment of missing incisors. Literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaan, Miklós

    2010-09-01

    An article of Czochrowska, Skaare, Stenvik and Zachrisson was published about the possibilities of orthodontic treatment of missing upper central incisors, in the American Journal of Orthodontics, in July 2003. This article generated a heavy discussion among the readers of this periodical. A lot of orthodontists published their pros and cons about the advantages and disadvantages of orthodontic space closure. The purpose of this review is to collect the opinions and arguments about the topic from the orthodontic literature. There are some long-term, follow-up studies which compared the results of the orthodontic and prosthetic solutions after the treatment of missing upper incisors. The better-known studies are Nordquist and McNeil' s work published in the Journal of Periodontology (1975) and the publication of Robertsson and Mohlin published in the European Journal of Orthodontics (2000). The long-term studies argued that from the aspect of patients' satisfaction and periodontal or functional evaluation the orthodontic treatments ensured better results than either the prosthodontic or implantological approaches. These statements are contentious by a lot of experts and so it is important to review all the aspects of this topic.

  17. Correlation coefficients of three self-perceived orthodontic treatment need indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Eslamipour

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Due to the sensitivity and specificity of the three self-perceived indices, these indices are not recommended for population screening and should be used as adjuncts to a normative index for decision-making in orthodontic treatment planning.

  18. Orthodontic treatment with a series of removable appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenin, David A; Trosien, Andrew H; Fong, Patricia F; Miller, Robert A; Lee, Rodney S

    2003-09-01

    In the United States, the demand for straight white teeth has never been more important to patients. Crowded, poorly aligned teeth are not esthetically pleasing and are difficult to keep clean. However, until recently, the process of straightening the teeth typically has involved appliances involving bands, brackets and wires that also can be difficult to clean. The desire for a cosmetic solution to misaligned teeth has led to an increase in the number of patients seeking veneers, crowns and other laboratory-fabricated cosmetic restorations. Some clinicians are not aware that there are other ways to align teeth without either significant enamel reduction or conspicuous fixed orthodontic appliances. An alternative method of treatment, involving a series of clear removable appliances, circumvents this shortcoming and enables tooth alignment while avoiding deterioration in the cosmetics of the smile during treatment. This article describes a method of treatment, Invisalign (Align Technology, Santa Clara, Calif.), that clinicians can use in conjunction with 3-D computer models to accomplish the esthetic and oral hygiene objectives during and after treatment. The authors present three case reports, all involving a chief concern of crowding. The first case involved treatment of both arches by interproximal reduction, alignment of teeth and leveling the curve of Spee. The second case involved treatment of both arches by proclination, expansion and minor interproximal reduction. The final case shows relief of lower-arch crowding via lower-incisor extraction. In addition to satisfying the patient's chief concern of desiring straight teeth, this method of treatment satisfies additional objectives of esthetic treatment and esthetic results with significant oral hygiene benefits. Clinicians can address a patient's chief concern effectively without requiring an inventory of appliances (such as bands, brackets, wires and instruments). Furthermore, the use of 3-D computer models

  19. Factors associated with the desire for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Leandro S; Pordeus, Isabela A; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L; Filogônio, Cid A; Filogônio, Cintia B; Pereira, Luciano J; Paiva, Saul M

    2009-12-18

    In the period of adolescence physical appearance takes on significant importance in the construction of personal identity, including one's relationship with one's own body. A variety of social, cultural, psychological and personal factors influences the self-perception of dental appearance and the decision to undergo orthodontic treatment. Adolescents who seek orthodontic treatment are concerned with improving their appearance and social acceptance. The aim of the present study was to determine factors associated to the desire for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents and their parents. The sample consisted of 403 subjects aged 14 to 18 years, selected randomly from a population of 182,291 schoolchildren in the same age group. The outcome variable "desire for orthodontic treatment" was assessed through a questionnaire. Self-perception of dental aesthetics was assessed using the Oral Aesthetic Subjective Impact Scale (OASIS) and the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI) was used for clinical assessment. Statistical analysis involved the chi-square test as well as both simple and multiple logistic regression analyses. The majority (78%) of the Brazilian adolescents desired orthodontic treatment and 69% of the parents reported that their children were not in orthodontic treatment due to the high costs involved. There was significant association (p or = 2 mm and parents' perception of their child's need for treatment.

  20. Expectations Of Orthodontic Treatment In Adults: The Conduct In Orthodontist/patient Relationship.

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza, Ricardo Alves; de Oliveira, André Frutuoso; Pinheiro, Suélem Maria Santana; Cardoso, Jefferson Paixão; Magnani, Maria Beatriz Borges de Araújo

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The high demand for orthodontic treatment, evidenced over the last few decades, has been justified mainly by the greater importance given to facial esthetics, influencing individual's self esteem. However, the professional frequently does not meet all the patient's expectations, for not establishing good communication and not knowing about the critical points during orthodontic treatment. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to elucidate patients' desires and doubts regarding or...

  1. Impacted maxillary central incisor: surgical exposure and orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Teresa; Neves, Manuel; Alves, Célia

    2011-08-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a patient with a horizontally impacted maxillary central incisor, a canine in the same quadrant, and an inclusion tendency. Due to severe crowing in the maxilla and the Class II molar relationship on the impaction side, a 2-stage treatment plan was developed. In the first stage, the right first premolar and deciduous canine were extracted; this allowed enough space for the eruption of the maxillary right permanent canine. The second stage included surgical exposure and traction of the impacted central incisor with a fixed orthodontic appliance. An excisional uncovering technique was needed to expose the impacted incisor. After it erupted, an apically positioned partial-thickness flap was used to add keratinized attached gingiva in the area surrounding the crown, initially located in an area of unattached gingiva. The patient finished treatment with a normal and stable occlusion between the maxillary and mandibular arches and an adequate width of attached gingiva. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Orthodontic treatment of impacted maxillary canines: an appraisal of prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Crescini, Aldo; Nieri, Michele; Rotundo, Roberto; Pini Prato, Giovan Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of pre-treatment radiographic features (alpha-angle, d-distance and s-sector) on the duration of active orthodontic traction of impacted maxillary canines treated by a combined surgical (flap approach) and orthodontic (direct traction to the center of the ridge) treatment. A study population of 168 patients (168 canines) was evaluated. Multiple regression analysis was used. Pre-treatment radiographic variables were associated significantly with the duration of orthodontic traction. Age, gender and site of impaction did not affect the duration of traction significantly. Alpha-angle, d-distance and s-sector are valid indicators for the duration of orthodontic traction.

  3. Orthodontic treatment in patient with idiopathic root resorption: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Rey

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple idiopathic external root resorption is a rare pathological condition usually detected as an incidental radiographic finding. External root resorption of permanent teeth is a multifactorial process related to several local and systemic factors. If an etiological factor cannot be identified for root resorption, the term "idiopathic" is applied. This report presents a case of multiple idiopathic apical root resorption. The condition was found in a young female patient seeking orthodontic treatment due to malocclusion. This kind of resorption starts apically and progresses coronally, causing a gradual shortening and rounding of the remaining root. Patients with this condition are not the ideal candidates for orthodontic treatment; however, the aim of this report is to describe an unusual case of idiopathic root resorption involving the entire dentition, and to present the orthodontic treatment of this patient. It describes the progress and completion of orthodontic therapy with satisfactory end results.

  4. Detection of molecular biomarkers as a diagnostic tool in the planning and progression of orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Gaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment focuses on providing patient care at the appropriate timing to utilize the growth potential for best results. It involves growth modification of the craniofacial region along with alveolar bone remodeling during tooth movement. The dynamic process of bone metabolism involves the release of biochemical mediators in the circulation. These molecules are indicative of the bone remodeling activity of osteoblastic deposition and osteoclastic resorption. Such biomarkers when detectable in the systemic circulation highlight the skeletal maturity of orthodontic patients and when detected locally as, in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF and saliva, indicate the progression of orthodontically induced alveolar bone remodeling. Assessment of molecular biomarkers of bone remodeling in the body fluids would aid the clinicians in planning orthodontic treatment at the ideal timing and evaluating the advent of the treatment.

  5. Treatment outcome for a sample of patients with Class II division 1 malocclusion treated at a regional hospital orthodontic department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burden, D J

    1998-01-01

    This retrospective study assessed the outcome of orthodontic treatment of 264 patients with Class II division 1 malocclusion (overjet greater than 6 mm). The sample comprised patients who had completed their fixed appliance orthodontic treatment at a regional hospital orthodontic unit in the Republic of Ireland. The PAR Index (Peer Assessment Rating) was used to evaluate treatment outcome using before and after treatment study casts. The results revealed that treatment for this particular type of malocclusion was highly effective with a very few patients failing to benefit from their orthodontic treatment.

  6. Management of impacted all canines with surgical exposure and alignment by orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Katiyar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine impaction is a dental problem very often encountered in orthodontic practice. After the third molar, the canine is the most frequently impacted tooth. Bringing the impacted canine into a normal position is important for functional occlusion and the final esthetics of the orthodontic treatment. This article illustrates a peculiar case, in which all four permanent canines maintained their unerupted status at age of 16 years. All four impacted canines were surgically exposed, attachment bonded, traction given with K-9 spring and ideally positioned with fixed orthodontic mechanotherapy.

  7. A Comparison of pical Root Resorption in Incisors after Fixed Orthodontic Treatment with Standard Edgewise and Straight Wire (MBT) Method

    OpenAIRE

    Zahed Zahedani, SM; Oshagh, M; Momeni Danaei, Sh; Roeinpeikar, SMM

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: One of the major outcomes of orthodontic treatment is the apical root resorption of teeth moved during the treatment. Identifying the possible risk factors, are necessary for every orthodontist. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the rate of apical root resorption after fixed orthodontic treatment with standard edgewise and straight wire (MBT) method, and also to evaluate other factors effecting the rate of root resorption in orthodontic treatments. Materials ...

  8. A Comparison of Apical Root Resorption in Incisors after Fixed Orthodontic Treatment with Standard Edgewise and Straight Wire (MBT) Method

    OpenAIRE

    Zahed Zahedani SM.; Oshagh M.; Momeni Danaei Sh.; Roeinpeikar SMM.

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: One of the major outcomes of orthodontic treatment is the apical root resorption of teeth moved during the treatment. Identifying the possible risk factors, are necessary for every orthodontist. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the rate of apical root resorption after fixed orthodontic treatment with standard edgewise and straight wire (MBT) method, and also to evaluate other factors effecting the rate of root resorption in orthodontic treatments.Materials a...

  9. Posterior crossbite and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs): need for orthodontic treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilander, Birgit; Bjerklin, Krister

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work was to update the bibliography regarding the concept of 'temporomandibular disorder (TMD)' and 'posterior crossbite' and try to find out if there is any association between some special signs/symptoms of TMD and type of posterior crossbite. A literature search from 1970 to 2009, due to specified criterion, resulted in 14 publications that were found to be relevant for the present systematic review. An association between TMD and posterior crossbite (Yes-group) was reported as often as absence of such a relationship (No-group). The samples in the two groups showed similarities as well as differences with respect to number, gender, and age. Most articles reported only on 'presence' or 'absence' of crossbite and only few on type of crossbite opposite to a thorough account of clinical signs and symptoms of TMD. This review seems, however, to state that a functional posterior crossbite (mandibular guidance with midline deviation) is associated with headache, temporomandibular joint and muscular pain, and clicking. As evident from the discussion, such type needs orthodontic treatment to rehabilitate the asymmetric muscular activity between the crossbite and non-crossbite sides and the changed condyle/temporal relationship caused by mandibular deviation. Whether this treatment also will avoid future TMD problems can be answered only after clinical follow-up studies have been performed.

  10. Obesity and orthodontic treatment: is there any direct relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Consolaro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Obesity is a wide-spread condition directly or indirectly connected with an increase in the prevalence of a variety of human diseases. It affects over 50% of the western overall population. In 2017, a thorough analysis of 204 studies on obesity and cancer revealed that the condition increases the risk of the following types of cancer: stomach, colon, rectal, bile duct, pancreatic, esophagus, breast, endometrial, ovarian, kidney and multiple myeloma. The first study aiming at establishing a connection between obesity and the rate of induced orthodontic tooth movement was conducted by Saloom et al; however, it could not effectively nor significantly reveal any direct influence or effect. Despite being identified during the first week, differences could not be explained and treatment time remained unchanged. In spite of lack of studies in the literature on the connection between obesity and the rate of induced tooth movement, in clinical practice, courses or specialized training, we should not have protocols changed nor adopt any measures or expect significant differences between normal-weight and obese individuals. It should be emphasized that unsuccessful cases or cases of root resorption associated with treatment should not be assigned to obesity, since scientific data is insufficient to do so.

  11. Localized Piezoelectric Alveolar Decortication for Orthodontic Treatment in Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charavet, C; Lecloux, G; Bruwier, A; Rompen, E; Maes, N; Limme, M; Lambert, F

    2016-08-01

    This randomized controlled trial aimed to evaluate the benefits and clinical outcomes of piezocision, which is a minimally invasive approach to corticotomy that is used in orthodontic treatments. Twenty-four adult patients presenting with mild overcrowdings were randomly allocated to either a control group that was treated with conventional orthodontics or a test group that received piezo-assisted orthodontics. The piezocisions were performed 1 wk week after the placement of the orthodontic appliances. Neither grafting material nor sutures were used. All patients were followed every 2 wk, and archwires were changed only when they were no longer active. The periods required for the completion of the overall orthodontic treatments were calculated, and the periodontal parameters were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the orthodontic treatment. Patient-centered outcomes were assessed with a visual analog scale; analgesic use following the procedures was also recorded. The patient characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. The overall treatment time was significantly reduced by 43% in the piezocision group as compared with the control group. In both groups, periodontal parameters (i.e., recession depth, pocket depth, plaque index, and papilla bleeding index) remained unchanged between the baseline and treatment completion time points. No increase in root resorption was observed in either group. Scars were observed in 50% of the patients in the piezocision group. Analgesic consumption was similar following orthodontic appliance placement and piezocision surgery. Patient satisfaction was significantly better in the piezocision group than in the control group. In these conditions, the piezocision technique seemed to be effective in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. No gingival recessions were observed. The risk of residual scars might limit the indications for piezocision in patients with a high smile line (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02590835).

  12. Orthodontic treatment stability predictors: A retrospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bernabé, Paloma González-Gil; Montiel-Company, José María; Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa; Gandía-Franco, Jose Luis; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    To examine medium- to long-term orthodontic treatment stability and its possible association with certain variables. In a retrospective longitudinal study of 70 postretention patients, the Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index was measured at the start (T1) and end (T2) of treatment and between 4 and 10 years afterwards (T3). The stability was considered absolute when the T2 and T3 values were identical and relative when the difference was within the ±5 range. Among the 70 patients, 65.8% were female and 34.2% were male. Their mean age was 14.5 years. The mean treatment length was 2.4 years. The mean retention phase was 3.3 years. The mean pre- and posttreatment PAR scores were 29.8 (T1) and 6.3 (T2). The mean T1-T2 difference was 23.6. The mean T2-T3 difference was -0.39. Within the study, 7.1% presented absolute stability and 68.6% presented relative stability. Lower anterior segment alignment and overbite were the most unstable occlusal features and tended to worsen. Fixed retainer (odds ratio [OR] 0.31; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.10-0.98) as a protective factor and years without retention (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.03-1.68) as a risk factor are predictor variables of instability in the case of lower anterior segment alignment. The PAR value at the end of treatment (OR 1.29; 95% CI 1.08-1.54) and extractions (OR 4.76; 95% CI 1.05-21.6) before treatment are predictors for midline instability.

  13. Nickel hypersensitivity and orthodontic treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gölz, Lina; Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Jäger, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Nickel-containing alloys are widely used in orthodontic appliances, even though nickel is by far the most common contact allergen. However, the scientific evidence concerning allergic reactions to nickel in orthodontic patients has not been evaluated systematically. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the prevalence of nickel hypersensitivity is affected by orthodontic treatment. Unrestricted electronic and manual searches were performed until July 2013 for human clinical studies assessing orthodontic treatment and nickel hypersensitivity. Methodological limitations were evaluated with the Downs and Black tool. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from random-effects meta-analyses, followed by subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Thirty studies were included in the review, and 24 datasets with 10 184 patients in the meta-analyses. Orthodontic treatment had no significant effect on nickel hypersensitivity (n = 11; crude OR 0.99; 95%CI: 0.78-1.25; p = 0.914). However, when confounding from factors such as sex and piercings was taken into account, orthodontic treatment was associated with a lower risk of hypersensitivity (n = 1; adjusted OR 0.60; 95%CI: 0.40-0.80; p nickel hypersensitivity, especially when it precedes piercings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Planning of volume and terms of orthodontic treatment of patients with transversal maloclusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Смаглюк, Любовь В; Белоус, Алевтина Н

    2016-01-01

    In planning of orthodontic treatment, as well as the alleged end of the treatment of orthodontic patients with transversal malocclusion should first pay attention to the treatment of opportunistic diseases that can affect the outcome of treatment of orthodontic patients (for example, rehabilitation of the nasopharynx, the treatment of rickets, the treatment of scoliosis posture, scoliosis ). definition of related factors affecting the volume and timing of the treatment of patients with transversal malocclusion. There were examined 32 patients with transversal malocclusion, and studied their medical history (Form 043). Patients were examined by standard algorithm survey. Two groups of patients by sex: Group 1: girls - 16 people and 2-th group: boys- 16 people. The material collected from 2010 to 2015. Patient age - 12-17 years. Subjective attitude to the disease formed on the basis of a number of factors that can be grouped into the following categories: social and constitutional and individual psychological. Since incorrect posture and malocclusion are the cause and effect of each other, in such cases should be treated at the same time and bite and pathology of the musculoskeletal system (10, 11). It is clear that in the planning of orthodontic treatment should be part and treatment of posture and a close and fruitful collaboration with the doctor traumatologist orthopaedist. The sex of the patient, especially temperament, the doctor-patient relationship, as well as the presence of somatic diseases have a significant impact on the length and complexity of the orthodontic treatment.

  15. A Rare Case of Apical Root Resorption during Orthodontic Treatment of Patient with Multiple Aplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Chintan M; Mahida, Khyati; Agrawal, Charu C; Bothra, Jitendrakumar; Mashru, Ketan

    2015-01-01

    External apical root resorption is an adverse effect of orthodontic treatment. It reduces the length of root and breaks the integrity of teeth and dental arch. Orthodontics is the only dental specialty that clinically uses the inflammatory process to correct the mal-aligned teeth. Hence, it is necessary to know the risk factors of root resorption and do everything to reduce the rate of root resorption. Hence, all predisposing factors which are systemic as well as local should be considered be...

  16. Nickel allergy in a Swedish adolescent population and its relation to orthodontic treatment and lifestyle factors

    OpenAIRE

    Fors, Ronny

    2008-01-01

    Nickel stands out as the main cause of contact allergy in both children and adults, which has given rise to concern and the introduction of regulations by official bodies. Today´s youths are frequently exposed to body piercing and orthodontic treatment. Changes in youth lifestyle practices are also likely to influence nickel exposure and thus, the occurrence of nickel allergy. However, against patient and parental concern regarding nickel exposure to orthodontic appliances, often evoked by al...

  17. Orthodontic and orthopaedic treatment for anterior open bite in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentini-Oliveira, Débora A; Carvalho, Fernando R; Rodrigues, Clarissa Garcia; Ye, Qingsong; Prado, Lucila B F; Prado, Gilmar F; Hu, Rongdang

    2014-09-24

    Anterior open bite occurs when there is a lack of vertical overlap of the upper and lower incisors. The aetiology is multifactorial including: oral habits, unfavourable growth patterns, enlarged lymphatic tissue with mouth breathing. Several treatments have been proposed to correct this malocclusion, but interventions are not supported by strong scientific evidence. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate orthodontic and orthopaedic treatments to correct anterior open bite in children. The following databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 14 February 2014); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL)(The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 1); MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 14 February 2014); EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 14 February 2014); LILACS via BIREME Virtual Health Library (1982 to 14 February 2014); BBO via BIREME Virtual Health Library (1980 to 14 February 2014); and SciELO (1997 to 14 February 2014). We searched for ongoing trials via ClinicalTrials.gov (to 14 February 2014). Chinese journals were handsearched and the bibliographies of papers were retrieved. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of orthodontic or orthopaedic treatments or both to correct anterior open bite in children. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of all reports identified. Risk ratios (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for dichotomous data. The continuous data were expressed as described by the author. Three randomised controlled trials were included comparing: effects of Frankel's function regulator-4 (FR-4) with lip-seal training versus no treatment; repelling-magnet splints versus bite-blocks; and palatal crib associated with high-pull chincup versus no treatment.The study comparing repelling-magnet splints versus bite-blocks could not be analysed because the authors interrupted the treatment earlier than planned due to side effects in four of ten patients

  18. Impact of social and economic characteristics on orthodontic treatment among children and teenagers in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germa, A; Kaminski, M; Nabet, C

    2010-04-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of orthodontic treatment in France among children and teenagers aged 8-18 years, by sex and by age, and to investigate the specific role of social and economic characteristics on use of orthodontic treatment. We analyzed data from the cross-sectional national health survey conducted in France in 2002-2003, which included a sample of 5988 children aged 8-18 years. All data were collected by interview including the question on orthodontic treatment. Other data used in our study were family social status and income, maternal educational attainment and place of birth, whether the child was covered by a supplementary health insurance and whether the residence was urban or rural. We also calculated the density of orthodontists in the district. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to study the relationships between these social and economic factors and orthodontic treatment. The prevalence of orthodontic treatment was 14% of all children aged 8-18, 15% for girls, and 13% for boys, and 23% in the 12 to 15-year age group. Children were less likely to have orthodontic treatment when parents were service or sales workers compared with children whose parents were managers or professionals (aOR = 0.50; 95%CI: [0.34;0.76]), when family income was in the lowest, compared with highest quartile (aOR = 0,62; 95% CI: [0.45;0.85]), when children had no supplementary insurance compared with children covered by private insurance (aOR = 0.53; 95% CI: [0.34; 0.81]), or when they lived in rural compared with urban areas (aOR = 0.70; 95% CI: [0.54; 0.91]). There are social inequalities in orthodontic treatment in France, associated mainly with social status, annual income, supplementary insurance, and the residence area.

  19. Patient and parent satisfaction following autotransplantation and associated orthodontic treatment delivered by an interdisciplinary team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shargill, I; Nandra, S; Day, P; Houghton, N

    2014-02-01

    To survey patient and parent satisfaction with premolar transplantation and the associated orthodontic treatment. A postal service evaluation questionnaire was used to survey patient and parent satisfaction for children who had completed treatment involving premolar transplantation and the associated orthodontics. Patients and parents each completed separate questionnaires. For some questions a Likert scale from 1 to 10 was used. Questionnaires were sent to 41 patients and their parents who had premolar transplants and orthodontic treatment. Following repeat mailing of the questionnaires: 20 of the patient and 25 parent questionnaires were completed and returned. Patients and parents felt there was a large improvement in dental appearance (median scores 8 and 10) and were highly satisfied with the final appearance (median scores 8 and 9). Both groups felt that treatment transition between departments was very good (median scores 9 and 9). Patients experienced moderate discomfort during their premolar transplant surgery and during their orthodontic treatment (scores 6 and 5, respectively). Most patients and parents would recommend this type of treatment (92 and 88%, respectively). Overall, patients and parents report high levels of satisfaction with all aspects of their premolar transplant and their associated orthodontic treatment.

  20. A comparative study of combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and clear aligners in patients with periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose With the increasing prevalence of orthodontic treatment in adults, clear aligner treatments are becoming more popular. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of orthodontic treatment on periodontal tissue and to compare orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances (FA) to clear aligner treatment (CAT) in periodontitis patients. Methods A total of 35 patients who underwent orthodontic treatment in the Department of Periodontology were included in this study. After periodontal treatment with meticulous oral hygiene education, patients underwent treatment with FA or CAT, and this study analyzed patient outcomes depending on the treatment strategy. Clinical parameters were assessed at baseline and after orthodontic treatment, and the duration of treatment was compared between these two groups. Results The overall plaque index, the gingival index, and probing depth improved after orthodontic treatment (Porthodontic treatment, clinical parameters were improved in the FA and CAT groups with meticulous oral hygiene education and plaque control. Regarding plaque index and gingival index, no significant differences were found between these two groups. We suggest that combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment can improve patients’ periodontal health irrespective of orthodontic techniques. PMID:26734489

  1. Class III orthognathic surgical cases facilitated by accelerated osteogenic orthodontics: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, JiaQi; Xu, Li; Liang, Cheng; Jiang, JiuHui

    2015-11-01

    To describe a multidisciplinary treatment approach that includes corticotomy, orthodontic force and orthognathic surgery for the management of skeletal Class III surgical cases. The main advantage of the combined techniques is a reduction in treatment time for young adult patients. Accelerated Osteogenic Orthodontics (AOO) was delivered to three young adult patients during their pre-surgical orthodontic treatment. After aligning and levelling the dental arches, a piezosurgical corticotomy was performed to the buccal aspect of the alveolar bone. Bone graft materials were used to cover the decorticated area and soft tissue flaps were replaced. The mean time for extraction space closure was 5.4 ± 1.3 months and the mean time for pre-surgical orthodontic treatment was 12.0 ± 0.9 months. The average total treatment time was 20.4 ± 2.4 months. A pre-existing bony fenestration in the buccal cortex adjacent to the right lateral incisor root apex of Case 1 was corrected. The facial aesthetics of three patients improved following multidisciplinary treatment. This approach may be an efficient method for the orthognathic patient who desires a reduced treatment time, but further clinical research is required.

  2. Comparison of two different debonding techniques in orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Luca; Migliau, Guido; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio; Di Giorgio, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate whether and how the adhesive bond failure site varied in relation to the material used for the orthodontic bonding and debonding technique applied. Two different methods of orthodontic debonding were included in our survey; cutters for orthodontics and debonding plier. Three different materials for the adhesion of the bracket: composite light curing, self-curing composite and glass ionomer cement. The remaining amount of adhesive on the tooth surface is an important parameter that gives information on how the location of the posting site varied during the debonding. 60 dental elements, maxillary and mandibular, previously extracted for orthodontic reasons, as well as periodontal, were included in our research. We investigated a possible significant correlation between different variables (debonding technique and materials for membership) and the ARI index. The use of orthodontic cutters or debonding pliers does not affect the adhesive bond failure site and both techniques have a tendency to leave a significant amount of adhesive on the surface enamel. In the resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements, detachment occurs at the interface enamel-adhesive and this pattern of detachment increases the risk of the enamel damage during debonding. In both types of composite resins (photopolymerizable or self-curing), the detachment occurs at the interface bracketing adhesive. In this case the amount of remaining adhesive material on the tooth must be removed with further methods, which in addition, increase the risk of iatrogenic injury as well as the working hours.

  3. Invisible orthodontics part 3: aesthetic orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, David; McMullin, Ailbhe; Malik, Ovais H

    2013-09-01

    In this, the third part of the series, aesthetic orthodontic treatment will be considered. The previous two articles have looked at invisible orthodontics with Invisalign and lingual brackets. This article will discuss the properties and use of aesthetic brackets, along with examples of orthodontic treatment cases using the aesthetic brackets. Increasing demand for aesthetics during orthodontic treatment has resulted in a significant increase in the use of aesthetic brackets. Clinicians need to be aware of the benefits and drawbacks of aesthetic brackets.

  4. The Need for Orthodontic Treatment among Vietnamese School Children and Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son Minh Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the need for orthodontic treatment among 12-year-old school children and 18-year-olds from Da Nang, Vietnam. Basic Research Design. A random representative sample of 200 12-year-old children from primary schools in Da Nang city was gathered. In addition, 200 18-year-old students were randomly selected from among the 4000 students studying at Da Nang University of Medical Technology and Pharmacy, Vietnam. All the subjects were evaluated according to Angle’s molar relationship, the presence of malocclusion, and the components of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (Dental Health Component, DHC, and Aesthetic Component, AC. Results. The DHC of index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN for 12-year-olds was in 60% of cases no or little, in 21% of cases moderate, and in 19% of cases definitive, while the prevalence of moderate and definitive need for treatment among the 18-year-olds was 24% and 30.5%, respectively. The prevalence of class III malocclusion, contact point displacement, and crossbite was higher in 18-year-olds than among the 12-year-olds, while the prevalence of increased overjet and increased overbite had decreased in 18-year-olds compared to the group of 12-year-olds. Conclusions. There is a strong need for orthodontic treatment in Vietnam’s population. The need for orthodontic treatment was determined by contact point displacement, crossbite, increased overjet, and increased overbite.

  5. Orthodontic treatment of dogs on the basis of modern knowledge and own experience

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    Polkowska Izabela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to demonstrate the orthodontic treatment of malocclusions in dogs, a condition which can lead to cranio-mandibular and functional disorders of the stomatognathic system. The treatment involved the use of maxillofacialorthopaedic appliances, which type depended on the type of disorder and the degree of malocclusion. The applied treatment induced changes in the alveolar bone. Throughout the process of the treatment a great attention was paid to regular brushing off the orthodontic appliance using antiseptics for prophylactic prevention of inflammation of gingival tissue and the palate caused by food getting stuck in the spaces between the teeth.

  6. Invisalign and traditional orthodontic treatment postretention outcomes compared using the American Board of Orthodontics objective grading system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuncio, Daniel; Maganzini, Anthony; Shelton, Clarence; Freeman, Katherine

    2007-09-01

    To compare the postretention dental changes between patients treated with Invisalign and those treated with conventional fixed appliances. This is a comparative cohort study using patient records of one orthodontist in New York City. Two groups of patients were identified that differed only in the method of treatment (Invisalign and Braces group). Dental casts and panoramic radiographs were collected and analyzed using the objective grading system (OGS) of the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO). The cases were evaluated immediately after appliance removal (T1) and at a postretention time (T2), three years after appliance removal. All patients had completed active orthodontic treatment and had undergone at least one year of retention. A Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to evaluate differences in treatment outcomes between the groups for each of the eight categories in the OGS, including four additional subcategories in the alignment category. A Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to determine the significance of changes within each group from T1 to T2. The change in the total alignment score in the Invisalign group was significantly larger than that for the Braces group. There were significant changes in total alignment and mandibular anterior alignment in both groups. There were significant changes in maxillary anterior alignment in the Invisalign group only. In this sample for this period of observation, patients treated with Invisalign relapsed more than those treated with conventional fixed appliances.

  7. Orthodontic treatment need in Peruvian young adults evaluated through dental aesthetic index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabé, Eduardo; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2006-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency and severity of the malocclusion and treatment needs in Peruvian young adults. The second aim was to compare the orthodontic treatment needs according to sex and socio-economic status (SES). This cross-sectional study was conducted at the University Dental Clinic of a private university in Lima, Peru. A total of 267 freshmen (from 16 to 25 years old) were randomly selected from a pool of 780 students. Students wearing an orthodontic appliance or reporting a history of orthodontic treatment were excluded from the study. Clinical examinations were conducted using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare the DAI scores according to sex and SES, respectively. The mean DAI score was 28.87 points (IC(95%) 27.77; 29.97, where IC indicates interval of confidence). Around one-third of the sample presented severe or very severe malocclusion, which implies a highly desirable or mandatory orthodontic treatment need. No statistically significant difference was found between the DAI scores according to sex (P = .592) and SES (P = .397). Approximately one-third of the evaluated Peruvian young adults would need orthodontic treatment according to the DAI. In this population, malocclusion was characterized by a relatively high frequency of missing teeth, appreciable dental crowding, and inadequate anteroposterior relationships.

  8. Establishing the reliability of palatal rugae pattern in individual identification (following orthodontic treatment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, D; Chowdhry, A; Bablani, D; Jain, P; Thapar, R

    2011-07-01

    This study aims to determine the stability of palatal rugae before and after orthodontic treatment. 50 orthodontic cases were selected with pre- and posttreatment casts and 50 casts were randomly selected as variables. Landmarks on the palatal raphe and rugae were marked on the maxillary casts. Points were made on medial and lateral ends of first, second and third rugae. Each cast was photographed, measured and then trimmed leaving only the rugae area of the hard palate. In the pre and post-treatment group, changes in transverse measurements were significantly different for lateral points of first rugae and anteroposterior changes were significant for the distances between first and second rugae. All inter-point measurements of third rugae were stable in post-treatment casts. Thirty blinded examiners compared 50 trimmed preorthodontic casts to similarly prepared one hundred casts for possible matches based on pattern of rugae. The percentages of correct matches for examiners had a median of 90%. The matching of pre-operative and post-operative orthodontic casts demonstrated that although some changes do occur in the rugae during orthodontic treatment, the morphology of palatal rugae remains stable throughout life. Hence carefully assessed rugae pattern may have a definite role in forensic identification. Further, points associated with the third palatal ruage were the most immutable over a person's life and hence could be used as a reference to evaluate the changes in teeth positions during orthodontic treatment.

  9. [Orthodontic treatment of children suffering from attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity (ADHD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessah, Stéphanie; Montluc, Nathalie; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Decosse, Michel-Henri

    2009-09-01

    Successful orthodontic treatment requires the child's cooperation. Yet how can this be achieved when this cooperation is compromised by a neurobehavioural disorder: the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)? This disorder, slightly tracked down, common in children, leads to hyperactivity, impulsiveness and a short attention span. The objective of this survey is to compare the challenges of conducting orthodontic treatment on children who have or have not been diagnosed and treated by a multi-disciplinary medical team. The data of this survey was collected from orthodontists in Paris and Strasbourg, and from graduate orthodontics students. The orthodontic treatment of 30 children (25 males and 5 females) between 8 and 15 years, affected by ADHD (half have been diagnosed and treated by a multi-disciplinary team) are compared to 30 control subjects. The results highlight the therapeutic difficulties (with behavior, attention span, cooperation, hygiene and dental trauma) encountered with children affected by ADHD (especially those who did not benefit from multidisciplinary follow up) compared to control population. In conclusion, hyperactive children present more challenges during an orthodontic treatment compared to a control population. Nevertheless, the treatment is easier when children are diagnosed and treated multimodally. Further studies are required on a wider population to confirm the differences in therapeutic difficulties.

  10. Conservative periodontal treatment combined with orthodontics for "hopeless" anterior teeth. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Z; Schwartz, Z; Soskolne, W A

    1990-02-01

    This article describes the treatment of a patient with periodontally "hopeless" teeth by conservative periodontal therapy combined with subgingival chlorhexidine irrigation and orthodontic tooth movement. The 3-year follow-up post-treatment shows the relative success of the treatment, without the use of surgical modality or the extraction of any teeth.

  11. [Efficiency of cephalometry in orthodontic treatment planning: cephalometric parameters and their age-related changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenina, O I; Shishkin, K M; Shishkin, M K; Popova, N V

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of cephalometry in orthodontic treatment planning in patients with teeth crowding and Angle Class I molars relation. Cephalometric parameters were analyzed in 70 patients that completed orthodontic treatment in 'Orthodont' dental clinic (Samara). Cephalometric X-rays were taken at baseline examination and after treatment. In patients with crowding and Class I molars relationship treated with extraction of all four first premolars correlation between N-Se and mandibular and maxillary length was disturbed. These patients showed higher N-Se and reduced jaws length than patients with no extraction or extraction of 2 premolars. The observed increase of G angle with reduced mandibular length assumes compensatory changes of mandible position. These disproportions were aggravated by facial growth. In certain cases cephalometric assessment is inefficient for treatment strategy choice.

  12. Clinical diagnosis and treatment of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis in the orthodontic patient. A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Rodríguez-Pulido

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: About 0.1% of the population suffers from necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, a disease of rapid progression and acute manifestation, which may progress to necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and eventually to bone sequestration and loss of gingival tissue. Case report: A 21-year-old female patient undergoing orthodontic treatment for six months, diagnosed with necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis due to acute pain in the gingival tissue, spontaneous bleeding, halitosis and abundant plaque. The treatment was conservative and effective, obtaining total remission of the lesion after seven days and three months of postoperative follow-up. Conclusion: Today there are no epidemiological or clinical reports that support the relationship of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis and orthodontic treatment. Prevention is critical to the success of the treatment, which is why the dentist should recognize the clinical features of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis to raise awareness of its risks in the orthodontic patient.

  13. [Cephalometry efficacy in orthodontic treatment planning: correlations of cephalometric values and their changes in the course of treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkin, K M; Arsenina, O I; Shishkin, M K; Popova, N V

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of cephalometry in planning of orthodontic patients with teeth crowding (TC) and Angle Class I molar relationship (MR). Cephalometric values of 70 patients with TC and class I MR were analyzed before and after orthodontic treatment. Cephalometric study of correlations proved to be more relevant than comparing with mean values. In patients with TC and class I MR statistically significant were correlations with: facial profile (ÐN-A-B) and jaws relationship in anterio-posterior direction (ÐA-N-B); ÐN-A-B and type of maxillary growth (ÐPn-Mp, ÐB); ÐB and maxillary incisors inclination (Ðis-SpP); ÐPn-Mp and mandibular incisors inclination (Ðii-Mp). These correlations depend on age, anomaly severity and orthodontic strategy. Cephalometry proved to be effective tool for orthodontic treatment planning, prognosis and modelling.

  14. Surface Treatment on Physical Properties and Biocompatibility of Orthodontic Power Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional orthodontic power chain, often composed of polymer materials, has drawbacks such as a reduction of elasticity owing to water absorption as well as surface discoloration and staining resulting from food or beverages consumed by the patient. The goal of this study was to develop a surface treatment (nanoimprinting for orthodontic power chains and to alleviate their shortcomings. A concave template (anodic alumina was manufactured by anodization process using pure aluminum substrate by employing the nanoimprinting process. Convex nanopillars were fabricated on the surface of orthodontic power chains, resulting in surface treatment. Distinct parameters of the nanoimprinting process (e.g., imprinting temperature, imprinting pressure, imprinting time, and demolding temperature were used to fabricate nanopillars on the surface of orthodontic power chains. The results of this study showed that the contact angle of the power chains became larger after surface treatment. In addition, the power chains changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. The power chain before surface treatment without water absorption had a water absorption rate of approximately 4%, whereas a modified chain had a water absorption rate of approximately 2%–4%. Furthermore, the color adhesion of the orthodontic power chains after surface modification was less than that before surface modification.

  15. Surface Treatment on Physical Properties and Biocompatibility of Orthodontic Power Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, H C; Chen, M S; Peng, B Y; Lin, W T; Shen, Y K; Wang, Y H

    2017-01-01

    The conventional orthodontic power chain, often composed of polymer materials, has drawbacks such as a reduction of elasticity owing to water absorption as well as surface discoloration and staining resulting from food or beverages consumed by the patient. The goal of this study was to develop a surface treatment (nanoimprinting) for orthodontic power chains and to alleviate their shortcomings. A concave template (anodic alumina) was manufactured by anodization process using pure aluminum substrate by employing the nanoimprinting process. Convex nanopillars were fabricated on the surface of orthodontic power chains, resulting in surface treatment. Distinct parameters of the nanoimprinting process (e.g., imprinting temperature, imprinting pressure, imprinting time, and demolding temperature) were used to fabricate nanopillars on the surface of orthodontic power chains. The results of this study showed that the contact angle of the power chains became larger after surface treatment. In addition, the power chains changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. The power chain before surface treatment without water absorption had a water absorption rate of approximately 4%, whereas a modified chain had a water absorption rate of approximately 2%-4%. Furthermore, the color adhesion of the orthodontic power chains after surface modification was less than that before surface modification.

  16. Postsurgical Orthodontic Treatment Planning: a Case Report with 20 Years Follow-up

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    Giampietro Farronato

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traditionally, maxillofacial deformities are corrected surgically after an initial orthodontic treatment phase. However in, this article, the authors emphasize the postsurgical therapeutic protocol which is extremely important for determining the final and permanent retention of the corrected occlusion.Methods: A 55 year old female with severe skeletal Class II malocclusion is presented. Combined surgical and orthodontic correction of the malocclusion was used.Results: The step-by-step procedure the authors followed for the postsurgical therapy is described. The goals of the postoperative therapy were to restore and rehabilitate neuromuscular function, obtain occlusal stabilization, grind teeth selectively, and final occlusion retention. The importance of a surgical occlusal splint for rehabilitating stomatognathic neuromuscular function postoperatively was demonstrated. Furthermore, the orthodontic-prosthodontic treatment ensured occlusion stability after the surgical correction. The long-term results confirmed the efficacy of the treatment protocol presented here from both functional and aesthetical perspectives.Conclusions: Postsurgical orthodontic treatment is an important step in the surgical and orthodontic therapy of maxillofacial deformities.

  17. Dentoalveolar Segmental Osteotomy Combined with Orthodontic Treatment for an Impacted and Ankylosed Upper Canine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aludden, Hanna Cecilia; Jensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosis is the abnormal adhesion of alveolar bone to dentin or cementum and commonly seen after traumatic dental injuries. Treatment of impacted and ankylosed teeth solely by orthodontics alignment may be challenging. Consequently, several treatment alternatives have been proposed...... for the management of ankylosed teeth involving extraction, surgical luxation, and osteotomy followed by dentoalveolar distraction or conventional orthodontic treatment. This case report describes a 55-year-old female who was referred by her orthodontist due to an impacted and ankylosed maxillary upper left canine...

  18. Periodontal Plastic Microsurgery in the Treatment of Deep Gingival Recession after Orthodontic Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Kahn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival recession is a condition that affects a large portion of the young and adult population and negatively affects the aesthetic aspects of the smile. Many factors are related to its development, including orthodontic movement beyond the osseous limits. Many treatment options have been proposed to cover the exposed root surface. The aim of this article was to describe three cases where a subepithelial connective tissue graft was performed, using a microsurgical technique, in the treatment of deep gingival recession after orthodontic treatment. This technique resulted in successful root coverage and keratinized tissue gain, improving the gingival esthetic pattern.

  19. Evaluation of anxiety level changes during the first three months of orthodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Yıldırım, Ersin; Karacay, Seniz

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the changes in dental anxiety, state anxiety, and trait anxiety levels of patients and their parents after 3 months of active orthodontic treatment. Methods We evaluated 120 patients and one parent of each patient. State Anxiety (STAI-S), Trait Anxiety (STAI-T), and Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) were administered before orthodontic treatment (T1) and after 3 months of treatment (T2). Differences in scores between T1 and T2 were compared using paired-sample t-tests ...

  20. The prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment needs in school going children of Nalagarh, Himachal Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Sharma, Abhishek; Sandhu, Navreet; Mehta, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need in 13-18-year-old schoolchildren of Nalagarh, Himachal Pradesh, India using the Index of Orthodontic Treatment need (IOTN) and to analyze the treatment needs between males and females and correlation between the esthetic component (AC) and dental health component (DHC) of IOTN. The sample comprised 2000 school children (1125 females and 875 males) who had not undergone orthodontic treatment. No radiographs, study casts, were used; IOTN was calculated from clinical examination. DHC results showed that little need for orthodontic treatment was found in 31.6% and moderate need in 30.85%. A great need was estimated at 37.55%. Severe contact point displacement of more than 4 mm was the most common occlusal feature in the definite treatment need group, followed by increased overjet, impeded eruption of teeth, and anterior or posterior cross bite. AC results showed that little need for orthodontic treatment was in 86.15%, moderate need in 8.90%, and great need in 4.95%. Index does not consider midline discrepancy, soft tissue abnormalities, and AC does not include Class III and Class II div 2 malocclusion photographs. There seems a discrepancy in the proportion of children needing orthodontic treatment on esthetic and dental health grounds. This study provides baseline data on the need and demand for orthodontic treatment among the sample which is important for planning public orthodontic and dental services.

  1. Severe root resorption resulting from orthodontic treatment: Prevalence and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maués, Caroline Pelagio Raick; do Nascimento, Rizomar Ramos; Vilella, Oswaldo de Vasconcellos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of severe external root resorption and its potential risk factors resulting from orthodontic treatment. METHODS: A randomly selected sample was used. It comprised conventional periapical radiographs taken in the same radiology center for maxillary and mandibular incisors before and after active orthodontic treatment of 129 patients, males and females, treated by means of the Standard Edgewise technique. Two examiners measured and defined root resorption according to the index proposed by Levander et al. The degree of external apical root resorption was registered defining resorption in four degrees of severity. To assess intra and inter-rater reproducibility, kappa coefficient was used. Chi-square test was used to assess the relationship between the amount of root resorption and patient's sex, dental arch (maxillary or mandibular), treatment with or without extractions, treatment duration, root apex stage (open or closed), root shape, as well as overjet and overbite at treatment onset. RESULTS: Maxillary central incisors had the highest percentage of severe root resorption, followed by maxillary lateral incisors and mandibular lateral incisors. Out of 959 teeth, 28 (2.9%) presented severe root resorption. The following risk factors were observed: anterior maxillary teeth, overjet greater than or equal to 5 mm at treatment onset, treatment with extractions, prolonged therapy, and degree of apex formation at treatment onset. CONCLUSION: This study showed that care must be taken in orthodontic treatment involving extractions, great retraction of maxillary incisors, prolonged therapy, and/or completely formed apex at orthodontic treatment onset. PMID:25741825

  2. Severe root resorption resulting from orthodontic treatment: Prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Pelagio Raick Maués

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of severe external root resorption and its potential risk factors resulting from orthodontic treatment. METHODS: A randomly selected sample was used. It comprised conventional periapical radiographs taken in the same radiology center for maxillary and mandibular incisors before and after active orthodontic treatment of 129 patients, males and females, treated by means of the Standard Edgewise technique. Two examiners measured and defined root resorption according to the index proposed by Levander et al. The degree of external apical root resorption was registered defining resorption in four degrees of severity. To assess intra and inter-rater reproducibility, kappa coefficient was used. Chi-square test was used to assess the relationship between the amount of root resorption and patient's sex, dental arch (maxillary or mandibular, treatment with or without extractions, treatment duration, root apex stage (open or closed, root shape, as well as overjet and overbite at treatment onset. RESULTS: Maxillary central incisors had the highest percentage of severe root resorption, followed by maxillary lateral incisors and mandibular lateral incisors. Out of 959 teeth, 28 (2.9% presented severe root resorption. The following risk factors were observed: anterior maxillary teeth, overjet greater than or equal to 5 mm at treatment onset, treatment with extractions, prolonged therapy, and degree of apex formation at treatment onset. CONCLUSION: This study showed that care must be taken in orthodontic treatment involving extractions, great retraction of maxillary incisors, prolonged therapy, and/or completely formed apex at orthodontic treatment onset.

  3. External root resorption after orthodontic treatment: a study of contributing factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae [School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the patient- and treatment-related etiologic factors of external root resorption. This study consisted of 163 patients who had completed orthodontic treatments and taken the pre- and post-treatment panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs. The length of tooth was measured from the tooth apex to the incisal edge or cusp tip on the panoramic radiograph. Overbite and overjet were measured from the pre- and post-treatment lateral cephalometric radiographs. The root resorption of each tooth and the factors of malocclusion were analyzed with an analysis of variance. A paired t test was performed to compare the mean amount of root resorption between male and female, between extraction and non-extraction cases, and between surgery and non-surgery groups. Correlation coefficients were measured to assess the relationship between the amount of root resorption and the age in which the orthodontic treatment started, the degree of changes in overbite and overjet, and the duration of treatment. Maxillary central incisor was the most resorbed tooth, followed by the maxillary lateral incisor, the mandibular central incisor, and the mandibular lateral incisor. The history of tooth extraction was significantly associated with the root resorption. The duration of orthodontic treatment was positively correlated with the amount of root resorption. These findings show that orthodontic treatment should be carefully performed in patients who need the treatment for a long period and with a pre-treatment extraction of teeth.

  4. External root resorption after orthodontic treatment: a study of contributing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yun Hoa; Cho, Bong Hae

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the patient- and treatment-related etiologic factors of external root resorption. This study consisted of 163 patients who had completed orthodontic treatments and taken the pre- and post-treatment panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs. The length of tooth was measured from the tooth apex to the incisal edge or cusp tip on the panoramic radiograph. Overbite and overjet were measured from the pre- and post-treatment lateral cephalometric radiographs. The root resorption of each tooth and the factors of malocclusion were analyzed with an analysis of variance. A paired t test was performed to compare the mean amount of root resorption between male and female, between extraction and non-extraction cases, and between surgery and non-surgery groups. Correlation coefficients were measured to assess the relationship between the amount of root resorption and the age in which the orthodontic treatment started, the degree of changes in overbite and overjet, and the duration of treatment. Maxillary central incisor was the most resorbed tooth, followed by the maxillary lateral incisor, the mandibular central incisor, and the mandibular lateral incisor. The history of tooth extraction was significantly associated with the root resorption. The duration of orthodontic treatment was positively correlated with the amount of root resorption. These findings show that orthodontic treatment should be carefully performed in patients who need the treatment for a long period and with a pre-treatment extraction of teeth.

  5. Emergency presurgical visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Castro Díaz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective has been to create a Protocol of Structured Presurgical Visit applicable to the patients who are undergoing an emergency surgery, to provide the user and his family all the necessary cares on the basis of those nursing diagnosis that prevail in all the cases of surgical emergency interventions. The used method has been an analysis of the emergency surgical interventions more prevalent from February 2007 until October 2008 in our area (a regional hospital, and statistic of those nursing diagnosis that more frequently appeared in these interventions, the previous moment to the intervention and in addition common to all of them. The results were the following ones: the more frequent emergency operations were: Caesarean, ginecological curettage, laparotomy, help in risk childbirth, orthopaedic surgery and appendectomy. The more frequent nursing diagnosis in all the emergency operations at the previous moment of the intervention were: risk of falls, pain, anxiety, deficit of knowledge, risk of infection, movement stress syndrome, risk of hemorrhage, cutaneous integrity deterioration. The conclusion is that users present at the previous moment to an emergency operation several problems, which force to the emergency surgical ward nurse to the introduction of the nursing methodology, in order to identify the problems, to mark results and to indicate the interventions to achieve those results, besides in a humanitarian way and with quality. This can be obtained by performing a Structured Emergency Presurgical Visit.

  6. Records needed for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robine J Rischen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditionally, dental models, facial and intra-oral photographs and a set of two-dimensional radiographs are used for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. As evidence is lacking, the discussion is ongoing which specific records are needed for the process of making an orthodontic treatment plan. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the contribution and importance of different diagnostic records for making an orthodontic diagnosis and treatment plan. DATA SOURCES: An electronic search in PubMed (1948-July 2012, EMBASE Excerpta Medica (1980-July 2012, CINAHL (1982-July 2012, Web of Science (1945-July 2012, Scopus (1996-July 2012, and Cochrane Library (1993-July 2012 was performed. Additionally, a hand search of the reference lists of included studies was performed to identify potentially eligible studies. There was no language restriction. STUDY SELECTION: The patient, intervention, comparator, outcome (pico question formulated for this study was as follows: for patients who need orthodontic treatment (P, will the use of record set X (I compared with record set Y (C change the treatment plan (O? Only primary publications were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Independent extraction of data and quality assessment was performed by two observers. RESULTS: Of the 1041 publications retrieved, 17 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 4 studies were of high quality. Because of the limited number of high quality studies and the differences in study designs, patient characteristics, and reference standard or index test, a meta-analysis was not possible. CONCLUSION: Cephalograms are not routinely needed for orthodontic treatment planning in Class II malocclusions, digital models can be used to replace plaster casts, and cone-beam computed tomography radiographs can be indicated for impacted canines. Based on the findings of this review, the minimum record set required for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning could not be defined. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

  7. Records needed for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rischen, Robine J; Breuning, K Hero; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, dental models, facial and intra-oral photographs and a set of two-dimensional radiographs are used for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. As evidence is lacking, the discussion is ongoing which specific records are needed for the process of making an orthodontic treatment plan. To estimate the contribution and importance of different diagnostic records for making an orthodontic diagnosis and treatment plan. An electronic search in PubMed (1948-July 2012), EMBASE Excerpta Medica (1980-July 2012), CINAHL (1982-July 2012), Web of Science (1945-July 2012), Scopus (1996-July 2012), and Cochrane Library (1993-July 2012) was performed. Additionally, a hand search of the reference lists of included studies was performed to identify potentially eligible studies. There was no language restriction. The patient, intervention, comparator, outcome (pico) question formulated for this study was as follows: for patients who need orthodontic treatment (P), will the use of record set X (I) compared with record set Y (C) change the treatment plan (O)? Only primary publications were included. Independent extraction of data and quality assessment was performed by two observers. Of the 1041 publications retrieved, 17 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 4 studies were of high quality. Because of the limited number of high quality studies and the differences in study designs, patient characteristics, and reference standard or index test, a meta-analysis was not possible. Cephalograms are not routinely needed for orthodontic treatment planning in Class II malocclusions, digital models can be used to replace plaster casts, and cone-beam computed tomography radiographs can be indicated for impacted canines. Based on the findings of this review, the minimum record set required for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning could not be defined. CRD42012002365.

  8. [Accelerated orthodontic treatment with piezocision: a mini-invasive alternative to conventional corticotomies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebaoun, Jean-David M; Surmenian, Jérôme; Dibart, Serge

    2011-12-01

    An increasing number of adult patients are seeking orthodontic treatment and a short treatment time has become a recurring request. To meet their expectations, a number of surgical techniques have been developed to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement. However, these have been found to be quite invasive. We are introducing here a new, minimally invasive flapless procedure, combining micro incisions, piezoelectric incisions and selective tunneling that allows for hard- or soft-tissue grafting. Combined with a proper treatment planning and a good understanding of the biological events involved, this novel technique can locally manipulate alveolar bone metabolism in order to obtain rapid and stable orthodontic results. Piezocision allows for rapid correction of severe malocclusions without the drawbacks of traumatic conventional corticotomy procedures. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2011.

  9. The Consultant Orthodontists Group 1994 survey of the use of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, A; Willmot, D R

    1996-02-01

    A questionnaire, relating to the use and acceptance of occlusal indices and in particular the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN), was sent to all UK hospital consultants in the orthodontics. Of the respondents 74.6 per cent routinely recorded the Dental Health Component of IOTN for their new patient referrals. The reasons for the increased acceptance of the IOTN amongst hospital orthodontic consultants are evaluated and some of the difficulties in usage, reported by respondents, are discussed.

  10. The theory of reasoned action and patient compliance during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Annemieke; Hoogstraten, Johan; Prahl-Andersen, Birte

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the theory of reasoned action (TRA) for the prediction and understanding of patients' intention to comply during orthodontic treatment and to analyze the effect of two additional variables in the model, namely perceived behavioral control and anticipated regret. Moreover, (the determinants of) intentions of orthodontic patients to comply during treatment were compared with (the determinants of) intentions of parents to stimulate this cooperation. A questionnaire was handed out to patients and parents visiting the Department of Orthodontics of the Academic Centre of Dentistry in Amsterdam. In both the patient and parent sample, independent-sample t-tests, correlation analyses and stepwise regression analyses were conducted. Variables in both samples were compared and tested. The extended version of the TRA explained 20% of the variance in the patients' intention to comply. The patients' anticipated regret, attitude and motivation to comply were significant determinants of the patients' intention to comply. In addition, the parents' attitude toward compliance was a significant predictor. The role of parents in enhancing patients' intentions to comply cannot be neglected. Our findings suggest that patients' intentions to comply during orthodontic treatment are influenced by factors outside of the TRA. Therefore, it is recommended to develop a new model, in which factors of the TRA are included, which can be used specifically for the study of compliance in orthodontics.

  11. A review on prevention and treatment of post-orthodontic white spot lesions - evidence-based methods and emerging technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrand, Fredrik; Twetman, Svante

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to update the evidence for primary and secondary prevention (treatment) of white spot lesions (WSL) adjacent to fixed orthodontic appliances.......The aim of this paper was to update the evidence for primary and secondary prevention (treatment) of white spot lesions (WSL) adjacent to fixed orthodontic appliances....

  12. Prevalence of malocclusion traits and orthodontic treatment in a Finnish adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krooks, Laura; Pirttiniemi, Pertti; Kanavakis, Georgios; Lähdesmäki, Raija

    2016-07-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of malocclusion traits and the extent of orthodontic treatment in a Finnish adult population. Materials and methods The study population comprised subjects (n = 1964) from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 living in the city of Oulu and within 100 km of it. A clinical oral and dental examination with registration of occlusion was carried out in 2012 in connection with a 46-year follow-up survey. Data on previous orthodontic treatment were collected based on a questionnaire. Results In the clinical examination, 39.5% of the subjects had at least one malocclusion trait. The most common malocclusion traits were lateral crossbite (17.9%), overbite ≥ 6 mm (11.7%) and overjet ≥ 6 mm (9.7%). Crossbite on the left premolars, negative overjet and increased overbite were found more frequently in men. The prevalence of malocclusion traits was at the same level in treated and untreated groups. Overall, 18.6% of the subjects had undergone orthodontic treatment. Women showed a significantly higher prevalence of orthodontic treatment. Conclusions The most common malocclusion trait in the present study was lateral crossbite. Significant male dominance in the prevalence of malocclusion was observed, which has not been reported earlier in Finland. Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion traits was more common among females in Northern Finland. This study indicates that orthodontic treatment provided in childhood was, on average, adequate in reducing malocclusion traits to the level observed in the general population.

  13. Use of Q methodology to assess the concerns of adult female individuals seeking orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao L

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Linjie Yao,1 Xingqiao Xu,2 Zhenyu Ni,3 Minling Zheng,3 Feiou Lin3 1Department of Pedodontics, 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 3Department of Orthodontics, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: Orthodontic treatment may cause functional restrictions, discomfort, and pain, which may lead to dental anxiety and noncooperation among patients. This study aimed to assess the concerns of adult female patients with respect to such treatment.Patients and methods: We conducted an explorative study using Q methodology among 40 adult female patients with different educational and social backgrounds in Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China. We asked participants to rank a set of 41 statements about seeking orthodontic treatment on an 11-point scale from “agree most” to “disagree most”. The collected data were analyzed using the PQ Method 2.35 program. We extracted significant viewpoints using centroid factor extraction and varimax rotation.Results: We identified major factors based on how the patients ranked statements. Patients in group 1 worried about lack of information about orthodontic treatment, and may have suffered from dental phobia; patients in group 2 were all single women, and they were worried that the braces might lower their chances of finding a partner; patients in group 3 worried about appearance and speech with braces; and patients in group 4 worried about cost, pain, and dental hygiene. The remaining participants who had other viewpoints did not load to any of these four groups.Conclusion: The concerns of adult female individuals seeking orthodontic treatment are complex. A significant feature of this study was using Q methodology to analyze the psychological characteristics of the patients. This study identified four typical characterizations that are associated with each group, and our findings may aid orthodontists in improving doctor

  14. Interventions for managing relapse of the lower front teeth after orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongchun; Sun, Jie; Lai, Wenli; Wu, Taixiang; Koshy, Stephen; Shi, Zongdao

    2013-09-06

    Orthodontic relapse can be defined as the tendency for teeth to return to their pre-treatment position, and this occurs especially in lower front teeth (lower canines and lower incisors). Retention, to maintain the position of corrected teeth, has become one of the most important phases of orthodontic treatment. However, 10 years after the completion of orthodontic treatment, only 30% to 50% of orthodontic patients effectively retain the satisfactory alignment initially obtained. After 20 years, satisfactory alignment reduces to 10%. When relapse occurs, simple effective strategies are required to effectively manage the problem. The periodontal, physiological or psychological conditions may be different from those before orthodontic treatment, so re-treatment methods may also need to be different. To assess the effects of interventions used to manage relapse of the lower front teeth after first fixed orthodontic treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 9 November 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 10), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 9 November 2012), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 9 November 2012). There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication. A thorough handsearch was done in relation to the following journals: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (1970 to 9 November 2012), Angle Orthodontist (1978 to 9 November 2012), European Journal of Orthodontics (1979 to 9 November 2012), Journal of Orthodontics (1978 to 9 November 2012), Chinese Journal of Stomatology (1953 to 9 November 2012), West China Journal of Stomatology (1983 to 9 November 2012), Chinese Journal of Dental Materials and Devices (1992 to 9 November 2012) and Chinese Journal of Orthodontics (1994 to 9 November 2012). We would have included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compared any of the following: fixed options

  15. Expectations of orthodontic treatment in adults: the conduct in orthodontist/patient relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alves de Souza

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The high demand for orthodontic treatment, evidenced over the last few decades, has been justified mainly by the greater importance given to facial esthetics, influencing individual's self esteem. However, the professional frequently does not meet all the patient's expectations, for not establishing good communication and not knowing about the critical points during orthodontic treatment. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to elucidate patients' desires and doubts regarding orthodontic treatment, by means of a survey applied to 60 adult patients. RESULTS: The analysis of results revealed that most individuals (38.3 % noticed treatment success after its conclusion. Occlusion deviation was pointed out by 66.7 % as the main reason for seeking treatment, and esthetics ranked as second (with 48.3 %. Treatment time was considered within the prediction by 46.7% of the interviewees and the results were judged as very good by 43.3 %. The social relations of most participants were not affected by treatment (73.3 %. Also, 58.3 % of the interviewees reported pain as the main complaint and 53.3 % found it difficult to use dental floss. Most participants saw the orthodontist as a professional who was concerned about their health (76.7 %, and believed that he/she was more able to treat them (96.6 % when compared with the general practitioner. CONCLUSION: The orthodontist/ patient relationship enables an understanding of the expectations regarding orthodontic treatment, resulting in greater motivation and cooperation, leading to a successful outcome.

  16. Impact of cone-beam computed tomography on orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Ryan J; Atchison, Kathryn A; White, Stuart C

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we measured the impact of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Participant orthodontists shown traditional orthodontic records for 6 patients were asked to provide a diagnostic problem list, a hypothetical treatment plan, and a clinical certainty. They then evaluated a CBCT scan for each patient and noted any changes, confirmations, or enhancements to their diagnosis and treatment plan. The number of diagnosis and treatment plan changes varied widely by patient characteristics. The most frequently reported diagnosis and treatment plan changes occurred in patients with unerupted teeth, severe root resorption, or severe skeletal discrepancies. We found no benefit in terms of changes in treatment plan for patients when the reason for obtaining a CBCT scan was to examine for abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint or airway, or crowding. Orthodontic participants who own CBCT machines or use CBCT scans frequently in practice reported significantly more diagnosis and treatment plan changes and greater confidence after viewing the CBCT scans during the study. The results of this study support obtaining a CBCT scan before orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning when a patient has an unerupted tooth with delayed eruption or a questionable location, severe root resorption as diagnosed with a periapical or panoramic radiograph, or a severe skeletal discrepancy. We propose that CBCT scans should be ordered only when there is clear, specific, individual clinical justification. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment of post-orthodontic white spot lesions with casein phosphopeptide-stabilised amorphous calcium phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bröchner, Ann; Christensen, Carsten; Kristensen, Bjarne

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of topical applications of 10% casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on white spot lesions (WSL) detected after treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Sixty healthy adolescents with >/=1 clinically visible WSL at debonding were...... findings were largely reflected by the clinical scores. No side effects were reported. Topical treatment of white spot lesions after debonding of orthodontic appliances with a casein phosphopeptide-stabilised amorphous calcium phosphate agent resulted in significantly reduced fluorescence and a reduced...

  18. Surgical-orthodontic treatment of Class I malocclusion with maxillary vertical excess--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, Jyothi; Isaac, Anish; Shanthraj, Ravis; Madannagowda, Shivalinga

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the treatment of an adult male with vertical maxillary excess, excessive gingival display on smiling, a convex profile, proclined upper and lower incisors, and crowded lower anteriors with severe lip incompetence. The therapy included stages: (1) Pre surgical orthodontics- leveling and aligning of the maxillary and mandibular arch with closure of all extraction spaces. (2) Surgical phase-Lefort I osteotomy for superior maxillary impaction, 5 mm of anterior and 3 mm of posterior impaction ofmaxilla was done. (3) Post surgical orthodontics for finishing and detailing. The treatment lasted 16 months; improved facial esthetics significantly; and resulted in a normal occlusion, overjet, and overbite.

  19. Interdisciplinary Treatment of an Adult Patient Using an Adjunctive Orthodontic Approach. Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rugina Roxana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this case presentation is to outline some of the advantages that an adjunct orthodontic treatment can offer in a comprehensive oral rehabilitation of an adult patient. Adjunctive orthodontic treatment is usually limited to a dental arch or to a group of teeth within an arch. The purpose of dental movements in this case will be to position the teeth in a way that makes the restoration or replacement of damaged or missing teeth as easy as possible and with minimal dental tissue sacrifice. In addition, the improved position of the teeth will create a healthier periodontal environment that is easier to maintain over time.

  20. Corticotomy-assisted orthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Cano, J.; Campo, Julián; Bonilla, Elena; Colmenero Ruiz, César

    2012-01-01

    The use of orthodontic treatment in adult patients is becoming more common and these patients have different requirements specially regarding duration of treatment and facial and dental aesthetics. Alveolar corticotomy is an effective means of accelerating orthodontic treatment. This literature revision include an historical background, biological and orthodontic fundamentals and the most significant clinical applications of this technique. Orthodontic treatment time is reduced with this tech...

  1. Orthodontic treatment provision and referral preferences among New Zealand general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldawood, S; Ampuan, S N H; Medara, N; Thomson, W M

    2011-11-01

    General dental practitioners (GDPs) are key clinicians in the orthodontic referral chain as they complement (and may compete with) orthodontists in providing treatment for the public. To determine the nature and extent of GDPs' involvement in orthodontic treatment provision and to identify influences on GDPs' choice of orthodontist. An email survey was conducted of actively-practising GDPs in May-June 2010. Two timelines of contact were followed, with non-responders to the first survey re-contacted three weeks later. Just under one-fifth (19.3 per cent) reported providing forms of orthodontic treatment. This proportion was higher among males, more experienced practitioners, and dentists in rural locations. The percentage involvement ranged from 22.3 per cent in Greater Auckland to 10.5 per cent in Greater Wellington and 11.9 per cent in Christchurch. In the remainder of New Zealand, percentages ranged from 11.5 per cent in urban areas to 37.1 per cent in rural areas. Of those providing treatment, almost half had 1-10 patients under management, and just over one-third had greater numbers. Sixty-one per cent of orthodontically-involved GDPs in Auckland had more than 10 orthodontic patients. The most commonly treated condition was a simple crossbite, while the least commonly treated condition was the severe Class III malocclusion. The provision of orthodontic treatment by New Zealand GDPs has decreased in recent years to an average of about one in five, but this figure is considerably higher in rural areas and is a notable feature of the greater Auckland area. The findings suggest that the majority of the more complex cases are continuing to be referred to specialist orthodontists.

  2. The congenitally missing upper lateral incisor. A retrospective study of orthodontic space closure versus restorative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertsson, S; Mohlin, B

    2000-12-01

    Orthodontic treatment for patients with uni- or bilateral congenitally missing lateral incisors is a challenge to effective treatment planning. The two major alternatives, orthodontic space closure or space opening for prosthetic replacements, can both compromise aesthetics, periodontal health, and function. The aim of this retrospective study was to examine treated patients who had congenitally missing lateral incisors and to compare their opinion of the aesthetic result with the dentists' opinions of occlusal function and periodontal health. In this sample, 50 patients were identified. Thirty had been treated with orthodontic space closure, and 20 by space opening and a prosthesis (porcelain bonded to gold and resin bonded bridges). The patient's opinion of the aesthetic result was evaluated using the Eastman Esthetic Index questionnaire and during a structured interview. The functional status, dental contact patterns, periodontal condition, and quality of the prosthetic replacement was evaluated. In general, subjects treated with orthodontic space closure were more satisfied with the appearance of their teeth than those who had a prosthesis. No significant differences in the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) were found. However, patients with prosthetic replacements had impaired periodontal health with accumulation of plaque and gingivitis. The conclusion of this study is that orthodontic space closure produces results that are well accepted by patients, does not impair temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function, and encourages periodontal health in comparison with prosthetic replacements.

  3. Combined periodontic-orthodontic-endodontic interdisciplinary approach in the treatment of periodontally compromised tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment in adult patients is one of the most frequently encountered components involving multidisciplinary approaches. In the present report, a 28-year-old male patient was treated for localized chronic periodontitis with pocket formation, mobility, pathologic migration and malalignment of maxillary left lateral incisor tooth #22. The periodontal therapy included motivation, education and oral-hygiene instructions (O.H.I., scaling and root planing and periodontal flap surgery. Subsequently on resolution of periodontal inflammation, orthodontic therapy was carried out using the orthodontic aligner for a period of 6 months. Post-treatment (3 years results showed complete resolution of infrabony pocket with significant bone fill, reduced tooth mobility and complete alignment of the affected maxillary left lateral incisor, thus restoring the esthetics and function.

  4. Dentoalveolar and skeletal changes associated with the pendulum appliance followed by fixed orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelieri, Fernanda; Almeida, Renato Rodrigues de; Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues de; Fuziy, Acácio

    2006-04-01

    This prospective clinical study analyzed the distalization of maxillary molars achieved by the pendulum appliance and its effect on the anchorage teeth during and after fixed orthodontic treatment. Lateral cephalograms of 22 adolescents (15 girls, 7 boys) taken pretreatment, after distalization, after leveling and aligning, and after fixed orthodontic treatment were evaluated. The initial mean age was 14.5 years (SD = 1.80). The mean time for distalization of the maxillary molars was 5.85 months (SD = 1.82), and the total treatment time was 3.61 years (SD = 1.83). The pendulum appliance moved the maxillary molars distally, but with significant distal inclination, protrusion of the anterior teeth, and increase in lower anterior facial height (LAFH) due to the clockwise mandibular rotation. After fixed orthodontic treatment, the maxillary incisors and the maxillary first premolars and first molars were returned to their pretreatment anteroposterior positions. Thus, at postdistalization, there was 2.1 mm of protrusion of the maxillary first molars, despite the anchorage reinforcement (Nance button and cervical headgear worn at night during fixed appliance therapy). However, at the end of treatment, all patients had Class I molar relationships. The pendulum appliance followed by fixed orthodontic treatment corrected the Class II sagittal relationship, especially due to the dentoalveolar changes secondary to the spontaneous mandibular growth in the anterior direction during fixed appliance treatment.

  5. Comparison of factors affecting orthodontic treatment motivation of Taiwanese and Thai patients in two hospitals

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    Wariya Laothong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/purpose: Many factors, including economic, psychosocial statuses and ethnicity, affect patients' decision to seek orthodontic treatment. The present study compared orthodontic patients' motivation, attitude and the factors affecting this motivation in Taiwanese and Thai patients. We investigated the association between the aforementioned variables and patient characteristics. Materials and methods: We enrolled 250 Thai and 250 Taiwanese patients (age ≥ 20 years from Sunprasitthiprasong and Taipei Medical University Hospitals, respectively, by using self-administered questionnaires. Demographic characteristics were analyzed using Pearson's chi-square test, patients' motivation, attitude and the factors affecting this motivation were analyzed using the sample t-test. The association among the variables was investigated by multiple regression analysis. Results: In both hospitals, the main motivation for seeking orthodontic treatment was esthetic concerns; the patients believed that treatment could make them more beautiful. Taiwanese and Thai patients rejected treatment because of high treatment costs and long treatment periods, respectively. A significant association was observed between household income and Thai patients' motivation (p < 0.05. Sex was significantly associated with Thai patients' attitude (p < 0.05. Age, sex, active treatment duration, and marital status were associated with Taiwanese attitude toward treatment (p < 0.05. In addition, age, household income, and information resources were significantly associated with the factors affecting Taiwanese patients' motivation (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Ethnicity influenced patients' motivation. Economic status was the main factor affecting Thai patients, whereas many factors affected Taiwanese patients' decision to seek orthodontic treatment. However, esthetic concerns were a crucial motivation for both groups. Keywords: factors affecting

  6. A comparative study of combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and clear aligners in patients with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji-Young

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing prevalence of orthodontic treatment in adults, clear aligner treatments are becoming more popular. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of orthodontic treatment on periodontal tissue and to compare orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances (FA) to clear aligner treatment (CAT) in periodontitis patients. A total of 35 patients who underwent orthodontic treatment in the Department of Periodontology were included in this study. After periodontal treatment with meticulous oral hygiene education, patients underwent treatment with FA or CAT, and this study analyzed patient outcomes depending on the treatment strategy. Clinical parameters were assessed at baseline and after orthodontic treatment, and the duration of treatment was compared between these two groups. The overall plaque index, the gingival index, and probing depth improved after orthodontic treatment (P<0.01). The overall bone level also improved (P=0.045). However, the bone level changes in the FA and CAT groups were not significantly different. Significant differences were found between the FA and CAT groups in probing depth, change in probing depth, and duration of treatment (P<0.05). However, no significant differences were found between the FA and CAT groups regarding the plaque index, changes in the plaque index, the gingival index, changes in the gingival index, or changes in the alveolar bone level. The percentage of females in the CAT group (88%) was significantly greater than in the FA group (37%) (P<0.01). After orthodontic treatment, clinical parameters were improved in the FA and CAT groups with meticulous oral hygiene education and plaque control. Regarding plaque index and gingival index, no significant differences were found between these two groups. We suggest that combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment can improve patients' periodontal health irrespective of orthodontic techniques.

  7. Association among pain, masticatory performance, and proinflammatory cytokines in crevicular fluid during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Gustavo Hauber; Schultz, Christian; Trein, Marcos Porto; Mundstock, Karina Santos; Weidlich, Patrícia; Goularte, Jéferson Ferraz

    2015-12-01

    Orthodontic patients usually complain about masticatory limitations associated with the activation of fixed appliances. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate whether orthodontic pain reflects differences in the objective evaluation of mastication and in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the crevicular fluid of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. Twenty patients with malocclusions requiring orthodontic treatment were included in this prospective study. Their pain experience, masticatory performance, and levels of interleukin 1-beta and prostaglandin E2 in crevicular fluid were evaluated at 3 times: before bracket placement, 24 hours after archwire placement, and 30 days after the initial appointment. All variables were compared with those of a control group of 25 subjects with normal occlusion. The masticatory performance of the patients was significantly reduced at 24 hours after bracket placement, the period in which they reported higher values of pain and had higher levels of interleukin 1-beta. The levels of prostaglandin E2 did not change in the periods evaluated, and there were no correlations between the levels of cytokines and the functional limitations observed. The only significant correlation was between pain and decreased masticatory performance. The masticatory performance of orthodontic patients is significantly reduced only during the period of greatest pain. However, these alterations did not correlate with any measurement of interleukin 1-beta or prostaglandin E2 in the crevicular fluid, suggesting that these solitary measurements are inadequate to predict the temporary pain and masticatory limitations experienced by patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Routine treatment of bilateral aplasia of upper lateral incisors by orthodontic space closure without mandibular extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Bernd; Seifi-Shirvandeh, Nasrin

    2009-06-01

    This study aimed to gather statistically validated information on the changes in orthodontic variables in patients with bilateral upper lateral incisor aplasia treated with isolated orthodontic space closure. Data were collected from 25 (15 females, 10 males) consecutively treated, unselected adolescents [mean age at the end of treatment 16.4 years, standard deviation (SD) 1.3] after orthodontic space closure using push-and-pull mechanics (PPM). The changes in the relevant parameters were determined by comparing baseline and final lateral headfilms and casts. Following verification of normal distribution by means of a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, a two-tailed t-test for related data was performed. SNA, ANB, OcP-NL, OcP-ML, upper space balance, overbite, overjet, bilateral molar relationship, and L1-NB changed significantly (P orthodontic space closure for bilateral upper lateral incisor aplasia using PPM can be regarded as a valid alternative to prosthetic solutions. Long-term use of Class III elastics does not lead to significant changes in relevant orthodontic parameters.

  9. Effect of the personality traits of the patient on pain perception and attitude toward orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijeet Kadu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to evaluate the relationship between personality traits, pain perception, and person′s attitude toward orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: The sample comprised of two groups: Group 1 consisted of 100 treated subjects (50 males, 50 females; average age, 16.07 ± 1.36 years, and Group 2 consisted of 100 untreated subjects (50 males, 50 females; average age, 16.07 ± 1.41 years. The instrument for data collection was a questionnaire that included an assessment of patients′ personality profiles, pain expectation for untreated subjects, pain experience for treated subjects, and attitude toward orthodontic treatment. Results: Gender and treatment status did not affect pain perception and attitude of a person toward orthodontic treatment. There was a strong relationship between pain perception and attitude with Pearson′s correlation of 0.367 and P ≤ 0.0001. With one unit increase in attitude there was 0.43 units increase in pain. Patients with high levels of trait neuroticism (P = 0.01 and low levels of trait conscientiousness (P = 0.02 experienced more pain. Patients with high levels of trait conscientiousness showed better attitude (P = 0.01. Conclusion: Personality traits, neuroticism, and conscientiousness have effect on pain perception and attitude of patients toward orthodontic treatment. Patients with better attitude experienced less pain and patients with less pain exhibited better attitude.

  10. OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF ADOLESCENT'S ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT NEEDS AND THEIR IMPACT ON SELF-ESTEEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshika; Mathur, Anmol; Batra, Manu; Makkar, Diljot Kaur; Aggarwal, Vikram Pal; Goyal, Nikita; Kaur, Puneet

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the presence of association between objective and subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment needs in adolescents and their impact on their self-esteem. Cross-sectional study with adolescents aged 10-17 years old in Sri Ganganagar city, Rajasthan, India. The objective index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) dental health component (DHC) and the subjective aesthetic component (AC) were used to determine the normative and the self-perception need for orthodontic treatment, respectively. The selected students were further examined for dental trauma, tooth loss, and dental caries. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale was applied for self-esteem level determination. Linear regression analysis was executed to test the individual association of different independent clinical variables with self-esteem scores. Among 1,140 studied adolescents, the prevalence of dental normative orthodontic treatment need was in 56.9% of individuals, whereas 53.3% of individuals considered themselves as needy for the treatment. Multivariate analyses revealed that out of all dental disorders, DHC followed by AC of IOTN had maximum impact on the self-esteem of the adolescence. Dissatisfaction with dental appearance is a strong predictor for low self-esteem in adolescence.

  11. Orthodontic treatment in adult with type I temporomandibular dysfunction : A case report

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    A Sai Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between occlusion and TMJ has been the subject of considerable controversy. It is widely believed that the TMJ signs and symptoms such as Joint pain, clicking, locking and headaches are secondary to abnormalities of occlusion, with actual derangement being uncommon. This case report is to put forward the hypothesis that, type I TMD is often due primarily to occlusal interferences for which orthodontic treatment is generally effective. This case report underlines the significance of fixed orthodontic appliance along with the anterior bite plane splint used in correction of type I TMD.

  12. Orthodontic Wire Ingestion during Treatment: Reporting a Case and Review the Management of Foreign Body Ingestion or Aspiration (Emergencies

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    Mohammad Hoseini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Today orthodontic treatment is in growing demand and is not limited to a specific age or social group. The nature of orthodontic treatment is such that the orthodontic wires and appliances, which are used to apply force and move the teeth, are exposed to the oral cavity. Shaping and replacing these wires in oral cavity are the major assignments of orthodontist on appointments. Therefore, we can say that orthodontic treatment requires working with dangerous tools in a sensitive place like oral cavity which is the entrance of respiratory and digestive systems. In this paper, a case of ingesting a broken orthodontic wire during eating is reported, and also necessary remedial measures at the time of encountering foreign body ingestion or aspiration are provided.

  13. Changes of occlusal plane inclination after orthodontic treatment with four premolars extraction in dento-alveolar bimaxillary protrusion cases

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    NR Yuliawati Zenab

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find out whether there were changes in occlusal plane inclination after fixed orthodontic treatment of bimaxillary protrusion cases where extraction of four first premolars was needed using the standard Edgewise appliances. The sample was fourteen orthodontic patients, aged above sixteen years old, no sexual discrimination, treated with fixed appliances at Orthodontic Specialist Clinic Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran. The method was a pre-post design which compared occlusal plane inclination obtained from tracings of lateral cephalograms before and after orthodontic treatment. The results were calculated with the paired t-test analysis. The study revealed that there were no significant changes in occlusal plane inclination after the orthodontic treatment.

  14. Digital design of a surgical guide for placement of definitive implants before orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktaroglu, Hanife Canan; Kim, Jae Seon; Londono, Jimmy; Baker, Philip S

    2015-08-01

    Interdisciplinary treatment planning is an essential part of orthodontic therapy for patients with partial edentulism, especially when dental implants are to serve initially as anchorage and ultimately as prosthetic abutments for the definitive fixed restoration. A technique is presented for designing and fabricating a computed tomography-based surgical guide to place definitive implants before orthodontic therapy. First, the diagnostic cast and the orthodontic tooth arrangement and diagnostic waxing cast are scanned with a 3-dimensional optical scanner. Three-dimensional renderings of these scans are then merged and superimposed onto the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image with implant planning software to develop definitive implant positions. A custom surgical guide is fabricated from these data. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Simple replantation protocol to avoid ankylosis in teeth intended for orthodontic treatment

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    Yuli Nugraeni

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dento-alveolar trauma resulted from accidents involving the oral regions mostly affect the upper central incisors. Overjet that is beyond 5 mm and incompetent lip also contribute to increase the risk. Several literatures had already discussed different methods of replantation of avulsed teeth. However, it was not meant for further orthodontic treatment. Purpose: The objective of this review is to propose a simple replantation protocol of avulsed teeth which also prevent from ankylosis. Reviews: Protruded teeth usually need orthodontic treatment; therefore, an appropriate management should be done to avoid the development of ankylosis. Ankylosis of the periodontal ligament (PDL becomes a problem in orthodontic tooth movement in repositioned or replanted teeth. In addition, ankylosed teeth also more susceptible to root resorption. Actually, it was caused by the endodontic treatment. In particular, severely protruded or unoccluded teeth are hypofunctional, therefore have narrow PDL, thus it may facilitate to ankylosis development. Ideal management protocol such as the use of root canal sealer i.e. mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA; the using of Emdogain, and resilient wiring or semi-rigid fixation with brackets has become a solution in avulsed teeth arranged for orthodontic treatment. Nevertheless, the presence of oral surgeon, endodontist and orthodontist in the same time, and also ideal preparations after an accident was difficult to achieve. Conclusion: Considering that reducing the ongoing PDL inflammation with intracanal medicaments and maintaining the functional force during mastication is possible; it is concluded that this simple replantation protocol is likely.

  16. Differential clinical effects of chlorhexidine gels on patients undergoing orthodontic treatment

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    Roxana Buzatu¹

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES AND BACKGROUND This study aims to evaluate and compare the clinical effects on gingival inflammation and plaque control using 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate gel with 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate gel in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty six patients aged between 20 and 30 years receiving fixed appliance orthodontic treatment in private practice, were selected for this study. Patients were split in two groups. The first group received a subgingival application of 10 ml 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate gel (Glucosite, Cerkamed. Subjects in the second group received a subgingival application of 10 ml 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate gel (RxPerioflush, Dental Life Sciences. RESULTS The results of the present study seem to support the results of previous scientific studies where chlorhexidine gluconate was used in a similar population CONCLUSIONS Within the limits of this study, we showed that usage of chlorhexidine gels in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment reduce PI, GI and BOP and PD, but no significant difference was observed, except for the initial phase of the inflammatory process concerning the gingival tissue. REFERENCES 1. 1 Fiore JP, Ishikuwa So, Kim DM. Gingival inflamation. In: Newman MG, Takel HH, Klokkeuold PR. Carranza’s clinical periodontology, Missouri. Linda Duncan. 2006. p. 389-396. 2. Lindhe J. Textbook of clinical periodontology 2nd ed., Copenhagen: Munksgaard. 1989. p. 234- 236. 3. Zachrisson S, Zachrisson BU. Gingival condition associated with orthodontic treatment. Angle Orthod. 1972. p. 26–34.

  17. Normative and subjective need for orthodontic treatment within different age groups in a population in Turkey.

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    Nur Yilmaz, R B; Oktay, I; Ilhan, D; Fişekçioğlu, E; Özdemir, Fulya

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate and compare the normative and subjective need for orthodontic treatment within different age groups in Turkey. One thousand and sixteen patients from seven different demographic regions of Turkey (Marmara, Black Sea, East Anatolia, Southeastern Anatolia, Mediterranean, Aegean, and Central Anatolia Region) (mean age ± SD: 12.80 ± 3.57 years) were randomly selected and divided into six age groups (7-8,9-10,11-12,13-14,15-16, and 17-18 year-olds) and categorized according to the dental health component (DHC) of the index for orthodontic treatment need (IOTN). Additionally, the patients were asked to indicate the photograph that was most similar to their own dentition from the 10-point scale of the aesthetic component of IOTN. The DHC of IOTN was not significantly different between the six age groups (P > 0.05). However, no/slight need (aesthetic component 1-4) for orthodontic treatment according to AC of IOTN was significantly higher in 13-14,15-16, and 17-18 age groups than 7-8, 9-10, and 11-12 age groups (P age groups (P > 0.05). The normative need distribution was homogeneous within all the age groups according to DHC. However, the subjective need for orthodontic treatment was higher in the younger age groups.

  18. Effectiveness of probiotics in the prevention of carious lesions during treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances.

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    Paula Contreras

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty experienced by patients with fixed orthodontic appliances in maintaining adequate oral hygiene poses a risk for dental caries. The use of probiotics has been proposed as a means of prevention. The following systematic review aims to determine the effectiveness of probiotics in the prevention of dental caries during treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. This review was carried out according to the PRISMA guidelines. A comprehensive electronic search was conducted in the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed and Google Scholar Beta databases. The inclusion criteria included randomized controlled clinical trials involving the use of probiotics, caries and patients under fixed orthodontic treatment. The methodological quality of the articles was evaluated according to risk of bias. Of the five included studies, three reported significant differences compared to the control group. Of the others, one article reported significant decrease in the final count of microorganisms compared to the beginning of treatment. Only one study reported no differences of any kind. It was estimated that the eligible studies were of moderate methodological quality and had an unclear risk of bias, without affecting key domains for the research. It is concluded that the daily consumption of probiotics can be effective in the prevention of carious lesions in patients under fixed orthodontic treatment. However, this should be interpreted with caution and corroborated by clinical trials of better methodological quality.

  19. Orthodontic Mini-implants for Treatment of Long-term Anterior Dislocation of Temporomandibular Joint

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    Amit Dahiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a relatively common occurrence; chronic long-term dislocation is rare. Variance in the duration of dislocation and anatomical considerations make the treatment for long-standing dislocation complex and controversial. This case report describes a new method of conservative management of a long-standing TMJ dislocation using orthodontic mini-implants.

  20. Methods used for prevention of white spot lesion development during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances

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    Kerbusch, A.E.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Mulder, J.; Sanden, W.J.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to survey methods that Dutch orthodontists use to prevent development or progression of enamel decalcifications during orthodontic treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A pre-tested questionnaire was sent by post to all orthodontists in the Netherlands with a

  1. Caries outcomes after orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances: do lingual brackets make a difference?

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    van der Veen, M.H.; Attin, R.; Schwestka-Polly, R.; Wiechmann, D.

    2010-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances is considered a risk factor for the development of white spot caries lesions (WSL). Traditionally, brackets are bonded to the buccal surfaces. Lingual brackets are developing rapidly and have become more readily available. Buccal surfaces are considered to

  2. Association between gingivitis and anterior gingival enlargement in subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment

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    Fabricio Batistin Zanatta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the association among gingival enlargement (GE, periodontal conditions and socio-demographic characteristics in subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. METHODS: A sample of 330 patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment for at least 6 months were examined by a single calibrated examiner for plaque and gingival indexes, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment loss and gingival enlargement. Socio-economic background, orthodontic treatment duration and use of dental floss were assessed by oral interviews. Associations were assessed by means of unadjusted and adjusted Poisson's regression models. RESULTS: The presence of gingival bleeding (RR 1.01; 95% CI 1.00-1.01 and excess resin around brackets (RR 1.02; 95% CI 1.02-1.03 were associated with an increase in GE. No associations were found between socio-demographic characteristics and GE. CONCLUSION: Proximal anterior gingival bleeding and excess resin around brackets are associated with higher levels of anterior gingival enlargement in subjects under orthodontic treatment.

  3. Orthodontic treatment outcomes obtained by application of a finishing protocol

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    Alvaro Carvajal-Flórez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the results of a finishing protocol implemented in patients treated in the Orthodontics graduate program at Universidad de Antioquia. Evaluation was carried out by means of the criteria set by the Objective Grading System (OGS of the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO. Methods: Cast models and panoramic radiographs of 34 patients were evaluated. The intervention group (IG consisted of 17 patients (19.88 ± 4.4 years old treated under a finishing protocol. This protocol included training in finishing, application of a finishing guide, brackets repositioning and patient's follow-up. Results of the IG were compared to a control group of 17 patients (21.88 ± 7.0 years old selected by stratified randomization without finishing intervention (CG. Results: The scores for both CG and IG were 38.00 ± 9.0 and 31.41 ± 9.6 (p = 0.048, respectively. The score improved significantly in the IG group, mainly regarding marginal ridges (CG: 5.59 ± 2.2; IG: 3.65 ± 1.8 (p = 0.009 and root angulation (CG: 7.59 ± 2.8; IG: 4.88 ± 2.6 (p = 0.007. Criteria that did not improve, but had the highest scores were: alignment (CG: 6.35 ± 2.7; IG: 6.82 ± 2.8 (p = 0.62 and buccolingual inclination (CG: 3.6 ± 5.88; IG: 5.29 ± 3.9 (p = 0.65. Conclusions: Standardization and implementation of a finishing protocol contributed to improve clinical performance in the Orthodontics graduate program, as expressed by occlusal outcomes. Greater emphasis should be given on the finishing phase to achieve lower scores in the ABO grading system.

  4. The spectrum of Apert syndrome: phenotype, particularities in orthodontic treatment, and characteristics of orthognathic surgery

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    Hohoff, Ariane; Joos, Ulrich; Meyer, Ulrich; Ehmer, Ulrike; Stamm, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    In the PubMed accessible literature, information on the characteristics of interdisciplinary orthodontic and surgical treatment of patients with Apert syndrome is rare. The aim of the present article is threefold: (1) to show the spectrum of the phenotype, in order (2) to elucidate the scope of hindrances to orthodontic treatment, and (3) to demonstrate the problems of surgery and interdisciplinary approach. Children and adolescents who were born in 1985 or later, who were diagnosed with Apert syndrome, and who sought consultation or treatment at the Departments of Orthodontics or Craniomaxillofacial Surgery at the Dental School of the University Hospital of Münster (n = 22; 9 male, 13 female) were screened. Exemplarily, three of these patients (2 male, 1 female), seeking interdisciplinary (both orthodontic and surgical treatment) are presented. Orthodontic treatment before surgery was performed by one experienced orthodontist (AH), and orthognathic surgery was performed by one experienced surgeon (UJ), who diagnosed the syndrome according to the criteria listed in OMIM™. In the sagittal plane, the patients suffered from a mild to a very severe Angle Class III malocclusion, which was sometimes compensated by the inclination of the lower incisors; in the vertical dimension from an open bite; and transversally from a single tooth in crossbite to a circular crossbite. All patients showed dentitio tarda, some impaction, partial eruption, idopathic root resorption, transposition or other aberrations in the position of the tooth germs, and severe crowding, with sometimes parallel molar tooth buds in each quarter of the upper jaw. Because of the severity of malocclusion, orthodontic treatment needed to be performed with fixed appliances, and mainly with superelastic wires. The therapy was hampered with respect to positioning of bands and brackets because of incomplete tooth eruption, dense gingiva, and mucopolysaccharide ridges. Some teeth did not move, or moved

  5. The spectrum of Apert syndrome: phenotype, particularities in orthodontic treatment, and characteristics of orthognathic surgery

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    Ehmer Ulrike

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the PubMed accessible literature, information on the characteristics of interdisciplinary orthodontic and surgical treatment of patients with Apert syndrome is rare. The aim of the present article is threefold: (1 to show the spectrum of the phenotype, in order (2 to elucidate the scope of hindrances to orthodontic treatment, and (3 to demonstrate the problems of surgery and interdisciplinary approach. Children and adolescents who were born in 1985 or later, who were diagnosed with Apert syndrome, and who sought consultation or treatment at the Departments of Orthodontics or Craniomaxillofacial Surgery at the Dental School of the University Hospital of Münster (n = 22; 9 male, 13 female were screened. Exemplarily, three of these patients (2 male, 1 female, seeking interdisciplinary (both orthodontic and surgical treatment are presented. Orthodontic treatment before surgery was performed by one experienced orthodontist (AH, and orthognathic surgery was performed by one experienced surgeon (UJ, who diagnosed the syndrome according to the criteria listed in OMIM™. In the sagittal plane, the patients suffered from a mild to a very severe Angle Class III malocclusion, which was sometimes compensated by the inclination of the lower incisors; in the vertical dimension from an open bite; and transversally from a single tooth in crossbite to a circular crossbite. All patients showed dentitio tarda, some impaction, partial eruption, idopathic root resorption, transposition or other aberrations in the position of the tooth germs, and severe crowding, with sometimes parallel molar tooth buds in each quarter of the upper jaw. Because of the severity of malocclusion, orthodontic treatment needed to be performed with fixed appliances, and mainly with superelastic wires. The therapy was hampered with respect to positioning of bands and brackets because of incomplete tooth eruption, dense gingiva, and mucopolysaccharide ridges. Some teeth did not

  6. A pilot clinical study of Class III surgical patients facilitated by improved accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, JiaQi; Jiang, Jiu-Hui; Xu, Li; Liang, Cheng; Bai, YunYang; Zou, Wei

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate if the improved accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (IAOO) procedure could speed Class III surgical patients' preoperative orthodontic treatment duration and, if yes, to what extent. This study was also designed to determine whether or not an IAOO procedure affects the tooth-moving pattern during extraction space closure. The samples in this study consisted of 24 Class III surgical patients. Twelve skeletal Class III surgery patients served as an experimental group (group 1) and the others as a control group (group 2). Before treatment, the maxillary first premolars were removed. For group 1, after the maxillary dental arch was aligned and leveled (T2), IAOO procedures were performed in the maxillary alveolar bone. Except for this IAOO procedure in group 1, all 24 patients experienced similar combined orthodontic and orthognathic treatment. Study casts of the maxillary dentitions were made before orthodontic treatment (T1) and after extraction space closure (T3). All of the casts were laser scanned, and the amount of movement of the maxillary central incisor, canine, and first molar, as well as arch widths, were digitally measured and analyzed by using the three-dimensional model superimposition method. The time durations T3-T2 were significantly reduced in group 1 by 8.65 ± 2.67 months and for T3-T1 were reduced by 6.39 ± 2.00 months (P teeth movement in the sagittal, vertical, and transverse dimensions between the two groups (P > .05). The IAOO can reduce the surgical orthodontic treatment time for the skeletal Class III surgical patient by more than half a year on average. The IAOO procedures do not save anchorage.

  7. SURGICAL ORTHODONTICS: LITERATURE REVIEW AND CASE REPORT

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    Piyush HEDA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Orthognathic surgery is a surgical procedure largely practiced throughout the world for the correction of various maxillofacial deformities. The procedure for correcting a particular deformity will be done after proper evaluation, which includes cephalometric, dental model analysis and photographs. The patient undergoes pre-surgical orthodontic correction for dental compensation, after which surgery is planned. During the last few decades, the profession has witnessed intense interest for the treatment of facial deformities, being widely practiced throughout the world. Orthognathic surgery has become an acceptable treatment plan for patients with various maxillofacial deformities, giving pleasing results. The present study reports the successful treatment method of Class II division 1 malocclusion through orthognathic surgery.

  8. Outcome assessment of Invisalign and traditional orthodontic treatment compared with the American Board of Orthodontics objective grading system.

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    Djeu, Garret; Shelton, Clarence; Maganzini, Anthony

    2005-09-01

    This treatment-outcome assessment objectively compares Invisalign (Align Technology, Santa Clara, Calif) treatment with braces. This study, a retrospective cohort analysis, was conducted in New York, NY, in 2004. Records from 2 groups of 48 patients (Invisalign and braces groups) were evaluated by using methods from the American Board of Orthodontics Phase III examination. The discrepancy index was used to analyze pretreatment records to control for initial severity of malocclusion. The objective grading system (OGS) was used to systematically grade posttreatment records. Statistical analyses evaluated treatment outcome, duration, and strengths and weaknesses of Invisalign compared with braces. The Invisalign group lost 13 OGS points more than the braces group on average, and the OGS passing rate for Invisalign was 27% lower than that for braces. Invisalign scores were consistently lower than braces scores for buccolingual inclination, occlusal contacts, occlusal relationships, and overjet. Invisalign's OGS scores were negatively correlated to initial overjet, occlusion, and buccal posterior crossibite. Invisalign patients finished 4 months sooner than those with fixed appliances on average. P Invisalign did not treat malocclusions as well as braces in this sample. Invisalign was especially deficient in its ability to correct large anteroposterior discrepancies and occlusal contacts. The strengths of Invisalign were its ability to close spaces and correct anterior rotations and marginal ridge heights. This study might help clinicians to determine which patients are best suited for Invisalign treatment.

  9. Surgical-Orthodontic Treatment of Gummy Smile with Vertical Maxillary Excess

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    Sumit Kumar Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical maxillary excess is a well-defined clinical entity with several treatment options available. Treatment of the condition requires extremely well-coordinated orthodontic and surgical treatment planning and execution. This case report describes a multidisciplinary approach in the successful management of a patient with severe vertical maxillary excess. Careful selection and good execution of a surgical-orthodontic treatment plan in the management of vertical maxillary excess provided the superior esthetic and functional results in this case. Maxillary Le Forte 1 procedure was performed for vertical maxillary impaction along with anterior segmental setback. The presented technique was unique as it shortened the treatment time and esthetic results in smile and vertical proportions were achieved.

  10. Overview of non-invasive factors (low level laser and low intensity pulsed ultrasound) accelerating tooth movement during orthodontic treatment.

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    Jawad, Mohammed Mahmood; Husein, Adam; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Hassan, Rozita; Shaari, Rumaizi

    2014-01-01

    The need for orthodontic treatment is increasing all the time. As the treatment is time consuming ranging from a year to several years, any method of reducing the period of treatment and increasing the quality of the tissue will be beneficial to patients. The use of non-invasive techniques such as low level laser therapy and low intensity pulsed ultasound in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement are promising. Thus, this overview study will help to generate more understanding about the background information and the possible applications of them in daily orthodontics, depending on previous literature searching for reviews and original research articles.

  11. From orthodontic treatment plan to ultrathin no-prep CAD/CAM temporary veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patroni, Stefano; Cocconi, Renato

    Several treatment options are described in the literature to solve the microdontia-related problems of maxillary anterior teeth. These options are often focused on an orthodontic rather than a restorative approach. The case presented here started with an orthodontic phase followed by a restorative one. The aim of the orthodontic phase was to achieve the correct spacing, respecting ideal average tooth proportions. This was done using a digital setup to restore the six anterior teeth, so that an optimal esthetic and functional result was achieved by the end of the orthodontic treatment. The purpose of the restorative phase was to contribute to the esthetic outcome and occlusal stability. The 12-year-old patient was treated utilizing a CAD/CAM procedure, which took advantage of the mechanical properties and reasonable cost of the chosen resin matrix ceramic material (Vita Enamic). Once stability has been attained and proper periodontal tissue maturation has been reached at the end of the patient's growth, there will then be the option of improving the esthetics by replacing these restorations with ceramic veneers.

  12. Orthodontic treatment of anterior open bite: a review article--is surgery always necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Isabelle; Figel, Philipp; Winchester, Lindsay

    2014-09-01

    Anterior open bite cases are very difficult to treat satisfactorily because of their multifactorial aetiology and their very high relapse rate. Dependent on the origin of the anterior open bite malocclusion and the patient's age, there are several treatment possibilities ranging from deterrent appliances, high-pull headgear, fixed appliances with and without extractions to orthognathic surgery, and skeletal anchorage with miniplates or miniscrews. The gold standard treatment of skeletal anterior open bite cases is the combined approach of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and orthognathic surgery. In recent years, temporary anchorage devices (TAD) have been developed to correct anterior open bites orthodontically. With the introduction of TAD as an effective treatment modality, orthognathic surgery may be avoidable in selected anterior open bite cases. This is a relatively new technique and to date there remains a lack of evidence of long-term stability of anterior open bite closure with TAD.

  13. [Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 by Postnikov appliance, face mask and bracket system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnikov, M A; Trunin, D A; Pankratova, N V; Nesterov, A M; Sadykov, M I; Ostankov, S A

    2018-01-01

    The diagnostics and treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 is an vital problem in orthodontics. Method of orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients with the help of improved and patented orthodontic construction - 'Postnikov appliance' - and face mask and bracket system is analysed in the article. Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III was examined in 24 patients aged 6-12 by the suggested method. All patients were examined clinically and with the help af additional diagnostic methods: head cephalometry in lateral position with further data analysis in Dolphin Imaging (USA). The use of computer technologies in Dolphin Imaging helps to controll the process of correction of dentition correlation in different stages of treatment, to reduce the period of treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 and to improve face esthetics and life quality ratio.

  14. Prevention of enamel demineralization during orthodontic treatment: an in vitro comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichu, Yashodhan M; Kamat, Nandini; Chandra, Pavan Kumar; Kapoor, Aditi; Razmus, Thomas; Aravind, N K S

    2013-01-01

    Enamel demineralization is considered to be the most prevalent and significant iatrogenic effect associated with fixed orthodontic treatment and can seriously jeopardize both tooth longevity and dental esthetics. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effectiveness of four different commercially available surface treatment medicaments for the inhibition of enamel demineralization. Seventy-five intact maxillary premolars extracted from patients undergoing orthodontic treatment were divided into five equal groups and were subjected to one of the following protocols: no treatment (control group) or treatment with one of the following four medicaments: fluoride varnish (Fluor Protector [FP]), casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (GC Tooth Mousse [TM]), calcium sodium phosphosilicate (SHY-NM), and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate with fluoride (GC Tooth Mousse Plus [TMP]). All the teeth were subjected to ten Cate demineralization solution?for 96 hours and subsequently evaluated under polarized light microscopy to obtain the mean depths of enamel demineralization. One-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni comparison tests were used to obtain statistically significant differences between the five different groups at P < .05. All four surface treatment medicaments provided statistically significant reduction in the depths of enamel demineralization as compared with the control group. FP provided the greatest protection of enamel surface in terms of reduction of lesion depth, followed by TMP, SHY-NM, and TM. The use of these commercially available medicaments could prove to be beneficial for patients undergoing orthodontic treatment and who are at a risk for developing enamel decalcification.

  15. Influence of lateral cephalometric radiography in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durão, Ana Reis; Alqerban, Ali; Ferreira, Afonso Pinhão; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of additional lateral cephalometric radiography in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Forty-three patients seeking orthodontic treatment, and for whom pretreatment diagnostic records were available, were randomly selected. Ten qualified orthodontists were involved in this study. The patients' records included three photographs of the angle trimmed dental casts, digital lateral cephalometric and panoramic radiographs, and standard clinical photographs comprising seven intra- and four extraoral pictures. Records were evaluated in two sessions. At the first session, orthodontists evaluated records without lateral cephalometric radiography (LCR). In the second session, the same information was presented, but with LCR. Between the two sessions the order in which the cases were presented was altered to avoid bias. The percentage of agreement between sessions was lower for diagnosis than for treatment planning. Concerning skeletal classification, the least experienced orthodontist was the least consistent (28%), while the more experienced orthodontist was the more reliable (67%). In terms of treatment modalities, in general there was an agreement of 64%. The most frequent modifications in treatment modalities were seen in Class II malocclusion patients. The results of our study suggest that the majority of Portuguese orthodontists judge that LCR is important to producing a treatment plan. Despite that, it does not seem to have an influence on orthodontic treatment planning.

  16. [Tip and torque changes in maxillary buccal segment after orthodontic treatment: a three-dimensional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gui; Qin, Yi-fei; Xu, Tian-min

    2010-11-01

    To investigate three-dimensional imaging registration and superimposition techniques in measuring the tip and torque change of upper canine, premolar and first molar after orthodontic treatment. Twenty-eight subjects (14 extraction cases and 14 non-extraction cases) with full records were randomly selected from the Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology. The pre-and post-treatment upper dental casts were digitized with three-dimensional spot laser scanner and superimposed with reverse engineering software. The facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) was transferred from post-treatment teeth to the pre-treatment teeth using three-dimensional imaging registration. The occlusal plane was constructed on the post-treatment upper digital cast and the tip and torque values were measured. In the non-extraction group, the tip of the second premolar decreased by 1.5° (P orthodontic treatment tended to tip the upper second premolar distally and increased the buccal crown torque of the upper premolars while extraction treatment increased the lingual crown torque of the upper canine.

  17. Prevention and Treatment of White Spot Lesions During and After Treatment with Fixed Orthodontic Appliances: a Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Lopatiene

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the systematic literature review is to update the evidence for the prevention of white spot lesions, using materials containing fluoride and/or casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate during and after treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Material and Methods: Information search for controlled studies on humans published between January 2008 and February 2016 was performed in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Embase, The Cochrane Library. Inclusion criteria were: the English language, study on humans, patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances, randomized or quasi-randomized controlled clinical studies fluoride-containing product or casein derivates used throughout the appliance therapy or straightaway after debonding. Results: 326 articles were reviewed (Embase 141, PubMed 129, ScienceDirect 41, Cochrane 15. Twelve clinical studies fulfilled all inclusion criteria. Use of fluoridated toothpaste had a remineralizing effect on white spot lesions (WSLs (P < 0.05; fluoride varnish and casein supplements were effective in prevention and early treatment of WSLs (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Early detection of white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment would allow implementing preventive measures to control the demineralization process before lesions progress. The systemic review has showed that the usage of fluoride and casein supplements in ameliorating white spot lesions during and after fixed orthodontic treatment is significantly effective. However the use of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate can be more beneficial than fluoride rinse in the reduction of demineralization spots.

  18. Surgical and orthodontic conduct in the treatment of mesiodens: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goursand, Daniela; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Leticia; de Oliveria, Gomes Carlos; Drummond, Alexandre Fortes; de Araujo, Zarzar Patricia Maria Pereira; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2007-01-01

    This article reports a clinical case involving an 8-year-old boy with two mesiodentes. The supernumerary teeth caused both a functional alteration (malocclusion) and an esthetic one (interincisal diastema), both of which affected his quality of living. Surgical removal of the supernumerary teeth and orthodontic follow-up was proposed, in agreement with the treatment established in the literature. This treatment produced satisfactory results in terms of both esthetics and functionality.

  19. Apical root resorption during orthodontic treatment with aligners? A retrospective radiometric study

    OpenAIRE

    Krieger, Elena; Drechsler, Thomas; Schmidtmann, Irene; Jacobs, Collin; Haag, Simeon; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Objective of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of apical root resorptions (ARR) during orthodontic treatment with aligners. Materials and methods The sample comprised 100 patients (17?75 years of age) with a class I occlusion and anterior crowding before treatment, treated exclusively with aligners (Invisalign?, Align Technologies, Santa Clara, CA, USA). The following teeth were assessed: upper and lower anterior teeth and first molars. Root and crown lengt...

  20. Orthodontic Protocol Using Mini-Implant for Class II Treatment in Patient with Special Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho Ferreira, Fernando Pedrin; Barbosa Lima, Anderson Paulo; de Paula, Eliana de C?ssia Molina; Ferreira Conti, Ana Claudia de Castro; Valarelli, Danilo Pinelli; de Almeida-Pedrin, Renata Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Improving facial and dental appearance and social interaction are the main factors for special needs (SN) patients to seek orthodontic treatment. The cooperation of SN patients and their parents is crucial for treatment success. Objective. To show through a case report the satisfactory results, both functional and esthetic, in patients with intellectual disability, congenital nystagmus, and severe scoliosis. Materials Used. Pendulum device with mini-implants as anchorage unit. Results. Improv...

  1. CBCT in orthodontics: assessment of treatment outcomes and indications for its use

    OpenAIRE

    Kapila, S D; Nervina, J M

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction into dentistry in 1998, CBCT has become increasingly utilized for orthodontic diagnosis, treatment planning and research. The utilization of CBCT for these purposes has been facilitated by the relative advantages of three-dimensional (3D) over two-dimensional radiography. Despite many suggested indications of CBCT, scientific evidence that its utilization improves diagnosis and treatment plans or outcomes has only recently begun to emerge for some of these applications....

  2. Clinical evaluation of periodontal health during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hănțoiu T.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Fixed orthodontic appliances make daily application of oral hygiene standard procedures more difficult and in time may lead to accumulation of oral biofilms and development of gingivitis and hyperplasia. The aim of the study is to evaluate the periodontal health expressed by clinical indices in patients under orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances, according to different oral hygene maintenance programs. Material and method: We performed a randomized prospective study on 60 patients with fixed orthodontic appliances (17-25 years of age devided in three study groups. The clnical indices recorded were: modified gingival index, plaque index and sulcular bleeding index. Statistical analysis or the results were carried out using Student t test. Results: The patients were randomly divided into three groups: group A-patients were instructed to use electric brush, water flosser and interdental brush, group B- electric brush, interdental brush and fluoride and group C- manual brushing and fluoride. Statistical comparison of the values of the indexes with the Student t test for independent samples showed statistically significant differences in all three groups of patients studied between initial and final values of all recorded clinical parameters. Conclusions: Fixed orthodontics do not induce periodontal disease if basic principles of oral hygiene are followed in compliant patients, which are correctly instructed to deal with real challenge, represented by complete elimination of debris and bacterial accumulation.

  3. Comparison of External Apical Root Resorption after Orthodontic Treatment with Two Appliances (Standard Edgewise and MBT

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    V. Mollabashi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The aim of this study was todeterminetheamount of external apical root resorption(EARRwithin two orthodontic appliances (standard edgewise and MBT. Material & Methods In this retrospective study, panoramic radiographs of 83 orthodontic patients (27 male and 56 female were evaluated. 46 patients had been treated with standard edgewise appliance (29 patients with extraction and 17 patients without extraction and 37 patients had been treated with MBT appliance (27 patients with extraction and 10 patients without extraction.EARR were evaluated in 24 teeth (anterior teeth, premolars and first molars in each patient. SPSS software and ordinal regression test were used for statistical analysis. Result: In this study the most EARR was seen in upper lateral incisors, then lower lateral incisors.EARR in upper canines and lower second premolars was significantly related to extraction of first premolarin MBT appliance. In non extraction cases, EARR was not related to the orthodontic appliance. Conclusion: Incisors teeth are the most disposed teeth to EARR. Orthodontic treatment with extraction increased EARR in canines and second premolars. MBT appliance may increase EARR. Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci . 2016; 22 (4 :316-322

  4. Quantitative changes in anaerobic subgingival microbiota in patients, before and during fixed orthodontic treatment

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    Amit Sidana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the growth of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Veillonella before and during fixed orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 40 patients (20 males, 20 females. The patients were divided into two groups, Group 1 (pretreatment group before any fixed orthodontic treatment and Group 2 (active treatment group 6 months into fixed treatment. A. actinomycetemcomitans was cultured on tryptic soy bacitracin vancomycin agar, and for the rest and total aerobic count, Columbia agar was used. The culture plates were incubated anaerobically for 72 h. Bacteria were identified by their physical and microscopic appearances. Further, specific bacteria were identified by VITEK 2 Compact Automated Identification System (Biomerieux. Using the magnifying glass, the total number of bacteria was determined. Result: For all the microbes, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, Veillonella (excepting A. actinomycetemcomitans, a significant increase in count was observed. Mean change was highest for P. intermedia (0.64 ± 0.74 × 104 CFU/ml and minimum for P. gingivalis (0.12 ± 0.35 × 104 CFU/ml. For A. actinomycetemcomitans, at both before and active treatment phases, the count was 0 ± 0 × 104 CFU/ml. For different microbes, change in microbial count ranged from 18.8% (P. gingivalis to 52% (P. intermedia. For Veillonella, the change was 51.4%. Conclusion: Orthodontic appliance serves as different loci for bacterial growth. In this in vivo study, significant differences were noted between the bacterial count in pretreatment group and active treatment group. Adequate oral prophylaxis instructions should be given to patients before starting fixed orthodontic treatment so that oral hygiene can be maintained.

  5. Orthodontic Protocol Using Mini-Implant for Class II Treatment in Patient with Special Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pedrin Carvalho Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving facial and dental appearance and social interaction are the main factors for special needs (SN patients to seek orthodontic treatment. The cooperation of SN patients and their parents is crucial for treatment success. Objective. To show through a case report the satisfactory results, both functional and esthetic, in patients with intellectual disability, congenital nystagmus, and severe scoliosis. Materials Used. Pendulum device with mini-implants as anchorage unit. Results. Improvement of facial and dental esthetics, correction of Class II malocclusion, and no root resorption shown in the radiographic follow-up. Conclusion. Knowing the limitations of SN patients, having a trained team, motivating and counting on the cooperation of parents and patients, and employing quick and low-cost orthodontic therapy have been shown to be the essential factors for treatment success.

  6. [Application of three-dimensional laser scanning-based maxillofacial soft tissue reconstruction in orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hua; Wu, Bu-ling; Bi, Zhen-yu; Jiao, Pei-feng; Zhao, Wei-dong; Sun, Feng-yang; Xu, Hui-yong; Liu, Yang

    2011-05-01

    To establish a convenient and rapid method for constructing a digital model of the maxillofacial soft tissue based on three-dimensional laser surface scanning to allow direct and accurate observation of the soft tissue changes in the course of orthodontic treatment. The point cloud data of three-dimensional laser scanning of the maxillofacial region were acquired from a healthy woman with Angle Class I occlusion, who maintained a horizontal Frankfort plane during scanning with the scanner placed at a distance of 80 cm. The scanning was repeated twice after wearing the dental cast for an Angle Class I occlusion. The three-dimensional digital model of the maxillofacial soft tissue was constructed based on the point cloud using GeoMagic10.0 software. The high-resolution three-dimensional model of the maxillofacial soft tissue reconstructed allowed accurate observation of the distinct facial anatomical landmarks and represented directly the soft tissue changes in the process of orthodontic treatment by merging the models. Using the analytic tool provided by the software, this model also allowed direct quantitative measurement of the nasolabial angle and the distances from the esthetic plane to the upper lip, labral inferior, and mentolabial sulcus, which were 111.86°, -3.57 mm, -2.54 mm, and 3.95 mm before orthodontic treatment as compared to 114.31°, -2.73 mm, -1.06 mm, and 3.46 mm during treatment, and 116.53°, -0.15 mm, 0.64 mm, and 3.11 mm after the treatment, respectively. Three-dimensional laser surface scanning enables accurate and rapid construction of the digital model of the facial soft tissues, which may provide valuable assistance in orthodontic treatment.

  7. Effect of intervention using a messaging app on compliance and duration of treatment in orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Xu, Zhen-Rui; Tang, Na; Ye, Cui; Zhu, Xiao-Ling; Zhou, Ting; Zhao, Zhi-He

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to determine the effectiveness of a messaging app (WeChat) in improving patients' compliance and reducing the duration of orthodontic treatment (DOT). A randomized controlled trial was performed in a dental hospital and a clinic from August 2012 to May 2015. Orthodontic patients were included at the beginning of treatment. Patients with multiphase treatment or braceless technique were excluded. Participants were randomized to WeChat group (received regular reminders and educational messages) or control group (received conventional management) and were followed up until the treatment was completed. Primary outcome measure was DOT. Others were late and failed attendance, bracket bond failure, and oral hygiene condition. One hundred twelve patients in each group participated and completed the trial. DOT in WeChat group were 7.3 weeks shorter (P = 0.007). There were less failed attendance (3.1 vs. 10.9 %, P WeChat group than control. There was no difference in orthodontic plaque index nor modified gingivitis index between the two groups before and after treatment. Number of failed attendances was identified as an independent factor affecting DOT (P = 0.004; HR = 0.89, 95 % CI 0.84 to 0.95). The intervention with WeChat is effective in reducing the treatment duration and bracket bond failure, and improving the attendance in orthodontic patients. DOT can be reduced by improving patient's compliance. The messaging app is useful for outpatient education and management.

  8. Factors associated with patient and parent satisfaction after orthodontic treatment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachêco-Pereira, Camila; Pereira, José Roberto; Dick, Bruce D; Perez, Arnaldo; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    Our objective was to identify factors associated with orthodontic treatment satisfaction of patients and their caregivers, when applicable. MEDLINE via Ovid, PubMed, EBM Reviews and EMBASE via OVIDSP, LILACS, Web of Science, and Google Scholar were searched electronically. Reference lists of included articles were also screened for potential relevant studies missed during the electronic searches. Studies evaluating the satisfaction levels of patients or caregivers after orthodontic treatment were considered. Methodologic quality of the included studies was assessed using a modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Eighteen studies satisfied the inclusion criteria, representing 2891 patients and 464 parents. The risk of bias was moderate in 13 and low in 4 of the included articles. The studies used different questionnaires and timings to assess postorthodontic treatment satisfaction. Based on the available limited evidence, satisfaction was associated with perceived esthetic outcomes, psychological benefits, and quality of care. The latter was specifically linked to dentist-staff-patient interactions. Dissatisfaction was associated with treatment duration, pain levels and discomfort, and the use of retention appliances. When both assessments were available, the patient's and the parent's satisfaction levels were strongly correlated. Based on the limited available evidence with moderate risk of bias, we identified factors that appear to be more commonly associated with a high or low level of satisfaction. Consideration of these factors could be important for practitioners attempting to set realistic expectations of their patients and caregivers regarding orthodontic treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Malocclusion prevalence and orthodontic treatment need in central Anatolian adolescents compared to European and other nations' adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Bilgic,Fundagul; Gelgor,Ibrahim Erhan; Celebi,Ahmet Arif

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine the prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need in a large sample of Central Anatolian adolescents and compare them with European-other nations' adolescents. Methods: The sample included 1125 boys and 1204 girls aged between 12 and 16 years with no previous orthodontic treatment history. Occlusal variables examined were molar relationship, overjet, overbite, crowding, midline diastema, posterior crossbite, and scissors bite. The dental health ...

  10. Orthodontic evolution: an update for the general dental practitioner. Part 1: recent advances, treatment need and demand, and benefits of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Niall J P

    2008-01-01

    Like all specialties of dentistry, orthodontics has undergone considerable development and improvement in treatment techniques over the past four decades. The two articles in this series aim to inform the general dental practitioner about these developments, together with an update on orthodontics' relationship to dental health, TMJ dysfunction and other aspects.

  11. Diagnosis and treatment planning of orthodontic patients with 3-dimensional dentofacial records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manosudprasit, Amornrut; Haghi, Arshan; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Masoud, Mohamed I

    2017-06-01

    Cephalometrics has been the foundation of orthodontic diagnosis for many years. However, for many orthodontic patients, a lateral cephalogram might not be necessary. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnosis and treatment planning agreement between standard records and nonradiographic 3-dimensional (3D) dentofacial photogrammetry records. Twenty patients had standard orthodontic records taken for their treatment as well as extraoral and intraoral 3D images. Twelve evaluators examined the standard records and then completed diagnosis and treatment planning questionnaires. They repeated the process 4 to 6 weeks later by using 3D photographic images along with the panoramic radiographs. Each evaluator also evaluated 2 random orthodontic cases twice with each method to evaluate consistency within each method. At the end of study, each evaluator was asked to complete a survey to document his or her experiences with the 3D photogrammetry method. Descriptive and kappa statistics were used to determine the agreement. Most diagnosis parameters had fair agreement between the methods and within each method. Skeletal and dental relationships had excellent agreement between and within the methods as well as most treatment decisions such as the need for extractions and surgery. Most evaluators (91.7%) thought that cephalometric x-rays would be needed only some of the time in diagnosis and treatment planning. Most evaluators (83.33%) thought that cephalometric radiographs are not needed in patients with a Class I ± a quarter cusp with crowding or spacing. Most diagnostic decisions had fair agreement within and between the 2 methods. The decision to extract and the need for orthognathic surgery had excellent agreement between the cephalometric and photogrammetric methods. The majority of examiners agreed that patients with Class I malocclusions ± a quarter cusp with no obvious skeletal discrepancy can be diagnosed and planned without a cephalometric radiograph

  12. The effects of orthodontic movement on a subepithelial connective tissue graft in the treatment of gingival recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Avila, Ana Leticia Rocha; Silva, Gabriela Molina; Añez, Maria Cecilia Galacini; Taffarel, Ivan Pedro

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to report on the five-year follow-up of a case involving treatment of gingival recession with a subepithelial connective tissue graft prior to orthodontic tooth movement. Gingival recession has a global prevalence that varies from 3 to 100 percent depending on the population studied and the method of analysis. In addition, the frequency of recession seems to be positively correlated with age. Planned orthodontic tooth movement is not necessarily an etiological factor for gingival recession, so long as it does not move the tooth out of its alveolar process. When the tooth is shifted without adequate biomechanical control, bone dehiscence can develop, and the recession can occur as a consequence of the orthodontic treatment. A 19.6-year-old female patient was referred for orthodontic treatment due to severe anterior-inferior dental crowding and a mandibular right lateral incisor in linguoverson and 4.0 mm of gingival recession on the labial surface. Normal gingival architecture was restored with a subepithelial connective tissue graft used to cover the 4.0 mm defect, after which orthodontic treatment repositioned the malposed incisor into its correct occlusal alignment. Individualized torque was applied to the mandibular right central incisor during the orthodontic treatment. The patient was reevaluated five years after completion of the orthodontic treatment. At the five-year recall appointment, the patient exhibited normal tooth alignment and generalized normal gingival architecture; however, 2 mm of gingival recession was noted on the graft site. This case demonstrated that periodontal surgical correction of facial gingival recession with a subepithelial graft may be performed prior to initiating orthodontic treatment.

  13. Orthodontic treatment for a mandibular prognathic girl of short stature under growth hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yun Pan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a case of a 12-year-old girl with maxillary deficiency, mandibular prognathism, and facial asymmetry, undergoing growth hormone (GH therapy due to idiopathic short stature. Children of short stature with or without GH deficiency have a deviating craniofacial morphology with overall smaller dimensions; facial retrognathism, especially mandibular retrognathism; and increased facial convexity. However, a complete opposite craniofacial pattern was presented in our case of a skeletal Class III girl with idiopathic short stature. The orthodontic treatment goal was to inhibit or change the direction of mandibular growth and stimulate the maxillary growth of the girl during a course of GH therapy. Maxillary protraction and mandibular retraction were achieved using occipitomental anchorage (OMA orthopedic appliance in the first stage of treatment. In the second stage, the patient was treated with a fixed orthodontic appliance using a modified multiple-loop edgewise archwire technique of asymmetric mechanics and an active retainer of vertical chin-cup. The treatment led to an acceptable facial profile and obvious facial asymmetry improvement. Class I dental occlusion and coincident dental midline were also achieved. A 3½-year follow-up of the girl at age 18 showed a stable result of the orthodontic and dentofacial orthopedic treatment. Our case shows that the OMA orthopedic appliance of maxillary protraction combined with mandibular retraction is effective for correcting skeletal Class III malocclusion with midface deficiency and mandibular prognathism in growing children with idiopathic short stature undergoing GH therapy.

  14. Extraction of Maxillary Central Incisors: An Orthodontic-Restorative Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Hedayati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malformed central incisors with poor prognosis could be candidates for extraction especially in crowded dental arches. This case report refers to a 12-year-old boy who suffered from malformed upper central incisors associated with severe attrition. Upper lateral incisors were positioned palatally and canines were rotated and positioned in the high buccal area. The patient had class II malocclusion and space deficiency in both dental arches. Due to incisal wear and malformed short maxillary central incisors and the need for root canal therapy with a major crown build-up, these teeth were extracted. The maxillary lateral incisors were substituted. Thus the maxillary canines were substituted for lateral incisors and the first premolars were substituted for canines. In the lower dental arch the first bicuspids were extracted. Composite resin build-up was performed on the maxillary lateral incisors and canines. This allowed for the crowding and the malocclusion to be corrected. Subsequent gingivectomy improved the patient's gingival margins and smile esthetics one month after orthodontic therapy.

  15. [Er:YAG laser in periodontics and implication in the orthodontic treatment plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glez, Dominique; Hourdin, Solenn; Sorel, Olivier

    2010-03-01

    The Er:YAG laser is used in periodontal surgery to remove excess tissue formations and to clean periodontal pockets. Combined with ultrasonic procedures lasers have significantly advanced the parameters of periodontal surgery. The goal of this article is to review the working mechanisms of the Er:YAG laser in the wide variety of its applications in complex treatment situations in both periodontics and orthodontics. EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2010.

  16. Diastema closure using direct bonding restorations combined with orthodontic treatment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Soon-Kong; Ha, Jung-Hong; Jin, Myoung-Uk; Kim, Sung-Kyo; Kim, Young-Kyung

    2012-08-01

    Closure of interdental spaces using proximal build-ups with resin composite is considered to be practical and conservative. However, a comprehensive approach combining two or more treatment modalities may be needed to improve esthetics. This case report describes the management of a patient with multiple diastemas, a peg-shaped lateral incisor and midline deviation in the maxillary anterior area. Direct resin bonding along with orthodontic movement of teeth allows space closure and midline correction, consequently, creating a better esthetic result.

  17. Malocclusion and early orthodontic treatment requirements in the mixed dentitions of a population of Nigerian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    daCosta, Oluranti Olatokunbo; Aikins, Elfleda Angelina; Isiekwe, Gerald Ikenna; Adediran, Virginia Efunyemi

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to establish the prevalence of dental features that indicate a need for early intervention and to ascertain the prevalence of different methods of early treatment among a population of Nigerian children in mixed dentition. Occlusal relationships were evaluated in 101 children in mixed dentition between the ages of 6 and 12 years who presented at the Orthodontic Unit, Department of Child Dental Health, Lagos University Teaching Hospital over a 2 years period. The need for different modes of early orthodontic treatment was also recorded. Anterior tooth rotations (61.4%) and increased overjet (44.6%) were the most prevalent occlusal anomalies. Others included deep bite (31.7%), reverse overjet (13.9%), and anterior open bite (14.8%). Severe maxillary spacing and crowding were exhibited in 12.0% and 5.0%, respectively. About a third (35.7%) of the subjects presented with crossbite while lip incompetence was observed in 43.6% of the subjects. About 44% of the subjects also presented with various oral habits with digit (15.8%) and lip sucking (9.9%) being the most prevalent. Subjects were recommended for treatment with 2 by 4 fixed orthodontic appliances (22.3%), habit breakers (20.7%), removable orthodontic appliances (16.5%), and extractions (15.7%). Increased overjet and anterior tooth rotation were the majority of occlusal anomalies seen, which are not only esthetically displeasing but may also cause an increased susceptibility to trauma to these teeth. Treatment options varied from extractions only to the use of appliance therapy.

  18. Influence of surface treatments on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to porcelain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Zeng, Jishan; Wang, Shaoan; Yang, Zheng; Huang, Qian; Chen, Pixiu; Zhou, Shujuan; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of various surface treatments after different storage time and thermocycling on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to the feldspathic porcelain surfaces. 128 disc-shaped porcelain specimens were randomly assigned to the following surface treatments: 9.6% HFA, 9.6% HFA combined with silane, 50 μ aluminum trioxide sandblasting followed by silane and application of silane after 37% phosphoric acid. Metal or ceramic brackets were bonded onto each treated porcelain facet with light cured resin. The samples were stored in 37 °C water 1 day or 7 days, thermocycled 500 times from 5 to 55 °C. The shear bond strengths were measured (1 mm/min), and statistically analyzed. The bond failure sites were classified according to ARI system. The surface of the glazed, sandblasted, hydrofluoric and phosphoric acid etched porcelain were examined with SEM. All groups achieved reasonable bond strengths to withstand the application of orthodontic forces. Water storage for 7 days caused lower shear bond strength than that of 1 day. But there is no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The mean shear bond strength provided by ceramic bracket with mechanical retention had no statistical difference with that of metal bracket. Therefore, the optimal treatment for orthodontic brackets bonding to feldspathic porcelain was to apply phosphoric acid combined with silane.

  19. Effects of CO-CR discrepancy in daily orthodontic treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    COSTEA, CARMEN MARIA; BADEA, MÎNDRA EUGENIA; VASILACHE, SORIN; MESAROŞ, MICHAELA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Nowadays centric relation is defined as a musculoskeletal stable position, with the condyles forward, as far upward as possible, centered transversely and with the articular disc properly interposed. On the other hand, centric occlusion or maximum intercuspidation is a dental determined position. The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the direction, frequency and magnitude of the discrepancy between centric occlusion and centric relation in all three axial directions, in a muscular non-deprogrammed population, before the beginning of orthodontic treatment. Methods The study group was represented by 40 symptomatic and asymptomatic patients seeking orthodontic treatment in a private dental office in Cluj-Napoca, Romania between 2014 and 2015. All patients had full records and articulator mounted models. All measurements were analyzed three-dimensionally. Results 85% of the patients had vertical and 87.5% had horizontal CO-CR discrepancy for both condyles. 87.5% of the cases have had a significant condylar displacement in at least one of the three planes. Conclusions We should be aware of the dental occlusion determined by the dental contacts and the occlusion dictated by the musculoskeletal stable position of the condyles. The bigger the discrepancy between these two positions at the level of the condyles, the greater the chances to have either a patient who will develop a form of TMD before/during or after the orthodontic or prosthetic treatment, or a patient suffering already, but poorly diagnosed. PMID:27152081

  20. Incisor root resorption in class II division 2 patients in relation to orthodontic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faxén Sepanian, Varro; Sonnesen, Liselotte

    2018-01-01

    Background/Objectives: The aims were 1. to analyse differences in the occurrence of orthodontic induced inflammatory root resorption (OIIRR) of the upper and lower incisors in Angle Class II division 2 patients, between patients treated with fixed appliance only (one-phase treatment group......) and patients treated with removable appliance before treatment with fixed appliance (two-phase treatment group) and 2. to analyse differences in OIIRR between treatment time, age, gender, craniofacial morphology and deviations in the dentition for the two groups together. Materials/Methods: Seventy...

  1. Treatment effects of various prescriptions and techniques for fixed orthodontic appliances : A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousoulea, Sophia; Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Eliades, Theodore

    2017-09-01

    Although several prescriptions and techniques exist for comprehensive fixed appliance treatment, their treatment effects have not yet been adequately assessed in an evidence-based manner. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the therapeutic and adverse effects of various prescriptions or techniques for orthodontic appliances from randomized clinical trials on human patients. Eight databases were searched up to July 2016 for randomized trials assessing any orthodontic prescriptions or techniques in human patients. After elimination of duplicate studies, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment according to the Cochrane guidelines, random effects meta-analyses with mean differences (MD) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were performed. Compared to Roth preadjusted appliances, both Begg and modified Begg appliances were associated with statistically significantly worse occlusal outcome assessed with Peer Assessment Review (PAR) scores (1 trial, MD 3.1 points, 95% CI 1.9-4.3 points and 1 trial, MD 2.4 points, 95% CI 1.2-3.6 points, respectively) with low quality of evidence, due to bias and imprecision. Compared to a partially programmed fixed orthodontic appliance, a fully programmed appliance was associated with a statistically significant, but clinically irrelevant increase in treatment duration (1 trial, MD 2.4 months, 95% CI 0.6-4.2 months), supported by high quality of evidence. However, caution is needed in the interpretation of these results as only a limited number of small trials with methodological issues were available. Based on existing trials, there is limited evidence to support any robust clinical recommendation regarding the prescriptions or techniques for fixed orthodontic appliances. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42016042727). None.

  2. Perception of children and mothers regarding dental aesthetics and orthodontic treatment need: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Emerson Tavares; da Silva, Beatriz Feitosa; Maia, Fabiana Barros Marinho; Forte, Franklin Delano Soares; Sampaio, Fábio Correia

    2016-12-01

    The normative orthodontic treatment need, established by dental professionals during the dental appointment, becomes ineffective when it does not evaluate all the factors that influence the decision-making process, including individuals' perception and satisfaction with their dental appearance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the perception of children and their mothers as regards orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with dental aesthetics and test if these variables are associated with the objective orthodontic treatment needs, assessed by the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). A cross-sectional study was conducted on 308 children aged 12 years, and their mothers were randomly selected by cluster sampling (primary schools). The variables "orthodontic treatment need," "satisfaction with chewing," and "dental appearance" were assessed by means of a questionnaire. The questions were answered individually at school or home, in cases of children or mothers, respectively. DAI was assessed to make an objective clinical assessment. The variables were dichotomized and statistically analyzed by the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests, contingency coefficient C, and logistic regression. The results of the clinical evaluation (DAI) were statistically associated with the perception of orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with dental appearance in children (p ≤ 0.01). However, no association was observed with regard to satisfaction with chewing and DAI (p = 0.10). The children's perception of orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with the appearance of their teeth was statistically associated (p ≤ 0.01) with their mothers' perception. Maxillary overjet, maxillary and mandibular misalignment, and dental crowding were associated with the orthodontic treatment need by children and their mothers, with p value -0.05 and 5 % level of significance. Maxillary overjet was a significant predictor for the perception of orthodontic

  3. The Cardiff dental study: a 20-year critical evaluation of the psychological health gain from orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenealy, Pamela M; Kingdon, Anne; Richmond, Stephen; Shaw, William C

    2007-02-01

    Despite the widespread belief that orthodontics improves psychological well-being and self-esteem, there is little objective evidence to support this (Kenealy et al., 1989a; Shaw, O'Brien, Richmond, & Brook, 1991). A 20 year follow-up study compared the dental and psychosocial status of individuals who received, or did not receive, orthodontics as teenagers. A prospective longitudinal cohort design with four studies of the effect of orthodontic treatment. Secondary analysis of outcome data incorporated orthodontic need at baseline and treatment received in a 2 x 2 factorial design. A multidisciplinary research programme studied a cohort of 1,018, 11-12 year old participants in 1981. Extensive assessment of dental health and psychosocial well-being was conducted; facial and dental photographs and plaster casts of dentition were obtained and rated for attractiveness and pre-treatment need. No recommendations about orthodontic treatment were made, and an observational approach was adopted. At the third follow-up 337 (30-31 year olds) were re-examined in 2001. Participants with a prior need for orthodontic treatment as children who obtained treatment demonstrated better tooth alignment and satisfaction. However when self-esteem at baseline was controlled for, orthodontics had little positive impact on psychological health and quality of life in adulthood. Lack of orthodontic treatment where there was a prior need did not lead to psychological difficulties in later life. Dental status alone was a weak predictor of self-esteem at outcome explaining 8% of the variance. Self-esteem in adulthood was more strongly predicted (65% of the variance) by psychological variables at outcome: perception of quality of life, life satisfaction, self-efficacy, depression, social anxiety, emotional health, and by self-perception of attractiveness. Longitudinal analysis revealed that the observed effect of orthodontic treatment on self esteem at outcome was accounted for by self esteem at

  4. Perception of children and mothers regarding dental aesthetics and orthodontic treatment need: a cross-sectional study

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    Emerson Tavares de Sousa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The normative orthodontic treatment need, established by dental professionals during the dental appointment, becomes ineffective when it does not evaluate all the factors that influence the decision-making process, including individuals’ perception and satisfaction with their dental appearance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the perception of children and their mothers as regards orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with dental aesthetics and test if these variables are associated with the objective orthodontic treatment needs, assessed by the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 308 children aged 12 years, and their mothers were randomly selected by cluster sampling (primary schools. The variables “orthodontic treatment need,” “satisfaction with chewing,” and “dental appearance” were assessed by means of a questionnaire. The questions were answered individually at school or home, in cases of children or mothers, respectively. DAI was assessed to make an objective clinical assessment. The variables were dichotomized and statistically analyzed by the chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests, contingency coefficient C, and logistic regression. Results The results of the clinical evaluation (DAI were statistically associated with the perception of orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with dental appearance in children (p ≤ 0.01. However, no association was observed with regard to satisfaction with chewing and DAI (p = 0.10. The children’s perception of orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with the appearance of their teeth was statistically associated (p ≤ 0.01 with their mothers’ perception. Maxillary overjet, maxillary and mandibular misalignment, and dental crowding were associated with the orthodontic treatment need by children and their mothers, with p value −0.05 and 5 % level of significance. Maxillary

  5. Three-dimensional dental arch changes of patients submitted to orthodontic-surgical treatment for correction of Class II malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Peixoto,Adriano Porto; Pinto,Ary dos Santos; Garib,Daniela Gamba; Gonçalves,João Roberto

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study assessed the three-dimensional changes in the dental arch of patients submitted to orthodontic-surgical treatment for correction of Class II malocclusions at three different periods. METHODS: Landmarks previously identified on upper and lower dental casts were digitized on a three-dimensional digitizer MicroScribe-3DX and stored in Excel worksheets in order to assess the width, length and depth of patient's dental arches. RESULTS: During orthodontic preparation, the m...

  6. Orthodontic treatment with preadjusted appliances and low-friction ligatures: experimental evidence and clinical observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; Fortini, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    To describe the features of low-friction ligatures during the leveling and aligning phase of fixed appliance therapy with preadjusted brackets. Experimental in vitro and in vivo studies were carried out to test the performance of the low-friction system with regard to leveling and aligning of the dental arches, as well as to increasing the transverse dimension of the maxillary arch. The outcomes of experimental testing showed that the combination of the low-friction ligatures with the superelastic nickel-titanium wires produced a significantly smaller amount of binding at the bracket/archwire/ligature unit when compared to conventional elastomeric ligatures. The biomechanical consequences of the use of low-friction ligatures were shorter duration of orthodontic treatment during the leveling and aligning phase, concurrent dentoalveolar expansion of the dental arch, and the possibility of using biologically adequate orthodontic forces.

  7. Serial extraction or premolar extraction in the permanent dentition? Comparison of duration and outcome of orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, M; Berg, R

    2000-01-01

    Treatment outcome and duration of 2 different treatment approaches in 2 groups of comparable extraction cases were analyzed: Group I: serial extraction performed in the early mixed dentition followed by orthodontic treatment in the permanent dentition; group II: extractions as well as orthodontic treatment in the permanent dentition. The following conclusions were reached: 1. The treatment period with fixed appliances was highly significantly shorter in group I; however, the number of appointments was significantly higher and the total duration of treatment/observation time significantly longer. 2. In both groups the reduction in PAR score was either improved or greatly improved in all cases.

  8. The duration of orthodontic treatment with and without extractions: a pilot study of five selected practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vig, P S; Weintraub, J A; Brown, C; Kowalski, C J

    1990-01-01

    Contemporary orthodontic practice is diverse, both in the variety of clinical problems treated and in the methods used. Practices differ with respect to their patient composition as well as in many variables relative to treatment protocols. Such heterogeneity makes it difficult to make valid generalizations concerning the characteristics of orthodontic treatment procedures or outcomes; yet data and methods are required for assessment of issues of efficacy and utility. The frequency of orthodontic extractions is an objective criterion that distinguishes practices and may also be related to differences in treatment outcome variables, such as duration. Following a telephone survey to estimate extraction rates in the practices of 238 Michigan orthodontists, five practices with very high or low reported rates were chosen for this pilot study. Our primary aim was to determine whether a systematic relationship existed between the relative frequency of extraction treatments and the duration of active appliance therapy. Records of 438 patients from these practices were examined. The extraction rates of the practices ranged from a low of 25% to a high of 84%. Treatment duration was affected by several variables, such as the number of arches treated, the number of treatment phases, and the practice selected. When the data for all five practices were pooled, and all of the extraction versus nonextraction treatments were compared, the mean durations of treatment were 31.2 and 31.3 months, respectively. Data from individual practices, however, indicated that extraction treatment in each of the practices was of longer duration than nonextraction therapy. These differences in duration were 3.0, 6.6, 2.4, 3.0, and 7.3 months in the five practices.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Enamel Thickness before and after Orthodontic Treatment Analysed in Optical Coherence Tomography

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    Julia Seeliger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the continuous development of materials and techniques of adhesive bonding, the basic procedure remains relatively constant. The technique is based on three components: etching substance, adhesive system, and composite material. The use of etchants during bonding orthodontic brackets carries the risk of damage to the enamel. Therefore, the article examines the effect of the manner of enamel etching on its thickness before and after orthodontic treatment. The study was carried out in vitro on a group of 80 teeth. It was divided into two subgroups of 40 teeth each. The procedure of enamel etching was performed under laboratory conditions. In the first subgroup, the classic method of enamel etching and the fifth-generation bonding system were used. In the second subgroup, the seventh-generation (self-etching bonding system was used. In both groups, metal orthodontic brackets were fixed and the enamel was cleaned with a cutter fixed on the micromotor after their removal. Before and after the treatment, two-dimensional optical coherence tomography scans were performed. The enamel thickness was assessed on the two-dimensional scans. The average enamel thickness in both subgroups was not statistically significant.

  10. Effects of chlorhexidine varnish on caries during orthodontic treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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    Elaine Machado Pingueiro OKADA

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of chlorhexidine varnish on the reduction of caries incidence during fixed orthodontic treatment. The literature searches involved The Cochrane Library, Medline, Scopus, OpenSigle databases and manual searches. The search on OpenSigle did not produce any additional articles. Clinical studies conducted in patients with orthodontic fixed appliances that used professional application of chlorhexidine varnish were included. The effect-size was calculated and a meta-analysis was performed. From 182 abstracts, a total of six articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. After reading the full articles, one was excluded because of lack of a control group. Three articles were used for continuous data analysis, and two articles were used for the dichotomous data analysis. The pooled meta-analysis with continuous data demonstrated chlorhexidine varnish effectiveness on caries reduction (p = 0.003, with a mean difference and confidence interval of −1.49 [−2.47, −0.51]. On the basis of the pooled meta-analysis of continuous data, we were able to conclude that professional application of chlorhexidine varnish is effective in caries incidence reduction during fixed orthodontic treatment.

  11. Importance of orthodontic movement in interdisciplinary treatment for restoring esthetics and functional occlusion

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    Carlos Henrique Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes interdisciplinary treatment conducted in adult patients, 49-year-old, with periodontal problems, losses and dental inclination, occlusal trauma, localized bone loss, and necessity of rehabilitation with dental implants. Alignment and leveling of the teeth, the molars uprighting with cantilever, and space closure were performed the treatment was facilitated by periodic periodontal control. The resultant occlusion was stable throughout a 5-year retention period. In conclusion, interdisciplinary treatment combined with periodontics, orthodontics, implantodontist, and restorative dentistry was useful for improving the patient′s oral health, function, and esthetics.

  12. Orthodontic treatment for prominent upper front teeth (Class II malocclusion) in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Klaus Bsl; Thiruvenkatachari, Badri; Harrison, Jayne E; O'Brien, Kevin D

    2018-03-13

    Prominent upper front teeth are a common problem affecting about a quarter of 12-year-old children in the UK. The condition develops when permanent teeth erupt. These teeth are more likely to be injured and their appearance can cause significant distress. Children are often referred to an orthodontist for treatment with dental braces to reduce the prominence of their teeth. If a child is referred at a young age, the orthodontist is faced with the dilemma of whether to treat the patient early or to wait and provide treatment in adolescence. To assess the effects of orthodontic treatment for prominent upper front teeth initiated when children are seven to 11 years old ('early treatment' in two phases) compared to in adolescence at around 12 to 16 years old ('late treatment' in one phase); to assess the effects of late treatment compared to no treatment; and to assess the effects of different types of orthodontic braces. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 27 September 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 8), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 27 September 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 27 September 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials of orthodontic treatments to correct prominent upper front teeth (Class II malocclusion) in children and adolescents. We included trials that compared early treatment in children (two-phase) with any type of orthodontic braces (removable, fixed, functional) or head-braces versus late treatment in adolescents (one-phase) with any type of orthodontic braces or head-braces, and trials that compared any

  13. Prospective evaluation of the psychosocial impact of the first 6 months of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance among young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Renata França; Ramos-Jorge, Joana; Marques, Leandro Silva; de Paiva, Saul Martins; Melgaço, Camilo Aquino; Pazzini, Camila Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the psychosocial impact of the first 6 months of orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance among young adults and compare the results with those of a control group of patients awaiting treatment for malocclusion. A study was conducted with a sample of 120 patients on a waiting list for orthodontic treatment at a university. The participants were allocated to an experimental group submitted to treatment and a control group awaiting treatment. The groups were matched for sex and age. All participants were instructed to answer the Brazilian version of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) at baseline and after 6 months. Statistical analysis involved the Wilcoxon test for the total PIDAQ score and the score of each subscale. All patients participated until the end of the study. Significant differences between baseline and the 6-month evaluation were found for the total PIDAQ score as well as the dental self-confidence and social impact subscales in both groups. No differences between baseline and the 6-month evaluation were found regarding the psychological impact or esthetic concern subscales in the control group. The patients in the experimental group reported greater esthetic impact 6 months after beginning treatment (P orthodontic treatment seem to improve psychosocial impact. The first 6 months of orthodontic treatment seem to improve the psychosocial impact of malocclusion. The patients analyzed in the present study reported a greater esthetic impact and less psychological impact after 6 months of using an orthodontic appliance.

  14. Insufficient Evidence Supports the Use of Low-Level Laser Therapy to Accelerate Tooth Movement, Prevent Orthodontic Relapse, and Modulate Acute Pain During Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsaii, Adrian; Al-Jewair, Thikriat

    2017-09-01

    Efficacy of low-level laser therapy in accelerating tooth movement, preventing relapse and managing acute pain during orthodontic treatment in humans: A systematic review. Sonesson M, De Geer E, Subraian J, Petrén S. BMC Oral Health 2017;17:11. No funding was obtained for this study TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN: Systematic review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aesthetic orthodontic archwires: Progress in their knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Rongo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In orthodontics, is quickly increasing the demand for treatments with a very low aesthetic impact in the social life. More and more adult patients want satisfy their necessity to have a beautiful smile, with “invisible” appliances. Numerous are the opportunities to perform an aesthetic orthodontic treatment such as lingual orthodontics, clear aligners or clear labial orthodontics. Aesthetic orthodontic archwires are a component of clear labial orthodontics together with aestheti...

  16. Surgical orthodontic treatment of an impacted canine in the presence of dens invaginatus and follicular cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallarossa, Marialuce; Canevello, Carola; Silvestrini Biavati, Francesca; Laffi, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. "Dens invaginatus" is a dental anomaly which originates from the invagination of the ameloblastic epithelium into the lingual surface of the dental crown during the odontogenesis. It can cause early pulpal necrosis, abscesses, retention or dislocation of contiguous elements, cysts, and internal resorptions. It normally affects the upper lateral incisors. In the following study the authors will discuss the etiology, the physiopathology, and the surgical-orthodontic management of a rare case of impacted canine associated with dens invaginatus and follicular cyst, with the aim of highlighting the importance of taking any therapeutic decision based on the data available in the literature. Case Report. The present study describes a combined surgical-orthodontic treatment of an impacted canine associated with a lateral incisor (2.2) suffering from type III dens invaginatus with radicular cyst, in a 15-year-old patient. Discussion. When treating a dens invaginatus there are different therapeutic solutions: they depend on the gravity of the anomaly and on the association with the retention of a permanent tooth. The aesthetic and functional restoration becomes extremely important when performing a surgical-orthodontic repositioning.

  17. Force systems in the initial phase of orthodontic treatment -- a comparison of different leveling arch wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuck, Lars-Michael; Drescher, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The determination of orthodontically-effective forces and moments places great demands on the technical equipment. Many patients report severe pain after fixed appliance insertion. Since it is assumed that pain from orthodontic appliances is associated with the force and moment levels applied to the teeth and since the occurrence of root resorption is a common therapeutic side effect, it would seem important to know the actual magnitudes of the components of the active orthodontic force systems. The aim of the present study was therefore to measure initial force systems produced by different leveling arch-wires in a complete multi-bracket appliance and to assess whether force and moment levels can be regarded as biologically acceptable or not. The actual bracket position in 42 patients was transferred onto a measurement model. Forces and moments produced by a super-elastic nickel-titanium (NiTi) archwire, a 6-strand stainless steel archwire, and a 7-strand super-elastic NiTi archwire were determined experimentally on different teeth. Average forces and moments produced by the super-elastic NiTi arch wires were found to be the highest. In spite if their larger diameter, the stranded arch wires' average force and moment levels were lower, especially that of the stranded super-elastic archwire. Nevertheless, maximum force levels sometimes exceeded recommended values in the literature and must be considered as too high. The measured arch wires' initial force systems differed significantly depending on the type of archwire and its material structure. Stranded arch wires produced lower force and moment levels, and we recommend their use in the initial phase of orthodontic treatment.

  18. Malocclusion prevalence and orthodontic treatment need in central Anatolian adolescents compared to European and other nations' adolescents

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    Fundagul Bilgic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To determine the prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need in a large sample of Central Anatolian adolescents and compare them with European-other nations' adolescents. Methods: The sample included 1125 boys and 1204 girls aged between 12 and 16 years with no previous orthodontic treatment history. Occlusal variables examined were molar relationship, overjet, overbite, crowding, midline diastema, posterior crossbite, and scissors bite. The dental health (DHC and aesthetic components (AC of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN were used as an assessment measure of the need for orthodontic treatment for the total sample. Results: The results indicated a high prevalence of Class I (34.9% and Class II, Division 1 malocclusions (40.0%. Moreover, increased (18% and reduced bites (14.%, and increased (25.1% and reversed overjet (10.% were present in the sample. Conclusion: Using the DHC of the IOTN, the proportion of subjects estimated to have great and very great treatment need (grades 4 and 5 was 28.%. However, only 16.7% of individuals were in need (grades 8-10 of orthodontic treatment according to the AC.

  19. Combined surgical and orthodontic treatment of bilaterial double teeth: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, A I; Willmot, D R

    1995-03-01

    A case of bilateral 'double teeth' is described. The patient, aged 8 at initial presentation, was unhappy with the appearance of his two abnormally large upper central incisor teeth. Endodontic treatment was carried out on both teeth followed by surgical splitting and the removal of half of each so as to leave two reasonably-shaped central incisors. Comprehensive orthodontic treatment was then carried out to align the teeth and reduce the overjet, following which the central incisors exhibited no increased mobility or any periodontal problems.

  20. [Application of digital design of orthodontic-prosthodontic multidisciplinary treatment plan in esthetic rehabilitation of anterior teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y S; Li, Z; Zhao, Y J; Ye, H Q; Zhou, Y Q; Hu, W J; Liu, Y S; Xun, C L; Zhou, Y S

    2018-02-18

    To develop a digital workflow of orthodontic-prosthodontic multidisciplinary treatment plan which can be applied in complicated anterior teeth esthetic rehabilitation, in order to enhance the efficiency of communication between dentists and patients, and improve the predictability of treatment outcome. Twenty patients with the potential needs of orthodontic-prosthodontic multidisciplinary treatment to solve their complicated esthetic problems in anterior teeth were recruited in this study. Digital models of patients' both dental arches and soft tissues were captured using intra oral scanner. Direct prosthodontic (DP) treatment plan and orthodontic-prosthodontic (OP) treatment plan were carried out for each patient. For DP treatment plans, digital wax-up models were directly designed on original digital models using prosthodontic design system. For OP treatment plans, virtual-setups were performed using orthodontic analyze system according to orthodontic and esthetic criteria and imported to prosthodontic design system to finalize the digital wax-up models. These two treatment plans were shown to the patients and demonstrated elaborately. Each patient rated two treatment plans using visual analogue scales and the medians of scores of two treatment plans were analyzed using signed Wilcoxon test. Having taken into consideration various related factors, including time, costs of treatment, each patient chose a specific treatment plan. For the patients chose DP treatment plans, digital wax-up models were exported and printed into resin diagnostic models which would be utilized in the prosthodontic treatment process. For the patients chose OP treatment plans, virtual-setups were used to fabricate aligners or indirect bonding templates and digital wax-up models were also exported and printed into resin diagnostic models for prosthodontic treatment after orthodontic treatment completed. The medians of scores of DP treatment plan and OP treatment plan were calculated and

  1. CBCT in orthodontics: assessment of treatment outcomes and indications for its use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nervina, J M

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction into dentistry in 1998, CBCT has become increasingly utilized for orthodontic diagnosis, treatment planning and research. The utilization of CBCT for these purposes has been facilitated by the relative advantages of three-dimensional (3D) over two-dimensional radiography. Despite many suggested indications of CBCT, scientific evidence that its utilization improves diagnosis and treatment plans or outcomes has only recently begun to emerge for some of these applications. This article provides a comprehensive and current review of key studies on the applications of CBCT in orthodontic therapy and for research to decipher treatment outcomes and 3D craniofacial anatomy. The current diagnostic and treatment planning indications for CBCT include impacted teeth, cleft lip and palate and skeletal discrepancies requiring surgical intervention. The use of CBCT in these and other situations such as root resorption, supernumerary teeth, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathology, asymmetries and alveolar boundary conditions should be justified on the basis of the merits relative to risks of imaging. CBCT has also been used to assess 3D craniofacial anatomy in health and disease and of treatment outcomes including that of root morphology and angulation; alveolar boundary conditions; maxillary transverse dimensions and maxillary expansion; airway morphology, vertical malocclusion and obstructive sleep apnoea; TMJ morphology and pathology contributing to malocclusion; and temporary anchorage devices. Finally, this article utilizes findings of these studies and current voids in knowledge to provide ideas for future research that could be beneficial for further optimizing the use of CBCT in research and the clinical practice of orthodontics. PMID:25358833

  2. Reliability assessment and correlation analysis of evaluating orthodontic treatment outcome in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guang-Ying; Zhao, Zhi-He; Ding, Yin; Bai, Yu-Xing; Wang, Lin; He, Hong; Shen, Gang; Li, Wei-Ran; Baumrind, Sheldon; Geng, Zhi; Xu, Tian-Min

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the reliability of experienced Chinese orthodontists in evaluating treatment outcome and to determine the correlations between three diagnostic information sources. Sixty-nine experienced Chinese orthodontic specialists each evaluated the outcome of orthodontic treatment of 108 Chinese patients. Three different information sources: study casts (SC), lateral cephalometric X-ray images (LX) and facial photographs (PH) were generated at the end of treatment for 108 patients selected randomly from six orthodontic treatment centers throughout China. Six different assessments of treatment outcome were made by each orthodontist using data from the three information sources separately and in combination. Each assessment included both ranking and grading for each patient. The rankings of each of the 69 judges for the 108 patients were correlated with the rankings of each of the other judges yielding 13 873 Spearman rs values, ranging from -0.08 to +0.85. Of these, 90% were greater than 0.4, showing moderate-to-high consistency among the 69 orthodontists. In the combined evaluations, study casts were the most significant predictive component (R(2)=0.86, P<0.000 1), while the inclusion of lateral cephalometric films and facial photographs also contributed to a more comprehensive assessment (R(2)=0.96, P<0.000 1). Grading scores for SC+LX and SC+PH were highly significantly correlated with those for SC+LX+PH (r(SC+LX)vs.(SC+LX+PH)=0.96, r(SC+PH)vs.(SC+LX+PH)=0.97), showing that either SC+LX or SC+PH is an excellent substitute for all three combined assessment.

  3. In-office bacteria test for a microbial monitoring during the conventional and self-ligating orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mummolo Stefano

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study investigated the microbial level of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp. during an orthodontic treatment, and compare the data with untreated control subjects. Sixty young adult subjects were selected (average 20.5, DS 1.62, among which 40 underwent an orthodontic treatment (20 were treated with self-ligating brackets and 20 with conventional brackets and 20 were controls. Plaque Index, salivary flow and buffering capacity of saliva were assessed before the beginning of the orthodontic treatment. Then the microbial counts were obtained by using an in-office bacteria test. The plaque index (PI increased over time in each group as well as salivary flow, mostly in subjects treated with self-ligating brackets, suggesting a difference between conventional and self-ligating brackets. S.mutans showed a different trend of colonization in the two treated groups, as for subjects treated with conventional brackets it showed the greater value at the early stage of treatment (T1, followed by a decrease at T2. Lactobacillus spp. showed significant increase over time in the two treated groups, respect to the control group. Linear regression analysis showed no significant predictor for the microbial count at T2. The assortment of the various species of bacteria change over time during the orthodontic treatment, and seems to show different trends, depending on the type of orthodontic device. Consequently a periodical microbial monitoring using in-office bacteria tests, seems indicated.

  4. Aesthetic Rehabilitation of a Complicated Crown-Root Fracture of the Maxillary Incisor: Combination of Orthodontic and Implant Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Dorigatti de Avila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present a complex rehabilitation, of fractured tooth, with implants in anterior region considering the orthodontics extrusion to clinical success. At 7 years old, the patient fractured the maxillary left central incisor and the dentist did a crown with the fragment. Twenty years later, the patient was referred to a dental clinic for orthodontic treatment, with the chief complaint related to an accentuated deep bite, and a professional started an orthodontic treatment. After sixteen months of orthodontic treatment, tooth 21 fractured. The treatment plan included an orthodontic extrusion of tooth 21 and implant placement. This case has been followed up and the clinical and radiographic examinations show excellence esthetic results and satisfaction of patient. The forced extrusion can be a viable treatment option in the management of crown root fracture of an anterior tooth to gain bone in a vertical direction. This case emphasizes that to achieve the esthetic result a multidisciplinary approach is necessary.

  5. Oral hygiene compliance in orthodontic patients: a randomized controlled study on the effects of a post-treatment communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzani, Mauro; Ragazzini, Giulia; Delucchi, Alessia; Mutinelli, Sabrina; Barreca, Carlo; Rinchuse, Daniel J; Servetto, Roberto; Piras, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    Several studies have recently demonstrated that a post-treatment communication to explain the importance of an oral hygiene can improve the orthodontic patients' compliance over a period of 66 days. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of a structured follow-up communication after orthodontic appliance application on oral hygiene compliance after 30-40 days. Eighty-four orthodontic participants enrolled from patients who were beginning fixed orthodontic treatment at the Orthodontic Department, Gaslini Hospital, Genova, between July and October 2014 were randomly assigned to one of three trial arms. Before the bonding, all patients underwent a session of oral hygiene aimed at obtaining an plaque index of "zero." At the following orthodontic appointment, the plaque index was calculated for each patient in order to assess oral hygiene compliance. The first group served as control and did not receive any post-procedure communication, the second group received a structured text message giving reassurance, and the third group received a structured telephone call. Participants were blinded to group assignment and were not made aware that the text message or the telephone call was part of the study. (The research protocol was approved by the Italian Comitato Etico Regionale della Liguria-sezione 3^ c/o IRCCS-Istituto G. Gaslini 845/2014, and it is not registered in the trial's register.) RESULTS: Thirty patients were randomly assigned to the control group, 28 participants to the text message group, and 26 to the telephone group. Participants who received a post-treatment communication reported higher level of oral hygiene compliance than participants in the control group. The plaque index was 0.3 (interquartile range (Iqr), 0.60) and 0.75 (Iqr, 1.30), respectively, with a significant difference (P = 0.0205). A follow-up procedure after orthodontic treatment may be an effective tool to increase oral hygiene compliance also over a short period.

  6. A randomized controlled trial evaluating antioxidant-essential oil gel as a treatment for gingivitis in orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Benjamin J; Campbell, Phillip M; Rees, Terry D; Buschang, Peter H

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the treatment effect of an antioxidant-essential oil gel on orthodontic patients with generalized gingivitis. The gel contains the essential oils menthol and thymol and the antioxidants ferulic acid and phloretin. Thirty patients from the university's orthodontic clinic were screened for gingivitis and randomly allocated into treatment and placebo-control groups. Each patient was evaluated at three orthodontic treatment visits (T1, T2, and T3). A periodontal examination, including probing depth (PD), bleeding on probing (BOP), gingival index (GI), and plaque index (PI) was performed at each visit. Between T1 and T2, patients were instructed to apply a topical gel (active or placebo) to their gingiva twice daily after brushing. From T2 to T3, patients were instructed to discontinue use of the gel. The treatment group showed statistically significant (P gingivitis.

  7. Long-term effects of Class II orthodontic treatment on oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, N C; Saffar, M; Hudel, H; Evälahti, M; Heikinheimo, K; Rice, D P C; Ruf, S

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the long-term (≥15 years) benefit of orthodontic Class II treatment (Tx) on oral health (OH). All patients (Department of Orthodontics, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany) who underwent Class II correction (Herbst-multibracket Tx, end of active Tx ≥ 15 years ago) and agreed to participate in a recall (clinical examination, interview, impressions, and photographs) were included. Records after active Tx were used to assess the long-term OH effects. Data were compared to corresponding population-representative age-cohorts as well as to untreated Class I controls without orthodontic Tx need during adolescence. Of 152 treated Class II patients, 75 could be located and agreed to participate at 33.7 ± 3.0 years of age (pre-Tx age: 14.0 ± 2.7 years). The majority (70.8%) were fully satisfied with their teeth and with their masticatory system. The Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth Index (DMFT) was 7.1 ± 4.8 and, thus, almost identical to that of the untreated Class I controls (7.9 ± 3.6). In contrast, the DMFT in the population-representative age-cohort was 56% higher. The determined mean Community Periodontal Index (CPI) maximum score (1.6 ± 0.6) was also comparable to the untreated Class I controls (1.7 ± 0.9) but in the corresponding population-representative age-cohort it was 19-44% higher. The extent of lower incisor gingival recessions did not differ significantly between the treated Class II participants and the untreated Class I controls (0.1 ± 0.2 vs. 0.0 ± 0.1 mm). Patients with orthodontically treated severe Class II malocclusions had a lower risk for oral health impairment than the general population. The risk corresponded to that of untreated Class I controls (without orthodontic Tx need during adolescence).

  8. Critical evaluation of incidence and prevalence of white spot lesions during fixed orthodontic appliance treatment: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaj, Dhinahar; Venkatachalapathy, Sudhakar; Tandon, Akshay; Pereira, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Development of dental caries, specifically, white spot lesions (WSLs), continues to be a well-recognized and troubling side effect of orthodontic fixed appliance therapy, despite vast improvement in preventive dental techniques and procedures. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate, determine, and summarize the incidence and prevalence rates of WSLs during orthodontic treatment that have been published in the literature. According to predetermined criteria, databases were searched for appropriate studies. References of the selected articles and relevant reviews were searched for any missed publications. In the 14 studies evaluated for WSLs, the incidence of new carious lesions formed during orthodontic treatment in patients was 45.8% and the prevalence of lesions in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment was 68.4%. The incidence and prevalence rates of WSLs in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment are quite high and significant. This widespread problem of WSL development is an alarming challenge and warrants significant attention from both patients and providers, which should result in greatly increased emphasis on effective caries prevention.

  9. Measurement of iron, magnesium and chromium concentrations in the saliva of the patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment

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    Valiollah Arash

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stainless steel alloy used in orthodontics has elements such as iron - magnesium and chromium , which may be released due to corrosion in the mouth . The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes of these elements in the saliva of patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Methods: In a clinical study with simple non- random sampling , 1ml saliva of 11 patients (7 females and 4 males who needed fixed orthodontic treatment and had no restorations or crowns were collected. During the fixed orthodontic treatment at successive times ( a day, a week, a month , two months and six months , 1 ml of saliva was collected and evaluated for the amount of iron ( spectrophotometry, chromium ( atomic absorption, and magnesium ( spectrophotometry . Bracket , band and wire used in all patients were stainless steel alloy and were manufactured by Dentaurum Company. After sample collection , the data analysis was performed with " Azeri- 5" and "10SPSS" software and repeated measures test. Results: The mean concentration of iron 66.326±0.541, chromium 0.483±0.324 and magnesium 0.552±293 decreased during the study but these results were not statistical y significant (p>0.05. Conclusions: Iron , chromium and magnesium concentration do not exceed the standard limits in saliva during orthodontic treatment.

  10. Efficacy of 3 toothbrush treatments on plaque removal in orthodontic patients assessed with digital plaque imaging: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Christina; Klukowska, Malgorzata; Tsaknaki, Iris; Timm, Hans; Grender, Julie; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2013-06-01

    Good oral hygiene is a challenge for orthodontic patients because food readily becomes trapped around the brackets and under the archwires, and appliances are an obstruction to mechanical brushing. The purpose of this study was to compare plaque removal efficacy of 3 toothbrush treatments in orthodontic subjects. This was a replicate-use, single-brushing, 3-treatment, examiner-blind, randomized, 6-period crossover study with washout periods of approximately 24 hours between visits. Forty-six adolescent and young adult patients with fixed orthodontics from a university clinic in Germany were randomized, based on computer-generated randomization, to 1 of 3 treatments: (1) oscillating-rotating electric toothbrush with a specially designed orthodontic brush head (Oral-B Triumph, OD17; Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio); (2) the same electric toothbrush handle with a regular brush head (EB25; Procter & Gamble); and (3) a regular manual toothbrush (American Dental Association, Chicago, Ill). The primary outcome was the plaque score change from baseline, which we determined using digital plaque image analysis. Forty-five subjects completed the study. The differences in mean plaque removal (95% confidence interval) between the electric toothbrush with an orthodontic brush head (6% [4.4%-7.6%]) or a regular brush head (3.8% [2.2%-5.3%]) and the manual toothbrush were significant (P toothbrush with the orthodontic brush head was superior (2.2%; P = 0.007) to the regular brush head. No adverse events were seen. The electric toothbrush, with either brush head, demonstrated significantly greater plaque removal over the manual brush. The orthodontic brush head was superior to the regular head. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Root resorption during orthodontic treatment with Invisalign®: a radiometric study

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    Giulia Gay

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Root resorption (RR is described as a permanent loss of tooth structure from the root apex. Many reports in the literature indicate that orthodontically treated patients are more likely to have severe apical root shortening, interesting mostly maxillary, followed by mandibular incisors. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence and severity of RR in adult patients treated with aligners. The study group consisted of 71 class I adult healthy patients (mean age 32.8 ± 12.7 treated with aligners (Invisalign®, Align Technologies, Santa Clara, CA, USA. All incisors, canines, upper first premolars, and first molars were assessed. Root and crown lengths of 1083 teeth were measured in panoramic radiographs at the beginning (T0 and at the end (T1 of clear aligner therapy. Individual root-crown ratio (RCR of each tooth and therefore the relative changes of RCR (rRCR were determined. A decrease of rRCR was assessed as a reduction of the root length during treatment. Results All patients had a minimum of one teeth affected with a reduction of root length, on average 6.38 ± 2.28 teeth per patient. Forty one, 81% of the 1083, measured teeth presented a reduction of the pre-treatment root length. A reduction in percentage of >0% up to 10% was found in 25.94% (n = 281, a distinct reduction of >10% up to 20% in 12.18% (n = 132 of the sample. 3.69% (n = 40 of the teeth were affected with a considerable reduction (>20%. Conclusions Orthodontic treatment with Invisalign® aligners could lead to RR. However, its incidence resulted to be very similar to that described for orthodontic light forces, with an average percentage of RR < 10% of the original root length.

  12. Root resorption during orthodontic treatment with Invisalign®: a radiometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Giulia; Ravera, Serena; Castroflorio, Tommaso; Garino, Francesco; Rossini, Gabriele; Parrini, Simone; Cugliari, Giovanni; Deregibus, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    Root resorption (RR) is described as a permanent loss of tooth structure from the root apex. Many reports in the literature indicate that orthodontically treated patients are more likely to have severe apical root shortening, interesting mostly maxillary, followed by mandibular incisors. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence and severity of RR in adult patients treated with aligners. The study group consisted of 71 class I adult healthy patients (mean age 32.8 ± 12.7) treated with aligners (Invisalign®, Align Technologies, Santa Clara, CA, USA). All incisors, canines, upper first premolars, and first molars were assessed. Root and crown lengths of 1083 teeth were measured in panoramic radiographs at the beginning (T0) and at the end (T1) of clear aligner therapy. Individual root-crown ratio (RCR) of each tooth and therefore the relative changes of RCR (rRCR) were determined. A decrease of rRCR was assessed as a reduction of the root length during treatment. All patients had a minimum of one teeth affected with a reduction of root length, on average 6.38 ± 2.28 teeth per patient. Forty one, 81% of the 1083, measured teeth presented a reduction of the pre-treatment root length. A reduction in percentage of >0% up to 10% was found in 25.94% (n = 281), a distinct reduction of >10% up to 20% in 12.18% (n = 132) of the sample. 3.69% (n = 40) of the teeth were affected with a considerable reduction (>20%). Orthodontic treatment with Invisalign® aligners could lead to RR. However, its incidence resulted to be very similar to that described for orthodontic light forces, with an average percentage of RR < 10% of the original root length.

  13. [Study on application of CPP-ACP on tooth mineralization during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen-dan; Liu, Ying-zhi; Xu, Yuan-yuan; Chen, Dong

    2010-04-01

    To determine the value of clinical application of CPP-ACP during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance. Seventy-five subjects were divided randomly into three groups, the control group, experimental group A and experimental group B. The control group were emphasized on daily oral hygiene. Experimental group A used fluor protector every three months under the dentist's guidance. Experimental group B used Casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate(CCP-ACP) once a day. After finishing the orthodontic treatment, photos were taken under the same condition ,then the degree of the enamel's demineralization was examined and the enamel decalcification index(EDI) was calculated. SPSS11.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. (1)The incidence of three groups' enamel decalcification declined in sequence as the control group(60%),experimental group A (36%), experimental group B (32%).(2)The incidence of the teeth's enamel calcification of three groups declined in sequence as the control group(14.7%),experimental group A (8.46%), experimental group B (7.72%), the difference between the control group and two experimental groups was significant, while no significant difference was found between the two experimental groups.(3(EDI of the control group was 0.155+/-0.023, EDI of the experimental group A was 0.082+/-0.009,while EDI of the experimental group B was 0.078+/-0.006. The difference between the control group and two experimental groups was statistically significant, while was not statistically significant between the two experimental groups. The application of fluor protector and CPP-ACP can improve the mineralization of the teeth during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance. CPP-ACP is more convenient for the patients to use. Supported by Research Fund of Bureau of Science and Technology of Futian District Shenzhen City(Grant No.FTWS056).

  14. Orthodontic-surgical treatment: neuromuscular evaluation in open and deep skeletal bite patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farronato, Giampietro; Giannini, Lucia; Galbiati, Guido; Stabilini, Santo Andrea; Maspero, Cinzia

    2013-10-29

    The aim of this study was to compare electromyographic data of two groups of patients (open and deep skeletal bite) before and after surgical orthodontic treatment. All patients who underwent orthognathic surgery at the Department of Orthodontics (University of Milan) were subjected to periodic electromyographic evaluation of the masticatory muscles (masseter and anterior temporal muscles) and to electrokinesiographic evaluation of mandibular movements. The sample comprised 72 patients (35 open skeletal bite patients and 37 deep skeletal bite patients) at the end of craniofacial growth. The electromyographic instruments used in the study included a Freely and a K6-I electromyograph. Statistical evaluation was carried out with Student's t tests for independent samples. Lots of differences between open and deep skeletal bite patients have been underlined by the analysis of the electromyographic data obtained. These results have been obtained with both electromyographic systems. Muscular activity in microvolts is higher in deep skeletal bite patients at the beginning of the treatment than in open bite ones, but during the following phases of the treatment, the two values became similar. Morphologic differences between open and deep bite patients can also be demonstrated by instrumental examinations, and their correction after surgical treatment is observable on electromyographic and electrognatographic exams.

  15. Changes in the surface roughness and friction coefficient of orthodontic bracket slots before and after treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaomo; Lin, Jiuxiang; Ding, Peng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the surface roughness of bracket slots and the friction coefficient between the bracket and the stainless steel archwire before and after orthodontic treatment. There were four experimental groups: groups 1 and 2 were 3M new and retrieved brackets, respectively, and groups 3 and 4 were BioQuick new and retrieved brackets, respectively. All retrieved brackets were taken from patients with the first premolar extraction and using sliding mechanics to close the extraction space. The surface roughness of specimens was evaluated using an optical interferometry profilometer, which is faster and nondestructive compared with a stylus profilometer, and provided a larger field, needing no sample preparation, compared with atomic force microscopy. Orthodontic treatment resulted in significant increases in surface roughness and coefficient of friction for both brands of brackets. However, there was no significant difference by brand for new or retrieved brackets. These retrieval analysis results highlight the necessity of reevaluating the properties and clinical behavior of brackets during treatment to make appropriate treatment decisions. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Autotransplantation of Immature Third Molars and Orthodontic Treatment After En Bloc Resection of Conventional Ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterne, Rafael Lima Verde; Moreira Neto, José Jeová Siebra; de Araújo Lima, Augusto Darwin Moreira; Nogueira, Renato Luiz Maia

    2015-09-01

    Ameloblastoma treatment can lead to significant bone defects; consequently, oral rehabilitation can be challenging. We present the case of a 14-year-old girl diagnosed with a conventional ameloblastoma in the mandible who was treated using en bloc resection and rehabilitated with autotransplantation of the immature third molars and orthodontic treatment. The lesion was in the region of the lower left canine and premolars, and en bloc resection resulted in a significant alveolar bone defect. Autotransplantation of the lower third molars to the site of the lower left premolars was performed. After 2 years, the upper left third molar was transplanted to the site of the lower left canine. During the orthodontic treatment period, considerable alveolar bone formation was observed in the region of the transplanted teeth, and roots developed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of alveolar bone formation induction caused by tooth transplantation after ameloblastoma treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Caries preventive efficiency of therapeutic complex accomponying orthodontic treatment of children with initial dental caries

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    Denga A.E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of orthodontic non-removable appliance in orthodontic treatment inter¬feres with the process of teeth mineralization, worsens level of oral cavity hygiene, stimulates development of caries process. The situation is complicated when a patient has an initial tooth decay. The aim of this study was to determine genetic characteristics of children with initial caries and clinical evaluation of effectiveness of the developed caries preventive therapeutic complex accompanying treatment of jaw facial anomalies (JFA. 47 children aged 12-14 with initial tooth decay participated in the examination. Complex diagnostics, including molecular genetic studies was carried out. Therapeutic complex for children, of the main group included remineralizing, adaptogenic, biogenic agents, which increase non-specific resistance, as well as infiltration ICON therapy before fixing braces. Caries preventive complex accompanying JFA treatment in children with primary tooth decay developed with regard to revealed genetic disorders of amelogenesis, 2-nd of phase detoxification, collagen formation, functional responses in the oral cavity, state of hard tissues of teeth and periodontal tissues enabled to preserve existing carious process, normalize periodontal and hygienic indices at all stages of treatment.

  18. Surgical Orthodontic Treatment for Open Bite in Noonan Syndrome Patient: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Masayoshi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Shimomura, Tadahiro; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2016-03-01

    Noonan syndrome, characterized by short stature, facial anomalies, and congenital heart defects, may also be associated with hematopoietic disorders. Craniofacial anomalies in affected patients include hypertelorism and severe open bite associated with masticatory dysfunction. We treated a Noonan syndrome patient with a skeletal open bite. Surgical orthodontic treatment including two-jaw surgery established a good occlusal relationship after correction of severe anemia. Both upper and lower incisors were moved to upright positions, while clockwise rotation of the palatal plane and decreased mandibular plane angle were accomplished. Lower masticatory activity may affect posttreatment occlusion in such cases.

  19. Diastema closure using direct bonding restorations combined with orthodontic treatment: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Kong Hwang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Closure of interdental spaces using proximal build-ups with resin composite is considered to be practical and conservative. However, a comprehensive approach combining two or more treatment modalities may be needed to improve esthetics. This case report describes the management of a patient with multiple diastemas, a peg-shaped lateral incisor and midline deviation in the maxillary anterior area. Direct resin bonding along with orthodontic movement of teeth allows space closure and midline correction, consequently, creating a better esthetic result.

  20. Class II malocclusion treatment using combined Twin Block and fixed orthodontic appliances – A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Anezi, Saud A.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the Twin Block functional orthodontic appliances is mostly dento-alveolar with small skeletal effect. There are certain clinical indications where functional appliances can be used successfully in class II malocclusion e.g. in a growing patient. The use of these appliances is greatly dependent on the patient’s compliance and they simplify the fixed appliance phase. In this case, a 13-year old adolescent was treated with Twin Block appliance followed by fixed appliance to detail the occlusion. The design and treatment effects were demonstrated in this case report. PMID:24151413

  1. Effect of the personality traits of the patient on pain perception and attitude toward orthodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Abhijeet Kadu; Sukhbir S Chopra; Balakrishnan Jayan; Gagan Deep Kochar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to evaluate the relationship between personality traits, pain perception, and person′s attitude toward orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: The sample comprised of two groups: Group 1 consisted of 100 treated subjects (50 males, 50 females; average age, 16.07 ± 1.36 years), and Group 2 consisted of 100 untreated subjects (50 males, 50 females; average age, 16.07 ± 1.41 years). The instrument for data collection was a questionnaire that included an assessm...

  2. Long-Term Stability of Pre-Orthodontic Orthognathic Bimaxillary Surgery Using Intraoral Vertical Ramus Osteotomy Versus Conventional Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeong-Hwa; Choi, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Kee-Deog; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Lee, Sang-Hwy; Yu, Hyung-Seog

    2018-02-20

    The aim of the present study was to compare the long-term stability of bimaxillary surgery using an intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) with and without presurgical orthodontic treatment. The present retrospective study included 31 consecutive patients with skeletal Class III malocclusions who had undergone bimaxillary surgery (Le Fort I osteotomy and bilateral IVRO). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on treatment type: pre-orthodontic orthognathic surgery (POGS; n = 17) and conventional surgery with presurgical orthodontic treatment (CS; n = 14). Lateral cephalograms were obtained before surgery, 1 day after surgery, 1 month after surgery, 1 year after surgery, and 2 years after surgery to evaluate skeletal and soft tissue changes between the 2 groups. Data were analyzed using χ 2 tests, Mann-Whitney U tests, repeated-measures analyses of variance, and independent t tests. There was no significant difference in skeletal or soft tissue measurements-with the exception of the angle between the sella-and-nasion plane and the occlusal plane (SN-OP; P stability in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Analysis of correlation between initial alveolar bone density and apical root resorption after 12 months of orthodontic treatment without extraction

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    Paula Cabrini Scheibel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between initial alveolar bone density of upper central incisors (ABD-UI and external apical root resorption (EARR after 12 months of orthodontic movement in cases without extraction. METHODS: A total of 47 orthodontic patients 11 years old or older were submitted to periapical radiography of upper incisors prior to treatment (T1 and after 12 months of treatment (T2. ABD-UI and EARR were measured by means of densitometry. RESULTS: No statistically significant correlation was found between initial ABD-UI and EARR at T2 (r = 0.149; p = 0.157. CONCLUSION: Based on the present findings, alveolar density assessed through periapical radiography is not predictive of root resorption after 12 months of orthodontic treatment in cases without extraction.

  4. Changes in the Oral Environment after Placement of Fixed Orthodontic Appliance for the Treatment of Malocclusion - a Descriptive Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanishree, T; Panchmal, Ganesh Shenoy; Shenoy, Rekha; Jodalli, Praveen; Sonde, Laxminarayan; Kundapur, Nagaraj

    The aim of this study was to determine the changes of salivary flow rate, pH, buffering capacity, total antioxidant capacity and changes in streptococci and lactobacilli counts at baseline, 1 month and 6 months of fixed orthodontic treatment. An unstimulated salivary sample was collected from 30 out of 43 patients who were in need of fixed orthodontic treatment (mean age 17.8 ± 5.01 years). Salivary samples were collected from the patients before the placement of fixed orthodontic appliance (Gemini MBT 0223M) at 1 month and 6 months following start of the treatment. Samples were tested for significant changes in flow rate, pH, buffering capacity, total antioxidant capacity and streptococci and lactobacilli counts. Results were compared using ANOVA. The study results showed that orthodontic appliances significantly changed the unstimulated salivary flow rate (p orthodontic appliance resulted in a significant increase in unstimulated salivary flow rate and lactobacilli counts, whereas buffering capacity decreased significantly during the study period.

  5. Outcomes of two-phase orthodontic treatment of deepbite malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Lorenzo; Baccetti, Tiziano; Giuntini, Veronica; Masucci, Caterina; Vangelisti, Andrea; Defraia, Efisio

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this prospective controlled study was to assess the outcomes of two-phase treatment of deepbite patients revaluated at the end of circumpubertal growth, 1 year after the end of a phase-2 treatment. A sample of 58 subjects with deepbite (mean age 9.7 years, overbite greater than 4.5 mm) was treated consecutively with a two-phase protocol. Lateral cephalograms were taken before treatment (T1), at the completion of phase 1 (T2), and 1 year after the completion of phase 2 with fixed appliances (T3, mean age 15.8 years). The T1-T2, T2-T3, and T1-T3 changes were compared with those of the 29 subjects (mean age at T1 = 9.1 years) with untreated deepbite (t-tests for independent samples). Prevalence rates for improved overbite during the T1-T3 interval and for corrected overbite at T3 were contrasted in the treated vs untreated groups (z tests on proportions). Overbite was reduced by 1.9 mm in the treated group as a result of overall treatment; this group also displayed a significant reduction in the interincisal angulation (-6.6°) due to a significant proclination of upper incisors (4.1°) and a significant increase in the projection of the lower incisors (2.0 mm). The average amount of deepbite correction 1 year into retention was modest, and it was mainly due to a significant proclination of the incisors. The prevalence rate of subjects with a corrected overbite in the treated sample at T3 (74%) was not significantly different from that of the untreated sample (52%).

  6. A posterior registration and subtraction of periapical radiographs for the evaluation of external apical root resorption after orthodontic treatment

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    Kreich, Eliane Maria; Chibinski, Ana Claudia; Coelho, Ulisses; Wambier, Leticia Stadler; Zedebski, Rosaio De Arruda Moura [School of Dentistry, Ponta Grossa State University, Ponta Grossa, Parana (Brazil); De Moraes, Mari Eli Leonelli; De Moraes, Luiz Cesar [Dept. of Dental Radiology, School of Dentistry, State University of Sao Paulo, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    This study employed a posteriori registration and subtraction of radiographic images to quantify the apical root resorption in maxillary permanent central incisors after orthodontic treatment, and assessed whether the external apical root resorption (EARR) was related to a range of parameters involved in the treatment. A sample of 79 patients (mean age, 13.5±2.2 years) with no history of trauma or endodontic treatment of the maxillary permanent central incisors was selected. Periapical radiographs taken before and after orthodontic treatment were digitized and imported to the Regeemy software. Based on an analysis of the posttreatment radiographs, the length of the incisors was measured using Image J software. The mean EARR was described in pixels and relative root resorption (%). The patient's age and gender, tooth extraction, use of elastics, and treatment duration were evaluated to identify possible correlations with EARR. The mean EARR observed was 15.44±12.1 pixels (5.1% resorption). No differences in the mean EARR were observed according to patient characteristics (gender, age) or treatment parameters (use of elastics, treatment duration). The only parameter that influenced the mean EARR of a patient was the need for tooth extraction. A posteriori registration and subtraction of periapical radiographs was a suitable method to quantify EARR after orthodontic treatment, and the need for tooth extraction increased the extent of root resorption after orthodontic treatment.

  7. A posterior registration and subtraction of periapical radiographs for the evaluation of external apical root resorption after orthodontic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreich, Eliane Maria; Chibinski, Ana Claudia; Coelho, Ulisses; Wambier, Leticia Stadler; Zedebski, Rosaio De Arruda Moura; De Moraes, Mari Eli Leonelli; De Moraes, Luiz Cesar

    2016-01-01

    This study employed a posteriori registration and subtraction of radiographic images to quantify the apical root resorption in maxillary permanent central incisors after orthodontic treatment, and assessed whether the external apical root resorption (EARR) was related to a range of parameters involved in the treatment. A sample of 79 patients (mean age, 13.5±2.2 years) with no history of trauma or endodontic treatment of the maxillary permanent central incisors was selected. Periapical radiographs taken before and after orthodontic treatment were digitized and imported to the Regeemy software. Based on an analysis of the posttreatment radiographs, the length of the incisors was measured using Image J software. The mean EARR was described in pixels and relative root resorption (%). The patient's age and gender, tooth extraction, use of elastics, and treatment duration were evaluated to identify possible correlations with EARR. The mean EARR observed was 15.44±12.1 pixels (5.1% resorption). No differences in the mean EARR were observed according to patient characteristics (gender, age) or treatment parameters (use of elastics, treatment duration). The only parameter that influenced the mean EARR of a patient was the need for tooth extraction. A posteriori registration and subtraction of periapical radiographs was a suitable method to quantify EARR after orthodontic treatment, and the need for tooth extraction increased the extent of root resorption after orthodontic treatment

  8. Orthodontic-orthognathic interventions in orthognathic surgical cases: "Paper surgery" and "model surgery" concepts in surgical orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan H Gandedkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thorough planning and execution is the key for successful treatment of dentofacial deformity involving surgical orthodontics. Presurgical planning (paper surgery and model surgery are the most essential prerequisites of orthognathic surgery, and orthodontist is the one who carries out this procedure by evaluating diagnostic aids such as crucial clinical findings and radiographic assessments. However, literature pertaining to step-by-step orthognathic surgical guidelines is limited. Hence, this article makes an attempt to provide an insight and nuances involved in the planning and execution. The diagnostic information revealed from clinical findings and radiographic assessments is integrated in the "paper surgery" to establish "surgical-plan." Furthermore, the "paper surgery" is emulated in "model surgery" such that surgical bite-wafers are created, which aid surgeon to preview the final outcome and make surgical movements that are deemed essential for the desired skeletal and dental outcomes. Skeletal complexities are corrected by performing "paper surgery" and an occlusion is set up during "model surgery" for the fabrication of surgical bite-wafers. Further, orthodontics is carried out for the proper settling and finishing of occlusion. Article describes the nuances involved in the treatment of Class III skeletal deformity individuals treated with orthognathic surgical approach and illustrates orthodontic-orthognathic step-by-step procedures from "treatment planning" to "execution" for successful management of aforementioned dentofacial deformity.

  9. [Invisible orthodontics: lingual orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion, D; Leclerc, J F

    1989-01-01

    After an historical, a description of the appliance and the problems met in lingual orthodontics, the authors show that it has come to maturity. Indirect bonding is one of the main elements contributing to success. A large iconography illustrates the different stages of the laboratory and presents an overview of the clinical possibilities of lingual orthodontics.

  10. Effect of rotary electric toothbrush versus manual toothbrush on periodontal status during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, R L; Murray, P; Robertson, P B

    1989-10-01

    Adolescents with fixed orthodontic appliances frequently have increased levels of plaque accumulation and gingivitis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a rotary electric toothbrush would be more effective than conventional toothbrushing in maintaining periodontal health in these patients. Forty adolescent patients were divided into equal groups matched for sex and age. Before and during placement of orthodontic appliances, one group was instructed in use of the rotary electric toothbrush and the other in the use of a conventional toothbrush; these instructions were reinforced at monthly visits thereafter. Baseline clinical assessments of Plaque Index, Gingival Index, and bleeding tendency were made on six standard teeth before appliances were placed. assessments were repeated at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months after appliances were placed. Intragroup and intergroup differences were tested by a two-way analysis of variance. At baseline there were no significant differences between the two groups for any study variable. During the 18-month study period, however, plaque accumulation and gingivitis increased significantly over baseline levels in the control group (p less than 0.01) but remained stable in the group using the rotary electric toothbrush. In addition, the control group showed significantly greater plaque (p less than 0.01), gingival inflammation (p less than 0.001), and gingival bleeding on probing (p less than 0.001) than did the treatment group from the 1- to 18-month examinations. These data suggest that the rotary electric toothbrush is more effective than conventional toothbrushes for removing plaque and controlling gingivitis in adolescents during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances.

  11. Three questionnaires to assess the perception of fixed orthodontic therapy before, during and after treatment: validity and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassir, Yassir A; McIntyre, Grant T; Bearn, David R

    2017-08-01

    To assess the validity and reliability of a series of three questionnaires for the quantification of patient perception of fixed appliance orthodontic treatment. The study was carried out at the University of Dundee with content and face validity being assessed using proformas. Initially ten experts (Orthodontic Specialists) assessed content validity with 11 professionals (seven Orthodontic Specialists and four Postgraduates) and 20 patients assessing face validity. Content validity was determined according to the values of item-level content validity index (I-CVI) and scale-level CVI (S-CVI/Ave), while specially designed feedback forms were used for face validation. Internal consistency determined the reliability of the questionnaires according to the value of Cronbach alpha correlation coefficient test. The three questionnaires were then modified according to the recommendations of professionals and patients with seven experts reassessing content validity and ten newly selected patients assessing face validity. The first round of content validity revealed that around half of the items in the questionnaires were not valid. Therefore, the questionnaires were not valid as a whole (S-CVI/Ave = 0.60). After modifying the questionnaires and removing the non-valid items, the new versions of the Pre-treatment, Orthodontic Experience, and Post-treatment Questionnaires showed high levels of face validity, content validity (S-CVI/Ave: 0.99, 0.97, and 0.99, respectively) and good levels of internal consistency (α = 0.86, 0.78, and 0.88, respectively). The patient sample was collected from a single university clinic and from one city within the UK and this could affect the generalizability of the results. Three content valid and reliable questionnaires have been developed and validated for the evaluation of patient perception of fixed appliance orthodontic treatment. Unlike other tools that assess oral health-related quality of life, this series of three questionnaires

  12. Lateral incisor root resorption and active orthodontic treatment in the early mixed dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amlani, M S; Inocencio, F; Hatibovic-Kofman, S

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the presence of root resorption in the lateral incisor after active orthodontic treatment in the early mixed dentition. Twenty-six children treated at the Children's Clinic of the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Western Ontario were examined radiographically for lateral incisors root resorption before and after early active treatment to align upper incisors (2 x 4 appliance). In addition, canine inclinations to the midline and to the long axis of the lateral incisor as well as the most medial position of the canine crown were measured as potential risk factors for root resorption. 8% (4) of the lateral incisors exhibited root resorption and the mean crown-to-root ratio of these teeth was significantly higher than that for lateral incisors not exhibiting root resorption. Similarly, mean canine inclinations to the midline and to the long axis of the lateral incisor were also significantly higher for the root resorption group. No association could be found between the most medial position of the canine crown and root resorption in the lateral incisor. This study showed that active orthodontic treatment in the early mixed dentition does not increase the risk for root resorption in the lateral incisors as long as the clinician takes into consideration canine inclinations and their potential effect on root resorption. Limitations inherent to radiographic assessment are acknowledged.

  13. Volumetric pulp changes after orthodontic treatment determined by cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Shivanand; Ajmera, Shreya; Ganeshkar, Sanjay V

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe and evaluate 3-dimensional pulp cavity changes during orthodontic treatment. Eighty-seven patients formed the study sample and were divided into an experimental group (48 patients) and a control group (39 patients). Cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) records were obtained before the start of the treatment (T0) and after space closure for the experimental group, whereas for the control group CBCT images were obtained approximately 17-18 months (T1) after obtaining the first image (T0). CBCT data were reconstructed with surface and volume rendering software (Mimics; Materialise, Leuven, Belgium), and the volumetric images were modified to display the teeth from various orientations. Six anterior teeth were segmented and their pulps isolated. Paired t test was used to check for statistical significance. The difference in the pulp volume was statistically significant at P Orthodontic treatment in the experimental group produced a significant decrease in the size of the pulp, which was statistically significant. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Occlusal bite force change after orthodontic treatment with Andresen functional appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khateeb, Susan N; Abu Alhaija, Elham S; Majzoub, Sami

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the occlusal bite force (OBF) changes, at the incisal and molar regions, after orthodontic treatment with functional appliance therapy in preadolescent subjects. OBF was measured for patients (17 females and 16 males) before and after the treatment with Andresen functional appliance for an average period of 9 months (mean age was 11.8±1.1 years). Three variables were registered; maximum OBF at molar region and the average of three readings at the molar (AOBF) and incisal regions (IOBF). The same variables were measured in two occasions for a matching non-treated control group with a period of 9 months between the two measurements. No significant changes were seen in the OBF measured parameters in the control group. There was a reduction in all measured parameters. The mean reduction in maximum OBF was 76.1±12.4 N (P appliance caused a significant reduction in OBF immediately after treatment. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. [Predicting of growth tendency with cephalometry. Cephalometric research comparing orthodontic treatment cases with four premolar extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Gyula Tamás; Herényi, Gejza; Szabó, Gyula

    2007-02-01

    The Hasund cephalometry gives important information about the position of the mandible and maxilla to each other and to the cranium in horizontal and vertical plane, and about the expecting mandibular growth. The aim of the study was to examine the reliability of the Hasund growth analysis on the basis of cephalogramms. The data of eighteen children having been treated with four premolar extraction in the growing period were compared. At the start of treatments the children's average age was 10 (8.5-11.5) years. Figures from the cephalometry were analysed by an orthodontic diagnostic program. According to our results the predicted growth was justified in 14 cases and contrary mandibular development was found in 4 cases. Beyond the limits of this study we concluded that the Hasund growth analysis gives mainly a reliable prognosis on predicting mandibular development. In diagnostic procedures this analysis should be followed for a successful decision-making in treatment plan. However, during the orthodontic treatment the prognostic results have to be monitored by using further cephalometric evaluations in a time-scales of a year.

  16. Can a surgery-first orthognathic approach reduce the total treatment time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Shik; Choi, Jong Woo; Kim, Do Yeon; Lee, Jang Yeol; Kwon, Soon Man

    2017-04-01

    Although pre-surgical orthodontic treatment has been accepted as a necessary process for stable orthognathic correction in the traditional orthognathic approach, recent advances in the application of miniscrews and in the pre-surgical simulation of orthodontic management using dental models have shown that it is possible to perform a surgery-first orthognathic approach without pre-surgical orthodontic treatment. This prospective study investigated the surgical outcomes of patients with diagnosed skeletal class III dentofacial deformities who underwent orthognathic surgery between December 2007 and December 2014. Cephalometric landmark data for patients undergoing the surgery-first approach were analyzed in terms of postoperative changes in vertical and horizontal skeletal pattern, dental pattern, and soft tissue profile. Forty-five consecutive Asian patients with skeletal class III dentofacial deformities who underwent surgery-first orthognathic surgery and 52 patients who underwent conventional two-jaw orthognathic surgery were included. The analysis revealed that the total treatment period for the surgery-first approach averaged 14.6 months, compared with 22.0 months for the orthodontics-first approach. Comparisons between the immediate postoperative and preoperative and between the postoperative and immediate postoperative cephalometric data revealed factors that correlated with the total treatment duration. The surgery-first orthognathic approach can dramatically reduce the total treatment time, with no major complications. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluoride varnish reduces white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Imran

    2008-01-01

    This was a randomised controlled trial (RCT) set in a community dental practice. The test varnish was a commercially available product, Fluor Protector (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), containing 0.1% fluoride as difluorosilane in a polyurethane varnish base. The placebo varnish applied had an identical composition but without fluoride. The incidence and prevalence of white spot lesions (WSL) on the upper incisors, cuspids and premolars were recorded, as scored from digital photographs by two independent examiners. In the case of disagreement, cases were re-examined until a consensus was achieved. The incidence of WSL during the treatment period was 7.4% in the fluoride varnish group compared with 25.3% placebo group (P <0.001). The mean progression score was significantly lower in the fluoride varnish group than in the placebo group, (0.8 +/- 2.0 vs 2.6 +/- 2.8; P <0.001). The absolute risk reduction was 18% and the number-needed-to-treat was calculated to be 5.5 (95% confidence interval, 3.7-10.9). The results strongly suggest that regular topical fluoride varnish applications may reduce the development of WSL adjacent to the bracket base during treatment with fixed appliances.

  18. Positional changes of maxillary central incisors following orthodontic treatment using single-crown implants as fixed reference markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brahem Ben, Elissa; Holm, Bente; Sonnesen, L

    2017-01-01

    . MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-seven patients - thirty-seven with (test group) and twenty without pre-implant orthodontic treatment (control group) - were rehabilitated with 89 single-crown implants in the upper maxilla. Clinical and radiographic data, clinical photographs, and dental casts were collected......OBJECTIVES: This follow-up study (1) compares tooth displacement of central incisors in patients with and without pre-implant orthodontic treatment and (2) investigates whether sex, age, or orthodontic retention have an effect on tooth displacement after the insertion of single-crown implants...... during baseline examinations after prosthetic rehabilitation and at the final follow-up examination at least 5 years later. A total of 114 dental casts were digitalized and aligned using a software program to measure changes in the positions of the central incisors. RESULTS: After a follow-up period...

  19. Non-surgical adjunctive interventions for accelerating tooth movement in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Angbawi, Ahmed; McIntyre, Grant T; Fleming, Padhraig S; Bearn, David R

    2015-11-18

    Accelerating the rate of tooth movement may help to reduce the duration of orthodontic treatment and associated unwanted effects including root resorption and enamel demineralisation. Several methods, including surgical and non-surgical adjuncts, have been advocated to accelerate the rate of tooth movement. Non-surgical techniques include low-intensity laser irradiation, resonance vibration, pulsed electromagnetic fields, electrical currents and pharmacological approaches. To assess the effect of non-surgical adjunctive interventions on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and the overall duration of treatment. We searched the following databases on 25 November 2014: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (November 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to November 2014), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to November 2014), LILACS via BIREME (1980 to November 2014), metaRegister of Controlled Trials (November 2014), the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov; November 2014) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (November 2014). We checked the reference lists of all trials identified for further studies. There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication in the searches of the electronic databases. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of people receiving orthodontic treatment using fixed appliances along with non-surgical adjunctive interventions to accelerate tooth movement. We excluded non-parallel design studies (for example, split-mouth) as we regarded them as inappropriate for assessment of the effects of this type of intervention. Two review authors were responsible for study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction; they carried out these tasks independently. Any disagreements were resolved by discussion amongst the review team to reach consensus. The review authors contacted

  20. Impact of body mass index on oral health during orthodontic treatment: an explorative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bremen, Julia; Lorenz, Nathalie; Ruf, Sabine

    2016-08-01

    To answer the question: is there a correlation between body mass index (BMI), oral health, and patient cooperation during multibracket (MB) appliance therapy? All adolescent MB patients started and finished between 2007 and 2012 were analysed. According to their pre-treatment BMI, patients were divided into one of the following groups: normal weight, overweight, or obese. Using the patients' records, the cooperation during treatment was classified as good, bad, or poor and the treatment duration was calculated. Using pre- and post-treatment photographs, white spot lesion (WSL) formation and gingivitis before and after MB therapy were assessed. Of the 175 subjects, 138 had a normal BMI (79 per cent), 22 were overweight (12.5 per cent), and 15 obese (8.5 per cent). Whereas 42.8 per cent of the normal weight patients showed a good cooperation, only 22.7 per cent of the overweight and 20.9 per cent of the obese patients cooperated sufficiently. On average, normal weight patients were treated for 22.2 months, overweight patients for 23.0 months, and obese patients for 27.7 months. Normal weight patients developed less WSL (41.3 per cent) during MB treatment than overweight (50 per cent) or obese (66.7 per cent) patients. Furthermore, patients with a normal weight or overweight had less gingival inflammation (79.5 per cent) after treatment than obese individuals (93.3 per cent). An increased BMI appears to be a risk factor for less cooperation, a longer treatment duration, and more oral health-related problems during MB treatment, indicating that these patients require special attention during orthodontic therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Apical root resorption during orthodontic treatment with aligners? A retrospective radiometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Elena; Drechsler, Thomas; Schmidtmann, Irene; Jacobs, Collin; Haag, Simeon; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2013-08-14

    Objective of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of apical root resorptions (ARR) during orthodontic treatment with aligners. The sample comprised 100 patients (17-75 years of age) with a class I occlusion and anterior crowding before treatment, treated exclusively with aligners (Invisalign®, Align Technologies, Santa Clara, CA, USA). The following teeth were assessed: upper and lower anterior teeth and first molars. Root and crown lengths of a total of 1600 teeth were measured twice in pre- and post-treatment panoramic radiographs. Afterwards, relative changes of the root length during treatment were calculated by a root-crown-ratio taking pre- and post-treatment root and crown lengths into consideration. A reduction of this ratio was considered as a shortening of the initial root length. Additionally, tooth movements of the front teeth were assessed by lateral cephalograms and the 3-dimensonal set up of each patient. All patients had a reduction of the pre-treatment root length with a minimum of two teeth. On average 7.36 teeth per patient were affected. 54% of 1600 measured teeth showed no measurable root reduction. A reduction of >0%-10% of the pre-treatment root length was found in 27.75%, a distinct reduction of >10%-20% in 11.94%. 6.31% of all teeth were affected with a considerable reduction of >20%. We found no statistically significant correlation between relative root length changes and the individual tooth, gender, age or sagittal and vertical orthodontic tooth movement; except for extrusion of upper front teeth, which was considered as not clinical relevant due to the small amount of mean 4% ARR. The present study is the first analyzing ARR in patients with a fully implemented orthodontic treatment with aligners (i.e. resolving anterior crowding). The variety was high and no clinical relevant influence factor could be detected. A minimum of two teeth with a root length reduction was found in every patient. On average, 7.36 teeth

  2. Motives for Surgical-Orthodontic Treatment and Effect of Treatment on Psychosocial Well-Being and Satisfaction: A Prospective Study of 118 Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oland, J.; Jensen, J.; Elklit, A.

    2011-01-01

    after surgery or later. The motives for treatment, fulfillment of those motives, psychosocial well-being, and degree of post-treatment satisfaction were assessed using questionnaires validated for Danish patients. A total of 47 age- and gender-matched subjects without any current or previous need......Purpose: A prospective, controlled study of consecutive surgical-orthodontic patients was performed to assess how treatment affects the patients' psychosocial well-being. We evaluated patients' treatment motivations and motive fulfillment in relation to their satisfaction with the treatment...... and assessed the correlation between their satisfaction and their psychosocial well-being. Patients and Methods: A total of 118 adult patients (51 men and 67 women, mean age 25 years) who had undergone surgical-orthodontic treatment were examined before the preoperative orthodontic treatment and 12 months...

  3. Effect of rotary electric toothbrush versus manual toothbrush on decalcification during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, R L; Rose, C M

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether daily use of a rotary electric toothbrush (Rota-dent, Prodentec Corp., Batesville, Ark.) and a 0.05% sodium fluoride (NaF) rinse would significantly reduce decalcification when compared with manual toothbrushing only (control group) or manual toothbrushing and daily use of a NaF rinse (rinse group). All three groups used a standard fluoride toothpaste. Ninety consecutive adolescent patients who were to receive orthodontic treatment were placed into one of three groups according to age and sex criteria. Decalcification was evaluated single blind by two calibrated examiners on the facial surfaces of all permanent teeth before appliances were placed (baseline) and 3 months after appliances were removed (posttreatment). Data were analyzed by analysis of covariance with the dependent variable derived by subtracting the baseline decalcification scores from the posttreatment scores and using the baseline scores as the covariate. The results showed that although there were no significant differences between the three groups at baseline, the Rota-dent group showed significantly (p electric toothbrush with a standard fluoride toothpaste and once daily use of a 0.05% NaF rinse is more effective for preventing decalcification in adolescents during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances than either conventional toothbrushing with a fluoride toothpaste, or similar toothbrushing and toothpaste with a once daily NaF rinse.

  4. Remember the periroot sheet in orthodontic treatment of ectodermal dysplasia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabella Vest Hansen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Root resorption has various etiologies. Recent studies have demonstrated a periroot sheet covering the root. The outermost layer of this sheet is the Malassez′ epithelial layer. Tooth malformations are seen in ectodermal dysplasia and it is believed that the ectodermal layer in the periroot sheet differs in cases of ectodermal dysplasia. Case reports: Three cases of unexpected severe root resorption are demonstrated. Two cases were diagnosed with ectodermal dysplasia and the third appeared with thin, curly hair and absence of eyebrows but no ectodermal diagnosis. In the ectodermal cases, there were severe orthodontically provoked resorptions on the teeth that appeared to be permanent but were possibly primary. In the third case, there was heavy resorption on permanent teeth due to orthodontic treatment. Discussion: The orthodontist should be aware that aggressive resorption can occur in cases not diagnosed with ectodermal dysplasia but with signs of ectodermal deviations, and that tooth morphology, hair, and skin are important to observe before proceeding with treatment.

  5. Corticotomy-assisted orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Jorge; Campo, Julián; Bonilla, Elena; Colmenero, César

    2012-02-01

    The use of orthodontic treatment in adult patients is becoming more common and these patients have different requirements specially regarding duration of treatment and facial and dental aesthetics. Alveolar corticotomy is an effective means of accelerating orthodontic treatment. This literature revision include an historical background, biological and orthodontic fundamentals and the most significant clinical applications of this technique. Orthodontic treatment time is reduced with this technique to one-third of that in conventional orthodontics. Alveolar bone grafting of labial and palatal/lingual surfaces ensures root coverage as the dental arch is expanded. Corticotomy-assisted orthodontics has been reported in a few clinical cases, and seems to be a promising adjuvant technique, indicated for many situations in the orthodontic treatment of adults without active periodontal pathology. Its main advantages are reduction of treatment time and postorthodontic stability. Further controlled prospective and histological studies are needed to study tooth movement, post-retention stability, and microstructural features of teeth, periodontium, and regenerated bone after using this procedure. Key words:Corticotomy, osteotomy, accelerated orthodontics.

  6. Orthodontic treatment of gummy smile by maxillary total intrusion with a midpalatal absolute anchorage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ryoon-Ki; Lim, Seung-Min; Heo, Jung-Min; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2013-06-01

    This article describes the orthodontic treatment of a 31-year-old Korean female patient with gummy smile and crowding. The patient showed excessive gingival display in both the anterior and posterior areas and a large difference in gingival heights between the anterior and posterior teeth in the maxilla. To correct the gummy smile, we elected to intrude the entire maxillary dentition instead of focusing only on the maxillary anterior teeth. Alignment and leveling were performed, and a midpalatal absolute anchorage system as well as a modified lingual arch was designed to achieve posterosuperior movement of the entire upper dentition. The active treatment period was 18 months. The gummy smile and crowding were corrected, and the results were stable at 21 months post-treatment.

  7. [Central incisor and individualizing treatment of the smile due to orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozencweig, Sophie; Muller, Christine

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of the orthodontic treatment that we provide are to re-establish functional occlusion and a harmonious facial appearance, taking the individual anatomic features of each patient into account as well the potential changes that will come with ageing. As a pre-treatment first step we analyze the position of the incisor teeth within the face. Next we pose several questions. Should we preserve a slight bi-maxillary protrusion or correct it? Should we decide to voluntarily maintain a slight supraclusion? When should we correct a gummy smile? What should we do about black holes? In this article we propose treatment approaches, illustrating them with clinical situations and focus on the critical role played by the central incisor in establishing smiles that are suitable for each patient, integrating them with the ageing patterns that we know the future will bring. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2012.

  8. Stability of orthodontic treatment outcome in relation to retention status: An 8-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinnes, Jeanett; Johnsen, Gunn; Kerosuo, Heidi

    2017-06-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the stability of orthodontic treatment outcome and retention status 7 or more years after active treatment in relation to posttreatment or postretention time, type of retention appliance, and duration of retainer use. The subjects were former patients who completed orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances from 2000 to 2007. The pretreatment eligibility criteria were anterior crowding of 4 mm or more in the maxilla or the mandible and Angle Class I or Class II sagittal molar relationship. Acceptable pretreatment and posttreatment dental casts were required. A total of 67 patients participated, 24 men and 43 women, with a mean age of 24.7 years (range, 20.0-50.0 years). All participants had a follow-up clinical examination, which included impressions for follow-up casts, and each completed a questionnaire. Data were obtained from pretreatment, posttreatment, and follow-up (T2) casts as well as from the patients' dental records. Treatment stability was evaluated with the peer assessment rating (PAR) index and Little's irregularity index. The participation rate was 64%. The average posttreatment time was 8.5 years (range, 7.0-11.0). All participants had received a retainer in the mandible, maxilla, or both after active treatment. At T2, the PAR score showed a mean relapse of 14%. The majority (78%) of participants still had a fixed retainer at T2 (retainer group), and 22% had been out of retention for at least 1 year (postretention group). The relapse according to the PAR did not differ significantly between participants with and without a retainer at T2. From posttreatment to T2, the irregularity of the mandibular incisors increased almost 3 times more in participants with no retainer in the mandible compared with those with an intact retainer at T2 (P = 0.001). In the maxilla, no corresponding difference was found. Our results suggest that occlusal relapse can be expected after active orthodontic treatment irrespective of long

  9. Tooth model reconstruction based upon data fusion for orthodontic treatment simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Hong-Tzong; Yang, Tsan-Jui; Chen, Yi-Chen

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a full tooth reconstruction method by integrating 3D scanner data and computed tomography (CT) image sets. In traditional dental treatment, plaster models are used to record patient׳s oral information and assist dentists for diagnoses. However, plaster models only save surface information, and are therefore unable to provide further information for clinical treatment. With the rapid development of medical imaging technology, computed tomography images have become very popular in dental treatment. Computed tomography images with complete internal information can assist the clinical diagnosis for dental implants or orthodontic treatment, and a digital dental model can be used to simulate and predict results before treatment. However, a method of producing a high quality and precise dental model has yet to be developed. To this end, this paper presents a tooth reconstruction method based on the data fusion concept via integrating external scanned data and CT-based medical images. First, a plaster model is digitized with a 3D scanner. Then, each crown can be separated from the base according to the characteristics of tooth. CT images must be processed for feature enhancement and noise reduction, and to define the tooth axis direction which will be used for root slicing. The outline of each slice of dental root can then be determined by the level set algorithm, and converted to point cloud data. Finally, the crown and root data can be registered by the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. With this information, a complete digital dental model can be reconstructed by the Delaunay-based region-growing (DBRG) algorithm. The main contribution of this paper is to reconstruct a high quality customized dental model with root information that can offer significant help to the planning of dental implant and orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF ADOLESCENT’S ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT NEEDS AND THEIR IMPACT ON SELF-ESTEEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshika; Mathur, Anmol; Batra, Manu; Makkar, Diljot Kaur; Aggarwal, Vikram Pal; Goyal, Nikita; Kaur, Puneet

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the presence of association between objective and subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment needs in adolescents and their impact on their self-esteem. Methods: Cross-sectional study with adolescents aged 10-17 years old in Sri Ganganagar city, Rajasthan, India. The objective index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) dental health component (DHC) and the subjective aesthetic component (AC) were used to determine the normative and the self-perception need for orthodontic treatment, respectively. The selected students were further examined for dental trauma, tooth loss, and dental caries. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale was applied for self-esteem level determination. Linear regression analysis was executed to test the individual association of different independent clinical variables with self-esteem scores. Results: Among 1,140 studied adolescents, the prevalence of dental normative orthodontic treatment need was in 56.9% of individuals, whereas 53.3% of individuals considered themselves as needy for the treatment. Multivariate analyses revealed that out of all dental disorders, DHC followed by AC of IOTN had maximum impact on the self-esteem of the adolescence. Conclusions: Dissatisfaction with dental appearance is a strong predictor for low self-esteem in adolescence. PMID:28977320

  11. Outcomes of comprehensive fixed appliance orthodontic treatment: A systematic review with meta-analysis and methodological overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Höchli, Damian; Eliades, Theodore

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess the occlusal outcome and duration of fixed orthodontic therapy from clinical trials in humans with the Objective Grading System (OGS) proposed by the American Board of Orthodontics. Nine databases were searched up to October 2016 for prospective/retrospective clinical trials assessing the outcomes of orthodontic therapy with fixed appliances. After duplicate study selection, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment according to the Cochrane guidelines, random-effects meta-analyses of the mean OGS score and treatment duration were performed and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. A total of 34 relevant clinical trials including 6,207 patients (40% male, 60% female; average age, 18.4 years) were identified. The average OGS score after treatment was 27.9 points (95% CI, 25.3-30.6 points), while the average treatment duration was 24.9 months (95% CI, 24.6-25.1 months). There was no significant association between occlusal outcome and treatment duration, while considerable heterogeneity was identified. In addition, orthodontic treatment involving extraction of four premolars appeared to have an important effect on both outcomes and duration of treatment. Finally, only 10 (39%) of the identified studies matched compared groups by initial malocclusion severity, although meta-epidemiological evidence suggested that matching may have significantly influenced their results. The findings from this systematic review suggest that the occlusal outcomes of fixed appliance treatment vary considerably, with no significant association between treatment outcomes and duration. Prospective matched clinical studies that use the OGS tool are needed to compare the effectiveness of orthodontic appliances.

  12. SEM-EDS-Based Elemental Identification on the Enamel Surface after the Completion of Orthodontic Treatment: In Vitro Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Machoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Braces as foreign bodies in the mouth carry a risk of side effects and toxicity to the human body. This article presents the results indicating the possible toxic effects of tools used for cleaning the enamel after the completion of orthodontic treatment. The studies were carried out in vitro. The procedure of enamel etching, bonding orthodontic metal brackets, and enamel cleaning after their removal was performed under laboratory conditions. The enamel microstructure and elements present on its surface were evaluated using the scanning electron microscope (SEM. Silicon and aluminium were found in addition to the tooth building elements.

  13. Optimal management of orthodontic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Topolski F; Moro A; Correr GM; Schimim SC

    2018-01-01

    Francielle Topolski,1 Alexandre Moro,1,2 Gisele Maria Correr,3 Sasha Cristina Schimim1 1Department of Orthodontics, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 2Department of Orthodontics, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 3Department of Restorative Dentistry, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil Abstract: Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment o...

  14. Treatment outcomes of pre-surgical infant orthopedics in patients with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Hosseini

    Full Text Available Non-syndromic clefts lip and/or palate (CL/P defects may have manifold significant and detrimental consequences for the affected individuals and their family environment. Although the use of pre-surgical infant orthopedics (PSIO was introduced as a means to improve management and treatment outcomes, there still remains a controversy.To investigate the effectiveness of PSIO in patients with non-syndromic CL/P and evaluate the quality of the available evidence.Search without restrictions, together with hand searching, until May 2016.Randomized clinical trials investigating the effects of pre-surgical infant orthopedic appliances.Following study retrieval and selection, data extraction and individual study risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool took place. The overall quality of the available evidence was assessed with the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach.Finally 20 papers (3 unique trials were identified, involving a total of 118 patients with unilateral complete CL/P and 16 with cleft of the soft and at least two thirds of the hard palate. Eight publications were considered as being of low, four of unclear and eight of high risk of bias. In general, the investigated appliances did not present significant effects when compared to each other or to no treatment in terms of feeding and general body growth, facial esthetics, cephalometric variables, maxillary dentoalveolar variables and dental arch relationships, speech and language evaluation, caregiver-reported outcomes, economic evaluation, as well as, adverse effects and problems. Overall, the quality of the available evidence was considered low.The aforementioned findings could provide initial guidance in the clinical setting. However, given the multitude of parameters, which may have affected the results, good practice would suggest further research, in order to reach more robust relevant recommendations for management decisions in

  15. Treatment outcomes of pre-surgical infant orthopedics in patients with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hamid Reza; Kaklamanos, Eleftherios G; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2017-01-01

    Non-syndromic clefts lip and/or palate (CL/P) defects may have manifold significant and detrimental consequences for the affected individuals and their family environment. Although the use of pre-surgical infant orthopedics (PSIO) was introduced as a means to improve management and treatment outcomes, there still remains a controversy. To investigate the effectiveness of PSIO in patients with non-syndromic CL/P and evaluate the quality of the available evidence. Search without restrictions, together with hand searching, until May 2016. Randomized clinical trials investigating the effects of pre-surgical infant orthopedic appliances. Following study retrieval and selection, data extraction and individual study risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool took place. The overall quality of the available evidence was assessed with the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. Finally 20 papers (3 unique trials) were identified, involving a total of 118 patients with unilateral complete CL/P and 16 with cleft of the soft and at least two thirds of the hard palate. Eight publications were considered as being of low, four of unclear and eight of high risk of bias. In general, the investigated appliances did not present significant effects when compared to each other or to no treatment in terms of feeding and general body growth, facial esthetics, cephalometric variables, maxillary dentoalveolar variables and dental arch relationships, speech and language evaluation, caregiver-reported outcomes, economic evaluation, as well as, adverse effects and problems. Overall, the quality of the available evidence was considered low. The aforementioned findings could provide initial guidance in the clinical setting. However, given the multitude of parameters, which may have affected the results, good practice would suggest further research, in order to reach more robust relevant recommendations for management decisions in individual

  16. Early vs late orthodontic treatment of tooth crowding by first premolar extraction: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Filho, Hibernon; Maia, Lúcio H; Lau, Thiago C L; de Souza, Margareth M G; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the body of evidence in the literature about the most favorable time for initiating orthodontic treatment in patients with severe crowding caused by tooth size arch length deficiency (TSALD). Electronic databases (PubMed, Ovid Medline, Scopus, Virtual Health Library, and The Cochrane Library) were searched for articles published between 1900 and April 2014. Studies were included that evaluated treatment of patients with severe crowding caused TSALD, who were treated with first premolar extraction. The association between the stage of development of occlusion at which treatment was started, and the primary and/or secondary outcomes of early and late treatment were investigated. After application of the eligibility criteria and reading of the full texts, six articles were included in the final review. Of these six articles, all of which were retrospective, four showed that the primary outcome (correction of severe crowding) of the early and late groups was improved, but without statistically significant differences after treatment. Therefore, the findings of secondary outcomes in the literature (postretention crowding relapse, duration of total and active treatment [treatment with appliances], external apical root resorption, and soft tissue profile) were the target of this study. These studies presented low or moderate methodological quality and control of bias. Both early and late extraction had a similar effect on correction of crowding. Early treatment had two favorable secondary outcomes (less relapse and reduced active treatment time) vs late treatment. However, the levels of evidence were not sufficient to assert which protocol was superior.

  17. [Investigation of differences in subjective demand for orthodontic treatment of middle school students in zones with different economic levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo; Yin, Bei; Zhao, Qing; Xu, Yichen; Huo, Jingyi; Li, Zhang'ao; Meng, Mingmei; Chen, Yafei

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the acquaintance to orthodontics and possible factors that obstruct orthodontic treatment in middle school students in zones with different economic levels in Jiangjin, Chongqing. The students were randomly divided into four groups: A class from a junior high school in town (group 1), a class from a senior high school in town (group 2), a class from a junior high school in the countryside (group 3), a class from a senior high school in the countryside (group 4). The information was collected by questionnaire, and the statistical analysis of results was carried out by SPSS 17.0 software. Sex made difference in the acquaintance to orthodontics treatment. Girls worried more about teeth extraction and pain that may occur during treatment than the boys. Students in the city had more access to related consultations compared to those in the countryside. Different economic conditions made much contribution to the proportion to go for orthodontics treatment in cities and rural areas. The evaluation from families and friends may affect patients' subjective estimation to themselves. Orthodontists should learn more about student patiens from various aspects, and make different therapies according to their sexes, economic conditions of family, education levels, etc. Only so can orthodontists get better compliance from their patients.

  18. Tooth movement in orthodontic treatment with low-level laser therapy: a systematic review of human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Garcia, Valentin Javier; Kasem, Khaled; Ustrell-Torrent, Josep Maria; Tallón-Walton, Victòria; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina

    2014-05-01

    This review attempts to organize the existing published literature regarding tooth movement in orthodontic treatment when low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is applied. The literature discusses different methods that have been developed to motivate the remodeling and decrease the duration of orthodontic treatment. The application of LLLT has been introduced to favor the biomechanics of tooth movements. However there is disagreement between authors as to whether LLLT reduces orthodontic treatment time, and the parameters that are used vary. Studies in humans and animals in which LLLT was applied to increase the dental movement were reviewed. Three reviewers selected the articles. The resulting studies were analyzed according to the parameters used in the application of laser and existing changes clinically and histopathologically. Out of 84 studies, 5 human studies were selected in which canine traction had been performed after removing a premolar, and 11 studies in rats were selected in which first premolar traction was realized. There were statistically significant changes in four human studies and eight animal studies. Varying the wavelength with a reasonable dose in the target zone leads to obtaining the desired biological effect and achieving a reduction of the orthodontic treatment time, although there are studies that do not demonstrate any benefit according to their values.

  19. [Computer assisted orthodontic diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo García, A; González Blanco, A

    1991-03-01

    Quick Ceph is a program to help in orthodontic diagnosis, which is not limited to lateral cephalometric analysis but also allows, thanks to the Macintosh graphic interface the simulation of all orthodontic and surgical movements and so this to establish a treatment plan.

  20. Efficacy of 2 finishing protocols in the quality of orthodontic treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Gregory J; McNamara, James A; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2011-11-01

    The objectives of this prospective clinical study were to evaluate the quality of treatment outcomes achieved with a complex orthodontic finishing protocol involving serpentine wires and a tooth positioner, and to compare it with the outcomes of a standard finishing protocol involving archwire bends used to detail the occlusion near the end of active treatment. The complex finishing protocol sample consisted of 34 consecutively treated patients; 1 week before debonding, their molar bands were removed, and serpentine wires were placed; this was followed by active wear of a tooth positioner for up to 1 month after debonding. The standard finishing protocol group consisted of 34 patients; their dental arches were detailed with archwire bends and vertical elastics. The objective grading system of the American Board of Orthodontics was used to quantify the quality of the finish at each time point. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare changes in the complex finishing protocol; the Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare changes between groups. The complex finishing protocol group experienced a clinically significant improvement in objective grading system scores after treatment with the positioner. Mild improvement in posterior space closure was noted after molar band removal, but no improvement in the occlusion was observed after placement of the serpentine wires. Patients managed with the complex finishing protocol also had a lower objective grading system score (14.7) at the end of active treatment than did patients undergoing the standard finishing protocol (23.0). Tooth positioners caused a clinically significant improvement in interocclusal contacts, interproximal contacts, and net objective grading system score; mild improvement in posterior band space was noted after molar band removal 1 week before debond. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effect of Awareness of American Board of Orthodontics Criteria on Treatment Outcomes in a Postgraduate Dental Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Rahime Burcu Nur; Nalbantgil, Didem; Ozdemir, Fulya

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the posttreatment outcomes in a postgraduate orthodontic clinic following a course on American Board of Orthodontics Cast and Radiograph Evaluation (ABO-CRE); to compare the outcomes of postgraduate students who took the course before and after finishing treatment of their cases; and to assess if the need for orthodontic treatment as determined by the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) at the beginning of treatment affected students' final scores. A course on ABO-CRE was given to second- (group A), third- (group B), and fourth- (group C) year postgraduate students at Yeditepe University, Istanbul, Turkey, in 2012. Pre- and posttreatment plaster models of 253 cases (group A) were treated by students in 2011-12. An additional 251 (group B, 2012-13) and 341 (group C, 2013-14) cases were evaluated in the first and second years after the course, respectively. The models were graded retrospectively using the ABO-CRE and IOTN. The results showed that the total mean scores on the posttreatment plaster models were significantly higher in the pre-course group than the first- and second-year post-course group (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). The borderline cases (grade 3) received a lower score on the ABO-CRE than the cases with need (grade 4) (p<0.01) and severe need (grade 5) (p<0.01) for orthodontic treatment. Increasing awareness by giving information about the ABO-CRE significantly improved the posttreatment success of these postgraduate students. After the course, treatment outcomes in the following year were better than two years later, suggesting it may be useful to teach the course annually to refresh students' knowledge.

  2. The extended tentacles of laser - From diagnosis to treatment in orthodontics: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Milling Tania, S. D.; Sathiasekar, Cynthia; Anison, Job Jacob; Samyukta Reddy, B. V.

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of lasers in dentistry in the mid-1990's, research in laser supported dental therapies is progressing at a rapid pace. Orthodontics is no exception. In orthodontics, lasers have many diagnostic, therapeutic, and biomodulating applications. To update the various applications of lasers in orthodontics. Lasers work by delivering energy in the form of light. Laser, striking the biological tissues can either get reflected, absorbed or scattered depending on several factors. ...

  3. Orthodontically guided bone transport in the treatment of alveolar cleft: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Elena; Otero, Marta; Berraquero, Rosario; Wucherpfennig, Begona; Hernández-Godoy, Juan; Guiñales, Jorge; Vincent, Germán; Burgueño, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Conventional treatments are sometimes not possible in certain alveolar cleft cases due to the severity of the gap which separates the fragments. Various management strategies have been proposed, including sequential surgical interventions or delaying treatment until adulthood to then carry out maxillary osteotomies. A further alternative approach has also been proposed, involving the application of bone transport techniques to mobilise the osseous fragments and thereby reduce the gap between lateral fragments and the premaxilla. Case Report We introduce the case of a 10-year-old patient who presented with a bilateral alveolar cleft and a severe gap. Stable occlusion between the premaxilla and the mandible was achieved following orthodontic treatment, making it inadvisable to perform a retrusive osteotomy of the premaxilla in order to close the alveolar clefts. Faced with this situation, it was decided we would employ a bone transport technique under orthodontic guidance using a dental splint. This would enable an osseous disc to be displaced towards the medial area and reduce the interfragmentary distance. During a second surgical intervention, closure of the soft tissues was performed and the gap was filled in using autogenous bone. Conclusions The use of bone transport techniques in selected cases allows closure of the osseous defect, whilst also preserving soft tissues and reducing the amount of bone autograft required. In our case, we were able to respect the position of the premaxilla and, at the same time, generate new tissues at both an alveolar bone and soft tissue level with results which have remained stable over the course of time. Key words:Alveolar cleft, bone transport, graft. PMID:26855699

  4. [Soft tissue changes of patients with skeletal class II malocclusion after orthodontic and surgical treatments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaiyun; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Xin

    2002-02-01

    One of the prime concerns of both the orthodontist and the oral surgeon must be the final soft tissue profile and the esthetic appearance of the patient. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the amount, direction, and predictability of the soft tissue changes associated with simultaneous skeletal changes. The authors analyzed the recent 22 cases with skeletal class II maloclusion in Orthodontic Department, College of Stomatology, West China University of Medical Sciences with 7 male and 15 female from 20 to 30 years old. Each patient was taken standardized lateral cephalograms before the treatment and 6-12 months after the treatment. A total of 16 hard and soft tissue landmarks were evaluated in both horizontal and vertical directions. In the horizontal directions, the soft tissue maxillary landmarks (superior labial sulcus, labrale superius, and upper lip stomion) moved posterior with a range of 2.17 to 2.33 mm. The strongest correlations were found between the posterior movement of the upper incisal edge and the three soft tissue parameters: superior labial sulcus r = 0.78, labrale superius r = 0.81, upper lip stomion r = 0.75. The soft/hard tissue ratios of the mandible anterior movement is 0.83:1 between inferior labial sulcus and B point, and 0.95:1 for Pog' to Pog. In the vertical directions, all the soft tissue mandible landmarks (Pog', inferior labial sulcus, labrale inferius, lower lip stomion) moved upward more than 2 mm. And the soft/hard tissue ratio is from 1.07:1 to 1.34:1. The combined orthodontic and surgical treatment is an efficient way to cure skeletal class II malocclusion. All the patients regained satisfactory face appearance and profile. Although the soft tissue movement is less than the hard tissue in both jaws in the horizontal direction, the vertical movement of the mandibular soft tissue is greater than that of the underlying hard tissue.

  5. Assessment of orthodontic treatment need among tribal children of Indore division, Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Shrikanth; Chauhan, Astha; Gowda, Srinivasa; Ambekar, Rutuja; Rathore, Bhupendra S; Chabra, Sakshi; Lalani, Afsheen; Harani, Harsh

    2018-01-01

    India is home to many tribes which have an interesting and varied history of origins, customs and social practices. Oral health care in tribal areas is limited due to shortage of dental manpower, financial constraints and the lack of perceived need for dental care among tribal masses. To assess orthodontic treatment need among tribal children of Indore division, Central India. A cross-sectional house to house survey was carried out among 800 tribal children aged 5 to 15 years old in two major tribal districts of Indore division. Permissions and consent were obtained from local administrative authorities, ethical committee and parents respectively. A structured proforma was used to record demographic data. Examination for dentofacial anomalies was conducted according to WHO 1997 survey methods. Descriptive tables and analytical tests like ANOVA, post-hoc and chi-square test were employed. The mean age was 9.75(±2.43) years. The mean DAI score among 12 to 15 years old children was 23.19±5.22. Female exhibited higher (24.51±5.34) mean DAI score compared to males (22.12±4.87) (p<0.05). The Patelia tribes (24.38±5.13) reported higher mean DAI score than Bhilala (23.02±5.69) and Bhil tribe (22.73±4.79) (p<0.005). The tribal children had minor malocclusion with no or slight treatment need. Categorization of orthodontic treatment need according to malocclusion severity is particularly important for the planning of corresponding public policies. The isolation of the villages, lack of transportation options imposes limitations on the availability of health professionals to provide dental services.

  6. Orthodontic treatment of nongrowing patient with class II division 2 malocclusion by Herbst appliance

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    Nedeljković Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inheritance is most casual etiological factor of Class II division 2 malocclusion. This kind of malocclusion is very difficult for treatment specially in older patients. Case report. In the female patient, 20 years old, at the beginning of the treatment at the School of Dentistry in Belgrade, lateral cephalogram showed skeletal and dentoalveolar Class II division 2 malocclusion. She was in the Herbst treatment for 8 months and 12 months more with a fixed multibracket appliance. The measurements were performed on lateral cephalograms before and after the treatment: ii, is, mi, ms, Pg and ss. The distance from these points to occlusal perpendicular line (Olp were measured and compared from cephalogram before to cephalogram after the treatment. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ tomograms were compared from before and after the treatment by superimposition. Correction was found in molar and incisor relation, overjet and overbite. There were found sagital skeletal changes and soft tissue profile improvement. Conclusion. Herbst appliance is effective in the treatment of Class II malocclusions, even in adult patients. Dental and skeletal changes as a result of Herbst treatment could be good choice instead of camouflage orthodontics or surgical decision.

  7. Er:YAG pre-treatment for bonding of orthodontic bracket: 1 year of in vitro treatment

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    de Jesus Tavarez RR

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus Tavarez,1 Gisele Lima Bezerra,2 Karla Janilee de Souza Penha,3 Carlos Rocha Gomes Torres,4 Leily Macedo Firoozmand5 1Department of Dentistry, Ceuma University (UNICEUMA, 2Dentistry Program, Ceuma University (UNICEUMA, 3Dentistry Program, Federal University of Maranhão, UFMA, São Luís, MA, 4Restorative Dentistry Department, ICT UNESP University, São Paulo, 5Dentistry Department I, Federal University of Maranhão,UFMA, São Luís, MA, Brazil Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro bond strength of metal brackets bonded with: total etch, total etch with erbium: yttrium aluminum garnet laser (Er:YAG and self-etching adhesive systems, submitted to thermal-mechanical cycling, simulating 1 year of orthodontic treatment.Materials and methods: For the study, 80 bovine incisors were randomly divided into 3 experimental groups (n=16 each: XT- acid etching + Transbond XT, XT/Er:YAG- Transbond XT associated with Er:YAG laser irradiation (λ=2.94 μm, 60 mJ, 10 Hz and SEP- Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer. Samples were submitted to thermal-mechanical cycling, simulating 1 year of orthodontic treatment. Afterward, the shear bond strength test was performed in a universal test machine at a speed of 0.5mm/min. Samples were evaluated under a stereomicroscope and by scanning electron microscopy for analysis of enamel surface and adhesive remnant index. Data were analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney (with Bonferroni correction statistical tests.Results: Statistically significant difference was observed between the groups studied (p<0.05. Groups XT and SEP showed the highest bond strength values, without statistical difference between them, while group XT/Er:YAG showed reduction in bond strength values. Higher frequency of adhesive failures between enamel and adhesive system was verified for groups XT and XT/Er:YAG.Conclusion: The conventional (XT and self-etching (SEP adhesive systems showed mean bond

  8. Initial arch wires for tooth alignment during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Fan; Lai, Wenli; Furness, Susan; McIntyre, Grant T; Millett, Declan T; Hickman, Joy; Wang, Yan

    2013-04-30

    Initial arch wires are the first arch wires to be inserted into the fixed appliance at the beginning of orthodontic treatment and are used mainly for the alignment of teeth by correcting crowding and rotations. With a number of different types of orthodontic arch wires available for initial tooth alignment, it is important to understand which wire is most efficient, as well as which wires cause the least amount of root resorption and pain during the initial aligning stage of treatment. This is an update of the review 'Initial arch wires for alignment of crooked teeth with fixed orthodontic braces' first published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 4. To assess the effects of initial arch wires for alignment of teeth with fixed orthodontic braces in relation to alignment speed, root resorption and pain intensity. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 2 August 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 7), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 2 August 2012) and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 2 August 2012). We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles. There was no restriction with regard to publication status or language of publication. We contacted all authors of included studies to identify additional studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of initial arch wires to align teeth with fixed orthodontic braces. Only studies involving participants with upper and/or lower full arch fixed orthodontic appliances were included. Two review authors were responsible for study selection, validity assessment and data extraction. All disagreements were resolved by discussion amongst the review team. Corresponding authors of included studies were contacted to obtain missing information. Nine RCTs with 571 participants were included in this review. All trials were at high risk of bias and a number of methodological limitations were identified. All trials had at least one

  9. The influence of patient's motivation on reported pain during orthodontic treatment

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    Marcio José da Silva Campos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients usually experience pain during orthodontic treatment. This fact can affect cooperation and the development of treatment. Reporting pain during treatment seems to be influenced by emotional aspects such as the patient's motivation. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between patient's motivation and the intensity of reported pain during two stages of treatment. METHODS: Twenty males (11-37 years old answered a questionnaire divided into five categories regarding their motivation towards treatment. The subjects were studied for 14 days (7 days with bonded brackets and 7 days with the initial arch inserted and the intensity of pain was evaluated on a daily basis. All the issues, including the intensity of pain, were measured through the visual analog scale (VAS. RESULTS: The VAS-associated questionnaire proved to have good temporal reliability and reasonable internal consistency, being that the "perceived severity" domain had the greatest, although not significant (p = 0.196 correlation with pain intensity. Only the question asking the patients if they thought that their teeth were too uneven showed a positive correlation with pain intensity (p = 0.048. CONCLUSION: The results seem to indicate that the five categories related to treatment motivation cannot be used to predict discomfort during treatment. In addition, patients who think their teeth are too uneven may experience more severe pain due to greater force application after insertion of the initial arch.

  10. Development of lingual brachet technique. (Esthetic and hygienic approach to orthodontic treatment) (Part 1) Background and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, K

    1978-04-01

    The present study relates to a development of the new technique and the new appliances, for the treatment of malocclusion and minor tooth movement. The primary purpose of the present study consists in to reduce mental burden of the patients receiving orthodontic treatment and to improve effect of the treatment further by making the appliance invisible when mouth is opened. The second purpose of the study is in orthodontic treatment carried out from lingual side, to control all teeth movement in oral cavity in three dimensions so that the normal occlusion may be operated. The third purpose of the present study is to make the exchange of wire readily when the wire with bigger elasticity is exchanged by turns during the process of the treatment. The background and the design of appliances for the lingual-bracker technique(lingual-bracket mushroom arch wire technique) is found out in this report.

  11. Cervical vertebral bone mineral density changes in adolescents during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Bethany; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Moon, Eun-Sang; Johnson, Elizabeth; Fields, Henry W; Palomo, J Martin; Johnston, William M

    2014-08-01

    The cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) stages have been used to estimate facial growth status. In this study, we examined whether cone-beam computed tomography images can be used to detect changes of CVM-related parameters and bone mineral density distribution in adolescents during orthodontic treatment. Eighty-two cone-beam computed tomography images were obtained from 41 patients before (14.47 ± 1.42 years) and after (16.15 ± 1.38 years) orthodontic treatment. Two cervical vertebral bodies (C2 and C3) were digitally isolated from each image, and their volumes, means, and standard deviations of gray-level histograms were measured. The CVM stages and mandibular lengths were also estimated after converting the cone-beam computed tomography images. Significant changes for the examined variables were detected during the observation period (P ≤0.018) except for C3 vertebral body volume (P = 0.210). The changes of CVM stage had significant positive correlations with those of vertebral body volume (P ≤0.021). The change of the standard deviation of bone mineral density (variability) showed significant correlations with those of vertebral body volume and mandibular length for C2 (P ≤0.029). The means and variability of the gray levels account for bone mineral density and active remodeling, respectively. Our results indicate that bone mineral density distribution and the volume of the cervical vertebral body changed because of active bone remodeling during maturation. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of post-orthodontic white spot lesions with casein phosphopeptide-stabilised amorphous calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröchner, Ann; Christensen, Carsten; Kristensen, Bjarne; Tranæus, Sofia; Karlsson, Lena; Sonnesen, Liselotte; Twetman, Svante

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of topical applications of 10% casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on white spot lesions (WSL) detected after treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Sixty healthy adolescents with ≥1 clinically visible WSL at debonding were recruited and randomly allocated to a randomised controlled trial with two parallel groups. The intervention group was instructed to topically apply a CPP-ACP -containing agent (Tooth Mousse, GC Europe) once daily and the subjects of the control group brushed their teeth with standard fluoride toothpaste. The intervention period was 4 weeks and the endpoints were quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) on buccal surfaces of the upper incisors, cuspids and first premolars and visual scoring from digital photos. The attrition rate was 15%, mostly due to technical errors, and 327 lesions were included in the final evaluation. A statistically significant (p < 0.05) regression of the WSL was disclosed in both study groups compared to baseline, but there was no difference between the groups. The mean area of the lesions decreased by 58% in the CPP-ACP group and 26% in the fluoride group (p = 0.06). The QLF findings were largely reflected by the clinical scores. No side effects were reported. Topical treatment of white spot lesions after debonding of orthodontic appliances with a casein phosphopeptide-stabilised amorphous calcium phosphate agent resulted in significantly reduced fluorescence and a reduced area of the lesions after 4 weeks as assessed by QLF. The improvement was however not superior to the "natural" regression following daily use of fluoride toothpaste.

  13. Oral hygiene compliance in orthodontic patients: a randomized controlled study on the effects of a post-treatment communication

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    Mauro Cozzani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have recently demonstrated that a post-treatment communication to explain the importance of an oral hygiene can improve the orthodontic patients’ compliance over a period of 66 days. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of a structured follow-up communication after orthodontic appliance application on oral hygiene compliance after 30–40 days. Methods Eighty-four orthodontic participants enrolled from patients who were beginning fixed orthodontic treatment at the Orthodontic Department, Gaslini Hospital, Genova, between July and October 2014 were randomly assigned to one of three trial arms. Before the bonding, all patients underwent a session of oral hygiene aimed at obtaining an plaque index of “zero.” At the following orthodontic appointment, the plaque index was calculated for each patient in order to assess oral hygiene compliance. The first group served as control and did not receive any post-procedure communication, the second group received a structured text message giving reassurance, and the third group received a structured telephone call. Participants were blinded to group assignment and were not made aware that the text message or the telephone call was part of the study. (The research protocol was approved by the Italian Comitato Etico Regionale della Liguria-sezione 3^ c/o IRCCS-Istituto G. Gaslini 845/2014, and it is not registered in the trial’s register. Results Thirty patients were randomly assigned to the control group, 28 participants to the text message group, and 26 to the telephone group. Participants who received a post-treatment communication reported higher level of oral hygiene compliance than participants in the control group. The plaque index was 0.3 (interquartile range (Iqr, 0.60 and 0.75 (Iqr, 1.30, respectively, with a significant difference (P = 0.0205. Conclusions A follow-up procedure after orthodontic treatment may be an effective tool to

  14. Evaluation of the orthodontic treatment need in a paediatric sample from Southern Italy and its importance among paediatricians for improving oral health in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzi, Valeria; Ierardo, Gaetano; Corridore, Denise; Di Carlo, Gabriele; Di Giorgio, Gianni; Leonardi, Emanuele; Campus, Guglielmo-Giuseppe; Vozza, Iole; Polimeni, Antonella; Bossù, Maurizio

    2017-08-01

    Data from epidemiological studies investigating the prevalence and severity of malocclusions in children are of great relevance to public health programs aimed at orthodontic prevention. Previous epidemiological studies focused mainly on the adolescence age group and reported a prevalence of malocclusion with a high variability, going from 32% to 93%. Aim of our study was to assess the need for orthodontic treatment in a paediatric sample from Southern Italy in order to improve awareness among paediatricians about oral health preventive strategies in pediatric dentistry. The study used the IOTN-DHC index to evaluate the need for orthodontic treatment for several malocclusions (overjet, reverse overjet, overbite, openbite, crossbite) in a sample of 579 children in the 2-9 years age range. The most frequently altered occlusal parameter was the overbite (prevalence: 24.5%), while the occlusal anomaly that most frequently presented a need for orthodontic treatment was the crossbite (8.8%). The overall prevalence of need for orthodontic treatment was of 19.3%, while 49% of the sample showed one or more altered occlusal parameters. No statistically significant difference was found between males and females. Results from this study support the idea that the establishment of a malocclusion is a gradual process starting at an early age. Effective orthodontic prevention programs should therefore include preschool children being aware paediatricians of the importance of early first dental visit. Key words: Orthodontic treatment, malocclusion, oral health, pediatric dentistry.

  15. Positional changes of maxillary central incisors following orthodontic treatment using single-crown implants as fixed reference markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahem, E B; Holm, B; Sonnesen, L; Worsaae, N; Gotfredsen, K

    2017-12-01

    This follow-up study (1) compares tooth displacement of central incisors in patients with and without pre-implant orthodontic treatment and (2) investigates whether sex, age, or orthodontic retention have an effect on tooth displacement after the insertion of single-crown implants. Fifty-seven patients - thirty-seven with (test group) and twenty without pre-implant orthodontic treatment (control group) - were rehabilitated with 89 single-crown implants in the upper maxilla. Clinical and radiographic data, clinical photographs, and dental casts were collected during baseline examinations after prosthetic rehabilitation and at the final follow-up examination at least 5 years later. A total of 114 dental casts were digitalized and aligned using a software program to measure changes in the positions of the central incisors. After a follow-up period of at least five years, 87% of the central incisors measured in the test group were displaced >0.25 mm vertically compared with 70% in the control group. Seventy-eight percent of the test group teeth had moved >0.25 mm horizontally compared with 55% in the control group. These differences were not significant, and there were no significant correlations with patient age or sex. The majority of patients had minor vertical (60%) or horizontal (67%) tooth displacement of the central incisors (0.25-0.75 mm) after a minimum follow-up period of 5 years. This study found no significant differences in tooth displacement comparing patients with and without pre-implant orthodontic treatment. No significant effect of sex, age, orthodontic retention, or implant location was observed on tooth displacement. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Combined Orthodontic-surgical Treatment for Skeletal Class III Malocclusion with Multiple Impacted Permanent and Supernumerary Teeth: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Dai Juan And Feng

    2014-01-01

    In this report we describe a combined orthodontic and surgical treatment for a 14-year-old boy with severe skeletal class III deformity and dental problem. His upper posterior primary teeth in the left side were over-retained and 6 maxillary teeth (bilateral central incisors and canines, left first and second premolars) were impacted, together with 5 supernumerary teeth in both arches. The treatment protocol involved extraction of all the supernumerary and deciduous teeth, surgical exposure and orthodontic traction of the impacted teeth, a bimaxillary orthognathic approach including Lefort I osteotomy. Bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSRO) and genioplasty was performed to correct skeletal problem. After treatment, all of the impacted teeth were brought to proper alignment in the maxillary arch. A satisfied profile and good posterior occlusion was achieved. Treatment mechanics and consideration during different stages are discussed.

  17. Factors influencing the choice of going to a dental quack practice for orthodontic treatment among the citizen of Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhyar Dyni Zakyah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Braces is the treatment of choice for malocclusion. However, in recent years malocclusion no longer serves as the reason behind the orthodontic treatment. Many people use it for the fashion purposes and some of them got it from a dental quack. The purpose of this study was to understand factors that influenced citizen of Bandung to go to dental quack practice for orthodontics treatment. Methods: Cross-sectional study with purposive sampling technique consisting of 30 samples. Inclusion criteria were subject wearing metal braces from dental quack, live within area of Bandung, and willing to participate in the study. Exclusion criteria was subjects that refused to participate in the study. Results: The study showed that 73% of the subjects use the treatment for aligning teeth over getting along with the trend or the perception of beauty from using colorful bracket rubber. 63% chose a dental quack because of the suggestions from friends who had done it before them. Low income combined with the need for orthodontics treatment and inadequate information about dental braces influencing subjects choice to go to a dental quack. The study showed that socioeconomic environment highly influenced the decision to wear braces from a dental quack. Conclusion: The low price factor was the main reason for dental quack braces highly demanded. Common people need to be educated to get proper treatment for malocclusion and to go for improper provider of dental treatment.

  18. Quality evaluation of the available Internet information regarding pain during orthodontic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livas, Christos; Delli, Konstantina; Ren, Yijin

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the quality of the data disseminated via the Internet regarding pain experienced by orthodontic patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic online search was performed for 'orthodontic pain' and 'braces pain' separately using five search engines. The first 25 results from

  19. Comparison of esthetic outcome after extraction or non-extraction orthodontic treatment in class II division 1 malocclusion patients

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Sneh Lata; Sharma, V. P.; Tandon, Pradeep; Singh, Gyan P.; Sachan, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The extraction of premolars as a practical form of orthodontic therapy has been accepted for many years, but there remains a controversy regarding the effect of premolar extraction to improve esthetics as well as dentoskeletal relationship. The esthetic impact of the soft-tissue profile might play a major role in deciding on premolar extraction or non-extraction treatment, particularly in borderline patients. This cephalometric study was undertaken to compare the post-treatment ...

  20. Orthodontic, genetic, and periodontal considerations in the treatment of impacted maxillary central incisors: A study of twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, A; Akhavan, M; Tong, H; Kook, Y A; Zernik, J H

    2000-01-01

    Treatment of twins each with one impacted maxillary central incisor and a mesiodens is described. Treatment included rapid expansion, extraction of the mesiodens, surgical exposure of the impacted central incisor, and its forced eruption. The impacted incisor was brought into functional position in one patient but was lost in the other because of insufficient root length and high mobility. Orthodontic, genetic, and periodontal considerations of these 2 cases are evaluated.

  1. Early orthodontic treatment for Class III malocclusion: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, See Choong; Thiruvenkatachari, Badri

    2017-01-01

    Class III malocclusion affects between 5% and 15% of our population. The 2 most common dilemmas surrounding Class III treatment are the timing of treatment and the type of appliance. A number of appliances have been used to correct a Class III skeletal discrepancy, but there is little evidence available on their effectiveness in the long term. Similarly, early treatment of Class III malocclusion has been practiced with increasing interest. However, there has been no solid evidence on the benefits in the long term. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of orthodontic/orthopedic methods used in the early treatment of Class III malocclusion in the short and long terms. Several sources were used to identify all relevant studies independently of language. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Embase (Ovid), and MEDLINE (Ovid) were searched to June 2016. The selection criteria included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective controlled clinical trials (CCTs) of children between the ages of 7 and 12 years on early treatment with any type of orthodontic/orthopedic appliance compared with another appliance to correct Class III malocclusion or with an untreated control group. The primary outcome measure was correction of reverse overjet, and the secondary outcomes included skeletal changes, soft tissue changes, quality of life, patient compliance, adverse effect, Peer Assessment Rating score, and treatment time. The search results were screened for inclusion, and the data extracted by 2 independent authors. The data were analyzed using software (version 5.1, Review Manager; The Nordic Cochrane Centre, The Cochrane Collaboration; Copenhagen, Denmark). The mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were expressed for the continuous data. Random effects were carried out with high levels of clinical or statistical heterogeneity and fixed affects when the heterogeneity was low

  2. Evolution of treatment mechanics and contemporary appliance design in orthodontics: A 40-year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Richard P; Bennett, John C

    2015-06-01

    Until the early 1970s, successful treatment with the Begg technique and the Tweed edgewise technique required tedious wire bending. The introduction of Andrews' straight wire appliance changed that, and it was one of the most significant contributions in the history of orthodontics. The straight wire appliance significantly reduced the amount of wire bending and also brought along other options in treatment mechanics. Retraction of the canines with elastic chains and ligature wires became more common. Sliding mechanics in place of closing loops became the method of space closure for a significant number of clinicians. Edgewise force levels were initially used to close spaces; however, it was soon observed that lighter forces were more effective with sliding mechanics. Along with these changes, it became apparent that compensation in the appliance was needed, depending on the type of malocclusion and particularly with varying extraction sequences. Various appliance designs were developed to accommodate changes in mechanics and force levels. These modifications improved tooth positions at the end of treatment as long as the brackets were properly placed. These major changes in appliances, force levels, and treatment mechanics can be traced back to the work of Dr Lawrence Andrews and the straight wire appliances. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-term periodontal response to orthodontic treatment of palatally impacted maxillary canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprioglio, Alberto; Vanni, Arianna; Bolamperti, Laura

    2013-06-01

    One of the most important aspects to take into consideration when evaluating the outcome of treatment of impacted maxillary canines is the final periodontal status. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term periodontal response of palatally impacted maxillary canines aligned using a codified procedure and the 'Easy Cuspid' compared with contralateral spontaneously erupted teeth. The periodontal conditions of the adjacent teeth were also considered. From an initial sample of 124 patients, 33 patients (24 females and 9 males) were selected. All patients who had undergone surgical orthodontic treatment conducted in accordance with a standardized protocol were recalled for follow-up at an average of 4.6 years after the end of treatment. The average treatment time was 29 months and the mean eruption time of the previously impacted tooth was 3.1 months. The average probing depth values showed no significant clinical differences. Probing depths recorded at the vestibular surface of the lateral incisor (P alignment of palatally impacted canines without damage to the periodontium.

  4. Impact of the first eight months of orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance on the families of adolescent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Lucas G; Melgaço, Camilo A; Abreu, Mauro H N G; Lages, Elizabeth M B; Paiva, Saul M

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of the first 8 months of orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance on the families of adolescent patients and to examine the evaluative properties of the Family Impact Scale (FIS). The study involved a sample of 94 parents/caregivers of adolescents undergoing orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance. The participants were asked to answer the Brazilian version of the FIS before treatment (T1) and 8 months after the bonding of the fixed appliance (T2). Statistical analysis was carried out using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and the Bonferroni correction for the overall score and FIS subscales. Responsiveness of the measure and the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) were also assessed. Among the 94 participants initially admitted to the present study, two were excluded as a result of treatment dropout and failure to return the second questionnaire. Thus, a sample of 92 parents/caregivers participated (response rate: 97.8%). Among the 92 participants, 70 were the mothers of patients, 16 were fathers, and six were other family members. Statistically significant improvements were found in the overall score (P orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance had a positive impact on the families of adolescents.

  5. Effect of neonatal capsaicin treatment on orthodontic tooth movement in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Julian E; Miller, James R; Hodges, James S; Beyer, John P; Larson, Brent E

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of neonatal administration of capsaicin on the magnitude of orthodontic tooth movement in rats. Twelve timed pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized between the capsaicin group and the vehicle group. The pups received treatment with either capsaicin or vehicle on day 2 of life. Capsaicin treatment has been shown to produce a selective destruction of fine myelinated and unmyelinated Aδ and C sensory nerve fibers, causing an inhibition of the effects from neurogenic inflammation. Tooth-movement experiments began at 12 weeks of age. A mesial tipping force was applied to the maxillary first molar by using a 3-mm length of Sentalloy closed-coil spring (Dentsply GAC Intl, Bohemia, NY) activated from a bonded molar cleat to the maxillary incisors; this appliance delivers a constant tipping force of 50 g. Diastema measurements between the first and second molars were made at 2 and 4 weeks after appliance placement. Measurements were made indirectly from stone models by using a charge-coupled device microscope camera and Optimas 5.2 measurement software (Media Cybernetics, Bethesda, Md). Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the differences between the groups. The capsaicin-treated rats and the controls did not differ in the amount of tooth movement at the collected time points (P >0.05). Similarly, the magnitude of change of tooth movement from 2 to 4 weeks did not differ between the groups (P >0.05). An increase in average diastema size was observed between 2 and 4 weeks after appliance activation in both treatment groups (P <0.0001). These results suggest that neonatal capsaicin desensitization in the rat does not affect the rate of orthodontic tooth movement after the application of a 50-g tipping force to the maxillary first molar. This might be due in part to the development of compensatory mechanisms in the chronically desensitized rat. Further studies are necessary to determine the

  6. Interdisciplinary orthodontic treatment for a patient with generalized aggressive periodontitis: Assessment of IgG antibodies to identify type of periodontitis and correct timing of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Yoshihito; Tomikawa, Kazuya; Deguchi, Toru; Honjo, Tadashi; Suzuki, Koji; Kono, Takayuki; Kuboki, Takuo; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Takashiba, Shogo; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a great challenge to clinicians when providing orthodontic treatment because of the potential for progression of periodontal disease. In this article, we report the successful comprehensive orthodontic treatment of bimaxillary protrusion and severe crowding in an adult with generalized aggressive periodontitis. A woman, aged 22 years 7 months, with a chief complaint of incisal crowding was diagnosed with a skeletal Class I malocclusion associated with severe anterior crowding, possibly worsened by generalized aggressive periodontitis. In addition to a periodontal examination, a blood IgG antibody titer analysis and microbiologic examination for periodontal pathogens were used to diagnose the type of periodontal disease and determine the proper timing to initiate orthodontic treatment. The total active treatment period was 28 months, followed by periodontal prostheses and regeneration therapy. Consequently, satisfactory facial profile, occlusion, and periodontal health were maintained for at least 36 months. These results indicate that efficient screening is important for providing successful orthodontic treatment in patients with advanced periodontal disease. This report also demonstrates the diagnostic importance of blood IgG antibody titer assays and microbiologic examinations to detect periodontal pathogens. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of nonextraction and extraction orthodontic treatments on smile esthetics for different malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chung; Wang, Yi-Chun

    2018-01-01

    Smile esthetics is a critical factor for evaluating orthodontic treatment outcomes. In this study, we evaluated the differences in esthetic perceptions and smile variables between extraction and nonextraction treatments for different malocclusions. Ninety participants were divided into 3 groups according to their pretreatment overjet (group I, 0-4 mm; group II, >4 mm; group III, <0 mm), with 15 extraction participants and 15 nonextraction participants in each group. Posttreatment frontal smiling photographs were evaluated by 30 raters (10 orthodontists, 10 general dentists, 10 laypeople), and 9 smile variables were measured. Smile perception for the group II extraction subjects was higher than for the nonextraction subjects by the orthodontists and general dentists. Regardless of the type of treatment, group III subjects were rated lower than those in groups I and II. The arch form index, maxillary incisor show, and smile arc were greater in the extraction participants. In multiple regression analysis, nonextraction and group III correlated negatively with the esthetic score. Maxillary incisor show, tooth number display, and buccal corridor ratio correlated positively with the esthetic score. Group II extraction subjects were rated higher than the nonextraction subjects by dental professionals. A smile with greater maxillary incisor show, number of displayed teeth, and buccal corridor ratio was considered more esthetic. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Early orthodontic treatment of children with dentofacial anomalies in the mixed dentition with the use of fixed appliances].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenina, O I; Ivanova, Yu A; Popova, N V; Popova, A V

    The article summarizes the authors experience in the treatment of patients with dentofacial anomalies in mixed dentition with fixed orthodontic appliances ("system 2×4") and combined treatment type with the use of extraoral device. Indications and contraindications, advantages and disadvantages, special conditions of the treatment, the mechanism of a face-bow action with extraoral traction, the sequence of events during the treatment are described in the article. Clinical cases of early treatment with "system 2×4" and in combination with the face-bow and extraoral traction demonstrate the effectiveness of the methods.

  9. The Relationship between Patient, Parent and Orthodontic Treatment Need and Demand in 17-Year-Old Studentsresiding in Abade/Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hosseinzadeh Nik

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The planning of orthodontic treatment within a public health system requires information on the orthodontic treatment needs of the population. The aims of this study were to assess the student, parent and clinician normative need and demand for orthodon-tic treatment in a sample of Iranian students using the IOTN and to compare the treatment need levels according to sex and socio-economic status of the students and parents in ur-ban and rural areas.Material and Methods: A sample of 427, 17-year-old students was selected randomly from schools in Abade. A questionnaire of family socioeconomic status was proposed to the parents. All the students were examined according to the Aesthetic and Dental Health components (AC and DHC of Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. Students' and par-ents' perceived need was also assessed using AC.Results: According to DHC classification, 18.7% of the students were in the "no need";35.6% in the "border line" and 45.7% in the "definite need" groups. The same categories for students assessed by the dentist were 66%, 30.2% and 3.7% respectively. AC assess-ment by students and parents entitled even more studentsin "no need" category. Sex and family income were the major factors in predicting orthodontic treatment demand (P<0.05.Conclusion: Orthodontic demand was highly related to the AC score and this component is of more value in predicting students demand instead of DHC.

  10. Orthodontic and surgical approach to the treatment of bilaterally impacted maxillary canines: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertan Erdinc, Aslihan M

    2008-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canines is a common orthodontic anomaly that causes facial and dentoalveolar system problems, both functional and esthetic. A combination of surgery and orthodontics is important in bringing impacted canines to their ideal position in the dental arch. In this case report of a 14-year-old patient with impacted right and left maxillary canines, the crowns of these teeth were surgically exposed, brackets were bonded, and light orthodontic forces were delivered for 2 years to align the teeth in the dental arch.

  11. A Comparison of pical Root Resorption in Incisors after Fixed Orthodontic Treatment with Standard Edgewise and Straight Wire (MBT) Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahed Zahedani, Sm; Oshagh, M; Momeni Danaei, Sh; Roeinpeikar, Smm

    2013-09-01

    One of the major outcomes of orthodontic treatment is the apical root resorption of teeth moved during the treatment. Identifying the possible risk factors, are necessary for every orthodontist. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of apical root resorption after fixed orthodontic treatment with standard edgewise and straight wire (MBT) method, and also to evaluate other factors effecting the rate of root resorption in orthodontic treatments. In this study, parallel periapical radiographs of 127 patients imaging a total of 737 individual teeth, were collected. A total of 76 patients were treated by standard edgewise and 51 patients by straight wire method. The periapical radiographs were scanned and then the percentage of root resorption was calculated by Photoshop software. The data were analyzed by Paired-Samples t-test and the Generalized Linear Model adopting the SPSS 15.0. In patients treated with straight wire method (MBT), mean root resorption was 18.26% compared to 14.82% in patients treated with standard edgewise technique (ptechnique can be attributed to more root movement in pre-adjusted MBT technique due to the brackets employed in this method.

  12. A combined prosthodontic and orthodontic treatment approach in a case of growth inhibition induced by dental implants: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Elena; Wegener, Joachim; Wagner, Wilfried; Hornikel, Sandra; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Functional and esthetic results can improve significantly when a combined prosthodontic-orthodontic treatment approach is employed in cases requiring extensive oral rehabilitation. The patient presented in this case report was treated in his late teens with dental implants as a replacement for his maxillary incisors. Ten years later, the entire maxillary anterior segment was in infraocclusion compared to the rest of the dentition and lip line. Since prosthodontic follow-up treatment alone could not achieve an optimal functional and esthetic outcome, the patient was treated orthodontically prior to renewing the restoration. A fixed appliance was used to intrude the mandibular anterior teeth as well as vertically align the infrapositioned maxillary lateral incisors.

  13. Mechanical properties and surface characterization of beta titanium and stainless steel orthodontic wire following topical fluoride treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mary P; Ries, David; Kula, Katherine; Ellis, Micheal; Fricke, Brian

    2007-03-01

    To study the effect of fluoride prophylactic agents on the loading and unloading mechanical properties and surface quality of beta titanium and stainless steel orthodontic wires. Rectangular beta titanium and stainless steel wires were immersed in either an acidulated fluoride agent, a neutral fluoride agent, or distilled water (control) for 1.5 hours at 37 degrees C. After immersion, the loading and unloading elastic modulus and yield strength of the wires were measured using a 3-point bend test in a water bath at 37 degrees C. A one-way analysis of variance and Dunnett's post hoc, alpha = .05, were used to analyze the mechanical testing data. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to qualitatively evaluate the wire topography as a function of the fluoride treatments. Unloading mechanical properties of beta titanium and stainless steel wires were significantly decreased (P steel wire could decrease the functional unloading mechanical properties of the wires and potentially contribute to prolonged orthodontic treatment.

  14. Two-phase orthodontic treatment in a patient with turner syndrome: an unusual case of deep bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristizábal, Juan Fernando; Smit, Rosana Martínez

    2015-05-01

    Turner syndrome is caused by complete or partial absence of one X chromosome. These patients usually have a delay in growth and altered body proportions, causing sexual infantilism, short stature, delayed bone maturation, and variations in craniofacial morphology, among other systemic complications. The skeletal features associated with this syndrome include maxillary growth reduction with midface hypoplasia; mandibular micrognathia; high, narrow palate; V-shaped maxillary arch; and open bite. This case report shows a two-phase orthodontic treatment in a patient with Turner syndrome with a Class II malocclusion and severe deep bite, which is an unusual feature in patients with this disease. A conventional orthodontic treatment was performed, and after 20 months in retention the patient remains stable.

  15. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumerlato, Marina; de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli; Osorio, Leandro Berni; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; de Menezes, Luciane Macedo; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Methods: One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48): Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3, two drillings were done with a spherical diamond bur; Group 4, sandblasting was performed with 50-µm aluminum oxide. Before the experiment, half of the samples stayed immersed in distilled water at 37oC for 90 days. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT and shear strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine. SBS were compared by surface treatment and by ageing with two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey’s test. ARI scores were compared between surface treatments with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s test. Results: Surface treatments on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets (p< 0.01), result not observed with ageing (p= 0.45). Groups II, III, and IV showed higher SBS and greater ARI than the Group 1 (p< 0.05). SBS was greater in the groups 3 and 4 (drilling, sandblasting) than in the Group 2 (grinding) (p< 0.05). SBS and ARI showed a positive correlation (Spearman’s R2= 0.57; p< 0.05). Conclusion: Surface treatment on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets, however ageing did not show any relevance. Sandblasting and drilling showed greater SBS than grinding. There was a positive correlation between SBS and ARI. PMID:28902249

  16. Lingual orthodontic appliances: invisible braces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, J C

    1991-04-01

    Lingual orthodontics is a relatively new method of delivering orthodontic treatment. These appliances may be used on any patient, but they have a special application for that small group of adult patients who need orthodontic treatment but refuse to accept the appearance of conventional appliances. The technique is difficult to manage and should be used only by experienced orthodontists. Although the patients may experience difficulties, these are usually adequately compensated for by the improved aesthetics.

  17. Class II Division 1 malocclusion with severe overbite: cephalometric evaluation of the effects of orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Leandro Silva; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Leticia; Araujo, Mônica Tirre de Souza; Bolognese, Ana Maria

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of orthodontic treatment among individuals with Class II Division 1 malocclusion and severe overbite. The sample was made up of 70 patients (35 males and 35 females), with an average age of 11.6 years in pretreatment and 14.9 years in posttreatment. One hundred forty lateral cephalograms were obtained and traced by a single investigator. All individuals were treated with the edgewise technique associated with the Kloehn cervical extraoral headgear during the growth spurt, and simultaneously presented ANB > or = 5 degrees and overbite > or = 4 mm. Statistical analysis involved t tests for both independent and paired samples and the Spearman correlation test. There were no significant differences between genders regarding the effects of treatment. The cases treated with extraction presented a greater reduction in the SNA angle. On average, all the variables of the study were significantly different when comparing the pretreatment and posttreatment conditions, except for the measurement of the mandibular plane angle (SNGoMe). Correction of severe overbite occurred in virtue of the intrusion of the maxillary and mandibular incisors associated to a reduction of the maxillary prognathism and differential growth of the mandible, as well as dentoalveolar growth.

  18. Multimodality Treatment for Rehabilitation of Adult Orthodontic Patient with Complicated Dental Condition and Jaw Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cheng Liaw

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old man with severe malocclusion requested comprehensive oral rehabilitation. He presented with retrognathic mandible, anterior deep bite and a gummy smile in the premaxilla, and tenting occlusal plane with severe buccal crossbite of the left maxillary posterior teeth. Inappropriate fixed prostheses spanned the maxilla and the mandible with a class II jaw relationship. A detailed analysis indicated the need for orthodontic treatment, orthognathic surgery, bone graft at the deficient alveolar ridge for implant surgery and a revision of all prostheses. Over a 2-year-period of management, the patient received anterior osteotomy for intrusion of lower anterior teeth, bilateral sagittal splitting osteotomy for mandible advancement and posterior osteotomy for inward upward repositioning of posterior teeth of the left maxilla to correct major jaw deformities. The deficient alveolar ridge in the premaxilla was augmented by autogenous bone graft harvested during the orthognathic surgery. He sequentially had mini-plate and dental implant as anchorage assisting teeth alignment in the mandible. Two 3-fixture-supported implant prostheses were delivered in the premaxilla and the mandible. The improvement in cosmesis, stability and function through treatment and a 2-year clinical follow-up were considered satisfactory.

  19. Changes of occlusal plane inclination after orthodontic treatment in different dentoskeletal frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-le; Kau, Chung; Wang, Min

    2014-06-25

    The inclination of the occlusal plane (OP) is related to facial types and experiences physiological growth-related changes. The aims of this research were to determine if there were any differences in the inclination of OP in subjects with three types of skeletal malocclusion and to investigate the characteristics and differences of functional occlusal plane (FOP) compared to bisected occlusal plane (BOP). A sample of 90 Caucasians patients was skeletal-classified into three (n = 30), and pre- and post-treatment cephalograms were digitized. Six linear and 8 angular cephalometric measurements were selected. The changes of OP inclination within each group and the differences among the three groups pre- and post-treatment were compared with paired t test and ANOVA test, respectively. The comparison and correlation between BOP and FOP were analyzed with paired t test and coefficient of correlation, respectively. The BOP angle increased in all of the three groups but only had statistically significant differences in skeletal class II patients in a mean of 1.51° (p stability (p > 0.05) in all three groups. The inclination of FOP was closely related to that of BOP (p stability in orthodontically treated patients with all three skeletal patterns.

  20. Orthodontic treatment for disabled children: a survey of parents' attitudes and overall satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeleira, María Teresa; Pazos, Elisabeth; Ramos, Isabel; Outumuro, Mercedes; Limeres, Jacobo; Seoane-Romero, Juan; Diniz, Marcio; Diz, Pedro

    2014-08-05

    Many patients with disability require orthodontic treatment (OT) to achieve adequate oral function and aesthetic appearance. The cooperation of disabled patients and of their parents is central to the success of OT, as treatment can involve ethical dilemmas. The aim of this study was to analyze the motivation, expectations and overall satisfaction with OT among parents of patients with disabilities. The parents of 60 disabled Spanish children with physical, mental and/or sensory impairment undergoing OT were surveyed on attitudes to OT and level of satisfaction with the outcomes. The survey consisted of 23 questions in 4 sections: attitude and adaptation, benefits, adverse effects, and level of satisfaction after completion of OT. A control group formed of the parents of 60 healthy children undergoing OT at the same institution were also surveyed. Parents of disabled children undergoing OT showed a high level of motivation and they are willing to collaborate in oral hygiene procedures. Adaptation to the removable appliances was poorer in disabled children but adaptation to fixed appliances was excellent. OT can provide a marked improvement in quality of life, social relationships and oral functionality in disabled children. Among parents of disabled children undergoing OT, the perceived level of overall satisfaction was very high and expectations were often exceeded.

  1. Hard- and soft-tissue contributions to the esthetics of the posed smile in growing patients seeking orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Laurie; McNamara, James A; Ackerman, Marc B; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to broaden the understanding of how various skeletal, dental, and soft-tissue relationships are related to the esthetics of the smile in patients with malocclusions before orthodontic treatment. Images of the posed smile were captured from digital video clips of 60 growing patients (33 girls, 27 boys) seeking orthodontic treatment; they were judged by panels of laypersons and orthodontists. Discriminant analysis identified determinants of the "pleasing smile" from the results of a visual analog scale. Quantitative measurements of the soft and hard tissues were made by using the smile images, cephalometric radiographs, and study models. The esthetics of the smile were correlated with specific skeletal, dental, and soft-tissue structures in the anteroposterior, vertical, and transverse dimensions (Pearson test on non-topographic correlations). The esthetic smile judgments of orthodontists agreed with those of laypersons (r >0.93). The vertical thicknesses of the lips were the most significant component of a pleasant smile, for both the orthodontists (upper lip) and laypersons (lower lip) (discriminant power: 75%). The vertical thickness of the upper lip had a significant positive correlation with the position of the maxillary incisor. Vertical lip thickness proved to be the most influential variable in smile esthetics. The significant relationship of incisor protrusion with the vertical thickness of the vermilion border of the upper lip must be considered when planning orthodontic treatment.

  2. Comparative study of presurgical hand hygiene with hydroalcoholic solution versus traditional presurgical hand hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Martín, M Beatriz; Erice Calvo-Sotelo, Alejo

    To compare presurgical hand hygiene with hydroalcoholic solution following the WHO protocol with traditional presurgical hand hygiene. Cultures of the hands of surgeons and surgical nurses were performed before and after presurgical hand hygiene and after removing gloves at the end of surgery. Cultures were done in 2different days: the first day after traditional presurgical hand hygiene, and the second day after presurgical hand hygiene with hydroalcoholic solution following the WHO protocol. The duration of the traditional hand hygiene was measured and compared with the duration (3min) of the WHO protocol. The cost of the products used in the traditional technique was compared with the cost of the hydroalcoholic solution used. The variability of the traditional technique was determined by observation. Following presurgical hand hygiene with hydroalcoholic solution, colony-forming units (CFU) were detected in 5 (7.3%) subjects, whereas after traditional presurgical hand hygiene CFU were detected in 14 subjects (20.5%) (p < 0.05). After glove removal, the numbers of CFU were similar. The time employed in hand hygiene with hydroalcoholic solution (3min) was inferior to the time employed in the traditional technique (p < 0.05), its cost was less than half, and there was no variability. Compared with other techniques, presurgical hand hygiene with hydroalcoholic solution significantly decreases CFU, has similar latency time, a lower cost, and saves time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficacy of combined orthodontic-periodontic treatment for patients with periodontitis and its effect on inflammatory cytokines: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Ai-Min; Zhang, Zong-Mei; Jia, Jin-Lin; Sui, Xin-Xin; Yu, Lu-Rui; Liu, Hai-Tao

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of combined orthodontic-periodontic treatment in the treatment of patients with periodontitis and its effects on the levels of inflammatory cytokines. A total of 117 patients with periodontitis were randomly assigned to the basic group (receiving basic periodontic treatment, n = 58) and the combined group (receiving combined orthodontic-periodontic treatment, n = 59). In addition, 52 healthy people without periodontal disease were selected as the normal group. Probing depth, tooth mobility, plaque index, clinical attachment level, and sulcus bleeding index were recorded. ELISA was applied to detect gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines. A 2-year clinical follow-up was conducted. Before treatment, the periodontal parameters (probing depth, tooth mobility, plaque index, clinical attachement level, and sulcus bleeding index) and GCF and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-1β, interleukin-5, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, and prostaglandin E2) in the combined and basic groups were higher than those in the normal group. After 6 and 18 months of treatment, the periodontal parameters and GCF and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines decreased in the combined and basic groups. The periodontal parameters and the GCF and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in the combined group were significantly lower than those in the basic group after 18 months of treatment. The combined group had a lower recurrence rate compared with the basic group. Combined orthodontic-periodontic treatment had good clinical efficacy in the treatment of periodontitis and could effectively decrease the levels of inflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Alterations in plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation promoted by treatment with self-ligating and conventional orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio de Almeida Cardoso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate, comparatively, the periodontal response during orthodontic treatment performed with self-ligating and conventional brackets. METHODS: Sixteen Caucasian individuals of both sexes, aged between 12 and 16 years old and in permanent dentition were selected. Eight individuals were treated with conventional brackets installed on the lower dental arch and self-ligating brackets on the upper arch. Another eight individuals received self-ligating brackets in the lower arch and conventional brackets in the upper arch. The subjects received material and instructions for oral hygiene. Visible plaque index (VPI, gingival bleeding index (GBI and clinical attachment level (CAL were evaluated just after installation of orthodontic appliances, and 30, 60 and 180 days later. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare differences between groups (self-ligating and conventional, two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test was used to assess CAL at each site of each tooth. Significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: No significant changes were found with regard to the assessed parameters (VPI, GBI and CAL in either one of the systems. CONCLUSION: No significant changes were found with regard to the periodontal response to orthodontic treatment for the variables assessed and between subjects receiving passive self-ligating and conventional brackets. All individuals had received oral hygiene instructions and had their periodontal conditions monitored.

  5. An orthodontic oral appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Marie; Legrell, Per Erik

    2010-11-01

    This pilot study was performed to test the hypothesis that an orthodontic oral appliance (OA) that is designed to work against the backwardly directed forces on the upper incisors may counteract the reduction in overjet from these devices. Thirty patients with normal bites, good oral health, and milder sleep apnea were randomized to treatment with either OAs or orthodontic OAs. Bite changes were evaluated on plaster casts and radiographs and by questionnaires after a mean of 2.4 years in 19 frequent users. Four of nine patients in the orthodontic OA group increased their overjet by > or =0.4 mm, while none of the 10 patients in the OA group experienced that effect. Only the orthodontic OA increases the overjet; this design may therefore be beneficial to patients at risk of negative effects on their bite during OA treatment.

  6. Radiographic Follow-Up during Orthodontic Treatment for Early Diagnosis of Sequential Supernumerary Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Selma Sano; Kruly, Paula de Castro; Garrido, Talissa Mayer; Matumoto, Marise Sano Suga; Suga, Uhana Seifert Guimarães; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga

    2016-01-01

    Most supernumerary teeth are impacted and asymptomatic. Objective. The aim of this paper is to describe two cases of sequential development of supernumerary teeth in the mandibular premolar region, identified during orthodontic treatment. Reports. The first case describes the radiographic follow-up of a female patient that presented a supernumerary tooth at the age of 9 years and 10 months in the right mandibular premolar region, followed by a further supernumerary tooth in the left mandibular premolar region identified at the age of 11 years and 3 months. In the second case, the radiographic follow-up of a male patient demonstrated 3 supernumerary teeth in the premolar region at the age of 16 years. During orthognathic surgery planning at the age of 20 years and 5 months, a supplemental supernumerary tooth was found in the left mandibular region. Conclusion. Considering the late developing of supernumerary premolars, appropriate follow-up with panoramic radiographs of patients with previous experience of supernumerary teeth is essential for early diagnosis of supplemental premolars to prevent possible complications.

  7. Epidemiological survey on third molar agenesis and facial pattern among adolescents requiring orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez de Diego, Rafael; Montero, Javier; López-Valverde, Nansi; Ignacio de Nieves, José; Prados-Frutos, Juan-Carlos; López-Valverde, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between facial pattern according to Ricketts cephalometric analysis, and prevalence of third molar agenesis, taking subject age and gender as control variables. An epidemiological survey was conducted based on a sample of 224 candidates for orthodontic treatment aged 12 to 24 (n=224). Third molar agenesis was recorded using Ricketts cephalometric analyses of lateral teleradiographs and panoramic radiographs. The risk for agenesis was predicted considering the 5 Vert Index parameters (facial axis, facial depth, mandibular plane angle, lower facial height and mandibular arch), facial type (brachyfacial, mesofacial, dolichofacial) and sociodemographic variables (age and sex), using odds ratio (OR) calculated by logistic regression. Third molar agenesis was observed in 25% of the sample. Risk for agenesis is significantly determined by sociodemographic factors (age, OR: 1.2), cephalic patterns (mesofacial vs dolichofacial, OR:4.3; and brachyfacial vs dolichofacial OR: 3.2) and cephalometric patterns (facial axis, OR: 0.8; lower facial height, OR: 0.8; and mandibular plane angle, OR:0.9). Facial parameters (facial axis, lower facial height, and mandibular plane angle) proved to be strong predictors of the risk for third molar agenesis, the prevalence of agenesis being significantly lower in dolichofacial individuals. Key words: Facial Pattern, Ricketts Analysis, Third Molar Agenesis.

  8. Self-concept and the perception of facial appearance in children and adolescents seeking orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Ceib; Beal, Kimberly N Edwards

    2009-01-01

    To examine, in adolescents with mild to moderate malocclusion, the relationship between self-concept and demographic characteristics, a clinical assessment of malocclusion, self-perception of malocclusion, and self-perception of facial attractiveness. Fifty-nine consecutive patients ages 9 to 15 years scheduled for initial records in a graduate orthodontic clinic consented to participate. Each subject independently completed the Multidimensional Self-Concept Scale (MSCS), the Facial Image Scale, and the Index of Treatment Need-Aesthetic Component (IOTN-AC). Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) scores were obtained from the patients' diagnostic dental casts. Forward multiple-regression analysis with a backward overlook was used to analyze the effect of the demographic, clinical, and self-perception measures on each of the six self-concept (MSCS) domains. Self-perception of the dentofacial region was the only statistically significant predictor (P Academic, and Physical domains of self-concept, while age, parental marital status, and the adolescent's self-perception of the dentofacial region were statistically significant predictors (P Self-Concept. The self-perceived level of the attractiveness or "positive" feelings toward the dentofacial region is more strongly related to self-concept than the severity of the malocclusion as indicated by the PAR score or by the adolescent's perception of their malocclusion.

  9. An Assessment of Oral Hygiene in 7-14-Year-Old Children undergoing Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupińska-Nanys, Magdalena; Zarzecka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The study is focused on increased risk of dental plaque accumulation among the children undergoing orthodontic treatment in consideration of individual hygiene and dietary habits. The study was conducted among 91 children aged 7-14 including 47 girls and 44 boys. The main objectives of the study were: API index, plaque pH, DMF index, proper hygiene and dietary habits. Statistical analysis was provided in Microsoft Office Exel spreadsheet and STATISTICA statistical software. The average API index among the children wearing removable appliance was 9 (SD = 13), and among children without appliances was 16 (SD = 21). DMF index for patients using appliances was 5 (SD = 3) and for those without appliances was 4 (SD = 2). The average plaque pH was 6 for children with appliances (SD = 0.9) and 6.2 without ones (SD = 0.3). In patients in whom there is a higher risk of dental plaque accumulating, correct oral hygiene supported with regular visits to the dentist is one of the best ways to control dental caries. In the fight against caries the most effective and only approach is to promote awareness of the problem, foster proper hygiene and nutritional habits, as well as educate children from a very young age in how to maintain proper oral hygiene.

  10. Self-Concept and the Perception of Facial Appearance in Children and Adolescents Seeking Orthodontic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Ceib; Beal, Kimberly N. Edwards

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine, in adolescents with mild to moderate malocclusion, the relationship between self-concept and demographic characteristics, a clinical assessment of malocclusion, self-perception of malocclusion, and self-perception of facial attractiveness. Methods and Materials Fifty-nine consecutive patients ages 9 to 15 years scheduled for initial records in a graduate orthodontic clinic consented to participate. Each subject independently completed the Multidimensional Self-Concept Scale (MSCS), the Facial Image Scale, and the Index of Treatment Need–Aesthetic Component (IOTN-AC). Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) scores were obtained from the patients’ diagnostic dental casts. Forward multiple-regression analysis with a backward overlook was used to analyze the effect of the demographic, clinical, and self-perception measures on each of the six self-concept (MSCS) domains. Results Self-perception of the dentofacial region was the only statistically significant predictor (P < .05) for the Global, Competence, Affect, Academic, and Physical domains of self-concept, while age, parental marital status, and the adolescent's self-perception of the dentofacial region were statistically significant predictors (P < .05) of Social Self-Concept. Conclusion The self-perceived level of the attractiveness or “positive” feelings toward the dentofacial region is more strongly related to self-concept than the severity of the malocclusion as indicated by the PAR score or by the adolescent's perception of their malocclusion. PMID:19123700

  11. Changes in psychological health, subjective food intake ability and oral health-related quality of life during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S-H; Cha, J-Y; Lee, K-J; Yu, H-S; Hwang, C-J

    2017-11-01

    Assessing changes in patient's psychological health and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) over time during orthodontic treatment may help clinicians to treat patients more carefully. To evaluate changes in mental health, self-reported masticatory ability and OHRQoL during orthodontic treatment in adults, this prospective study included 66 adults (30 men, 36 women; mean age, 24·2 ± 5·2 years). Each patient completed the Korean versions of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, Rosenberg self-esteem scale, key subjective food intake ability (KFIA) test for five key foods and Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14K) at baseline (T0), 12 months after treatment initiation (T1) and debonding (T2). All variables changed with time. Self-esteem and the total OHIP-14K score significantly decreased and increased, respectively, at T1, with a particular increase in the psychological and social disabilities scores. There were no significant differences in any questionnaire scores before and after treatment. The total OHIP-14K score was positively correlated with trait anxiety and depression, and negatively correlated with self-esteem and KFIA at T0, regardless of the treatment duration. Older patients showed a significant increase in the total OHIP-14K score at T1 and T2. OHRQoL worsened with an increase in the treatment duration. Our results suggest that OHRQoL temporarily deteriorates, with the development of psychological and social disabilities, during orthodontic treatment. This is related to the baseline age, psychological health and self-reported masticatory function. However, patients recover once the treatment is complete. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Validation of the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System for assessing the treatment outcomes of Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guang-Ying; Baumrind, Sheldon; Zhao, Zhi-He; Ding, Yin; Bai, Yu-Xing; Wang, Lin; He, Hong; Shen, Gang; Li, Wei-Ran; Wu, Wei-Zi; Ren, Chong; Weng, Xuan-Rong; Geng, Zhi; Xu, Tian-Min

    2013-09-01

    Orthodontics in China has developed rapidly, but there is no standard index of treatment outcomes. We assessed the validity of the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System (ABO-OGS) for the classification of treatment outcomes in Chinese patients. We randomly selected 108 patients who completed treatment between July 2005 and September 2008 in 6 orthodontic treatment centers across China. Sixty-nine experienced Chinese orthodontists made subjective assessments of the end-of-treatment casts for each patient. Three examiners then used the ABO-OGS to measure the casts. Pearson correlation analysis and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were conducted to evaluate the correspondence between the ABO-OGS cast measurements and the orthodontists' subjective assessments. The average subjective grading scores were highly correlated with the ABO-OGS scores (r = 0.7042). Four of the 7 study cast components of the ABO-OGS score-occlusal relationship, overjet, interproximal contact, and alignment-were statistically significantly correlated with the judges' subjective assessments. Together, these 4 accounted for 58% of the variability in the average subjective grading scores. The ABO-OGS cutoff score for cases that the judges deemed satisfactory was 16 points; the corresponding cutoff score for cases that the judges considered acceptable was 21 points. The ABO-OGS is a valid index for the assessment of treatment outcomes in Chinese patients. By comparing the objective scores on this modification of the ABO-OGS with the mean subjective assessment of a panel of highly qualified Chinese orthodontists, a cutoff point for satisfactory treatment outcome was defined as 16 points or fewer, with scores of 16 to 21 points denoting less than satisfactory but still acceptable treatment. Cases that scored greater than 21 points were considered unacceptable. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Orthodontic treatment for prominent lower front teeth (Class III malocclusion) in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson, Simon; Harrison, Jayne E; Furness, Susan; Worthington, Helen V

    2013-09-30

    Prominent lower front teeth (termed reverse bite; under bite; Class III malocclusion) may be due to a combination of the jaw or tooth positions or both. The upper jaw (maxilla) can be too far back or the lower jaw (mandible) too far forward, or both. Prominent lower front teeth can also occur if the upper front teeth (incisors) are tipped back or the lower front teeth are tipped forwards, or both. Various treatment approaches have been described to correct prominent lower front teeth in children and adolescents. To assess the effects of orthodontic treatment for prominent lower front teeth in children and adolescents. We searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 7 January 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 12), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 7 January 2013), and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 7 January 2013). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) recruiting children or adolescents or both (aged 16 years or less) receiving any type of orthodontic treatment to correct prominent lower front teeth (Class III malocclusion). Orthodontic treatments were compared with control groups who received either no treatment, delayed treatment or a different active intervention. Screening of references, identification of included and excluded studies, data extraction and assessment of the risk of bias of the included studies was performed independently and in duplicate by two review authors. The mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for continuous data. Meta-analysis was only undertaken when studies of similar comparisons reported comparable outcome measures. A fixed-effect model was used. The I2 statistic was used as a measure of statistical heterogeneity. Seven RCTs with a total of 339 participants were included in this review. One study was assessed as at low risk of bias, three studies were at high risk of bias, and in the remaining three studies risk of bias

  14. A ortodontia na atuação odontogeriátrica The orthodontic treatment in older patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyna Martins do Valle-Corotti

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: este artigo tem como objetivo abordar as características do tratamento ortodôntico associado a uma atuação odontogeriátrica, pois devido a um aumento da expectativa de vida, um maior número de pacientes idosos tem procurado tratamento odontológico para uma reabilitação estética e/ou funcional. METODOLOGIA: através de uma avaliação de dados presentes na literatura são abordados fatores como enfermidades sistêmicas, uso de medicamentos, condição da saúde bucal, quantidade de osso alveolar, motivação do paciente e estabilidade oclusal após a terapia ortodôntica. Para exemplificar o tratamento ortodôntico no paciente idoso são apresentados dois casos clínicos. CONCLUSÕES: o tratamento ortodôntico representa uma intervenção viável na atuação odontogeriátrica, desde que realizado com forças suaves, considerando as limitações de cada caso e respeitando as características inerentes a esta atuação.OBJECTIVE: to approach the characteristics of the orthodontic treatment in aged patients, because the increase of life expectancy resulted in a bigger number of these kind of patients looking for orthodontic treatment. METHODS: an evaluation of the literature show a series of factors as: systemic disease, medicine utilization, condition of the buccal health, amount of alveolar bone, patients’ motivations and occlusal stability after the orthodontic therapy. To demonstrate the orthodontic treatment in the aged patient two clinical cases are presented. CONCLUSIONS: the orthodontic treatment represents a viable intervention in the aged patients, since that carried through with soft forces, considering the limitations of each case and respecting the inherent characteristics to these patients.

  15. FIXED OR REMOVABLE APPLIANCE FOR EARLY ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT OF FUNCTIONAL ANTERIOR CROSSBITE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedel, Anna-Paulina

    2015-01-01

    Anterior crossbite with functional shift also called pseudo Class III is a malocclusion in which the incisal edges of one or more maxillary incisors occlude with the incisal edges of the mandibular incisors in centric relationship: the mandible and mandibular incisors are then guided anteriorly in central occlusion resulting in an anterior crossbite. Early correction, at the mixed dentition stage, is recommended, in order to avoid a compromising dentofacial condition which could result in the development of a true Class III malocclusion and temporomandibular symptoms. Various treatment options are available. The method of choice for orthodontic correction of this condition should not only be clinically effective, with long-term stability, but also cost-effective and have high patient acceptance, i.e. minimal perceived pain and discomfort. At the mixed dentition stage, the condition may be treated by fixed (FA) or removable appliance (RA). To date there is insufficient evidence to determine the preferred method. The overall aim of this thesis was therefore to compare and evaluate the use of FA and RA for correcting anterior crossbite with functional shift in the mixed dentition, with special reference to clinical effectiveness, stability, cost-effectiveness and patient perceptions. Evidence-based, randomized controlled trial (RCT) methodology was used, in order to generate a high level of evidence. The thesis is based on the following studies: The material comprised 64 patients, consecutively recruited from the Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Sweden and from one Public Dental Health Service Clinic in Malmö, Skane County Council, Sweden. The patients were no syndrome and no cleft patients. The following inclusion criteria were applied: early to late mixed dentition, anterior crossbite affecting one or more incisors with functional shift, moderate space deficiency in the maxilla, no inherent skeletal Class III discrepancy, ANB

  16. Two-unit cantilevered resin-bonded fixed partial denture as a substitute for a prosthodontic-orthodontic treatment plan: a 5-year case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Elham; St-Georges, Annie; de Grandmont, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    In this case report, we describe the successful long-term treatment of a patient with dental agenesis. The initial treatment plan included an orthodontic phase to provide adequate space for replacing missing lateral incisors with implants. However, because of some complications encountered after 2 years of orthodontic treatment, a revised treatment plan was considered to achieve functional and esthetic goals. The patient was completely satisfied 5 years after being treated with two 2-unit cantilevered resin-bonded fixed partial dentures supported by the cuspids. This conservative treatment plan was cost-effective without having any significant biological cost.

  17. A comparison of the periodontal health of patients during treatment with the Invisalign system and with fixed orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miethke, Rainer-Reginald; Vogt, Silke

    2005-05-01

    Evaluation of the periodontal health in patients during treatment with either fixed orthodontic appliances or the Invisalign system. The study was designed as a concomitant trial. The evaluation of the patients started in February 2002 and was completed in August 2003. Thirty consecutive patients each with fixed orthodontic appliances and with aligners were examined at three consecutive control visits for their periodontal condition. All individuals were part of the clientele of the Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics of the Charité Berlin. The parameters evaluated were the modified Gingival Index, modified Plaque Index, modified Papillary Bleeding Index, and sulcus probing depth. The first three indices were recorded alternatively buccally and lingually in all permanent teeth from central incisor to first molar: buccally in the maxillary right and the mandibular left quadrants, lingually in the maxillary left and mandibular right quadrants. The sulcus depth was measured in four areas: mesially and distally, lingually and buccally in the 1st molar and the 1st premolar of each quadrant. Each control visit was concluded with a detailed, individualized oral hygiene instruction. The modified Plaque Index was significantly lower in the Invisalign group overall. On the other hand, the periodontal condition of the two samples was nearly identical. Periodontal health is not jeopardized, even though the Invisalign system aligners cover all the teeth and the keratinized gingiva in part. This could be attributed to the fact that aligners are removable and thus allow unimpeded oral hygiene.

  18. Clinical and microbiological parameters in patients with self-ligating and conventional brackets during early phase of orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejda, Slavica; Varga, Marina Lapter; Milosevic, Sandra Anic; Mestrovic, Senka; Slaj, Martina; Repic, Dario; Bosnjak, Andrija

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effect of different bracket designs (conventional brackets and self-ligating brackets) on periodontal clinical parameters and periodontal pathogens in subgingival plaque. The following inclusion criteria were used: requirement of orthodontic treatment plan starting with alignment and leveling, good general health, healthy periodontium, no antibiotic therapy in the previous 6 months before the beginning of the study, and no smoking. The study sample totaled 38 patients (13 male, 25 female; mean age, 14.6 ± 2.0 years). Patients were divided into two groups with random distribution of brackets. Recording of clinical parameters was done before the placement of the orthodontic appliance (T0) and at 6 weeks (T1), 12 weeks (T2), and 18 weeks (T3) after full bonding of orthodontic appliances. Periodontal pathogens of subgingival microflora were detected at T3 using a commercially available polymerase chain reaction test (micro-Dent test) that contains probes for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. There was a statistically significant higher prevalence of A actinomycetemcomitans in patients with conventional brackets than in patients with self-ligating brackets, but there was no statistically significant difference for other putative periodontal pathogens. The two different types of brackets did not show statistically significant differences in periodontal clinical parameters. Bracket design does not seem to have a strong influence on periodontal clinical parameters and periodontal pathogens in subgingival plaque. The correlation between some periodontal pathogens and clinical periodontal parameters was weak.

  19. [Evaluation of the knowledge, attitude and practices of orthodontists in relation to nickel allergy during orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerhrhaye, W; Bahije, L; Zaoui, F; Merzouk, N

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of Moroccan dentists about allergy to Nickel (Ni) during orthodontic treatment. Dentists of two Moroccan cities (n = 553) were contacted and a questionnaire was distributed to those who have certified of partial or exclusive practice of orthodontics (N = 202). They were asked to specify the adverse reactions observed and the alloys frequently used. KAP about etiology, prevention and therapeutic management of allergic patients were also addressed. Twenty-two percent of the dentists have reported at least one allergic patient reaction with more implication of fixed appliances. Eleven percent of adverse effects locations reported were mucosal area and facial skin near contact area and less than 5% was systemic eruption outside contact site. Only 34% of the respondents knew the Nickel allergy etiology. Nickel-containing orthodontic alloys are generally used even in patient with suspected nickel allergy. It is very important to minimize corrosion factors and use nickel-free appliances in clinical practice.

  20. A Comparative Study of Dentoskeletal Changes Following Orthodontic Treatment with First Premolar Extraction in Long Face and Normal Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Heravi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate vertical facial and dental changes after orthodontic treatment with extraction of first four premolars, and to find whether long facial height could influence the treatment result. Methods: Fifty-six orthodontic patients with the minimum age of 15, whose treatment plan involved extracting four first premolars, participated in the study. The patients included 30 females and 27 males. Cephalometric measurements before and after treatment were compared using a paired T-test. Independent T-test was employed to compare post treatment changes for each parameter between normal and long face groups. The same analysis performed between male and female subjects. Results: Treatment changes revealed a significant increase in the vertical distance from the upper molar to palatal plane, the lower molar to mandibular plane and Menton to palatal plane in all groups. There was significantly more increase in most post-treatment linear measurements in males than in females, with the same direction in both genders. There were no significant differences between normal and long face in any measurement. Conclusion: All patients showed some extrusion of the molar teeth after extraction of the premolars. The difference between normal and long face groups was not significant.

  1. Interactions of hard tissues, soft tissues, and growth over time, and their impact on orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, David M

    2015-09-01

    The approach to orthodontic diagnosis has changed gradually but steadily over the past 2 decades. The shift away from diagnosis based entirely on hard tissue evaluations has been a result of a broadened recognition of the importance of facial and smile appearance to our patients, and how they change over time. The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the integration of the new soft tissue paradigm into long-term treatment planning, with a focus on the esthetic goals of treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Presurgical Orthopedics Appliance: The Latham Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    The Latham appliance is an active presurgical orthopedic device used for cleft defects. Its long-term effects are debated. It was introduced to help surgeons achieve a more predictable surgical outcome; hence, it should be evaluated for its presurgical benefits. The device has been successful in expanding and aligning the maxillary segments; retruding protruded premaxillae; aligning bilateral alveolar ridges; placing less tension on surgical closures; and reducing fistulation rates. However, it has not been shown to have either a positive or negative long-term effect on maxillary development or occlusion. It is a valuable preoperative tool for surgeons treating cleft defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Conventional Vs Digital Impressions: Acceptability, Treatment Comfort and Stress Among Young Orthodontic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Alessandro; Beretta, Matteo; Luongo, Giuseppe; Mangano, Carlo; Mangano, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare patients' acceptability, comfort and stress with conventional and digital impressions. Thirty young orthodontic patients (15 males and 15 females) who had no previous experience of impressions were enrolled in this study. Conventional impressions for orthodontic study models of the dental arches were taken using an alginate impression material (Hydrogum ® , Zhermack Spa, Badia Polesine, Rovigo, Italy). Fifteen days later, digital impressions of both arches were acquired using an intraoral scanner (CS3600 ® , Carestream Dental, Rochester, NY, USA). Immediately after impression taking, patients' acceptability, comfort and stress were measured using two questionnaires and the State anxiety scale. Data showed no difference in terms of anxiety and stress; however, patients preferred the use of digital impressions systems instead of conventional impression techniques. Alginate impressions resulted as fast as digital impressions. Digital impressions resulted the most accepted and comfortable impression technique in young orthodontic patients, when compared to conventional techniques.

  4. Modality and risk management for orthodontic extrusion procedures in interdisciplinary treatment for generating proper bone and tissue contours for the planned implant: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Sachiko; Sasaki, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    In adult interdisciplinary treatments with using dental implants, limited orthodontic treatment, especially orthodontic extrusion (OE), offers many benefits by both correcting teeth alignment and by contributing to the regeneration of periodontal tissues. However, orthodontic procedures carry some risks and unpredictabilities that might compromise tooth and/or periodontal tissue health. Especially in complex cases, it is difficult to decide which orthodontic treatment modalities should be combined, in what sequences they should be applied, and what their force systems and treatment times are.To achieve optimum results, some cases require two or more OEs to the same site being carried out at different times while taking the treatment effects into consideration. Such staged OE offers minimum intervention and maximum efficiency. In this case report, OE was first applied for orthodontic extraction. After bone regeneration followed by an implant placement and another surgical operation, a second OE was applied to align the inclination of an adjacent tooth. As a result, a predictable prognosis of implants as well as greatly improved esthetics and periodontal tissue health were achieved.

  5. Interceptive orthodontic treatment in bullied adolescents and its impact on self-esteem and oral-health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehra, Jadbinder; Newton, J T; Dibiase, Andrew T

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this follow-up study was to measure the self-reported frequency and severity of bullying in orthodontic patients previously identified as being bullied, who have commenced interceptive orthodontic treatment, and to investigate the effect on an individual's self-esteem and oral-health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Forty-three adolescents previously identified as being bullied due to the presence of a malocclusion were invited to take part in a follow-up study following commencement of orthodontic treatment at three UK Hospitals. Validated questionnaires were used to assess the self-reported frequency and severity of bullying, self-esteem and OHRQoL. The participation rate at follow-up was 63 per cent. Following commencement of orthodontic treatment, 21 (78 per cent) participants reported they were currently no longer being bullied due to the presence of their malocclusion. In comparison to their pre-treatment scores, participants reported fewer functional limitations (P = 0.013), decreased emotional (P bullied in comparison to those who continued to report bullying. There appears to be no effect on an individual's self-esteem. Orthodontic treatment may have a positive effect on adolescents experiencing bullying related to their malocclusion and their OHRQoL.

  6. Effect of low-level laser therapy on dental pain induced by separator force in orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtahi, Seyed Mostafa; Mousavi, Seyed Amir; Shafaee, Hooman; Tanbakuchi, Behrad

    2013-09-01

    Patients undergoing orthodontic treatment experience varying degrees of pain with separator insertion. A survey of patients' attitude towards orthodontic treatment revealed that pain was the most discouraging factor related to their treatment. Moreover, it was the highest ranking reason for wanting to discontinue care. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of low-level laser irradiation on dental pain induced by forces from separators in orthodontic treatment. This study was an experimental clinical trial. Twenty-nine patients were recruited for this research. Low-level laser irradiation was applied on one half of the maxillary and mandibular arches for 5 days. The opposite half of the arches was considered the control group. Laser irradiation was applied for 30 seconds in the alveolar bone between the second premolars, first molars, and second molars. Pain perception was evaluated with a standardized questionnaire that was answered by patients before and after laser irradiation. Data was analyzed by Wilcoxon and Friedman test. P value ≤0.05 was considered significant. The highest pain level was reported at day 1 following separator placement and decreased gradually until day 5. At day 4 and 5, the pain intensity was lower in the laser group than in the control group; however, this finding was not statistically significant. At day 1 and 3, the pain intensity was higher in the laser group than in the control group; however, it was not statistically significant. At day 2, the pain intensity was lower in the laser group than in the control group and was statistically significant. Our findings suggest that there is no statistically significant difference in pain by using low-level laser irradiation.

  7. Orthodontic Class II:1 treatment-efficiency and outcome quality of Herbst-multibracket appliance therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, N; Ruehl, J; Ruf, S

    2017-12-08

    The aim of this retrospective investigation was to assess the efficiency and outcome quality of Class II:1 treatment (Tx). The investigation is based on the evaluation of all Class II:1 patients that ever (1986-2014) started Tx with a Herbst appliance and subsequently a multibracket appliance (MBA) at the study center. Study casts from before Tx, after Herbst-MBA Tx, and (if available) after ≥ 24 months of retention were evaluated using the Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index, the Ahlgren scale, and standard occlusal variables. In total, 526 Class II:1 patients with a mean pre-Tx age of 14.4 years (range 9.8-44.4) had received Herbst-MBA Tx; 18 patients discontinued Tx before completion. For 240 patients, data from ≥ 24 months of retention were available. The pre-Tx PAR score of 32.4 ± 8.83 was reduced to 8.0 ± 4.51 during Tx. A slight increase to 8.8 ± 5.11 occurred during retention. The percentage of patients which could be assigned to the category "greatly improved" was 62% after Tx and 57% after retention; only 2-3% had to be assigned to the category "worse/no different." The outcome ratings according to the Ahlgren scale revealed 17% excellent, 35% good, 45% satisfactory, and 3% unsuccessful results. Class II:1 Tx using Herbst-MBA is an efficient approach in orthodontic care. During a mean active Tx period of 2 years, high-quality results can be obtained in the majority of patients. The present investigation is the first to investigate a large unselected cohort of consecutive Herbst-MBA patients to determine representative data on the efficiency and the outcome quality of this Tx approach.

  8. Efficacy of fluoride varnish for preventing white spot lesions and gingivitis during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances-a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschneck, Christian; Christl, Jan-Joachim; Reicheneder, Claudia; Proff, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The development of white spot lesions around orthodontic brackets and gingivitis is a common problem during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. This prospective randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial investigated the preventive efficacy of a one-time application of two commonly used fluoride varnishes in patients with low to moderate caries risk. Ninety adolescent orthodontic patients with a low to moderate caries risk were prospectively randomized to three groups of 30 patients each: (1) standardized dental hygiene with fluoride toothpaste and one-time application of placebo varnish (control) or (2) of elmex® fluid or (3) of Fluor Protector S on all dental surfaces at the start of fixed therapy. The extent of enamel demineralization and gingivitis was determined with the ICDAS and the gingivitis index (GI) at baseline and after 4, 12, and 20 weeks. Each treatment group showed a significant increase of the ICDAS index, but not of the GI over the course of time with no significant intergroup differences detectable. A one-time application of fluoride varnish at the start of orthodontic treatment did not provide any additional preventive advantage over sufficient dental hygiene with fluoride toothpaste with regard to formation of white spots and gingivitis in patients with a low to moderate caries risk. In dental practice, patients often receive an application of fluoride varnish at the start of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. However, the efficacy of this procedure is still unclear.

  9. Periodontal status of Pakistani orthodontic patients

    OpenAIRE

    MOOSA, Yousuf; HAN, Ling Na; SAFDAR, Jawad; SHEIKH, Omair Ahmed; PAN, Ya Ping

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the periodontal status of orthodontic patients and non-orthodontic patients, aged 15–28 years, of both genders. The cross-sectional study included 100 orthodontic and 100 non-orthodontic patients evaluated using a Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need (CPITN) probe on the index teeth. A questionnaire was distributed to the participants to assess and evaluate the use of oral hygiene aids. The data were analyzed using SPSS v...

  10. Treatment of an impacted supernumerary tooth using limited fixed orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyun; Tai, Kiyoshi; Kanao, Akira

    2013-01-01

    A 42-year and 9-month-old female with an impacted supernumerary tooth was treated with limited fixed orthodontic appliances. As seen in this case, it is possible to successfully treat impacted teeth in adults even though the most common time to treat impactions is during adolescence.

  11. Three case reports demonstrating treatment of relatively complex orthodontic cases using a completely customised lingual appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, John

    2016-01-01

    It is a commonly held misconception among Irish dentists that only minor malocclusions can be treated with lingual appliances. This article demonstrates the use of contemporary completely customised lingual orthodontic appliances to treat a diverse range of malocclusions, to a satisfactory level, and thereby may disabuse clinicians of the belief that only minor malocclusions can be treated with lingual appliances.

  12. Orthodontics and orthognathic surgery in the combined treatment of an excessively "gummy smile".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, P

    1999-06-01

    This report highlights the benefits that can be achieved with the combined orthodontic and orthognathic surgical approach where the presenting malocclusion is related primarily to an underlying skeletal malrelationship. The patient experienced a dramatic improvement in her facial form and occlusion, and a reduction of her excessively "gummy smile".

  13. Custom Made Pressure Appliance for Presurgical Sustained ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Plastic Surgery for the fabrication of ear pressure clip for the left auricular keloid. She complained of swelling ... A case of presurgical size reduction for a large ear keloid with a custom made pressure appliance is presented. ... She was also instructed about use, maintenance of hygiene and regular follow-up for periodic ...

  14. Custom Made Pressure Appliance for Presurgical Sustained ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among the most common complications of this therapy is ulceration due to excessive pressure. A case of presurgical size reduction for a large ear keloid with a custom made pressure appliance is presented. This novel design of the appliance allows for better control over the amount and direction of the pressure applied on ...

  15. Stereoscopic virtual reality presurgical planning for cerebrospinal otorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Luo; Yang, De-Lin; Wu, Jin-Song

    2010-07-01

    We present a complicated case of spontaneous cerebrospinal otorrhea, which had not been cured despite undergoing 5 surgical interventions in the past. The disability to identify the location of the fistula was the main crux of the past failures. On this occasion, stereoscopic virtual reality presurgical planning was applied to identify the exact location of the fistula and a surgical simulation was performed, and was later confirmed during the actual operation. Interactive manipulation in a stereoscopic virtual environment makes the decision making process easier in the treatment of cerebrospinal otorrhea.

  16. Assessment of pain and discomfort during early orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion using the Removable Mandibular Retractor Appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, M; Hajeer, M Y; Al-Jundi, A

    2013-06-01

    To determine the degree of pain and discomfort during the orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion using the Removable Mandibular Retractor (RMR). The sample consisted of 33 skeletal Class III patients (17 males and 16 females; average age: 7.5 ± 1.33 years) who had been assigned to the RMR treatment group in a randomised controlled trial comparing this treatment versus a control group of no treatment at the Orthodontic Department, University of Al-Baath Dental School in Syria. Pain and discomfort were assessed using standardised questionnaires at the following assessment times: 7 days (T1), 14 days (T2), 6 weeks (T3), 3 months (T4) and 6 months (T5) after appliance insertion. Levels of pain and discomfort decreased gradually by time in general. No significant changes in the levels of pain, tooth sensitivity and soft tissues tension were detected, whereas a significant decrease in the levels of pressure, impaired speech, impaired swallowing and lack of confidence in public was observed two weeks following appliance insertion. Mandibular constraint feeling required three months to decrease significantly. No difference was found between males and females with regard to acceptance. The RMR is well accepted by Class III patients in the early mixed dentition.

  17. Using three-dimensional imaging to assess treatment outcomes in orthodontics: a progress report from the University of the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Carlson, S; Beers, A; Curry, S; Norris, K; Boyd, R L

    2003-01-01

    Past research in integrated three-dimensional (3D) craniofacial mapping at the Craniofacial Research Instrumentation Laboratory (CRIL) of the University of the Pacific is summarized in narrative form. The advantages and limitations of recent commercial developments in the application of cone beam geometry volumetric X-ray scanners in dentistry and surface digital mapping of study casts are discussed. The rationale for methods currently in development at CRIL for merging longitudinal information from existing 3D study casts and two-dimensional lateral X-ray cephalograms in studies of orthodontic treatment outcome is presented.

  18. Optimal management of orthodontic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolski, Francielle; Moro, Alexandre; Correr, Gisele Maria; Schimim, Sasha Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician's range of options in the search for better patient care.

  19. Prevalence of malocclusions, oral habits and orthodontic treatment need in a 7- to 15-year-old schoolchildren population in Tirana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganà, Giuseppina; Masucci, Caterina; Fabi, Francesco; Bollero, Patrizio; Cozza, Paola

    2013-06-14

    The aim of present study was to determine the prevalence of malocclusions, oral habits and the need for orthodontic treatment in a sample of 7- to 15-year-old Albanese schoolchildren. The final sample comprised 2,617 subjects (1,257 males and 1,360 females), all orthodontically untreated. Occlusal relationship and the functional analysis were recorded for all subjects. The prevalence rates for the dental health component of the index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) were calculated. Comparisons between genders were performed for the prevalence of malocclusions, oral habits and IOTN grades (chi-square tests). Class I, class II and class III malocclusions and asymmetries were observed in 40.4%, 29.2%, 3.2% and 27.1% of the sample, respectively. There were 2,108 subjects (80.6%) that showed oral habits, with females (82.1%) presenting with a greater prevalence rate than males (78.9%). The objective need for orthodontic treatment (grades 4 and 5 of IOTN) was registered in 1,077 subjects (41.2%). This prevalence rate is higher than those reported for other European countries. No significant differences between genders were found for the IOTN grades. The findings of the present study revealed the need to improve public health plans for orthodontic prevention and screening and to organise the resources in this area in Albania.

  20. Presurgical cleft lip and palate orthopedics: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzain, Ibtesam; Batwa, Waeil; Cash, Alex; Murshid, Zuhair A

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cleft lip and/or palate go through a lifelong journey of multidisciplinary care, starting from before birth and extending until adulthood. Presurgical orthopedic (PSO) treatment is one of the earliest stages of this care plan. In this paper we provide a review of the PSO treatment. This review should help general and specialist dentists to better understand the cleft patient care path and to be able to answer patient queries more efficiently. The objectives of this paper were to review the basic principles of PSO treatment, the various types of techniques used in this therapy, and the protocol followed, and to critically evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of some of these techniques. In conclusion, we believe that PSO treatment, specifically nasoalveolar molding, does help to approximate the segments of the cleft maxilla and does reduce the intersegment space in readiness for the surgical closure of cleft sites. However, what we remain unable to prove equivocally at this point is whether the reduction in the dimensions of the cleft presurgically and the manipulation of the nasal complex benefit our patients in the long term. PMID:28615974

  1. Assessment of the effect of ozonated water irrigation on gingival inflammation in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Jose

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A split-mouth longitudinal study was designed here to evaluate the effect of ozonated water delivered subgingivally through a jet device (Kent Ozone dental TY 820 jet in controlling gingival inflammation of patients undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment following thorough oral prophylaxis were recalled after 2 weeks, and baseline gingival inflammation was estimated. This study was conducted as split-mouth technique with the upper left quadrant (Control side was irrigated by jetting saline into sulcus by air–water syringe with gauge 22 needle tip and upper right quadrant (Test side irrigated with ozonated water by a jet device using similar delivery tip. The patients were recalled at the end of 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th month and the irrigations as well as gingival inflammation estimation were repeated. A biochemical assessment of gingival inflammation (estimation of aspartate aminotransferase [AST] in gingival crevicular fluid [GCF] and clinical assessment (gingival index scoring was done at each visit. Results: At the test side, the AST level in the GCF was found to be maintained almost the same value as baseline till the end of 4th month, indicating not much of change in inflammatory status. Statistically significant difference in GCF-AST and gingival index score between test and control sites were found at the end of 3rd and 4th month with a significance of P < 0.05. Conclusion: The patient undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment showed a consistent improvement in gingival inflammation on frequent irrigation with ozone jet irrigation as compared with saline irrigation delivered with same jetting force.

  2. Effect of heat treatment on the tensile strength of 'Elgiloy' orthodontic wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, S M; Darvell, B W

    2016-08-01

    Elgiloy is the trade name of a cobalt-chromium-nickel superalloy that is offered for orthodontic use as wire. Despite some years of use, there is very little information in the dental literature on its mechanical properties, and especially on the effect of the hardening heat treatment (HT), that may be used after forming, on the tensile strength (TS) in relation to the four 'tempers' that are available. Straight lengths of round wire of the four available tempers, Blue, Yellow, Green and Red, were tested in direct tension at 5mm/min in air at 23°C to fracture, both as-supplied (AS) and with HT at 500°C for 5h, in air. HT was done in a high-uniformity, three-zone tube furnace in an alumina boat. The wires were then allowed to cool to room temperature in the boat, outside the furnace. The nominal (original cross-sectional area) peak stress was calculated. TS varied from 1.4 to 2.1GPa, AS, and 1.6 to 2.8GPa HT, according to temper, but with appreciable variation within tempers. Even so, the TS plot of HT vs. AS was very straight and of narrow distribution (intercept: -0.638±0.064GPa, slope: 1.575±0.036, r(2): 0.994918, n=12, F=1957.7, p∼8×10(-13)). The strengthening due to HT was highly regular and TS can be reliably predicted on the basis of the AS value, but this of course cannot be known without specific batch testing. However, the unexpectedly large variation in the AS values within tempers renders such a prediction of lower reliability and usefulness in practice. Indeed, the distinction between tempers can be negligible, making selection according to application demands problematic, and differential property expectation less than certain. No such product data are provided commercially. Quality control is not as tight as might be expected. The implications for treatment need to be explored. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Post orthodontic treatment stability measurement in dentoskeletal class I malocclusion based on the objective grading system index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Anthony Pasaribu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the stability of orthodontic treatment results in dentoskeletal class I malocclusion treated with and without extraction of four premolars and to compare the stability of treatment result between those groups. Occlusal relationship after treatment and six-month post retention were measured on dental cast using The Objective Grading System Index at Orthodontic Specialist Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran. The analytic descriptive study was carried out on 30 samples that comprised 14 samples were treated without extraction of four premolars and 16 samples were treated with extraction of four premolars. ABO Measuring Gauge was used to measure seven variables: tooth alignment, the height of the marginal ridges, buccolingual inclination, occlusal relationships, occlusal contacts, overjet, and interproximal tooth contacts. The results were statistically analyzed with the Wilcoxon rank test to test the difference of The Objective Grading System Index between posttreatment and postretension. Mann-Whitney U test was applied to determine the difference between the group with the extraction of four premolars and the group without extraction of four premolars. The level of significance was set at 0.05. The results of this study showed these following variables: tooth alignment, occlusal contacts, and overjet were unstable at the group with the extraction of four premolars, while only tooth alignment was found to be unstable in the group without extraction of the four premolars. Mann-Whitney U test did not show statistically significant difference in stability comparison test between the groups.

  4. Miniscrew-assisted multidisciplinary orthodontic treatment with surgical mandibular advancement and genioplasty in a brachyfacial Class II patient with mandibular asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa; García-Sanz, Verónica; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    This article describes the complex dental treatment of a 43-year-old man with skeletal Class II, mandibular asymmetry, severe brachyfacial pattern, Class II Division 2, canting of the occlusal plane, and an increased curve of Spee. To achieve optimal results, we adopted a multidisciplinary approach to treatment, involving periodontics, oral surgery, orthodontics, maxillofacial surgery, and prosthetics specialists. After periodontal treatment, miniscrews were placed to correct the occlusal plane canting and the excessive curve of Spee with orthodontic treatment. The surgical treatment plan consisted of a bilateral asymmetric sagittal split osteotomy for mandibular advancement and genioplasty. The patient had an infection after the surgery at the site of the right fixation plate, so the plate was removed, and active orthodontic treatment was continued and finished. Mandibular first molar implants and maxillary ceramic crowns using the Digital Smile Design method (Digital Smile Design, Doral, FL) were placed at the end of orthodontic treatment. The patient was satisfied with the treatment results and with his facial and dental appearance, as well as his oral function. The 2-year follow-up pictures show a stable result both esthetically and functionally. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The 808 nm Laser-Assisted Surgery as an Adjunct to Orthodontic Treatment of Delayed Tooth Eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Massoud; Vahid-Dastjerdi, Elahe; Ameli, Nazila; Badiee, Mohammad-Reza; Younessian, Farnaz; Amdjadi, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    Failure of teeth to erupt from gingival tissues at usual developmental time is called delayed tooth eruption (DTE). Delayed tooth eruption lead to prolonged fixed orthodontic treatment and its eventual complications. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of laser-assisted (808 nm) surgical uncovering, on the tooth emergence and orthodontic treatment of DTE. A total of 16 orthodontic patients were included in this study and were equally assigned to an experimental and a control group. Subjects for experiment consisted of eight patients (6 girls and 2 boys) with a mean age of 14±0.9 years. All patients exhibited delayed second premolar eruption. The laser wavelength was 810 nm and it was set in a continuous wave mode at a power output of 1.6 watt with a 0.3-mm diameter fiber tip. When the target tissue was sufficiently anesthetized, the tip was directed at an angle of 10 to 20 degrees to the tissue (light contact mode); and was applied continuously for approximately 12 Seconds until an acceptable tooth exposure area was visible. The facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) line represents the most prominent portion of the facial central lobe for premolars. All orthodontic brackets are aligned along this reference and are located on FA (Facial Axis) point. The standard for adequate tooth eruption was the accessibility of facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) for bonding the brackets. Data gathered from the patients were statistically surveyed and compared by means of Tukey's Test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). All patients showed good gingival status, no significant bleeding during or immediately after the surgery, and acceptable level of healing after laser surgery. The biologic width of the teeth was preserved and no violation of this important periodontal parameter was observed. The average time for accessing the FA point in experimental group was 11±1.1 weeks and the mentioned period was increased to 25±1.8 weeks in control group

  6. Cephalometry in orthodontic practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theunissen, J.J.W.; Terlingen, P.J.A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Cephalometry is applied in orthodontic practice to: - obtain information on the growth of the skull - assist diagnosis of the relationship between the jaws and abnormalities in dentition - evaluate the results of treatment. The course of the diagnostic procedure with the aid of the Ricketts analysis and evaluation of the treatment results using five superimpositions is demonstrated by means of two examples. (Auth.)

  7. Panorama of Prevalence of Malocclusion, Treatment Needs, Specific Occlusal Traits & Gender Distribution in Patients Seeking Orthodontic Treatment in Kolhapur Population - A Prospective Cross-sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraddha Subhash Shetti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the prevalence of malocclusion, treatment needs and specific occlusal traits among Kolhapur population. Materials & Method: The sample comprised 500 individuals: that is, 250 boys & 250 girls between the age group of 13 -20 years. The sample was drawn from among the patients reporting for the treatment of malocclusion to the department. After intraoral examination, dental casts of the patients were assessed later and scored. A mouth mirror, a ruler & a sliding digital caliper was used. For every individual, variables related to malocclusion were recorded on a specially designed registration chart. A set of 10 photographs showing a range of dental attractiveness of the aesthetic component based on IOTN was followed and the data was subjected to statistical analysis. Results: About 48.80 % individuals had Angle′s Class I malocclusion; 34.60 % had Class II division 1; 2% had Class IT division 2 and 1.80% had Class Ill malocclusion. Deep-bite type of vertical malocclusion was present in 62.60% of the sample and 37.40% subjects had a normal overbite. The next most prevalent type of malocclusion was deviation of dental midlines which was found in 50.40% of sample. Orthodontic treatment need as assessed by the DHC of the IOTN were such that 24.20 %and 53.40% fell into grade 4 and grade 5 respectively. Therefore definitely requiring treatment and as assessed by the AC of the IOTN 27.40% and 18.20% sample fell into grades 8 - 10 and grade 10 respectively, as it was the least aesthetic arrangement of the dentition therefore definitely requiring treatment. Conclusions: Orthodontic treatment indices such as IOTN can be used effectively with less subjective bias to determine the orthodontic treatment need. The study suggests that there is a borderline to definite need for treatment in a large amount of population in the semirural western Maharashtra.

  8. Prospect of relieving pain due to tooth movement during orthodontic treatment utilizing a Ga-Al-As diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Noriyoshi; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Goseki, Takemi; Shibata, Yasuko; Takiguchi, Hisashi; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Iwasawa, Tadamasa

    1995-04-01

    The effects of low-power laser irradiation on prostaglandin (PG)E2 and interleukin(IL)-1(beta) production in stretched human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells were assessed in vitro. PDL cells derived from healthy premolars were utilized for these experiments. Cells were seeded in flexible-bottom culture plates and elongated (18% increase) under a vacuum at 6 cycles per minute for 1 to 5 days. The stretched cells were irradiated with a Ga-Al-As low-power diode laser (60 mW) once a day for 3 to 10 minutes for 1 to 5 days. PGE2 and IL-1(beta) levels in the medium were measured by radio immunoassay. Human PDL cells showed a marked elevation in PGE2 and IL-1(beta) production in response to mechanical stretching. The increase in PGE2 production was significantly inhibited by laser irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in IL-1(beta) production was also inhibited by laser irradiation, although the inhibition was only partial under this irradiation condition. Since high levels of PGE2 and IL-1(beta) are found in the PDL when teeth are moved during orthodontic treatment and since both factors are involved with the induction of pain, the inhibitory effects of laser irradiation on PGE2 and IL-1(beta) production suggest that laser irradiation may have therapeutic benefits in relieving the pain that accompanies orthodontic treatment.

  9. Mechanical and Histological Effects of Resorbable Blasting Media Surface Treatment on the Initial Stability of Orthodontic Mini-Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansukh, Odontuya; Jeong, Jong-Wha; Kim, Jong-Wan; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of resorbable blasting media (RBM) treatment on early stability of orthodontic mini-implants by mechanical, histomorphometric, and histological analyses. Methods. Ninety-six (64 for mechanical study and 32 for histological study and histomorphometric analysis) titanium orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs) with machined (machined group) or RBM-treated (CaP) surface (RBM group) were implanted in the tibiae of 24 rabbits. Maximum initial torque (MIT) was measured during insertion, and maximum removal torque (MRT) and removal angular momentum (RAM) were measured at 2 and 4 weeks after implantation. Bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area (BA) were analyzed at 4 weeks after implantation. Results. RBM group exhibited significantly lower MIT and significantly higher MRT and RAM at 2 weeks than machined group. No significant difference in MRT, RAM, and BIC between the two groups was noted at 4 weeks, although BA was significantly higher in RBM group than in machined group. RBM group showed little bone resorption, whereas machined group showed new bone formation after bone resorption. Conclusions. RBM surface treatment can provide early stability of OMIs around 2 weeks after insertion, whereas stability of machined surface OMIs may decrease in early stages because of bone resorption, although it can subsequently recover by new bone apposition.

  10. Modified glass ionomer and orthodontic band: An interim alternative for the treatment of molar incisor hypomineralization. A case report.

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    Carla Orellana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH is a developmental condition resulting in defects in the enamel characterized by demarcated opacities mainly affecting first permanent molars and occasionally permanent incisors in 1 of every 6 children worldwide. Affected molars have greater susceptibility to post eruptive breakdown, extensive caries and, in severe cases, are difficult to restore. When the MIH-affected molar presents severe crown destruction, it is necessary to perform an intermediate restoration to preserve the remaining dental structure in order to maintain occlusion, proper hygiene and periodontal health. The case of an 11-year-old patient with severe MIH is reported. The patient had extensive crown destruction by caries in tooth 1.6 without clinical or radiographic signs of pulp pathology. After an initial preventive intervention, enamel without dentin support and carious dentin were removed from tooth 1.6. Subsequently, crown restoration was performed with resin-modified glass ionomer, followed by the cementation of an orthodontic band. After 18 months of follow-up, the patient reported no pain or discomfort. The restoration was preserved intact, maintaining occlusal functionality, pulp and gingival health. Conclusion: The interim treatment, cementing an orthodontic band over a tooth restored with glass ionomer seems to favor retention and compressive strength, keeping the MIH-affected molar asymptomatic for at least 18 months. Further studies evaluating this treatment option in similar clinical situations are recommended.

  11. Orthodontic and pediatric dental treatment approach in patient with multiple dental anomalies

    OpenAIRE

    SOUZA, Ricardo Alves; CARVALHO, Alberic Costa; BARRETTO, Larissa Passos; SIMÕES, Francisco Xavier Paranhos Coêlho

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical case report is to discuss the approach to oral rehabilitation of a patient with severe dental alterations such as enamel hypoplasia, change in shape, supernumerary tooth, dental ankylosis, agnesia and crowing in the incisor region. All of these problems compromised not only the esthetical and functional aspects of this patient, but his social relationships as well. Thus integrated planning between Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics made it possible to provide th...

  12. Evaluation of two protocols for low-level laser application in patients submitted to orthodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Marquezan,Mariana; Bolognese,Ana Maria; Araújo,Mônica Tirre de Souza

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Different low-level laser (LLL) irradiation protocols have been tested to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). Nevertheless, divergent results have been obtained. It was suggested that the stimulatory action of low level laser irradiation occurs during the proliferation and differentiation stages of bone cellular precursors, but not during later stages. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of two protocols of LLL irradiation on experimental to...

  13. Exposure of Cleft Lip and Palate Patients to Toxic Elements Released during Orthodontic Treatment in the Study of Non-Invasive Matrices.

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    Marcin Mikulewicz

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was evaluation of metal ions (nickel and chromium released from orthodontic appliances in cleft lip and palate patients and the usefulness of non-invasive matrices (saliva and hair.The material studied consisted of 100 individuals, including 59 females and 41 males of 5 to 16 years of age, which were divided into 3 groups: experimental-patients with cleft lip and palate (36 individuals, the average treatment time 5.74 years; control group-patients without cleft lip and palate, during orthodontic treatment (32 individuals, the average treatment time 1.78 years and the control group patients without cleft lip and palate, without any orthodontic appliances (32 individuals. Samples (saliva, hair were collected and subjects underwent a survey by questionnaire. Multi-elemental analyses of the composition of non-invasive matrices was conducted in an accredited laboratory by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry technique ICP-OES. The results were reported as mean contents of particular elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Si in hair and in saliva.The concentration of Cr, Ni, Fe and Cu ions in saliva of cleft lip and palate patients were several times higher as compared with not treated orthodontically control groups and higher than in the group with orthodontic appliances. Among the assessed matrices, hair of cleft lip and palate patients seem to be not a meaningful biomarker.It was found that orthodontic appliances used in long-term treatment of cleft lip and palate patients do not release toxic levels of Cr and Ni ions.

  14. Conventional Vs Digital Impressions: Acceptability, Treatment Comfort and Stress Among Young Orthodontic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Alessandro; Beretta, Matteo; Luongo, Giuseppe; Mangano, Carlo; Mangano, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to compare patients’ acceptability, comfort and stress with conventional and digital impressions. Materials and Methods: Thirty young orthodontic patients (15 males and 15 females) who had no previous experience of impressions were enrolled in this study. Conventional impressions for orthodontic study models of the dental arches were taken using an alginate impression material (Hydrogum®, Zhermack Spa, Badia Polesine, Rovigo, Italy). Fifteen days later, digital impressions of both arches were acquired using an intraoral scanner (CS3600®, Carestream Dental, Rochester, NY, USA). Immediately after impression taking, patients’ acceptability, comfort and stress were measured using two questionnaires and the State anxiety scale. Results: Data showed no difference in terms of anxiety and stress; however, patients preferred the use of digital impressions systems instead of conventional impression techniques. Alginate impressions resulted as fast as digital impressions. Conclusions: Digital impressions resulted the most accepted and comfortable impression technique in young orthodontic patients, when compared to conventional techniques. PMID:29492177

  15. Optimal management of orthodontic pain

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    Topolski F

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Francielle Topolski,1 Alexandre Moro,1,2 Gisele Maria Correr,3 Sasha Cristina Schimim1 1Department of Orthodontics, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 2Department of Orthodontics, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 3Department of Restorative Dentistry, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil Abstract: Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician’s range of options in the search for better patient care. Keywords: tooth movement, pain control, drug therapy, laser therapy

  16. An overview of pre-surgical evaluation

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    Kurupath Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of an epilepsy surgery program depends upon the early identification of potential surgical candidates and selecting from them, ideal candidates for surgery, who are destined to have a post-operative seizure-free outcome without any unacceptable neurological deficits. Since epilepsy surgery centers in resource-poor countries will lack the full range of state-of-the-art technologies usually available in resource-rich countries to perform pre-surgical evaluation, cost-effectively utilization of the locally available investigative facilities to select the surgical candidates becomes challenging. In the present era of rapid electronic communications and telemedicine, it has become possible for epilepsy surgery centers to pool their technological and human resources and to partner with centers nationally and internationally in implementing pre-surgical evaluation strategies.

  17. Periodontal status of Pakistani orthodontic patients

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    Yousuf MOOSA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the periodontal status of orthodontic patients and non-orthodontic patients, aged 15–28 years, of both genders. The cross-sectional study included 100 orthodontic and 100 non-orthodontic patients evaluated using a Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need (CPITN probe on the index teeth. A questionnaire was distributed to the participants to assess and evaluate the use of oral hygiene aids. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 17, and various comparisons were performed using the chi-square test. The study revealed that there was a statistically significant association in CPITN scores between the orthodontic and non-orthodontic patients (p < 0.01. The study showed that patients undergoing orthodontic treatment have increased plaque accumulation and probing depth resulting in periodontal tissue destruction. Proper oral hygiene practices and interdental aids should be employed to control plaque.

  18. Review Article: A Review Of Adult Orthodontics – Role Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A review of previous studies done on adult orthodontic treatment needs was undertaking. Adult orthodontic treatment was compared with adolescent orthodontic treatment. A review of treatment outcome of adult orthodontic patients showed that most patients felt satisfied with the treatment. Some report appliance discomfort ...

  19. The prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need among 15-year-old school children in Galle district in Sri Lanka: An epidemiological study

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    Chathurangi Niroshana Gunatissa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To ascertain the prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need among 15 year old school children in Galle district in the Southern Province in Sri Lanka. Objective: To ascertain the prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need among 15-year-old school children in Galle district in the Southern Province in Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among 802 school children in the Galle district. Multi-stage cluster sampling technique combined with probability proportionate to size method was used to select the sample. Occlusal characteristics including overjet, overbite, crossbites, crowding, and spacing were recorded using a standard pro forma and the need for orthodontic treatment was assessed using the index of orthodontic treatment need dental health component. SPSS 17 for Windows was used to analyze the data. The awareness of malocclusion among the subjects was also assessed. Results: It was observed that the prevalence of malocclusion among the sample was 69.5%, and the overall treatment need was 26.6%.

  20. Effects of Presurgical Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, men diagnosed with androgen-sensitive prostate cancer with intermediate- or high-risk features will be examined with mpMRI, undergo targeted biopsies, and be treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy.

  1. Pre-surgical register of tobacco consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilán, Eva; Moreno, Montse; Pérez, Àngels; Castellano, Yolanda; Fernández, Esteve; Martínez, Cristina

    2018-03-24

    Smoking cessation before surgery decreases the risk of complications. The aim of this study was to analyse the smoking register, associated variables and a short talk given to smokers in pre-surgical visits. Cross-sectional study. The pre-surgical records of 680 patients were assessed. We selected patient sociodemographic variables, surgical intervention characteristics, smoking status and consumption pattern. Logistic regression was used to study the variables association with smoking. A percentage of 97.2 of the pre-surgical records include information on tobacco consumption. Overall 20% of surgical patients are smokers. The probability of smoking is higher among men (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7-4.0) and≤60 years (aOR 5.4, 95% CI 3.2-9.1). None of the records had information regarding a short talk given to patients to give up smoking. Smoking consumption was prevalent, but the characterisation of a smoker's profile and short talk given to patient before surgery was practically nonexistent. Ensuring that patients who smokes receives a short talk to give up smoking before surgery is necessary. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Angle’s Class II division 1 associated to mandibular retrusion and skeletal open bite: a 5-year post-orthodontic/orthopedic treatment follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Gustavo Tirado

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obtaining long term stability allied to functional and aesthetic balance is the main goal of any orthodontic-orthopedic therapy. This case report describes the orthodontic therapy applied to a 7-year-9-month old child, who presented a Class II, division 1 malocclusion associated to skeletal open bite. Functional and skeletal corrections (sagittally and vertically) were obtained by means of mandible advancement achieved with a closed Balter’s bionator appliance followed by a fixed appliance. This approach showed to be efficient in accomplishing both functional and aesthetic goals, that were kept stable five years after the treatment was finished. This case report was presented to the Board of Directors of the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO), as partial requirement to becoming a Diplomate of the BBO. PMID:29160350

  3. The effects of natural compounds-containing mouthrinses on patients with fixed orthodontic appliance treatment: clinical and microbiological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Wong, Ricky W K; Seneviratne, Chaminda Jayampath; Hagg, Urban; McGrath, Colman; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the effects of two natural compounds-containing mouthrinses (NCCMs) (a fructus mume (FM) extract-containing mouthrinse and an essential oil (EO)-containing mouthrinse) on gingival health and microbial profiles in young orthodontic patients. This 6-month randomized, single-blinded, parallel-controlled clinical trial consists of 90 patients with fixed appliance treatment. The subjects were allocated to (1) negative control group: oral hygiene instruction (OHI) alone; (2) test group 1: OHI plus EO mouthrinse; and (3) test group 2: OHI plus FM mouthrinse. Clinical examinations included plaque index (PI), bleeding index (BI) and modified gingival index (MGI). Salivary microbial quantifications included total aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, Streptococci and Lactobacilli counts. Clinical and microbiological examinations were conducted at baseline, 3rd and 6th months (T1, T2, and T3). BI was significantly reduced in both the FM mouthrinse and EO mouthrinse groups compared with the negative control group at T3 (P 0.05). Both NCCMs effectively reduced gingival bleeding without causing significant alterations of microbial profile in young orthodontic patients. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, BSPD and IAPD.

  4. The effects of non-extraction orthodontic treatment on the vertical dimension: a comparison of a dolichofacial and a mesofacial group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Short, Lesley L; Banting, David W

    2012-05-01

    The decision regarding extraction or non-extraction orthodontic treatment for patients with different skeletal facial patterns is more commonly based on traditional concepts rather than scientific facts. The present study aimed to investigate whether dolichofacial patients responded differently compared with mesofacial patients to non-extraction orthodontic treatment with respect to vertical changes in facial height. Twenty-eight dolichofacial patients and 29 mesofacial patients who underwent non-extraction orthodontic treatment were selected. All patients commenced treatment prior to 15 years of age and had a mean age of 12.3 years for the dolichofacial group and 12.6 years for the mesofacial group. Serial lateral cephalometric radiographs were traced by hand on acetate paper and digitised using the Rocky Mountain Orthodontics JOE 32 programme. Statistical analysis examined the recorded changes in facial axis angle, facial angle, menton-to-ANS distance and facial convexity. An increase in menton-to-ANS distance and facial angle and a decrease in facial convexity were observed in both groups to a similar extent. Interestingly, the facial axis of both groups remained constant throughout treatment and up to two years post-treatment. Both groups showed slightly increased facial axis angle beyond the original value at two years post-treatment. No statistically significant difference between the two groups was observed in the changes of any of the variables over time. The results countered the traditional concept that dolichofacial patients would have an increased facial height after being subjected to non-extraction orthodontic mechanics. It appeared that long-term vertical height of the face was more dependent on genetics rather than environmental influences.

  5. Assessment of facial profile changes in Class I biprotrusion adolescent subjects submitted to orthodontic treatment with extractions of four premolars

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    Claudia Trindade Mattos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cephalometric changes in tooth and profile position in young adolescent individuals with Class I biprotrusion submitted to orthodontic treatment with extractions of four first premolars. METHODS: Pre and posttreatment lateral cephalometric radiographs from 20 patients with Class I biprotrusion malocclusion were used to evaluate the following measurements: nasolabial angle, distance from lips to E line, distance from lips, incisors, tip of the nose and soft tissue pogonion to Sy line. RESULTS: All measurements showed significant changes after treatment (p<0.05, except the distance from lips and soft tissue pogonion to Sy line. There was a positive correlation between the retraction of incisors and the change of upper and lower lips (0.803/0.925; p<0.001. CONCLUSION: The profile retrusion observed occurred more due to nose growth than to lips retraction. The response from soft tissues to incisors retraction showed a great variability.

  6. Periodontal management in orthognathic surgery: early screening of periodontal risk and its current management for the optimization of orthodontic and surgical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, B; Bouletreau, P; Breton, P

    2014-09-01

    Orthodontic preparation for orthognathic surgery requires correcting mal-occlusions and coordination of arcades. In addition to improving the aesthetics, these treatments can ensure the achievement and sustainability of prosthetics and/or implants. Nevertheless, periodontal structures are easily damaged. Orthodontic displacement can only be applied in the absence of inflammation or weakened periodontal structure. An early detection of periodontal risk should be achievable by prescribers of a surgical-orthodontic treatment. Simplified periodontal examination, with easily detectable warning signs, will help to identify the periodontal risk. Although periodontal treatment follows current "non invasive" trend, some procedures remain necessary to prevent and/or remedy periodontal defects or diseases, such as mineral periodontal reinforcement corticotomy. It is essential that the patient meets all the practitioners to plan and assess the extent of the constraints necessary to optimize results, before starting orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery. Any periodontal complication (even minor) will be considered as a failure, regardless of good aesthetic and functional results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Parents' and caregivers' perceptions of the quality of life of adolescents in the first 4 months of orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Lucas G; Melgaço, Camilo A; Lages, Elizabeth M B; Abreu, Mauro H N G; Paiva, Saul M

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate adolescents oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in the first 4 months of fixed orthodontic appliance treatment using parents and caregivers as proxies. Descriptive study. Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics at Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. A sample of parents and caregivers of 95 adolescents undergoing orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance. Participants were required to answer the Brazilian version of the Parental-Caregivers Perceptions Questionnaire (P-CPQ) before adolescent's treatment (T1) and 4 months after bonding of the fixed appliance (T2). Statistical analysis was carried out using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and the Bonferroni correction for the domains of P-CPQ. Among the 95 participants, there were 73 mothers, 18 fathers and 4 were other relations. There was a statistically significant improvement in the overall score as well as in both emotional and social wellbeing subscales (Porthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance. © 2014 British Orthodontic Society.

  8. THE EFFECTIVNESS OF CHRONIC GINGIVITES TREATMENT IN PATIENTS WITH NON-REMOVABLE ORTHODONTIC APPARATUS ACCORDING TO THE RESULTS OF PERIODONTAL TISSUES INDEX ASSESSMENT

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    Ye. Ya. Kostenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. The risk of chronic gingivitis is increased in patients who undergo orthodontic treatment. It is known that the gingivitis is closely correlated with the level of hygiene. Objective. The study involved 123 orthodontic patients with chronic catarrhal and hypertrophic gingivitis that developed during the first two months of active orthodontic treatment. We chose VITIS ORTНODONTIС (DENTAID INTERNATIONAL, Spain that contains active ingredients we need to support healthy state of oral cavity. All studied patients were 12-15 years old. Methods. For dental examination we used health indices OHI-S according to Greene-Vermillion (1964. Gums bleeding was determined according to a modified SBI index by Muhlemann (1971, inflammation of the gingival margin was assessed by PMA index Parma (1960. Results. Therapeutic treatment consisted of the following: all patients underwent correction of oral hygiene, removal of dental plaque. Vitis ORTHODONTIC was prescribed due to the manufacturer's recommendations: rinse 15 ml for 30 seconds after normal procedures of oral hygiene. Eating or drinking is not recommended during the next 30 minutes after using this product. The results proved a high anti-inflammatory efficacy of the treatment schemes. Conclusions. The complex therapy of early manifestations of inflammation in periodontal had a positive effect on the subjective feelings of patients and health performance rate, gum inflammation and bleeding.

  9. Estimation of changes in nickel and chromium content in nickel-titanium and stainless steel orthodontic wires used during orthodontic treatment: An analytical and scanning electron microscopic study

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    Vandana Kararia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The biocompatibility of orthodontic dental alloys has been investigated over the past 20 years, but the results have been inconclusive. The study compares standard 3 M Unitek nickel-titanium (NiTi and stainless steel archwires with locally available JJ orthodontics wires. Scanning electron microscope (SEM study of surface changes and complexometric titration to study compositional change was performed. Materials and Methods: Ten archwires each of group 1-3 M 0.016" NiTi, group 2-JJ 0.016" NiTi, group 3-3 M 0.019" FNx010.025" SS and group 4-JJ SS contributed a 10 mm piece of wire for analysis prior to insertion in the patient and 6 weeks post insertion. SEM images were recorded at Χ2000, Χ4000 and Χ6000 magnification. The same samples were subjected to complexiometric titration using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid to gauge the actual change in the composition. Observations and Results: The SEM images of all the archwires showed marked changes with deep scratches and grooves and dark pitting corrosion areas post intraoral use. 3M wires showed an uniform criss-cross pattern in as received wires indicating a coating which was absent after intraoral use. There was a significant release of Nickel and Chromium from both group 3 and 4. Group 2 wires released ions significantly more than group 1 (P = 0.0. Conclusion: Extensive and stringent trials are required before certifying any product to be used in Orthodontics.

  10. Estimation of changes in nickel and chromium content in nickel-titanium and stainless steel orthodontic wires used during orthodontic treatment: An analytical and scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kararia, Vandana; Jain, Pradeep; Chaudhary, Seema; Kararia, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    The biocompatibility of orthodontic dental alloys has been investigated over the past 20 years, but the results have been inconclusive. The study compares standard 3 M Unitek nickel-titanium (NiTi) and stainless steel archwires with locally available JJ orthodontics wires. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) study of surface changes and complexometric titration to study compositional change was performed. Ten archwires each of group 1-3 M 0.016" NiTi, group 2-JJ 0.016" NiTi, group 3-3 M 0.019" *0.025" SS and group 4-JJ SS contributed a 10 mm piece of wire for analysis prior to insertion in the patient and 6 weeks post insertion. SEM images were recorded at ×2000, ×4000 and ×6000 magnification. The same samples were subjected to complexiometric titration using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid to gauge the actual change in the composition. The SEM images of all the archwires showed marked changes with deep scratches and grooves and dark pitting corrosion areas post intraoral use. 3M wires showed an uniform criss-cross pattern in as received wires indicating a coating which was absent after intraoral use. There was a significant release of Nickel and Chromium from both group 3 and 4. Group 2 wires released ions significantly more than group 1 (P = 0.0). Extensive and stringent trials are required before certifying any product to be used in Orthodontics.

  11. Automatic method of analysis of OCT images in the assessment of the tooth enamel surface after orthodontic treatment with fixed braces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Robert; Machoy, Monika; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Wróbel, Zygmunt

    2014-04-22

    Fixed orthodontic appliances, despite years of research and development, still raise a lot of controversy because of its potentially destructive influence on enamel. Therefore, it is necessary to quantitatively assess the condition and therein the thickness of tooth enamel in order to select the appropriate orthodontic bonding and debonding methodology as well as to assess the quality of enamel after treatment and clean-up procedure in order to choose the most advantageous course of treatment. One of the assessment methods is computed tomography where the measurement of enamel thickness and the 3D reconstruction of image sequences can be performed fully automatically. OCT images of 180 teeth were obtained from the Topcon 3D OCT-2000 camera. The images were obtained in vitro by performing sequentially 7 stages of treatment on all the teeth: before any interference into enamel, polishing with orthodontic paste, etching and application of a bonding system, orthodontic bracket bonding, orthodontic bracket removal, cleaning off adhesive residue. A dedicated method for the analysis and processing of images involving median filtering, mathematical morphology, binarization, polynomial approximation and the active contour method has been proposed. The obtained results enable automatic measurement of tooth enamel thickness in 5 seconds using the Core i5 CPU M460 @ 2.5GHz 4GB RAM. For one patient, the proposed method of analysis confirms enamel thickness loss of 80 μm (from 730 ± 165 μm to 650 ± 129 μm) after polishing with paste, enamel thickness loss of 435 μm (from 730 ± 165 μm to 295 ± 55 μm) after etching and bonding resin application, growth of a layer having a thickness of 265 μm (from 295 ± 55 μm to 560 ± 98 μm after etching) which is the adhesive system. After removing an orthodontic bracket, the adhesive residue was 105 μm and after cleaning it off, the enamel thickness was 605 μm. The enamel thickness before and

  12. Impact of fixed orthodontic appliance or clear-aligner on daily performance, in adult patients with moderate need for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feiou; Yao, Linjie; Bhikoo, Chandradev; Guo, Jing

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of wearing fixed orthodontic appliance (FOA) or clear-aligner, on daily performance in adult patients. The Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP) index was assessed in 152 adults aged 25-35 years at baseline (T0), 6 months after bonding (T1), and 12 months after bonding (T2). Participants were randomly divided into two groups: CA group (participants treated with clear-aligner) and a control group (FOA group; participants treated with FOA). Baseline malocclusion severity was assessed using the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. There were no significant differences in sociodemographic variables and OIDP scores at baseline between the two groups. Significant changes in OIDP total and subscale scores were observed while wearing FOA: OIDP total score and subscale scores of eating, cleaning teeth, smiling, and social relation at T1 and T2 were significantly higher than at baseline (P<0.05 or P<0.01). However, only OIDP total score was significantly increased at T1 compared to the baseline in the CA group. OIDP total score and subscale scores of eating, cleaning teeth, smiling, and social relation were significantly higher in patients wearing FOA than in patients wearing clear-aligner at T1 and T2 (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Patients wearing clear-aligner have fewer impacts on daily life than those wearing FOA during treatment, and have no significant changes in OIPD subscale scores at 12 months. FOA therapy significantly impacts daily performance in adult patients during treatment.

  13. A 4-year clinical evaluation of direct composite build-ups for space closure after orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Mustafa; Tuncer, Safa; Öztaş, Evren; Tekçe, Neslihan; Uysal, Ömer

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the medium-term clinical performance of direct composite build-ups for diastema closures and teeth recontouring using a nano and a nanohybrid composite in combination with three- or two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives following treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. A total of 30 patients (mean age, 19.5 years) received 147 direct composite additions for teeth recontouring and diastema closures. A nano and a nanohybrid composite (Filtek Supreme XT and CeramX Duo) were bonded to tooth structure by using a three-step (Scotchbond Multipurpose) or a two-step (XP Bond) etch and rinse adhesive. Ten out of 147 composite build-ups (composite addition) constituted tooth recontouring cases, and the remaining 137 constituted diastema closure cases. The restorations were evaluated by two experienced, calibrated examiners according to modified Ryge criteria at the following time intervals: baseline, 1, 2, 3, and 4 years. The 4-year survival rates were 92.8 % for Filtek Supreme XT/Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus and 93 % for CeramX Duo/XP Bond. Only ten restorations failed (5 Filtek Supreme XT and 5 CeramX Duo). Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the two composite-adhesive combinations with respect to color match, marginal discoloration, wear/loss of anatomical form, caries formation, marginal adaptation, and surface texture on comparing the five time periods (baseline, 1, 2, 3, and 4 years) The 4-year survival rates in the present study were favorable. The restorations exhibited excellent scores with regard to color match, marginal adaptation, surface texture, marginal discoloration, wear/loss of anatomical form, and caries formation, after 4 years of clinical evaluation. Clinical relevance An alternative clinical approach for correcting discrepancies in tooth size and form, such as performing direct composite restorations following fixed orthodontic treatment, may be an excellent and minimally invasive treatment.

  14. The Study of Factors Influencing on Orthodontic Treatment Difficulty of Impacted Maxillary Canine with Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Miresmaeili

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Maxillary canines are esthetically and functionally important, but patients with impacted maxillary canines are perceived to be more difficult and time-consuming to treat than the average orthodontic patient. The aim of this study was to define orthodontic Treatment Difficulty Index (TDI of impacted maxillary canine with CBCT according to experts' opinions.Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study, nine variables in CBCT of thirty six consecutive patients with 50 impacted maxillary canines were measured using Dolphin 3D. The related 3D and 2D pictures and the measured data were uploaded on a website. Ten orthodontists were asked to judge the difficulty of bringing the impacted canine to occlusal plane from 1 to 10 (1 = easy, 10 = extremely difficult.Then, they were also asked to evaluate the effect of each variable on treatment from 1 to 5 (1= very low, 5= very high. Random effect linear regression was used in exploration stage and then simple linear regression was used for the application of the model.Results: The patients mean age was 19.08 ± 5.8 years. Mean clinical experience of examiners was 22.7 ±12.02 years. Three variables were deleted at exploration stage and two other in model application stage. Vertical distance to the occlusal plane (P=0.000, overlap in frontal view (P=0.000, angulations of the canine to the occlusal plan (P=0.029, dilacerations (P=0.000, and rotation (P=0.029 had a significant relationship with TDI.Conclusion: Treatment difficulty of impacted maxillary canines could be predicted quantitatively by measuring variables in CBCT.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(3:30-35

  15. Evaluation of two protocols for low-level laser application in patients submitted to orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquezan, Mariana; Bolognese, Ana Maria; Araújo, Mônica Tirre de Souza

    2013-02-15

    Different low-level laser (LLL) irradiation protocols have been tested to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). Nevertheless, divergent results have been obtained. It was suggested that the stimulatory action of low level laser irradiation occurs during the proliferation and differentiation stages of bone cellular precursors, but not during later stages. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of two protocols of LLL irradiation on experimental tooth movement: One with daily irradiations and another with irradiations during the early stages. Thirty-six rats were divided into control groups (CG1, CG2, CG3) and irradiated groups (IrG1, IrG2, IrG3) according to the presence of: experimental tooth movement, laser irradiation, type of laser irradiation protocol and date of euthanasia (3th or 8th day of experiment). At the end of experimental periods, a quantitative evaluation of the amount of OTM was made and the reactions of the periodontium were analyzed by describing cellular and tissue reactions and by counting blood vessels. The amount of OTM revealed no significant differences between groups in the same experimental period (p orthodontic devices and without laser irradiation (p < 0.05). Moreover, angiogenesis was verified in some of the irradiated groups. The irradiation protocols tested were not able to accelerate OTM and root resorption was observed while they were applied.

  16. Lingual orthodontics in private practice

    OpenAIRE

    S B V Ramana Reddy; J V N Sravanthi

    2016-01-01

    Adult patients show reluctance for labial fixed orthodontic treatment owing to poor esthetics. This increased esthetic demand even during treatment led to the development of invisible bracket systems. The best appliance to meet the esthetic requirements and to give complete three-dimensional control to correct any kind of malocclusion is a fixed lingual appliance. However, one of the challenging aspects of lingual orthodontics is anterior torque control. This torque control can be achieved by...

  17. Quick response codes in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moidin Shakil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quick response (QR code codes are two-dimensional barcodes, which encodes for a large amount of information. QR codes in Orthodontics are an innovative approach in which patient details, radiographic interpretation, and treatment plan can be encoded. Implementing QR code in Orthodontics will save time, reduces paperwork, and minimizes manual efforts in storage and retrieval of patient information during subsequent stages of treatment.

  18. Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Mohanlal Bhandari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report demonstrates an orthodontic method that offers short treatment time and the ability to simultaneously reshape and increase the buccolingual thickness of the supporting alveolar bone. A 23-year-old female with Angle′s Class I moderately to severely crowded malocclusion with periodontal pocket with 31 and reduced thickness of the buccal cortical plate of lower anteriors, requested shortened orthodontic treatment time. This surgery technique included buccal full-thickness flaps, selective partial decortication of the cortical plates, concomitant bone grafting/augmentation, and primary flap closure. Following the surgery, orthodontic adjustments were made approximately every 2 weeks. From bracketing to debracketing, the case was completed in approximately 7 months and 3 weeks. Posttreatment evaluation of patient revealed good results. Preexisting thin labial bony cortical plate with lower anteriors was covered. This finding suggests credence to the incorporation of the bone augmentation procedure into the corticotomy surgery because this made it possible to complete the orthodontic treatment with a more intact periodontium. The rapid expansive tooth movements with no significant apical root resorption may be attributed to the osteoclastic or catabolic phase of the regional acceleratory phenomenon.

  19. Stability and relapse after orthodontic treatment of deep bite cases-a long-term follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danz, J C; Greuter, C; Sifakakis, I; Fayed, M; Pandis, N; Katsaros, C

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this long-term follow-up study was twofold-firstly, to assess prevalence of relapse after treatment of deep bite malocclusion and secondly, to identify risk factors that predispose patients with deep bite malocclusion to relapse. Sixty-one former patients with overbite more than 50% incisor overlap before treatment were successfully recalled. Clinical data, morphometrical measurements on plaster casts before treatment, after treatment and at long-term follow-up, as well as cephalometric measurements before and after treatment were collected. The median follow-up period was 11.9 years. Patients were treated by various treatment modalities, and the majority of patients received at least a lower fixed retainer and an upper removable bite plate during retention. Relapse was defined as increase in incisor overlap from below 50% after treatment to equal or more than 50% incisor overlap at long-term follow-up. Ten per cent of the patients showed relapse to equal or larger than 50% incisor overlap, and their amount of overbite increase was low. Among all cases with deep bite at follow-up, gingival contact and palatal impingement were more prevalent in partially corrected noncompliant cases than in relapse cases. In this sample, prevalence and amount of relapse were too low to identify risk factors of relapse. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Reliability of organic mouthwash in comparison to chlorhexidine mouthwash on Streptococcus mutans in early phase of orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitish Abrol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To test the hypothesis that there are no differences in Streptococcus mutans count in the early phase of orthodontic treatment between organic and chlorhexidine mouthwash. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients were divided into two groups: Group I: Organic mouthwash and Group II: Chlorhexidine mouthwash. The gingival index (GI, plaque index (PI, gingival bleeding index, pocket depths, and level of S. mutans counts were calculated at the different intervals of time. Paired t-test in SPSS software was used for statistical evaluations. Results: There was a significant difference in the values of GI, PI, gingival bleeding index, and pocket depth as well as in the level of streptococcal count (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Null hypothesis is rejected. This study indicates that organic mouthwash showed the lesser level of S. mutans count as compared to chlorhexidine mouthwash hence it is recommended to use organic mouthwash.

  1. Orthodontic treatment of a particular subgroup of children with special health care needs, children with craniofacial anomalies: An analysis of treatment length and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Marco; D'Alessandro, Giovanni; Amunni, Franco; Piana, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    To analyze any differences in the orthodontic treatment between children belonging to a particular subgroup of subjects with special health care needs (SHCN), children with craniofacial anomalies (CFA), and children not diagnosed with SHCN (NO SHCN). The study sample consisted of 50 children with SHCN and a confirmed diagnosis of CFA (SHCN/CFA); the control group consisted of 50 NO SHCN children fully matched for age, gender, and type of appliance used. The differences between the two groups were analyzed retrospectively: pre-, posttreatment scores, and score reduction of the Peer Assessment Rating Index (PAR), dental health component (DHC), and aesthetic component (AC) of Orthodontic Treatment Need Index (IOTN), number of appointments, number of simple or complex chair-time appointments, overall treatment time, and age at treatment start and end. There were no statistically significant differences between the SHCN/CFA and NO SHCN groups for number of appointments, overall treatment time, age at treatment start, and age at treatment end (P  =  .682, .458, .535, and .675, respectively). There were statistically significant differences between groups in PAR, DHC, AC pre- and posttreatment, and number of simple and complex chair-time appointments (P  =  .030 and .000; .020 and .023; .000 and .000; .043; and .037; respectively). The reduction of PAR, DHC, and AC scores was not significantly different between groups (P  =  .060, .765, and .825, respectively). The treatment of children with SHCN, in general, and with CFA, in particular, on the one hand involves a higher rate of using complex chair time appointments and an inferior treatment outcome, by the other side implies an overall