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Sample records for presurgical infant orthopedics

  1. An Intelligibility Assessment of Toddlers with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Received and Did Not Receive Presurgical Infant Orthopedic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konst, Emmy M.; Weersink-Braks, Hanny; Rietveld, Toni; Peters, Herman

    2000-01-01

    The influence of presurgical infant orthopedic treatment (PIO) on speech intelligibility was evaluated with 10 toddlers who used PIO during the first year of life and 10 who did not. Treated children were rated as exhibiting greater intelligibility, however, transcription data indicated there were not group differences in actual intelligibility.…

  2. Long-term effects of presurgical infant orthopedics in patients with cleft lip and palate: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzel, Aslıhan; Alparslan, Z Nazan

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the scientific evidence on the efficiency of presurgical infant orthopedic appliances in patients with cleft lip and palate to shed light on a specific, contemporary discussion of whether the appliances have long-term advantages with respect to treatment outcomes. A systematic review. Two literature surveys from the five electronic databases were performed with a 1-month interval. Randomized controlled trials and controlled clinical trials (controls had no presurgical infant orthopedics) that had follow-up periods of a minimum of 6 years were included in the study. The exceptions to the follow-up limit were studies related to feeding and parent satisfaction. Of the 319 articles retrieved in the literature surveys, 12 were qualified for the final analysis. The level of evidence of these articles ranged from 1b to 4. Eight randomized controlled trials and four controlled clinical trials were available on eight treatment outcomes. The longest follow-up period of the randomized controlled trials was 6 years. No randomized controlled trials were found on active presurgical infant orthopedic appliances and on nasoalveolar molding appliances. Based on the results, presurgical infant orthopedic appliances have no long-term positive effects on seven of the eight studied treatment outcomes in patients with cleft lip and palate. More randomized controlled trials need to be done to have evidence regarding the effects of presurgical infant orthopedics in different surgical protocols. Also, the encouraging results about the effect of nasolaveolar molding appliances on nasal symmetry have to be supported by future randomized controlled trials.

  3. Presurgical orthopedics by drink plates does not significantly normalize deglutition in infants with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösel, Michael; Fendel, Christine; Jung, Klaus; Sandoval, Paulo; Engelke, Wilfried G

    2016-03-01

    To test the null hypothesis of no significant difference between intraoral pressure characteristics in infants with cleft lip and palate (CLP) with or without presurgical orthopedic (PSO) plates (groups CLP and CLP-PSO), compared with noncleft infants. Intraoral atmospheric pressure assessments were performed on 17 subjects with preoperative CLP (m/f, 11/6; mean/SD, 4.76/0.92 months) and a matched control group (n = 24; m/f, 15/9; mean/SD, 4.88/0.9 months), for 200 seconds, simultaneously at the vestibulum (vestibular space [VS]) and at the palate (subpalatal space [SPS]), using a prepared pacifier connected to a digital manometer. Areas under the pressure curves (AUC), frequencies, durations, and magnitudes of swallowing peaks and pressure resting plateaus were compared between trial groups and locations (VS, SPS) using a two-factor analysis of variance for repeated measures, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Mann-Whitney U-test (α = .05). The null hypothesis was rejected: Globally, there were statistically significant differences in intraoral pressure characteristics between groups CLP, CLP-PSO, and control (all P < .01), with significantly higher negative pressures (AUC) in the control subjects compared with those of CLP or CLP-PSO. There were significant effects by the location of pressure recordings (VS, SPS) and their interaction with all treatment groups. Differences between noncleft and CLP subjects were more pronounced in the VS than in the SPS. There was no significant effect by PSO. PSO does not improve deviated swallowing characteristics during suction in CLP infants.

  4. Presurgical Orthopedics Appliance: The Latham Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    The Latham appliance is an active presurgical orthopedic device used for cleft defects. Its long-term effects are debated. It was introduced to help surgeons achieve a more predictable surgical outcome; hence, it should be evaluated for its presurgical benefits. The device has been successful in expanding and aligning the maxillary segments; retruding protruded premaxillae; aligning bilateral alveolar ridges; placing less tension on surgical closures; and reducing fistulation rates. However, it has not been shown to have either a positive or negative long-term effect on maxillary development or occlusion. It is a valuable preoperative tool for surgeons treating cleft defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment outcomes of pre-surgical infant orthopedics in patients with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Hosseini

    Full Text Available Non-syndromic clefts lip and/or palate (CL/P defects may have manifold significant and detrimental consequences for the affected individuals and their family environment. Although the use of pre-surgical infant orthopedics (PSIO was introduced as a means to improve management and treatment outcomes, there still remains a controversy.To investigate the effectiveness of PSIO in patients with non-syndromic CL/P and evaluate the quality of the available evidence.Search without restrictions, together with hand searching, until May 2016.Randomized clinical trials investigating the effects of pre-surgical infant orthopedic appliances.Following study retrieval and selection, data extraction and individual study risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool took place. The overall quality of the available evidence was assessed with the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach.Finally 20 papers (3 unique trials were identified, involving a total of 118 patients with unilateral complete CL/P and 16 with cleft of the soft and at least two thirds of the hard palate. Eight publications were considered as being of low, four of unclear and eight of high risk of bias. In general, the investigated appliances did not present significant effects when compared to each other or to no treatment in terms of feeding and general body growth, facial esthetics, cephalometric variables, maxillary dentoalveolar variables and dental arch relationships, speech and language evaluation, caregiver-reported outcomes, economic evaluation, as well as, adverse effects and problems. Overall, the quality of the available evidence was considered low.The aforementioned findings could provide initial guidance in the clinical setting. However, given the multitude of parameters, which may have affected the results, good practice would suggest further research, in order to reach more robust relevant recommendations for management decisions in

  6. Treatment outcomes of pre-surgical infant orthopedics in patients with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hamid Reza; Kaklamanos, Eleftherios G; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2017-01-01

    Non-syndromic clefts lip and/or palate (CL/P) defects may have manifold significant and detrimental consequences for the affected individuals and their family environment. Although the use of pre-surgical infant orthopedics (PSIO) was introduced as a means to improve management and treatment outcomes, there still remains a controversy. To investigate the effectiveness of PSIO in patients with non-syndromic CL/P and evaluate the quality of the available evidence. Search without restrictions, together with hand searching, until May 2016. Randomized clinical trials investigating the effects of pre-surgical infant orthopedic appliances. Following study retrieval and selection, data extraction and individual study risk of bias assessment using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool took place. The overall quality of the available evidence was assessed with the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. Finally 20 papers (3 unique trials) were identified, involving a total of 118 patients with unilateral complete CL/P and 16 with cleft of the soft and at least two thirds of the hard palate. Eight publications were considered as being of low, four of unclear and eight of high risk of bias. In general, the investigated appliances did not present significant effects when compared to each other or to no treatment in terms of feeding and general body growth, facial esthetics, cephalometric variables, maxillary dentoalveolar variables and dental arch relationships, speech and language evaluation, caregiver-reported outcomes, economic evaluation, as well as, adverse effects and problems. Overall, the quality of the available evidence was considered low. The aforementioned findings could provide initial guidance in the clinical setting. However, given the multitude of parameters, which may have affected the results, good practice would suggest further research, in order to reach more robust relevant recommendations for management decisions in individual

  7. Presurgical cleft lip and palate orthopedics: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzain I

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ibtesam Alzain,1 Waeil Batwa,2 Alex Cash,3 Zuhair A Murshid2 1Pediatric Dentistry, 2Orthodontic Department, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 3Cleft Lip and Palate Orthodontics, Queen Victoria NHS Foundation Trust, South Thames Cleft Service, London, UK Abstract: Patients with cleft lip and/or palate go through a lifelong journey of multidisciplinary care, starting from before birth and extending until adulthood. Presurgical orthopedic (PSO treatment is one of the earliest stages of this care plan. In this paper we provide a review of the PSO treatment. This review should help general and specialist dentists to better understand the cleft patient care path and to be able to answer patient queries more efficiently. The objectives of this paper were to review the basic principles of PSO treatment, the various types of techniques used in this therapy, and the protocol followed, and to critically evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of some of these techniques. In conclusion, we believe that PSO treatment, specifically nasoalveolar molding, does help to approximate the segments of the cleft maxilla and does reduce the intersegment space in readiness for the surgical closure of cleft sites. However, what we remain unable to prove equivocally at this point is whether the reduction in the dimensions of the cleft presurgically and the manipulation of the nasal complex benefit our patients in the long term. Keywords: presurgical orthopedic, nasoalveolar molding, cleft lip and palate

  8. Presurgical cleft lip and palate orthopedics: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzain, Ibtesam; Batwa, Waeil; Cash, Alex; Murshid, Zuhair A

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cleft lip and/or palate go through a lifelong journey of multidisciplinary care, starting from before birth and extending until adulthood. Presurgical orthopedic (PSO) treatment is one of the earliest stages of this care plan. In this paper we provide a review of the PSO treatment. This review should help general and specialist dentists to better understand the cleft patient care path and to be able to answer patient queries more efficiently. The objectives of this paper were to review the basic principles of PSO treatment, the various types of techniques used in this therapy, and the protocol followed, and to critically evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of some of these techniques. In conclusion, we believe that PSO treatment, specifically nasoalveolar molding, does help to approximate the segments of the cleft maxilla and does reduce the intersegment space in readiness for the surgical closure of cleft sites. However, what we remain unable to prove equivocally at this point is whether the reduction in the dimensions of the cleft presurgically and the manipulation of the nasal complex benefit our patients in the long term. PMID:28615974

  9. Current status of presurgical infant orthopaedic treatment for cleft lip and palate patients: A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjane, P. Priyanka; Kamble, R. H.; Diagavane, S. Pallavi; Shrivastav, S. Sunita; Batra, Puneet; Vasudevan, S. D.; Patil, Pushkar

    2014-01-01

    Rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients is a challenge for all the concerned members of the cleft team, and various treatment modalities have been attempted to obtain aesthetic results. Presurgical infant orthopaedics (PSIO) was introduced to reshape alveolar and nasal segments prior to surgical repair of cleft lip. However, literature reports lot of controversy regarding the use of PSIO in patients with CLP. Evaluation of long-term results of PSIO can provide scientific evidence on the efficacy and usefulness of PSIO in CLP patients. The aim was to assess the scientific evidence on the efficiency of PSIO appliances in patients with CLP and to critically analyse the current status of PSIO. A PubMed search was performed using the terms PSIO, presurgical nasoalveolar moulding and its long-term results and related articles were selected for the review. The documented studies report no beneficial effect of PSIO on maxillary arch dimensions, facial aesthetics and in the subsequent development of dentition and occlusion in CLP patients. Nasal moulding seems to be more beneficial and effective in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients with better long-term results. PMID:25593413

  10. Current status of presurgical infant orthopaedic treatment for cleft lip and palate patients: A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Priyanka Niranjane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate (CLP patients is a challenge for all the concerned members of the cleft team, and various treatment modalities have been attempted to obtain aesthetic results. Presurgical infant orthopaedics (PSIO was introduced to reshape alveolar and nasal segments prior to surgical repair of cleft lip. However, literature reports lot of controversy regarding the use of PSIO in patients with CLP. Evaluation of long-term results of PSIO can provide scientific evidence on the efficacy and usefulness of PSIO in CLP patients. The aim was to assess the scientific evidence on the efficiency of PSIO appliances in patients with CLP and to critically analyse the current status of PSIO. A PubMed search was performed using the terms PSIO, presurgical nasoalveolar moulding and its long-term results and related articles were selected for the review. The documented studies report no beneficial effect of PSIO on maxillary arch dimensions, facial aesthetics and in the subsequent development of dentition and occlusion in CLP patients. Nasal moulding seems to be more beneficial and effective in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients with better long-term results.

  11. Effect of presurgical orthopedics on oral-health related quality of life in Chilean children with cleft lip and palate. A pilot study.

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    Pedro Christian Aravena

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effect of Presurgical Orthopedics (PSO on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL in Children with Cleft Lip and Palate (CLP treated in two hospitals in Chile using the Spanish version of the Child Oral Health Impact Profile (COHIP-Sp. Method: Cross-sectional study, involving 42 children with CLP (mean age 12±2.1 years; 28 men who attended their annual checkup at the main Hospital of Valdivia and at the Hospital Fundacion Gantz in Santiago, Chile, between March and April 2016. Those who met the selection criteria were applied the COHIP-Sp scale. Based on their medical records, patients who used PSO as treatment protocol were classified as "PSO". Those who did not receive treatment with the appliance were classified as "Non-PSO". The score of the COHIP-Sp scale and its domains between the two groups was compared (t-test, p<0.05. Results: Twenty-five patients (59.5% used PSO. COHIP-Sp score was 91.7±26.2 points in the PSO group, and 81.2±30.9 points in the Non-PSO group. There was no statistically significant difference (p=0.24. Conclusion: OHRQoL of patients with CLP treated with PSO was similar to that of patients not treated with PSO.

  12. Effect of infant orthopedics on facial appearance of toddlers with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (Dutchcleft).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaarts, C.A.M.; Prahl-Andersen, B.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Mulder, J.W.; Vaandrager, J.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of infant orthopedics (IO) on facial appearance of 54 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), aged 4 and 6 years. DESIGN: Prospective two-arm randomized controlled clinical trial in three Cleft Palate Centers in the Netherlands (Dutchcleft-trial).

  13. Infant orthopedics and facial growth in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate until six years of age (Dutchcleft)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaarts, C.A.M.; Prahl-Andersen, B.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Prahl, C.; Ongkosuwito, E.M.; Borstlap, W.A.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate longitudinally the effect of infant orthopedics (IO) on dentofacial cephalometric variables in unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients from 4 to 6 years of age. Design: Prospective two-arm randomized controlled clinical trial in three cleft palate centers in The

  14. Effect of infant orthopedics on facial appearance of toddlers with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (Dutchcleft)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaarts, C.A.M.; Prahl-Andersen, B.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Mulder, J.W.; Vaandrager, J.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of infant orthopedics (IO) on facial appearance of 54 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), aged 4 and 6 years. Design: Prospective two-arm randomized controlled clinical trial in three Cleft Palate Centers in the Netherlands (Dutchcleft-trial).

  15. Language skills of young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate following infant orthopedics: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konst, E.M.; Rietveld, T.; Peters, H.F.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of infant orthopedics (IO) on the language skills of children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). DESIGN: In a prospective randomized clinical trial (Dutchcleft), two groups of children with complete UCLP were followed up longitudinally: one

  16. Presurgical and postsurgical assessment of the neurodevelopment of infants with single-suture craniosynostosis: comparison with controls

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    Starr, Jacqueline R.; Kapp-Simon, Kathleen A.; Cloonan, Yona Keich; Collett, Brent R.; Cradock, Mary Michaeleen; Buono, Lauren; Cunningham, Michael L.; Speltz, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    Object Although most infants with single-suture craniosynostosis (SSC) appear to have neurodevelopmental test scores in the average range, SSC has been associated with cognitive and motor delays during infancy. Whether and when surgery improves such deficits are not yet known. The authors aimed to compare the pre- and postsurgical neurodevelopmental status of patients with SSC with those of control infants without craniosynostosis. Methods The authors conducted a large, multicenter, longitudinal study of 168 infants with craniosynostosis and 115 controls without synostosis who were of similar age, race, sex, and socioeconomic status. The authors assessed participants by using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Second Edition (BSID-II) and the Preschool Language Scale, Third Edition (PLS-3) at enrollment, before patients’ intracranial surgery, and when participants were 18 months of age (after surgery for patients). Results After adjusting for potential confounding factors in linear regression analyses, the authors found a tendency for patients to perform similarly to or slightly worse than controls on neurodevelopmental examinations at both visits. After surgery, the patients’ mean scores were 0.6 to three points lower than those of controls on the five BSID-II and PLS-3 scales (p = 0.02–0.07). Compared with controls, patients had 2.3 and 1.9 times the adjusted odds of scoring in the delayed range on either BSID-II scale (Mental Development Index and Psychomotor Development Index) for the first and second visits, respectively (p = 0.001 and p = 0.015, respectively). The patients’ mean adjusted test scores were nearly unrelated to the timing of their surgery. Conclusions These findings support recommendations for neurodevelopmental screening in infants with SSC. Longer follow-up, as is being conducted with the patients in the present study, will be critical for identifying the potential longer-term correlates of SSC and its surgical correction. PMID

  17. Treatment modalities of infants with upper airway obstruction--review of the literature and presentation of novel orthopedic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochel, Janka; Meyer-Marcotty, Philipp; Wirbelauer, Johannes; Böhm, Hartmut; Kochel, Michael; Thomas, Wolfgang; Bareis, Ute; Hebestreit, Helge; Speer, Christian; Stellzig-Eisenhauer, Angelika

    2011-01-01

    To present a new orthopedic method for treatment of infants with Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) and upper airway obstruction (UAO) as an alternative to other established nonsurgical and surgical techniques such as positioning, nasopharyngeal or endotracheal intubation, tongue-lip adhesion, extension, distraction, or tracheostomy. Review of the literature and presentation of novel orthopedic appliances. Department of Orthodontics, Dental Clinic, Medical Faculty of the University of Wuerzburg, Germany, Department and Clinic of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty of the University of Wuerzburg, Germany, 2005 to 2008. Seven patients with significant respiratory and feeding difficulties between 0 and 6 months of age. Both patients with nonsyndromic PRS and patients with syndromic PRS were included. The type of respiratory tract obstruction was defined by nasopharyngoscopy. Patients with type 1 obstruction received a plate with an epiglottic spur; whereas, patients with obstruction type 2, 3, or 4 received a plate with a pharyngeal tube. All patients were successfully treated with orthopedic appliances alone. Under plate therapy they showed good oxygen saturation and could consequently be better nourished orally. The presented novel method is a noninvasive technique in treatment of infants with UAO.

  18. The effect of infant orthopedics on the occlusion of the deciduous dentition in children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (Dutchcleft).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaarts, C.A.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Prahl-Andersen, B.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the effect of infant orthopedics (IO) on the occlusion of the deciduous dentition in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP). DESIGN: Prospective, two-arm, randomized, controlled clinical trial with three participating cleft palate centers (Dutchcleft). SETTING:

  19. Infant orthopedics has no effect on maxillary arch dimensions in the deciduous dentition of children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (Dutchcleft).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaarts, C.A.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Prahl-Andersen, B.; Dirks, I.V.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the effect of infant orthopedics on maxillary arch dimensions in the deciduous dentition in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate. DESIGN: Prospective two-arm randomized controlled clinical trial with three participating cleft palate centers. SETTING: Cleft palate

  20. Transverse dental arch relationship at 9 and 12 years in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate treated with infant orthopedics: a randomized clinical trial (DUTCHCLEFT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noverraz, R.L.M.; Disse, M.A.; Ongkosuwito, E.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Prahl, C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective A long-term evaluation to assess the transverse dental arch relationships at 9 and 12 years of age in unilateral cleft lip and palate treated with or without infant orthopedics (IO). The hypothesis is that IO has no effect on the transverse dental arch relationship. Material and methods A

  1. Use of a perceptual evaluation instrument to assess the effects of infant orthopedics on the speech of toddlers with cleft lip and palate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konst, E.M.; Rietveld, T.; Peters, H.F.M.; Weersink-Braks, H.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of infant orthopedics (IO) administered in the first year of life on the speech characteristics of 2.5-year-old children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) using a perceptual evaluation instrument with equal-appearing interval (EAI) scales.

  2. [Locomotor development in infants with developmental dysplasia of the hip or idiopathic clubfoot undergoing orthopedic treatment. Prospective comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masquijo, J J; Campos, L; Torres-Gómez, A; Allende, V

    2013-10-01

    Several disorders of early childhood, such as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and clubfoot, requires orthopedic treatment that limits active mobility of the lower extremities for a period of time. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact on locomotor development of the orthopedic treatment in infants less than one year-old. The study included a prospective cohort of consecutive patients diagnosed with developmental dysplasia of the hip (Group A, 24 patients), and clubfoot (Group B, 32 patients) treated from January 2007 to June 2009. A third group (Group C) of 50 healthy children was used as control. The variables evaluated were: months with a brace, age to sit without support, age at the start of crawling, and age at the beginning of walking. The results obtained were analyzed. Comparisons between the three groups were performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. We chose a value of P<.05 as level of statistical significance. The analysis of independent samples showed that the mean age at which the patients began to sit were similar: 6.12, 6.42 and 6.19 months, respectively (P=.249). The mean age for crawling was similar, although with a slight trend toward statistical significance: 8.84, 9.38 and 9.17 months, respectively (P=.08). The age at which they started walking was different between the three groups: 12.14, 13.21 and 12.41 months, respectively (P<.001). Orthopedic treatment of DDH and clubfoot in children less than one year-old slightly slows down the course of normal locomotor development. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Orthopedic services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007455.htm Orthopedic services To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Orthopedics, or orthopedic services, aim at the treatment of ...

  4. Pre: Surgical orthopedic pre-maxillary alignment in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient

    OpenAIRE

    Ellore, Vijaya Prasad Kamavaram; Ramagoni, Naveen Kumar; Taranatha, Mahantesha; Nara, Asha; Gunjalli, Gururaj; Bhat, Ashwin Devasya

    2012-01-01

    Pre-surgical orthopedic appliances are mainly used to retract and align the protruded and deviated pre-maxilla and to facilitate initial lip repair. This article presents a case report of a five year old male child patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate in whom a special custom made pre-surgical orthopedic appliance was delivered. Use of a special custom made presurgical orthopedic appliance for repositioning pre-maxilla in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient is discussed in this arti...

  5. Pre: Surgical orthopedic pre-maxillary alignment in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient

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    Vijaya Prasad Kamavaram Ellore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-surgical orthopedic appliances are mainly used to retract and align the protruded and deviated pre-maxilla and to facilitate initial lip repair. This article presents a case report of a five year old male child patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate in whom a special custom made pre-surgical orthopedic appliance was delivered. Use of a special custom made presurgical orthopedic appliance for repositioning pre-maxilla in bilateral cleft lip and palate patient is discussed in this article.

  6. Emergency presurgical visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Castro Díaz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective has been to create a Protocol of Structured Presurgical Visit applicable to the patients who are undergoing an emergency surgery, to provide the user and his family all the necessary cares on the basis of those nursing diagnosis that prevail in all the cases of surgical emergency interventions. The used method has been an analysis of the emergency surgical interventions more prevalent from February 2007 until October 2008 in our area (a regional hospital, and statistic of those nursing diagnosis that more frequently appeared in these interventions, the previous moment to the intervention and in addition common to all of them. The results were the following ones: the more frequent emergency operations were: Caesarean, ginecological curettage, laparotomy, help in risk childbirth, orthopaedic surgery and appendectomy. The more frequent nursing diagnosis in all the emergency operations at the previous moment of the intervention were: risk of falls, pain, anxiety, deficit of knowledge, risk of infection, movement stress syndrome, risk of hemorrhage, cutaneous integrity deterioration. The conclusion is that users present at the previous moment to an emergency operation several problems, which force to the emergency surgical ward nurse to the introduction of the nursing methodology, in order to identify the problems, to mark results and to indicate the interventions to achieve those results, besides in a humanitarian way and with quality. This can be obtained by performing a Structured Emergency Presurgical Visit.

  7. Orthopedic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, T.

    1978-01-01

    The clinical performance of the Lixiscope in orthopedics was compared with routine radiography. Portability and size were the major advantages of the Lixiscope. The main disadvantage at this point in time was the Lixiscope's inability to study large areas.

  8. Medical Issues: Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... support & care > living with sma > medical issues > orthopedics Orthopedics In SMA, muscle weakness can cause several complications. ... difficulty sitting, standing, or performing normal daily activities. Orthopedic Considerations Doctors and therapists classify individuals with SMA ...

  9. Comparative study of presurgical hand hygiene with hydroalcoholic solution versus traditional presurgical hand hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Martín, M Beatriz; Erice Calvo-Sotelo, Alejo

    To compare presurgical hand hygiene with hydroalcoholic solution following the WHO protocol with traditional presurgical hand hygiene. Cultures of the hands of surgeons and surgical nurses were performed before and after presurgical hand hygiene and after removing gloves at the end of surgery. Cultures were done in 2different days: the first day after traditional presurgical hand hygiene, and the second day after presurgical hand hygiene with hydroalcoholic solution following the WHO protocol. The duration of the traditional hand hygiene was measured and compared with the duration (3min) of the WHO protocol. The cost of the products used in the traditional technique was compared with the cost of the hydroalcoholic solution used. The variability of the traditional technique was determined by observation. Following presurgical hand hygiene with hydroalcoholic solution, colony-forming units (CFU) were detected in 5 (7.3%) subjects, whereas after traditional presurgical hand hygiene CFU were detected in 14 subjects (20.5%) (p < 0.05). After glove removal, the numbers of CFU were similar. The time employed in hand hygiene with hydroalcoholic solution (3min) was inferior to the time employed in the traditional technique (p < 0.05), its cost was less than half, and there was no variability. Compared with other techniques, presurgical hand hygiene with hydroalcoholic solution significantly decreases CFU, has similar latency time, a lower cost, and saves time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. 2012 American Board of Pediatric Dentistry College of Diplomates annual meeting: the role of pediatric dentists in the presurgical treatment of infants with cleft lip/cleft palate utilizing nasoalveolar molding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammad M; Brecht, Lawrence E; Cutting, Court B; Grayson, Barry H

    2012-01-01

    The pediatric dentist plays a crucial role in the treatment and management of infants born with cleft deformities of the lip, alveolus, and palate. At New York University Langone Medical Center in New York City, 70% of infants with cleft lip/cleft palate (CLCP) are detected on prenatal ultrasound analysis. Thus, the role of the pediatric dentist can start as early as prenatal counseling. Nasoalveolar molding (NAM) is delivered during the first 3 to 5 months of life. During this stage of treatment, the pediatric dentist establishes the foundation of the “cleft dental” home and initiates the first stage of anticipatory guidance. Consequently, parents are educated and motivated to initiate oral hygiene care upon eruption of the first primary teeth. The purpose of this paper was to describe the role of the pediatric dentist in performing nasoalveolar molding and also describe its indications, appliance design, fabrication, biomechanics, complications, and patient management.

  11. Custom Made Pressure Appliance for Presurgical Sustained ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Plastic Surgery for the fabrication of ear pressure clip for the left auricular keloid. She complained of swelling ... A case of presurgical size reduction for a large ear keloid with a custom made pressure appliance is presented. ... She was also instructed about use, maintenance of hygiene and regular follow-up for periodic ...

  12. Custom Made Pressure Appliance for Presurgical Sustained ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among the most common complications of this therapy is ulceration due to excessive pressure. A case of presurgical size reduction for a large ear keloid with a custom made pressure appliance is presented. This novel design of the appliance allows for better control over the amount and direction of the pressure applied on ...

  13. Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions KidsHealth / For Parents / Common Childhood Orthopedic Conditions What's in this article? Flatfeet Toe Walking ...

  14. An overview of pre-surgical evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurupath Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of an epilepsy surgery program depends upon the early identification of potential surgical candidates and selecting from them, ideal candidates for surgery, who are destined to have a post-operative seizure-free outcome without any unacceptable neurological deficits. Since epilepsy surgery centers in resource-poor countries will lack the full range of state-of-the-art technologies usually available in resource-rich countries to perform pre-surgical evaluation, cost-effectively utilization of the locally available investigative facilities to select the surgical candidates becomes challenging. In the present era of rapid electronic communications and telemedicine, it has become possible for epilepsy surgery centers to pool their technological and human resources and to partner with centers nationally and internationally in implementing pre-surgical evaluation strategies.

  15. Pre-surgical register of tobacco consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilán, Eva; Moreno, Montse; Pérez, Àngels; Castellano, Yolanda; Fernández, Esteve; Martínez, Cristina

    2018-03-24

    Smoking cessation before surgery decreases the risk of complications. The aim of this study was to analyse the smoking register, associated variables and a short talk given to smokers in pre-surgical visits. Cross-sectional study. The pre-surgical records of 680 patients were assessed. We selected patient sociodemographic variables, surgical intervention characteristics, smoking status and consumption pattern. Logistic regression was used to study the variables association with smoking. A percentage of 97.2 of the pre-surgical records include information on tobacco consumption. Overall 20% of surgical patients are smokers. The probability of smoking is higher among men (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7-4.0) and≤60 years (aOR 5.4, 95% CI 3.2-9.1). None of the records had information regarding a short talk given to patients to give up smoking. Smoking consumption was prevalent, but the characterisation of a smoker's profile and short talk given to patient before surgery was practically nonexistent. Ensuring that patients who smokes receives a short talk to give up smoking before surgery is necessary. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Orthobiologics in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert F; Mooney, James F

    2017-07-01

    Orthobiologics are biologic devices or products used in orthopedic surgery to augment or enhance bone formation. The use of orthobiologics in pediatric orthopedics is less frequent than in other orthopedic subspecialties, mainly due to the naturally abundant healing potential and bone formation in children compared with adults. However, orthobiologics are used in certain situations in pediatric orthopedics, particularly in spine and foot surgery. Other uses have been reported in conjunction with specific procedures involving the tibia and pelvis. The use of bioabsorable implants to stabilize children's fractures is an emerging concept but has limited supporting data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Breastfeeding is early functional jaw orthopedics (an introduction).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, D C

    2001-01-01

    Breastfeeding places beneficial orthopedic forces on the jaws, similar to the forces of Functional Jaw Orthopedics--the newest form of orthodontics. To date most breastfeeding benefits have been attributed to the content of mother's milk. The true orthopedic benefits of breastfeeding, suckling, deserve more definitive attention and research. Breastfeeding is early preventive Functional Jaw Orthopedics because breastfeeding forces impact the jaws during a very rapid period of infant jaw growth. Breast suckling aids proper development of the jaws which form the gateway to the human airway. Bottle, pacifier and digit sucking deform jaws and airways. Forward forces of suckling clearly oppose the backward forces of sucking. Dentists who understand the positive impact of forward orthopedic forces on the jaws should support and advocate exclusive breastfeeding for about 6 months.

  18. SECOT-GEDOS consensus on pre-surgical pain management in knee and hip arthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Ibán, M A; Maculé, F; Torner, P; Gil Garay, E; Oteo-Álvaro, A; López Millán, J M; Díaz Heredia, J; Loza, E

    2015-01-01

    To develop recommendations, based on best evidence and experience, on pain management in patients undertaking total knee or hip replacement. Nominal group methodology was followed. A group of experts was selected (5 orthopedics, 1 anesthesiologist), who defined the scope, users, topics, preliminary recommendations, and 3 systematic reviews: efficacy and safety of pre-surgical analgesia regarding to post-surgical pain, efficacy and safety of pre-emptive analgesia and pre-operative factors of post-operative pain. The level of evidence and grade of recommendation was established using the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine, and the level of agreement with the Delphi technique (2 rounds). The Delphi was extended to 39 orthopedics and anesthesiologists. The whole document was reviewed by all the experts. A total of 21 recommendations were produced. They include specific pharmacological treatment, as well as the evaluation and monitoring of patients on this treatment, and post-operative pre-emptive treatment. Agreement above 70% was reached in 19 recommendations. In patients undergoing total knee or hip replacement, a proper evaluation, follow-up, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of predictors of poor surgical outcomes should be performed, especially those related to pre-operative pain. This can improve post-operative pain and surgery outcomes. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding in unilateral cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Zuhaib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Presurgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNAM is a non-surgical method of reshaping the cleft lip, alveolus, palate and the nose to minimize the severity of the cleft deformity, before primary cheiloplastyand palatoplasty. In this context, PNAM proves to be an invaluable asset in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate. Aims: The study was conducted to evaluate the effi cacy of PNAM in the management of unilateral cleft lip and palate with the following objectives: (1 To assess and compare the degree of reduction in the size of cleft palate and alveolus (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM. (2 To evaluate and compare the improvement in columellar length and correction of columellar deviation (pre-PNAM and post-PNAM. (3 To assess the changes in the position of the alar base and the alar cartilages. Settings and Design: Prospective study. Subjects and Methods: A prospective study consisting of, which included 20 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate was conducted. The age at the start of PNAM treatment of the infants ranged from 2 to 44 days of age reporting to our institute between December 2011 and August 2013. All the patients underwent PNAM therapy before primary cheiloplasty at 6 months of age; clinical parameters were assessed pre- and post-therapy using photographs and dental study models of the maxilla. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test for paired comparisons. Results: Results of the study showed a promising reduction in the cleft size before the surgery, signifi cant improvement in nasal symmetry, including the columellar length on the cleft side. Conclusions: PNAM is a valuable adjunct to our surgical armamentarium in dealing with the challenges of primary closure of unilateral cleft lip and palate thereby enhancing the overall surgical outcome. The advantages of this method include the simplicity of the procedure and improving the quality of surgical repair, particularly in obtaining tension free muscle

  20. Diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging and pre-surgical evaluation in the assessment of traumatic intra-articular knee disorders in children and adolescents: what conditions still pose diagnostic challenges?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gans, Itai; Ganley, Theodore J. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Orthopaedics, 34th and Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bedoya, Maria A.; Ho-Fung, Victor [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-08-31

    Diagnosis of intra-articular lesions in children based on clinical examination and MRI is particularly challenging. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation of the knee in pediatric patients relative to arthroscopic evaluation as the gold standard. We report diagnoses frequently missed or inaccurately diagnosed pre-operatively. We conducted a retrospective review of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation in children and adolescents ages 1-17 years who were treated by knee arthroscopy during a 21/2-year period. All MRIs were reviewed by a pediatric radiologist blinded to clinical findings. Pediatric orthopedic clinic notes were reviewed for pre-surgical evaluation (based on physical exam, radiograph, MR images and radiologist's MRI report). Arthroscopic findings were used as the gold standard. We calculated the percentages of diagnoses at arthroscopy missed on both MRI and pre-surgical evaluation. Diagnostic accuracy between children and adolescents and in patients with one pathological lesion vs. those with >1 lesion was analyzed. We performed a second review of MR images of the missed or over-called MRI diagnoses with knowledge of arthroscopic findings. We included 178 children and adolescents. The most common diagnoses missed on MRI or pre-surgical evaluation but found at arthroscopy were: discoid meniscus (8/30, or 26.7% of cases); lateral meniscal tears (15/80, or 18.8% of cases); intra-articular loose bodies (5/36, or 13.9% of cases), and osteochondral injuries (9/73, or 12.3% of cases). Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation was 92.7% and 95.3%, respectively. No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between children and adolescents was observed. When multiple intra-articular lesions were present, lateral meniscal tears were more likely to be inaccurately diagnosed (missed or over-called) on both MRI (P = 0.009) and pre-surgical evaluation (P < 0.001). Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and pre-surgical

  1. Diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging and pre-surgical evaluation in the assessment of traumatic intra-articular knee disorders in children and adolescents: what conditions still pose diagnostic challenges?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gans, Itai; Ganley, Theodore J.; Bedoya, Maria A.; Ho-Fung, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of intra-articular lesions in children based on clinical examination and MRI is particularly challenging. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation of the knee in pediatric patients relative to arthroscopic evaluation as the gold standard. We report diagnoses frequently missed or inaccurately diagnosed pre-operatively. We conducted a retrospective review of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation in children and adolescents ages 1-17 years who were treated by knee arthroscopy during a 21/2-year period. All MRIs were reviewed by a pediatric radiologist blinded to clinical findings. Pediatric orthopedic clinic notes were reviewed for pre-surgical evaluation (based on physical exam, radiograph, MR images and radiologist's MRI report). Arthroscopic findings were used as the gold standard. We calculated the percentages of diagnoses at arthroscopy missed on both MRI and pre-surgical evaluation. Diagnostic accuracy between children and adolescents and in patients with one pathological lesion vs. those with >1 lesion was analyzed. We performed a second review of MR images of the missed or over-called MRI diagnoses with knowledge of arthroscopic findings. We included 178 children and adolescents. The most common diagnoses missed on MRI or pre-surgical evaluation but found at arthroscopy were: discoid meniscus (8/30, or 26.7% of cases); lateral meniscal tears (15/80, or 18.8% of cases); intra-articular loose bodies (5/36, or 13.9% of cases), and osteochondral injuries (9/73, or 12.3% of cases). Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation was 92.7% and 95.3%, respectively. No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between children and adolescents was observed. When multiple intra-articular lesions were present, lateral meniscal tears were more likely to be inaccurately diagnosed (missed or over-called) on both MRI (P = 0.009) and pre-surgical evaluation (P < 0.001). Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and pre-surgical

  2. Ictal PET in presurgical workup of refractory extratemporal epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javeria Nooraine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ictal Pet in presurgical workup of refractory epilepsy is seldom performed and limited due to technical difficulties. In carefully selected patient subset with frequent extratemporal seizures, ictal PET depicts ′seizure onset zone′ with high spatial resolution even within a widespread pathology. We here depict a four year old with posterior quadrant dysplasia evaluated with ictal PET.

  3. Multimodal neuroimaging in presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Weifang; Chen, Hui; Xia, Hong; Zhou, Zhen; Mei, Shanshan; Liu, Qingzhu; Li, Yunlin

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial EEG (icEEG) monitoring is critical in epilepsy surgical planning, but it has limitations. The advances of neuroimaging have made it possible to reveal epileptic abnormalities that could not be identified previously and improve the localization of the seizure focus and the vital cortex. A frequently asked question in the field is whether non-invasive neuroimaging could replace invasive icEEG or reduce the need for icEEG in presurgical evaluation. This review considers promising neuroimaging techniques in epilepsy presurgical assessment in order to address this question. In addition, due to large variations in the accuracies of neuroimaging across epilepsy centers, multicenter neuroimaging studies are reviewed, and there is much need for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to better reveal the utility of presurgical neuroimaging. The results of multiple studies indicate that non-invasive neuroimaging could not replace invasive icEEG in surgical planning especially in non-lesional or extratemporal lobe epilepsies, but it could reduce the need for icEEG in certain cases. With technical advances, multimodal neuroimaging may play a greater role in presurgical evaluation to reduce the costs and risks of epilepsy surgery, and provide surgical options for more patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.

  4. Orthopedic radiology in the postoperative patient (practical orthopedic radiology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, B.N.; Gelman, M.I.

    1987-01-01

    This course examines various aspects of the radiologic examination of postoperative orthopedic patients. The operative indications, pertinent aspects of surgical technique, expected postoperative radiographic appearances, and radiographic findings indicating postoperative complications are discussed. The evaluation of total joint replacement surgery, spinal surgery, lower extremity procedures, and failed orthopedic devices and appliances are covered

  5. Orthopedic X-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernau, A.

    1982-01-01

    Positioning techniques have been developed as a means of standardizing skeleton pictures so as to facilitate functional interpretations in orthopedics. Standard positions are described as well as specific orthopedic and traumatological problems. The list of positions must, of course, be incomplete as there are too many. Access to the subject is facilitated by a systematic approach. (orig.) [de

  6. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  7. Greening of orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rushyuan J; Mears, Simon C

    2012-06-01

    Every year, 4 billion pounds of waste are produced by health care facilities, and the amount continues to increase annually. In response, a movement toward greening health care has been building, with a particular focus on the operating room. Between 20% and 70% of health care waste originates from a hospital's operating room, and up to 90% of operating room waste is improperly sorted and sent for costly and unneeded hazardous waste processing. Recent successful changes include segregation of hospital waste, substitution of the ubiquitous polypropylene plastic wrap used for the sterilization and handling of surgical equipment with metal cases, and the reintroduction of reusable surgical gowns. Orthopedic-related changes include the successful reprocessing and reuse of external fixators, shavers, blades, burs, and tourniquets. These changes have been shown to be environmentally and economically beneficial. Early review indicates that these changes are feasible, but a need exists for further evaluation of the effect on the operating room and flow of the surgical procedure and of the risks to the surgeons and operating room staff. Other key considerations are the effects of reprocessed and reused equipment on patient care and outcome and the role of surgeons in helping patients make informed decisions regarding surgical care. The goals of this study were to summarize the amount and types of waste produced in hospitals and operating rooms, highlight the methods of disposal used, review disposal methods that have been developed to reduce waste and improve recycling, and explore future developments in greening health care. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Plasma Biomedicine in Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Satsohi

    2012-10-01

    Various effects of plasmas irradiation on cells, tissues, and biomaterials relevant for orthopedic applications have been examined. For direct application of plasmas to living cells or tissues, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) with helium flows into ambient air were used. For biomaterial processing, on the other hand, either helium DBDs mentioned above or low-pressure discharges generated in a chamber were used. In this presentation, plasma effects on cell proliferation and plasma treatment for artificial bones will be discussed. First, the conditions for enhanced cell proliferation in vitro by plasma applications have been examined. The discharge conditions for cell proliferation depend sensitively on cell types. Since cell proliferation can be enhanced even when the cells are cultured in a plasma pre-treated medium, long-life reactive species generated in the medium by plasma application or large molecules (such as proteins) in the medium modified by the plasma are likely to be the cause of cell proliferation. It has been found that there is strong correlation between (organic) hydroperoxide generation and cell proliferation. Second, effects of plasma-treated artificial bones made of porous hydroxyapatite (HA) have been examined in vitro and vivo. It has been found that plasma treatment increases hydrophilicity of the surfaces of microscopic inner pores, which directly or indirectly promotes differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells introduced into the pores and therefore causes faster bone growth. The work has been performed in collaboration with Prof. H. Yoshikawa and his group members at the School of Medicine, Osaka University.

  9. Orthopedic workforce planning in Germany - an analysis of orthopedic accessibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bauer

    Full Text Available In Germany, orthopedic workforce planning relies on population-to-provider-ratios represented by the 'official degree of care provision'. However, with geographic information systems (GIS, more sophisticated measurements are available. By utilizing GIS-based technologies we analyzed the current state of demand and supply of the orthopedic workforce in Germany (orthopedic accessibility with the integrated Floating Catchment Area method. The analysis of n = 153,352,220 distances revealed significant geographical variations on national scale: 5,617,595 people (6.9% of total population lived in an area with significant low orthopedic accessibility (average z-score = -4.0, whereas 31,748,161 people (39.0% of total population lived in an area with significant high orthopedic accessibility (average z-score = 8.0. Accessibility was positively correlated with the degree of urbanization (r = 0.49; p<0.001 and the official degree of care provision (r = 0.33; p<0.001 and negatively correlated with regional social deprivation (r = -0.47; p<0.001. Despite advantages of simpler measures regarding implementation and acceptance in health policy, more sophisticated measures of accessibility have the potential to reduce costs as well as improve health care. With this study, significant geographical variations were revealed that show the need to reduce oversupply in less deprived urban areas in order to enable adequate care in more deprived rural areas.

  10. Stereoscopic virtual reality presurgical planning for cerebrospinal otorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Luo; Yang, De-Lin; Wu, Jin-Song

    2010-07-01

    We present a complicated case of spontaneous cerebrospinal otorrhea, which had not been cured despite undergoing 5 surgical interventions in the past. The disability to identify the location of the fistula was the main crux of the past failures. On this occasion, stereoscopic virtual reality presurgical planning was applied to identify the exact location of the fistula and a surgical simulation was performed, and was later confirmed during the actual operation. Interactive manipulation in a stereoscopic virtual environment makes the decision making process easier in the treatment of cerebrospinal otorrhea.

  11. Improved patient specific seizure detection during pre-surgical evaluation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chua, Eric C-P

    2011-04-01

    There is considerable interest in improved off-line automated seizure detection methods that will decrease the workload of EEG monitoring units. Subject-specific approaches have been demonstrated to perform better than subject-independent ones. However, for pre-surgical diagnostics, the traditional method of obtaining a priori data to train subject-specific classifiers is not practical. We present an alternative method that works by adapting the threshold of a subject-independent to a specific subject based on feedback from the user.

  12. Medical photography: principles for orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Metin; Bülbül, Murat; Toker, Serdar; Beksaç, Burak; Kara, Adnan

    2014-04-05

    Medical photography is used clinically for patient evaluation, treatment decisions, and scientific documentation. Although standards for medical photography exist in many branches of medicine, we have not encountered such criteria in publications in the area of orthopedics. This study aims to (1) assess the quality of medical images used in an orthopedic publication and (2) to propose standards for medical photography in this area. Clinical photographs were reviewed from all issues of a journal published between the years 2008 and 2012. A quality of clinical images was developed based on the criteria published for the specialties of dermatology and cosmetic surgery. All images were reviewed on the appropriateness of background, patient preparation, and technique. In this study, only 44.9% of clinical images in an orthopedic publication adhered to the proposed conventions. Standards have not been established for medical photography in orthopedics as in other specialty areas. Our results suggest that photographic clinical information in orthopedic publications may be limited by inadequate presentation. We propose that formal conventions for clinical images should be established.

  13. Moral Dilemmas in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, John J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2015-12-01

    All orthopedic surgeons face moral dilemmas on a regular basis; however, little has been written about the moral dilemmas that are encountered when providing orthopedic care to pediatric patients and their families. This article aims to provide surgeons with a better understanding of how bioethics and professionalism apply to the care of their pediatric patients. First, several foundational concepts of both bioethics and professionalism are summarized, and definitions are offered for 16 important terms within the disciplines. Next, some of the unique aspects of pediatric orthopedics as a subspecialty are reviewed before engaging in a discussion of 5 common moral dilemmas within the field. Those dilemmas include the following: (1) obtaining informed consent and assent for either surgery or research from pediatric patients and their families; (2) performing cosmetic surgery on pediatric patients; (3) caring for pediatric patients with cognitive or physical impairments; (4) caring for injured pediatric athletes; and (5) meeting the demand for pediatric orthopedic care in the United States. Pertinent considerations are reviewed for each of these 5 moral dilemmas, thereby better preparing surgeons for principled moral decision making in their own practices. Each of these dilemmas is inherently complex with few straightforward answers; however, orthopedic surgeons have an obligation to take the lead and better define these kinds of difficult issues within their field. The lives of pediatric patients and their families will be immeasurably improved as a result. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Characteristics of cancer patients participating in presurgical lifestyle intervention trials exploring effects on tumor biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Dasher

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Similar to other clinical trials, lack of time is a leading barrier to enrollment, and travel/distance appears to be a greater barrier for women in presurgical studies. Larger presurgical lifestyle intervention trials will require tailored strategies to enhance recruitment.

  15. Transient splenium lesions in presurgical epilepsy patients: incidence and pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelles, M.; Falkenhausen, M. von; Urbach, H. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Radiology/Neuroradiology, Bonn (Germany); Bien, C.G.; Kurthen, M. [University of Bonn Medical Center, Department of Epileptology, Bonn (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Transient splenium corporis callosi (SCC) lesions are related to rapid reduction of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The range of substances with predilection for SCC changes, their pathophysiology and their occurrence are still unknown. In a prospective 2-year study an epilepsy-dedicated MRI protocol supplemented by DWI and ADC maps was performed after AED withdrawal for diagnostic seizure provocation in all patients with pharmacoresistant seizures locally admitted to the Department of Epileptology. Of 891 presurgical epilepsy patients, 6 (0.7%) had SCC lesions with cytotoxic edema on DWI. Carbamazepine combined with other AEDs was administered in five of those patients. In the study period we observed identical lesions in a schizophrenic patient treated with olanzapine and citalopram, in a patient with oropharyngeal carcinoma treated with alkylating agents, and in a hypernatremic patient following neurohypophyseal granular cell tumor surgery. Transient SCC lesions are related to rapid AED reduction but may occur in similar conditions with fluid balance alterations. We contribute further clinical data in this field to better classify the pharmaceuticals that are prone to the described cerebral cytotoxic side effects in the SCC and to clarify their incidence among presurgical epilepsy patients. (orig.)

  16. [The beginnings of orthopedic surgery in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Chanan

    2013-08-01

    In early mandatory Israel, orthopedics was mainly conservative, The first modern orthopedic surgeon was Ernst Spira from Czechoslovakia who established an orthopedic service at the Beilinson Hospital in Petah Tikva and left in 1948 to establish the Orthopedic Department and the Rehabilitation Center in Tel Hashomer, which treated the War of Independence casualties including amputees and victims of spinal cord injuries. A second orthopedic department was opened in Tel Hashomer by Shmuel Weissman who left in 1961 to open the Orthopedic Department at the Ichilov hospital in Tel Aviv. Shmuel Weissman became the first Chairman of Orthopedic Surgery at the Tel Aviv University medical school. In 1955, Myer Makin opened a modern orthopedic department in the Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem and the Alyn Hospital for crippled children. In 1951, Assaf Harofeh Hospital opened the Department of Orthopedic Surgery headed by Anatol Axer who specialized in the treatment and rehabilitation of polio patients. The majority of the second generation of orthopedic department directors was trained by these four surgeons. Major developments in the 1960s and 1970s were the introduction of the AO system revolutionizing fracture treatment from conservative to operative treatment, the advent of total hip and knee replacements, Harrington instrumentation in spinal surgery and arthroscopy were major advances in orthopedic patient care brought to Israel by the aforementioned second generation of orthopedic surgeons. Hand surgery became an independent subspecialty of orthopedics and was lead by the internationally renowned hand surgeon, Isidore Kessler.

  17. Imaging of orthopedic sports injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Gielen, J.L.; Maas, M.

    2007-01-01

    This volume provides an updated review of imaging abnormalities in orthopedic sports injuries. The first part of the book contains background information on relevant basic science and general imaging principles in sports traumatology. The second part comprises a topographic discussion of sports injuries. Each chapter highlights the merit of different imaging techniques, focused on a specific clinical problem. In the third part, natural history, monitoring and follow-up by imaging are discussed. This well-illustrated book will be of value for musculoskeletal radiologists, orthopedic surgeons, sports physicians and everyone else involved in sports medicine. (orig.)

  18. Diagnostic imaging in bovine orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Johann; Geissbühler, Urs; Steiner, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Although a radiographic unit is not standard equipment for bovine practitioners in hospital or field situations, ultrasound machines with 7.5-MHz linear transducers have been used in bovine reproduction for many years, and are eminently suitable for evaluation of orthopedic disorders. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use radiology and ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. These diagnostic imaging techniques improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis in every bovine patient but especially in highly valuable cattle, whose owners demand increasingly more diagnostic and surgical interventions that require high-level specialized techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN OPHTHALMOLOGY AND ORTHOPEDICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazac, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Although orthopedics and ophthalmology seem to be two different medical specialties, numerous studies that have been conducted in the past 35 years have shown a tight connection between several ocular pathologies and an increased risk of hip fractures due to falling. This article aims to review the ocular pathologies that have been proven to be associated with an increased risk of falling, to integrate the results of several studies showing a direct relationship between ocular pathologies and an increased risk of falling and finally to suggest ways in which the incidence of traumatic orthopedic injuries can be reduced by applying ophthalmologic principles.

  20. 76 FR 20690 - International Consortium of Orthopedic Registries; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration International Consortium of Orthopedic Registries; Public... Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``International Consortium of Orthopedic Registries... orthopedic registries that have orthopedic implant information and create a research network to advance the...

  1. Orthopedic Management of Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Jeffrey D.; Segal, Lee S.

    2010-01-01

    The management of orthopedic problems in spina bifida has seen a dramatic change over the past 10 years. The negative effects of spasticity, poor balance, and the tethered cord syndrome on ambulatory function are better appreciated. There is less emphasis on the hip radiograph and more emphasis on the function of the knee and the prevention of…

  2. FLUOROSCOPY DURATION IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvia, Joao Caron La; de Moraes, Pablo Reis; Ammar, Tiago Yossef; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the mean length of radiation emission from fluoroscopic devices during several types of orthopedic surgery and which of these required greater use of radiation. Methods: The times taken to perform sixteen different types of surgery (total of 80 procedures) were measured. At the end of each procedure, the length of time for which fluoroscopy was used directly from the image intensifier was ascertained. Results: The mean time required for fluoroscopy per operation was 61 seconds. The procedures that demanded greatest mean duration of radiation use were bilateral proximal femoral epiphysiodesis (5.1 minutes) and femoral shaft osteosynthesis using a locked intramedullary nail (3.33 min). Conclusion: The mean duration of fluoroscopy use in orthopedic operations was 61 seconds. The procedures using an intramedullary device were the ones that required greatest radiation emission. PMID:27027000

  3. Bundled payments in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Brandon D

    2015-02-01

    As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Describe the concept of bundled payments and the potential applications of bundled payments in orthopedic surgery. 2. For specific situations, outline a clinical episode of care, determine the participants in a bundling situation, and define care protocols and pathways. 3. Recognize the importance of resource utilization management, quality outcome measurement, and combined economic-clinical value in determining the value of bundled payment arrangements. 4. Identify the implications of bundled payments for practicing orthopedists, as well as the legal issues and potential future directions of this increasingly popular alternative payment method. Bundled payments, the idea of paying a single price for a bundle of goods and services, is a financial concept familiar to most American consumers because examples appear in many industries. The idea of bundled payments has recently gained significant momentum as a financial model with the potential to decrease the significant current costs of health care. Orthopedic surgery as a field of medicine is uniquely positioned for success in an environment of bundled payments. This article reviews the history, logistics, and implications of the bundled payment model relative to orthopedic surgery. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Presurgical Mapping of the Language Network Using Resting State Functional Connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (Resting-state fMRI) is a tool for investigating the functional networks that arise during the resting-state of the brain. Recent advances of the resting-state fMRI analysis suggest its feasibility for evaluating language function. The most common clinical application is for presurgical mapping of cortex for a brain tumor or for resective epilespy surgery. In this article, we review the techniques and presurgical applications of resting-stat...

  5. [STUDY ABOUT PATIENT'S RELIGIOUS NEED IN PRESURGICAL STAGE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Célia Pires de

    1977-04-01

    A study of problems related to nursing assistance of patient's religious need in presurgical stage. Two hundred adult patients of both sexes admitted in three hospitals of São Paulo were interviewed. One hospital was a governmental institution, and two were private. Patient's interviews were made by means of a form containing open questions, which were filled out by the researcher according the patient's answers. Therefore it was able to reinforce the existent thought of the human being having a theological instinct, for almost the totality of the studied patients believed in God and showed their beliefs with unlike religious practices. Patients belonged to different denominations, most of them roman catholics. The common problem found among patients was the fear of surgery, which decreased with religious practices. In such a way, it was pointed out the significance of nursing service of admission, for this was the main nursing problem found in this study: large number of patients were unable to realize their practices while in hospital, given the lack of orientation the main reazon for that. Patients also suggested what they would like to receive from the hospital to attend their religious need. All the suggestions could be solved through the application of nursing process, considering the patient's dependence degree.

  6. Nanotechnology in orthopedics: a clinically oriented review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Walter Ryan; Hudson, Parke William; Ponce, Brent Andrew; Rajaram Manoharan, Sakthivel Rajan

    2018-03-02

    The utility of nanotechnology in medicine, specifically within the field of orthopedics, is a topic of extensive research. Our review provides a unique comprehensive overview of the current and potential future uses of nanotechnology with respect to orthopedic sub-specialties. Nanotechnology offers an immense assortment of novel applications, most notably the use of nanomaterials as scaffolds to induce a more favorable interaction between orthopedic implants and native bone. Nanotechnology has the capability to revolutionize the diagnostics and treatment of orthopedic surgery, however the long-term health effects of nanomaterials are poorly understood and extensive research is needed regarding clinical safety.

  7. Wholistic orthopedics: Is this the right way to treat geriatric orthopedic patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Ebnezar, John; Bali, Yogita; John, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Geriatric orthopedic problems poses different challenges in their management. Conventional treatment methods like drugs, physiotherapy and surgeries are inadequate. A Geriatric orthopedic patient suffers as a whole and not in isolation. This article highlights the importance of managing geriatric orthopedic patients as a whole and outlines the various steps of wholistic management.

  8. Wholistic orthopedics: Is this the right way to treat geriatric orthopedic patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ebnezar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geriatric orthopedic problems poses different challenges in their management. Conventional treatment methods like drugs, physiotherapy and surgeries are inadequate. A Geriatric orthopedic patient suffers as a whole and not in isolation. This article highlights the importance of managing geriatric orthopedic patients as a whole and outlines the various steps of wholistic management.

  9. EVALUATION OF THE KNOWLEDGE ON COST OF ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS AMONG ORTHOPEDIC SURGEONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Sabongi, Rodrigo Guerra; Batista, Alysson Ferreira; Astur, Diego Costa; Falotico, Guilherme Guadagnini; Cohen, Moises

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the knowledge of Brazilian Orthopedic Surgeons on the costs of orthopedic surgical devices used in surgical implants. Methods: A questionnaire was applied to Brazilian Orthopedic Surgeons during the 46th Brazilian Congress on Orthopedics and Traumatology. Results: Two hundred and one Orthopedic Surgeons completely filled out the questionnaire. The difference between the average prices estimated by the surgeons and the average prices provided by the supplier companies was 47.1%. No differences were found between the orthopedic specialists and other subspecialties on the prices indicated for specific orthopedic implants. However, differences were found among orthopedic surgeons who received visits from representatives of implant companies and those who did not receive those visits on prices indicated for shaver and radiofrequency device. Correlation was found between length of orthopedic experience and prices indicated for shaver and interference screw, and higher the experience time the lower the price indicated by Surgeons for these materials. Conclusion: The knowledge of Brazilian Orthopedic Surgeons on the costs of orthopedic implants is precarious. Reduction of cost of orthopedics materials depends on a more effective communication and interaction between doctors, hospitals and supplier companies with solid orientation programs and awareness for physicians about their importance in this scenario.Level of Evidence III, Cross-Sectional Study. PMID:28243178

  10. Wholistic orthopedics: Is this the right way to treat geriatric orthopedic patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebnezar, John; Bali, Yogita; John, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Geriatric orthopedic problems poses different challenges in their management. Conventional treatment methods like drugs, physiotherapy and surgeries are inadequate. A Geriatric orthopedic patient suffers as a whole and not in isolation. This article highlights the importance of managing geriatric orthopedic patients as a whole and outlines the various steps of wholistic management. PMID:28149067

  11. Locking mechanism for orthopedic braces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, J. I.; Epps, C. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An orthopedic brace locking mechanism is described which under standing or walking conditions cannot be unlocked, however under sitting conditions the mechanism can be simply unlocked so as to permit bending of the patient's knee. Other features of the device include: (1) the mechanism is rendered operable, and inoperable, dependent upon the relative inclination of the brace with respect to the ground; (2) the mechanism is automatically locked under standing or walking conditions and is manually unlocked under sitting conditions; and (3) the mechanism is light in weight and is relatively small in size.

  12. Hypnotic efficacy of midazolam in pre-surgical patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Cailar, J.; Holzer, J.; Jullien, Y.; Passeron, D.

    1983-01-01

    1 The hypnotic effect of midazolam on the sleep of pre-surgical patients was studied in 99 patients (53 males, 46 females) due to undergo surgery the following day. 2 One tablet of 15 mg midazolam was administered at 21.00 h and a second was given 45 min later if the subject had not fallen asleep, sleep-onset latency being measured from the time the second tablet was taken. 3 Eighty patients required 1 tablet and 19 required 2 tablets. According to the subjective assessment, patients receiving 1 tablet fell asleep in 22.9 ± 14.9 min and those taking 2 tablets fell asleep in 38.4 ± 25.3 min (difference significant P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the 1- and 2-tablet groups with regard to sleep duration, number of awakenings, overall assessment of the night's sleep, sleep quality and state on awakening. 4 Factors which had a statistically significant influence on the dosage requirement were (a) sex, 30.4% females requiring a second tablet v. 9.4% males; (b) age, the mean age of the 2-tablet group being 36.5 v. 47 years in the lower dose group; (c) weight, patients with lower body weight requiring the higher dosage, mean 57.5 v. 66 kg; (d) current insomnia or a history of sleeping problems; (e) previous use of hypnotics; (f) degree of insomnia, moderate/severe insomnia needing a higher dosage (42% v. 21%). 5 One tablet of 15 mg midazolam is sufficient to induce sleep in most cases, a higher dose being indicated where insomnia is chronic and in young robust patients. No definite statement as to whether sex affects the dosage needed can be made on the basis of these findings, and this aspect would require further investigation in a study in which sex is the only variable. PMID:6138065

  13. Imaging of orthopedic trauma and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book bridges the communication gap, between the radiologist and the orthopedic surgeon in regard to trauma. It also combines ease of use with authoritative information, and includes in each discussion a review of the pertinent anatomy, mechanism of injury, and radiology and orthopedic classification

  14. Sawbones laboratory in orthopedic surgical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandar M. Hetaimish

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sawbones are artificial bones designed to simulate the bone architecture, as well as the bone’s physical properties. The incorporation of sawbones simulation laboratories in many orthopedic training programs has provided the residents with flexibility in learning and scheduling that align with their working hour limitations. This review paper deliberates the organization of sawbones simulation in orthopedic surgical training to enhance trainee’s future learning. In addition, it explores the implications of sawbones simulation in orthopedic surgical teaching and evaluation. It scrutinizes the suitability of practicing on sawbones at the simulation laboratory to improve orthopedic trainee’s learning. This will be followed with recommendations for future enhancement of sawbones simulation-based learning in orthopedic surgical training.

  15. Assessment of ganaxolone's anticonvulsant activity using a randomized, double-blind, presurgical trial design. Ganaxolone Presurgical Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxer, K; Blum, D; Abou-Khalil, B W; Morrell, M J; Lee, D A; Data, J L; Monaghan, E P

    2000-09-01

    A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial to examine the safety, tolerability, and antiepileptic activity of ganaxolone in patients after withdrawal from other antiepileptic drugs during presurgical evaluations was performed. Fifty-two eligible patients were withdrawn from antiepileptic drugs and randomized to receive ganaxolone (24 patients) or placebo (28 patients) for up to 8 days. Ganaxolone was administered at a dose of 1500 mg/d on day 1 and 1875 mg/d on days 2 to 8. Dosing occurred three times per day: immediately after breakfast, lunch, and dinner. The primary measure of antiepileptic activity was duration of treatment before withdrawal from the trial. Kaplan-Meier curves depicted a clear separation between treatment groups, with 50% of the ganaxolone-treated patients completing the entire study, compared with 25% of patients treated with placebo. Intent-to-treat survival analyses revealed a trend toward efficacy with ganaxolone (p = 0.0795, log rank test). Covariate analyses revealed a significant treatment effect on survival time in men (p = 0.03). Post-hoc chi2 probe analyses focusing on patients who completed the entire study revealed a significant difference (p = 0.04) between treatment groups. The tolerability of ganaxolone was similar to that of placebo, with adverse events being reported by 79% of patients in the ganaxolone group and 68% of patients in the placebo group. Ganaxolone monotherapy was well tolerated for the duration of this clinical trial, and the results provide preliminary evidence that ganaxolone does have antiepileptic activity.

  16. Using the presurgical psychological evaluation to predict 5-year weight loss outcomes in bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Ryan J; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Dulmen, Manfred H M van; Ashton, Kathleen; Heinberg, Leslie J

    2017-03-01

    Psychosocial factors contribute to poorer weight loss outcomes following bariatric surgery; however, findings on associations between preoperative psychiatric diagnoses, psychological testing, and weight loss are inconsistent. Examine associations between presurgical psychiatric diagnoses derived from a semi-structured clinical interview and test scores from the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality-Inventory-2 - Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) and 5-year Body Mass Index (BMI) outcomes. Cleveland Clinic Bariatric and Metabolic Institute METHODS: 446 consecutively consented patients who underwent a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) at least 5 years prior were included in the study. A majority were women (74.2%) and Caucasian (66.2%). Patients' mean presurgical BMI was 49.14 kg/m 2 [SD = 9.50 kg/m 2 ]. Psychiatric diagnoses were obtained from a presurgical, semi-structured clinical interview and all participants were administered the MMPI-2-RF at their presurgical evaluations. BMIs were collected at 4 postoperative time points across a 5-year trajectory. This prospective design utilized latent growth curve modeling. Older patients evidenced a slower rate of BMI reduction over time. A presurgical diagnosis of Binge Eating Disorder predicted higher BMIs at the 5-year outcome. Scores on MMPI-2-RF measures of emotional and behavioral dysfunction domains incrementally predicted poorer weight loss outcomes. Preoperative indicators of psychopathology, notably indicators that are dimensional in nature, are important in predicting postoperative outcomes. Closer follow-up with patients who evidence presurgical psychological factors, both before and after surgery, may help improve outcomes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Presurgical Mapping of the Language Network Using Resting-state Functional Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2016-02-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (resting-state fMRI) is a tool for investigating the functional networks that arise during the resting state of the brain. Recent advances of the resting-state fMRI analysis suggest its feasibility for evaluating language function. The most common clinical application is for presurgical mapping of cortex for a brain tumor or for resective epilespy surgery. In this article, we review the techniques and presurgical applications of resting-state fMRI analysis for language evaluation, and discuss the use in the clinical setting, focusing on planning for neurosurgery.

  18. Presurgical Mapping of the Language Network Using Resting State Functional Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (Resting-state fMRI) is a tool for investigating the functional networks that arise during the resting-state of the brain. Recent advances of the resting-state fMRI analysis suggest its feasibility for evaluating language function. The most common clinical application is for presurgical mapping of cortex for a brain tumor or for resective epilespy surgery. In this article, we review the techniques and presurgical applications of resting-state fMRI analysis for language evaluation, and discuss the use in the clinical setting, focusing on planning for neurosurgery. PMID:26848557

  19. What expects orthopedic surgeon from bone scan?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutter, B.; Cazenave, A.

    2003-01-01

    The isotope bone scan continues to be one of the 'lost widely performed nuclear medicine investigations. Beyond the common clinical indication like detection of skeletal metastases, bone scan use is increasing in benign orthopedic conditions, and after orthopedic surgery, despite development of new investigations modalities (US, MRI). Three (or two) phase bone scintigraphy, Single Photon Emission Computer Tomography have increased its value and provided new clinical roles. This review emphasizes through some practical clinical examples how to increase diagnostic value of the method and to offer an adapted response to the orthopedic surgeon's attempts. (author)

  20. Physical modification of polyetheretherketone for orthopedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ya-Wei; Zhang, Li-Nan; Hou, Zeng-Tao; Ye, Xin; Gu, Hong-Sheng; Yan, Guo-Ping; Shang, Peng

    2014-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is regarded as one of the most potential candidates for replacing current implant applications. To obtain good bone-implant interfaces, many modification methods have been developed to enable PEEK and PEEK-based composites from bio-inert to bioactive. Among them, physical methods have aroused significant attention and been widely used to modify PEEK for orthopedic implants. This review summarizes current physical modification techniques of PEEK for orthopedic applications, which include composite strategies, surface coating methods and irradiation treatments. The positive consequences of those modification methods will encourage continuing investigations and stimulate the wide range of applications of PEEK-based implants in orthopedics.

  1. Three-dimensional Technologies in Orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Savvidou, Olga D; Koutsouradis, Panagiotis; Chloros, George D; Bolia, Ioanna K; Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Kontogeorgakos, Vasileios A; Mavrodontis, Ioannis I; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Diamantopoulos, Panos

    2018-01-01

    New 3-dimensional digital technologies are revolutionizing orthopedic clinical practice, allowing structures of any complexity to be manufactured in just hours. Such technologies can make surgery for complex cases more precise, more cost-effective, and possibly easier to perform. Applications include pre-operative planning, surgical simulation, patient-specific instrumentation and implants, bioprinting, prosthetics, and orthotics. The basic principles of 3- dimensional technologies, including imaging, design, numerical simulation, and printing, and their current applications in orthopedics are reviewed. [Orthopedics. 2018; 41(1):12-20.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. 21 CFR 888.4540 - Orthopedic manual surgical instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Orthopedic manual surgical instrument. 888.4540... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4540 Orthopedic manual surgical instrument. (a) Identification. An orthopedic manual surgical instrument is a nonpowered hand-held device...

  3. Office automation for the orthopedic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuslich, S D; Skorczewski, G F

    1986-10-01

    What are the essential elements of office automation that can be directly applied to the practice of orthopedics? New technology, when implemented into a planned, logical system, can increase practice efficiency and productivity.

  4. Importance of Presurgical Breast MRI in Patients 60 Years of Age and Older

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatia V Destounis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate the importance of presurgical bilateral breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI in women 60 years of age and older. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained with waiver of informed consent for this retrospective review. From December 2003 to December 2011, all patients 60 years and older who had presurgical bilateral breast MRI were reviewed, revealing 1268 presurgical MRI examinations; 310 had a new lesion identified by MRI. Cases were excluded due to incomplete or missing data, resulting in 243 patients with 272 findings eligible for analysis. Data recorded included patient demographics, core biopsy method and pathology, type of surgery, and surgical pathology results. Results: Of 1268 exams performed in this population, 272 (21.5% patients with suspicious MRI findings underwent needle biopsy. Malignancy was found in 114 (42%, benign findings in 127 (47%, and atypia in 31 (11%. Of the malignancies, 83 were in the ipsilateral breast and 31 in the contralateral breast to the original diagnosis. Of the ipsilateral findings, 47 were in the same quadrant as the primary diagnosis, 28 in a different quadrant, and 8 were metastatic lymph nodes. Of the 31 atypical findings, 14 were contralateral to the primary diagnosis and 17 were ipsilateral. Two hundred and thirty-three patients underwent surgical excision; 111 changed their surgical management as a lesion was seen on MRI and was diagnosed as cancer on needle biopsy. Conclusions: Among the patients aged 60 years and above who had presurgical bilateral breast MRI, we found additional cancers in 9.0% (n = 114/1268 and atypia in 2.4% (n = 31/1268. A change in management as a result of the MRI-detected lesion occurred in 8.8% (n = 111/1268. These results demonstrate that performing presurgical bilateral breast MRI is of value in women 60 years of age and above.

  5. The Impact of Early Infant Jaw-Orthopaedics on Early Speech Production in Toddlers with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmander, Anette; Lillvik, Malin; Friede, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of study was to investigate the impact of pre-surgical Infant Orthopaedics (IO) on consonant production at 18 months of age in children with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate (UCLP) and to compare the consonant production to that of age-matched children without clefts. The first ten children in a consecutive series of 20 with UCLP…

  6. Artificial intelligence for analyzing orthopedic trauma radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak, Jakub; Fahlberg, Niklas; Maki, Atsuto; Razavian, Ali Sharif; Jilert, Anthony; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof; Gordon, Max

    2017-12-01

    Background and purpose - Recent advances in artificial intelligence (deep learning) have shown remarkable performance in classifying non-medical images, and the technology is believed to be the next technological revolution. So far it has never been applied in an orthopedic setting, and in this study we sought to determine the feasibility of using deep learning for skeletal radiographs. Methods - We extracted 256,000 wrist, hand, and ankle radiographs from Danderyd's Hospital and identified 4 classes: fracture, laterality, body part, and exam view. We then selected 5 openly available deep learning networks that were adapted for these images. The most accurate network was benchmarked against a gold standard for fractures. We furthermore compared the network's performance with 2 senior orthopedic surgeons who reviewed images at the same resolution as the network. Results - All networks exhibited an accuracy of at least 90% when identifying laterality, body part, and exam view. The final accuracy for fractures was estimated at 83% for the best performing network. The network performed similarly to senior orthopedic surgeons when presented with images at the same resolution as the network. The 2 reviewer Cohen's kappa under these conditions was 0.76. Interpretation - This study supports the use for orthopedic radiographs of artificial intelligence, which can perform at a human level. While current implementation lacks important features that surgeons require, e.g. risk of dislocation, classifications, measurements, and combining multiple exam views, these problems have technical solutions that are waiting to be implemented for orthopedics.

  7. Core Concepts: Orthopedic Intern Curriculum Boot Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Mark A; Kazarian, Erick; King, Brandon; Biermann, Janet S; Carpenter, James E; Caird, Michelle S; Irwin, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgical interns must gain a broad array of clinical skills in a short time. However, recent changes in health care have limited resident-patient exposures. With the reported success of simulation training in the surgical literature, the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) and Residency Review Committee for Orthopaedic Surgery have required that surgical simulation training be a component of the intern curricula in orthopedic surgical residencies. This study examined the short-term effectiveness of an orthopedic "intern boot camp" covering 7 of 17 simulation training concept modules published by the ABOS. Eight orthopedic post-graduate year 1 (PGY-1) residents (study group) completed a structured 3-month curriculum and were compared with 7 post-graduate year 2 (PGY-2) residents (comparison group) who had just completed their orthopedic surgical internship. Seven core skills were assessed using both task-specific and global rating scales. The PGY-1 residents demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in all 7 modules with respect to their task-specific pre-test scores: sterile technique (P=.001), wound closure (Porthopedic internship elevated a variety of clinical skills to levels exhibited by PGY-2 residents. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Bibliometric analysis of the orthopedic literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Zhaoyang; Yi, Zhongmei; Peng, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Bibliometric indicators are used to assess research performance. The goal of this study was to explore publication output to construct a picture of orthopedics that may be beneficial to researchers and orthopedic specialists. All orthopedics articles published in 61 journals from 2000 to 2011 were retrieved from the Science Citation Index Expanded database. The numbers of articles, citations, authors, institutions, and journals were analyzed and subjected to quantitative and qualitative comparisons. The number of published orthopedics articles increased between 2000 and 2011. Articles published by authors from the United States always ranked first in number, although the United States' share is decreasing in the world literature. Authors from the United States published the most-cited articles and the most articles in journals with top-10 impact factors; moreover, the United States also had the greatest share of experts and highly ranked institutions. The United Kingdom, Germany, and Japan were always within the world's top 4 in terms of numbers of articles and citations. The shares of Germany, South Korea, and China among total orthopedics articles increased, especially that of China. In 2011, China ranked the fifth in the world, with its world share increasing from 0.64% in 2000 to 5.05% in 2011. However, China lags behind in average citations per article, top research institutions, and most prolific authors. According to the total citations per article, the University of Pittsburgh, Harvard University, and the Hospital for Special Surgery were the most prolific institutions. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. [Research and analysis to Shui nationality medicine treatment orthopedics & traumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian-Shan; Li, Pu; Yang, Yong; Chen, Xin-Chun; Lin, Li

    2013-05-01

    To investigated Shui nationality folk medicine's awareness to orthopedics & traumatology, the history of orthopedics & traumatology treatment, Shui nationality folk doctors' practicing medicine, heritage, diagnosis and treatment methods and tools, etc, through investigated drug resources category and distribution characteristics of Shui nationality medicine to orthopedics & traumatology treatment, explored and finished Shui nationality medicine orthopedics & traumatology treatment theoretical system. After more than 5 years' exploration and finishing, preliminarily formed the theoretical system framework and medicine application characteristics of Shui nationality medicine treating orthopedics & traumatology. Shui nationality medicine treatment orthopedics & traumatology has distinctive national style, and worthy to further exploration and research.

  10. Venous Thromboembolism Following Major Orthopedic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    CIONAC FLORESCU, Simona; ANASTASE, Denisa-Madalina; MUNTEANU, Ana-Maria; STOICA, Ioan Cristian; ANTONESCU, Dinu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an important complication of major orthopedic surgery (total hip arthroplasty-THA, total knee arthroplasty-TKA, hip fracture surgery-FHS) and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite this, not all patients receive an appropriate prophylaxis, often due to a disproportionate fear of bleeding complications. A challenge in the management of VTE prophylaxis is to balance the benefits of the treatment with the risk of bleeding. In this article, we review the latest guidelines recommendations regarding prevention of postoperative VTE in patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. PMID:24371484

  11. The use of cone-beam computed tomography and virtual reality simulation for pre-surgical practice in endodontic microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suebnukarn, S; Rhienmora, P; Haddawy, P

    2012-07-01

    To design and evaluate the impact of virtual reality (VR) pre-surgical practice on the performance of actual endodontic microsurgery.   The VR system operates on a laptop with a 1.6-GHz Intel processor and 2 GB of main memory. Volumetric cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) data were acquired from a fresh cadaveric porcine mandible prior to endodontic microsurgery. Ten inexperienced endodontic trainees were randomized as to whether they performed endodontic microsurgery with or without virtual pre-surgical practice. The VR simulator has microinstruments to perform surgical procedures under magnification. After the initial endodontic microsurgery, all participants served as their own controls by performing another procedure with or without virtual pre-surgical practice. All procedures were videotaped and assessed by two independent observers using an endodontic competency rating scale (from 6 to 30). A significant difference was observed between the scores for endodontic microsurgery on molar teeth completed with virtual pre-surgical practice and those completed without virtual presurgical practice, median 24.5 (range = 17-28) versus median 18.75 (range = 14-26.5), P = 0.041. A significant difference was observed between the scores for osteotomy on a molar tooth completed with virtual pre-surgical practice and those completed without virtual pre-surgical practice, median 4.5 (range = 3.5-4.5) versus median 3 (range = 2-4), P = 0.042. Pre-surgical practice in a virtual environment using the 3D computerized model generated from the original CBCT image data improved endodontic microsurgery performance. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  12. Anaesthetic considerations for patients undergoing pre-surgical embolization of intracranial and spinal tumours: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suparna Bharadwaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-surgical embolization of vascular brain and spinal tumours is an effective method of reducing intraoperative bleeding. Many technological developments of the microcatheters and embolic materials that are used have led to better outcomes in tumour embolization. Pre-operative embolization has become a standard of practice in the management of many vascular brain and spinal tumours. Anaesthesiologists are generally involved with these procedures which may be performed with general anaesthesia, conscious sedation or monitored anaesthesia care. The choice of the anaesthetic technique usually depends on the patient characteristics, tumour location, vascularity of the tumour and most importantly the neuroradiologist and/or institutional preferences. There is limited information in the literature on the anaesthetic considerations for these patients. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of the indications, techniques, complications and relevant anaesthetic considerations for patients undergoing pre-surgical embolization of intracranial and spinal tumours.

  13. An Overview of the History of Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, Ishaan; O'Donnell, Joseph F

    Orthopedic surgery has a long and rich history. While the modern term orthopedics was coined in the 1700s, orthopedic principles were beginning to be developed and used during primitive times. The Egyptians continued these practices, and described ways to recognize and manage common orthopedic conditions. The Greeks and Romans subsequently began to study medicine in a systematic manner, and greatly improved our understanding of orthopedic anatomy and surgical technique. After a period of little progress during the Middle Ages, rapid advancement was noted during the Renaissance, including the description of various injuries, improvements in surgical technique, and development of orthopedic hospitals. Collectively, these advances provided the foundation for modern orthopedics. Currently, orthopedic surgery is a rapidly developing field that has benefited from the works of numerous scholars and surgeons. It is important to recognize the successes and failures of the past, in order to advance research and practice as well as improve patient care and clinical outcomes.

  14. Clinical Application of Spatiotemporal Distributed Source Analysis in Presurgical Evaluation of Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG), which acquires neuromagnetic fields in the brain, is a useful diagnostic tool in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. Previous studies have shown that MEG affects the planning intracranial electroencephalography placement and correlates with surgical outcomes by using a single dipole model. Spatiotemporal source analysis using distributed source models is an advanced method for analyzing MEG, and has been recently introduced for analyzing epileptic spikes. It has ...

  15. Definitive Presurgical CAD/CAM-Guided Implant-Supported Crown in an Esthetic Area

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, Vinicius de Magalhães; Costa, Natália Rafaela de Assis; Martins, Paulo Henrique Fonseca; Vasconcellos, Walison Arthuso; Discacciati, José Augusto César; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the digital workflow from cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) to the installation of a definitive presurgical zirconium individual crown in a 19-year-old woman requiring implant replacement of a maxillary right lateral incisor. The patient had agenesis of this tooth and had completed the orthodontic treatment. CBCT was conducted and diagnostic casts were digitized. Virtual planning was completed by defining a prosthetically driven implant and a stereolithographic surgica...

  16. Task-free presurgical mapping using functional magnetic resonance imaging intrinsic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hesheng; Buckner, Randy L; Talukdar, Tanveer; Tanaka, Naoaki; Madsen, Joseph R; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2009-10-01

    Low-frequency components of the spontaneous functional MR imaging signal provide information about the intrinsic functional and anatomical organization of the brain. The ability to use such methods in individual patients may provide a powerful tool for presurgical planning. The authors explore the feasibility of presurgical motor function mapping in which a task-free paradigm is used. Six surgical candidates with tumors or epileptic foci near the motor cortex participated in this study. The investigators directly compared task-elicited activation of the motor system to activation obtained from intrinsic activity correlations. The motor network within the unhealthy hemisphere was identified based on intrinsic activity correlations, allowing distortions of functional anatomy caused by the tumor and epilepsy to be directly visualized. The precision of the motor function mapping was further explored in 1 participant by using direct cortical stimulation. The motor regions localized based on the spontaneous activity correlations were quite similar to the regions defined by actual movement tasks and cortical stimulation. Using intrinsic activity correlations, it was possible to map the motor cortex in presurgical patients. This task-free paradigm may provide a powerful approach to map functional anatomy in patients without task compliance and allow multiple brain systems to be determined in a single scanning session.

  17. Presurgical Weight Is Associated with Pain, Functional Impairment, and Anxiety among Gastric Bypass Surgery Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharlene Wedin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain and obesity are significant public health concerns in the United States associated with significant levels of health-care expenses and lost productivity. Previous research suggests that obesity is a risk factor for chronic pain, mainly due to excessive weight placed on the joints. However, the obesity-pain relationship appears to be complex and reciprocal. Little work to date has focused on the relationship between weight and pain among patients undergoing gastric bypass surgery for weight loss. Patients scheduled to undergo bariatric surgery for weight loss at a large southeastern academic medical center ( completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI, the Center for Epidemiological Studies 10-item Depression scale (CESD-10, and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI. Higher presurgical weight was associated with higher pain-on-average ratings, higher functional impairment due to pain across the domains of physical activity, mood, walking ability, relationships, and enjoyment of life. Higher presurgical weight was associated with higher BAI scores, but weight was not related to depression. Findings suggest that bariatric surgery candidates report a moderate amount of pain prior to surgery and that presurgical weight is associated with higher pain, increased functional impairment due to pain, and increased anxiety. Anxiety was found to mediate the relationship between increased weight and pain.

  18. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Presurgical Evaluation of Brain Vascular Malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, Natalia; Herrera, Diego A; Vargas Sergio A

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe our experience in presurgical evaluation of intracranial vascular malformations by means of functional magnetic resonance (fMRI). Method: To evaluate eight patients with cerebral vascular malformations (seven arterio-venous malformation [AVM ] and one cavernous malformation) to send to the eloquent cortex with RMf pre-surgical mapping is assessed. Used a technique that is dependent on the level of oxygen (BOLD) to locate these areas in the cerebral vascular malformation, by applying different paradigms. Results: We found one AVM at the right temporal lobe with activation of the parahipocampal gyrus at the contralateral side using a memory paradigm; another patient with an AVM at the right mesotemporal lobe showed activation of visual and spatial memory of the contralateral hippocampus and parahippocampus. One patient with an AVM at the left parietal lobe without compromise of sensorial and motor cortex; a cavernous malformation at the left angular gyrus with hemispheric language dominance in that side; one right thalamic AVM, one periventricular AVM bilateral language dominance; one left occipital AVM with decreased activation in visual association cortex; one temporoccipital AVM with left language dominance and neurovascular uncoupling. Conclusion: fMRI can delineate anatomically the relationship between the lesion and eloquent cortex, providing useful information for presurgical planning and allowing risk estimation of intervention.

  19. Emotional intelligence in orthopedic surgery residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin; Petrisor, Brad; Bhandari, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    Background Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to understand and manage emotions in oneself and others. It was originally popularized in the business literature as a key attribute for success that was distinct from cognitive intelligence. Increasing focus is being placed on EI in medicine to improve clinical and academic performance. Despite the proposed benefits, to our knowledge, there have been no previous studies on the role of EI in orthopedic surgery. We evaluated baseline data on EI in a cohort of orthopedic surgery residents. Methods We asked all orthopedic surgery residents at a single institution to complete an electronic version of the Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). We used completed questionnaires to calculate total EI scores and 4 branch scores. Data were analyzed according to a priori cutoff values to determine the proportion of residents who were considered competent on the test. Data were also analyzed for possible associations with age, sex, race and level of training. Results Thirty-nine residents (100%) completed the MSCEIT. The mean total EI score was 86 (maximum score 145). Only 4 (10%) respondents demonstrated competence in EI. Junior residents (p = 0.026), Caucasian residents (p = 0.009) and those younger than 30 years (p = 0.008) had significantly higher EI scores. Conclusion Our findings suggest that orthopedic residents score low on EI based on the MSCEIT. Optimizing resident competency in noncognitive skills may be enhanced by dedicated EI education, training and testing. PMID:24666445

  20. Prosthesis infections after orthopedic joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhijun; Borgwardt, Lotte; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Prosthesis-related infection is a serious complication for patients after orthopedic joint replacement, which is currently difficult to treat with antibiotic therapy. Consequently, in most cases, removal of the infected prosthesis is the only solution to cure the infection. It is, therefore...

  1. Emotional intelligence in orthopedic surgery residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin; Petrisor, Brad; Bhandari, Mohit

    2014-04-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to understand and manage emotions in oneself and others. It was originally popularized in the business literature as a key attribute for success that was distinct from cognitive intelligence. Increasing focus is being placed on EI in medicine to improve clinical and academic performance. Despite the proposed benefits, to our knowledge, there have been no previous studies on the role of EI in orthopedic surgery. We evaluated baseline data on EI in a cohort of orthopedic surgery residents. We asked all orthopedic surgery residents at a single institution to complete an electronic version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). We used completed questionnaires to calculate total EI scores and 4 branch scores. Data were analyzed according to a priori cutoff values to determine the proportion of residents who were considered competent on the test. Data were also analyzed for possible associations with age, sex, race and level of training. Thirty-nine residents (100%) completed the MSCEIT. The mean total EI score was 86 (maximum score 145). Only 4 (10%) respondents demonstrated competence in EI. Junior residents (p = 0.026), Caucasian residents (p = 0.009) and those younger than 30 years (p = 0.008) had significantly higher EI scores. Our findings suggest that orthopedic residents score low on EI based on the MSCEIT. Optimizing resident competency in noncognitive skills may be enhanced by dedicated EI education, training and testing.

  2. Neonatal maxillary orthopedics: past to present

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Prahl, C.; Berkowitz, S.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal maxillary orthopedics was introduced in the treatment protocol for cleft lip and palate in the 1950s of the last century. A wide range of appliances has been designed with pin-retained active appliances at one end of the spectrum and passive appliances at the other. Although neonatal

  3. Artificial intelligence for analyzing orthopedic trauma radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak, Jakub; Fahlberg, Niklas; Maki, Atsuto; Razavian, Ali Sharif; Jilert, Anthony; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — Recent advances in artificial intelligence (deep learning) have shown remarkable performance in classifying non-medical images, and the technology is believed to be the next technological revolution. So far it has never been applied in an orthopedic setting, and in this study we sought to determine the feasibility of using deep learning for skeletal radiographs. Methods — We extracted 256,000 wrist, hand, and ankle radiographs from Danderyd’s Hospital and identified 4 classes: fracture, laterality, body part, and exam view. We then selected 5 openly available deep learning networks that were adapted for these images. The most accurate network was benchmarked against a gold standard for fractures. We furthermore compared the network’s performance with 2 senior orthopedic surgeons who reviewed images at the same resolution as the network. Results — All networks exhibited an accuracy of at least 90% when identifying laterality, body part, and exam view. The final accuracy for fractures was estimated at 83% for the best performing network. The network performed similarly to senior orthopedic surgeons when presented with images at the same resolution as the network. The 2 reviewer Cohen’s kappa under these conditions was 0.76. Interpretation — This study supports the use for orthopedic radiographs of artificial intelligence, which can perform at a human level. While current implementation lacks important features that surgeons require, e.g. risk of dislocation, classifications, measurements, and combining multiple exam views, these problems have technical solutions that are waiting to be implemented for orthopedics. PMID:28681679

  4. Surgical simulation training in orthopedics: current insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalun, Portia; Wagner, Natalie; Yan, James; Nousiainen, Markku T; Sonnadara, Ranil R

    2018-01-01

    While the knowledge required of residents training in orthopedic surgery continues to increase, various factors, including reductions in work hours, have resulted in decreased clinical learning opportunities. Recent work suggests residents graduate from their training programs without sufficient exposure to key procedures. In response, simulation is increasingly being incorporated into training programs to supplement clinical learning. This paper reviews the literature to explore whether skills learned in simulation-based settings results in improved clinical performance in orthopedic surgery trainees. A scoping review of the literature was conducted to identify papers discussing simulation training in orthopedic surgery. We focused on exploring whether skills learned in simulation transferred effectively to a clinical setting. Experimental studies, systematic reviews, and narrative reviews were included. A total of 15 studies were included, with 11 review papers and four experimental studies. The review articles reported little evidence regarding the transfer of skills from simulation to the clinical setting, strong evidence that simulator models discriminate among different levels of experience, varied outcome measures among studies, and a need to define competent performance in both simulated and clinical settings. Furthermore, while three out of the four experimental studies demonstrated transfer between the simulated and clinical environments, methodological study design issues were identified. Our review identifies weak evidence as to whether skills learned in simulation transfer effectively to clinical practice for orthopedic surgery trainees. Given the increased reliance on simulation, there is an immediate need for comprehensive studies that focus on skill transfer, which will allow simulation to be incorporated effectively into orthopedic surgery training programs.

  5. Characteristics of highly successful orthopedic surgeons: a survey of orthopedic chairs and editors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Guy; Hussain, Nasir; Sprague, Sheila; Mehlman, Charles T.; Dogbey, Godwin; Bhandari, Mohit

    2013-01-01

    Background Highly successful orthopedic surgeons are a small group of individuals who exert a large influence on the orthopedic field. However, the characteristics of these leaders have not been well-described or studied. Methods Orthopedic surgeons who are departmental chairs, journal editors, editorial board members of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (British edition), or current or past presidents of major orthopedic associations were invited to complete a survey designed to provide insight into their motivations, academic backgrounds and accomplishments, emotional and physical health, and job satisfaction. Results In all, 152 surgeons completed the questionnaire. We identified several characteristics of highly successful surgeons. Many have contributed prolific numbers of publications and book chapters and obtained considerable funding for research. They were often motivated by a “desire for personal development (interesting challenge, new opportunities),” whereas “relocating to a new institution, financial gain, or lack of alternative candidates” played little to no role in their decisions to take positions of leadership. Most respondents were happy with their specialty choice despite long hours and high levels of stress. Despite challenges to their time, successful orthopedic surgeons made a strong effort to maintain their health; compared with other physicians, they exercise more, are more likely to have a primary care physician and feel better physically. Conclusion Departmental chairs, journal editors and presidents of orthopedic associations cope with considerable demands of clinical, administrative, educational and research duties while maintaining a high level of health, happiness and job satisfaction. PMID:23706848

  6. iPad apps for orthopedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Orrin I; Bhola, Siddharth

    2011-12-01

    The development and distribution of mobile applications, or apps, designed for medical professionals and patients is quickly expanding, and within this group are apps designed specifically for orthopedic use. Currently, the most popular mobile apps are sponsored by private companies and focus on delivering device-specific information. If this trend toward the use of privately funded educational materials continues, regulations may need to be established to ensure that the information provided is accurate, honest, and supported by peer-reviewed literature. It will likely be the responsibility of the orthopedic community to ensure that the development and use of these apps has appropriate oversight and validation as they are incorporated into clinical practice and training. Copyright © 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Robotics in Orthopedics: A Brave New World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsley, Brian S

    2018-02-16

    Future health-care projection projects a significant growth in population by 2020. Health care has seen an exponential growth in technology to address the growing population with the decreasing number of physicians and health-care workers. Robotics in health care has been introduced to address this growing need. Early adoption of robotics was limited because of the limited application of the technology, the cumbersome nature of the equipment, and technical complications. A continued improvement in efficacy, adaptability, and cost reduction has stimulated increased interest in robotic-assisted surgery. The evolution in orthopedic surgery has allowed for advanced surgical planning, precision robotic machining of bone, improved implant-bone contact, optimization of implant placement, and optimization of the mechanical alignment. The potential benefits of robotic surgery include improved surgical work flow, improvements in efficacy and reduction in surgical time. Robotic-assisted surgery will continue to evolve in the orthopedic field. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Occupational injuries among pediatric orthopedic surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsiddiky, Abdulmonem M.; Alatassi, Raheef; Altamimi, Saad M.; Alqarni, Mahdi M.; Alfayez, Saud M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this cross-sectional study, we surveyed all pediatric orthopedic surgeons in Saudi Arabia using an anonymous electronic questionnaire composed of 23 items to identify the rate of occupational injuries and obtain other relevant information. Thirty-nine participants completed the questionnaire (response rate: 83%). Participants who sustained occupational injuries throughout their careers represented 82.5%. The most injured areas were the hands, eyes, and back by 54.5%, 24.2%, and 15.2%, respectively. Approximately 11.1% were injured while operating on infected patients. Approximately 30.3% reported their injuries to their institution. We concluded that the rate of occupational injuries among pediatric orthopedic surgeons is very high and underreported. PMID:28640103

  9. Orthopedic problems in geriatric dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Brian S

    2005-05-01

    Senior dogs and cats with orthopedic injuries and diseases often require a treatment plan that differs from that of younger patients. Injured bone and soft tissues tend to heal more slowly in the geriatric patient. The older animal is likely to have a less competent immune system and may have compromised metabolic and endocrine function. Pre-existing musculoskeletal problems may make ambulation difficult for an animal convalescing from a new orthopedic problem. Special attention is often needed when treating these patients for fractures, joint instability, infection, and neoplasia. In general, issues that should be addressed in the geriatric patient include reducing intraoperative and anesthesia time, enhancing bone and soft tissue healing, return to early function, control of postoperative pain, physical therapy, and proper nutrition.

  10. Redefining the Economics of Geriatric Orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truntzer, Jeremy; Nacca, Christopher; Paller, David; Daniels, Alan H

    2014-12-01

    The heath care system in the United States is in the midst of a transition, in large part to help accommodate an older and more medically complex population. Central to the current evolution is the reassessment of value based on the cost utility of a particular procedure compared to alternatives. The existing contribution of geriatric orthopedics to the societal burden of disease is substantial, and literature focusing on the economic value of treating elderly populations with musculoskeletal injuries is growing. A literature review of peer-reviewed publications and abstracts related to the cost-effectiveness of treating geriatric patients with orthopedic injuries was carried out. In our review, we demonstrate that while cost-utility studies generally demonstrate net society savings for most orthopedic procedures, geriatric populations often contribute to negative net society savings due to decreased working years and lower salaries while in the workforce. However, the incremental cost-effective ratio for operative intervention has been shown to be below the financial willingness to treat threshold for common procedures including joint replacement surgery of the knee (ICER US$8551), hip (ICER US$17 115), and shoulder (CE US$957) as well as for spinal procedures and repair of torn rotator cuffs (ICER US$12 024). We also discuss the current trends directed toward improving institutional value and highlight important complementary next steps to help overcome the growing demands of an older, more active society. The geriatric population places a significant burden on the health care system. However, studies have shown that treating this demographic for orthopedic-related injuries is cost effective and profitable for providers under certain scenarios.

  11. Methods of orthopedic treatment of dentition defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konnov V.V.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the methods of orthopedic treatment of dentition defects. To restore the functionality and individual aesthetic standards of dental system, with different types of partial loss of teeth, depending on the anatomical and topographical conditions, various kinds of dental prosthesis designs are used in the oral cavity: non-removable (bridges, cantilever, adhesive dentures and removable (laminar and clasp dental prostheses, as well as their combinations.

  12. Redefining the Economics of Geriatric Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacca, Christopher; Paller, David; Daniels, Alan H

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The heath care system in the United States is in the midst of a transition, in large part to help accommodate an older and more medically complex population. Central to the current evolution is the reassessment of value based on the cost utility of a particular procedure compared to alternatives. The existing contribution of geriatric orthopedics to the societal burden of disease is substantial, and literature focusing on the economic value of treating elderly populations with musculoskeletal injuries is growing. Materials and Methods: A literature review of peer-reviewed publications and abstracts related to the cost-effectiveness of treating geriatric patients with orthopedic injuries was carried out. Results: In our review, we demonstrate that while cost-utility studies generally demonstrate net society savings for most orthopedic procedures, geriatric populations often contribute to negative net society savings due to decreased working years and lower salaries while in the workforce. However, the incremental cost-effective ratio for operative intervention has been shown to be below the financial willingness to treat threshold for common procedures including joint replacement surgery of the knee (ICER US$8551), hip (ICER US$17 115), and shoulder (CE US$957) as well as for spinal procedures and repair of torn rotator cuffs (ICER US$12 024). We also discuss the current trends directed toward improving institutional value and highlight important complementary next steps to help overcome the growing demands of an older, more active society. Conclusion: The geriatric population places a significant burden on the health care system. However, studies have shown that treating this demographic for orthopedic-related injuries is cost effective and profitable for providers under certain scenarios. PMID:26246943

  13. Orthopedic workforce planning in Germany – an analysis of orthopedic accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Peter; Maier, Werner; Groneberg, David A.

    2017-01-01

    In Germany, orthopedic workforce planning relies on population-to-provider-ratios represented by the ‘official degree of care provision’. However, with geographic information systems (GIS), more sophisticated measurements are available. By utilizing GIS-based technologies we analyzed the current state of demand and supply of the orthopedic workforce in Germany (orthopedic accessibility) with the integrated Floating Catchment Area method. The analysis of n = 153,352,220 distances revealed significant geographical variations on national scale: 5,617,595 people (6.9% of total population) lived in an area with significant low orthopedic accessibility (average z-score = -4.0), whereas 31,748,161 people (39.0% of total population) lived in an area with significant high orthopedic accessibility (average z-score = 8.0). Accessibility was positively correlated with the degree of urbanization (r = 0.49; p<0.001) and the official degree of care provision (r = 0.33; p<0.001) and negatively correlated with regional social deprivation (r = -0.47; p<0.001). Despite advantages of simpler measures regarding implementation and acceptance in health policy, more sophisticated measures of accessibility have the potential to reduce costs as well as improve health care. With this study, significant geographical variations were revealed that show the need to reduce oversupply in less deprived urban areas in order to enable adequate care in more deprived rural areas. PMID:28178335

  14. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haaker G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerrit Haaker, Albert Fujak Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective "survival motor neuron" (SMN protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Keywords: spinal muscular atrophy, scoliosis, contractures, fractures, lung function, treatment, rehabilitation, surgery, ventilation, nutrition, perioperative management

  15. Undergraduate orthopedic education: Is it adequate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Jagdish

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Basic musculoskeletal knowledge is essential to the practice of medicine. The purpose of this study was to assess the adequacy of musculoskeletal knowledge of medical students. Materials and Methods : The validated basic competency examination in musculoskeletal medicine devised by Freidman and Bernstein was administered to final year medical students just prior to their final professional examination. Participants were also required to assess their confidence at making a musculoskeletal physical examination and diagnosis as well as comment on the adequacy of time in the curriculum devoted to Orthopedics. Results : The response rate was 83% (40/48. The average cognitive examination score was 48.3%. Two participants (5% obtained a score of ≥ 73.1%, the recommended mean passing score. Seventeen students (42.5% felt orthopedic clinical cases were the most difficult to perform a physical examination and diagnose. Thirteen students (32.5% felt that the time devoted to orthopedics in the medical curriculum was inadequate. Conclusions : Ninety-five percent of the students failed to show basic musculoskeletal competency. A change in medical curriculum and teaching methods is required to address this problem.

  16. [Orthopedics and patients under national socialism dictatorship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, K D; Rauschmann, M

    2001-10-01

    The 12-year dictatorship of National Socialism represents a decisive event in the history of orthopedics in Germany. Treatment and care was limited to those patients whose prognosis promised their reintegration into the work force. Those orthopedic patients with mental and psychological handicaps no longer came under the care of orthopedists and were potential candidates for annihilation. Despite concerted efforts to the contrary, as can be gleaned from the lists of topics at the annual meetings, the prevailing political circumstances encumbered scientific activities. The almost total isolation from international contacts had a negative effect. Orthopedists were hindered in their work by the law on sterilization, which provided for sterilization in cases of severe physical deformity. Some orthopedists even considered the presence of hip dysplasia to be an indication. The roles played by Georg Hohmann, Hellmut Eckhardt, Lothar Kreuz, and other leading orthopedists are described in detail. It can be regarded as certain that Hohmann and Eckhardt were able to prevent dire consequences for their orthopedic patients and the profession by cautious tactics. The ethnical problems of involvement with National Socialism are thoroughly discussed.

  17. 3 Tesla MRI-negative focal epilepsies: Presurgical evaluation, postoperative outcome and predictive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogias, Evangelos; Klingler, Jan-Helge; Urbach, Horst; Scheiwe, Christian; Schmeiser, Barbara; Doostkam, Soroush; Zentner, Josef; Altenmüller, Dirk-Matthias

    2017-12-01

    To investigate presurgical diagnostic modalities, clinical and seizure outcome as well as predictive factors after resective epilepsy surgery in 3 Tesla MRI-negative focal epilepsies. This retrospective study comprises 26 patients (11 males/15 females, mean age 34±12years, range 13-50 years) with 3 Tesla MRI-negative focal epilepsies who underwent resective epilepsy surgery. Non-invasive and invasive presurgical diagnostic modalities, type and localization of resection, clinical and epileptological outcome with a minimum follow-up of 1year (range 1-11 years, mean 2.5±2.3years) after surgery as well as outcome predictors were evaluated. All patients underwent invasive video-EEG monitoring after implantation of intracerebral depth and/or subdural electrodes. Ten patients received temporal and 16 extratemporal or multilobar (n=4) resections. There was no perioperative death or permanent morbidity. Overall, 12 of 26 patients (46%) were completely seizure-free (Engel IA) and 65% had a favorable outcome (Engel I-II). In particular, seizure-free ratio was 40% in the temporal and 50% in the extratemporal group. In the temporal group, long duration of epilepsy correlated with poor seizure outcome, whereas congruent unilateral FDG-PET hypometabolism correlated with a favorable outcome. In almost two thirds of temporal and extratemporal epilepsies defined as "non-lesional" by 3 Tesla MRI criteria, a favorable postoperative seizure outcome (Engel I-II) can be achieved with accurate multimodal presurgical evaluation including intracranial EEG recordings. In the temporal group, most favorable results were obtained when FDG-PET displayed congruent unilateral hypometabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. IClinfMRI Software for Integrating Functional MRI Techniques in Presurgical Mapping and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ai-Ling; Hou, Ping; Johnson, Jason M; Wu, Changwei W; Noll, Kyle R; Prabhu, Sujit S; Ferguson, Sherise D; Kumar, Vinodh A; Schomer, Donald F; Hazle, John D; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Liu, Ho-Ling

    2018-01-01

    Task-evoked and resting-state (rs) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques have been applied to the clinical management of neurological diseases, exemplified by presurgical localization of eloquent cortex, to assist neurosurgeons in maximizing resection while preserving brain functions. In addition, recent studies have recommended incorporating cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) imaging into clinical fMRI to evaluate the risk of lesion-induced neurovascular uncoupling (NVU). Although each of these imaging techniques possesses its own advantage for presurgical mapping, a specialized clinical software that integrates the three complementary techniques and promptly outputs the analyzed results to radiology and surgical navigation systems in a clinical format is still lacking. We developed the Integrated fMRI for Clinical Research (IClinfMRI) software to facilitate these needs. Beyond the independent processing of task-fMRI, rs-fMRI, and CVR mapping, IClinfMRI encompasses three unique functions: (1) supporting the interactive rs-fMRI mapping while visualizing task-fMRI results (or results from published meta-analysis) as a guidance map, (2) indicating/visualizing the NVU potential on analyzed fMRI maps, and (3) exporting these advanced mapping results in a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) format that are ready to export to a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and a surgical navigation system. In summary, IClinfMRI has the merits of efficiently translating and integrating state-of-the-art imaging techniques for presurgical functional mapping and clinical fMRI studies.

  19. Reliability for non-invasive somatosensory cortex localization: Implications for pre-surgical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Jack; Boe, Shaun; Bardouille, Timothy

    2015-12-01

    In patients with epilepsy or space occupying tumors in cortical regions, surgical resection is often considered as the primary treatment. Pre-surgical neuroimaging can provide a detailed map of pathological and functional cortex, leading to safer surgery. Mapping can be achieved non-invasively using magnetoencephalography (MEG), and is concordant with invasive findings. However, the reliability of MEG mapping between sessions is not well established. The inter-session reliability is an important property in pre-surgical mapping to establish resection margins, but repeated scans are impracticable. The present study sought to quantify the intersession reliability of MEG localization of somatosensory cortex (S1). Eighteen healthy individuals underwent MEG sessions on 3 consecutive days. Five participants were excluded due to technical issues during one of the three days. Each session included clinical-style S1 localization using electrical stimuli to each median nerve at sub-motor thresholds. The 35 ms peak of the somatosensory evoked field was used for localizing S1 in each session using a single equivalent current dipole model. Intersession reliability was quantified using two methods. Average Euclidean Distance (AED) quantified the difference in localization between each session and the inter-session mean localization. Session Euclidean Distance (SED) quantified the difference in localization between each pair of sessions. Results showed the AED was 4.8 ± 1.9 mm, whereas the SED was 8.3 ± 3.4mm. While the AED values obtained parallel those reported previously in smaller samples, the SED values were substantially larger. Clinicians should consider up to an 8mm confidence interval around the estimated location of S1 based on MEG pre-surgical mapping. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. IClinfMRI Software for Integrating Functional MRI Techniques in Presurgical Mapping and Clinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Ling Hsu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Task-evoked and resting-state (rs functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI techniques have been applied to the clinical management of neurological diseases, exemplified by presurgical localization of eloquent cortex, to assist neurosurgeons in maximizing resection while preserving brain functions. In addition, recent studies have recommended incorporating cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR imaging into clinical fMRI to evaluate the risk of lesion-induced neurovascular uncoupling (NVU. Although each of these imaging techniques possesses its own advantage for presurgical mapping, a specialized clinical software that integrates the three complementary techniques and promptly outputs the analyzed results to radiology and surgical navigation systems in a clinical format is still lacking. We developed the Integrated fMRI for Clinical Research (IClinfMRI software to facilitate these needs. Beyond the independent processing of task-fMRI, rs-fMRI, and CVR mapping, IClinfMRI encompasses three unique functions: (1 supporting the interactive rs-fMRI mapping while visualizing task-fMRI results (or results from published meta-analysis as a guidance map, (2 indicating/visualizing the NVU potential on analyzed fMRI maps, and (3 exporting these advanced mapping results in a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM format that are ready to export to a picture archiving and communication system (PACS and a surgical navigation system. In summary, IClinfMRI has the merits of efficiently translating and integrating state-of-the-art imaging techniques for presurgical functional mapping and clinical fMRI studies.

  1. Pre-surgical cortical activation to food pictures is associated with weight loss following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Abigail; Bruce, Jared; Bruce, Amanda; Aupperle, Robin; Lepping, Rebecca; Martin, Laura; Hancock, Laura; Patrician, Trisha; Malley, Steve; Selim, Niazy; Savage, Cary R

    2014-01-01

    Recent research suggests that preintervention functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data may predict weight loss outcomes among patients who participate in a behavioral weight loss plan. No study has examined whether presurgical brain activation can predict outcomes following bariatric surgery. The aim of the present study was to determine if brain activations during a presurgical fMRI food-motivation paradigm are associated with weight loss 3 and 6 months following laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). Nineteen participants viewed food and nonfood pictures from a well-established food motivation paradigm during an fMRI scanning session before LAGB surgery. Weight was assessed presurgery and 3 and 6 months postsurgery; data for all participants was available at each time point. fMRI data were analyzed using the BrainVoyager QX statistical package. Whole brain voxelwise correlations of presurgery (food-nonfood) brain activation and weight, corrected for multiple comparisons, were performed to analyze the relationship between presurgical brain activation and subsequent weight loss. The settings were a medical university brain imaging center and 2 surgical weight loss centers in a major metropolitan area. Increased activity in frontal regions associated with cognitive control (medial, middle, superior frontal gyrus) and posterior cingulate cortex was associated with weight loss following LAGB. We found that neural activity in previously established regions associated with cognitive and behavioral self-regulation predicts weight loss following bariatric surgery. These preliminary findings highlight the role of neural circuitry in the success and maintenance of weight loss and suggest a possible future use of fMRI in screening LAGB surgery candidates. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Positron emission mammography in breast cancer presurgical planning: comparisons with magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Schilling, Kathy; Narayanan, Deepa; Kalinyak, Judith E.; The, Juliette; Velasquez, Maria Victoria; Kahn, Simone; Saady, Matthew; Mahal, Ravinder; Chrystal, Larraine

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to compare the performance characteristics of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission mammography (PEM) with breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a presurgical imaging and planning option for index and ipsilateral lesions in patients with newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven breast cancer. Methods Two hundred and eight women >25 years of age (median age = 59.7 ± 14.1 years) with biopsy-proven primary breast cancer enrolled in this prospective, si...

  3. Influence of orthopedic reinforced gloves versus double standard gloves on contamination events during small animal orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Galina; Singh, Ameet; Gibson, Tom; Moens, Noel; Oblak, Michelle; Ogilvie, Adam; Reynolds, Debbie

    2017-10-01

    To determine the influence of orthopedic reinforced gloves on contamination events during small animal orthopedic surgery. Prospective randomized controlled trial SAMPLE POPULATION: Two hundred and thirty-seven pairs of orthopedic gloves (474 gloves) and 203 pairs of double standard gloves (812 gloves) worn during 193 orthopedic procedures. Primary and assistant surgeons were randomized to wear either orthopedic reinforced gloves or double gloves. Gloves were leak tested to identify perforations at the end of procedures. Perforations detected intraoperatively or postoperatively were recorded. A contamination event was defined as at least one perforation on either hand for orthopedic reinforced gloves, or a perforation of both the inner and outer glove on the same hand for double gloves. Baseline characteristics between the 2 intervention groups were similar. There was no difference in contamination events between the double-gloved and orthopedic gloved groups (OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.49-1.87, P = .89). The same percentage of contamination events (8% glove pairs used) occurred in the double gloved group (17 contamination events) and in the orthopedic gloved group (19 contamination events). The odds of a contamination event increased by 1.02 (95% CI 1.01-1.03, P contamination events in small animal orthopedic procedures. Surgeons reluctant to double glove due to perceptions of decreased dexterity and discomfort may safely opt for wearing orthopedic gloves, which may improve their compliance. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  4. Nanotechnology-enhanced orthopedic materials fabrications, applications and future trends

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology-Enhanced Orthopedic Materials provides the latest information on the emergence and rapid development of nanotechnology and the ways it has impacted almost every aspect of biomedical engineering. This book provides readers with a comprehensive overview of the field, focusing on the fabrication and applications of these materials, presenting updated, practical, and systematic knowledge on the synthesis, processing, and modification of nanomaterials, along with the rationale and methodology of applying such materials for orthopedic purposes. Topics covered include a wide range of orthopedic material formulations, such as ceramics, metals, polymers, biomolecules, and self-assemblies. Final sections explore applications and future trends in nanotechnology-enhanced orthopedic materials. Details practical information on the fabrication and modification of new and traditional orthopedic materials Analyzes a wide range of materials, designs, and applications of nanotechnology for orthopedics Investigate...

  5. Orthopedic complications of linear morphea: Implications for early interdisciplinary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Jennifer J; Schoch, Bradley S; Werthel, Jean David; McIntosh, Amy L; Davis, Dawn M R

    2018-01-01

    Linear morphea of the limb primarily affects children, and extracutaneous manifestations are common. Orthopedic surgeons are often essential in the care of patients with linear morphea, yet there are few reports outlining specific orthopedic complications in this population. We sought to improve the understanding of orthopedic complications in linear morphea of the limb. Between 1999 and 2014, 51 children were evaluated for linear morphea of an extremity. Twenty-six (51%) had documented orthopedic manifestations. Outcome measures included limb length discrepancy, angular malalignment, limb atrophy, and orthopedic surgical intervention. Joint contractures were most common, affecting 88% of patients, followed by limb atrophy, angular deformity, and limb length discrepancy; 14% required surgical intervention. Despite the use of systemic immunosuppressive therapy in many patients, approximately half of patients with linear morphea of an extremity have orthopedic disease. Early orthopedist involvement is crucial to improve limb alignment and preserve function. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Presurgical language fMRI activation correlates with postsurgical verbal memory decline in left-sided temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labudda, Kirsten; Mertens, Markus; Aengenendt, Joerg; Ebner, Alois; Woermann, Friedrich G

    2010-12-01

    We analysed the association of presurgical language fMRI activations and postsurgical verbal memory changes in 16 left-sided mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients with initially intact memory. Patients with severe verbal memory decline after surgery (n = 9) had stronger presurgical fMRI activations within the left posterior temporal lobe, compared to those with no decline (n = 7). Language fMRI activation may predict verbal memory outcome, even in patients with a high risk of postsurgical memory deterioration. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pre-surgical localisation of epileptogenic zones by the SPECT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namer, I.J.; Scheiber, C.; Waydelich, R.; Armspach, J.P.; Hirsch, E.; Marescaux, C.; Grucker, D.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to localize the epileptogenic zones by non-invasive methods in the frame of a pre-surgical examination. Eighty five patients presenting a cryptogenic temporal epilepsy were subject to a complete clinical examination and video-EEG, a quantitative MRI and a SPECT in the inter-critical and critical period (n = 15). The SPECT was performed by means of a double head Elscint camera (900 MBq of 99m Tc-HMPAO or ECR) and the MRI was carried out with a Bruker appliance (0.28 T). The cartography of T 2 relaxation time was effected on a single cross section by means of a spin-echo sequence with 48 echoes (T R = 2000 ms, T E = 15 ms). In the 85 patients studied, the inter-critical SPECT has evidenced a regional hypo-perfusion in 71.9% of cases, the clinical MRI, an anomaly of the meso-temporal structures in 82.4% of cases and the T 2 cartography, an increase in the relaxation time in 87.5% of cases. The association of the two examinations rises this score up to 96.4%, a result quite encouraging for a pre-surgical evaluation. In 74 patients, presenting a unilateral temporal epilepsy the T 2 cartography permitted also to observe anomalous values in 37.5% of cases in the controlateral structures apparently normal, thus making questionable the success of surgical intervention

  8. [Presurgical evaluaton for lateral suboccipital craniotomy using contrast-enhanced CT volumetric imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi; Saito, Akihiko; Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Fuji, Yukihiko

    2009-05-01

    To safely and precisely accomplish lateral suboccipital craniotomy (LSOC), we have presurgically evaluated the three-dimensional (3-D) relationships of various vascular structures and cranial landmarks in the occipito-cervical region by volumetric imaging of 3-D contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT). The 3-D anatomies visualized by adjusting the window width, window level, and opacity level of the specific CT value for each structure were an occpital artery (OA), mastoid and posterior condylar emissary veins (MEV and PCEV), which were useful in dissecting muscles and exposing the cranial surface, and the relationship of the transverse-sigmoid sinus CTSS) and the asterion, which was necessary and decisive for making a key burr hole to perform craniotomy. The morphologic analysis for our 48 cases with cerebello-pontine angle tumor or neurovascular compression syndrome showed running patterns of OA, varieties of MEV and PCEV in their sizes and connections, right dominance of TSS, and the various relationship between the TSS and the asterion. Especially, the exact location of the TSS compared to the astenon was found to be inferior in 56%, right below in 38%, and superior in 6%. In conclusion, presurgical evaluation using volumetric imaging of 3-D CECT is a convenient and valuable method for obtaining the anatomic information required for performing LSOC safely and precisely in individual patients.

  9. Early orthognathic surgery with three-dimensional image simulation during presurgical orthodontics in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Moon-Key; Park, Sun-Yeon; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Park, Wonse; Lee, Sang-Hwy

    2011-03-01

    To correct dentofacial deformities, three-dimensional skeletal analysis and computerized orthognathic surgery simulation are used to facilitate accurate diagnoses and surgical plans. Computed tomography imaging of dental occlusion can inform three-dimensional facial analyses and orthognathic surgical simulations. Furthermore, three-dimensional laser scans of a cast model of the predetermined postoperative dental occlusion can be used to increase the accuracy of the preoperative surgical simulation. In this study, we prepared cast models of planned postoperative dental occlusions from 12 patients diagnosed with skeletal class III malocclusions with mandibular prognathism and facial asymmetry that had planned to undergo bimaxillary orthognathic surgery during preoperative orthodontic treatment. The data from three-dimensional laser scans of the cast models were used in three-dimensional surgical simulations. Early orthognathic surgeries were performed based on three-dimensional image simulations using the cast images in several presurgical orthodontic states in which teeth alignment, leveling, and space closure were incomplete. After postoperative orthodontic treatments, intraoral examinations revealed that no patient had a posterior open bite or space. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional skeletal analyses showed that no mandibular deviations occurred between the immediate and final postoperative states of orthodontic treatment. These results showed that early orthognathic surgery with three-dimensional computerized simulations based on cast models of predetermined postoperative dental occlusions could provide early correction of facial deformities and improved efficacy of preoperative orthodontic treatment. This approach can reduce the decompensation treatment period of the presurgical orthodontics and contribute to efficient postoperative orthodontic treatments.

  10. Biomechanical Studies and Optical Digitizer Development for Enhanced Orthopedic Footwear

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Houston, Vern

    2001-01-01

    .... Custom designed and manufactured orthopedic footwear is also an essential component in treatment and rehabilitative care of persons with neuromusculoskeletal foot/ankle pathologies, biomechanical...

  11. Trends in Medicare Reimbursement for Orthopedic Procedures: 2000 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Durand, Wesley M; Haglin, Jack M; Rubin, Lee E; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C; Daniels, Alan H

    2018-03-01

    Understanding trends in reimbursement is critical to the financial sustainability of orthopedic practices. Little research has examined physician fee trends over time for orthopedic procedures. This study evaluated trends in Medicare reimbursements for orthopedic surgical procedures. The Medicare Physician Fee Schedule was examined for Current Procedural Terminology code values for the most common orthopedic and nonorthopedic procedures between 2000 and 2016. Prices were adjusted for inflation to 2016-dollar values. To assess mean growth rate for each procedure and subspecialty, compound annual growth rates were calculated. Year-to-year dollar amount changes were calculated for each procedure and subspecialty. Reimbursement trends for individual procedures and across subspecialties were compared. Between 2000 and 2016, annual reimbursements decreased for all orthopedic procedures examined except removal of orthopedic implant. The orthopedic procedures with the greatest mean annual decreases in reimbursement were shoulder arthroscopy/decompression, total knee replacement, and total hip replacement. The orthopedic procedures with the least annual reimbursement decreases were carpal tunnel release and repair of ankle fracture. Rate of Medicare procedure reimbursement change varied between subspecialties. Trauma had the smallest decrease in annual change compared with spine, sports, and hand. Annual reimbursement decreased at a significantly greater rate for adult reconstruction procedures than for any of the other subspecialties. These findings indicate that reimbursement for procedures has steadily decreased, with the most rapid decrease seen in adult reconstruction. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Impact of a Musculoskeletal Clerkship on Orthopedic Surgery Applicant Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Daniel A; Calfee, Ryan P; Boyer, Martin I

    Orthopedic surgery lacks racial and sexual diversity, which we hypothesized stems from absence of exposure to orthopedics during medical school. We conducted a study to determine whether diversity of matched orthopedic surgery residency applicants increased after introduction of a required third-year rotation. We compared 2 groups: precurriculum and postcurriculum. The postcurriculum group was exposed to a required 1-month musculoskeletal rotation during the third year of medical school. Comparisons were made of percentage of total students exposed to orthopedics, percentage who applied to and matched to orthopedic surgery, and proportion of women and underrepresented minorities. A prospective survey was used to determine when students chose orthopedics and what influenced their decisions. The required rotation increased the percentage of third-year students rotating on orthopedics (25%) with no change in application rate (6%). It also led to an 81% relative increase in the proportion of female applicants and a 101% relative increase in underrepresented minority applicants. According to survey data, 79% of students chose orthopedics during their third year, and 88% thought they were influenced by their rotation. A required third-year rotation exposes more medical students to orthopedics and increases the diversity of matching students.

  13. Medical Crowdfunding for Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Wesley M; Johnson, Joseph R; Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H

    2018-01-01

    Crowdfunding for medical expenses is growing in popularity. Through several websites, patients create public campaign profiles to which donors can contribute. Research on medical crowdfunding is limited, and there have been no studies of crowdfunding in orthopedics. Active medical crowdfunding campaigns for orthopedic trauma, total joint arthroplasty, and spine surgery were queried from a crowdfunding website. The characteristics and outcomes of crowdfunding campaigns were abstracted and analyzed. For this study, 444 campaigns were analyzed, raising a total of $1,443,528. Among the campaigns that received a donation, mean amount raised was $4414 (SE, $611). Multivariate analysis showed that campaigns with unspecified location (odds ratio, 0.26; P=.0008 vs West) and those for total joint arthroplasty (odds ratio, 0.35; P=.0003 vs trauma) had significantly lower odds of receipt of any donation. Description length was associated with higher odds of donation receipt (odds ratio, 1.13 per +100 characters; Pcrowdfunding may be disproportionately available to patients with specific diagnoses, those from specific regions, those who are able to craft a lengthy descriptive narrative, and those with access to robust digital social networks. Clinicians are likely to see a greater proportion of patients turning to crowdfunding as it grows in popularity. Patients may ask physicians for information about crowdfunding or request testimonials to support campaigns. Surgeons should consider their response to such requests individually. These findings shed light on the dynamics of medical crowdfunding and support robust personal and professional deliberation. [Orthopedics. 2018; 41(1):e58-e63.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Three-Dimensional Printing in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltorai, Adam E M; Nguyen, Eric; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is emerging as a clinically promising technology for rapid prototyping of surgically implantable products. With this commercially available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used to create graspable objects from 3D reconstructed images. Models can enhance patients' understanding of their pathology and surgeon preoperative planning. Customized implants and casts can be made to match an individual's anatomy. This review outlines 3D printing, its current applications in orthopedics, and promising future directions. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Imaging of orthopedic trauma and surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on imaging techniques for diagnosis of trauma of bones. A comparative evaluation is presented for planning of proper diagnosis and treatment. Various techniques discussed are routine radiography; computerized tomography, NMR imaging, angiography, ultrasonography; and use of radioisotopes. The mechanism of injury of bone joints of upper and lower limbs and spine is discussed after discussing the anatomy of each in the beginning of each paper. Topics titled are healing of fractures; fractures of pelvis; knee; shoulder; foot and ankle; fractures of humerus; stress fractures; and orthopedic radiology. Prosthesis use and plastic surgery of joints is also discussed.

  16. Compliance of Dutch orthopedic departments with national guidelines on thromboprophylaxis. A survey of Dutch orthopedic thromboprohylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, Harmen B.; Hoppener, Marnix R.; Henny, Christiaan P.; Büller, Harry R.; Verheyen, Cees C. P. M.

    2005-01-01

    All 110 Dutch orthopedic departments were sent a survey on perioperative thromboprophylaxis protocols, and 79% responded. After hip and knee replacements, all used pharmacological thromboprophylaxis: a low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) in 87% of departments, which was most often combined with

  17. Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course: A Collaboration between Anatomists and Orthopedic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFriez, Curtis B.; Morton, David A.; Horwitz, Daniel S.; Eckel, Christine M.; Foreman, K. Bo; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months…

  18. Economic analysis of athletic team coverage by an orthopedic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Nicholas; Freedman, Kevin; Tucker, Brad; Austin, Luke; Eck, Brandon; Pepe, Matt; Tjoumakaris, Fotios

    2015-11-01

    Coverage of high school football by orthopedic sports medicine specialists is considered standard of care in many localities. Determining the economic viability of this endeavor has never been investigated. The primary purpose of the present investigation was to perform an economic analysis of local high school sports coverage by an orthopedic sports medicine practice. From January 2010 to June 2012, a prospective injury report database was used to collect sports injuries from five high school athletic programs covered by a single, private orthopedic sports medicine practice. Patients referred for orthopedic care were then tracked to determine expected cost of care (potential revenue). Evaluation and management codes and current procedure terminology codes were obtained to determine the value of physician visits and surgical care rendered. Overhead costs were calculated based on historical rates within our practice and incorporated to determine estimated profit. 19,165 athletic trainer contacts with athletes playing all sports, including both those 'on-field' and in the training room, resulted in 473 (2.5%) physician referrals. The covering orthopedic practice handled 89 (27.9%) of the orthopedic referrals. Of orthopedic physician referrals, 26 (5.4%) required orthopedic surgical treatment. The covering team practice handled 17/26 (65%) surgical cases. The total revenue collected by the covering team practice was $26,226.14. The overhead cost of treatment was $9441.41. Overall estimated profit of orthopedic visits and treatment during this period for the covering practice was $16,784.73. The covering team practice handled 28% of the orthopedic referrals, 65% of the surgical cases and captured 59% of the potential profit. An increase in physician referrals could increase the benefit for orthopedic surgeons.

  19. Pericytes for the treatment of orthopedic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Aaron W; Hindle, Paul; Murray, Iain R; West, Christopher C; Tawonsawatruk, Tulyapruek; Shen, Jia; Asatrian, Greg; Zhang, Xinli; Nguyen, Vi; Simpson, A Hamish; Ting, Kang; Péault, Bruno; Soo, Chia

    2017-03-01

    Pericytes and other perivascular stem cells are of growing interest in orthopedics and tissue engineering. Long regarded as simple regulators of angiogenesis and blood pressure, pericytes are now recognized to have MSC (mesenchymal stem cell) characteristics, including multipotentiality, self-renewal, immunoregulatory functions, and diverse roles in tissue repair. Pericytes are typified by characteristic cell surface marker expression (including αSMA, CD146, PDGFRβ, NG2, RGS5, among others). Although alone no marker is absolutely specific for pericytes, collectively these markers appear to selectively identify an MSC-like pericyte. The purification of pericytes is most well described as a CD146 + CD34 - CD45 - cell population. Pericytes and other perivascular stem cell populations have been applied in diverse orthopedic applications, including both ectopic and orthotopic models. Application of purified cells has sped calvarial repair, induced spine fusion, and prevented fibrous non-union in rodent models. Pericytes induce these effects via both direct and indirect mechanisms. In terms of their paracrine effects, pericytes are known to produce and secrete high levels of a number of growth and differentiation factors both in vitro and after transplantation. The following review will cover existing studies to date regarding pericyte application for bone and cartilage engineering. In addition, further questions in the field will be pondered, including the phenotypic and functional overlap between pericytes and culture-derived MSC, and the concept of pericytes as efficient producers of differentiation factors to speed tissue repair. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Blog and Podcast Watch: Orthopedic Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grock, Andrew; Rezaie, Salim; Swaminathan, Anand; Min, Alice; Shah, Kaushal H; Lin, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch presents high quality open-access educational blogs and podcasts in emergency medicine (EM) based on the ongoing ALiEM Approved Instructional Resources (AIR) and AIR-Professional series. Both series critically appraise resources using an objective scoring rubric. This installment of the Blog and Podcast Watch highlights the topic of orthopedic emergencies from the AIR series. The AIR series is a continuously building curriculum that follows the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) annual testing schedule. For each module, relevant content is collected from the top 50 Social Media Index sites published within the previous 12 months, and scored by eight AIR board members using five equally weighted measurement outcomes: Best Evidence in Emergency Medicine (BEEM) score, accuracy, educational utility, evidence based, and references. Resources scoring ≥30 out of 35 available points receive an AIR label. Resources scoring 27-29 receive an honorable mention label, if the executive board agrees that the post is accurate and educationally valuable. A total of 87 blog posts and podcasts were evaluated. Key educational pearls from the three AIR posts and the 14 honorable mentions are summarized. The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch series is based on the AIR and AIR-Pro series, which attempts to identify high quality educational content on open-access blogs and podcasts. This series provides an expert-based, post-publication curation of educational social media content for EM clinicians with this installment focusing on orthopedic emergencies.

  1. Disparities in internet use among orthopedic outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kenneth P; Rehman, Saqib; Goldhirsh, Jessie

    2014-02-01

    Internet access has lagged behind for patients with lower incomes and from certain ethnic groups. This study investigated the possible improvement of access to health-related information on the Internet for all patients in an urban outpatient setting, regardless of socioeconomic background. A 28-question survey was completed by 100 orthopedic outpatients evaluating associations between their age, ethnicity, income, or education level and their access to the Internet. The survey also examined how patients used the Internet to obtain information about their medical condition, their privacy concerns when conducting online research, and their use of mobile phones as a primary means of Internet access. The Internet was used by 57% of orthopedic outpatients in this urban setting. Internet access decreased with advancing age but increased with increasing income and education, findings consistent with similar studies. Despite the inability to identify an association between ethnicity and Internet access in this patient population, fewer Latinos (33%) than whites (67%) or African Americans (77%) sought information about their medical condition. Among patients who used a mobile phone as the primary method for online access, 74% were African American or Latino and 26% were white. This difference in mobile phone use for online access suggests that mobile phones have provided ethnic minorities with greater Internet access and thus may have narrowed the digital divide among the races. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Improving fMRI reliability in presurgical mapping for brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, M Tynan R; Clarke, David B; Stroink, Gerhard; Beyea, Steven D; D'Arcy, Ryan Cn

    2016-03-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is becoming increasingly integrated into clinical practice for presurgical mapping. Current efforts are focused on validating data quality, with reliability being a major factor. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of a recently developed approach that uses receiver operating characteristic-reliability (ROC-r) to: (1) identify reliable versus unreliable data sets; (2) automatically select processing options to enhance data quality; and (3) automatically select individualised thresholds for activation maps. Presurgical fMRI was conducted in 16 patients undergoing surgical treatment for brain tumours. Within-session test-retest fMRI was conducted, and ROC-reliability of the patient group was compared to a previous healthy control cohort. Individually optimised preprocessing pipelines were determined to improve reliability. Spatial correspondence was assessed by comparing the fMRI results to intraoperative cortical stimulation mapping, in terms of the distance to the nearest active fMRI voxel. The average ROC-r reliability for the patients was 0.58±0.03, as compared to 0.72±0.02 in healthy controls. For the patient group, this increased significantly to 0.65±0.02 by adopting optimised preprocessing pipelines. Co-localisation of the fMRI maps with cortical stimulation was significantly better for more reliable versus less reliable data sets (8.3±0.9 vs 29±3 mm, respectively). We demonstrated ROC-r analysis for identifying reliable fMRI data sets, choosing optimal postprocessing pipelines, and selecting patient-specific thresholds. Data sets with higher reliability also showed closer spatial correspondence to cortical stimulation. ROC-r can thus identify poor fMRI data at time of scanning, allowing for repeat scans when necessary. ROC-r analysis provides optimised and automated fMRI processing for improved presurgical mapping. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  3. The Contribution of Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) to the Presurgical Assessment of Language Function in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Anne; Beland, Renee; Lassonde, Maryse

    2012-01-01

    Before performing neurosurgery, an exhaustive presurgical assessment is required, usually including an investigation of language cerebral lateralization. Among the available procedures, the intracarotid amobarbital test (IAT) was formerly the most widely used. However, this procedure has many limitations: it is invasive and potentially traumatic,…

  4. Strongly lateralized activation in language fMRI of atypical dominant patients-implications for presurgical work-up.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wellmer, J.; Weber, B.; Weis, S.; Klaver, P.; Urbach, H.; Reul, J.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Elger, C.E.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is being used increasingly for language dominance assessment in the presurgical work-up of patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. However, the interpretation of bilateral fMRI-activation patterns is difficult. Various studies propose

  5. Use and usability of custom-made orthopedic shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Jannink, M.J.A.; Hijmans, Juha M.; Geertzen, Jan H.B.; Postema, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the use of custom-made orthopedic shoes (OS) and the association between the use of OS and the most relevant aspects of their usability. Over a 6-month period, patients meeting the inclusion criteria were recruited by 12 orthopedic shoe companies scattered

  6. Delay to orthopedic consultation for isolated limb injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Dominique M.; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann; Parent, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe referral mechanisms for referral to orthopedic surgery for isolated limb injuries in a public health care system and to identify factors affecting access. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SETTING Orthopedic surgery service in a level 1 trauma centre in Montreal, Que. PARTICIPANTS We conducted a prospective study of 166 consecutive adults (mean age 48 years) referred to orthopedic surgery for isolated limb injuries during a 4-month period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Self-reported data on the nature of the trauma, the elapsed time between injury and orthopedic consultation, the number and type of previous primary care consultations, sociodemographic characteristics, and the level of satisfaction with care. RESULTS Average time between the injury and orthopedic consultation was 89 hours (range 3 to 642), with an average of 68 hours (range 0 to 642) for delay between primary care consultation and orthopedic consultation. A total of 36% of patients with time-sensitive diagnoses had unacceptable delays to orthopedic consultation according to the Quebec Orthopaedic Association guidelines. Lower limb injury, consulting first at another hospital, living far from the trauma centre, patient perception of low severity, and having a soft tissue injury were associated with longer delays. CONCLUSION Identifying gaps and risk factors for slower access might help improve referral mechanisms for orthopedic consultation. PMID:19826162

  7. Improving Response Rates among Students with Orthopedic and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Christian P.; Kuntzler, Patrice M.; Cardenas, Shaun; O'Malley, Eileen; Phillips, Carolyn; Singer, Jacqueline; Stoeger, Alex; Kindler, Keith

    2014-01-01

    One challenge teachers of students with orthopedic and multiple disabilities face is providing sufficient time and opportunity to communicate. This challenge is universal across countries, schools, and settings: teachers want students to communicate because communication lies at the core of what makes us human. Yet students with orthopedic and…

  8. Exploratory study of pre-surgical medications with dienogest or leuprorelin in laparoscopic cystectomy of endometrial cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Motoki; Yano, Ryuichiro; Hiraku, Yuka; Shibata, Mayuko; Hatano, Kayoko; Yamamoto, Shiori; Sato, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Kazushige; Morishige, Ken-ichiro

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of pre-surgical medication with dienogest or leuprorelin on post-surgical ovarian function. We conducted an exploratory study in two centers in Japan that comprised 30 patients with ovarian endometrial cysts for whom surgical excision was planned. Patients were enrolled and divided into pre-surgical medication groups with dienogest or leuprorelin for 12 weeks. Thereafter, patients were treated by laparoscopic cystectomy. The primary outcome was ovarian function post-surgery, as assessed by serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) level, antral follicle count (AFC) and resumption of menses. Secondary outcome was the effect of pre-surgical medication, as assessed by the size of endometrial cysts and visual analog scale (VAS) score. Serum AMH, AFC, size of endometrial cysts, and VAS scores were measured at baseline (before medication), after medication (1 day before surgery), and at 4 and 12 weeks post-surgery. Serum AMH levels did not change after pre-surgical medication with either dienogest or leuprorelin. Although AMH decreased after surgery, it recovered by 12 weeks post-surgery in both groups with no statistically significant difference. Mean AFC did not change after surgery in either group. Menses returned by 12 weeks post-surgery in all patients except for those who were pregnant. The rate of reduction of endometrial cyst volume did not differ between the groups. Both dienogest and leuprorelin were associated with substantial reductions in VAS scores. There were no statistically significant differences between pre-surgical medication with dienogest and leuprorelin in post-surgical ovarian function. Both medications were effective in reducing endometrial cyst volume and VAS score. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  9. Clinical application of spatiotemporal distributed source analysis in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoaki eTanaka

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG, which acquires neuromagnetic fields in the brain, is a useful diagnostic tool in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. Previous studies have shown that MEG affects the planning intracranial EEG placement and correlates with surgical outcomes by using a single dipole model. Spatiotemporal source analysis using distributed source models is an advanced method for analyzing MEG, and has been recently introduced for analyzing epileptic spikes. It has advantages over the conventional single dipole analysis for obtaining accurate sources and understanding the propagation of epileptic spikes. In this article, we review the source analysis methods, describe the techniques of the distributed source analysis, interpretation of source distribution maps, and discuss the benefits and feasibility of this method in evaluation of epilepsy.

  10. Clinical application of spatiotemporal distributed source analysis in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naoaki; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG), which acquires neuromagnetic fields in the brain, is a useful diagnostic tool in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. Previous studies have shown that MEG affects the planning intracranial electroencephalography placement and correlates with surgical outcomes by using a single dipole model. Spatiotemporal source analysis using distributed source models is an advanced method for analyzing MEG, and has been recently introduced for analyzing epileptic spikes. It has advantages over the conventional single dipole analysis for obtaining accurate sources and understanding the propagation of epileptic spikes. In this article, we review the source analysis methods, describe the techniques of the distributed source analysis, interpretation of source distribution maps, and discuss the benefits and feasibility of this method in evaluation of epilepsy.

  11. Presurgical language fMRI in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy: effects of task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bernd; Wellmer, Jörg; Schür, Simone; Dinkelacker, Vera; Ruhlmann, Jürgen; Mormann, Florian; Axmacher, Nikolai; Elger, Christian E; Fernández, Guillén

    2006-05-01

    To determine whether language functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before epilepsy surgery can be similarly interpreted in patients with greatly different performance levels. An fMRI paradigm using a semantic decision task with performance control and a perceptual control task was applied to 226 consecutive patients with drug-resistant localization-related epilepsy during their presurgical evaluations. The volume of activation and lateralization in an inferior frontal and a temporoparietal area was assessed in correlation with individual performance levels. We observed differential effects of task performance on the volume of activation in the inferior frontal and the temporoparietal region of interest, but performance measures did not correlate with the lateralization of activation. fMRI, as applied here, in patients with a wide range of cognitive abilities, can be interpreted regarding language lateralization in a similar way.

  12. Evaluation of a pre-surgical functional MRI workflow: From data acquisition to reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, Cyril R; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Job, Dominic; Rodriguez, David; Storkey, Amos; Whittle, Ian; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Present and assess clinical protocols and associated automated workflow for pre-surgical functional magnetic resonance imaging in brain tumor patients. Protocols were validated using a single-subject reliability approach based on 10 healthy control subjects. Results from the automated workflow were evaluated in 9 patients with brain tumors, comparing fMRI results to direct electrical stimulation (DES) of the cortex. Using a new approach to compute single-subject fMRI reliability in controls, we show that not all tasks are suitable in the clinical context, even if they show meaningful results at the group level. Comparison of the fMRI results from patients to DES showed good correspondence between techniques (odds ratio 36). Providing that validated and reliable fMRI protocols are used, fMRI can accurately delineate eloquent areas, thus providing an aid to medical decision regarding brain tumor surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pre-surgical Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Asthma Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, Yasemin; van Huisstede, Astrid; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Taube, Christian; Braunstahl, Gert-Jan

    2017-11-01

    This pilot study was performed to investigate the feasibility of pre-surgical pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in morbidly obese patients with uncontrolled asthma, undergoing bariatric surgery. Four morbidly obese female patients with asthma participated in a 12-week PR program (exercise, diet, and psychological intervention) before undergoing bariatric surgery, and the outcomes were compared to a matched group of seven female controls (bariatric surgery only). In patients who participated in PR, asthma control and asthma quality of life improved dramatically after 3 months of PR. Besides, asthma control was better at the moment of surgery. The results of this pilot study show that PR is feasible in morbidly obese asthmatics and should be considered for a selected group of patients with uncontrolled asthma before undergoing bariatric surgery.

  14. Infant Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Midwest. Top of Page Infant Mortality Rates by Race and Ethnicity, 2015 *Source: Table 1 (p. 79) ... 1.27MB] . In 2015, infant mortality rates by race and ethnicity were as follows: Non-Hispanic black ...

  15. Change in presurgical diagnostic imaging evaluation affects subsequent pediatric epilepsy surgery outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinger, Luc; Chan, Carol; D'Arco, Felice; Moineddin, Rahim; Muthaffar, Osama; Rutka, James T; Snead, O Carter; Smith, Mary Lou; Widjaja, Elysa

    2016-01-01

    Since 2008, we have changed our presurgical diagnostic imaging evaluation for medically refractory focal epilepsy to include high-resolution epilepsy protocol on 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and combined magnetoencephalography and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in selected patients with normal or subtle changes on MRI or discordant diagnostic tests. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the change in imaging practice on epilepsy surgery outcome in a tertiary pediatric epilepsy surgery center. The change in practice occurred in early 2008, and patients were classified based on old or new practice. The patient characteristics, surgical variables, and seizure-free surgical outcome were compared, and the trend in seizure-free outcome over time was assessed. There was a trend for increased abnormal MRI (92% vs. 86%, respectively, p = 0.062), and increased utilization of FDG-PET (34% vs. 3% respectively, p 0.05). During the old practice, there was no statistically significant change in yearly trend of seizure-free outcome (odds ratio [OR] 0.960, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.875-1.053, p = 0.386). The change in practice in 2008 was associated with a significant improvement in seizure-free outcome (OR 1.535, 95% CI 1.100-2.142, p = 0.012). During the new practice, there was a significant positive trend in yearly seizure-free outcome (OR 1.219, 95% CI 1.053-1.411, p = 0.008), after adjusting for age at seizure onset, invasive monitoring, location and type of surgery, histology, MRI, magnetoencephalography, and FDG-PET. We have found an improvement in seizure-free surgical outcome following the change in imaging practice. This study highlights the importance of optimizing and improving presurgical diagnostic imaging evaluation to improve surgical outcome. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. American Society of Functional Neuroradiology-Recommended fMRI Paradigm Algorithms for Presurgical Language Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, D F; Vachha, B; Mian, A; Faro, S H; Maheshwari, M; Sair, H I; Petrella, J R; Pillai, J J; Welker, K

    2017-10-01

    Functional MR imaging is increasingly being used for presurgical language assessment in the treatment of patients with brain tumors, epilepsy, vascular malformations, and other conditions. The inherent complexity of fMRI, which includes numerous processing steps and selective analyses, is compounded by institution-unique approaches to patient training, paradigm choice, and an eclectic array of postprocessing options from various vendors. Consequently, institutions perform fMRI in such markedly different manners that data sharing, comparison, and generalization of results are difficult. The American Society of Functional Neuroradiology proposes widespread adoption of common fMRI language paradigms as the first step in countering this lost opportunity to advance our knowledge and improve patient care. A taskforce of American Society of Functional Neuroradiology members from multiple institutions used a broad literature review, member polls, and expert opinion to converge on 2 sets of standard language paradigms that strike a balance between ease of application and clinical usefulness. The taskforce generated an adult language paradigm algorithm for presurgical language assessment including the following tasks: Sentence Completion, Silent Word Generation, Rhyming, Object Naming, and/or Passive Story Listening. The pediatric algorithm includes the following tasks: Sentence Completion, Rhyming, Antonym Generation, or Passive Story Listening. Convergence of fMRI language paradigms across institutions offers the first step in providing a "Rosetta Stone" that provides a common reference point with which to compare and contrast the usefulness and reliability of fMRI data. From this common language task battery, future refinements and improvements are anticipated, particularly as objective measures of reliability become available. Some commonality of practice is a necessary first step to develop a foundation on which to improve the clinical utility of this field. © 2017 by

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in orthopedics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, P.E.; Matthiass, H.H.; Reiser, M.

    1990-01-01

    NMR imaging (MR tomography) allows the non-invasive diagnostic evaluation of cartilage, ligaments, tendons and muscles of the limbs, joints and the vertebral spine. The images are characterized by a good spatial resolution, and in contrast to the X-ray CT, sectional images can be done in all planes, as well as three-dimensional image reconstructions. The book reviews the current state of the art and foreseeable developments of NMR imaging of the supporting and connective tissue, also discussing the application of paramagnetic contrast media, and the novel NMR spectroscopy as a method pointing into the future. All contributions discussing the clinical aspects have been written jointly by experts in orthopedics and radiology. (orig.) With 153 figs., 8 tabs [de

  18. Application of Stem Cells in Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Andreas; van Griensven, Martijn; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Buchmann, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell research plays an important role in orthopedic regenerative medicine today. Current literature provides us with promising results from animal research in the fields of bone, tendon, and cartilage repair. While early clinical results are already published for bone and cartilage repair, the data about tendon repair is limited to animal studies. The success of these techniques remains inconsistent in all three mentioned areas. This may be due to different application techniques varying from simple mesenchymal stem cell injection up to complex tissue engineering. However, the ideal carrier for the stem cells still remains controversial. This paper aims to provide a better understanding of current basic research and clinical data concerning stem cell research in bone, tendon, and cartilage repair. Furthermore, a focus is set on different stem cell application techniques in tendon reconstruction, cartilage repair, and filling of bone defects. PMID:22550505

  19. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  20. Orthopedic surgical analyzer for percutaneous vertebroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Gye Rae; Choi, Hyung Guen; Lim, Do H.; Lee, Sung J.

    2001-05-01

    Since the spine is one of the most complex joint structures in the human body, its surgical treatment requires careful planning and high degree of precision to avoid any unwanted neurological compromises. In addition, comprehensive biomechanical analysis can be very helpful because the spine is subject to a variety of load. In case for the osteoporotic spine in which the structural integrity has been compromised, it brings out the double challenges for a surgeon both clinically and biomechanically. Thus, we have been developing an integrated medical image system that is capable of doing the both. This system is called orthopedic surgical analyzer and it combines the clinical results from image-guided examination and the biomechanical data from finite element analysis. In order to demonstrate its feasibility, this system was applied to percutaneous vertebroplasty. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a surgical procedure that has been recently introduced for the treatment of compression fracture of the osteoporotic vertebrae. It involves puncturing vertebrae and filling with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Recent studies have shown that the procedure could provide structural reinforcement for the osteoporotic vertebrae while being minimally invasive and safe with immediate pain relief. However, treatment failures due to excessive PMMA volume injection have been reported as one of complications. It is believed that control of PMMA volume is one of the most critical factors that can reduce the incidence of complications. Since the degree of the osteoporosis can influence the porosity of the cancellous bone in the vertebral body, the injection volume can be different from patient to patient. In this study, the optimal volume of PMMA injection for vertebroplasty was predicted based on the image analysis of a given patient. In addition, biomechanical effects due to the changes in PMMA volume and bone mineral density (BMD) level were investigated by constructing clinically

  1. Dynamic Cleft Maxillary Orthopedics and Periosteoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukash, Frederick N; Shikowitz-Behr, Lauren B; Schwartz, Michael; Tuminelli, Frank

    2018-01-01

    In 1985 this cleft team, dissatisfied with the treatment and results from cleft lip and palate repair, began a longitudinal long-term study using dynamic maxillary orthopedics and periosteoplasty as was originally described by Drs Millard and Latham. All cases were carefully documented through adolescence, including clinical assessments, orthodontic, radiographic, and cephalometric analyses. In 1998, in this journal, we published our data on 35 complete unilateral and 10 complete bilateral cleft patients. At that time facial growth was following normal cephalometric patterns. Crossbites were dental and treated with orthodontics. There was radiologic evidence of bone within the alveolus with elimination of the oronasal fistula, and facial aesthetics revealed soft faded scars and balanced noses.That publication was a preliminary study with the intent to provide long-term results when full facial growth was achieved. This article reports on 25 patients from the initial cohort (20 unilateral and 5 bilateral) that we were able to closely follow up for 25 years, with the same clinical team, making it the longest study of its kind.At this stage, data revealed continued growth of the midface both vertically and horizontally. Secondary alveolar cleft bone grafting when required was in small aliquots placed into well-healed tissue, and orthodontic movement of teeth was through a consolidated alveolus. Orthognathic procedures were performed in 2 of 5 bilateral and 0 of 20 unilateral cases.We concluded that in this cohort, dynamic maxillary orthopedics and periosteoplasty, despite controversy in the literature, did not negatively impact facial growth and provided the benefit of early structural normalization and social integration by consolidation of the maxilla, closure of the oronasal fistula, tension free closure of the lip, and by balancing the nose.

  2. Prospective analysis of a novel orthopedic residency advocacy education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Bariteau, Jason T; Grabel, Zachary; DiGiovanni, Christopher W

    2014-10-01

    Future physician leaders must be able to critically assess health care policy and patient advocacy issues. Currently, no nationally accepted, standardized curriculum to provide advocacy education during orthopedic residency training exists. We therefore developed an "Advocacy" curriculum for our orthopedic residents designed to direct particular attention to patient advocacy, specialty advocacy, and healthcare policy. Residents were given pre- and post-curriculum questionnaires to gauge their perception of the importance, strengths, and weaknesses of this curriculum. A paired t-test was used to compare pre- and post-curriculum responses. Twenty-one of 24 orthopedic residents completed the pre-curriculum and post-curriculum questionnaire regarding the importance of advocacy education (87.5% response rate). Overall, 85.7% (18/21) of responders ranked the curriculum on orthopedic advocacy as good or excellent. Prior to the advocacy curriculum, 33.3% (7/21) of residents felt that learning about orthopedic advocacy was important to their education, while following the curriculum 100% (21/21) felt so (padvocacy curriculum, 90.5% (19/21) of responders would be interested in getting involved in orthopedic advocacy. This curriculum significantly increased residents' belief in the importance of advocacy issues. Following the curriculum, 100% of responding residents considered orthopedic advocacy education as important. An advocacy curriculum may serve as an integral preparatory educational core component to residency training.

  3. Use of Hardware Battery Drill in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satish, Bhava R J; Shahdi, Masood; Ramarao, Duddupudi; Ranganadham, Atmakuri V; Kalamegam, Sundaresan

    2017-03-01

    Among the power drills (Electrical/Pneumatic/Battery) used in Orthopedic surgery, battery drill has got several advantages. Surgeons in low resource settings could not routinely use Orthopedic battery drills (OBD) due to the prohibitive cost of good drills or poor quality of other drills. "Hardware" or Engineering battery drill (HBD) is a viable alternative to OBD. HBD is easy to procure, rugged in nature, easy to maintain, durable, easily serviceable and 70 to 75 times cheaper than the standard high end OBD. We consider HBD as one of the cost effective equipment in Orthopedic operation theatres.

  4. [Pre-surgical period and non-work-related sickness absence due to inguinal hernia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Moraga, Montserrat; Catalina-Romero, Carlos; Martínez-Muñoz, Paloma; Cobo-Santiago, María Dolores; González-López, Maite; Cabrera-Sierra, Martha; Porrero-Carro, José Luis; Calvo-Bonacho, Eva

    2014-04-01

    To analyze non-work-related sickness absence (NWR-SA) due to inguinal hernia and the factors related to its duration, paying particular attention to the pre-surgical period of NWR-SA. Prospective cohort study was conducted on 1,003 workers with an episode of NWR-SA due to an inguinal hernia, belonging to the insured population of a mutual insurance company. We assessed the duration of the NWR-SA episodes and the main demographic, occupational and clinical variables potentially related to it. Cox regression analyses were conducted to establish the predictors of NWR-SA duration. The mean duration of NWR-SA due to inguinal hernia was 68.6 days. After multivariate analysis (Cox regression), having a pre-surgical period of NWR-SA (HR = 0.35; 95%CI: 0.28-0.43), manual occupations (HR=0.68; 95%CI: 0.49-0.95), construction sector (HR=0.71; 95%CI: 0.58-0.88), direct payment methods by a Mutual Insurance Company during sick leave in self-employed workers (HR=0.58; 95%CI, 0.41-0.82), or employees (HR=0.51; 95%CI: 0.36-0.72), comorbidity (HR=0.45; 95%CI:0.34-0.59), and surgery performed under an entity other than the Public Health System or a mutual insurance company (HR=0,76; 95%CI: 0.59-0.97) were associated with longer NWR-SA. The Mutual Insurance Company always performed the surgery when a pre-surgery period of NWR-SA existed (mean duration=47 ±39.6 days); that was associated with shorter periods of post-surgical NWR-SA (P=.001). The NWR-SA due to inguinal hernia is a multifactorial phenomenon in which the pre-surgery period plays an important role. The collaboration between organizations involved in the management of NWR-SA seems to be an effective strategy for reducing its duration. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Positron emission mammography in breast cancer presurgical planning: comparisons with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Kathy; Narayanan, Deepa; Kalinyak, Judith E; The, Juliette; Velasquez, Maria Victoria; Kahn, Simone; Saady, Matthew; Mahal, Ravinder; Chrystal, Larraine

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the performance characteristics of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission mammography (PEM) with breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a presurgical imaging and planning option for index and ipsilateral lesions in patients with newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven breast cancer. Two hundred and eight women >25 years of age (median age = 59.7 ± 14.1 years) with biopsy-proven primary breast cancer enrolled in this prospective, single-site study. MRI, PEM, and whole-body positron emission tomography (WBPET) were conducted on each patient within 7 business days. PEM and WBPET images were acquired on the same day after intravenous administration of 370 MBq of FDG (median = 432.9 MBq). PEM and MRI images were blindly evaluated, compared with final surgical histopathology, and the sensitivity determined. Substudy analysis compared the sensitivity of PEM versus MRI in patients with different menopausal status, breast density, and use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) as well as determination of performance characteristics for additional ipsilateral lesion detection. Two hundred and eight patients enrolled in the study of which 87% (182/208) were analyzable. Of these analyzable patients, 26.4% (48/182), 7.1% (13/182), and 64.2% (120/182) were pre-, peri-, and postmenopausal, respectively, and 48.4% (88/182) had extremely or heterogeneously dense breast tissue, while 33.5% (61/182) had a history of HRT use. Ninety-two percent (167/182) underwent core biopsy for index lesion diagnosis. Invasive cancer was found in 77.5% (141/182), while ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and/or Paget's disease were found in 22.5% (41/182) of patients. Both PEM and MRI had index lesion depiction sensitivity of 92.8% and both were significantly better than WBPET (67.9%, p PEM and MRI had equivalent sensitivity of various tumors, categorized by tumor stage as well as similar invasive tumor size predictions with Spearman's correlation

  6. [Orthopedic shoes: Still in touch with the times?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemann, B

    2015-11-01

    Deformities of the foot due to rheumatic disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis, occur in 85-95% of patients during the course of their disease. This study investigates whether treatment with orthopedic shoes still has a place in modern therapies. Foot orthotics and technical orthopedic shoes can play an important role in purely conservative treatment as well as postoperative therapy. Due to a lack of knowledge concerning modern orthopedic shoe techniques, this treatment option has slipped out of focus--in part because of its association with the old-fashioned unshapely black orthopedic shoes. Nevertheless, these shoes can contribute significantly to maintenance of patient mobility; a factor of extreme importance to the individuals who already suffer considerably from the disease per se.

  7. Comparing consensus guidelines on thromboprophylaxis in orthopedic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk-Mulder, M. C.; Ettema, H. B.; Verheyen, C. C.; Büller, H. R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Different guidelines exist regarding the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in orthopedic surgery. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to compare (inter)national guidelines and analyse differences. Methods: MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library and the internet were searched for guidelines on the

  8. Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in pediatric orthopedics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosing the musculoskeletal disorders of childhood. Conditions such as neonatal osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, diskitis of childhood, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, the osteochondroses, the toddler's fracture, sports injuries, spondylolysis, myositis ossificians, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are readily defined. High-quality state-of-the-art scintigraphy is essential in infants and young children. 64 references

  9. Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in pediatric orthopedics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, J.J.

    1986-12-01

    Radionuclide bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosing the musculoskeletal disorders of childhood. Conditions such as neonatal osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, diskitis of childhood, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, the osteochondroses, the toddler's fracture, sports injuries, spondylolysis, myositis ossificians, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are readily defined. High-quality state-of-the-art scintigraphy is essential in infants and young children. 64 references.

  10. The industrial orthopedic rehabilitation market: a niche opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, F J; Gill, H S

    1990-05-01

    The industrial orthopedic rehabilitation market is an opportunity for hospitals of all sizes to provide a needed service with significant revenue potential. For a 250-bed community hospital, an industrial orthopedic rehabilitation program can generate $3.5 to $4 million in revenue. Based on the authors' experience, contribution margins from the programs, if designed properly, can range from 30% to 40%. A well-designed industrial orthopedic rehabilitation program adds to a strong orthopedics product line by providing continuity of care and the "extras" that make a program successful. For a hospital that is developing an orthopedics product line and trying to build a presence in the marketplace, an industrial orthopedic rehabilitation program can introduce your services to local employers, opening the door for their use of other "high tech" orthopedic services that you provide. Industrial rehabilitation is synonymous with what is often referred to in health care as the outpatient "workers' compensation" or "injured workers"' market. Essentially, this market consists of employees whose on-the-job injuries or job-related chronic conditions require medical care. These injuries may or may not involve lost workdays during which injured employees are unable to perform job functions. Since the orthopedic segment of the industrial rehabilitation market represents the bulk of the injuries and costs, developing the services and programs that can produce return to work (or case settled) outcomes for these workers represents a sound opportunity for health care providers. However, since workers' compensation insurance is liability (not health care) insurance, understanding the rules and regulations specific to this insurance segment in your state, along with the needs of all the key players in the system, is the key to developing programmatic elements critical to long-term success.

  11. Clinical Aspects of Combination of Aesthetic Fixed Orthopedic Appliances

    OpenAIRE

    Ozhohan, Z. R.; Biben, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of examination of 80 patients with aesthetic fixed orthopedic appliances. The state of the occlusal surface of fixed orthopedic appliances as well as the occlusal contact surface area was studied. The occlusal surfaces were made of ceramics and zirconium dioxide. The surface area of occlusal contacts was studied using 3Shape Dental System since computer occlusiography provides the most accurate results. Physical examination indicated a higher level of ceramic ...

  12. How Useful are Orthopedic Surgery Residency Web Pages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeji, Lasun O; Yu, Jonathan C; Oladeji, Afolayan K; Ponce, Brent A

    2015-01-01

    Medical students interested in orthopedic surgery residency positions frequently use the Internet as a modality to gather information about individual residency programs. Students often invest a painstaking amount of time and effort in determining programs that they are interested in, and the Internet is central to this process. Numerous studies have concluded that program websites are a valuable resource for residency and fellowship applicants. The purpose of the present study was to provide an update on the web pages of academic orthopedic surgery departments in the United States and to rate their utility in providing information on quality of education, faculty and resident information, environment, and applicant information. We reviewed existing websites for the 156 departments or divisions of orthopedic surgery that are currently accredited for resident education by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Each website was assessed for quality of information regarding quality of education, faculty and resident information, environment, and applicant information. We noted that 152 of the 156 departments (97%) had functioning websites that could be accessed. There was high variability regarding the comprehensiveness of orthopedic residency websites. Most of the orthopedic websites provided information on conference, didactics, and resident rotations. Less than 50% of programs provided information on resident call schedules, resident or faculty research and publications, resident hometowns, or resident salary. There is a lack of consistency regarding the content presented on orthopedic residency websites. As the competition for orthopedic websites continues to increase, applicants flock to the Internet to learn more about orthopedic websites in greater number. A well-constructed website has the potential to increase the caliber of students applying to a said program. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by

  13. 3D-printed patient-specific applications in orthopedics

    OpenAIRE

    Wong KC

    2016-01-01

    Kwok Chuen Wong Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong Abstract: With advances in both medical imaging and computer programming, two-dimensional axial images can be processed into other reformatted views (sagittal and coronal) and three-dimensional (3D) virtual models that represent a patients’ own anatomy. This processed digital information can be analyzed in detail by orthopedic surgeons to perform p...

  14. Factors affecting orthopedic residency selection: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelzow, Jason; Petretta, Robert; Broekhuyse, Henry M

    2017-06-01

    Annually, orthopedic residency programs rank and recruit the best possible candidates. Little evidence exists identifying factors that potential candidates use to select their career paths. Recent literature from nonsurgical programs suggests hospital, social and program-based factors influence program selection. We sought to determine what factors influence the choice of an orthopedic career and a candidate's choice of orthopedic residency program. We surveyed medical student applicants to orthopedic programs and current Canadian orthopedic surgery residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 1-5). The confidential online survey focused on 3 broad categories of program selection: educational, program cohesion and noneducation factors. Questions were graded on a Likert Scale and tailed for mean scores. In total, 139 residents from 11 of 17 Canadian orthopedic programs (49% response rate) and 23 medical student applicants (88% response rate) completed our survey. Orthopedic electives and mandatory rotations were reported by 71% of participants as somewhat or very important to their career choice. Collegiality among residents (4.70 ± 0.6), program being the "right fit" (4.65 ± 0.53) and current resident satisfaction with their chosen program (4.63 ±0.66) were ranked with the highest mean scores on a 5-point Likert scale. There are several modifiable factors that residency programs may use to attract applicants, including early availability of clerkship rotations and a strong mentorship environment emphasizing both resident-resident and resident-staff cohesion. Desirable residency programs should develop early access to surgical and operative skills. These must be balanced with a continued emphasis on top-level orthopedic training.

  15. Presurgical motor, somatosensory and language fMRI: Technical feasibility and limitations in 491 patients over 13 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyndall, Anthony J.; Reinhardt, Julia; Stippich, Christoph; Tronnier, Volker; Mariani, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    To analyse the long-term feasibility and limitations of presurgical fMRI in a cohort of tumour and epilepsy patients with different MR-scanners at 1.5 and 3.0 T. Four hundred and ninety-one consecutive patients undergoing presurgical fMRI between 2000 and 2012 on five different MR-scanners using established paradigms and semi-automated data processing were included. Success rates of task performance and BOLD-activation were determined for motor and somatosensory somatotopic mapping and language localisation. Procedural success, failures and imaging artifacts were analysed. MR-field strengths were compared. Two thousand three hundred fifteen of 2348 (98.6 %) attempted paradigms (1033 motor, 1220 speech, 95 somatosensory) were successfully performed. 100 paradigms (4.3 %) were repetition runs. 23 speech, 6 motor and 2 sensory paradigms failed for non-compliance and technical issues. Most language paradigm failures were noted in overt sentence generation. Average significant BOLD-activation was higher for motor than language paradigms (95.8 vs. 81.6 %). Most language paradigms showed significantly higher activation rates at 3 T compared to 1.5 T, whereas no significant difference was found for motor paradigms. fMRI proved very robust for the presurgical localisation of the different motor and somatosensory body representations, as well as Broca's and Wernicke's language areas across different MR-scanners at 1.5 and 3.0 T over 13 years. (orig.)

  16. Presurgical motor, somatosensory and language fMRI: Technical feasibility and limitations in 491 patients over 13 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyndall, Anthony J.; Reinhardt, Julia; Stippich, Christoph [University Hospital Basel, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Basel (Switzerland); Tronnier, Volker [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck Campus, Department of Neurosurgery, Luebeck (Germany); Mariani, Luigi [University Hospitals Basel, Department of Neurosurgery, Basel (Switzerland)

    2017-01-15

    To analyse the long-term feasibility and limitations of presurgical fMRI in a cohort of tumour and epilepsy patients with different MR-scanners at 1.5 and 3.0 T. Four hundred and ninety-one consecutive patients undergoing presurgical fMRI between 2000 and 2012 on five different MR-scanners using established paradigms and semi-automated data processing were included. Success rates of task performance and BOLD-activation were determined for motor and somatosensory somatotopic mapping and language localisation. Procedural success, failures and imaging artifacts were analysed. MR-field strengths were compared. Two thousand three hundred fifteen of 2348 (98.6 %) attempted paradigms (1033 motor, 1220 speech, 95 somatosensory) were successfully performed. 100 paradigms (4.3 %) were repetition runs. 23 speech, 6 motor and 2 sensory paradigms failed for non-compliance and technical issues. Most language paradigm failures were noted in overt sentence generation. Average significant BOLD-activation was higher for motor than language paradigms (95.8 vs. 81.6 %). Most language paradigms showed significantly higher activation rates at 3 T compared to 1.5 T, whereas no significant difference was found for motor paradigms. fMRI proved very robust for the presurgical localisation of the different motor and somatosensory body representations, as well as Broca's and Wernicke's language areas across different MR-scanners at 1.5 and 3.0 T over 13 years. (orig.)

  17. Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.

  18. Coagulation studies in patients with orthopedic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangarajan Kanchana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Head injury, severe acidosis, hypothermia, massive transfusion and hypoxia often complicate traumatic coagulopathy. First line investigations such as prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen level, platelet count and D-dimer levels help in the initial assessment of coagulopathy in a trauma victim. Aim : To study the coagulation profile in patients of orthopedic trauma. Settings and Design : Prospective study. Patients and Methods : Patients with head injury, severe acidosis, massive transfusion and severe hypoxia were excluded from the study. Coagulation parameters were evaluated at three intervals, at the time of admission, intra operatively and in the postoperative period. Statistical Analysis : Chi-square test was used for analysis of categorical variables. For comparison between groups, two- way ANOVA was used. Results and Conclusions : Of the 48 patients studied, 38 (80% had normal DIC scores upon admission and only 10 (20% had mild DIC scores at the time of admission. The median Injury Severity Score was 34 and they did not correlate with DIC scores. Fibrinogen levels alone were significantly different, increased progressively (mean pre op, intra op and post op levels 518 ± 31,582 ± 35 and 643 ± 27 respectively; P ≤ 0.02 since the time of admission in these patients. All the other parameters remained unchanged. Further large scale prospective studies would be required to correlate elevated fibrinogen levels with the type of trauma or surgery.

  19. Physician-Hospital Alignment in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Brandon D

    2015-09-01

    The concept of "alignment" between physicians and hospitals is a popular buzzword in the age of health care reform. Despite their often tumultuous histories, physicians and hospitals find themselves under increasing pressures to work together toward common goals. However, effective alignment is more than just simple cooperation between parties. The process of achieving alignment does not have simple, universal steps. Alignment will differ based on individual situational factors and the type of specialty involved. Ultimately, however, there are principles that underlie the concept of alignment and should be a part of any physician-hospital alignment efforts. In orthopedic surgery, alignment involves the clinical, administrative, financial, and even personal aspects of a surgeon's practice. It must be based on the principles of financial interest, clinical authority, administrative participation, transparency, focus on the patient, and mutual necessity. Alignment can take on various forms as well, with popular models consisting of shared governance and comanagement, gainsharing, bundled payments, accountable care organizations, and other methods. As regulatory and financial pressures continue to motivate physicians and hospitals to develop alignment relationships, new and innovative methods of alignment will also appear. Existing models will mature and evolve, with individual variability based on local factors. However, certain trends seem to be appearing as time progresses and alignment relationships deepen, including regional and national collaboration, population management, and changes in the legal system. This article explores the history, principles, and specific methods of physician-hospital alignment and its critical importance for the future of health care delivery. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Orthopedic rehabilitation using the "Rutgers ankle" interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girone, M; Burdea, G; Bouzit, M; Popescu, V; Deutsch, J E

    2000-01-01

    A novel ankle rehabilitation device is being developed for home use, allowing remote monitoring by therapists. The system will allow patients to perform a variety of exercises while interacting with a virtual environment (VE). These game-like VEs created with WorldToolKit run on a host PC that controls the movement and output forces of the device via an RS232 connection. Patients will develop strength, flexibility, coordination, and balance as they interact with the VEs. The device will also perform diagnostic functions, measuring the ankle's range of motion, force exertion capabilities and coordination. The host PC transparently records patient progress for remote evaluation by therapists via our existing telerehabilitation system. The "Rutgers Ankle" Orthopedic Rehabilitation Interface uses double-acting pneumatic cylinders, linear potentiometers, and a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) force sensor. The controller contains a Pentium single-board computer and pneumatic control valves. Based on the Stewart platform, the device can move and supply forces and torques in 6 DOFs. A proof-of-concept trial conducted at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) provided therapist and patient feedback. The system measured the range of motion and maximum force output of a group of four patients (male and female). Future medical trials are required to establish clinical efficacy in rehabilitation.

  1. Pediatric orthopedic surgery in humanitarian aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales de Gauzy, J; Trinchero, J-F; Jouve, J-L

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric orthopedic surgery in humanitarian aid is conducted mainly in cooperation with emerging countries. Each mission is different, and depends on numerous parameters such as the country, the frequency of such missions, the pathologies encountered, the local structure and team, and the non-governmental organization (NGO) involved. Pathologies vary in etiology (tuberculosis, poliomyelitis) and severity. Each mission requires the presence of an experienced surgeon. Working conditions are often rudimentary. Surgical indications should be restricted to procedures that are going to be effective, with minimal postoperative complications, without any surgical "acrobatics". Teaching should be in association with the local university, and adapted to local needs. Mission objectives need to be realistic. Surgical indications should be adapted to local conditions, and the surgeon needs to be able to say "no" to procedures involving undue risk. The surgeon on mission should cooperate with local teams and be able to adapt to unusual situations. Assessment of results is essential to improving efficacy and evaluating the success of the mission. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. [Technical orthopedics. Importance in an increasingly operatively oriented faculty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemann, B; Maronna, U

    2013-10-01

    The foundation of the German Society for Orthopedics in 1901 was due to a separation from the faculty of surgery because a surgical approach alone did not adequately deal with the symptoms. Orthopedists were initially considered as a fringe group. The conservative treatment approach was initially at the forefront and operative measures were a side line. The main aim was the rehabilitation of patients into a normal life as best as possible. In the conservative area treatment with orthopedic technical aids and appliances rapidly came to play an important role and a great multitude of technical appliances were developed with sometimes very different possible applications. Despite the clearly improved operative treatment approaches in orthopedics and trauma surgery, technical orthopedics still plays a substantial role even today. Healing and supportive aids and appliances are of decisive importance for the treatment of a multitude of diseases and handicaps. They stabilize and improve operative treatment results and often result in new approaches. This depends on cooperation between technicians, therapists and physicians in a team, even in the scientific field. Evidence-based studies on the effectiveness of technical aids are currently still uncommon but recently some clear evidence for effectiveness could be shown. Scientifically this is a very varied field of work. The demographic development presents new requirements which must be dealt with. Technical solutions are often very promising especially in this field. Technical orthopedics remains an important component of the specialty of orthopedics and trauma surgery and with an increasing tendency due to more recent research and development.

  3. The value of multichannel MEG and EEG in the presurgical evaluation of 70 epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knake, S; Halgren, E; Shiraishi, H; Hara, K; Hamer, H M; Grant, P E; Carr, V A; Foxe, D; Camposano, S; Busa, E; Witzel, T; Hämäläinen, M S; Ahlfors, S P; Bromfield, E B; Black, P M; Bourgeois, B F; Cole, A J; Cosgrove, G R; Dworetzky, B A; Madsen, J R; Larsson, P G; Schomer, D L; Thiele, E A; Dale, A M; Rosen, B R; Stufflebeam, S M

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity of a simultaneous whole-head 306-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG)/70-electrode EEG recording to detect interictal epileptiform activity (IED) in a prospective, consecutive cohort of patients with medically refractory epilepsy that were considered candidates for epilepsy surgery. Seventy patients were prospectively evaluated by simultaneously recorded MEG/EEG. All patients were surgical candidates or were considered for invasive EEG monitoring and had undergone an extensive presurgical evaluation at a tertiary epilepsy center. MEG and EEG raw traces were analysed individually by two independent reviewers. MEG data could not be evaluated due to excessive magnetic artefacts in three patients (4%). In the remaining 67 patients, the overall sensitivity to detect IED was 72% (48/67 patients) for MEG and 61% for EEG (41/67 patients) analysing the raw data. In 13% (9/67 patients), MEG-only IED were recorded, whereas in 3% (2/67 patients) EEG-only IED were recorded. The combined sensitivity was 75% (50/67 patients). Three hundred and six-channel MEG has a similarly high sensitivity to record IED as EEG and appears to be complementary. In one-third of the EEG-negative patients, MEG can be expected to record IED, especially in the case of lateral neocortical epilepsy and/or cortical dysplasia.

  4. The effect of metformin on apoptosis in a breast cancer presurgical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, M; DeCensi, A; Pruneri, G; Puntoni, M; Bottiglieri, L; Varricchio, C; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, A; Gentilini, O D; Pagani, G; Dell'Orto, P; Lazzeroni, M; Serrano, D; Viale, G; Bonanni, B

    2013-11-26

    Metformin has been associated with antitumour activity in breast cancer (BC) but its mechanism remains unclear. We determined whether metformin induced a modulation of apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) overall and by insulin resistance status in a presurgical trial. Apoptosis was analysed in core biopsies and in surgical samples from 100 non-diabetic BC patients participating in a randomised trial of metformin vs placebo given for 4 weeks before surgery. Eighty-seven subjects (45 on metformin and 42 on placebo) were assessable for TUNEL measurement at both time points. TUNEL levels at surgery were higher than that at baseline core biopsy (PKi67 labelling index and TUNEL levels were directly correlated both at baseline and surgery (Spearman's r=0.51, Papoptosis by metformin, although there was a trend to a different effect according to insulin resistance status, with a pattern resembling Ki67 changes. Apoptosis was significantly higher in the surgical specimens compared with baseline biopsy and was directly correlated with Ki67. Our findings provide additional evidence for a dual effect of metformin on BC growth according to insulin resistance status.

  5. Pros and cons in endocrine practice: pre-surgical treatment with somatostatin analogues in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Marco; Bollerslev, Jens

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this commentary is to balance the pros and cons for pre-surgical SSA treatment in a modern perspective ending up with a pragmatic recommendation for treatment based on the current evidence and expertise of the authors. Even though prospective and randomized studies in this particular area are hampered by obvious limitations, the interpretation of the four published trials has in general been in favor of pre-treatment with SSA, showing a better outcome following surgery. However, major drawbacks of these studies, such as non-optimal diagnostic criteria for cure, potential selection bias, and timing of the postoperative evaluation in SSA pre-treated patients, limit their overall interpretation. Three matched-controlled studies showed remarkably similar results with no apparent beneficial effect of SSA pre-treatment on surgical outcome. Both prospective, randomized studies and retrospective studies did not find any significant difference in the rate of endocrine and non-endocrine complications related to surgery, despite the beneficial clinical effects of SSA treatment in most acromegalic patients. The newly diagnosed patient with acromegaly should be carefully evaluated in the trans-disciplinary neuroendocrine team and treatment individualized accordingly. The issue of SSA pre-treatment to improve surgical outcome is yet to be settled and further methodologically sound studies are probably necessary to clarify this point.

  6. Approach to pediatric epilepsy surgery: State of the art, Part I: General principles and presurgical workup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Makram; Wyllie, Elaine; Rahi, Amal C; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2009-03-01

    In 1990, the National Institute of Health adopted epilepsy surgery in children as an option when medications fail. In the past few years several concepts have become increasingly recognized as key to a successful approach to epilepsy surgery in children. These include the concepts of neuronal plasticity, the epileptogenic lesion, the ictal onset, symptomatogenic, irritative, and epileptogenic zones. In addition, several techniques have increasingly been utilized to delineate the above areas in an attempt to determine, in each patient, the epileptogenic zone, defined as the zone the resection of which leads to seizure freedom. When seizure semiology (which defines the symptomatogenic zone), ictal EEG (which identifies the ictal onset zone), and structural imaging (which identifies the epileptogenic lesion) can be reconciled to infer the location of the epileptogenic zone, surgery is usually, subsequently, undertaken. When these diagnostic modalities are discordant, not definitive, or when the epileptogenic zone is close to eloquent cortex, invasive EEG, complemented by other imaging techniques may be needed. These include magnetoencephalography, single photon emission tomography, various types of positron emission tomography, various magnetic resonance imaging modalities (functional, diffusion weighted, other) and other emerging and experimental techniques. While MRI, video-EEG, and neuropsychological assessments are well established components of the presurgical evaluation, the use of the new emerging imaging technologies is dictated by the degree of anatomo-electro-clinical correlations, and, awaiting multicentric studies and more detailed guidelines, remains center-dependent.

  7. Evaluation of the factors influencing brain language laterality in presurgical planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batouli, Seyed Amir Hossein; Hasani, Nafiseh; Gheisari, Sara; Behzad, Ebrahim; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali

    2016-10-01

    Brain lesions cause functional deficits, and one treatment for this condition is lesion resection. In most cases, presurgical planning (PSP) and the information from laterality indices are necessary for maximum preservation of the critical functions after surgery. Language laterality index (LI) is reliably estimated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI); however, this measure is under the influence of some external factors. In this study, we investigated the influence of a number of factors on language LI, using data from 120 patients (mean age=35.65 (±13.4) years) who underwent fMRI for PSP. Using two proposed language tasks from our previous works, brain left hemisphere was showed to be dominant for the language function, although a higher LI was obtained using the "Word Generation" task, compared to the "Reverse Word Reading". In addition, decline of LIs with age, and lower LI when the lesion invaded brain language area were observed. Meanwhile, gender, lesion side (affected hemisphere), LI calculation strategy, and fMRI analysis Z-values did not statistically show any influences on the LIs. Although fMRI is widely used to estimate language LI, it is shown here that in order to present a reliable language LI and to correctly select the dominant hemisphere of the brain, the influence of external factors should be carefully considered. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicting Postsurgical Satisfaction in Adolescents With Idiopathic Scoliosis: The Role of Presurgical Functioning and Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberg, Christine B; Manganella, Juliana; Manalo, Gem; Simons, Laura E; Hresko, M Timothy

    2017-12-01

    There is a need to better assess patient satisfaction and surgical outcomes. The purpose of the current study is to identify how preoperative expectations can impact postsurgical satisfaction among youth with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery. The present study includes patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery enrolled in a prospective, multicentered registry examining postsurgical outcomes. The Scoliosis Research Society Questionnaire-Version 30, which assesses pain, self-image, mental health, and satisfaction with management, along with the Spinal Appearance Questionnaire, which measures surgical expectations was administered to 190 patients before surgery and 1 and 2 years postoperatively. Regression analyses with bootstrapping (with n=5000 bootstrap samples) were conducted with 99% bias-corrected confidence intervals to examine the extent to which preoperative expectations for spinal appearance mediated the relationship between presurgical mental health and pain and 2-year postsurgical satisfaction. Results indicate that preoperative mental health, pain, and expectations are predictive of postsurgical satisfaction. With the shifting health care system, physicians may want to consider patient mental health, pain, and expectations before surgery to optimize satisfaction and ultimately improve clinical care and patient outcomes. Level I-prognostic study.

  9. Clinical characteristics, risk factors and pre-surgical evaluation of post-infectious epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellner, J; Trinka, E

    2013-03-01

    Epilepsy is a frequent complication of central nervous system (CNS) infections. Post-infectious epilepsy is commonly refractory to medical treatment and plays a pivotal role for the poor long-term outcome of CNS infections. To provide an overview of clinical characteristics and risk factors of seizures associated with CNS infections. In addition, to summarize the state of the art of anticonvulsive treatment and the pre-surgical evaluation process in refractory cases. A comprehensive literature search for articles published between January 1970 and December 2011 was carried out. The occurrence of seizures during the acute course of meningitis, encephalitis and brain abscess is the main risk factor for the development of post-infectious epilepsy. There is a shortage of trials evaluating the efficacy of prophylactic and symptomatic treatment during the course of acute infection. Moreover, there are no randomized-controlled trials studying anticonvulsive drugs and their combinations for the management of post-infectious epilepsy. In a selected group of patients, however, medically refractory focal epilepsy is potentially curable by surgery. Further studies are required to improve the pathogenetic understanding of post-infectious epilepsy in order to develop preventive measures as well as to evaluate additional medical and surgical treatment strategies for the patients currently not considered for surgery. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  10. A Bayesian non-parametric Potts model with application to pre-surgical FMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy D; Liu, Zhuqing; Bartsch, Andreas J; Nichols, Thomas E

    2013-08-01

    The Potts model has enjoyed much success as a prior model for image segmentation. Given the individual classes in the model, the data are typically modeled as Gaussian random variates or as random variates from some other parametric distribution. In this article, we present a non-parametric Potts model and apply it to a functional magnetic resonance imaging study for the pre-surgical assessment of peritumoral brain activation. In our model, we assume that the Z-score image from a patient can be segmented into activated, deactivated, and null classes, or states. Conditional on the class, or state, the Z-scores are assumed to come from some generic distribution which we model non-parametrically using a mixture of Dirichlet process priors within the Bayesian framework. The posterior distribution of the model parameters is estimated with a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm, and Bayesian decision theory is used to make the final classifications. Our Potts prior model includes two parameters, the standard spatial regularization parameter and a parameter that can be interpreted as the a priori probability that each voxel belongs to the null, or background state, conditional on the lack of spatial regularization. We assume that both of these parameters are unknown, and jointly estimate them along with other model parameters. We show through simulation studies that our model performs on par, in terms of posterior expected loss, with parametric Potts models when the parametric model is correctly specified and outperforms parametric models when the parametric model in misspecified.

  11. Psychosocial Moderators of Presurgical Stress Management for Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilts, Chelsea D.; Parker, Patricia A.; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Objective It is important to identify factors that predict who will benefit the most from psychosocial interventions in cancer populations. Methods This study examines the moderating effect of baseline social support (Social Support, SS; Dyadic Adjustment DA), distress (Brief Symptom Inventory, BSI; Impact of Event Scale, IES), and coping style (Brief COPE) on quality of life outcomes (SF-36 Physical Component Summary scores(PCS)) 1 year post surgery derived from a presurgical cognitive behavioral stress management program (SM; n = 23), supportive attention (SA; n = 37), or standard care (SC; n = 29). Results Moderation analyses indicated that men who reported low baseline social support (SS) and were in SM had increased PCS one year after surgery compared to men with low SS in the SC group (β = −0.39, p < .01), with SA having a non-significant intermediate effect. Men who reported high distress (BSI) at baseline and were in the SA group had increased PCS one year after surgery compared to those in the SC group (β = 24.80, p = .01), with SM having a non-significant intermediate effect. Mediation analyses suggested that neither SM nor SA improved QOL simply by increasing social support or decreasing general distress. Conclusions Distressed individuals may benefit more from unstructured discussion of distress whereas those low in social support may benefit more from a structured approach to learning coping skills. PMID:23088178

  12. Presurgical Planning for Supratentorial Lesions with Free Slicer Software and Sina App.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Gang; Han, Kai-Wei; Zhang, Dan-Feng; Li, Zhen-Xing; Li, Yi-Ming; Hou, Li-Jun

    2017-10-01

    Neuronavigation systems are used widely in the localization of intracranial lesions with satisfactory accuracy. However, they are expensive and difficult to learn. Therefore, a simple and practical augmented reality (AR) system using mobile devices might be an alternative technique. We introduce a mobile AR system for the localization of supratentorial lesions. Its practicability and accuracy were examined by clinical application in patients and comparison with a standard neuronavigation system. A 3-dimensional (3D) model including lesions was created with 3D Slicer. A 2-dimensional image of this 3D model was obtained and overlapped on the patient's head with the Sina app. Registration was conducted with the assistance of anatomical landmarks and fiducial markers. The center of lesion projected on scalp was identified with our mobile AR system and standard neuronavigation system, respectively. The difference in distance between the centers identified by these 2 systems was measured. Our mobile AR system was simple and accurate in the localization of supratentorial lesions with a mean distance difference of 4.4 ± 1.1 mm. Registration added on an average of 141.7 ± 39 seconds to operation time. There was no statistically significant difference for the required time among 3 registrations (P = 0.646). The mobile AR system presents an alternative technology for image-guided neurosurgery and proves to be practical and reliable. The technique contributes to optimal presurgical planning for supratentorial lesions, especially in the absence of a neuronavigation system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gender Disparities Within US Army Orthopedic Surgery: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Christopher M; Dworak, Theodora C; Anderson, Ashley B; Brelin, Alaina M; Nesti, Leon J; McKay, Patricia L; Gwinn, David E

    2018-01-01

    Women account for approximately 15% of the active duty US Army, and studies show that women may be at an increased risk of musculoskeletal injury during sport and military training. Nationally, the field of orthopedic surgery comprises 14% women, lagging behind other surgical fields. Demographics for US Military orthopedic surgeons are not readily available. Similarly, demographic data of graduating medical students entering Military Medicine are not reported. We hypothesize that a gender disparity within military orthopedics will be apparent. We will compare the demographic profile of providers to our patients and hypothesize that the two groups are dissimilar. Secondarily, we examine the demographics of military medical students potentially entering orthopedics from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) or the Health Professions Scholarship Program. A census was formed of all US Army active duty orthopedic surgeons to include staff surgeons and residents, as well as US Army medical student graduates and orthopedic patients. There are 252 Army orthopedic surgeons and trainees; 26 (10.3%) are women and 226 (89.7%) are men. There were no significant demographic differences between residents and staff. Between 2014 and 2017, the 672 members of the USUHS graduating classes included 246 Army graduates. Of those, 62 (25%) were female. Army Health Professions Scholarship Program graduated 1,072 medical students, with women comprising 300 (28%) of the group. No statistical trends were seen over the 4 yr at USUHS or in Health Professions Scholarship Program. In total, 2,993 orthopedic clinic visits during the study period were by Army service members, 23.6% were women. There exists a gender disparity among US Army orthopedic surgeons, similar to that seen in civilian orthopedics. Gender equity is also lacking among medical students who feed into Army graduate medical education programs. The gender profile of our patient population is not

  14. Characteristics and trends of orthopedic publications between 2000 and 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Ryu, Mi Sun; Chung, Chin Youb; Choi, In Ho; Kwon, Dae Gyu; Kim, Tae Won; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Seo, Sang Gyo; Park, Moon Seok

    2011-09-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the trends of orthopedic publications during the last decade, and to document the country of origin, journal, funding source, and language of contribution using PubMed. Orthopedic articles published between 2000 and 2009 were retrieved from PubMed using the following search terms: "orthopaedic[Affiliation] AND ("2000/1/1"[PDAT]: "2009/12/31"[PDAT])" and "orthopedic[Affiliation] AND ("2000/1/1"[PDAT]: "2009/12/31"[PDAT])." The articles were downloaded in XML file format, which contained the following information: article title, author names, journal names, publication dates, article types, languages, authors' affiliations and funding sources. These information was extracted, sorted, and rearranged using the database's management software. We investigated the annual number of published orthopedic articles worldwide and the annual rate of increase. Furthermore, the country of publication origin, journal, funding source, and language of contribution were also investigated. A total of 46,322 orthopedic articles were published and registered in PubMed in the last 10 years. The worldwide number of published orthopedic articles increased from 2,889 in 2000 to 6,909 in 2009, showing an annual increase of 384.6 articles, or an annualized compound rate of 10.2%. The United States ranked highest in the number of published orthopedic articles, followed by Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany, and the Republic of Korea. Among the orthopedic articles published worldwide during the last 10 years, 37.9% pertained studies performed in the United States. Fifty-seven point three percent (57.3%) of articles were published in journals established in the United States. Among the published orthopaedic articles, 4,747 articles (10.2%) disclosed financial support by research funds, of which 4,688 (98.8%) articles utilized research funds from the United States. Most articles were published in English (97.2%, 45,030 articles). The number of published

  15. The Institute for Global Orthopedics and Traumatology: A Model for Academic Collaboration in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Devin James; Coughlin, Richard; Caldwell, Amber; Shearer, David

    2017-01-01

    In 2006, surgeons at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) established the Institute for Global Orthopedics and Traumatology (IGOT), an initiative within the department of orthopedic surgery. The principal aim of IGOT is to create long-term, sustainable solutions to the growing burden of musculoskeletal injury in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) through academic partnership. IGOT currently has relationships with teaching hospitals in Ghana, Malawi, Tanzania, Nicaragua, and Nepal. The organizational structure of IGOT is built on four pillars: Global Surgical Education (GSE), Global Knowledge Exchange (GKE), Global Research Initiative (GRI), and Global Leadership and Advocacy. GSE focuses on increasing surgical knowledge and technical proficiency through hands-on educational courses. The GKE facilitates the mutual exchange of surgeons and trainees among IGOT and its partners. This includes a global resident elective that allows UCSF residents to complete an international rotation at one of IGOT's partner sites. The GRI strives to build research capacity and sponsor high-quality clinical research projects that address questions relevant to local partners. The fourth pillar, Global Leadership and Advocacy aims to increase awareness of the global impact of musculoskeletal injury through national and international courses and events, such as the Bay Area Global Health Film Festival. At the core of each tenet is the collaboration among IGOT and its international partners. Over the last decade, IGOT has experienced tremendous growth and maturation in its partnership model based on cumulative experience and the needs of its partners.

  16. The Quality of Cost-Utility Analyses in Orthopedic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Schairer, William W; O'Dea, Evan; McCormick, Frank; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    As health care in the United States transitions toward a value-based model, there is increasing interest in applying cost-effectiveness analysis within orthopedic surgery. Orthopedic trauma care has traditionally underemphasized economic analysis. The goals of this review were to identify US-based cost-utility analysis in orthopedic trauma, to assess the quality of the available evidence, and to identify cost-effective strategies within orthopedic trauma. Based on a review of 971 abstracts, 8 US-based cost-utility analyses evaluating operative strategies in orthopedic trauma were identified. Study findings were recorded, and the Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES) instrument was used to grade the overall quality. Of the 8 studies included in this review, 4 studies evaluated hip and femur fractures, 3 studies analyzed upper extremity fractures, and 1 study assessed open tibial fracture management. Cost-effective interventions identified in this review include total hip arthroplasty (over hemiarthroplasty) for femoral neck fractures in the active elderly, open reduction and internal fixation (over nonoperative management) for distal radius and scaphoid fractures, limb salvage (over amputation) for complex open tibial fractures, and systems-based interventions to prevent delay in hip fracture surgery. The mean QHES score of the studies was 79.25 (range, 67-89). Overall, there is a paucity of cost-utility analyses in orthopedic trauma; however, the available evidence suggests that certain operative interventions can be cost-effective. The quality of these studies, however, is fair, based on QHES grading. More attention should be paid to evaluating the cost-effectiveness of operative intervention in orthopedic trauma. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Pre-surgical predictors for psychiatric disorders following epilepsy surgery in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Gerardo Maria de Araújo; Mazetto, Lenon; Gomes, Francinaldo Lobato; Marinho, Murilo Martinez; Tavares, Igor Melo; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2012-11-01

    Psychiatric outcomes of patients submitted to epilepsy surgery have gained particular interest given the high prevalence of pre-surgical psychiatric disorders (PD) in this population. The present study aimed to verify the possible pre-surgical predictors for psychiatric disorders following epilepsy surgery in a homogeneous series of patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and mesial temporal sclerosis (TLE-MTS). Data from 115 TLE-MTS patients (65 females; 56.5%) who underwent cortico-amygdalohippocampectomy were included. Pre- and post-surgical psychiatric evaluations were performed using DSM-IV criteria. Pre-surgical PD - particularly mood, anxiety and psychotic disorders - were diagnosed in 47 patients (40.8%). Twenty-seven patients (54% of those with pre-surgical PD) demonstrated a remission of psychiatric symptoms on post-surgical psychiatric evaluation. Eleven patients (9.6%) developed de novo PD. The presence of pre-surgical depression (OR=3.32; p=0.008), pre-surgical interictal psychosis (OR=4.39; p=0.009) and epileptiform discharges contralateral to the epileptogenic zone (OR=2.73; p=0.01) were risk factors associated with post-surgical PD. Although epilepsy surgery is considered to be the best treatment option for patients with refractory TLE-MTS, the relatively high psychiatric comorbidities observed in surgical candidates and their possible negative impact on post-surgical outcomes require a careful pre-surgical evaluation of clinical, sociodemographic and psychiatric factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 3D-printed patient-specific applications in orthopedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong KC

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Kwok Chuen Wong Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong Abstract: With advances in both medical imaging and computer programming, two-dimensional axial images can be processed into other reformatted views (sagittal and coronal and three-dimensional (3D virtual models that represent a patients’ own anatomy. This processed digital information can be analyzed in detail by orthopedic surgeons to perform patient-specific orthopedic procedures. The use of 3D printing is rising and has become more prevalent in medical applications over the last decade as surgeons and researchers are increasingly utilizing the technology’s flexibility in manufacturing objects. 3D printing is a type of manufacturing process in which materials such as plastic or metal are deposited in layers to create a 3D object from a digital model. This additive manufacturing method has the advantage of fabricating objects with complex freeform geometry, which is impossible using traditional subtractive manufacturing methods. Specifically in surgical applications, the 3D printing techniques can not only generate models that give a better understanding of the complex anatomy and pathology of the patients and aid in education and surgical training, but can also produce patient-specific surgical guides or even custom implants that are tailor-made to the surgical requirements. As the clinical workflow of the 3D printing technology continues to evolve, orthopedic surgeons should embrace the latest knowledge of the technology and incorporate it into their clinical practice for patient-specific orthopedic applications. This paper is written to help orthopedic surgeons stay up-to-date on the emerging 3D technology, starting from the acquisition of clinical imaging to 3D printing for patient-specific applications in orthopedics. It 1 presents the necessary steps to prepare the medical images that are

  19. Positron emission mammography in breast cancer presurgical planning: comparisons with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, Kathy; The, Juliette; Velasquez, Maria Victoria; Kahn, Simone; Saady, Matthew; Mahal, Ravinder; Chrystal, Larraine; Narayanan, Deepa; Kalinyak, Judith E.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the performance characteristics of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission mammography (PEM) with breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a presurgical imaging and planning option for index and ipsilateral lesions in patients with newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven breast cancer. Two hundred and eight women >25 years of age (median age = 59.7 ± 14.1 years) with biopsy-proven primary breast cancer enrolled in this prospective, single-site study. MRI, PEM, and whole-body positron emission tomography (WBPET) were conducted on each patient within 7 business days. PEM and WBPET images were acquired on the same day after intravenous administration of 370 MBq of FDG (median = 432.9 MBq). PEM and MRI images were blindly evaluated, compared with final surgical histopathology, and the sensitivity determined. Substudy analysis compared the sensitivity of PEM versus MRI in patients with different menopausal status, breast density, and use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) as well as determination of performance characteristics for additional ipsilateral lesion detection. Two hundred and eight patients enrolled in the study of which 87% (182/208) were analyzable. Of these analyzable patients, 26.4% (48/182), 7.1% (13/182), and 64.2% (120/182) were pre-, peri-, and postmenopausal, respectively, and 48.4% (88/182) had extremely or heterogeneously dense breast tissue, while 33.5% (61/182) had a history of HRT use. Ninety-two percent (167/182) underwent core biopsy for index lesion diagnosis. Invasive cancer was found in 77.5% (141/182), while ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and/or Paget's disease were found in 22.5% (41/182) of patients. Both PEM and MRI had index lesion depiction sensitivity of 92.8% and both were significantly better than WBPET (67.9%, p < 0.001, McNemar's test). For index lesions, PEM and MRI had equivalent sensitivity of various tumors, categorized by tumor stage as well as similar invasive tumor size

  20. Electrical source imaging of interictal spikes using multiple sparse volumetric priors for presurgical epileptogenic focus localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Strobbe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical source imaging of interictal spikes observed in EEG recordings of patients with refractory epilepsy provides useful information to localize the epileptogenic focus during the presurgical evaluation. However, the selection of the time points or time epochs of the spikes in order to estimate the origin of the activity remains a challenge. In this study, we consider a Bayesian EEG source imaging technique for distributed sources, i.e. the multiple volumetric sparse priors (MSVP approach. The approach allows to estimate the time courses of the intensity of the sources corresponding with a specific time epoch of the spike. Based on presurgical averaged interictal spikes in six patients who were successfully treated with surgery, we estimated the time courses of the source intensities for three different time epochs: (i an epoch starting 50 ms before the spike peak and ending at 50% of the spike peak during the rising phase of the spike, (ii an epoch starting 50 ms before the spike peak and ending at the spike peak and (iii an epoch containing the full spike time period starting 50 ms before the spike peak and ending 230 ms after the spike peak. To identify the primary source of the spike activity, the source with the maximum energy from 50 ms before the spike peak till 50% of the spike peak was subsequently selected for each of the time windows. For comparison, the activity at the spike peaks and at 50% of the peaks was localized using the LORETA inversion technique and an ECD approach. Both patient-specific spherical forward models and patient-specific 5-layered finite difference models were considered to evaluate the influence of the forward model. Based on the resected zones in each of the patients, extracted from post-operative MR images, we compared the distances to the resection border of the estimated activity. Using the spherical models, the distances to the resection border for the MSVP approach and each of the different time

  1. Positron emission mammography in breast cancer presurgical planning: comparisons with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, Kathy; The, Juliette; Velasquez, Maria Victoria; Kahn, Simone; Saady, Matthew; Mahal, Ravinder; Chrystal, Larraine [Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Radiology Department, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Narayanan, Deepa [Naviscan, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kalinyak, Judith E. [Naviscan, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the performance characteristics of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission mammography (PEM) with breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a presurgical imaging and planning option for index and ipsilateral lesions in patients with newly diagnosed, biopsy-proven breast cancer. Two hundred and eight women >25 years of age (median age = 59.7 {+-} 14.1 years) with biopsy-proven primary breast cancer enrolled in this prospective, single-site study. MRI, PEM, and whole-body positron emission tomography (WBPET) were conducted on each patient within 7 business days. PEM and WBPET images were acquired on the same day after intravenous administration of 370 MBq of FDG (median = 432.9 MBq). PEM and MRI images were blindly evaluated, compared with final surgical histopathology, and the sensitivity determined. Substudy analysis compared the sensitivity of PEM versus MRI in patients with different menopausal status, breast density, and use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) as well as determination of performance characteristics for additional ipsilateral lesion detection. Two hundred and eight patients enrolled in the study of which 87% (182/208) were analyzable. Of these analyzable patients, 26.4% (48/182), 7.1% (13/182), and 64.2% (120/182) were pre-, peri-, and postmenopausal, respectively, and 48.4% (88/182) had extremely or heterogeneously dense breast tissue, while 33.5% (61/182) had a history of HRT use. Ninety-two percent (167/182) underwent core biopsy for index lesion diagnosis. Invasive cancer was found in 77.5% (141/182), while ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and/or Paget's disease were found in 22.5% (41/182) of patients. Both PEM and MRI had index lesion depiction sensitivity of 92.8% and both were significantly better than WBPET (67.9%, p < 0.001, McNemar's test). For index lesions, PEM and MRI had equivalent sensitivity of various tumors, categorized by tumor stage as well as similar invasive

  2. 3T phased array MRI improves the presurgical evaluation in focal epilepsies: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knake, S; Triantafyllou, C; Wald, L L; Wiggins, G; Kirk, G P; Larsson, P G; Stufflebeam, S M; Foley, M T; Shiraishi, H; Dale, A M; Halgren, E; Grant, P E

    2005-10-11

    Although detection of concordant lesions on MRI significantly improves postsurgical outcomes in focal epilepsy (FE), many conventional MR studies remain negative. The authors evaluated the role of phased array surface coil studies performed at 3 Tesla (3T PA MRI). Forty patients with medically intractable focal epilepsies were prospectively imaged with 3T PA-MRI including high matrix TSE T2, fluid attenuated inversion recovery, and magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo. All patients were considered candidates for epilepsy surgery. 3T PA-MRIs were reviewed by a neuroradiologist experienced in epilepsy imaging with access to clinical information. Findings were compared to reports of prior standard 1.5T MRI epilepsy studies performed at tertiary care centers. Experienced, unblinded review of 3T PA-MRI studies yielded additional diagnostic information in 48% (19/40) compared to routine clinical reads at 1.5T. In 37.5% (15/40), this additional information motivated a change in clinical management. In the subgroup of patients with prior 1.5T MRIs interpreted as normal, 3T PA-MRI resulted in the detection of a new lesion in 65% (15/23). In the subgroup of 15 patients with known lesions, 3T PA-MRI better defined the lesion in 33% (5/15). Phased array surface coil studies performed at 3 Tesla read by an experienced unblinded neuroradiologist can improve the presurgical evaluation of patients with focal epilepsy when compared to routine clinical 1.5T studies read at tertiary care centers.

  3. Brain spect in the pre-surgical evaluation of epileptic patients preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Buchpiguel

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available Pre-surgical evaluation of epileptic patients consists of neurological examination, intensive electroencephalographic (EEG monitoring and anatomical studies (CT and MRI. Functional methods such as PET and SPECT imaging are now used more frequently. We have studied pre-operatively 15 adult epileptic patients (8 female, 7 male using a rotational scintillation camera interfaced to a dedicated computer. The tomographic images were obtained 15 minutes after intravenous injection of 99mTc_HMPAO. All had MRI scanning and intensive EEG monitoring which generally included seizure recording. Five patients had progressive lesions (3 meningiomas, 2 astrocytomas. In 10 patients, neuroradiological studies did not show the presence of progressive lesions (2 normal scans and 8 cases with inactive lesions. Two patients with meningioma showed hypoperfusion at the lesion site while the third patient had a marked hyperperfusion which might correlate with the clinical diagnosis of epilepsia partialis continua. In the astrocytoma patients SPECT scans showed hypoperfusion at the lesion site. Data obtained from the 10 patients without progressive CNS lesions showed: (a in 4, SPECT findings correlated well with the anatomical findings; (b in 5 instances, SPECT was able to disclose additional functional deficits; (c in one case, there was no SPECT correlate of a discrete anatomical lesion. In 5 of these cases with no progressive lesions (n=10 SPECT findings were useful as a complementary tool in determining the clinical or surgical management of these patients. Despite the small number and hete-rogenicity of the present sample, SPECT seems to be an useful tool as part of the clinical workup of epileptic patients who are candidates for epilepsy surgery.

  4. Alternative-based thresholding with application to presurgical fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnez, Joke; Moerkerke, Beatrijs; Bartsch, Andreas; Nichols, Thomas E

    2013-12-01

    Functional magnetic reasonance imaging (fMRI) plays an important role in pre-surgical planning for patients with resectable brain lesions such as tumors. With appropriately designed tasks, the results of fMRI studies can guide resection, thereby preserving vital brain tissue. The mass univariate approach to fMRI data analysis consists of performing a statistical test in each voxel, which is used to classify voxels as either active or inactive-that is, related, or not, to the task of interest. In cognitive neuroscience, the focus is on controlling the rate of false positives while accounting for the severe multiple testing problem of searching the brain for activations. However, stringent control of false positives is accompanied by a risk of false negatives, which can be detrimental, particularly in clinical settings where false negatives may lead to surgical resection of vital brain tissue. Consequently, for clinical applications, we argue for a testing procedure with a stronger focus on preventing false negatives. We present a thresholding procedure that incorporates information on false positives and false negatives. We combine two measures of significance for each voxel: a classical p-value, which reflects evidence against the null hypothesis of no activation, and an alternative p-value, which reflects evidence against activation of a prespecified size. This results in a layered statistical map for the brain. One layer marks voxels exhibiting strong evidence against the traditional null hypothesis, while a second layer marks voxels where activation cannot be confidently excluded. The third layer marks voxels where the presence of activation can be rejected.

  5. Metallic artifact in MRI after removal of orthopedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Hosseini, Mehrdad Mohammad; Emami, Mohammad Jafar; Foroughi, Amin Aiboulhassani

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the metallic artifacts in MRI of the orthopedic patients after removal of metallic implants. Subjects and methods: From March to August 2009, 40 orthopedic patients operated for removal of orthopedic metallic implants were studied by post-operative MRI from the site of removal of implants. A grading scale of 0–3 was assigned for artifact in MR images whereby 0 was considered no artifact; and I–III were considered mild, moderate, and severe metallic artifacts, respectively. These grading records were correlated with other variables including the type, size, number, and composition of metallic devices; and the site and duration of orthopedic devices stay in the body. Results: Metallic susceptibly artifacts were detected in MRI of 18 of 40 cases (45%). Screws and pins in removed hardware were the most important factors for causing artifacts in MRI. The artifacts were found more frequently in the patients who had more screws and pins in the removed implants. Gender, age, site of implantation of the device, length of the hardware, composition of the metallic implants (stainless steel versus titanium), and duration of implantation of the hardware exerted no effect in producing metallic artifacts after removal of implants. Short TE sequences of MRI (such as T1 weighted) showed fewer artifacts. Conclusion: Susceptibility of metallic artifacts is a frequent phenomenon in MRI of patients upon removal of metallic orthopedic implants.

  6. The Economic Burden of Orthopedic Surgery Residency Interviews on Applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Harold A; Finkler, Elissa S; Wu, Karen; Schiff, Adam P; Nystrom, Lukas M

    2016-01-01

    The intense competition for orthopedic surgery residency positions influences the interview process. The financial impact on residency applicants is less well understood. The purpose of the present study was to define the economic burden of the orthopedic surgery residency interview process while additionally describing how applicants finance the expense. We distributed surveys to 48 nonrotating applicants at our institution's residency interview days for the 2015 match year. The survey consisted of eleven questions specific to the costs of interviewing for orthopedic surgery residency positions. The survey response rate was 90% (43/48). Applicants applied to a median of 65 orthopedic surgery residency programs (range 21-88) and targeted a median of 15 interviews (range 12-25). The mean cost estimate for a single interview was $450 (range $200-800) and the cost estimate for all interviews was $7,119 (range $2,500-15,000). Applicants spent a mean of $344 (range $0-750) traveling to our interview. Seventy-two percent borrowed money to finance their interview costs and 28% canceled interviews for financial reasons. The financial cost of interviewing for orthopedic surgery is substantial and a majority of applicants add to their educational debt by taking out loans to finance interviews. Future considerations should be made to minimize these costs for an already financially burdened population.

  7. Patient Attitudes Toward Orthopedic Surgeon Ownership of Related Ancillary Businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Paul H; Cross, Michael B; Johnson, Staci R; Rasinski, Kenneth A; Nunley, Ryan M; Della Valle, Craig J

    2016-08-01

    Physician ownership of businesses related to orthopedic surgery, such as surgery centers, has been criticized as potentially leading to misuse of health care resources. The purpose of this study was to determine patients' attitudes toward surgeon ownership of orthopedic-related businesses. We surveyed 280 consecutive patients at 2 centers regarding their attitudes toward surgeon ownership of orthopedic-related businesses using an anonymous questionnaire. Three surgeon ownership scenarios were presented: (1) owning a surgery center, (2) physical therapy (PT), and (3) imaging facilities (eg, Magnetic Resonance Imaging scanner). Two hundred fourteen patients (76%) completed the questionnaire. The majority agreed that it is ethical for a surgeon to own a surgery center (73%), PT practice (77%), or imaging facility (77%). Most (>67%) indicated that their surgeon owning such a business would have no effect on the trust they have in their surgeon. Although >70% agreed that a surgeon in all 3 scenarios would make the same treatment decisions, many agreed that such surgeons might perform more surgery (47%), refer more patients to PT (61%), or order more imaging (58%). Patients favored surgeon autonomy, however, believing that surgeons should be allowed to own such businesses (78%). Eighty-five percent agreed that patients should be informed if their surgeon owns an orthopedic-related business. Although patients express concern over and desire disclosure of surgeon ownership of orthopedic-related businesses, the majority believes that it is an ethical practice and feel comfortable receiving care at such a facility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Orthopedic injury in electric bicycle-related collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxuan; Yun, Zhe; Li, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Yucai; Yang, Tongtao; Zheng, Lianhe; Qian, Jixian

    2017-05-19

    Although electric bicycle-related injuries have become the most common reason for hospitalization due to a road crash in China, no study has comprehensively investigated electric bicycle collisions and their impact on orthopedic injuries; such a study may provide evidence to support a new road safety policy. A retrospective review of orthopedic injuries from electric bicycle collisions was performed in an urban trauma center. We collected variables including age, gender, location of fracture, presence of open or closed fractures, concomitant vascular, and neurologic injuries. A total of 2,044 cases were involved in electric bicycle collisions. The orthopedic injury victims were predominantly male and middle aged. The most common orthopedic injury was a femur fracture. Open fractures frequently involved the forearm and tibia/fibula. Male patients were more likely to suffer from multiple fractures and associated injuries than female patients. Fewer patients age 60 years old or older wore helmets at the time of the accident compared to those in other age groups. Orthopedic injuries from electric bicycle-related accidents cause patients substantial suffering that could lead to serious social consequences. Helmet use and protective clothing or similar safety gear, especially for electric bicycle users, should be required to provide greater protection.

  9. Infant reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... twitch their hips toward the touch in a dancing movement. GRASP REFLEX This reflex occurs if you ... Infant reflexes can occur in adults who have: Brain damage Stroke When to Contact a Medical Professional ...

  10. CPR - infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as 4 to 6 minutes later. Machines called automated external defibrillators (AEDs) can be found in many ... side down. Follow the guidelines for using infant car seats. Teach your baby the meaning of "don' ...

  11. Infant Constipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Infant Constipation Page Content Parents also worry that their babies ... without success? These signs can all suggest actual constipation. What parents can do: After the first month ...

  12. Is orthopedics more competitive today than when my attending matched? An analysis of National Resident Matching Program data for orthopedic PGY1 applicants from 1984 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnes, Jonathan M; Mayerson, Joel L; Scharschmidt, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated supply and demand trends for orthopedic postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) positions from 1984 to 2011 for the purpose of estimating national intercandidate competition over time. National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) data for orthopedic surgery from 1984 to 2011 were collected. Proxy variables including (total number of orthopedic applicants/number of orthopedic PGY1 positions), (number of US senior applicants to orthopedics/number of orthopedic PGY1 positions), (number of US seniors matching into orthopedics/number of US senior orthopedic applicants), (total number of matched orthopedic applicants/total number of orthopedic applicants), and (total number of US applicants who fail to match into orthopedics/total number of US senior applicants into orthopedics) as well as average United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 scores were used to gauge the level of competition between candidates and were compared over time. Academic medical center in the Midwestern United States. Medical professors and medical students. The NRMP data suggested that the number of positions per applicant decreased or remained stable since 1984 and that the percentage of applicants who did not match was no higher now than in the past. This finding was primarily because of the relative decrease in the ratio of applicants to available PGY1 positions, which stems from the number of positions increasing more rapidly than the number of applicants. The NRMP data from 1984 to 2011 supported our hypothesis that intercandidate competition intensity for orthopedic PGY1 positions has not increased over time. The misconception that orthopedics is becoming more competitive likely arises from the increased number of applications submitted per candidate and the resulting relative importance placed on objective criteria such as United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 scores when programs select interview cohorts. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in

  13. CT and MRI techniques for imaging around orthopedic hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Thuy Duong; Skornitzke, Stephan; Weber, Marc-Andre; Sutter, Reto

    2018-01-01

    Orthopedic hardware impairs image quality in cross-sectional imaging. With an increasing number of orthopedic implants in an aging population, the need to mitigate metal artifacts in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is becoming increasingly relevant. This review provides an overview of the major artifacts in CT and MRI and state-of-the-art solutions to improve image quality. All steps of image acquisition from device selection, scan preparations and parameters to image post-processing influence the magnitude of metal artifacts. Technological advances like dual-energy CT with the possibility of virtual monochromatic imaging (VMI) and new materials offer opportunities to further reduce artifacts in CT and MRI. Dedicated metal artifact reduction sequences contain algorithms to reduce artifacts and improve imaging of surrounding tissue and are essential tools in orthopedic imaging to detect postoperative complications in early stages.

  14. Therapists, Trainers, and Acupuncturists: Focused Review for the Orthopedic Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domes, Christopher M; Kruger, Cori L

    2015-12-01

    Effective treatment of orthopedic injuries requires a multidisciplinary team, including physical and occupational therapists, athletic trainers, massage therapists, and acupuncturists. Orthopedic surgeons commonly encounter these practitioners but may not be familiar with the training, credentialing, and most importantly, the appropriate use of members of this team. There are general similarities in practice locations as well as types of symptoms addressed by the providers discussed, which include the treatment of physical pain, evaluation and treatment of physical impairment, and some facilitation of adaptation to the limitations caused by injuries. Across the 5 types of providers discussed there are widely varying training and licensing requirements, specializations, and continuing education requirements to maintain licensure. This article provides a focused review of these members of the multidisciplinary team and highlights the current American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons recommendations for the use of occupational and physical therapists for orthopedic conditions, including hip fractures, total hip arthroplasty, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Evolving trauma and orthopedics training in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaparthy, Praveen K; Sayana, Murali K; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    The ever-growing population of the UK has resulted in increasing demands on its healthcare service. Changes have been introduced in the UK medical training system to avoid loss of training time and make it more focused and productive. Modernizing medical careers (MMC) was introduced in 2005. This promised to reduce the training period for a safe trauma specialist, in trauma and orthopedics, to 10 years. At around the same time, the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) was introduced to reduce the working hours for junior doctors in training, to improve patient safety and also work-life balance of junior doctors. Introduction of the assessment tools from Orthopedic Competency assessment project (OCAP) will help tailor the training according to the needs of the trainee. The aim of this article is to review the changes in the UK orthopedic surgical training over the past two decades. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Strongly lateralized activation in language fMRI of atypical dominant patients-implications for presurgical work-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Jörg; Weber, Bernd; Weis, Susanne; Klaver, Peter; Urbach, Horst; Reul, Jürgen; Fernandez, Guillen; Elger, Christian E

    2008-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is being used increasingly for language dominance assessment in the presurgical work-up of patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. However, the interpretation of bilateral fMRI-activation patterns is difficult. Various studies propose fMRI-lateralization index (LI) thresholds between +/-0.1 and +/-0.5 for discrimination of atypical from typical dominant patients. This study examines if these thresholds allow identifying atypical dominant patients with sufficient safety for presurgical settings. 65 patients had a tight comparison, fully controlled semantic decision fMRI-task and a Wada-test for language lateralization. According to Wada-test, 22 were atypical language dominant. In the remaining, Wada-test results were compatible with unilateral left dominance. We determined fMRI-LI for two frontal and one temporo-parietal functionally defined, protocol-specific volume of interest (VOI), and for the least lateralized of these VOIs ("low-VOI") in each patient. We find large intra-individual LI differences between functionally defined VOIs irrespective of underlying type of language dominance (mean LI difference 0.33+/-0.35, range 0-1.6; 15% of patients have inter-VOI-LI differences >1.0). Across atypical dominant patients fMRI-LI in the Broca's and temporo-parietal VOI range from -1 to +1, in the "remaining frontal" VOI from -0.93 to 1. The highest low-VOI-LI detected in atypical dominant patients is 0.84. Large intra-individual inter-VOI-LI differences and strongly lateralized fMRI-activation in patients with Wada-test proven atypical dominance question the value of the proposed fMRI-thresholds for presurgical language lateralization. Future studies have to develop strategies allowing the reliable identification of atypical dominance with fMRI. The low-VOI approach may be useful.

  17. Role of presurgical targeted molecular therapy in renal cell carcinoma with an inferior vena cava tumor thrombus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng C

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cheng Peng,1,* Liangyou Gu,1,* Lei Wang,2 Qingbo Huang,1 Baojun Wang,1 Gang Guo,1 Yang Fan,1 Yu Gao,1 Xin Ma,1 Xu Zhang1 1Department of Urology, State Key Laboratory of Kidney Diseases, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Chinese PLA Medical Academy, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Urology, Chinese PLA 534 Hospital, Luoyang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The clinical benefit of targeted molecular therapy (TMT in renal cell carcinoma (RCC with an inferior vena cava (IVC tumor thrombus remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of presurgical TMT on the heights and levels of IVC thrombi, and to assess its impact on surgical strategy. Patients and methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from 18 patients with RCC involving IVC tumor thrombi who were treated at our hospital with presurgical TMT followed by an IVC thrombectomy. The changes in heights and levels of the IVC thrombi were compared using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Clinicopathological factors were also evaluated to assess their association with TMT efficacy. Results: The tumor thrombus levels before TMT were stage I in 1 patient (5.6%, II in 12 patients (66.7%, III in 4 patients (22.2%, and IV in 1 patient (5.6%. After a median of two treatment cycles (range: 1–3, the thrombus height decreased measurably in 11 patients (61.1% with an average shrinkage of 17.7%. The thrombus height remained stable in five patients (27.8% and was enlarged in two (11.1%. Downstaging of the thrombus level occurred in four patients (22.2%; the surgical strategy was modified in three patients (16.7% to avoid cardiopulmonary bypass and complicated liver mobilization under robot-assisted laparoscopy. Furthermore, a higher neutrophil count tended to be associated with a worse clinical TMT-associated outcome (P=0.056. Conclusion: Our data suggest a limited influence of presurgical TMT

  18. Nanomedicine applications in orthopedic medicine: state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Mozhdeh; Eslahi, Niloofar; Ordikhani, Farideh; Tamjid, Elnaz; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    The technological and clinical need for orthopedic replacement materials has led to significant advances in the field of nanomedicine, which embraces the breadth of nanotechnology from pharmacological agents and surface modification through to regulation and toxicology. A variety of nanostructures with unique chemical, physical, and biological properties have been engineered to improve the functionality and reliability of implantable medical devices. However, mimicking living bone tissue is still a challenge. The scope of this review is to highlight the most recent accomplishments and trends in designing nanomaterials and their applications in orthopedics with an outline on future directions and challenges. PMID:26451110

  19. Infant Care and Infant Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Information Find a Study Resources and Publications Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find ... How many infants are born each year? What steps can help promote an infant’s health before birth? ...

  20. [Daily routine in orthopedics and traumatology - results of a nationwide survey of residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merschin, D; Münzberg, M; Stange, R; Schüttrumpf, J P; Perl, M; Mutschler, M

    2014-10-01

    The subject orthopedics and traumatology suffers by a loss of attractiveness which results in a lack of young blood. The aim of this study of the Youth Forum of the German Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology (DGOU) is to register the working conditions of residents in orthopedics. In the months September and October 2013 we performed a survey on members of the following German societies: German Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology (DGOU), German Society of Traumatology (DGU) and the German Society of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery (DGOOC), (age orthopedics and traumatology. In order to maintain orthopedics and traumatology as an attractive it is necessary to implement flexible working time models and to reorganize and improve training-concepts. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Patient-specific three-dimensional printing for pre-surgical planning in hepatocellular carcinoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perica, Elizabeth; Sun, Zhonghua

    2017-12-01

    Recently, three-dimensional (3D) printing has shown great interest in medicine, and 3D printed models may be rendered as part of the pre-surgical planning process in order to better understand the complexities of an individual's anatomy. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of utilising 3D printed liver models as clinical tools in pre-operative planning for resectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions. High-resolution contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images were acquired and utilized to generate a patient-specific 3D printed liver model. Hepatic structures were segmented and edited to produce a printable model delineating intrahepatic anatomy and a resectable HCC lesion. Quantitative assessment of 3D model accuracy compared measurements of critical anatomical landmarks acquired from the original CT images, standard tessellation language (STL) files, and the 3D printed liver model. Comparative analysis of surveys completed by two radiologists investigated the clinical value of 3D printed liver models in radiology. The application of utilizing 3D printed liver models as tools in surgical planning for resectable HCC lesions was evaluated through kappa analysis of questionnaires completed by two abdominal surgeons. A scaled down multi-material 3D liver model delineating patient-specific hepatic anatomy and pathology was produced, requiring a total production time of 25.25 hours and costing a total of AUD $1,250. A discrepancy was found in the total mean of measurements at each stage of production, with a total mean of 18.28±9.31 mm for measurements acquired from the original CT data, 15.63±8.06 mm for the STL files, and 14.47±7.71 mm for the 3D printed liver model. The 3D liver model did not enhance the radiologists' perception of patient-specific anatomy or pathology. Kappa analysis of the surgeon's responses to survey questions yielded a percentage agreement of 80%, and a κ value of 0.38 (P=0.24) indicating fair agreement. Study

  2. Socioeconomic value of orthopedic devices: evidence and methodological challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorenson C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Corinna Sorenson,1,2 Michael Drummond2,31LSE Health, London School of Economics, London, UK; 2European Health Technology Institute for Socioeconomic Research, Brussels, Belgium; 3Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, UKAbstract: With continued technological advances in orthopedic devices and increasingly limited health care resources, greater attention will be placed on substantiating the socioeconomic value of these devices. Therefore, this study focused on a systematic review of available economic evaluations of selected orthopedic devices (n = 33 studies to assess their impact on different clinical and economic outcomes. The existing evidence suggests that they have important benefits to patients, including reduced risk of fractures, increased mobility and functioning, and enhanced quality of life, and do so cost effectively or with cost savings. However, we have identified several methodological obstacles to sufficient ascertainment of value, such as a lack of robust information on health economic outcomes and long-term evidence. We also identify areas where additional research is needed to assess more fully the value of orthopedic devices.Keywords: medical devices, orthopedics, health economic evaluation

  3. Rivaroxaban for Thromboprophylaxis After Nonelective Orthopedic Trauma Surgery in Switzerland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Simmen, Hanspeter; Jakob, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness and the outcomes of rivaroxaban vs the standard of care for venous thromboembolic prophylaxis in patients undergoing fracture-related surgery. A total of 413 patients undergoing fracture-related surgery from 9 Swiss orthopedic and trauma centers were enro...

  4. Reviewer agreement in scoring 419 abstracts for scientific orthopedics meetings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, R.W.; Keijser, L.C.M.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Blankevoort, L.; Farrokhyar, F.; Bhandari, M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The selection of presentations at orthopedic meetings is an important process. If the peer reviewers do not consistently agree on the quality score, the review process is arbitrary and open to bias. The aim of this study was: (1) to describe the inter-reviewer agreement of a previously

  5. Survey of 2582 cases of acute orthopedic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymanha, Mehran; Mobayen, Mohammadreza; Asadi, Kamran; Adeli, Alborz; Haghparast-Ghadim-Limudahi, Zahra

    2014-11-01

    Orthopedic injuries are among the most common causes of mortality, morbidity, hospitalization, and economic burden in societies. In this research, we study the prevalence of different types of trauma requiring orthopedic surgery. We conducted a cross-sectional study on 2582 patients with acute orthopedic injuries admitted to the orthopedic emergency ward at the Poursina Hospital (a referral center in Guilan province (northern Iran), during December 2010 through September 2011. Patients were examined and the data collection form was filled for each patient. Data were analyzed by SPSS software version 19 and were listed in tables. Of 2582 included cases, 1940 were male and 642 were female, with a mean age of 34.5 years. Most injuries were seen in the 25 to 44 year age group from rural areas. The highest frequency of trauma related to falls. On the other hand, bicycling and shooting had the lowest frequencies. There were 18 cases with limb amputation. Overall, 66.5% of patients had fractures, 5% had soft tissue lacerations, and 10% had dislocations. Identification of risk factors and methods of prevention is one of the most important duties of healthcare systems. Devising plans to minimize these risk factors and familiarizing people with them is prudent.

  6. Looking at the Social Activity for Adolescents with Orthopedic Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biastro, Leslie; Frank, Heather; Larwin, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents with identified orthopedic impairments are often less likely to participate in social activities outside of the school setting. However, the adolescents who are able to participate in activities have higher social skills, more academic successes, and show more satisfaction in their roles as family member or friend. The aim of this…

  7. Left-Handed Preschool Children with Orthopedic Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banham, Katharine M.

    1983-01-01

    The mental development of 332 preschool-age children with orthopedic disabilities was assessed at a children's hospital over a 10-year period, and comparisons were made for right-handed and left-handed. The left-handed children were slower than right-handed children in learning speech and language skills (Author/SEW)

  8. Radiation injuries to the skeleton and their orthopedic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, R.; Rahnfeld, R.

    1978-01-01

    70 patients subjected to orthopedic treatment and radiotherapy for skeletal tumors have been examined. It was found that serious radiation injuries frequently occurred. Above all there were contractures, disordered healing of wounds, ulcerations, and scolioses and kyphoses of the growing skeleton. Therefore, in the case of diseases of the skeleton, it is recommended to restrain radiotherapy. It has to be rejected in child's age

  9. Orthopedic and Major Limb Trauma at the Tikur Anbessa University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Ethiopia, Injuries constitute around half of all surgical emergencies, and are the primary reason for an emergency hospital visit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and pattern of major limb traumatic injuries and orthopedic conditions treated as emergency at Tikur ...

  10. Clinical potential of implantable wireless sensors for orthopedic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karipott, Salil Sidharthan; Nelson, Bradley D; Guldberg, Robert E; Ong, Keat Ghee

    2018-03-21

    Implantable wireless sensors have been used for real-time monitoring of chemicals and physical conditions of bones, tendons and muscles to diagnose and study orthopedic diseases and injuries. Due to the importance of these sensors in orthopedic care, a critical review, which not only analyzes the underlying technologies but also their clinical implementations and challenges, will provide a landscape view on their current state and their future clinical role. Areas covered: By conducting an extensive literature search and following the leaders of orthopedic implantable wireless sensors, this review covers the battery-powered and battery-free wireless implantable sensor technologies, and describes their implementation for hips, knees, spine, and shoulder stress/strain monitoring. Their advantages, limitations, and clinical challenges are also described. Expert commentary: Currently, implantable wireless sensors are mostly limited for scientific investigations and demonstrative experiments. Although rapid advancement in sensors and wireless technologies will push the reliability and practicality of these sensors for clinical realization, regulatory constraints and financial viability in medical device industry may curtail their continuous adoption for clinical orthopedic applications. In the next five years, these sensors are expected to gain increased interest from researchers, but wide clinical adoption is still unlikely.

  11. [Application of platelet-rich plasma in clinical orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weili; Li, Qi; Li, Jian

    2014-10-01

    To summarize the application status and progress of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in clinical orthopedics. The recent related literature concerning the application of PRP in clinical orthopedics was extensively reviewed and analyzed. Recently, a large number of clinical studies on PRP have been carried out, which are applied in bone defects or nonunion, spinal fusion, osteoarthritis and cartilage injuries, ligament reconstruction, muscle strain, tendon terminal diseases, and a variety of acute and chronic soft tissue injuries. Some results show certain effectiveness, while others demonstrate invalid. Easily drawing, achieving autologous transplantation, and the biological repair potential of the musculoskeletal tissues make PRP to be widely used in clinical orthopedics. However, there are still no uniform standards accepted and reliable clinical guidelines about the application of PRP. Furthermore, a variety of PRP products and their respective indications are also different. The clinical evidences with the greater sample size and higher quality are still needed to further support the safety and effectiveness of PRP in clinical orthopedics.

  12. Reviewer agreement in scoring 419 abstracts for scientific orthopedics meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Rudolf W.; Keijser, Lucien C. M.; de Waal Malefijt, Maarten C.; Blankevoort, Leendert; Farrokhyar, Forough; Bhandari, Mohit

    2007-01-01

    The selection of presentations at orthopedic meetings is an important process. If the peer reviewers do not consistently agree on the quality score, the review process is arbitrary and open to bias. The aim of this study was: (1) to describe the inter-reviewer agreement of a previously designed

  13. Semuloparin for prevention of venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, M R; Fisher, W; Mouret, P

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Semuloparin is a novel ultra-low-molecular-weight heparin under development for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention in patients at increased risk, such as surgical and cancer patients. OBJECTIVES: Three Phase III studies compared semuloparin and enoxaparin after major orthopedic...

  14. Frequency of orthopedic diseases in horses: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovač Milomir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study determined the frequency of orthopedic diseases in horses. It was possible to establish 141 specific orthopedic diagnoses in 1955 horses with lameness. In 14.58 % horses, multiple pathologic orthopedic changes were determined. In 61.84 % cases, the pathologic changes were present on the thoracic limb, 28,86 % on the pelvic limb and other parts of the oganism (neck, spine, muscles in 9.29 % cases. Pathologic changes on the tendons, ligaments, tendon sheats, bursae and muscles were determined in 31.51 % cases. Diseases of the hoof were present in 25.82 % cases. According to our investigation the most frequent orthopedic diseases are: podarthritis (acute, chronic, septic (5.04 %, navicular disease (4.69 %, tendinitis m. flexor digitalis superfacialis (4.51 %, kissing spine syndrom (4.30 % periarthritis et osteoarthrosis tarsi (3.30 %, distal metacarpal/metatarzophalengeal tendovaginitis (3.30 % and high suspensory ligament desmitis (3.12 %. Most frequent fractures were diagnosed on the metacarpal/metatarsal bone II and IV (2.56 %. Osteochondrossis dissecans was most frequently determined in the tarsocrural (1.26 % and the metacarpophalengeal joint (1.56 %.

  15. Monitoring of Serial Presurgical and Postsurgical Changes in the Serum Proteome in a Series of Patients with Calcific Aortic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumi Satoh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Comprehensive analysis of proteome differentially expressed in response to surgery or drug treatment is useful to understand biological responses to dispensed interventions. Here we investigated expression changes in sera of patients who suffered from calcific aortic stenosis (CAS, before and after surgery for aortic valve replacement. Materials and Methods. Sera obtained before and after surgery with depletion of highly abundant proteins were analyzed with iTRAQ labeling followed by nanoLC-MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS. Results. Fifty-one proteins shared in five patients were identified with differential levels in postsurgical and presurgical sera. Finally, 16 proteins that show statistically significant levels in patients’ sera compared with those in control sera (P<0.05 were identified. Most of the identified proteins were positive acute-phase proteins. Among three proteins other than acute-phase proteins, we confirmed increased levels of antithrombin-III and zinc-α-2-glycoprotein in postsurgical sera by Western blot analysis using other CAS patients’ sera. Furthermore, antithrombin-III and zinc-α-2-glycoprotein were not found among proteins with differential levels in postsurgical and presurgical sera of patients with aortic aneurysms that we identified in a previous study. Conclusions. The results indicated that antithrombin-III and zinc-α-2-glycoprotein would become unique monitoring proteins for evaluating pathophysiological and biochemical processes occurring before and after surgery for CAS.

  16. Surgical treatment for cervicomedullary compression among infants with achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimony, Nir; Ben-Sira, Liat; Sivan, Yakov; Constantini, Shlomi; Roth, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of dwarfism. Respiratory failure is responsible for most deaths among these children and is often related to cervicomedullary compression (CMC). We present our experience with early cervicomedullary decompression in infants with achondroplasia. Data was retrospectively collected for infants with achondroplasia who underwent CMC decompression between 1998 and 2013. Data included presurgical and postsurgical neurological examinations, MRI scans, and sleep study results. Ten infants were included. Ages at surgery were 4 to 23 months (12.5 ± 6.88 months). All infants displayed neurological findings prior to surgery, although often subtle. All infants underwent a foramen magnum opening with a wide C1 laminectomy. Following surgery, seven patients (70 %) demonstrated improved neurological status, and one displayed neurological deterioration. Seven patients demonstrated improved sleep quality 1 year after surgery. These patients had a good or improved neurological status following surgery. Preoperative radiological findings included abnormal hyperintense T2 changes in all children (improved following surgery in six children), brainstem distortion in four children (improved in all), and diminished cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces at the level of the foramen magnum in eight children (improved in seven). One child with extensive preoperative T2 changes accompanied by neurological and respiratory decline, deteriorated following surgery, and remains chronically ventilated. Infants with achondroplasia are prone to neurological and respiratory symptoms. We believe that early diagnosis and early surgery for decompression of the foramen magnum and C1 lamina can alleviate respiratory symptoms, improve neurological status, and perhaps prevent sudden infant death in this population.

  17. Publication Productivity of Early-Career Orthopedic Trauma Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hake, Mark E; Lee, John J; Goulet, James A

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this study were to: (1) define the publication productivity of early-career orthopedic trauma surgeons over time; (2) compare the early-career publication productivity of recent orthopedic trauma fellowship graduates vs their more senior colleagues; and (3) determine the proportion of fellowship graduates who meet the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) publication criteria for active membership early in their careers. Orthopedic trauma fellowship graduates from 1982 to 2007 were analyzed. A literature search was performed for each fellow's publications for the 6-year period beginning the year of fellowship graduation. Publication productivity was compared between early and recent groups of graduates, 1987 to 1991 and 2003 to 2007, respectively. Fulfillment of OTA publication criteria was determined. Seventy-nine percent of graduates contributed to 1 or more publications. The recent group produced more total publications per graduate (4.06 vs 3.29, P=.01) and more coauthor publications (2.60 vs 2.04, P=.019) than the early group. The number of first-author publications did not differ between groups (1.46 vs 1.25, P=.26). A greater percentage of the recent group met current OTA publication criteria compared with the early group (51% vs 35%, P=.04). The findings showed that recent orthopedic trauma graduates had increased publication productivity compared with their more senior colleagues, although a proportion had not qualified for active OTA membership 6 years into their career. Overall, these data are encouraging and suggest that young orthopedic trauma surgeons remain committed to sustaining a high level of academic excellence. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. A Comprehensive, High-Quality Orthopedic Intern Surgical Skills Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Samuel E; Patt, Joshua C; Scannell, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    To design and implement a month-long, low-cost, comprehensive surgical skills curriculum built to address the needs of orthopedic surgery interns with high satisfaction among both interns and faculty. The study design was retrospective and descriptive. The study was conducted at tertiary care referral center with a medium sized orthopedic residency surgery program (5 residents/year). Totally 5 orthopedic surgery residents and 16 orthopedic surgery faculty participated. A general mission was established-to orient the resident to the postgraduate year 1 and prepare them for success in residency. The basic tenets of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons surgical skills program framework were built. Curricular additions included anatomic study, surgical approaches, joint-specific physical examination, radiographic interpretation, preoperative planning, reduction techniques, basic emergency and operating room procedures, cadaveric procedure practice, and introduction to arthroplasty. The program was held in August during protected time for intern participants. In total, 16 orthopedic surgeons instructed 85% of the educational sessions. One faculty member did most of the preparation and organization to facilitate the program. The program ran for a cumulative 89 hours, including 14.5 hours working with cadaveric specimens. The program cost a total of $8100. The average module received a 4.15 rating on a 5-point scale, with 4 representing "good" and 5 representing "excellent." The program was appropriately timed and addressed topics relevant to the intern without sacrificing clinical experience or burdening inpatient services with interns' absence. The program received high satisfaction ratings from both the interns as well as the faculty. Additionally, the program fostered early relationships between interns and faculty-an unforeseen benefit. In the future, our program plans to better integrate validated learning metrics and improve instruction pertaining to both

  19. Characteristics of Orthopedic Publications in High-Impact General Medical Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Lehman, Jason D; Lyman, Stephen; Marx, Robert G

    2017-05-01

    Orthopedic studies are occasionally published in high-impact general medical journals; these studies are often given high visibility and have significant potential to impact health care policy and inform clinical decision-making. The purpose of this review was to investigate the characteristics of operative orthopedic studies published in high-impact medical journals. The number of orthopedic studies published in high-impact medical journals is relatively low; however, these studies demonstrate methodological characteristics that may bias toward nonoperative treatment. Careful analysis and interpretation of orthopedic studies published in these journals is warranted. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(3):e405-e412.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Infant Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... iron-fortified formula.Some formulas are made from soy milk instead of cow’s milk. If your baby seems ... cow’s milk, your doctor may suggest using a soy-milk formula.If you’re not breastfeeding, use infant ...

  1. CPR: Infant

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Infant (1:52) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course Materials Shop Our Store ...

  2. Attitudes toward chiropractic: a survey of North American orthopedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Jason W; Jacobs, Craig; Ngo, Trung; Rodine, Robert; Torrance, David; Jim, Janey; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Petrisor, Brad; Drew, Brian; Bhandari, Mohit

    2009-12-01

    Questionnaire survey. To elicit orthopedic surgeons' attitudes toward chiropractic. Orthopedic surgeons and chiropractors often attend to similar patient populations, but little is known about the attitudes of orthopedic surgeons toward chiropractic. We administered a 43-item cross-sectional survey to 1000 Canadian and American orthopedic surgeons that inquired about demographic variables and their knowledge and use of chiropractic. Imbedded in our survey was a 20-item chiropractic attitude questionnaire (CAQ). 487 surgeons completed the survey (response rate, 49%). North American orthopedic surgeons' attitudes toward chiropractic were diverse, with 44.5% endorsing a negative impression, 29.4% holding favorable views, and 26.1% being neutral. Approximately half of respondents referred patients for chiropractic care each year, mainly due to patient request.The majority of surgeons believed that chiropractors provide effective therapy for some musculoskeletal complaints (81.8%), and disagreed that chiropractors could provide effective relief for nonmusculoskeletal conditions (89.5%). The majority endorsed that chiropractors provide unnecessary treatment (72.7%), engage in overly-aggressive marketing (63.1%) and breed dependency in patients on short-term symptomatic relief (52.3%). In our adjusted generalized linear model, older age (-2.62 points on the CAQ for each 10 year increment; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -3.74 to -1.50), clinical interest in foot and ankle (-2.77; 95% CI = -5.43 to -0.10), and endorsement of the research literature (-4.20; 95% CI = -6.29 to -2.11), the media (-3.05; 95% CI = -5.92 to -0.19), medical school (-7.42; 95% CI = -10.60 to -4.25), or 'other' (-4.99; 95% CI = -8.81 to -1.17) as a source of information regarding chiropractic were associated with more negative attitudes; endorsing a relationship with a specific chiropractor (5.05; 95% CI = 3.00 to 7.10) or residency (3.79;95% CI = 0.17 to 7.41) as sources of information regarding

  3. High-intensity interval training (HIT) for effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Matthew; Weston, Kathryn L; Prentis, James M; Snowden, Chris P

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of perioperative medicine is leading to greater diversity in development of pre-surgical interventions, implemented to reduce patient surgical risk and enhance post-surgical recovery. Of these interventions, the prescription of pre-operative exercise training is gathering momentum as a realistic means for enhancing patient surgical outcome. Indeed, the general benefits of exercise training have the potential to pre-operatively optimise several pre-surgical risks factors, including cardiorespiratory function, frailty and cognitive function. Any exercise programme incorporated into the pre-operative pathway of care needs to be effective and time efficient in that any fitness gains are achievable in the limited period between the decision for surgery and operation (e.g. 4 weeks). Fortunately, there is a large volume of research describing effective and time-efficient exercise training programmes within the discipline of sports science. Accordingly, the objective of our commentary is to synthesise contemporary exercise training research, both from non-clinical and clinical populations, with the overarching aim of informing the development of effective and time-efficient pre-surgical exercise training programmes. The development of such exercise training programmes requires the careful consideration of several key principles, namely frequency, intensity, time, type and progression of exercise. Therefore, in light of more recent evidence demonstrating the effectiveness and time efficiency of high-intensity interval training-which involves brief bouts of intense exercise interspersed with longer recovery periods-the principles of exercise training programme design will be discussed mainly in the context of such high-intensity interval training programmes. Other issues pertinent to the development, implementation and evaluation of pre-operative exercise training programmes, such as individual exercise prescription, training session monitoring and potential

  4. EEG-fMRI correlation patterns in the presurgical evaluation of focal epilepsy: A comparison with electrocorticographic data and surgical outcome measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houdt, P.J.; de Munck, J.C.; Leijten, F.S.S.; Huiskamp, G.J.M.; Colon, A.J.; Boon, P.A.J.M.; Ossenblok, P.P.W.

    2013-01-01

    EEG-correlated functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) visualizes brain regions associated with interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). This technique images the epileptiform network, including multifocal, superficial and deeply situated cortical areas. To understand the role of EEG-fMRI in presurgical

  5. The role of biomechanics in orthopedic and neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulig, Kornelia; Burnfield, Judith M

    2008-01-01

    Movement is fundamental to human well-being, function and participation in work and leisure activities. As a result, regaining optimal movement abilities and independence frequently become central foci of rehabilitation programs developed for individuals recovering from serious orthopedic and neurologic injuries. Further, preventing additional injury to the locomotor system becomes essential for effective long-term management of chronic medical conditions such as tendon dysfunction and diabetes. The primary aim of this perspective is to illustrate the role of biomechanics in orthopedics, musculoskeletal and neurological rehabilitation. Specifically, this paper discusses selected examples, ranging from the tissue to whole body biomechanics level, that highlight how scientific evidence from the theoretical and applied sciences have merged to address common and sometimes unique clinical problems.

  6. Stem cells in orthopedics: current concepts and possible future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagaria, Vaibhav; Patil, Nilesh; Sapre, Vikram; Chadda, Anshul; Singrakia, Manoj

    2006-04-01

    Stem cells are the cells that have the ability to divide for indefinite periods in culture and to give rise to specialized cells. Sources of these cells include embryo, umbilical cord and certain sites in adults such as the central nervous system [CNS] and bone marrow. Its use hold promise of wide spread applications particularly in areas of spinal cord injury, difficult non-unions, critical bone defects, spinal fusions, augmentation of ligament reconstructions, cartilage repair and degenerative disc disorders. This review article contains current information derived from Medline searches on the use in various orthopedic subspecialties. Some issues remain at the forefront of the controversy involving stem cell research - legislation, ethics and public opinion, cost and concentration methods. As is true with any new technology, the enthusiasm for this technology that has potential to influence virtually every orthopedic case management, must be balanced by subjecting it to stringent clinical and basic research investigations.

  7. Evaluation of Patient Radiation Dose during Orthopedic Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, H; Elzaki, A.; Sam, A.K.; Sulieman, A.

    2013-01-01

    The number of orthopedic procedures requiring the use of the fluoroscopic guidance has increased over the recent years. Consequently the patient exposed to un avoidable radiation doses. The aim of the current study was to evaluate patient radiation dose during these procedures.37 patients under went dynamic hip screw (DHS) and dynamic cannulated screw (DCS) were evaluated using calibrated Thermolumincent Dosimeters (TLDs), under carm fluoroscopic machines ,in three centers in Khartoum-Sudan. The mean Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) was 7.9 m Gy per procedure. The bone marrow and gonad organ exposed to significant doses. No correlation was found between ESD and Body Mass Index (BMI), or patient weight. Well correlation was found between kilo voltage applied and ESD. Orthopedic surgeries delivered lower radiation dose to patients than cardiac catheterization or hysterosalpingraphy (HSG) procedures. More study should be implemented to follow radiation dose before surgery and after surgery

  8. Web-Based Patient Education in Orthopedics: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Tessa; Melles, Marijke; Groeneveld, Bob Sander; de Ridder, Huib

    2018-04-23

    Patients with orthopedic conditions frequently use the internet to find health information. Patient education that is distributed online may form an easily accessible, time- and cost-effective alternative to education delivered through traditional channels such as one-on-one consultations or booklets. However, no systematic evidence for the comparative effectiveness of Web-based educational interventions exists. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effects of Web-based patient education interventions for adult orthopedic patients and to compare its effectiveness with generic health information websites and traditional forms of patient education. CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PUBMED, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched covering the period from 1995 to 2016. Peer-reviewed English and Dutch studies were included if they delivered patient education via the internet to the adult orthopedic population and assessed its effects in a controlled or observational trial. A total of 10 trials reported in 14 studies involving 4172 patients were identified. Nine trials provided evidence for increased patients' knowledge after Web-based patient education. Seven trials reported increased satisfaction and good evaluations of Web-based patient education. No compelling evidence exists for an effect of Web-based patient education on anxiety, health attitudes and behavior, or clinical outcomes. Web-based patient education may be offered as a time- and cost-effective alternative to current educational interventions when the objective is to improve patients' knowledge and satisfaction. However, these findings may not be representative for the whole orthopedic patient population as most trials included considerably younger, higher-educated, and internet-savvy participants only. ©Tessa Dekkers, Marijke Melles, Bob Sander Groeneveld, Huib de Ridder. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http

  9. Medication Review and Patient Outcomes in an Orthopedic Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Marianne; Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Brock, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the health-related effect of systematic medication review performed by a clinical pharmacist and a clinical pharmacologist on nonelective elderly orthopedic patients. METHODS: This is a nonblinded randomized controlled study of 108 patients 65 years or older treated...... with at least 4 drugs. For the intervention, the clinical pharmacist reviewed the participants' medication after completion of the usual medication routine. Information was collected from medical charts, interviews with participants, and database registrations of drug purchase. Results were conferred...

  10. Applications of finite element simulation in orthopedic and trauma surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Cegoñino, José; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Puértolas, Sergio; López, Enrique; Mateo, Jesús; Gracia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Research in different areas of orthopedic and trauma surgery requires a methodology that allows both a more economic approach and the ability to reproduce different situations in an easy way. Simulation models have been introduced recently in bioengineering and could become an essential tool in the study of any physiological unity, regardless of its complexity. The main problem in modeling with finite elements simulation is to achieve an accurate reproduction of the anatomy and a perfect corr...

  11. Occupational exposure in orthopedic procedures under fluoroscopic control

    OpenAIRE

    Edyta Owsiak; Renata Kopeć; Maciej Budzanowski; Maria A. Staniszewska

    2017-01-01

    Background: In interventional radiology the highest radiation doses are usually recorded for both the medical staff and the patients. Interventional procedures with X-rays are implemented in a number of medical specializations. This paper concerns the exposure of interventional teams performing orthopedic procedures under X-rays control. Material and Methods: Doses for interventional teams were measured in the 3 Łódź hospitals. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were applied to measure the followin...

  12. Online reviews of orthopedic surgeons: an emerging trend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Chelsea; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-04-01

    Various websites are dedicated to rating physicians. The goals of this study were to: (1) evaluate the prevalence of orthopedic surgeon ratings on physician rating websites in the United States and (2) evaluate factors that may affect ratings, such as sex, practice sector (academic or private), years of practice, and geographic location. A total of 557 orthopedic surgeons selected from the 30 most populated US cities were enrolled. The study period was June 1 to July 31, 2013. Practice type (academic vs private), sex, geographic location, and years since completion of training were evaluated. For each orthopedic surgeon, numeric ratings from 7 physician rating websites were collected. The ratings were standardized on a scale of 0 to 100. Written reviews were also collected and categorized as positive or negative. Of the 557 orthopedic surgeons, 525 (94.3%) were rated at least once on 1 of the physician rating websites. The average rating was 71.4. The study included 39 female physicians (7.4%) and 486 male physicians (92.6%). There were 204 (38.9%) physicians in academic practice and 321 (61.1%) in private practice. The greatest number of physicians, 281 (50.4%), practiced in the South and Southeast, whereas 276 (49.6%) practiced in the West, Midwest, and Northeast. Those in academic practice had significantly higher ratings (74.4 vs 71.1; P<.007). No significant difference based on sex (72.5 male physicians vs 70.2 female physicians; P=.17) or geographic location (P=.11) were noted. Most comments (64.6%) were positive or extremely positive. Physicians who were in practice for 6 to 10 years had significantly higher ratings (76.9, P<.01) than those in practice for 0 to 5 years (70.5) or for 21 or more years (70.7). Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Re-examine tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses of BOLD fMRI. Implications in presurgical brain mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liya; Ali, Shazia; Fa, Tianning; Mao, Hui; Dandan, Chen; Olson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Background: Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI is used for presurgical functional mapping of brain tumor patients. Abnormal tumor blood supply may affect hemodynamic responses and BOLD fMRI signals. Purpose: To perform a multivariate and quantitative investigation of the effect of brain tumors on the hemodynamic responses and its impact on BOLD MRI signal time course, data analysis in order to better understand tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses, and accurately mapping cortical regions in brain tumor patients. Material and Methods: BOLD fMRI data from 42 glioma patients who underwent presurgical mapping of the primary motor cortex (PMC) with a block designed finger tapping paradigm were analyzed, retrospectively. Cases were divided into high grade (n = 24) and low grade (n = 18) groups based on pathology. The tumor volume and distance to the activated PMCs were measured. BOLD signal time courses from selected regions of interest (ROIs) in the PMCs of tumor affected and contralateral unaffected hemispheres were obtained from each patient. Tumor-induced changes of BOLD signal intensity and time to peak (TTP) of BOLD signal time courses were analyzed statistically. Results: The BOLD signal intensity and TTP in the tumor-affected PMCs are altered when compared to that of the unaffected hemisphere. The average BOLD signal level is statistically significant lower in the affected PMCs. The average TTP in the affected PMCs is shorter in the high grade group, but longer in the low grade tumor group compared to the contralateral unaffected hemisphere. Degrees of alterations in BOLD signal time courses are related to both the distance to activated foci and tumor volume with the stronger effect in tumor distance to activated PMC. Conclusion: Alterations in BOLD signal time courses are strongly related to the tumor grade, the tumor volume, and the distance to the activated foci. Such alterations may impair accurate mapping of tumor-affected functional

  14. All-in-one interictal presurgical imaging in patients with epilepsy: single-session EEG/PET/(f)MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grouiller, Frederic; Delattre, Benedicte M.A.; Lazeyras, Francois; Ratib, Osman; Vargas, Maria I.; Garibotto, Valentina; Pittau, Francesca; Spinelli, Laurent; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliemoz, Serge; Heinzer, Susanne; Iannotti, Giannina R.

    2015-01-01

    In patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, resection of the epileptic focus can lead to freedom from seizures or significant improvement in well-selected candidates. Localization of the epileptic focus with multimodal concordance is crucial for a good postoperative outcome. Beyond the detection of epileptogenic lesions on structural MRI and focal hypometabolism on FDG PET, EEG-based Electric Source Imaging (ESI) and simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) are increasingly applied for mapping epileptic activity. We here report presurgical multimodal interictal imaging using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for single-session FDG PET, MRI, EEG-fMRI and ESI. This quadrimodal imaging procedure was performed in a single session in 12 patients using a high-density (256 electrodes) MR-compatible EEG system and a hybrid PET/MR scanner. EEG was used to exclude subclinical seizures during uptake of the PET tracer, to compute ESI on interictal epileptiform discharges and to guide fMRI analysis for mapping haemodynamic changes correlated with interictal epileptiform activity. The whole multimodal recording was performed in less than 2 hours with good patient comfort and data quality. Clinically contributory examinations with at least two modalities were obtained in nine patients and with all modalities in five patients. This single-session quadrimodal imaging procedure provided reliable and contributory interictal clinical data. This procedure avoids multiple scanning sessions and is associated with less radiation exposure than PET-CT. Moreover, it guarantees the same medication level and medical condition for all modalities. The procedure improves workflow and could reduce the duration and cost of presurgical epilepsy evaluations. (orig.)

  15. All-in-one interictal presurgical imaging in patients with epilepsy: single-session EEG/PET/(f)MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grouiller, Frédéric; Delattre, Bénédicte M A; Pittau, Francesca; Heinzer, Susanne; Lazeyras, François; Spinelli, Laurent; Iannotti, Giannina R; Seeck, Margitta; Ratib, Osman; Vargas, Maria I; Garibotto, Valentina; Vulliemoz, Serge

    2015-06-01

    In patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, resection of the epileptic focus can lead to freedom from seizures or significant improvement in well-selected candidates. Localization of the epileptic focus with multimodal concordance is crucial for a good postoperative outcome. Beyond the detection of epileptogenic lesions on structural MRI and focal hypometabolism on FDG PET, EEG-based Electric Source Imaging (ESI) and simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) are increasingly applied for mapping epileptic activity. We here report presurgical multimodal interictal imaging using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for single-session FDG PET, MRI, EEG-fMRI and ESI. This quadrimodal imaging procedure was performed in a single session in 12 patients using a high-density (256 electrodes) MR-compatible EEG system and a hybrid PET/MR scanner. EEG was used to exclude subclinical seizures during uptake of the PET tracer, to compute ESI on interictal epileptiform discharges and to guide fMRI analysis for mapping haemodynamic changes correlated with interictal epileptiform activity. The whole multimodal recording was performed in less than 2 hours with good patient comfort and data quality. Clinically contributory examinations with at least two modalities were obtained in nine patients and with all modalities in five patients. This single-session quadrimodal imaging procedure provided reliable and contributory interictal clinical data. This procedure avoids multiple scanning sessions and is associated with less radiation exposure than PET-CT. Moreover, it guarantees the same medication level and medical condition for all modalities. The procedure improves workflow and could reduce the duration and cost of presurgical epilepsy evaluations.

  16. All-in-one interictal presurgical imaging in patients with epilepsy: single-session EEG/PET/(f)MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grouiller, Frederic; Delattre, Benedicte M.A.; Lazeyras, Francois; Ratib, Osman; Vargas, Maria I.; Garibotto, Valentina [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Pittau, Francesca; Spinelli, Laurent; Seeck, Margitta; Vulliemoz, Serge [Geneva University Hospital, EEG and Epilepsy Unit, Department of Neurology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Heinzer, Susanne [Philips AG Healthcare, Zuerich (Switzerland); Iannotti, Giannina R. [Geneva University Hospital, Functional Brain Mapping Laboratory, Department of Fundamental Neurosciences, Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2015-04-17

    In patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, resection of the epileptic focus can lead to freedom from seizures or significant improvement in well-selected candidates. Localization of the epileptic focus with multimodal concordance is crucial for a good postoperative outcome. Beyond the detection of epileptogenic lesions on structural MRI and focal hypometabolism on FDG PET, EEG-based Electric Source Imaging (ESI) and simultaneous EEG and functional MRI (EEG-fMRI) are increasingly applied for mapping epileptic activity. We here report presurgical multimodal interictal imaging using a hybrid PET/MR scanner for single-session FDG PET, MRI, EEG-fMRI and ESI. This quadrimodal imaging procedure was performed in a single session in 12 patients using a high-density (256 electrodes) MR-compatible EEG system and a hybrid PET/MR scanner. EEG was used to exclude subclinical seizures during uptake of the PET tracer, to compute ESI on interictal epileptiform discharges and to guide fMRI analysis for mapping haemodynamic changes correlated with interictal epileptiform activity. The whole multimodal recording was performed in less than 2 hours with good patient comfort and data quality. Clinically contributory examinations with at least two modalities were obtained in nine patients and with all modalities in five patients. This single-session quadrimodal imaging procedure provided reliable and contributory interictal clinical data. This procedure avoids multiple scanning sessions and is associated with less radiation exposure than PET-CT. Moreover, it guarantees the same medication level and medical condition for all modalities. The procedure improves workflow and could reduce the duration and cost of presurgical epilepsy evaluations. (orig.)

  17. Mobile apps for orthopedic surgeons: how useful are they?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franko OI

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Orrin I Franko,1 John P Andrawis,2 Dayne T Mickelson31Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of California, San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, CA, USA; 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Harbor-University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance, CA, USA; 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Smartphone apps have become an integral part of medical training and practice in the hospital and clinical setting. However, to ensure the safety of patient care, it remains imperative that physicians and physician-educators alike continue to monitor and recognize the strengths and limitations of these powerful tools. Orthopaedic surgeons have widely adopted the use of smartphones and tablets and consequently, a number of resources have emerged to assist orthopaedic trainees and providers in discovering and assessing the most appropriate apps for their practice. The purpose of this review article is to advise readers on how best to identify apps for orthopaedic surgeons, summarize the most popular and useful existing apps, present the current available data to support their use, and provide recommendations to the orthopaedic community regarding safe and responsible mobile technology use in clinical practice.Keywords: smartphone, tablet, mobile, apps

  18. Questionable Word Choice in Scientific Writing in Orthopedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey M. O`Connor

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Given the strong influence of thoughts, emotions, and behaviors on musculoskeletal symptoms andlimitations it’s important that both scientific and lay writing use the most positive, hopeful, and adaptive words andconcepts consistent with medical evidence. The use of words that might reinforce misconceptions about preferencesensitiveconditions (particularly those associated with age could increase symptoms and limitations and might alsodistract patients from the treatment preferences they would select when informed and at ease.Methods: We reviewed 100 consecutive papers published in 2014 and 2015 in 6 orthopedic surgery scientific journals.We counted the number and proportion of journal articles with questionable use of one or more of the following words:tear, aggressive, required, and fail. For each word, we counted the rate of misuse per journal and the number of specificterms misused per article per journalResults: Eighty percent of all orthopedic scientific articles reviewed had questionable use of at least one term. Tearwas most questionably used with respect to rotator cuff pathology. The words fail and require were the most commonquestionably used terms overall.Conclusion: The use of questionable words and concepts is common in scientific writing in orthopedic surgery. It’sworth considering whether traditional ways or referring to musculoskeletal illness merit rephrasing.

  19. Use of Google Scholar public profiles in orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsworth, Kevin; Fraser, Dave; Glatt, Vaida; Hohmann, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the growth of Google Scholar public profiles in orthopedics over a 12-month period and to investigate global patterns. Data was prospectively acquired from June 2013 to June 2014. Google Scholar queries specific to orthopedic surgery were performed at 90-day intervals. Demographic aspects of each user were also compiled, including gender, current location, and primary interests. To determine differences between the growth of Google Scholar public profile registrations and citation counts, as well as differences in growth in different regions, repeated measures of analysis of variance (RMANOVA) were used. RMANOVA revealed statistically significant differences ( p = 0.0001) for regional growth. The largest growth was observed in the United Kingdom ( p = 0.009, 289%), followed by the Asia-Pacific region ( p = 0.004, 177%) and "Other" ( p = 0.006, 172%). The mean growth per 90-day interval is 19.9% ( p = 0.003) and the mean 12-month growth is 107% ( p = 0.05). Statistically significant differences between gender (male vs. female) and basic and clinical sciences ( χ 2 = 22.4, p = 0.0001) were observed. This study suggests an exponential growth in the number of authors in the field of orthopedic surgery creating a Google Scholar public profile, and at the current rate participation doubles every 10.6 months.

  20. ONTOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK FOR KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Zdravković

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency and effectiveness of orthopedic surgery can be achieved by enabling proper decision-making in a shortest period of time, based on complete and updated information on the status, type of fracture and fixators used for a particular fracture. In this way, the risk of possible complications caused by a late intervention can be reduced. In such circumstances, there exist critical needs for an effective and efficient knowledge management approach where different domain models are combined and formally interrelated, so that the decisions are based on the consistent and complete information. In this paper, ontologies are used to propose a framework for implementing such an approach in the domain of orthopedic surgery. The framework combines formal models of the generic products and supply chains for their manufacturing and delivery, anatomical elements, e.g. bones, types of their fractures and fixators – the medical products which are used in the fracture treatments. Then the possible uses of this framework for the purpose of knowledge management in orthopedic surgery are discussed in the context of the assumptions of development of Next Generation Enterprise Information Systems.

  1. Medical students' and interns' interest in orthopedic surgery: the gender factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Joshua E; Zisk-Rony, Rachel Y; Liebergall, Meir; Tandeter, Howard; Kaplan, Leon; Weiss, Yoram G; Weissman, Charles

    2014-01-01

    There is an extremely small proportion of female medical students choosing to specialize in orthopedic surgery. The aim of the study was to assess medical students' and interns' interests and perceptions of orthopedic surgery and explore why women are not interested in orthopedic surgery. Questionnaires were distributed to final-year medical students and interns assessing their interests and perception of orthopedic surgery. Final-year medical students and interns. Responses were obtained from 317 students and 199 interns. Among the medical students, 15% were interested in orthopedic surgery, but only 2% were women. Both male and female students perceived orthopedics as an "action"-packed, procedure-based profession, providing instant gratification, time in the operating room, high income, and the option for private practice. Female medical students considered it boring. Among interns, 11% were interested in orthopedic surgery; however, only 2% were women. When compared with the interns who were not interested in orthopedic surgery, a greater number of the interns interested in orthopedic surgery rated time with family and a procedure-intensive profession as important. Female students and interns were also interested in other surgical fields. The increasing majority of women among medical students will reshape the future of physician workforce by dictating changes in workforce participation, working conditions, and intercollegial relationships. Orthopedic surgery will need to adapt to these realities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Value and clinical application of orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm in CT scans after orthopedic metal implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yi; Pan, Shinong; Zhao, Xudong; Guo, Wenli; He, Ming; Guo, Qiyong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm (O-MAR) in CT orthopedic metal artifact reduction at different tube voltages, identify an appropriate low tube voltage for clinical practice, and investigate its clinical application. The institutional ethical committee approved all the animal procedures. A stainless-steel plate and four screws were implanted into the femurs of three Japanese white rabbits. Preoperative CT was performed at 120 kVp without O-MAR reconstruction, and postoperative CT was performed at 80–140 kVp with O-MAR. Muscular CT attenuation, artifact index (AI) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were compared between preoperative and postoperative images (unpaired t test), between paired O-MAR and non-O-MAR images (paired Student t test) and among different kVp settings (repeated measures ANOVA). Artifacts' severity, muscular homogeneity, visibility of inter-muscular space and definition of bony structures were subjectively evaluated and compared (Wilcoxon rank-sum test). In the clinical study, 20 patients undertook CT scan at low kVp with O-MAR with informed consent. The diagnostic satisfaction of clinical images was subjectively assessed. Animal experiments showed that the use of O-MAR resulted in accurate CT attenuation, lower AI, better SNR, and higher subjective scores (p < 0.010) at all tube voltages. O-MAR images at 100 kVp had almost the same AI and SNR as non-O-MAR images at 140 kVp. All O-MAR images were scored ≥ 3. In addition, 95% of clinical CT images performed at 100 kVp were considered satisfactory. O-MAR can effectively reduce orthopedic metal artifacts at different tube voltages, and facilitates low-tube-voltage CT for patients with orthopedic metal implants

  3. Value and clinical application of orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm in CT scans after orthopedic metal implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yi; Pan, Shinong; Zhao, Xudong; Guo, Wenli; He, Ming; Guo, Qiyong [Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate orthopedic metal artifact reduction algorithm (O-MAR) in CT orthopedic metal artifact reduction at different tube voltages, identify an appropriate low tube voltage for clinical practice, and investigate its clinical application. The institutional ethical committee approved all the animal procedures. A stainless-steel plate and four screws were implanted into the femurs of three Japanese white rabbits. Preoperative CT was performed at 120 kVp without O-MAR reconstruction, and postoperative CT was performed at 80–140 kVp with O-MAR. Muscular CT attenuation, artifact index (AI) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were compared between preoperative and postoperative images (unpaired t test), between paired O-MAR and non-O-MAR images (paired Student t test) and among different kVp settings (repeated measures ANOVA). Artifacts' severity, muscular homogeneity, visibility of inter-muscular space and definition of bony structures were subjectively evaluated and compared (Wilcoxon rank-sum test). In the clinical study, 20 patients undertook CT scan at low kVp with O-MAR with informed consent. The diagnostic satisfaction of clinical images was subjectively assessed. Animal experiments showed that the use of O-MAR resulted in accurate CT attenuation, lower AI, better SNR, and higher subjective scores (p < 0.010) at all tube voltages. O-MAR images at 100 kVp had almost the same AI and SNR as non-O-MAR images at 140 kVp. All O-MAR images were scored ≥ 3. In addition, 95% of clinical CT images performed at 100 kVp were considered satisfactory. O-MAR can effectively reduce orthopedic metal artifacts at different tube voltages, and facilitates low-tube-voltage CT for patients with orthopedic metal implants.

  4. Trends in the orthopedic job market and the importance of fellowship subspecialty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Nathan T; Mercer, Deana M; Moneim, Moheb S

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have examined possible incentives for pursuing orthopedic fellowship training, but we are unaware of previously published studies reporting the trends in the orthopedic job market since the acceptance of certain criteria for fellowship programs by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in 1985. We hypothesized that, since the initiation of accredited postresidency fellowship programs, job opportunities for fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have increased and job opportunities for nonfellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons have decreased. We reviewed the job advertisements printed in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, for the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009. We categorized the job opportunities as available for either a general (nonfellowship-trained) orthopedic surgeon or a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon. Based on the advertisements posted in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, American Volume, a trend exists in the orthopedic job market toward seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons. In the years 1984, 1994, 2004, and 2009, the percentage of job opportunities seeking fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons was 16.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.1%-20.3%), 40.6% (95% CI, 38.1%-43.1%), 52.2% (95% CI, 48.5%-55.9%), and 68.2% (95% CI, 65.0%-71.4%), respectively. These differences were statistically significant (analysis of variance, Ptraining is thus a worthwhile endeavor. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. How do Orthopedic Surgeons Address Psychological Aspects of Illness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Vranceanu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthopaedic surgeons have a pivotal role in transitioning the care of orthopedic patients from a biomedical to a biopsychosocial model. In an effort to foster this transition, we designed a study aimed to determine surgeons’ attitudes and practice of noticing, screening, discussing psychological illness with patients, as well as making referrals to address psychosocial issues in patients in need. Additionally, we asked surgeons to rank order potential barriers to and reasons for referrals to psychosocial treatment.   Methods: Orthopaedic surgeons members of the Science and Variation Group and Ankle Platform (N =350 completed demographics, and a 4-part survey assessing the degree to which surgeons notice, assess, screen and refer for psychological treatments, as well ranked ordered barriers to engaging in these processes. Results: As a group surgeons were neutral to referral for psychological treatment and formal screening of psychological factors, and somewhat likely to notice and discuss psychological factors. Surgeons were more likely to refer for psychological treatment if they engaged in research, or if they reside in South America as opposed to North America. The highest ranked barriers to screening, noticing, discussing and referring for psychological treatment were lack of time, stigma and feeling uncomfortable. Conclusion: Overall surgeons are likely to notice and discuss psychological factors, but less likely to formally screen or refer for psychological treatment. Transition to biopsychosocial models should focus on problem solving these barriers by teaching surgeons communication skills to increase comfort with discussing psychoemotional factors associated with orthopedic problems. The use of empathic communication can be very helpful in normalizing the difficulty of coping with an orthopedic condition, and may facilitate referral.

  6. The organizational and financial viability of an orthopedic trauma service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mitchel B; Cayen, Barry

    2009-12-01

    This study was designed to explore the effect of establishing an Orthopedic Trauma Service (OTS) on departmental revenue within an academic orthopedic department. The effect of the OTS on physician and resident perceptions of job satisfaction, education, and quality of patient care were also evaluated. A proforma financial analysis was undertaken using an optimization model to predict the potential financial performance of an OTS before its implementation. Financial data were then collected prospectively for the first year of the OTS and compared with the preceding year's financial data. All residents and faculty in the department completed visual analog scale surveys after the formation of the service. While maintaining a fixed amount of work production (work relative value units [WRVUs]) per year, our model predicted an $111,000 increase in departmental charges as a result of a shift in the elective case mix. After implementation of the OTS, elective charges/WRVU increased by 7.4% while trauma charges/WRVU increased by 2.6%. This, combined with a minor increase in departmental work volume (115,661 WRVUs pre-OTS vs. 117,577 WRVUs post-OTS) and an improvement in collections/charge (47-48%), yielded a departmental collection increase of 11% ($1.1 million). Resident and faculty job satisfaction improved, as did the perception of the quality of trauma care that was being provided. The organization and implementation of an OTS within an academic orthopedic department can lead to an improved professional experience for residents and faculty, the perception of improved patient care for the trauma patient, and an increase in departmental revenue.

  7. E-learning in orthopedic surgery training: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpada, Sandip P; Morris, Matthew T; Burton, Denver A

    2016-12-01

    E-learning is the use of internet-based resources in education. In the field of surgical education, this definition includes the use of virtual patient cases, digital modeling, online tutorials, as well as video recordings of surgical procedures and lectures. In recent years, e-learning has increasingly been considered a viable alternative to traditional teaching within a number of surgical fields. Here we present (1) a systematic review of literature assessing the efficacy of e-learning modules for orthopedic education and (2) a discussion of their relevance. A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library was conducted according to the guidelines defined in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement (PRISMA). The search yielded a total of 255 non-duplicate citations that were screened using predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. A total of 9 full text articles met inclusion criteria, which included the use of an objective outcome measure to evaluate an orthopedic e-learning module. Six studies assessed knowledge using a multiple-choice test and 4 assessed skills using a clinical exam. All studies showed positive score improvement pre- to post-intervention, and a majority showed greater score improvement than standard teaching methods in both knowledge (4/6 studies) and clinical skills (3/4 studies). E-learning represents an effective supplement or even alternative to standard teaching techniques within orthopedic education for both medical students and residents. Future work should focus on validating specific e-learning programs using standardized outcome measures and assessing long-term knowledge retention using e-learning platforms.

  8. [Femoral artery pseudoaneurysms encountered in orthopedics and traumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raherinantenaina, F; Rajaonanahary, T M A; Rakoto Ratsimba, H N

    2015-12-01

    Most published articles regarding orthopedic- and trauma-related femoral artery pseudoaneurysms (FAPs) are case reports in English. Reported cases are often associated with a literature review but actually provide little robust data. We wanted to summarize the current knowledge on diagnostic and therapeutic features of these FAPs. A new case of superficial FAP is described followed by a review of the literature. A bibliographic search was performed online (PubMed, ScinceDirect) from 1964 to 2015 using the descriptors "traumatic femoral pseudoaneurysm, orthopedic surgery, osteochondroma". A total of 64 cases of FAPs was analyzed. There were 50 men with an average age of 40.72±26.45 years old. The most common clinical presentation was painful swelling (34%). Arteriography was the commonest radiological investigation used (63%). The main etiologies were orthopedic injuries (47%), surgery of the upper thigh (30%) and femoral osteochondromas (23%). Arterial injuries included superficial femoral (47%) and profunda femoris artery (50%). The treatment was open surgery (56%) or endovascular repair (36%). Deep femoral artery and its branches were embolized (47%) or ligated (38%). Endovascular stenting was performed in 30% of posttraumatic FAPs. All FAPs relating to osteochondromas were repaired surgically. Postoperative courses were uneventful in 95% of patients. Endovascular embolization is preferred in management of postsurgical FAPs which have usually involved the deep femoral artery. Endovascular stenting graft may be proposed for posttraumatic FAPs, for which the superficial femoral trunk is the most often involved vessel. Surgical repair should be performed when endovascular stenting graft is not feasible. Surgical repair is mandatory for all FAPs secondary to traumatic exostoses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Sham Surgery in Orthopedics: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Diener, Ina; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of sham surgery in orthopedics by conducting a systematic review of literature. Systematic searches were conducted on Biomed Central, BMJ.com, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, NLM Central Gateway, OVID, ProQuest (Digital Dissertations), PsycInfo, PubMed/Medline, ScienceDirect and Web of Science. Secondary searching (PEARLing) was undertaken, whereby reference lists of the selected articles were reviewed for additional references not identified in the primary search. All randomized controlled trials comparing surgery versus sham surgery in orthopedics were included. Data were extracted and methodological quality was assessed by two reviewers using the Critical Review Form-Quantitative Studies. Levels of scientific evidence, based on the direction of outcomes of the trials, were established following the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Hierarchy of Evidence (Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, 1999). This review includes six randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 277 subjects. All six studies were rated as very good on methodological quality. Heterogeneity across the studies, with respect to participants, interventions evaluated, and outcome measures used, prevented meta-analyses. Narrative synthesis of results, based on effect size, demonstrated that sham surgery in orthopedics was as effective as actual surgery in reducing pain and improving disability. This review suggests that sham surgery has shown to be just as effective as actual surgery in reducing pain and disability; however, care should be taken to generalize findings because of the limited number of studies. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Validity of subjective smoking status in orthopedic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bender D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Bender,* Patrick Haubruck,* Sonja Boxriker, Sebastian Korff, Gerhard Schmidmaier, Arash Moghaddam Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: In this level 1 diagnostic study, we analyzed the validity of subjective smoking status and, as secondary research question, the smoking cessation adherence in orthopedic patients during a routine hospital stay of nonunion patients by measuring serum cotinine.  Methods: We included patients undergoing revision surgery due to nonunion of long bones. Patients were interviewed about their smoking status. Blood samples were taken from all the patients prior to surgery and for an additional 6 weeks following surgery. Serum levels of cotinine were measured, and coherence between subjective smoking status and objective cotinine analysis was evaluated.  Results: Between March 2012 and August 2014, we enrolled 136 patients. Six of the 26 “previous smokers” (23% and four of the 65 “nonsmokers” (6% had serum cotinine above cutoff levels. In self-labeled smokers, serum cotinine levels averaged at 2,367.4±14,885.9 ng/mL (with a median of 100 ng/mL, whereas in previous smokers the levels averaged at 4,270±19,619.4 ng/mL (with a median of 0 ng/mL and in the nonsmokers group the levels averaged at 12±53.9 ng/mL (with a median of 0.03 ng/mL. Overall, the subjective smoking status matched serum cotinine testing in 88% of the cases. Sensitivity was 79.6% and specificity was 93.1%. Ninety-one percent of the patients with preoperative positive serum values were still positive at follow-up.  Conclusion: In this study, we could show that subjective smoking status in orthopedic patients is predominantly reliable as validated by objective cotinine measurements; however, patients who declare themselves as “previous smokers” are at elevated risk

  11. Surface evaluation of orthopedic hip implants marketed in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, M. M.; Trommer, R. M.; Maru, M. M.; Roesler, C. R. M.; Barros, W. S.; Dutra, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    One of the factors that contribute to the quality of total hip prostheses is the degree of accuracy in the manufacturing of the joint surfaces. The dimensional control of joint components is important because of its direct influence on the durability and, consequently, in the patients’ life quality. This work presents studies on the form and roughness of orthopedic hip prostheses marketed in Brazil. The results provide data for quality control of the surfaces of the femoral heads and acetabular components of hip prostheses and indicate the need of improvement in the procedures used to this control.

  12. Use of bisphosphonates in orthopedic surgery: pearls and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Calderon, Santiago A; Colman, Matthew W; Raskin, Kevin A; Hornicek, Francis J; Gebhardt, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Bisphosphonates are medications known to decrease bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclastic activity. They are the first-line therapy for the treatment of osteoporosis because a significant body of literature has proved their efficacy in reducing the risk of fracture in the hip, spine and other nonvertebral osseous sites. In addition, the use of bisphosphonates has significantly decreased morbidity and increased survival, and they have also proved to be cost-effective. Unexpected adverse effects have been reported recently, but the benefit of bisphosphonates use outweighs the risks. This article reviews the current use of bisphosphonates in orthopedic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIALS IN ORTHOPEDICS: DIFFICULTIES AND LIMITATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Imamura, Marta; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are considered to be the gold standard for evidence-based medicine nowadays, and are important for directing medical practice through consistent scientific observations. Steps such as patient selection, randomization and blinding are fundamental for conducting a RCT, but some additional difficulties are presented in trials that involve surgical procedures, as is common in orthopedics. The aim of this article was to highlight and discuss some difficulties and possible limitations on RCTs within the field of surgery. PMID:27027037

  14. The Early Years of Organized Chiropractic Orthopedics, 1954–1973: A Social History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Bart N.; Johnson, Claire D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This paper presents the origins and development of the organized chiropractic orthopedics movement in the United States from 1954–1973. Methods: Hand searches of early periodicals were performed and information was organized chronologically to create a timeline. Context for the timeline was provided by extracting pertinent information from audio recordings of interviews. Relevant background information was located using the cumulative index of the journal Chiropractic History and searching the MANTIS database. Historical Features: After World War I, The advent of third party reimbursement for health care created a new environment for health care practitioners. For doctors of chiropractic, this event provided the impetus to begin the postgraduate chiropractic orthopedics program over 50 years ago. In 1954, Alvin A. Hancock, DC and F. Maynard Lipe, DC successfully launched an active orthopedics movement after several earlier attempts failed during the 1940s and early 1950s. The movement generated from the desire to train and certify chiropractors to manage personal injury and workers’ compensation low back injuries. In addition to developing interdisciplinary educational programs, the chiropractic orthopedics group was responsible for producing a research agenda, some of the profession’s early orthopedic-focused research, and for starting the National Council on Chiropractic Orthopedics of the National Chiropractic Association, which later became the American Chiropractic Association Council on Orthopedics. These organizations produced thousands of specialists in chiropractic orthopedics, later known as Diplomates of the American Board of Chiropractic Orthopedists. Conclusion: Several orthopedics interest groups were formed and credentialing processes were created to qualify doctors as recognized chiropractic orthopedics specialists. The popularity of this movement resulted in the inclusion of orthopedics into core chiropractic college curricula and

  15. Nanotechnology: the scope and potential applications in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaskar, Ashok; Rojas, D; Videla, F

    2018-03-30

    Nanotechnology involves manipulation of matter measuring 1-100 nm in at least one of its dimensions at the molecular level. Engineering and manipulation of matter at the molecular level has several advantages in the field of medicine (nanomedicine) since most of the biological molecules exist and function at a nanoscale. Though promising, questions still remain on how much of this will ultimately translate into achieving better patient care. Concerns of cost-effectiveness and nanotechnology safety still remain unclear. Orthopedics is an attractive area for the application of nanotechnology since the bone, and its constituents such as hydroxyapatite, Haversian systems, and the collagen fibrils are nanocompounds. The major orthopedic applications of nanotechnology involve around (i) effective drug delivery systems for antibiotics and chemotherapeutic agents, (ii) surface preparation of implants and prosthesis to improve osteointegration and reduce biofilm formation, (iii) controlled drug eluting systems to combat implant-related infections, (iv) tissue engineering for scaffolds preparation to deal with bone and cartilage defects, and (v) diagnostic applications in the field of oncology and musculoskeletal infections.

  16. Robotic System Development for Cooperative Orthopedic Drilling Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayabaskar Kasi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a robotic bone drilling and screwing system for applications in orthopedic surgery. The goal is to realize two robot manipulators performing cooperative bone drilling. The proposed cooperative bone drilling system can be divided into hardware and software development. The hardware development section consists of two robot manipulator arms, which perform drilling and gripping of the bone, and operates using two joysticks. The software section assists the surgeon in visual and navigation control of those robot manipulators. Controller used in this system can be included in the hardware and software sections. Disturbance observer based position control was used in the robot manipulator maneuver and reposition controller (cooperative control was used in cooperative drilling operation to maintain the alignment of the drill bit during drilling. A mathematical model for the control system was designed and a real environment mimicking simulation for bone drilling was designed. The result of the simulation shows that the cooperative robot system managed to perform cooperative drilling when misalignment occurs during bone drilling. The bone gripping robot managed to restore the drill bit to its ideal alignment in every event of misalignment in the drilling axis. Therefore this cooperative system has potential application in experimental orthopedic surgery.

  17. Identification of Orthopedic Injuries Rehabilitation Needs in Bam Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Nejati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is identification of rehabilitation needs in orthopedic injuries of bam earthquake. Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study we examined 3000 Persons of the injured people of the Bam earthquake who were referred to the hospitals of the country. We selected some of hospitals randomly and evaluated history of all patients that had been injured by earthquake. Results: Data shows that the most injuries are because of fracture and dislocation (63.74%. then, the traumatic injuries of the peripheral and central nervous system have the most penetration. (11.15 % and 9.53% and the other cases including soft tissue injuries (3.17%, open wound (9.48%, arterial injuries (0.72% and amputee have the least of all (0.55%. Conclusion: The practical conclusion for critic management is that the most needed experts are orthopedic and rehabilitation experts (physiotherapists and technical orthopedists, the emergency rehabilitation clinic are required for prompt rehabilitation services too.

  18. Aggregate Interview Method of ranking orthopedic applicants predicts future performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Jacqueline; VanHeest, Ann; Tatman, Penny; Gioe, Terence

    2013-07-01

    This article evaluates and describes a process of ranking orthopedic applicants using what the authors term the Aggregate Interview Method. The authors hypothesized that higher-ranking applicants using this method at their institution would perform better than those ranked lower using multiple measures of resident performance. A retrospective review of 115 orthopedic residents was performed at the authors' institution. Residents were grouped into 3 categories by matching rank numbers: 1-5, 6-14, and 15 or higher. Each rank group was compared with resident performance as measured by faculty evaluations, the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE), and American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) test results. Residents ranked 1-5 scored significantly better on patient care, behavior, and overall competence by faculty evaluation (Porthopedic resident candidates who scored highly on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education resident core competencies as measured by faculty evaluations, performed above the national average on the OITE, and passed the ABOS part 1 examination at rates exceeding the national average. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Allergy to metals as a cause of orthopedic implant failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krecisz, Beata; Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Bakowicz-Mitura, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    A constantly growing social demand for orthopedic implants has been observed in Poland. It is estimated that about 5% of patients experience post-operation complications. It is suspected that in this group of patients an allergic reaction contributes to rejection of metal implants. The aim of our study was to assess contact allergy to metals in 14 people (9 women and 5 men) suffering from poor implant tolerance. In some of them, recurrent skin eruptions, generalized or nearby implants, have occurred and in 3 patients skin fistula was observed. These complaints appeared one year after operation. The patients underwent patch tests with allergens from the Chemotechnique Diagnostics (Malmö, Sweden), including nickel, chromium, cobalt, palladium, copper, aluminum. In addition, allergens, such as titanium, vanadium and molybdenum prepared by chemical laboratory in the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lódiź, Poland, were introduced. Of the 14 patients, 8 persons (5 women and 3 men) were sensitized to at least one metal, mostly to nickel (7/14) and chromium (6/14). Of the 8 sensitized patients, 3 were reoperated. Owing to the exchange of prosthesis the complaints subsided, including healing up skin fibulas. These facts weight in favor of the primeval sensitizing effect of metal prosthesis and the relation between allergy and clinical symptoms of poor tolerance to orthopedic implants.

  20. Developments in ambulatory surgery in orthopedics in France in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, C; Rochcongar, G; Court, C

    2017-02-01

    Under the new categorization introduced by the Health Authorities, ambulatory surgery (AS) in France now accounts for 50% of procedures, taking all surgical specialties together. The replacement of full hospital admission by AS is now well established and recognized. Health-care centers have learned, in coordination with the medico-surgical and paramedical teams, how to set up AS units and the corresponding clinical pathways. There is no single model handed down from above. The authorities have encouraged these developments, partly by regulations but also by means of financial incentives. Patient eligibility and psychosocial criteria are crucial determining factors for the success of the AS strategy. The surgeons involved are strongly committed. Feedback from many orthopedic subspecialties (shoulder, foot, knee, spine, hand, large joints, emergency and pediatric surgery) testify to the rise of AS, which now accounts for 41% of all orthopedic procedures. Questions remain, however, concerning the role of the GP in the continuity of care, the role of innovation and teaching, the creation of new jobs, and the attractiveness of AS for surgeons. More than ever, it is the patient who is "ambulatory", within an organized structure in which surgical technique and pain management are well controlled. Not all patients can be eligible, but the AS concept is becoming standard, and overnight stay will become a matter for medical and surgical prescription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of internet and social media usage in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Emily; Li, Xinning; Nguyen, Joseph; Matzkin, Elizabeth

    2014-08-08

    Prior studies in other specialties have shown that social networking and Internet usage has become an increasingly important means of patient communication and referral. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of Internet or social media usage in new patients referred to a major academic orthopedics center and to identify new avenues to optimize patient recruitment and communication. New patients were surveyed (n=752) between December 2012 to January 2013 in a major academic orthopaedic center to complete a 15-item questionnaire including social media and Internet usage information. Data was collected for all orthopaedic sub-specialties and statistical analysis was performed. Fifty percent of patients use social networking sites, such as Facebook. Sports medicine patients tend to be higher social networking users (35.9%) relative to other services (9.8-17.9%) and was statistically higher when compared to the joints/tumor service (Psocial media. Patients that travelled between 120 to 180 miles from the hospital for their visits were significantly more likely to be social media users, as were patients that did research on their condition prior to their new patient appointment. We conclude that orthopedic patients who use social media/Internet are more likely to be younger, researched their condition prior to their appointment and undergo a longer average day's travel (120-180 miles) to see a physician. In an increasingly competitive market, surgeons with younger patient populations will need to utilize social networking and the Internet to capture new patient referrals.

  2. Dynamic Patterns of Expertise: The Case of Orthopedic Medical Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaf, Dan; Amar, Eyal; Marwan, Norbert; Neuman, Yair; Salai, Moshe; Rath, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze dynamic patterns for scanning femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) radiographs in orthopedics, in order to better understand the nature of expertise in radiography. Seven orthopedics residents with at least two years of expertise and seven board-certified orthopedists participated in the study. The participants were asked to diagnose 15 anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiographs of 15 surgical patients, diagnosed with FAI syndrome. Eye tracking data were recorded using the SMI desk-mounted tracker and were analyzed using advanced measures and methodologies, mainly recurrence quantification analysis. The expert orthopedists presented a less predictable pattern of scanning the radiographs although there was no difference between experts and non-experts in the deterministic nature of their scan path. In addition, the experts presented a higher percentage of correct areas of focus and more quickly made their first comparison between symmetric regions of the pelvis. We contribute to the understanding of experts' process of diagnosis by showing that experts are qualitatively different from residents in their scanning patterns. The dynamic pattern of scanning that characterizes the experts was found to have a more complex and less predictable signature, meaning that experts' scanning is simultaneously both structured (i.e. deterministic) and unpredictable.

  3. Source reconstruction based on subdural EEG recordings adds to the presurgical evaluation in refractory frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramantani, Georgia; Cosandier-Rimélé, Delphine; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Maillard, Louis; Zentner, Josef; Dümpelmann, Matthias

    2013-03-01

    In presurgical investigations of refractory frontal lobe epilepsy, subdural EEG recordings offer extensive cortical coverage, but may overlook deep sources. Electrical Source Localization (ESL) from subdural recordings could overcome this sampling limitation. This study aims to assess the clinical relevance of this new method in refractory frontal lobe epilepsy associated with focal cortical dysplasia. In 14 consecutive patients, we retrospectively compared: (i) the ESL of interictal spikes to the conventional irritative and seizure onset zones; (ii) the surgical outcome of cases with congruent ESL and resection volume to cases with incongruent ESL and resection volume. Each spike type was averaged to serve as a template for ESL by the MUSIC and sLORETA algorithms. Results were superimposed on the corresponding pre and post-surgical MRI. Both ESL methods were congruent and consistent with conventional electroclinical analysis in all patients. In 7 cases, ESL identified a common deep source for spikes of different 2D localizations. The inclusion of ESL in the resection volume correlated with seizure freedom. ESL from subdural recordings provided clinically relevant results in patients with refractory frontal lobe epilepsy. ESL complements the conventional analysis of subdural recordings. Its potential in improving tailored resections and surgical outcomes should be prospectively assessed. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Pre-surgical Vitamin D Supplementation and Ketogenic Diet in a Patient with Recurrent Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branca, Jacopo J V; Pacini, Stefania; Ruggiero, Marco

    2015-10-01

    A woman, mother of one at the age of 19 years, was diagnosed with mammary adenocarcinoma in the right breast in 1985 at the age of 37 years. The patient underwent surgery (quadrantectomy), lymphadenectomy and radiotherapy. In 1999, an adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in the left breast, followed by adequate resection, radiotherapy and anti-oestrogen receptor treatment for 6 years. In March 2014, an infiltrating adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in the remaining part of the right breast that had been operated on and irradiated in 1985. The pre-surgical biopsy, showed weak positivity for progesterone receptor (PgR) (10%, score 2+), and high positivity for the nuclear protein Ki67 (30%). In the three weeks between diagnosis and operation, when no other treatment had been planned, the patient decided to self-administer high doses of oral vitamin D3 (10,000 IU/day), and to follow a strict ketogenic diet. Following right mastectomy, analysis of the surgical specimen showed no positivity for HER2 expression (negative, score 0), and significant increase in positivity of PgR (20%). Positivity for ER and Ki67 were unaltered. This observation indicates that a combination of high-dose vitamin D3 and ketogenic diet leads to changes in some biological markers of breast cancer, i.e. negativization of HER2 expression and increased expression of PgR. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. RapidNAM: generative manufacturing approach of nasoalveolar molding devices for presurgical cleft lip and palate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Franz Xaver; Schönberger, Markus; Gattinger, Johannes; Eblenkamp, Markus; Wintermantel, Erich; Rau, Andrea; Güll, Florian Dieter; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Loeffelbein, Denys J

    2017-08-28

    Nasoalveolar molding (NAM) is an accepted treatment strategy in presurgical cleft therapy. The major drawbacks of the treatment listed in the literature relate to the time of the treatment and the coordination of the required interdisciplinary team of therapists, parents, and patients. To overcome these limitations, we present the automated RapidNAM concept that facilitates the design and manufacturing process of NAM devices, and that allows the virtual modification and subsequent manufacture of the devices in advance, with a growth prediction factor adapted to the patient's natural growth. The RapidNAM concept involves (i) the prediction of three trajectories that envelope the fragmented alveolar segments with the goal to mimic a harmonic arch, (ii) the extrusion from the larger toward the smaller alveolar segment along the envelope curves toward the harmonic upper alveolar arch, and (iii) the generation of the NAM device with a ventilation hole, fixation pin, and fixation points for the nasal stents. A feasibility study for a vector-based approach was successfully conducted for unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients. A comparison of the modified target models with the reference target models showed similar results. For further improvement, the number of landmarks used to modify the models was increased by a curve-based approach.

  6. The Orthopedically Disabled Child: Psychological Implications with an Individual Basis. July 1984 Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This study describes the implications of the Individual Psychology of Alfred Adler and field theory associated with Kurt Lewin in understanding orthopedically disabled children and points out that orthopedically disabled youngsters have a remarkable range of individual differences both in type of disability as well as level of adjustment.…

  7. Orthopedic Surgery Resident Debt Load and Its Effect on Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joey P; Cassidy, Dale B; Tofte, Josef N; Bariteau, Jason T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    Student loan debt has become a topic of discussion and debate among physicians and legislators. This study seeks to assess the level of debt of orthopedic surgery residents and to determine whether debt burden affects the career choice of orthopedic trainees. A 26-question, anonymous survey was distributed via email to resident trainees enrolled in different medical and surgical specialty training programs across the United States. Orthopedic trainees were compared with trainees in other specialties using comparative statistics. Of the approximately 13,503 residents who were sent the survey, a total of 3076 responded, including 167 of an estimated 580 orthopedic residents, for approximate response rates of 22.8% and 28.8%, respectively. On average, orthopedic surgery residents were at a later post-graduate year than overall respondents (Porthopedic surgery residents (57.21% vs 49.08%, respectively; P=.041). More than 50% of all respondents agreed that student loan debt would affect their type or location of practice. The majority of orthopedic residents take student loan debt into consideration when determining their final location and type of practice, although less so for orthopedic trainees compared with other specialties. As medical education continues to become more expensive and the threat of dropping physician reimbursement looms on the horizon, student debt may become a primary driving factor for young American physicians' career plans. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e438-e443.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Orthopedic Specialist, Classroom Course 10-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX. Health Care Research Div.

    These military-developed curriculum materials for a course for orthopedic specialists are targeted for students from grades 11 through the adult level. The course is designed to provide a working knowledge of the application of casts, traction, and splints to orthopedic patients and the removal of these devices; a working knowledge of assisting in…

  9. [The motivation of patients to visit private stomatology institutions for the orthopedic stomatological care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustov, I N

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with the results of sociological survey of patients concerning the motivation of their appealability to private stomatology institutions for the orthopedic stomatological care. The survey data includes the information needed for planning functioning and management of orthopedic stomatological service.

  10. PAs in orthopedics in the VHA's community-based outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Daniel O; Hooker, Roderick S

    2017-04-01

    In the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system, most orthopedic care takes place in the VA medical centers (VAMCs). Because most patients receiving orthopedic care were referred by adult medicine providers, more widely deploying physician assistants (PAs) in orthopedic medicine might help offset this workload. An orthopedic medicine demonstration project recruited, trained, and positioned PAs in community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs) to improve access to care. The project involved surgeons at the Houston VAMC instructing five newly employed PAs in a wide range of orthopedic evaluation and management strategies before their assignment to a CBOC. An administrative assessment compared encounter data pre- and postproject (2012 and 2014) to determine if this strategy modified orthopedic workload and improved patient access to care. By 2014, orthopedic patient visit volume had increased 31%-10% at the VAMC and 21% at the five CBOCs. Overall, the five deployed PAs managed 28% of all orthopedic encounters spread over 1 year and only 3.2% of visits required VAMC referral for further evaluation or treatment. During the project, the total volume of patient visits increased throughout the Houston VAMC region but access to care for this specialty service also increased, with more veteran musculoskeletal care being met at the five CBOCs, off-loading visit demand centrally. The adaptability and flexibility of new roles has been identified as one of the defining characteristics of PAs. That the VHA can take advantage of this role malleability suggests that employing PAs is useful in meeting medical service needs of veterans.

  11. Low back pain as seen in orthopedic clinics of a Nigerian Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: We aimed to determine the etiology and pattern of presentation of low back pain among patients seen in our orthopedic outpatient clinics. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective review of database of all new patients with low back pain seen at the orthopedics clinics of Federal Teaching Hospital, ...

  12. Factors affecting interest in orthopedics among female medical students: a prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Keith; Namdari, Surena; Bowers, Andrea; Keenan, Mary Ann; Levin, L Scott; Ahn, Jaimo

    2011-12-06

    The field of orthopedics has a limited ability to recruit high-quality female applicants. The purpose of this study was to determine whether early exposure to the field affects a woman's decision to pursue orthopedics. We performed a prospective, nonrandomized cohort study between academic years 2005 and 2009 and compared interest in orthopedic surgery among female (n=271) and male (n=71) medical students at 2 urban teaching institutions. Elective lectures and orthopedic literature were distributed via e-mail to the study participants. These materials included articles published in the medical literature, materials produced and distributed by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, and Web sites providing educational materials. The primary outcome was the likelihood of application for orthopedic residency. We studied the influence of demographics, exposure, and attitudes on interest in pursuing an orthopedic career. Men had a significantly higher baseline level of interest in orthopedic surgery than women (P=.005). Younger age (Porthopedics were significantly related to interest among women. At final follow-up, total personal exposures (P=.003) and total independent exposures (Porthopedic educational resources may be useful in generating female interest. Perceptions and attitudes regarding orthopedic surgery must to be changed to attract the best and brightest minds, regardless of sex. Copyright © 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Ethical implications of regenerative medicine in orthopedics : an empirical study with surgeons and scientists in the field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemansburg, Sophie L; van Delden, Johannes J M; Oner, F Cumhur; Dhert, Wouter J A; Bredenoord, Annelien L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Regenerative medicine (RM) interventions, such as (stem) cell transplantation, scaffolds, gene transfer, and tissue engineering, are likely to change the field of orthopedics considerably. These strategies will significantly differ from treatments in current orthopedic practice,

  14. Revised version of quality guidelines for presurgical epilepsy evaluation and surgical epilepsy therapy issued by the Austrian, German, and Swiss working group on presurgical epilepsy diagnosis and operative epilepsy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, Felix; Bast, Thomas; Czech, Thomas; Feucht, Martha; Hans, Volkmar H; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Noachtar, Soheyl; Oltmanns, Frank; Polster, Tilman; Seeck, Margitta; Trinka, Eugen; Wagner, Kathrin; Strzelczyk, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The definition of minimal standards remains pivotal as a basis for a high standard of care and as a basis for staff allocation or reimbursement. Only limited publications are available regarding the required staffing or methodologic expertise in epilepsy centers. The executive board of the working group (WG) on presurgical epilepsy diagnosis and operative epilepsy treatment published the first guidelines in 2000 for Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. In 2014, revised guidelines were published and the WG decided to publish an unaltered English translation in this report. Because epilepsy surgery is an elective procedure, quality standards are particularly high. As detailed in the first edition of these guidelines, quality control relates to seven different domains: (1) establishing centers with a sufficient number of sufficiently and specifically trained personnel, (2) minimum technical standards and equipment, (3) continuous medical education of employees, (4) surveillance by trained personnel during video electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring (VEM), (5) systematic acquisition of clinical and outcome data, (6) the minimum number of preoperative evaluations and epilepsy surgery procedures, and (7) the cooperation of epilepsy centers. These standards required the certification of the different professions involved and minimum numbers of procedures. In the subsequent decade, quite a number of colleagues were certified by the trinational WG; therefore, the executive board of the WG decided in 2013 to make these standards obligatory. This revised version is particularly relevant given that the German procedure classification explicitly refers to the guidelines of the WG with regard to noninvasive/invasive preoperative video-EEG monitoring and invasive intraoperative diagnostics in epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Rising incidence of Enterococcus species in microbiological specimens from orthopedic patients correlates to increased use of cefuroxime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siesing, Peter Christian; Alva-Jørgensen, Jens Peter; Brodersen, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Enterococci are emerging causes of severe infections, including wound and bone infections in orthopedic patients. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a correlation between the incidence of enterococci in tissue samples (biopsies) from orthopedic patients...... and consumption of cefuroxime in the orthopedic department....

  16. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Alzimami, K.; Habeeballa, B.; Osman, H.; Abdelaziz, I.; Sassi, S.A.; Sam, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    This study intends to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) and (ii) Dynamic Cannula Screw (DCS) and to evaluate entrance surface Air kerma (ESAK) dose and organ doses and effective doses. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used. The mean patients’ doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 mGy for DHS and DCS procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean organ and effective dose for patients and staff were higher in DHS compared to DCS. Orthopedic surgeons were exposed to unnecessary radiation doses due to the lack of protection measures. The radiation dose per hip procedure is within the safety limit and less than the previous studies

  17. Effects of external stress on biodegradable orthopedic materials: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable orthopedic materials (BOMs are used in rehabilitation and reconstruction of fractured tissues. The response of BOMs to the combined action of physiological stress and corrosion is an important issue in vivo since stress-assisted degradation and cracking are common. Although the degradation behavior and kinetics of BOMs have been investigated under static conditions, stress effects can be very serious and even fatal in the dynamic physiological environment. Since stress is unavoidable in biomedical applications of BOMs, recent work has focused on the evaluation and prediction of the properties of BOMs under stress in corrosive media. This article reviews recent progress in this important area focusing on biodegradable metals, polymers, and ceramics.

  18. ADVANCES IN THE USE OF STEM CELLS IN ORTHOPEDICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Narazaki, Douglas Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Primordial cells or stem cells are multipotent undifferentiated cells with the capacity to originate any type of cell in the organism. They may have their origins in the blastocyst and thus are classified as embryonic, or tissues developed in fetuses, newborns or adults and thus are known as somatic stem cells. Bone marrow is one of the main locations for isolating primordial cells, and there are two lineages: hematopoietic and mesenchymal progenitor cells. There are several uses for these undifferentiated cells in orthopedics, going from cartilaginous lesions in osteoarthrosis, osteochondritis dissecans and patellar chondromalacia, to bone lesions like in pseudarthrosis or bone losses, or nerve lesions like in spinal cord trauma. Studying stem cells is probably the most promising field of study of all within medicine, and this is shortly going to revolutionize all medical specialties (both clinical and surgical) and thus provide solutions for diseases that today are difficult to deal with. PMID:27027022

  19. Marijuana use and mortality following orthopedic surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Andrew S; Smith, Walter; Mullen, Sawyer; Ponce, Brent A; McGwin, Gerald; Shah, Ashish; Naranje, Sameer M

    2018-03-20

    The association between marijuana use and surgical procedures is a matter of increasing societal relevance that has not been well studied in the literature. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between marijuana use and in-hospital mortality, as well as to assess associated comorbidities in patients undergoing commonly billed orthopedic surgeries. The National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2010 to 2014 was used to determine the odds ratios for the associations between marijuana use and in-hospital mortality, heart failure (HF), stroke, and cardiac disease (CD) in patients undergoing five common orthopedic procedures: hip (THA), knee (TKA), and shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), spinal fusion, and traumatic femur fracture fixation. Of 9,561,963 patients who underwent one of the five selected procedures in the four-year period, 26,416 (0.28%) were identified with a diagnosis of marijuana use disorder. In hip and knee arthroplasty patients, marijuana use was associated with decreased odds of mortality compared to no marijuana use (p<0.0001), and increased odds of HF (p = 0.018), stroke (p = 0.0068), and CD (p = 0.0123). Traumatic femur fixation patients had the highest prevalence of marijuana use (0.70%), which was associated with decreased odds of mortality (p = 0.0483), HF (p = 0.0076), and CD (p = 0.0003). For spinal fusions, marijuana use was associated with increased odds of stroke (p<0.0001) and CD (p<0.0001). Marijuana use in patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty was associated with decreased odds of mortality (p<0.001) and stroke (p<0.001). In this study, marijuana use was associated with decreased mortality in patients undergoing THA, TKA, TSA and traumatic femur fixation, although the significance of these findings remains unclear. More research is needed to provide insight into these associations in a growing surgical population.

  20. Orthopedic surgery in cerebral palsy: Instructional course lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Sharan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthopedic surgery (OS plays an important role in the management of cerebral palsy (CP. The objectives of OS are to optimize functions and prevent deformity. Newer developments in OS for CP include emphasis on hip surveillance, minimally invasive procedures, use of external fixators instead of plates and screws, better understanding of lever arm dysfunctions (that can only be corrected by bony OS, orthopedic selective spasticity-control surgery, and single-event multilevel lever arm restoration and anti spasticity surgery, which have led to significant improvements in gross motor function and ambulation, especially in spastic quadriplegia, athetosis, and dystonia. The results of OS can be dramatic and life altering for the person with CP and their caregivers if it is performed meticulously by a specialized surgical team, at the appropriate age, for the correct indications, employing sound biomechanical principles and is followed by physician-led, protocol based, intensive, multidisciplinary, institutional rehabilitation, and long term followup. However, OS can be a double-edged sword, and if performed less than optimally, and without the supporting multidisciplinary medical and rehabilitation team, expertise and infrastructure, it often leads to significant functional worsening of the person with CP, including irretrievable loss of previous ambulatory capacity. OS must be integrated into the long term management of the person with CP and should be anticipated and planned at the optimal time and not viewed as a “last resort” intervention or failure of rehabilitation. This instructional course lecture reviews the relevant contemporary principles and techniques of OS in CP.

  1. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Salman bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P.O. Box 422, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I. [Sudan Univesity of Science and Technology, College of Medical Radiologic Sciences, P.O. Box 1908, Khartoum (Sudan); Alzimami, K. [King Saud University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P.O. Box 10219, 11433 Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Osman, H. [Taif University, College of Applied Medical Science, Radiology Department, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Omer, H. [University of Dammam, Faculty of Medicine, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Sassi, S. A., E-mail: Abdelmoneim_a@yahoo.com [Prince Sultan Medical City, Department of Medical Physics, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-15

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  2. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulieman, A.; Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I.; Alzimami, K.; Osman, H.; Omer, H.; Sassi, S. A.

    2014-08-01

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  3. Emergency department orthopedics observation unit as an alternative to admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Amy A; Jones, Jaime; Weiss, Steven J; Silva, Otono

    2014-10-01

    Inclusion of select orthopedic problems in the orthopedics observation unit (OOU) may reduce hospital admissions. Our system allows OOU status for 24 hours, but the effect on admissions is unknown. Our primary hypothesis was that we could predict which OOU patients required admission based on the presence of uncontrolled pain. Data were prospectively collected for all OOU patients in this prospective observational study, including data on extremity cellulitis, fractures, and spine injuries awaiting brace placement.The primary outcome variable was admission to the hospital versus discharge home. The a priori hypotheses were that patients with more persistent or worsening pain would require admission more often and that the OOU would result in fewer patients needing a costlier inpatient admission to the hospital. An a priori power analysis showed adequate power of 80% to detect a difference between admitted and discharged patients. Data were prospectively collected from August 2011 to August 2012 for 199 consecutive OOU patients, 62% of whom were men. Diagnoses included infection (cellulitis or abscess of extremity) in 76%, fracture in 15% and other in 9% of the patients. Sixty-two patients (31%) were admitted and 7 patients (4%) made return visits for the same problem within a 30-day period. No significant relations existed between any of the independent variables and admission on bivariate analysis. Multivariable logistic regression found no significant predictors of hospital admission. Logistic regression was not performed on 30-day returns because of the low event rate (4%). An OOU prevented 138 of 199 (69%) patients from being admitted to a hospital. There were no significant predictors of which patients would require admission. Pain was not a predictor of need for admission. The lack of significant predictors is important in suggesting that without the ability to predict which patients require admission, a system using an OOU can reduce admissions by more than

  4. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Baranowski

    Full Text Available Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES, and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants

  5. Infant Mortality and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Profiles > Black/African American > Infant Health & Mortality Infant Mortality and African Americans African Americans have 2.2 ... to receive late or no prenatal care. Infant Mortality Rate Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live ...

  6. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  7. Combined EEG/MEG can outperform single modality EEG or MEG source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Aydin

    Full Text Available We investigated two important means for improving source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis. The first investigation is about the optimal choice of the number of epileptic spikes in averaging to (1 sufficiently reduce the noise bias for an accurate determination of the center of gravity of the epileptic activity and (2 still get an estimation of the extent of the irritative zone. The second study focuses on the differences in single modality EEG (80-electrodes or MEG (275-gradiometers and especially on the benefits of combined EEG/MEG (EMEG source analysis. Both investigations were validated with simultaneous stereo-EEG (sEEG (167-contacts and low-density EEG (ldEEG (21-electrodes. To account for the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG, we constructed a six-compartment finite element head model with anisotropic white matter conductivity, and calibrated the skull conductivity via somatosensory evoked responses. Our results show that, unlike single modality EEG or MEG, combined EMEG uses the complementary information of both modalities and thereby allows accurate source reconstructions also at early instants in time (epileptic spike onset, i.e., time points with low SNR, which are not yet subject to propagation and thus supposed to be closer to the origin of the epileptic activity. EMEG is furthermore able to reveal the propagation pathway at later time points in agreement with sEEG, while EEG or MEG alone reconstructed only parts of it. Subaveraging provides important and accurate information about both the center of gravity and the extent of the epileptogenic tissue that neither single nor grand-averaged spike localizations can supply.

  8. Combined EEG/MEG can outperform single modality EEG or MEG source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ümit; Vorwerk, Johannes; Dümpelmann, Matthias; Küpper, Philipp; Kugel, Harald; Heers, Marcel; Wellmer, Jörg; Kellinghaus, Christoph; Haueisen, Jens; Rampp, Stefan; Stefan, Hermann; Wolters, Carsten H

    2015-01-01

    We investigated two important means for improving source reconstruction in presurgical epilepsy diagnosis. The first investigation is about the optimal choice of the number of epileptic spikes in averaging to (1) sufficiently reduce the noise bias for an accurate determination of the center of gravity of the epileptic activity and (2) still get an estimation of the extent of the irritative zone. The second study focuses on the differences in single modality EEG (80-electrodes) or MEG (275-gradiometers) and especially on the benefits of combined EEG/MEG (EMEG) source analysis. Both investigations were validated with simultaneous stereo-EEG (sEEG) (167-contacts) and low-density EEG (ldEEG) (21-electrodes). To account for the different sensitivity profiles of EEG and MEG, we constructed a six-compartment finite element head model with anisotropic white matter conductivity, and calibrated the skull conductivity via somatosensory evoked responses. Our results show that, unlike single modality EEG or MEG, combined EMEG uses the complementary information of both modalities and thereby allows accurate source reconstructions also at early instants in time (epileptic spike onset), i.e., time points with low SNR, which are not yet subject to propagation and thus supposed to be closer to the origin of the epileptic activity. EMEG is furthermore able to reveal the propagation pathway at later time points in agreement with sEEG, while EEG or MEG alone reconstructed only parts of it. Subaveraging provides important and accurate information about both the center of gravity and the extent of the epileptogenic tissue that neither single nor grand-averaged spike localizations can supply.

  9. Reproducibility of EEG-MEG fusion source analysis of interictal spikes: Relevance in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rasheda Arman; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Aydin, Ümit; Lina, Jean-Marc; Dubeau, François; Kobayashi, Eliane; Grova, Christophe

    2018-02-01

    Fusion of electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data using maximum entropy on the mean method (MEM-fusion) takes advantage of the complementarities between EEG and MEG to improve localization accuracy. Simulation studies demonstrated MEM-fusion to be robust especially in noisy conditions such as single spike source localizations (SSSL). Our objective was to assess the reliability of SSSL using MEM-fusion on clinical data. We proposed to cluster SSSL results to find the most reliable and consistent source map from the reconstructed sources, the so-called consensus map. Thirty-four types of interictal epileptic discharges (IEDs) were analyzed from 26 patients with well-defined epileptogenic focus. SSSLs were performed on EEG, MEG, and fusion data and consensus maps were estimated using hierarchical clustering. Qualitative (spike-to-spike reproducibility rate, SSR) and quantitative (localization error and spatial dispersion) assessments were performed using the epileptogenic focus as clinical reference. Fusion SSSL provided significantly better results than EEG or MEG alone. Fusion found at least one cluster concordant with the clinical reference in all cases. This concordant cluster was always the one involving the highest number of spikes. Fusion yielded highest reproducibility (SSR EEG = 55%, MEG = 71%, fusion = 90%) and lowest localization error. Also, using only few channels from either modality (21EEG + 272MEG or 54EEG + 25MEG) was sufficient to reach accurate fusion. MEM-fusion with consensus map approach provides an objective way of finding the most reliable and concordant generators of IEDs. We, therefore, suggest the pertinence of SSSL using MEM-fusion as a valuable clinical tool for presurgical evaluation of epilepsy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Influence of podiatry on orthopedic surgery at a level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakoi, Andre M; Old, Andrew B; O'Neill, Craig A; Stein, Benjamin E; Stander, Eric P; Rosenblatt, Joseph; Herman, Martin J

    2014-06-01

    Level I trauma centers frequently see trauma at or below the ankle, which requires consultation with the orthopedic surgery department. However, as podiatry programs begin to firmly establish themselves in more Level I trauma centers, their consultations increase, ultimately taking those once seen by orthopedic surgery. A review of the literature demonstrates that this paradigm shift has yet to be discussed. The purpose of this study was to determine how many, if any, lower extremity fracture consultations a newly developed podiatry program would take from the orthopedic surgery department. A retrospective review was performed of emergency department records from January 2007 to December 2011. Seventeen different emergency department diagnoses were used to search the database. Ultimately, each patient's emergency department course was researched. Several trends were noted. First, if trauma surgery was involved, only the orthopedic surgery department was consulted for any injuries at or below the ankle. Second, the emergency department tended to consult the podiatry program only between the hours of 8 am and 6 pm. Third, as the podiatry program became more established, their number of consultations increased yearly, and, coincidentally, the orthopedic surgery department's consultations decreased. Finally, high-energy traumas involved only the orthopedic surgery department. Whether the orthopedic surgery department or podiatry program is consulted regarding trauma surgery is likely hospital dependent. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. What opportunities are available for resident involvement in national orthopedic and subspecialty societies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dy, Christopher J; Cross, Michael B; Osbahr, Daryl C; Parks, Michael L; Green, Daniel W

    2011-10-05

    As physician involvement in health policy grows, there will be an increasing need for future leaders in orthopedics. Interested orthopedic residents may be unaware of opportunities for leadership involvement in professional and subspecialty organizations. This article investigates whether national and subspecialty organizations offer membership to residents, allow residents to participate in committees, and provide opportunities for scholarly activity and mentorship. The authors surveyed 20 national orthopedic professional and subspecialty societies to evaluate the availability and cost of resident membership, meeting attendance and participation, research funding, committee membership, and mentorship opportunities. Each society's Web site was reviewed, and societies were contacted by phone if further inquiry was needed. Of the 20 orthopedic societies surveyed, 11 allowed resident membership. Five of 20 societies allowed residents to serve on committees, with a total of 14 total positions for residents. Four organizations provided formalized mentorship programs to residents. Although opportunities for resident involvement in subspecialty and professional societies are available in the majority of groups surveyed, the Orthopaedic Trauma Association and American Society for Surgery of the Hand provided the most comprehensive collection of opportunities. Residents should also pursue involvement in other organizations that may be more readily accessible, such as local, state, and regional orthopedic and medical societies. Increased resident participation in these organizations may help in increasing the 14 nationally available committee positions for orthopedic residents. Our orthopedic profession and societies should encourage motivated residents to pursue involvement and leadership at the national level. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Osteopenia - premature infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neonatal rickets; Brittle bones - premature infants; Weak bones - premature infants; Osteopenia of prematurity ... AW, Diamond FB. Disorders of mineral homeostasis in children and adolescents. In: Sperling MA ed. Pediatric Endocrinology . ...

  13. Mechanical ventilator - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventilator - infants; Respirator - infants ... WHY IS A MECHANICAL VENTILATOR USED? A ventilator is used to provide breathing support for ill or immature babies. Sick or premature babies are often ...

  14. Urinary catheter - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal ... A urinary catheter is a small, soft tube placed in the bladder. This article addresses urinary catheters in babies. WHY IS ...

  15. High blood pressure - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypertension - infants ... and blood vessels The health of the kidneys High blood pressure in infants may be due to kidney or ... blood vessel of the kidney) In newborn babies, high blood pressure is often caused by a blood clot in ...

  16. Short-term Outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty Performed at an Orthopedic Specialty Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padegimas, Eric M; Kreitz, Tyler M; Zmistowski, Benjamin; Teplitsky, Seth L; Namdari, Surena; Purtill, James J; Hozack, William J; Chen, Antonia F

    2018-01-01

    This study compared perioperative outcomes for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) at an orthopedic specialty hospital and a tertiary referral center. The authors identified all primary TKA procedures performed in 2014 at the 2 facilities. Each patient at the orthopedic specialty hospital was manually matched to a patient at the tertiary referral center according to demographic and clinical variables. Matching was blinded to outcomes. Outcomes were 90-day readmission, mortality rate, reoperation, length of stay, and use of inpatient rehabilitation. Each group had 215 TKA patients. The 2 groups of patients were similar in age (66.8 years, P=.98), body mass index (30.4 kg/m 2 , P=.99), age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (3.4, P=1.00), and sex (46.0% male, P=1.00). Mean length of stay was 1.47±0.62 days at the orthopedic specialty hospital vs 1.87±0.75 days (Porthopedic specialty hospital and 6 readmissions at the tertiary referral center (P=.31). There were 6 reoperations at the orthopedic specialty hospital and 5 at the tertiary referral center (P=.76). In addition, 8 patients at the orthopedic specialty hospital used inpatient rehabilitation vs 15 patients at the tertiary referral center (P=.08). One patient who was treated at the orthopedic specialty hospital required transfer to a tertiary referral center. This study found that perioperative outcomes were similar for matched patients who underwent primary TKA at an orthopedic specialty hospital and a tertiary referral center. Patients treated at the orthopedic specialty hospital spent 0.4 fewer days in the hospital compared with matched patients who were treated at the tertiary referral center. This equals 2 fewer hospital nights for every 5 TKA patients. [Orthopedics. 2018; 41(1):e84-e91.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Perspectives of Orthopedic Surgeons on Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelani, Muyibat A; O'Connor, Mary I

    2017-08-01

    Racial/ethnic disparities in healthcare, including orthopedics, have been extensively documented. However, the level of knowledge among orthopedic surgeons regarding racial/ethnic disparities is unknown. The purpose of this study is to determine the views of orthopedic surgeons on (1) the extent of racial/ethnic disparities in orthopedic care, (2) patient and system factors that may contribute, and (3) the potential role of orthopedic surgeons in the reduction of disparities. Three hundred five members of the American Orthopaedic Association completed a survey to assess their knowledge of racial/ethnic disparities and their perceptions about the underlying causes. Twelve percent of respondents believe that patients often receive different care based on race/ethnicity in healthcare in general, while 9 % believe that differences exist in orthopedic care in general, 3 % believe that differences exist within their hospitals/clinics, and 1 % reported differences in their own practices. Despite this, 68 % acknowledge that there is evidence of disparities in orthopedic care. Fifty-one percent believe that a lack of insurance significantly contributes to disparities. Thirty-five percent believe that diversification of the orthopedic workforce would be a "very effective" strategy in addressing disparities, while 25 % percent believe that research would be "very effective" and 24 % believe that surgeon education would be "very effective." Awareness regarding racial/ethnic disparities in musculoskeletal care is low among orthopedic surgeons. Additionally, respondents were more likely to acknowledge disparities within the practices of others than their own. Increased diversity, research, and education may help improve knowledge of this problem.

  18. Caudal ropivacaine in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Ilett, K F; Reid, C

    2001-01-01

    Ropivacaine is a new long-acting amino-amide local anesthetic. However, there are no data on its use in infants. In the current study, the authors investigated the pharmacokinetics of caudal ropivacaine in 30 infants younger than 12 months.......Ropivacaine is a new long-acting amino-amide local anesthetic. However, there are no data on its use in infants. In the current study, the authors investigated the pharmacokinetics of caudal ropivacaine in 30 infants younger than 12 months....

  19. Infant crying and abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, S.A.; Wal, M.F.V.D.; Brugman, E.; Sing, R.A.H.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    Child abuse and neglect are important causes of child morbidity and death. We assessed potentially detrimental parental actions induced by infant crying in 3259 infants aged 1-6 months, in the Netherlands. In infants aged 6 months, 5·6% (95% CI 4·2-7·0) of parents reported having smothered, slapped,

  20. Characterization of the hypercoagulable state following severe orthopedic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Amanda E; Edelman, J James B; Lott, Natalie; Bannon, Paul G; McElduff, Patrick; Curnow, Jennifer L; Balogh, Zsolt J

    2014-08-01

    Acute traumatic coagulopathy develops in seriously injured patients, which is followed by a paradoxical hypercoagulable state. The hypercoagulable state contributes to venous thromboembolism, and yet, there are no sensitive tests available to detect it. The aim of this study was to characterize the hypercoagulable state caused by major orthopedic trauma using the overall hemostatic potential (OHP) assay. Major orthopedic trauma patients admitted during a 7-month period in 2012 were included in the study. Blood samples were drawn 1 hour before surgery, then 1, 7, 24 hours and 3, 5, 10, and 42 days postoperatively. The assay parameters were determined and analyzed according to injury severity (polytrauma or nonpolytrauma), type of surgical intervention, and shock status. Values were compared with 20 healthy controls. Forty-one consecutive patients were enrolled (age, 41.5 ± 2.7 years; 70% male; Injury Severity Score [ISS], 21.5 ± 2.1). Hypercoagulability based on OHP was present in the preoperative sample compared with the controls (OHP, 13.8 ± 1.4 U vs. 8.1 ± 0.5 U; p = 0.020) and then further elevated after surgery (1 hour postoperative, 17.8 ± 2.0 U vs. preoperative, 13.8 ± 1.4 U, p = 0.008). Polytrauma patients were more hypercoagulable than nonpolytrauma at the preoperative sample time (17.7 ± 2.6 U vs. 10.7 ± 1.2 U, p = 0.040) and postoperative period (24.3 ± 3.4 U vs. 11.9 ± 1.4 U, p = 0.006). The OHP for patients undergoing open pelvic surgery (28.3 ± 3.0 U) was higher than both intramedullary nailing (16.2 ± 2.0 U) and percutaneous pelvic surgery (17.0 ± 1.7 U) on Day 5 (p trauma and surgical intervention, which was present for 10 days postoperatively. The extent of hypercoagulability could be associated with polytrauma and the type of surgical intervention; however, further studies are needed to confirm this. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  1. Use of orthopedic shoes in patients with degenerative disorders of the foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, Michiel J.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Karin; Stewart, Roy E.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.

    Objectives: To study the actual use of orthopedic shoes by patients with degenerative foot disorders and to identify factors associated with use and nonuse, based on the parameters of the International Organization for Standardization definition of usability: effectiveness, efficiency, satisfaction,

  2. High Disparity Between Orthopedic Resident Interest and Participation in International Health Electives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven; Shultz, Paul; Daniels, Alan; Ackelman, Edward; Kamal, Robin N

    2016-07-01

    Few orthopedic surgical residency programs offer international health electives (IHEs). Efforts to expand these programs have been increasing across medical disciplines. Whether orthopedic residents will participate remains unknown. This study quantified and characterized orthopedic resident interest and barriers to IHEs in US residency programs. A web-based survey was administered to residents from 154 US orthopedic residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 2014 to 2015. Questions assessed demographics and program background, previous medical experience abroad, barriers to participation, and level of interest in participating in an international health elective during their training and beyond. Twenty-seven (17.5%) residency programs responded. Chi-square analysis showed that residents who expressed interest in participating were significantly more likely to have experience abroad compared with those who expressed no interest (Porthopedic residencies (POrthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e680-e686.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. TRAUMA AND ORTHOPEDIC MORBIDITY OF CHILDREN IN RUSSIA IN 2013. ORGANIZATION OF SPECIALIZED CARE FOR CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Алексей Георгиевич Баиндурашвили

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is a summary of the materials presented at the X Jubilee Congress of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgeons of Russia on September 16, 2014, in Moscow by the director of the FSBI «Scientific and Research Institute for Children’s Orthopedics n. a. G. I. Turner», corr.-member of RAS Alexey Georgievich Baindurashvili. Statistical data on traumatism and morbidity of the musculoskeletal system of the child population, information on the organization of trauma and orthopedic care for children are based on data from the state statistical reports of the Russian Ministry of Health. These data may be useful to public health officials, and orthopedic and trauma surgeons in subjects of the Russian Federation.

  4. [Clinical observation of traumatic ankle arthritis with orthopedics lotion on 60 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Yu, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Observing the clinical curative effect of orthopedics lotion to treat traumatic ankle arthritis, the outpatient department of orthopedics in Guang'anmen Hospital collected 60 cases who were diagnosed as traumatic ankle arthritis. The cases who already met the inclusion criteria, were randomly divided into the treatment group (30 cases) and control group (30 cases). Thirty patients in treatment group were received fumigation treatment with orthopedics lotion; 30 patients in control group were treated by intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate. After 5 weeks treatment, the effects on the both groups would be observed and analysed. Baird-Jackson scoring system was used to assess the overall curative effect. Visual analogue scales (VAS) was used to assess analgesic effect. BJ scores of pre-treatment and post-treatment in both the treatment group and the control group were compared, P orthopedics lotion is a effective way to treat traumatic ankle arthritis, and it has significant effect on analgesic.

  5. [Diagnosis and treatment of headache combined with orthopedic disorders in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiduk, A A; Korostovtsev, D D; Gaiduk, Yu V; Ageeva, L Ya

    2013-01-01

    To study characteristics of headache combined with orthopedic disorders in children and adolescents and to develop treatment approaches, we examined 116 patients aged from 5 to 17 years. Headache of tension was found in 89 (77%) and chronic headache in 27 (23%) patients. Along with clinical/neurological and orthopedic examination, all patients were studied using a special device that allowed to quantitatively measure the bearing (in three dimensions) and biomechanic body balance. Electroencephalography, Doppler ultrasound and transcranial tests of neck vessels and ophthalmological examination were carried out. Based on the features of headache characteristic of some groups of patients, the authors suggest using a multidiscipline approach including the day-to-day interaction between neurologist and orthopedist, pharmacological therapy, therapeutic physical training, specific orthopedic inner sole and other rehabilitation methods. This treatment has led to better recovery of patients compared to the treatment using only neurological or orthopedic techniques.

  6. A Survey on Transfusion Status in Orthopedic Surgery at a Trauma Center

    OpenAIRE

    Soleimanha, Mehran; Haghighi, Mohammad; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Sedighinejad, Abbas; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Naderi-Nabi, Bahram; Chavoshi, Tahereh; Mehrnoosh, Mehrnoosh Ghandili

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased costs and mortality associated with inappropriate blood transfusions have led to investigations about blood request and blood transfusion techniques. We investigated the transfusion status in patients who underwent orthopedic surgery in Poursina Hospital (Rasht, Iran) to optimizing blood usage and determine if a scheduled transfusion program for every orthopedic surgery could improve blood transfusion management. Method: In this descriptive-prospective study, all orthop...

  7. Relationship of orthopedic examination, goniometric measurements, and radiographic signs of degenerative joint disease in cats

    OpenAIRE

    Lascelles, B Duncan X; Dong, Yaa-Hui; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Thomson, Andrea; Wheeler, Simon; Correa, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Available information suggests a mismatch between radiographic and orthopedic examination findings in cats with DJD. However, the extent of the discrepancy between clinical and radiographic signs of OA in companion animals has not been described in detail. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between orthopedic examination findings, joint goniometry, and radiographic signs of DJD in 100 cats, in a prospective observational design. Cat temperament, pain response to...

  8. The TROJAN Project: Creating a Customized International Orthopedic Training Program for Junior Doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Kalraiya, Ashish; Buddhdev, Pranai

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal problems account for a vast proportion of presentations encountered by doctors globally, with figures ranging from 15-36%. However, the time medical schools allocate to learning orthopedics is by no means proportional to this. This study aims to bridge this gap by developing an international orthopedic teaching program tailored to the specific knowledge and skills required by junior doctors in different countries. This prospective study asked fifty junior doctors, who had rece...

  9. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 34. Competency Curriculum for Orthopedic Assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    Observation and Direction of Orthopedic Nursing MODULE 3: TURNING PATIENT ON SPECIAL ORTHOPEDIC EQUIPMENT TASKS a. Turn patient on circo -electric bed b...Turn patient on Stryker frame PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVE (Stimulus) Upon physician’s orders (Behavior) The ORTHA will turn patient on circo -electric bed...or Stryker frame (Conditions) With indirect supervision and assistance; using appropriate equipment for circo -electric bed or Stryker frame (Criteria

  10. Orthopedic Surgeons' Management of Elective Surgery for Patients Who Use Nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Matthew; Krosin, Michael; Lynch, Tennyson L; Leasure, Jeremi

    2017-01-01

    Despite significant research documenting the detrimental effects of tobacco, the orthopedic literature lacks evidence regarding how surgeons alter their management of elective surgery when patients use nicotine. To better understand how patients' use of nicotine influences orthopedic surgeons' pre- and postoperative management of elective surgery, a 9-question paper survey was distributed at the 2012 annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons among attending US orthopedic surgeons, including general orthopedists and specialty-trained orthopedic surgeons. Survey questions focused on attitudes and practice management regarding patients who use nicotine. Using a chi-square test, no statistically significant variation was observed between subspecialists and general orthopedists or among different subspecialties. Ninety-eight percent of the orthopedic surgeons surveyed counseled tobacco users about the adverse effects of nicotine. However, approximately half of all of the respondents spent less than 5 minutes on perioperative nicotine counseling. Forty-one percent of all of the respondents never delayed elective surgery because of a patient's nicotine use, followed closely by 39% delaying surgery for less than 3 months. Subspecialty had little influence on how orthopedic surgeons managed nicotine users. The high rate of counseling on the adverse effects of nicotine suggested agreement regarding the detrimental effects of smoking. However, the study population infrequently delayed surgery or used smoking cessation measures. Studies are needed to determine why few surgeons frequently alter the management of nicotine users and what modifications in orthopedic practice could improve outcomes for these patients. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):e90-e94.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. A qualitative and quantitative needs assessment of pain management for hospitalized orthopedic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordts, Grace A; Grant, Marian S; Brandt, Lynsey E; Mears, Simon C

    2011-08-08

    Despite advances in pain management, little formal teaching is given to practitioners and nurses in its use for postoperative orthopedic patients. The goal of our study was to determine the educational needs for orthopedic pain management of our residents, nurses, and physical therapists using a quantitative and qualitative assessment. The needs analysis was conducted in a 10-bed orthopedic unit at a teaching hospital and included a survey given to 20 orthopedic residents, 9 nurses, and 6 physical therapists, followed by focus groups addressing barriers to pain control and knowledge of pain management. Key challenges for nurses included not always having breakthrough pain medication orders and the gap in pain management between cessation of patient-controlled analgesia and ordering and administering oral medications. Key challenges for orthopedic residents included treating pain in patients with a history of substance abuse, assessing pain, and determining when to use long-acting vs short-acting opioids. Focus group assessments revealed a lack of training in pain management and the need for better coordination of care between nurses and practitioners and improved education about special needs groups (the elderly and those with substance abuse issues). This needs assessment showed that orthopedic residents and nurses receive little formal education on pain management, despite having to address pain on a daily basis. This information will be used to develop an educational program to improve pain management for postoperative orthopedic patients. An integrated educational program with orthopedic residents, nurses, and physical therapists would promote understanding of issues for each discipline. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Do Astronauts Havbe a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions Than a Cohort of Working Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, M. S.; Murray, J. D.; Young, M.; Wear, M. L.; Van Baalen, M.; Tarver, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated [1], but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  13. Factors involved in selection of a career in surgery and orthopedics for medical students in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollias, C; Banza, L; Mkandawire, N

    2010-03-01

    There is a critical shortage of Orthopedic Surgeons in Malawi as well as all countries in sub-Saharan Africa. To date, there is no published literature that has investigated surgical or Orthopedic career selection amongst African medical trainees. With the goal of facilitating recruitment into Surgery and Orthopedics in Malawi, we explored the key aspects of Malawian Medical Students' choice of careers in surgical disciplines. An on-line survey of all students in clinical years at the College of Medicine in Blantyre, Malawi was performed. The survey was anonymous and constructed de novo by a stringent process including Item Generation, Item reduction, Survey composition, Pre-testing, Assessment of Validity by a recognized survey expert, Pilot testing in on-line format by several Malawian Medical Students, and then formal survey testing. Surgery was the most popular specialty choice among the medical trainees (46%). General Surgery was the popular surgical specialty (27%), followed by Neurosurgery (22%) and Orthopedics (19%). The majority of students (67%) feared occupational exposure to HIV but this did not appear to be a factor in specialty choice (p = 0.9). Students with Orthopedic mentors were significantly more likely to choose Orthopedics as their first choice surgical specialty (p = 0.01). Despite limited resources and surgeons in sub-Saharan Africa, surgical specialties are desirable career choices. This is the first evaluation of factors involved in surgical or Orthopedic career selection in any African context. Future initiatives to improve exposure and mentorship in Orthopedics are fundamental to recruitment into the specialty.

  14. Relation between type and local of orthopedic injuries with physical activity in horses

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa,Nicole Ruas de; Luna,Stelio Pacca Loureiro; Pizzigatti,Dietrich; Martins,Mayra Teixeira Alas; Possebon,Fabio Sossai; Aguiar,Adriana Cristina Saldanha

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Equine sport modalities influence the prevalence and predisposition of musculoskeletal injuries in horses. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of location and type of orthopedic injuries of horses undergoing various physical activities. Data from 116 horses of different breeds and ages was analyzed. Physical activities included dressage, racing, polo pony, jumping, work and western performance. All horses had history of orthopedic lameness diagnosed by radiographs and/or ult...

  15. Pelvic ring fractures: what the orthopedic surgeon wants to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Bharti; Sheehan, Scott E; Sodickson, Aaron D; Weaver, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Treating trauma patients with displaced pelvic fractures requires a multidisciplinary approach at a designated trauma center to reduce morbidity and mortality. Immediate recognition of pelvic ring disruption and determination of pelvic stability are critical components in the evaluation of such patients. Stability is achieved by the ability of the osseoligamentous structures of the pelvis to withstand physiologic stresses without abnormal deformation. The supporting pelvic ligaments, including the posterior and anterior sacroiliac, iliolumbar, sacrospinous, and sacrotuberous ligaments, play a crucial role in pelvic stabilization. Radiologists should be familiar with the ligamentous anatomy and biomechanics relevant to understanding pelvic ring disruptions, as well as the Young and Burgess classification system, a systematic approach for interpreting pelvic ring disruptions and assessing stability on the basis of fundamental force vectors that create predictable patterns. This system provides an algorithmic approach to interpreting images and categorizes injuries as anterioposterior (AP) compression, lateral compression, vertical shear, or combined. Opening and closing of the pelvis from rotational forces result in AP compression and lateral compression injuries, respectively, whereas vertical shear injuries result from cephalad displacement of the hemipelvis. AP and lateral compression fractures are divided into types 1, 2, and 3, with increasing degrees of severity. Knowledge of these injury patterns leads to prompt identification and diagnosis of other subtle injuries and associated complications at pelvic radiography and cross-sectional imaging, allowing the orthopedic surgeon to apply corrective forces for prompt pelvic stabilization. ©RSNA, 2014.

  16. Frequency of Recidivism in Patients With Orthopedic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleszar, Juliann C; Childs, Benjamin R; Vallier, Heather A

    2016-09-01

    The goals of this study were to determine the frequency of trauma recidivism and to identify risk factors. The authors hypothesized that substance abuse and mental illness would be associated with recidivism. They performed a retrospective review of 879 patients who were treated surgically for high-energy fractures over a period of 4 years. Recidivism was defined as presentation to the trauma center for a new, unrelated injury. A recurrent recidivist was a repeat patient who returned for more than 1 additional injury. The study identified 164 (18.7%) patients who returned with a new injury. Mean age of recidivists was 37.1 years vs 40.7 years for nonrecidivists (P=.025). Of the recidivists, 80% were male, and this group was more likely to be unmarried (76.2% vs 67.2%, P=.044) and unemployed (40.4% vs 19.6%, Precidivism is common, occurring overall in 18.7% of the study sample within a mean of 2.9 years. Factors associated with recidivism included age younger than 40 years, unmarried status, substance use, unemployment, and lack of insurance coverage. The greatest independent risk factors for recidivism were Medicaid insurance or no insurance and a history of a gunshot wound or assault. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):300-306.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Accuracy study of new computer-assisted orthopedic surgery software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidon, Eli [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Beilinson-Rabin Medical Center, Petach Tikva (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Steinberg, Ely L., E-mail: steinberge@tasmc.health.gov.il [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The new computerized system is based on image analysis and designed to aid in orthopedic surgeries by virtual trajectory of the guide wire, intra-operative planning and various measurements. Validation of the accuracy and safety of any computer-aided surgery system is essential before implementing it clinically. We examined the accuracy of guide-wire length and angle measurements and fusion of multiple adjacent images (panoramic view image, PVI{sup ®}) of the new software. Methods: This is a 2-part study. Part I: twenty guide wires were drilled to various depths in a synthetic femur model and the results obtained by the software measurements were compared with manual measurements by a caliper and a depth gauge. Part II: a sawbone femur shaft was osteotomized and various inclinations of >10° to the varus or valgus angles were tested. The manually obtained measurements of angles and lengths were compared to the new computerized system software PVI. Results: There was a significant positive linear correlation between all groups of the computerized length and the control measurements (r > 0.983, p < 0.01). There was no significant difference among different distances, angles or positions from the image intensifier. There was a significant positive linear correlation between the angle and length measurement on the PVI and the control measurement (r > 0.993, p < 0.01). Conclusions: The new computerized software has high reliability in performing measurements of length using an aiming, positioning and referring device intra-operatively.

  18. [Technical aspects in the provision of orthopedic shoes for athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, M; Volkering, C; Röser, A

    2013-03-01

    From the technical point of view different groups must be distinguished in the provision of orthopedic shoes for athletes. The one group encompasses athletes who are provided with insoles in the hope of improved comfort or better performance. The other group includes athletes with diseases or injuries of the lower limbs for whom the provision of appropriate shoes and insoles makes it possible for them to participate again actively in their chosen sport. In such cases one has to differentiate between the purely physical disorder of the foot and biomechanical disorders. For the first group the correct fitting of the shoe is the most important factor whereas in the second group attempts are made to correct and/or compensate for the deficit by means of insoles and wedges as well as supporting or bedding elements. The particular challenge for all such measures is to achieve an as small as possible impairment on the sport activity or, in the ideal cases, even to support it. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Current concept review: quality and process improvement in orthopedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinney SJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stephen J Pinney,1 Alexandra E Page,2 David S Jevsevar,3 Kevin J Bozic4 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, St Mary's Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA; 2Orthopaedic Surgery, AAOS Health Care Systems Committee, San Diego, CA, USA; 3Department of Orthopaedics, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth University, Hanover, NH, USA; 4Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care, Dell Medical School at the University of Texas, Austin, TX, USAAbstract: Multiple health care stakeholders are increasingly scrutinizing musculoskeletal care to optimize quality and cost efficiency. This has led to greater emphasis on quality and process improvement. There is a robust set of business strategies that are increasingly being applied to health care delivery. These quality and process improvement tools (QPITs have specific applications to segments of, or the entire episode of, patient care. In the rapidly changing health care world, it will behoove all orthopedic surgeons to have an understanding of the manner in which care delivery processes can be evaluated and improved. Many of the commonly used QPITs, including checklist initiatives, standardized clinical care pathways, lean methodology, six sigma strategies, and total quality management, embrace basic principles of quality improvement. These principles include focusing on outcomes, optimizing communication among health care team members, increasing process standardization, and decreasing process variation. This review summarizes the common QPITs, including how and when they might be employed to improve care delivery. Keywords: clinical care pathway, musculoskeletal care, outcomes, quality management, six sigma, lean thinking

  20. Why medical students choose orthopedic surgery as a specialty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erraji, Moncef; Kharraji, Abdessamad; Abbasi, Najib; Najib, Abdeljawad; Yacoubi, Hicham

    2015-01-01

    Before the crisis announced the Moroccan surgery, the objectives of this study were to analyze the choice of specialties newly appointed to the internal review and the guidance of medical students and to determine the factors influencing this choice. Data on specialty choice students were analyzed and a questionnaire was offered to students of Morocco at the beginning of academic year 2013-20014 The form consisted of questions on the year of study. sex, professional guidelines and reasons for choice. candidates were male, the average age of our residents was 28 years. We also noted the importance of the passage as well as external service trauma. Care provided to patients, lifestyle and income reported by 85% of respondents to be the most important factors to pursue orthopedics as a career. The TR-Orth is now a specialty that responds to a positive choice. The choice of TR-Orth by students at the end of medical school curriculum is reinforced by teaching and practicing the specialty during the internship. The overall training is unsatisfactory overall. Students would deepen in some areas. This study confirms that there is currently a shift in trauma surgery, mostly induced by an a priori negative for particular workloads. PMID:26185556

  1. Prevalence of Internet and Social Media Usage in Orthopedic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Emily; Nguyen, Joseph; Matzkin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies in other specialties have shown that social networking and Internet usage has become an increasingly important means of patient communication and referral. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of Internet or social media usage in new patients referred to a major academic orthopedics center and to identify new avenues to optimize patient recruitment and communication. New patients were surveyed (n=752) between December 2012 to January 2013 in a major academic orthopaedic center to complete a 15-item questionnaire including social media and Internet usage information. Data was collected for all orthopaedic sub-specialties and statistical analysis was performed. Fifty percent of patients use social networking sites, such as Facebook. Sports medicine patients tend to be higher social networking users (35.9%) relative to other services (9.8-17.9%) and was statistically higher when compared to the joints/tumor service (Porthopedic patients who use social media/Internet are more likely to be younger, researched their condition prior to their appointment and undergo a longer average day’s travel (120-180 miles) to see a physician. In an increasingly competitive market, surgeons with younger patient populations will need to utilize social networking and the Internet to capture new patient referrals. PMID:25317312

  2. The Top 100 Cited Articles in Clinical Orthopedic Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Suresh K; Dein, Eric J; Spiker, Andrea M; Bernard, Johnathan A; Zikria, Bashir A

    2015-08-01

    Orthopedic sports medicine continues to evolve, owing much of its clinical management and practice to rigorous academic research. In this review, we identify and describe the top 100 cited articles in clinical sports medicine and recognize the authors and institutions driving the research. We collected articles (excluding basic science, animal, and cadaveric studies) from the 25 highest-impact sports medicine journals and analyzed them by number of citations, journal, publication date, institution, country, topic, and author. Mean number of citations was 408 (range, 229-1629). The articles were published in 7 journals, most in the 1980s to 2000s, and represented 15 countries. Thirty topics were addressed, with a heavy emphasis on anterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction, knee rating systems, rotator cuff reconstruction, and chondrocyte transplantation. The 3 most cited articles, by Insall and colleagues, Constant and Murley, and Tegner and Lysholm, addressed a knee, a shoulder, and another knee rating system, respectively. Several authors contributed multiple articles. The Hospital for Special Surgery and the University of Bern contributed the most articles (5 each). This study provides a comprehensive list of the past century's major academic contributions to sports medicine. Residents and fellows may use this list to guide their scholarly investigations.

  3. Deep venous thrombosis after orthopedic surgery in adult cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, P P; Graham, D; Hann, L E; Boland, P J; Healey, J H

    1998-05-01

    Patients with cancer and patients undergoing major orthopedic procedures are two groups at risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The objective was to determine the rate of venous thromboembolic disease in patients with a malignant neoplasm and major orthopaedic surgery of the lower limb. The study included 169 patients. All patients were given knee-high intermittent pneumatic compression devices for prophylaxis. Postoperative surveillance for thrombosis was performed on all patients with venous duplex doppler ultrasonography. Proximal DVT occurred in 24 of 169 patients (14.2%). One patient (0.6%) developed a symptomatic, nonfatal pulmonary embolus (PE). The development of DVT was not associated with age, sex, type of surgery, type of neoplasm, location, or pathologic fracture. The addition of anticoagulant medication such as warfarin did not significantly reduce the rate of DVT in a subset of 54 patients. In three patients, the DVT occurred only in the contralateral limb, and in four patients, there were bilateral DVTs. When intermittent compression boots were used for prophylaxis in conjunction with ultrasound screening, the risk of proximal DVT was substantial (14.2%), but the rate of symptomatic PE was low (0.6%).

  4. PEEK Biomaterials in Trauma, Orthopedic, and Spinal Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, S. M.; Devine, J. N.

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1980s, polyaryletherketones (PAEKs) have been increasingly employed as biomaterials for trauma, orthopedic, and spinal implants. We have synthesized the extensive polymer science literature as it relates to structure, mechanical properties, and chemical resistance of PAEK biomaterials. With this foundation, one can more readily appreciate why this family of polymers will be inherently strong, inert, and biocompatible. Due to its relative inertness, PEEK biomaterials are an attractive platform upon which to develop novel bioactive materials, and some steps have already been taken in that direction, with the blending of HA and TCP into sintered PEEK. However, to date, blended HA-PEEK composites have involved a trade-off in mechanical properties in exchange for their increased bioactivity. PEEK has had the greatest clinical impact in the field of spine implant design, and PEEK is now broadly accepted as a radiolucent alternative to metallic biomaterials in the spine community. For mature fields, such as total joint replacements and fracture fixation implants, radiolucency is an attractive but not necessarily critical material feature. PMID:17686513

  5. Academic characteristics of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with high school, collegiate, and professional teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Buza, John A; Byram, Ian; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a study to determine the academic involvement and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians at high school, college, and professional levels of sport. Through Internet and telephone queries, we identified 1054 team physicians from 362 institutions, including 120 randomly selected high schools and colleges and 122 professional teams (baseball, basketball, football, hockey). For all physicians included in the study, we performed a comprehensive search of the Internet and of a citation database to determine academic affiliations, number of publications, and h-index values. Of the 1054 physicians, 678 (64%) were orthopedic surgeons. Percentage of orthopedic team physicians affiliated with an academic medical center was highest in professional sports (64%; 173/270) followed by collegiate sports (36%; 98/275) and high school sports (20%; 27/133). Median number of publications per orthopedic team physician was significantly higher in professional sports (30.6) than in collegiate sports (10.7) or high school sports (6). Median number of publications by orthopedic physicians also varied by sport, with the highest number in Major League Baseball (37.9; range, 0-225) followed by the National Basketball Association (32.0; range, 0-227) and the National Football League (30.4; range, 0-460), with the lowest number within the National Hockey League (20.7; range, 0-144). Academic affiliation and research productivity of orthopedic team physicians vary by competition level and professional sporting league.

  6. Tratamiento ortopédico con moldeador nasoalveolar prequirúrgico en la fisura labiopalatina unilateral Orthopaedic treatment with presurgical nasoalveolar moulding in unilateral cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio José España-López

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describen 2 casos de niños con fisura labiopalatina unilateral total con gran separación de procesos alveolares, remitidos a nuestra unidad. Tras valoración por el equipo multidisciplinar se procede a realizar tratamiento ortopédico mediante moldeamiento nasoalveolar prequirúrgico durante 3,5 meses en un caso y 2 meses en el otro. A los 9 meses se mantiene la coalescencia de ambos procesos alveolares y la simetría nasal en ambos pacientes, existiendo una buena proyección de la punta nasal y longitud de la columela.We present two cases of children with total unilateral cleft lip and palate with a marked separation of alveolar segments. After evaluation by a multidisciplinart team, he children were treated with a presurgical nasoalveolar moulding for 2 months in one of them and 3.5 months in the other. At 9 months after the presurgical nasoalveolar moulding treatment, there was improved dental arch form, the cleft edges moved closer to each other, and improved symmetry of the nose in width, height, and columella lengths in both patients.

  7. FOOD ALLERGY IN INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Balabolkin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the etiology, growth mechanisms, clinical implications, diagnostics and treatment of the infant food allergy. The author highlights the status of the allergy to the proteins of cow milk within this age group of children. Alongside the article describes the modern approaches to the diet therapy of the infants with the allergy to the proteins of cow milk.Key words: infant, food allergy, allergy to the proteins of cow milk, diet therapy.

  8. ANALYSIS OF OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY, ORTHOPEDICS AND THORACIC SURGERY JOURNALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Wilma Terezinha Anselmo

    2015-01-01

    To perform an extensive analysis of journals in Medicine III - CAPES, and specifically those in the areas of Otorhinolaryngology, Orthopedics and Traumatology and Chest Surgery. An active search for the impact factors in the Journal Citation Reports, Scimago, their indexation in Scielo, Lilacs, Scopus and Google Scholar, and their stratification in WebQualis was done. Forty-four journals with measured impact factors ranging from 3.006 to 0.128 were detected in the area of Otorhinolaryngology; however, only 26 of them (60%) had a Qualis measured by CAPES; in the stratification, no journal was detected in A1, three were A2 and nine B1. Three journals were located for Chest Surgery, with only one of them having a measured Qualis (A2) with a mean of 3.61. Sixty-seven journals were detected for Orthopedics and Traumatology, with an impact factor ranging from 4.699 to 0.156; Qualis was measured in only 38 of them (60%); there were three journal stratified as A1, seven as A2 and 25 as B1. The search for journals of higher impact induces authors to not publish in journals related to their area and facing more difficulties than investigators from other areas. Realizar análise ampla dos periódicos da Medicina III - CAPES e, especificamente, os pertencentes à Otorrinolaringologia, Ortopedia e Traumatologia, e Cirurgia Torácica. Busca ativa do fator de impacto dos periódicos das áreas citadas no Journal Citation Report e Scimago, sua indexação no Scielo, Lilacs, Scopus, Google Scholar e sua estratificação no WebQualis. Para a Otorrinolaringologia foram encontrados 44 periódicos, cujo fator de impacto variou de 3.006 a 0.128; entretanto, apenas 26 deles (60%) tinham Qualis medido pela CAPES; nas estratificações encontrou-se nenhuma revista em A1, três em A2 e nove em B1. Para a Cirurgia Torácica foram localizados três periódicos, sendo que apenas um tinha Qualis medido (A2) com média de 3.61. Os resultados da busca para a Ortopedia e Traumatologia permitiu

  9. Machining of a bioactive nanocomposite orthopedic fixation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparnell, Amie; Aniket; El-Ghannam, Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    Bioactive ceramics bond to bone and enhance bone formation. However, they have poor mechanical properties which restrict their machinability as well as their application as load bearing implants. The goal of this study was to machine bioactive fixation screws using a silica-calcium phosphate nanocomposite (SCPC50). The effect of compact pressure, holding time, and thermal treatment on the microstructure, machinability, and mechanical properties of SCPC50 cylinders were investigated. Samples prepared by powder metallurgy technique at compact pressure range of 100-300 MPa and treated at 900°C/1 h scored a poor machinability rating of (1/5) due to the significant formation of amorphous silicate phase at the grain boundaries. On the other hand, lowering of compact pressure and sintering temperature to 30 MPa/3 h and 700°C/2 h, respectively, minimized the formation of the amorphous phase and raised the machinability rating to (5/5). The modulus of elasticity and ultimate strength of machinable SCPC50 were 10.8 ± 2.0 GPa and 72.8 ± 22.8 MPa, respectively, which are comparable to the corresponding values for adult human cortical bone. qRT-PCR analyses showed that bone cells attached to SCPC50 significantly upregulated osteocalcin mRNA expression as compared to the cells on Ti-6Al-4V. Moreover, cells attached to SCPC50 produced mineralized bone-like tissue within 8 days. On the other hand, cells attached to Ti-6Al-4V failed to produce bone mineral under the same experimental conditions. Results of the study suggest that machinable SCPC50 has the potential to serve as an attractive new material for orthopedic fixation devices. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Interactive segmentation in MRI for orthopedic surgery planning: bone tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Firat; Karani, Neerav; Fürnstahl, Philipp; Goksel, Orcun

    2017-06-01

    Planning orthopedic surgeries is commonly performed in computed tomography (CT) images due to the higher contrast of bony structure. However, soft tissues such as muscles and ligaments that may determine the functional outcome of a procedure are not easy to identify in CT, for which fast and accurate segmentation in MRI would be desirable. To be usable in daily practice, such method should provide convenient means of interaction for modifications and corrections, e.g., during perusal by the surgeon or the planning physician for quality control. We propose an interactive segmentation framework for MR images and evaluate the outcome for segmentation of bones. We use a random forest classification and a random walker-based spatial regularization. The latter enables the incorporation of user input as well as enforcing a single connected anatomical structures, thanks to which a selective sampling strategy is proposed to substantially improve the supervised learning performance. We evaluated our segmentation framework on 10 patient humerus MRI as well as 4 high-resolution MRI from volunteers. Interactive humerus segmentations for patients took on average 150 s with over 3.5 times time-gain compared to manual segmentations, with accuracies comparable (converging) to that of much longer interactions. For high-resolution data, a novel multi-resolution random walker strategy further reduced the run time over 20 times of the manual segmentation, allowing for a feasible interactive segmentation framework. We present a segmentation framework that allows iterative corrections leading to substantial speed gains in bone annotation in MRI. This will allow us to pursue semi-automatic segmentations of other musculoskeletal anatomy first in a user-in-the-loop manner, where later less user interactions or perhaps only few for quality control will be necessary as our annotation suggestions improve.

  11. A simple strategy to reduce stereotype threat for orthopedic residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Everlyne; Wright, James G

    2014-04-01

    Stereotype threat, defined as the predicament felt by people in either positive or negative learning experiences where they could conform to negative stereotypes associated with their own group membership, can interfere with learning. The purpose of this study was to determine if a simple orientation session could reduce stereotype threat for orthopedic residents. The intervention group received an orientation on 2 occasions focusing on their possible responses to perceived poor performance in teaching rounds and the operating room (OR). Participants completed a survey with 7 questions typical for stereotype threat evaluating responses to their experiences. The questions had 7 response options with a maximum total score of 49, where higher scores indicated greater degree of experiences typical of stereotype threat. Of the 84 eligible residents, 49 participated: 22 in the nonintervention and 27 in the intervention group. The overall scores were 29 and 29.4, and 26.2 and 25.8 in the nonintervention and intervention groups for their survey responses to perceived poor performance in teaching rounds (p = 0.85) and the OR (p = 0.84), respectively. Overall, responses typical of stereotype threat were greater for perceived poor performance at teaching rounds than in the OR (p = 0.001). Residents experience low self-esteem following perceived poor performance, particularly at rounds. A simple orientation designed to reduce stereotype threat was unsuccessful in reducing this threat overall. Future research will need to consider longer-term intervention as possible strategies to reduce perceived poor performance at teaching rounds and in the OR.

  12. Genital Problems in Infants (Female)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infants and Children Chest Pain, Acute Chest Pain, Chronic Cold and Flu Cough Diarrhea Ear Problems Elimination Problems Elimination Problems in Infants and Children Eye Problems Facial Swelling Feeding Problems in Infants ...

  13. Collaborative multicenter trials in Latin America: challenges and opportunities in orthopedic and trauma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Vinicius Ynoe de; Belloti, Joao Carlos; Faloppa, Flavio; Bhandari, Mohit

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Orthopedic research agendas should be considered from a worldwide perspective. Efforts should be planned as the means for obtaining evidence that is valid for health promotion with global outreach. DESIGN AND SETTING Exploratory study conducted at Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, Brazil, and McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada. METHODS We identified and analyzed collaborative and multicenter research in Latin America, taking into account American and Canadian efforts as the reference points. We explored aspects of the data available from official sources and used data from traffic accidents as a model for discussing collaborative research in these countries. RESULTS The evaluation showed that the proportion of collaborative and multicenter studies in our setting is small. A brief analysis showed that the death rate due to traffic accidents is very high. Thus, it seems clear to us that initiatives involving collaborative studies are important for defining and better understanding the patterns of injuries resulting from orthopedic trauma and the forms of treatment. Orthopedic research may be an important tool for bringing together orthopedic surgeons, researchers and medical societies for joint action. CONCLUSIONS We have indicated some practical guidelines for initiatives in collaborative research and have proposed some solutions with a summarized plan of action for conducting evidence-based research involving orthopedic trauma.

  14. Biological strategies for improved osseointegration and osteoinduction of porous metal orthopedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewallen, Eric Alexander; Riester, Scott M; Bonin, Carolina A; Kremers, Hilal Maradit; Dudakovic, Amel; Kakar, Sanjeev; Cohen, Robert C; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Lewallen, David G; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2015-04-01

    The biological interface between an orthopedic implant and the surrounding host tissue may have a dramatic effect upon clinical outcome. Desired effects include bony ingrowth (osseointegration), stimulation of osteogenesis (osteoinduction), increased vascularization, and improved mechanical stability. Implant loosening, fibrous encapsulation, corrosion, infection, and inflammation, as well as physical mismatch may have deleterious clinical effects. This is particularly true of implants used in the reconstruction of load-bearing synovial joints such as the knee, hip, and the shoulder. The surfaces of orthopedic implants have evolved from solid-smooth to roughened-coarse and most recently, to porous in an effort to create a three-dimensional architecture for bone apposition and osseointegration. Total joint surgeries are increasingly performed in younger individuals with a longer life expectancy, and therefore, the postimplantation lifespan of devices must increase commensurately. This review discusses advancements in biomaterials science and cell-based therapies that may further improve orthopedic success rates. We focus on material and biological properties of orthopedic implants fabricated from porous metal and highlight some relevant developments in stem-cell research. We posit that the ideal primary and revision orthopedic load-bearing metal implants are highly porous and may be chemically modified to induce stem cell growth and osteogenic differentiation, while minimizing inflammation and infection. We conclude that integration of new biological, chemical, and mechanical methods is likely to yield more effective strategies to control and modify the implant-bone interface and thereby improve long-term clinical outcomes.

  15. Orthopedic Management of Patients with Pompe Disease: A Retrospective Case Series of 8 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Haaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pompe disease (PD, a lysosomal storage disease as well as a neuromuscular disorder, is a rare disease marked by progressive muscle weakness. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT in recent years allowed longer survival but brought new problems to the treatment of PD with increasing affection of the musculoskeletal system, particularly with a significantly higher prevalence of scoliosis. The present paper deals with the orthopedic problems in patients with PD and is the first to describe surgical treatment of scoliosis in PD patients. Patients and Methods. The orthopedic problems and treatment of eight patients with PD from orthopedic consultation for neuromuscular disorders are retrospectively presented. We analyzed the problems of scoliosis, hip dysplasia, feet deformities, and contractures and presented the orthopedic treatment options. Results. Six of our eight PD patients had scoliosis and two young patients were treated by operative spine stabilization with benefits for posture and sitting ability. Hip joint surgery, operative contracture release, and feet deformity correction were performed with benefits for independent activity. Conclusion. Orthopedic management gains importance due to extended survival and musculoskeletal involvement under ERT. Surgical treatment is indicated in distinct cases. Further investigation is required to evidence the effect of surgical spine stabilization in PD.

  16. Hospital characteristics and patient populations served by physician owned and non physician owned orthopedic specialty hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan-Sarrazin Mary S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of physician owned specialty hospitals focusing on high margin procedures has generated significant controversy. Yet, it is unclear whether physician owned specialty hospitals differ significantly from non physician owned specialty hospitals and thus merit the additional scrutiny that has been proposed. Our objective was to assess whether physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals and non physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals differ with respect to hospital characteristics and patient populations served. Methods We conducted a descriptive study using Medicare data of beneficiaries who underwent total hip replacement (THR (N = 10,478 and total knee replacement (TKR (N = 15,312 in 29 physician owned and 8 non physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals during 1999–2003. We compared hospital characteristics of physician owned and non physician owned specialty hospitals including procedural volumes of major joint replacements (THR and TKR, hospital teaching status, and for profit status. We then compared demographics and prevalence of common comorbid conditions for patients treated in physician owned and non physician owned specialty hospitals. Finally, we examined whether the socio-demographic characteristics of the neighborhoods where physician owned and non physician owned specialty hospitals differed, as measured by zip code level data. Results Physician owned specialty hospitals performed fewer major joint replacements on Medicare beneficiaries in 2003 than non physician owed specialty hospitals (64 vs. 678, P Conclusion Physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals differ significantly from non physician owned specialty orthopedic hospitals and may warrant the additional scrutiny policy makers have proposed.

  17. The Holy Grail of Orthopedic Surgery: Mesenchymal Stem Cells—Their Current Uses and Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Berebichez-Fridman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Only select tissues and organs are able to spontaneously regenerate after disease or trauma, and this regenerative capacity diminishes over time. Human stem cell research explores therapeutic regenerative approaches to treat various conditions. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are derived from adult stem cells; they are multipotent and exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. They can differentiate into multiple cell types of the mesenchyme, for example, endothelial cells, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, fibroblasts, tenocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells, and sarcomere muscular cells. MSCs are easily obtained and can be cultivated and expanded in vitro; thus, they represent a promising and encouraging treatment approach in orthopedic surgery. Here, we review the application of MSCs to various orthopedic conditions, namely, orthopedic trauma; muscle injury; articular cartilage defects and osteoarthritis; meniscal injuries; bone disease; nerve, tendon, and ligament injuries; spinal cord injuries; intervertebral disc problems; pediatrics; and rotator cuff repair. The use of MSCs in orthopedics may transition the practice in the field from predominately surgical replacement and reconstruction to bioregeneration and prevention. However, additional research is necessary to explore the safety and effectiveness of MSC treatment in orthopedics, as well as applications in other medical specialties.

  18. Mobile Device Trends in Orthopedic Surgery: Rapid Change and Future Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrawis, John P; Muzykewicz, David A; Franko, Orrin I

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly becoming integral communication and clinical tools. Monitoring the prevalence and utilization characteristics of surgeons and trainees is critical to understanding how these new technologies can be best used in practice. The authors conducted a prospective Internet-based survey over 7 time points from August 2010 to August 2014 at all nationwide American Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited orthopedic programs. The survey questionnaire was designed to evaluate the use of devices and mobile applications (apps) among trainees and physicians in the clinical setting. Results were analyzed and summarized for orthopedic surgeons and trainees. During the 48-month period, there were 7 time points with 467, 622, 329, 223, 237, 111, and 134 responses. Mobile device use in the clinical setting increased across all fields and levels of training during the study period. Orthopedic trainees increased their use of Smartphone apps in the clinical setting from 60% to 84%, whereas attending use increased from 41% to 61%. During this time frame, use of Apple/Android platforms increased from 45%/13% to 85%/15%, respectively. At all time points, 70% of orthopedic surgeons believed their institution/hospital should support mobile device use. As measured over a 48-month period, mobile devices have become an ubiquitous tool in the clinical setting among orthopedic surgeons and trainees. The authors expect these trends to continue and encourage providers and trainees to be aware of the limitations and risks inherent with new technology. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. The Holy Grail of Orthopedic Surgery: Mesenchymal Stem Cells—Their Current Uses and Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berebichez-Fridman, Roberto; Gómez-García, Ricardo; Berebichez-Fastlicht, Enrique; Olivos-Meza, Anell; Granados, Julio; Velasquillo, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Only select tissues and organs are able to spontaneously regenerate after disease or trauma, and this regenerative capacity diminishes over time. Human stem cell research explores therapeutic regenerative approaches to treat various conditions. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are derived from adult stem cells; they are multipotent and exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. They can differentiate into multiple cell types of the mesenchyme, for example, endothelial cells, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, fibroblasts, tenocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells, and sarcomere muscular cells. MSCs are easily obtained and can be cultivated and expanded in vitro; thus, they represent a promising and encouraging treatment approach in orthopedic surgery. Here, we review the application of MSCs to various orthopedic conditions, namely, orthopedic trauma; muscle injury; articular cartilage defects and osteoarthritis; meniscal injuries; bone disease; nerve, tendon, and ligament injuries; spinal cord injuries; intervertebral disc problems; pediatrics; and rotator cuff repair. The use of MSCs in orthopedics may transition the practice in the field from predominately surgical replacement and reconstruction to bioregeneration and prevention. However, additional research is necessary to explore the safety and effectiveness of MSC treatment in orthopedics, as well as applications in other medical specialties. PMID:28698718

  20. Ambulatory surgery in orthopedics: experience of over 10,000 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Ferrero, M A; Faour-Martín, O; Simon-Perez, C; Pérez-Herrero, M; de Pedro-Moro, J A

    2014-03-01

    The concept of day surgery is becoming an increasingly important part of elective surgery worldwide. Relentless pressure to cut costs may constrain clinical judgment regarding the most appropriate location for a patient's surgical care. The aim of this study was to determine clinical and quality indicators relating to our experience in orthopedic day durgery, mainly in relation to unplanned overnight admission and readmission rates. Additionally, we focused on describing the main characteristics of the patients that experienced complications, and compared the patient satisfaction rates following ambulatory and non-ambulatory procedures. We evaluated 10,032 patients who underwent surgical orthopedic procedures according to the protocols of our Ambulatory Surgery Unit. All complications that occurred were noted. A quality-of-life assessment (SF-36 test) was carried out both pre- and postoperatively. Ambulatory substitution rates and quality indicators for orthopedic procedures were also determined. The major complication rate was minimal, with no mortal cases, and there was a high rate of ambulatory substitution for the procedures studied. Outcomes of the SF-36 questionnaire showed significant improvement postoperatively. An unplanned overnight admission rate of 0.14 % was achieved. Our institution has shown that it is possible to provide good-quality ambulatory orthopedic surgery. There still appears to be the potential to increase the proportion of these procedures. Surgeons and anesthesiologists must strongly adhere to strict patient selection criteria for ambulatory orthopedic surgery in order to reduce complications in the immediate postoperative term.

  1. [Chances and risks of a new residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The residency program for a specialist in orthopedics and trauma surgery is facing fundamental changes based on an initiative originating from the working group "medical training" of the German Medical Association (GMA). A survey indicated that 50 % of all trainees are dissatisfied with their current situation. It appears important to integrate the ideas and wishes of current orthopedic residents in a novel training concept. To assess this a survey was performed by the Young Forum of the German Society for Orthopedics und Trauma Surgery. The internet-based short survey was conducted in January 2013 among members of the professional societies (DGU, DGOU and DGOOC). 408 physicians participated. The majority of the participating physicians is interested in a career in orthopedics and trauma surgery with primarily operative contents. Accordingly the majority (62 %, n = 253) voted against a reduction of numbers of surgical interventions with 86 % (n = 351) confirming the necessity that these operations must be carried out by the trainee himself. The upcoming changes in residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery offer the opportunity for a well structured and practical oriented residency program. It could be a further step in increasing satisfaction in this profession. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Opioid use for chronic pain management in Italy: results from the Orthopedic Instant Pain survey project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Fanelli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a common symptom in orthopedic patients, but is managed sub-optimally, partly due to scarce opioid use in severe cases. The aim of the Orthopedic Instant Pain Survey (POIS was to evaluate changes in pain management in Italian orthopedic practice 2 years after a legislative change (Law 38/2010 simplifying opioid access for pain control. A web-based survey on the knowledge of this law and trends observed in clinical practice for severe pain treatment was administered to 143 Italian orthopedic specialists. In total, 101 (70% respondents showed a high level of knowledge. Nevertheless, 54.5% stated that they do not use opioids for severe osteo-articular pain management. Main barriers to opioid use are fear of adverse events (61.4%, especially nausea/vomiting and constipation, and patient resistance (29.7%. A modest knowledge of pain classification was also demonstrated. Opioid use remains very limited in Italian orthopedic practice. Physicians’ fear of side effects showed poor knowledge of strategies for effective management of opioid-related adverse events, such as combined oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone. Continuing educational programs could improve delivery of evidence-based pain management.

  3. Opioid use for Chronic Pain Management in Italy: Results from the Orthopedic Instant Pain Survey Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Guido; Cherubino, Paolo; Compagnone, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common symptom in orthopedic patients, but is managed sub-optimally, partly due to scarce opioid use in severe cases. The aim of the Orthopedic Instant Pain Survey (POIS) was to evaluate changes in pain management in Italian orthopedic practice 2 years after a legislative change (Law 38/2010) simplifying opioid access for pain control. A web-based survey on the knowledge of this law and trends observed in clinical practice for severe pain treatment was administered to 143 Italian orthopedic specialists. In total, 101 (70%) respondents showed a high level of knowledge. Nevertheless, 54.5% stated that they do not use opioids for severe osteo-articular pain management. Main barriers to opioid use are fear of adverse events (61.4%), especially nausea/vomiting and constipation, and patient resistance (29.7%). A modest knowledge of pain classification was also demonstrated. Opioid use remains very limited in Italian orthopedic practice. Physicians’ fear of side effects showed poor knowledge of strategies for effective management of opioid-related adverse events, such as combined oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone. Continuing educational programs could improve delivery of evidence-based pain management. PMID:25002934

  4. PREBIOTICS IN INFANT FORMULAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvan Vandenplas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract is different in breastfed infants and in children receiving standard infant formulas. While breast milk is rich in prebiotic oligosaccharides and can also contain some probiotics, standard infant formulas contain neither one thing nor the other. The formulation of an infant formula includes various prebiotic ingredients: galacto- and fructooligosaccharides, polydextrose and their combinations. There is evidence that the addition of prebiotics to baby food makes the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract of infants receiving infant formulas more similar to the microbiota of breastfed children. Prebiotics alter the metabolic activity of the intestinal microflora (lower stool pH and increase the amount of short-chain fatty acids, have a bifidogenic effect and provide a stool consistency and bowel movement frequency that are similar to these parameters in breastfed infants. There is limited evidence that such changes in microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract may have some influence on the development of an infant's immune system. Adverse events are extremely rare in the application of prebiotics. 

  5. Stillbirth and Infant Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard

    2012-01-01

    mechanisms behind these associations remain largely unknown. Although maternal obesity is associated with a wide range of complications in the mother and neonate that may impair fetal and infant survival, the increased risk of stillbirth and infant mortality is virtually unchanged when accounting...

  6. New perspectives and recommendations for anticoagulant therapy post orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Kropf

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant therapy is essential for the prevention of risks associated with the formation of thrombus in patients after surgery, especially in orthopedics. Recently, new oral anticoagulants were introduced in the therapeutic arsenal. This fact is important, because the current drug of choice in clinical practice is enoxaparin, a low molecular weight heparin. As all injecting drugs, enoxaparin may reduce patients' adherence to treatment by dissatisfaction with and resistance to the administration. This article reviews the available literature on the overall utility of these innovative medicines, approaching the pharmacology, the compared efficacy in relation to current agents, and the potential targets for new agents, as well as points to new trends in research and development. The article also contributes with a practical guide for use and recommendations to health professionals, especially focusing on the reversibility of hemorrhagic events, and discusses the importance of convenience/satisfaction of use, the cost of treatment, and the risk-benefit profile for patients.A terapia anticoagulante é fundamental para a prevenção de riscos associados à formação de trombos em pacientes pós-cirúrgicos, principalmente em ortopedia. Recentemente, novos anticoagulantes orais foram introduzidos no arsenal terapêutico. Tal fato é importantíssimo, visto que o atual medicamento de primeira escolha na prática clínica é a enoxaparina, uma heparina de baixo peso molecular. Por ser de uso injetável, a enoxaparina pode diminuir a adesão do paciente ao tratamento, devido à insatisfação e à resistência quanto à via de administração. Este artigo revisa a literatura disponível sobre a utilidade total desses medicamentos inovadores ao abordar a farmacologia, a eficácia em comparação com os agentes atuais e os alvos potenciais para novos agentes, bem como aponta as novas tendências em pesquisa e desenvolvimento. O artigo também contribui

  7. Allergy to orthopedic metal implants - a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kręcisz, Beata; Kieć-Świerczyńska, Marta; Chomiczewska-Skóra, Dorota

    2012-09-01

    Evaluation of the allergenic properties of the metal knee or hip joint implants 24 months post surgery and assessment of the relation between allergy to metals and metal implants failure. The study was conducted in two stages. Stage I (pre-implantation) - 60 patients scheduled for arthroplasty surgery. Personal interview, dermatological examination and patch testing with 0.5% potassium dichromate, 1.0% cobalt chloride, 5.0% nickel sulfate, 2.0% copper sulfate, 2.0% palladium chloride, 100% aluminum, 1% vanadium chloride, 5% vanadium, 10% titanium oxide, 5% molybdenum and 1% ammonium molybdate tetrahydrate were performed. Stage II (post-surgery) - 48 subjects participated in the same procedures as those conducted in Stage I. Stage I - symptoms of "metal dermatitis" were found in 21.7% of the subjects: 27.9% of the females, 5.9% of the males. Positive patch test results were found in 21.7% of the participants, namely to: nickel (20.0%); palladium (13.3%); cobalt (10.0%); and chromium (5.9%). The allergy to metals was confirmed by patch testing in 84.6% of the subjects with a history of metal dermatitis. Stage II - 10.4% of the participants complained about implant intolerance, 4.2% of the examined persons reported skin lesions. Contact allergy to metals was found in 25.0% of the patients: nickel 20.8%, palladium 10.4%, cobalt 16.7%, chromium 8.3%, vanadium 2.1% Positive post-surgery patch tests results were observed in 10.4% of the patients. The statistical analysis of the pre- and post-surgery patch tests results showed that chromium and cobalt can be allergenic in implants. Metal orthopedic implants may be the primary cause of allergies. that may lead to implant failure. Patch tests screening should be obligatory prior to providing implants to patients reporting symptoms of metal dermatitis. People with confirmed allergies to metals should be provided with implants free from allergenic metals.

  8. Development and Evaluation of Polyvinyl Alcohol-Hydrogels as an Artificial Atrticular Cartilage for Orthopedic Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Kobayashi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to its excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties, various different applications of polyvinyl alcohol-hydrogels (PVA-H has been attempted in many fields. In the field of orthopedic surgery, we have been engaged for long time in research on the clinical applications of PVA-H as a artificial cartilage, and have performed many basic experiments on the mechanical properties, synthesis of PVA-H, and developed orthopedic implants using PVA-H. From these studies, many applications of artificial articular cartilage, intervertbral disc and artificial meniscus etc. have been developed. This review will present the overview of the applications and recent advances of PVA-H cartilages, and discuss clinical potential of PVA-H for orthopedics implant.

  9. Computer navigation in orthopedic trauma: safer surgeries with less irradiation and more precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akins, Ralitsa; Abdelgawad, Amr A; Kanlic, Enes M

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of patients and practitioners to ionizing radiation for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes has become the norm rather than the exception. This article discusses the findings from a literature review of intraoperative risks from ionizing radiation to patients and surgeons and the validity of substituting the conventional intraoperative fluoroscopy with computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) in orthopedic trauma surgery. Diversity of study designs and measurements exists in reporting intraoperative ionizing radiation, making direct study comparisons difficult. CAOS can effectively reduce the amount of radiation exposure. There are definite advantages and disadvantages for using CAOS in the field of orthopedic trauma. Implementation of CAOS may hold the answer to better patient and surgeon intraoperative radiation safety with decreased operative time and increased procedure precision. The increased safety for patients and surgeons is a critical consideration in recommending CAOS in trauma surgery.

  10. Compliance of patients wearing an orthotic device or orthopedic shoes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Eva; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2015-10-01

    Alongside the positive effects of use of orthotic devices for the lower extremities (ODLE) and orthopedic shoes, complaints and criticism by users possibly lead to non-compliance. The purpose is to determine the compliance of patients wearing an ODLE or orthopedic shoes and to describe the main reasons for using and not using. Different online databases were searched for articles about patients' compliance with regard to an ODLE or orthopedic shoes. A methodological quality control was conducted. Ten studies (1576 patients) were included. The data revealed between 6 and 80% not users. Several reasons for not using the orthotic device were described (e.g. pain, discomfort and cosmetically unacceptable). The high percentage of patients who are not wearing the prescribed orthotic devices leads to a high financial loss for society and a waste of therapeutic effort. These results should be taken into account during the design, construction and selection process of orthotic devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Application and research advances of metabolomics in the field of orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhijian; Qiu, Guixing; Zhao, Yu

    2015-06-01

    Metabolomics is a subject of systematic, qualitative and quantitative analysis of all metabolites in all organisms, which is applied to finding biomarkers and studying pathogenesis of diseases. Study procedures of metabolomics include data acquisition by spectroscopic/spectrometric techniques, multivariate statistical analysis and projection of the acquired metabolomic information. In recent years, metabolomics have gained popularity in orthopedic field. Metabolomic study of osteoarthritis was firstly conducted and widely developed. Metabolite profiles of different samples, including serum/plasma, urine, synovial fluid and synovial tissue, were studied and dozens of differential metabolites and several disturbed metabolic pathways were found. In addition, metabolomic studies of osteoporosis, ankylosing spondylitis and bone tumors were also conducted, which identified many potential biomarkers and made further understanding of pathogenesis of corresponding disease. However, metabolomic studies in orthopedic field just begin. More orthopedic diseases will be researched thank to the satisfactory results of previous reports.

  12. [How many generalists and how many specialists does orthopedics and traumatology need?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achatz, G; Perl, M; Stange, R; Mutschler, M; Jarvers, J S; Münzberg, M

    2013-01-01

    The training in orthopedic and trauma surgery has changed significantly with the introduction of the new residency program. The contents taught have already been reduced in breadth and the current developments in the outpatient and particularly in the clinical landscape also contribute to increasing specialization. This trend favors structures in which comprehensive medical care for the population in Germany in orthopedic and trauma surgery appears to be endangered and in which the future efforts for e.g. polytraumatised patients need to be questioned. The Young Forum of the German Society for Orthopedics and Traumatology actively accompanies a discussion about the necessity and value of generalists to ensure the level of care in Germany in addition to the specialists.

  13. [Further training in the faculty of orthopedics and trauma surgery. Outstanding, average or insufficient?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perl, M; Stange, R; Niethard, M; Münzberg, M

    2013-01-01

    A well structured and executed and practical residency program is important to secure a sufficient number of well trained orthopedic surgeons in the future. Some of the residents, however, see substantial shortcomings here. Additionally, orthopedic residency programs struggle to be a valid alternative for graduated medical students when comparing them to residency programs in other medical specialities or alternative job options. In improving the current situation program directors as well as residents must play a key role. A rapid improvement of structural shortcomings of German residency programs does not only provide an advantage in recruiting new residents now, but may also help to maintain the high quality in orthopedic health care in the future.

  14. Orthopedic research: an overview of data entry, database management, and statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassing, D R; Ritter, M A; Faris, P M; Keating, E M; Nyhuis, A W

    1989-12-01

    An orthopedic practitioner can facilitate clinical research and analyze quality assurance data with a minor investment in a personal computer, an optical scanner, and two software packages, namely a database manager and a statistics program. One of the most time-consuming stages in the research process includes entering patient chart data, editing and manipulating the data (database management), and analyzing the data (statistical analysis). This can be automated to a large extent with the above mentioned equipment. This article focuses on the steps involved in organizing an orthopedic office for research. The steps include choosing a method of data entry, choosing and implementing a database package, and choosing and implementing a statistics package. This discussion is followed by a practical review of basic statistics applicable to orthopedic research. Several simple and advanced tests are described and examples are given for each.

  15. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF Ti-Al-Nb ALLOYS FOR ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira V.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure titanium shows very interesting characteristics such as high strength-to-weight ratio, very good corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility, which make this material appropriate for use in orthopedic and dental implants. Due to the mechanical properties of pure titanium, its use in implants is restricted to applications which involve moderate mechanical stress, such as dental implants. In applications where high mechanical strength is necessary, like orthopedic implants, it is appropriate to employ titanium-based alloys, which have better properties than pure titanium. The present work is related to the microstructure and corrosion resistance characterization of the Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy, designed to be used in orthopedic prostheses.

  16. Reconstruction of white matter fibre tracts using diffusion kurtosis tensor imaging at 1.5T: Pre-surgical planning in patients with gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leote, Joao; Nunes, Rita G; Cerqueira, Luis; Loução, Ricardo; Ferreira, Hugo A

    2018-01-01

    Tractography studies for pre-surgical planning of primary brain tumors is typically done using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which cannot resolve crossing, kissing or highly angulated fibres. Tractography based on the estimation of the diffusion kurtosis (DK) tensor was recently demonstrated to enable tackling these limitations. However, its use in the clinical context at low 1.5T field has not yet been reported. To evaluate if the estimation of whole-brain tractography using the DK tensor is feasible for pre-surgical investigation of patients with brain tumors at 1.5T. Eight healthy subjects and 3 patients with brain tumors were scanned at 1.5T using a 12-channel head coil. Diffusion-weighted images were acquired with repetition/echo times of 5800/107 ms, 82 × 82 resolution, 3 × 3 × 3 mm 3 voxel size, b-values of 0, 1000, 2000 s/mm 2 and 64 gradient sensitising directions. Whole-brain tractography was estimated using the DK tensor and corticospinal tracts (CST) were isolated using regions-of-interest placed at the cerebral peduncles and motor gyrus. Tract size, DK metrics and CST deviation index (highest curvature point) were compared between healthy subjects and patients. Tract sizes did not differ between groups. The CST deviation index was significantly higher in patients compared to healthy subjects. Fractional anisotropy was significantly lower in patients, with higher mean kurtosis asymmetry index at the highest curvature point in patients. Corticospinal fibre bundles estimated using DK tensor in a 1.5T scanner presented similar properties in patients with brain gliomas as those reported in the literature using DTI-based tractography.

  17. Pre-surgical integration of FMRI and DTI of the sensorimotor system in transcortical resection of a high-grade insular astrocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea eEkstrand

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein we report on a patient with a WHO Grade III astrocytoma in the right insular region in close proximity to the internal capsule who underwent a right frontotemporal craniotomy. Total gross resection of insular gliomas remains surgically challenging based on the possibility of damage to the corticospinal tracts. However, maximizing the extent of resection has been shown to decrease future adverse outcomes. Thus, the goal of such surgeries should focus on maximizing extent of resection while minimizing possible adverse outcomes. In this case, pre-surgical planning included integration of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, to localize motor and sensory pathways. Novel fMRI tasks were individually developed for the patient to maximize both somatosensory and motor activation simultaneously in areas in close proximity to the tumor. Information obtained was used to optimize resection trajectory and extent, facilitating gross total resection of the astrocytoma. Across all three motor-sensory tasks administered, fMRI revealed an area of interest just superior and lateral to the astrocytoma. Further, DTI analyses showed displacement of the corona radiata around the superior dorsal surface of the astrocytoma, extending in the direction of the activation found using fMRI. Taking into account these results, a transcortical superior temporal gyrus surgical approach was chosen in order to avoid the area of interest identified by fMRI and DTI. Total gross resection was achieved and minor post-surgical motor and sensory deficits were temporary. This case highlights the utility of comprehensive pre-surgical planning, including fMRI and DTI, to maximize surgical outcomes on a case-by-case basis.

  18. Virtual reality presurgical planning for cerebral gliomas adjacent to motor pathways in an integrated 3-D stereoscopic visualization of structural MRI and DTI tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tian-ming; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Jin-Song; Tang, Wei-Jun; Zhao, Yao; Pan, Zhi-Guang; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2010-11-01

    Resection of gliomas invading primary motor cortex and subcortical motor pathway is difficult in both surgical decision-making and functional outcome prediction. In this study, magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data were used to perform tractography to visualize pyramidal tract (PT) along its whole length in a stereoscopic virtual reality (VR) environment. The potential value of its clinical application was evaluated. Both three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI datasets were obtained from 45 eligible patients with suspected cerebral gliomas and then transferred to the VR system (Dextroscope; Volume Interactions Pte. Ltd., Singapore). The cortex and tumor were segmented and reconstructed via MRI, respectively, while the tractographic PTs were reconstructed via DTI. All those were presented in a stereoscopic 3-D display synchronously, for the purpose of patient-specific presurgical planning and surgical simulation in each case. The relationship between increasing amplitude of the number of effective fibers of PT (EPT) at affected sides and the patients' Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) at 6 months was addressed out. In VR presurgical planning for gliomas, surgery was aided by stereoscopic 3-D visualizing the relative position of the PTs and a tumor. There was no significant difference between pre- and postsurgical EPT in this population. A positive relationship was proved between EPT increasing amplitude and 6-month KPS. 3-D stereoscopic visualization of tractography in this VR environment enhances the operators to well understand the anatomic information of intra-axial tumor contours and adjacent PT, results in surgical trajectory optimization initially, and maximal safe tumor resection finally. In accordance to the EPT increasing amplitude, surgeon can predict the long-term motor functional outcome.

  19. PreSurgMapp: a MATLAB Toolbox for Presurgical Mapping of Eloquent Functional Areas Based on Task-Related and Resting-State Functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huiyuan; Ding, Zhongxiang; Mao, Dewang; Yuan, Jianhua; Zhu, Fangmei; Chen, Shuda; Xu, Yan; Lou, Lin; Feng, Xiaoyan; Qi, Le; Qiu, Wusi; Zhang, Han; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2016-10-01

    The main goal of brain tumor surgery is to maximize tumor resection while minimizing the risk of irreversible postoperative functional sequelae. Eloquent functional areas should be delineated preoperatively, particularly for patients with tumors near eloquent areas. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a noninvasive technique that demonstrates great promise for presurgical planning. However, specialized data processing toolkits for presurgical planning remain lacking. Based on several functions in open-source software such as Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM), Resting-State fMRI Data Analysis Toolkit (REST), Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI (DPARSF) and Multiple Independent Component Analysis (MICA), here, we introduce an open-source MATLAB toolbox named PreSurgMapp. This toolbox can reveal eloquent areas using comprehensive methods and various complementary fMRI modalities. For example, PreSurgMapp supports both model-based (general linear model, GLM, and seed correlation) and data-driven (independent component analysis, ICA) methods and processes both task-based and resting-state fMRI data. PreSurgMapp is designed for highly automatic and individualized functional mapping with a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) for time-saving pipeline processing. For example, sensorimotor and language-related components can be automatically identified without human input interference using an effective, accurate component identification algorithm using discriminability index. All the results generated can be further evaluated and compared by neuro-radiologists or neurosurgeons. This software has substantial value for clinical neuro-radiology and neuro-oncology, including application to patients with low- and high-grade brain tumors and those with epilepsy foci in the dominant language hemisphere who are planning to undergo a temporal lobectomy.

  20. Risk Factors for the Postoperative Transfusion of Allogeneic Blood in Orthopedics Patients With Intraoperative Blood Salvage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jia-Hua; Lyu, Yi; Cheng, Li-Ming; Li, Ying-Chuan; Gou, Da-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to explore the risk factors affecting the postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in patients undergoing orthopedics surgery with intraoperative blood salvage (IBS). A retrospective study of 279 patients undergoing orthopedic surgeries with IBS from May 2013 to May 2015 was enrolled. The binary logistic regression was used to find out the risk factors associated with postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in orthopedics patients with IBS, and then receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn to determine the optimal threshold of the regression model. Single factor analysis showed that age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, preoperative hemoglobin, operation time, received autologous blood, the laying time of autologous blood, bleeding volume, and postoperative drainage volume had significant effects on postoperative allogeneic blood transfusion. In binary logistic regression analysis, the independent factors predicting orthopedic patients with IBS need to transfuse allogeneic blood after surgeries were age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.415, P = 0.006), ASA grade (OR = 2.393, P = 0.035), preoperative hemoglobin (OR = 0.532, P = 0.022), and postoperative drainage volume (OR = 4.279, P = 0.000). The area under ROC curve was 0.79 and the predicted accuracy rate of the model was 81.58%. After operation, the orthopedic patients with IBS still have a high allogeneic blood transfusion rate, and IBS is not a perfect blood protection method. The logistic regression model of our study provides a reliable prediction for postoperative transfusion of allogeneic blood in orthopedic patients with IBS, which have a certain reference value. PMID:26937919

  1. The TROJAN Project: Creating a Customized International Orthopedic Training Program for Junior Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalraiya, Ashish; Buddhdev, Pranai

    2015-03-03

    Musculoskeletal problems account for a vast proportion of presentations encountered by doctors globally, with figures ranging from 15-36%. However, the time medical schools allocate to learning orthopedics is by no means proportional to this. This study aims to bridge this gap by developing an international orthopedic teaching program tailored to the specific knowledge and skills required by junior doctors in different countries. This prospective study asked fifty junior doctors, who had recently completed an orthopedics job, what three orthopedic teaching topics taught retrospectively would have benefitted their clinical practice. The most requested topics were used to design educational workshops for junior doctors and these consequently comprised the TROJAN (Teaching Requested by Orthopaedic Juniors And Novices) training program. Data was collected from twenty-five junior doctors in KwaZulu-Natale State, South Africa, and twenty-five in London, UK. It is therefore in these two countries that the TROJAN program was subsequently made available. Participants who selected topics were within two years of graduating medical school and had worked an orthopedic or Accident and Emergency job within the last year. 49% of topics chosen by SA doctors were practical skills such as wrist and ankle fracture reduction techniques, and management of open fractures. The most requested topic by UK doctors (11 out of 25) was management of neck of femur fractures. This is rationalized by the fact South African doctors require more hands-on responsibility in their daily practice whereas in the UK greater emphasis is placed on optimizing patients for theatre and making sound management plans. TROJAN currently develops orthopedic skills and knowledge in junior doctors in South Africa and United Kingdom with teaching customized based upon location. Feedback has been exceptionally positive with every candidate thus far rating the usefulness of TROJAN as the highest option, very useful.

  2. Analysis of the orthopedic in-training examination (OITE) musculoskeletal trauma questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, Jeffrey D; Srinivasan, Ramesh C; Goulet, James A; Dougherty, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Residency program directors are responsible for providing assessment and feedback about resident performance and for developing a comprehensive resident curriculum in orthopedic surgery. One measure of resident knowledge is the Orthopedic In-Training Examination (OITE). Scores of the OITE examination have been found to correlate with the American Board of Orthopedic Surgery Part 1 Certifying Examination. The purpose of this study was to identify commonly tested orthopedic trauma topics, the taxonomic distribution of questions, and literature references in the OITE to aid curriculum development and individual test preparation. The musculoskeletal trauma-related questions on the OITE during a 5-year period (2004-2008) were reviewed, and the number of questions, topics, taxonomic classification, and educational references associated with each question were analyzed. Nearly 30% of questions each year consist of musculoskeletal trauma-related topics. Femur, tibia, and hip fractures were the most commonly tested topics. The majority (65.6%) of musculoskeletal trauma questions tested recall of specific facts. Examiners referenced primary literature sources (74.9%) more than textbooks (25.1%). The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American) and the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma were cited most, accounting for 44.3% of all journal references. Forty-seven percent of the primary references were published within 5 years of the test administration. One method for assessing orthopedic knowledge is the OITE examination. Longitudinal analysis of trauma-related questions shows a consistent pattern of both topics and primary literature citation. This information may be used to help guide structured review for future OITE examinations and develop an orthopedic trauma curriculum for a residency program. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The TROJAN Project: Creating a Customized International Orthopedic Training Program for Junior Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalraiya, Ashish; Buddhdev, Pranai

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal problems account for a vast proportion of presentations encountered by doctors globally, with figures ranging from 15-36%. However, the time medical schools allocate to learning orthopedics is by no means proportional to this. This study aims to bridge this gap by developing an international orthopedic teaching program tailored to the specific knowledge and skills required by junior doctors in different countries. This prospective study asked fifty junior doctors, who had recently completed an orthopedics job, what three orthopedic teaching topics taught retrospectively would have benefitted their clinical practice. The most requested topics were used to design educational workshops for junior doctors and these consequently comprised the TROJAN (Teaching Requested by Orthopaedic Juniors And Novices) training program. Data was collected from twenty-five junior doctors in KwaZulu-Natale State, South Africa, and twenty-five in London, UK. It is therefore in these two countries that the TROJAN program was subsequently made available. Participants who selected topics were within two years of graduating medical school and had worked an orthopedic or Accident and Emergency job within the last year. 49% of topics chosen by SA doctors were practical skills such as wrist and ankle fracture reduction techniques, and management of open fractures. The most requested topic by UK doctors (11 out of 25) was management of neck of femur fractures. This is rationalized by the fact South African doctors require more hands-on responsibility in their daily practice whereas in the UK greater emphasis is placed on optimizing patients for theatre and making sound management plans. TROJAN currently develops orthopedic skills and knowledge in junior doctors in South Africa and United Kingdom with teaching customized based upon location. Feedback has been exceptionally positive with every candidate thus far rating the usefulness of TROJAN as the highest option, very useful

  4. Thirty-day readmission rates in orthopedics: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatz, James T; Tueting, Jonathan L; Anderson, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Hospital readmission rates are being used to evaluate performance. A survey of the present rates is needed before policies can be developed to decrease incidence of readmission. We address three questions: What is the present rate of 30-day readmission in orthopedics? How do factors such as orthopedic specialty, data source, patient insurance, and time of data collection affect the 30-day readmission rate? What are the causes and risk factors for 30-day readmissions? A review was first registered with Prospero (CRD42014010293, 6/17/2014) and a meta-analysis was performed to assess the current 30-day readmission rate in orthopedics. Studies published after 2006 were retrieved, and 24 studies met the inclusion criteria. The 30-day readmission rate was extrapolated from each study along with the orthopedic subspecialty, data source, patient insurance, time of collection, patient demographics, and cause of readmission. A sensitivity analysis was completed on the stratified groups. The overall 30-day readmission rate across all orthopedics was 5.4 percent (95% confidence interval: 4.8,6.0). There was no significant difference between subspecialties. Studies that retrieved data from a multicenter registry had a lower 30-day readmission rate than those reporting data from a single hospital or a large national database. Patient populations that only included Medicare patients had a higher 30-day readmission rate than populations of all insurance. The 30-day readmission rate has decreased in the past ten years. Age, length of stay, discharge to skilled nursing facility, increased BMI, ASA score greater than 3, and Medicare/Medicaid insurance showed statistically positive correlation with increased 30-day readmissions in greater than 75 percent of studies. Surgical site complications accounted for 46 percent of 30-day readmissions. This meta-analysis shows the present rate of 30-day readmissions in orthopedics. Demonstrable heterogeneity between studies underlines the

  5. Do Astronauts have a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions than a Cohort of Working Professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Young, Millenia; Wear, Mary L.; Tarver, W. J.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. NASA has implemented several occupational health initiatives during the past 20 years to decrease the number and severity of injuries, but the individual success rate is unknown. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated, but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. The purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  6. Examination to assess the clinical examination and documentation of spine pathology among orthopedic residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglin, Jack M; Zeller, John L; Egol, Kenneth A; Phillips, Donna P

    2017-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) guidelines requires residency programs to teach and evaluate residents in six overarching "core competencies" and document progress through educational milestones. To assess the progress of orthopedic interns' skills in performing a history, physical examination, and documentation of the encounter for a standardized patient with spinal stenosis, an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) was conducted for 13 orthopedic intern residents, following a 1-month boot camp that included communications skills and curriculum in history and physical examination. Interns were objectively scored based on their performance of the physical examination, communication skills, completeness and accuracy of their electronic medical record (EMR), and their diagnostic conclusions gleaned from the patient encounter. The purpose of this study was to meaningfully assess the clinical skills of orthopedic post-graduate year (PGY)-1 interns. The findings can be used to develop a standardized curriculum for documenting patient encounters and highlight common areas of weakness among orthopedic interns with regard to the spine history and physical examination and conducting complete and accurate clinical documentation. A major orthopedic specialty hospital and academic medical center. Thirteen PGY-1 orthopedic residents participated in the OSCE with the same standardized patient presenting with symptoms and radiographs consistent with spinal stenosis. Videos of the encounters were independently viewed and objectively evaluated by one investigator in the study. This evaluation focused on the completeness of the history and the performance and completion of the physical examination. The standardized patient evaluated the communication skills of each intern with a separate objective evaluation. Interns completed these same scoring guides to evaluate their own performance in history, physical examination, and communications

  7. [SGTB orthopedic regime to correct protrusive skeletal anomalies: a developmental path through evolution, renovation and innovation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Gang

    2015-10-01

    Sagittal-guidance Twin-block appliance (SGTB), an orthopedic therapy that has been widely implemented in orthodontic practice since it was introduced by the author a decade ago. This overview was aimed to clarify the fundamental mechanism of SGTB in correction of skeletal malocclusions, i.e., retraction of the maxilla triggered by the muscular force generated from mandibular forward positioning. This overview was also designed to summarize the evolutionary pathway through which SGTB regime originated and developed from removable, bonded and to the latest form of clear aligner SGTB. It was concluded that SGTB promised to be an efficient orthopedic approach to manage complicated and severe dentofacial anomalies with skeletal element.

  8. [Improving the effectiveness of functional jaw orthopedics in Class II malocclusion by appropriate treatment timing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-12-01

    Time can be considered the fourth dimension in dento-facial orthopedics. Treatment timing can play a significant role in the outcomes of treatment aimed to produce an orthopedic effect in the craniofacial structures. The results of methodologically-sound cephalometric studies of both the past and the recent history of orthodontics clearly indicate that optimal treatment timing for Class II skeletal disharmony with a functional appliance (e.g. twin block) is during or slightly after the peak in mandibular growth as revealed by a reliable biologic indicator of individual skeletal maturity such as the cervical vertebral maturation method. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2010.

  9. [Nomenclature and classification of complications. Standard procedure at the Heidelberg University Orthopedic Clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, K L; Clauss, M

    1999-03-01

    In order to get a better data management of complications in orthopedic surgery and in order to get comparable statistics a standardisation of nomenclature and classification of complications is demanded since 1.1.1997. The Orthopedic University Clinic of Heidelberg started with a register of all early complications of all inpatients. According to a standardized nomenclature all occurred complications the doctors put in the data of complications in a database. These data were controlled, complemented and classified by members of the quality management group. This guideline consists of five parts: catalogue of diagnoses, general and special definitions, classification and an allocation table of diagnoses to grades of severity.

  10. Constipation prophylaxis in children undergoing orthopedic surgery: A quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantegazzi, Laila Sara; Seliner, Brigitte; Imhof, Lorenz

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of constipation prophylaxis administered with the support of an advanced practice nurse. A quasi-experimental study with a historical control group of 112 pediatric (age 1-18) orthopedic patients and an intervention group of 59 patients was conducted in a surgical ward in Switzerland. The implementation of a standardized constipation prophylaxis led to an absolute risk reduction (27%) of constipation. Fisher's exact test showed a significant difference in the prevalence of constipation in the two samples, p = .001. Constipation prophylaxis is a necessity in pediatric orthopedics. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Multi-detector CT imaging in the postoperative orthopedic patient with metal hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vande Berg, Bruno; Malghem, Jacques; Maldague, Baudouin; Lecouvet, Frederic

    2006-01-01

    Multi-detector CT imaging (MDCT) becomes routine imaging modality in the assessment of the postoperative orthopedic patients with metallic instrumentation that degrades image quality at MR imaging. This article reviews the physical basis and CT appearance of such metal-related artifacts. It also addresses the clinical value of MDCT in postoperative orthopedic patients with emphasis on fracture healing, spinal fusion or arthrodesis, and joint replacement. MDCT imaging shows limitations in the assessment of the bone marrow cavity and of the soft tissues for which MR imaging remains the imaging modality of choice despite metal-related anatomic distortions and signal alteration

  12. Noticeable Variations in the Educational Exposure During Residency in Danish Orthopedic Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Eske; Fridberg, Marie; Knudsen, Ulrik Kragegaard

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to examine the educational exposure during residency in Danish orthopedic departments. DESIGN: Questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. SETTING: Data were gathered from January 1, 2014 to April 30, 2014 through a nationwide web-based questionnaire....... CONCLUSIONS: A large variation in the educational exposure was found among the Danish orthopedic departments. Numbers indicate that Danish residents, compared with their US counterparts, operate considerably less during residency. Most residents work overtime and many of them work for free to participate...

  13. When Infants Talk, Infants Listen: Pre-Babbling Infants Prefer Listening to Speech with Infant Vocal Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masapollo, Matthew; Polka, Linda; Ménard, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    To learn to produce speech, infants must effectively monitor and assess their own speech output. Yet very little is known about how infants perceive speech produced by an infant, which has higher voice pitch and formant frequencies compared to adult or child speech. Here, we tested whether pre-babbling infants (at 4-6 months) prefer listening to…

  14. A Novel Phased-Concept Course for the Delivery of Anatomy and Orthopedics Training in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, Stefan; Hepp, Pierre; Löffler, Sabine; Cornwall, Jon; Hammer, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Integration of anatomy and clinical teaching is a theoretical ideal, yet there is a worldwide paucity of such amalgamation. These teaching models provide support for medical trainees, an important element in Germany where orthopedic intern numbers have declined and anecdotal evidence suggests disinterest in orthopedics. The aim of the study was to…

  15. Selective laser sintering of calcium phosphate materials for orthopedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Goonhee

    control of micro and macro pore structure, to maximize bone healing and provide sufficient mechanical strength. It also permits the complete removal of the polymeric binders that are resided in the SLS process. In collaboration with the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and BioMedical Enterprises, Inc., porous implants based on anatomical geometry have been successfully implanted in rabbits and dogs. These histologic animal studies reveal excellent biocompatibility and show its great potential for commercial custom-fit implant manufacture. The second research effort involves fabrication of fully dense bone for application in dental restoration and load-bearing orthopedic functions. Calcium phosphate glass melts, proven to be biocompatible in the first effort, were cast into carbon molds. Processes were developed for preparing the molds. These carbon molds of anatomic shape can be prepared from either Computer Numerical Control (CNC) milling of slab stock or SLS processing of thermoset-coated graphite powder. The CNC milling method provides accurate dimension of the molds in a short period of time, however, the capable geometries are limited; generally two pieces of molds are required for complex shapes. The SLS method provides very complex shape green molds. However, they need to go through pyrolysis of thermoset binder to provide the high temperature capability reached at calcium phosphate melt temperatures (1100°C) and noticeable shrinkage was observed during pyrolysis. The cast glass was annealed to develop polycrystalline calcium phosphate. This process also exhibits great potential.

  16. [The construction of a medical discipline and its challenges: Orthopedics in Switzerland during the 19th and 20th centuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, Mariama

    2015-07-01

    During the 19th century, numerous figures, with different qualifications, claimed to practice orthopedics: doctors, surgeons, inventors of equipment and instruments, and other empiricists. They performed certain types of techniques, massages, surgical operationsand/or fitted prostheses. The polysemous notion of orthopedics had created conflicts of interest that would reach their height at the end of the 19th century. The integration of orthopedics into the training at the university level enhanced its proximity to surgery, a discipline that has dominated the so-called modern medicine. During the 20th century, various medical branches defend the legitimacy of certain orthopedic practices, thereby threating to a degree the title itself of this specialization. By examining the challenges that have shaped the history of orthopedics in Switzerland, this article also seeks to shed light on the strategies that were implemented in adopting a medical and technical discipline within a transforming society.

  17. Ptosis - infants and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blepharoptosis - children; Congenital ptosis; Eyelid drooping - children; Eyelid drooping - amblyopia; Eyelid drooping - astigmatism ... Ptosis in infants and children is often due to a problem with the muscle that raises the eyelid. A nerve problem in the eyelid can ...

  18. Abbott Infant Formula Recall

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This list includes products subject to recall since September 2010 related to infant formula distributed by Abbott. This list will be updated with publicly available...

  19. Urine collection - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003417.htm Urine collection - infants To use the sharing features on this ... collect the urine at home, have some extra collection bags available. How the Test will Feel There ...

  20. Total parenteral nutrition - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007239.htm Total parenteral nutrition - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  1. Cow's milk - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002448.htm Cow's milk - infants To use the sharing features on this ... year old, you should not feed your baby cow's milk, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). ...

  2. Diarrhea in infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    When your infant has diarrhea; When your baby has diarrhea; BRAT diet; Diarrhea in children ... Children who have diarrhea may have less energy, dry eyes, or a dry, sticky mouth. They may also not wet their diaper as ...

  3. Diarrhea in infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... water down Pedialyte or Infalyte. Do not give sports drinks to young infants. Try giving your baby ... gastrointestinal tract infections and food poisoning. In Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ, ...

  4. A Prototype Robotic Arm for Use by Severely Orthopedically Handicapped Students. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Richard

    This 18-month pilot project, which ran from October 1, 1987 to March 31, 1989, developed a prototype robotic arm for educational use by students with severe orthopedic disabilities in the Columbus (Ohio) Public Schools. The developmental effort was intended first, to provide direct access to currently available instructional materials and, second,…

  5. Postoperative urinary retention after general and spinal anesthesia in orthopedic surgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Abdel aziz Niazi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Urinary retention is more common after spinal than general anesthesia in orthopedic patients. Adding narcotics to the local anesthetics intrathecally causes more incidence of postoperative urinary retention, which may delay patients discharge and transabdominal ultrasonography is a reliable, noninvasive, inexpensive and simple method to measure bladder volume postoperatively.

  6. The Effect of Orthopedic Advertising and Self-Promotion on a Naïve Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohney, Stephen; Lee, Daniel J; Elfar, John C

    2016-01-01

    There has been a marked increase in the number of physicians marketing themselves directly to patients and consumers. However, it is unclear how different promotional styles affect patients' perceptions of their physicians. We hypothesized that self-promoting orthopedic surgeons enjoy a more positive impact on nonphysician patients as compared to non-self-promoting surgeons, as well as a corresponding negative impact on their peer-surgeons. Surgeon websites were selected from the 5 largest population centers in the United States. Subjects with varying degrees of familiarity with orthopedic surgery evaluated Internet profiles of surgeons on a forced choice Likert scale to measure the amount of self-promotion. The naïve subjects judged self-promoting surgeons more favorably than the orthopedic surgeons. In contrast, board-certified orthopedic surgeons viewed self-promoting surgeons more negatively than did their nonphysician counterparts. In summary, the present study revealed that the potential for self-promotion to unduly influence potential patients is real and should be a considerable concern to surgeons, patients, and the profession.

  7. A Survey on Transfusion Status in Orthopedic Surgery at a Trauma Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Soleimanha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increased costs and mortality associated with inappropriate blood transfusions have led to investigations about blood request and blood transfusion techniques. We investigated the transfusion status in patients who underwent orthopedic surgery in Poursina Hospital (Rasht, Iran to optimizing blood usage and determine if a scheduled transfusion program for every orthopedic surgery could improve blood transfusion management. Method: In this descriptive-prospective study, all orthopedic surgeries in Poursina Hospital, Rasht, between April to June 2013 were reviewed. All patient information was recorded, including: demographics, type of surgery, hemoglobin level, cross-match test, duration of surgery, and blood loss, and transfusion. Based on the one-way ANOVA and independent samples test analysis, cross-match to transfusion ratio and transfusion possibility, the transfusion index, and maximal surgical blood order schedule were calculated to determine blood transfusion status. Results: Among 872 selected orthopedic surgery candidates, 318 of them were cross-matched and among those, 114 patients received a blood transfusion. In this study, the cross-match to transfusion ratio was 6.4, transfusion possibility 36.47%, transfusion index 0.6, and maximal surgical blood order schedule 0.9. Conclusion: We found that blood ordering was moderately higher than the standard; so it is highly recommended to focus on the knowledge of evidence based on transfusion and standard guidelines for blood transfusion to avoid over-ordering.

  8. Bacteria antibiotic resistance: New challenges and opportunities for implant-associated orthopedic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingyun; Webster, Thomas J

    2018-01-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, which has made antibiotic choices for infection control increasingly limited and more expensive. In the U.S. alone, antibiotic-resistant bacteria cause at least 2 million infections and 23,000 deaths a year resulting in a $55-70 billion per year economic impact. Antibiotics are critical to the success of surgical procedures including orthopedic prosthetic surgeries, and antibiotic resistance is occurring in nearly all bacteria that infect people, including the most common bacteria that cause orthopedic infections, such as Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Most clinical cases of orthopedic surgeries have shown that patients infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This paper reviews the severity of antibiotic resistance at the global scale, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and the pathways bacteria used to develop antibiotic resistance. It highlights the opportunities and challenges in limiting antibiotic resistance through approaches like the development of novel, non-drug approaches to reduce bacteria functions related to orthopedic implant-associated infections. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:22-32, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Eponymous terms in daily practice: a survey among Dutch orthopedic surgeons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somford, Matthijs P.; Nieuwe Weme, Rebecca A.; Sierevelt, Inger; Eygendaal, Denise

    2017-01-01

    With a survey among Dutch orthopedic surgeons, we try to assess whether eponymous terms are still in use in daily practice. We also tried to find out whether younger generations tend to use them less than our older colleagues. In a survey consisting of 57 eponymous terms, 67 participants were asked

  10. The impact of ankle osteoarthritis. The difference of opinion between patient and orthopedic surgeon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Angelique G. H.; Hofstad, Cheriel J.; Breslau, Mark J.; Blankevoort, Leendert; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Outcome measures for ankle osteoarthritis (OA) are created by physicians with little input of the target patient group. The aim of this study was to determine the difference in opinion between patients and orthopedic surgeons concerning the importance of specific symptoms of ankle OA and its impact

  11. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations…

  12. Qualitative evaluation of a form for standardized information exchange between orthopedic surgeons and occupational physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Faber (Elske); A. Burdorf (Alex); A.L. van Staa (AnneLoes); H.S. Miedema (Harald); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Both occupational physicians and orthopedic surgeons can be involved in the management of work relevant musculoskeletal disorders. These physicians hardly communicate with each other and this might lead to different advice to the patient. Therefore, we evaluated a

  13. The Physical Fitness of Sensory and Orthopedically Impaired Youth: Project UNIQUE. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnick, Joseph P.; Short, Francis X.

    The report summarizes findings from an examination of the physical fitness of orthopedically and sensory impaired students (10-17 years old). Physical fitness was hypothesized to include six areas: body composition, muscular strength/endurance, speed, agility, flexibility, and cardiorespiratory endurance. A chapter on methods details subject…

  14. Rapid Extremity Pain Relief by Battlefield Acupuncture after Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-21

    FINAL REPORT Project Title: Rapid Extremity Pain Relief by Battlefield Acupuncture after Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial...relieving acute extremity pain , reducing medication use, decreasing time to full ambulation and improving quality of life than placebo acupuncture or...designated intervention. Acupuncture was performed by physician acupuncturists. Subjects reported pain level immediately after acupuncture , 24, 28 168

  15. [Lack of new trainees in trauma surgery and orthopedics. An approach to a solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, K; Matziolis, D; Perka, C

    2010-12-01

    The reasons for a shortage of young people in trauma surgery and orthopedics have often been discussed. Atypical progression of medical operating levels, antisocial working hours and an inadequate financial compensation for on-call duties have been given as the reasons for a lack of interest in the discipline. Additionally a progressive feminization of the medical profession and rejection of surgical disciplines because of a mismatch with family interests and the demands of advanced surgical training have also been named. Surveys on the choice of medical specialization reveal that experiences during the course of studying have a great influence on future prospects and are immensely important for the further focusing on the future as a medical doctor. In order to increase the attractiveness of the specialization, programs for students were initiated by the heads of the Conventions of Higher Education Lecturers for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery and the management of the German Society for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery. Due to the enormous popularity auxiliary projects were demanded. Consequently a "Trauma Surgery and Orthopedic Day for Students" was organized on 16th February 2010 in the Musculoskeletal Centre of the Charité in Berlin. The aim was to convey practical skills and to inspire the choice of this specialization in the future.

  16. Orthopedic Surgery in Rural American Hospitals: A Survey of Rural Hospital Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Rural American residents prefer to receive their medical care locally. Lack of specific medical services in the local community necessitates travel to a larger center which is less favorable. This study was done to identify how rural hospitals choose to provide orthopedic surgical services to their communities. Methods: All hospitals in 5 states…

  17. Franciszek Neugebauer's Ichnograms as a Pioneering Diagnostic Method in Orthopedics in the 19th Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowska-Zamachowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an original orthopedic diagnostic method from the late 19th century developed by Franciszek Neugebauer, a distinguished Polish physician. His technique of detecting skeletal abnormalities was an excellent coping method in the time before the first diagnostic imaging method - x-ray imaging - had been invented.

  18. Aging and orthopedics: how a lifespan development model can inform practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautreau, Sylvia; Gould, Odette N; Forsythe, Michael E

    2016-08-01

    Orthopedic surgical care, like all health care today, is in flux owing to an aging population and to chronic medical conditions leading to an increased number of people with illnesses that need to be managed over the lifespan. The result is an ongoing shift from curing acute illnesses to the management and care of chronic illness and conditions. Theoretical models that provide a useful and feasible vision for the future of health care and health care research are needed. This review discusses how the lifespan development model used in some disciplines within the behavioural sciences can be seen as an extension of the biopsychosocial model. We posit that the lifespan development model provides useful perspectives for both orthopedic care and research. We present key concepts and recommendations, and we discuss how the lifespan development model can contribute to new and evolving perspectives on orthopedic outcomes and to new directions for research. We also offer practical guidelines on how to implement the model in orthopedic practice.

  19. Stem Cells in Orthopedics: A Comprehensive Guide for the General Orthopedist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Weber, Alexander E; Yanke, Adam; Nho, Shane J

    2016-01-01

    The use of biologic adjuvants in the treatment of operative and nonoperative orthopedic injuries continues to expand in concert with our understanding of the acute and chronic healing process of musculoskeletal injuries. Stem cell treatments in orthopedics are among the most commonly explored options, and have found varying levels of success in promoting osseous and soft tissue healing. Basic science and translational studies have demonstrated the potential for broad application of stem cells in the treatment of a growing number of musculoskeletal injuries. Emerging clinical studies have also provided promising results, although the vast majority of studies have featured small sample sizes and limited duration of follow-up. In addition, a number of important questions remain regarding the clinical safety, treatment delivery, and overall efficacy of stem cell augmentation of injured tissue in orthopedics. The objective of the current review is to present a broad overview of the current state of stem cell treatments in orthopedic surgery, with an emphasis on soft tissue healing. This review of stem cell treatment covers the basic science behind biologic augmentation, advantages of the various stem cell sources, preclinical results, and current and future clinical applications.

  20. Social Networking as a Tool for Lifelong Learning with Orthopedically Impaired Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Metin; Güneyli, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses how Turkish Cypriot orthopedically impaired learners who are living in North Cyprus use social networking as a tool for leisure and education, and to what extent they satisfy their personal development needs by means of these digital platforms. The case study described, conducted in North Cyprus in 2015 followed a qualitative…

  1. Validation of a Web-Based Curriculum for Resident Education in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boody, Barrett; Johnson, Patrick; Pugely, Andrew; Miller, Daniel; Geller, Jeffrey; Payne, William; Boegener, James; Schafer, Michael; Beal, Matthew

    The Orthopedic In-Training Examination is an annual standardized examination with multiple-choice questions focused on application of orthopedic surgery core knowledge and principles. The outcome of this test can be used to both predict how residents are progressing in their orthopedic knowledge as well as assess their likelihood to pass the Orthopedic Board Examinations, that is the American Boards of Orthopedic Surgery Part 1, following completion of residency. Preparation for the examination can be difficult, as residents commonly have limited study time to review the vast amounts of available published literature. The objective of our study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Orthopaedic In Training Examination (OITE) scores and the participants' perceived utility of the curriculum for OITE preparation. Residents from 5 US Orthopedic residencies (4 M.D. and 1 D.O.) were included in a pilot program of the Orthobullets PASS curriculum in the academic year 2013 to 2014. Only residents enrolled in the PASS curriculum who completed both the 2013 and 2014 OITEs were included in the final analysis (n = 71). We used the OITE 2013 and 2014 rank postgraduate year (RPGY) reported scores to assess for efficacy of the PASS curriculum, as the RPGY score provides postgraduate year-of-training matched analysis to control for expected increased levels of knowledge with subsequent retesting. While OITE scores incrementally increased for the group as a whole (n = 71, RPGY mean improvement = +2.5%, p = 0.406), the junior resident subgroup (postgraduate year 1-2) produced a statistically significant increase in scores (n = 28, RPGY mean increase = 10.1%, p = 0.0260). Nearly 90% (38/42) of curriculum participants surveyed reported a preference to complete a similar review curriculum for future OITE preparation. The participants completing greater than 150 PASS questions (n = 57) were analyzed for OITE predictive capacity of the PASS curriculum. Pearson analysis with PASS

  2. Quantitative analysis of the orthodontic and orthopedic effects of maxillary traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Isaacson, R J; West, E E; Molthen, R

    1983-11-01

    This article analyzes differences in displacement of ANS and of the upper first molar when different vectors of force are delivered to the maxilla in non-full-banded Phase I mixed-dentition treatment of Class II malocclusion. The sample is identical to that for which we have previously reported differences in change in several key measures of mandibular and facial shape. It includes a cervical-traction group, a high-pull-to-upper-molar group, a modified-activator group, and an untreated Class II control group. Using newly developed computer-conducted procedures, which are described, we have been able to partition the orthodontic and orthopedic components of upper molar displacement and also to isolate treatment effects from those attributable to spontaneous growth and development. In the region of ANS, small but statistically significant and clinically meaningful differences were noted between treatments. When the intercurrent effects of growth and development had been factored out (Table III), orthopedic distal displacement of ANS was significantly greater in the high-pull and cervical groups than in the activator group. Orthopedic downward displacement of ANS was seen to be significantly greater in the cervical group than in the high-pull and activator groups. In the region of the first molar cusp, mean distal displacement of the tooth as an orthopedic effect was found to be almost identical in the cervical and high-pull groups (although variability was greater in the cervical group), but the mean orthodontic effect was significantly greater in the high-pull group than in the cervical group. In the cervical group, where relatively light forces were used for relatively long treatment periods on average, more of the total distal displacement of the upper molar was of an orthopedic character than of an orthodontic character. Conversely, in the high-pull group, in which relatively heavier forces tended to be used for briefer treatment periods, most of the distal

  3. Evaluation of radiation protection in interventional orthopedic procedures in Khartoum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M. Y. A.

    2013-06-01

    In this study an evaluation of radiation safety and protection in interventional orthopedic procedures for the staff in three theatres in Khartoum state was conducted. To evaluate radiation protection program and staff knowledge with regard to radiation protection a questionnaire was designed and distributed among the staff there. Integrity check was conducted on the available radiation tools ( lead aprons) to ensure that they provide optimal protection when positioned appropriately. Also dose rate was measured around the theatre to evaluate the level of leakage radiation. Finally the absorbed dose to orthopedic specialists was measured during several procedures. The study showed the absence of most of the radiation protection and safety procedures that ensure the protection of of workers and lack of radiation protection program. The integrity check conducted on lead aprons showed uncapable crack in about 24% of the checked aprons. And in spite of this, there was no action taken to withdraw those faulty aprons or to replace them due to the acute shortage of the aprons available in the three centers and this will cause unjustified radiation exposure to the staff. The level of radiation around the theatres was found to fall within the acceptable limit according to the international commission of radiation protection (ICRP) recommendations that -if implemented -could improve the status of radiation protection in interventional orthopedic procedures. The improve. The important recommendations are to establish a single regulatory authority in Sudan independent from any user or promotion of radiation as well as to conduct periodically training courses for orthopedic staff on radiation protection in orthopedic interventional procedures.(Author)

  4. The impact of a hospitalist on role boundaries in an orthopedic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster F

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fiona Webster,1 Samantha Bremner,2 Megan Jackson,3 Vikas Bansal,2 Joanna Sale41Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Holland Orthopedic and Arthritic Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Faculty of Social Science, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada; 4Mobility Program Clinical Research Unit, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, CanadaPurpose: Hospitalists specialize in the management of hospitalized patients. They work with several health care professionals to provide patient care. There has been little research examining the perceived impact of the hospitalist's role on staff working in an orthopedic environment. This study examined the experiences of staff across several professional backgrounds in working with a hospitalist in an orthopedic environment.Participants and methods: A qualitative descriptive approach was taken to investigate the experience of staff working with a hospitalist at a specialized orthopedic hospital. Purposive sampling was used to recruit interview participants including nurses, internists, pharmacists, physiotherapists, anesthetists, senior administration, and orthopedic surgeons to the point of theoretical saturation, which occurred after 12 interviews. Interviews were coded, and these codes were combined into categories and predominant themes were identified.Findings: Overall, staff believed that the hospitalist role was a positive addition to the facility. The role benefitted patients and supported the clinical well-being and education of staff. Many staff felt the hospitalist had no impact on their workload, but others reported that their work had decreased or increased. Several described the potential for role overlap between the hospitalist and other physicians.Conclusion: The importance of interprofessional collaboration in the implementation of the hospitalist role was a recurring theme in our analysis. This study

  5. Developing a minimum data set of the information management system for orthopedic injuries in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Mohammadi, Ali; Chraghbaigi, Ramin; Fathi, Taimur; Shojaee Baghini, Mahdieh

    2014-07-01

    Orthopedic injuries are the most common types of injuries. To identify the main causes of injuries, collecting data in a standard manner at the national level are needed, which justifies necessity of making a minimum data set (MDS). The aim of this study was to develop an MDS of the information management system for orthopedic injuries in Iran. This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed in 2013. Data were collected from hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences that had orthopedic department, medical documents centers, legal medicine centers, emergency centers, internet access, and library. Investigated documents were orthopedic injury records in 2012, documents that retrieved from the internet, and printed materials. Records with Random sampling by S22-S99 categories from ICD-10 were selected and the related internet-sourced data were evaluated entirely. Data were collected using a checklist. In order to make a consensus about the data elements, the decision Delphi technique was applied by a questionnaire. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaire were assessed by expert's opinions and test-retest method, respectively. AN MDS OF ORTHOPEDIC INJURIES WERE ASSIGNED TO TWO CATEGORIES: administrative category with six classes including 142 data elements, and clinical category with 17 classes including 250 data elements. This study showed that some of the essential data elements included in other country's MDS or required for organizations and healthcare providers were not included. Therefore, a complete list of an MDS elements was created. Existence of comprehensive data concerning the causes and mechanisms of injuries informs public health policy-makers about injuries occurrence and enables them to take rationale measures to deal with these problems.

  6. Informal (Hallway) medical consultation in orthopedics-is it as common as it seems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Leonid; Barzilay, Yair; Friedman, Adi; Ilsar, Idan; Safran, Ori; Mattan, Yoav

    2017-05-01

    Informal (hallway) medical consultation is an integral part of the physician's work. As musculoskeletal complaints are very common, orthopedic surgeons stand in the frontline of this practice. Many of these consultations are poorly, if at all, documented, thus imposing a potential medical danger to the patient and a medicolegal danger to the surgeon. We conducted this first study to examine whether this practice is common among the orthopedic surgeons in university hospital. In this prospective study, a 2-month record of informal consultations was kept. Six orthopedic surgeons-two joint reconstruction surgeons, one spine surgeon, two arthroscopy and sports medicine surgeons, and a shoulder surgeon participated. They recorded the details of the consulter, whether the consultation was for himself or somebody else, the major complaint, and whether it was a second opinion. All patients were advised to go to the formal orthopedic consultation and no advice or treatment was given. At the end of 2 months, each surgeon was asked to evaluate the percentage of cases he had failed to report. During the 2-month period, 158 people asked for informal (hallway) consultations. 11 of them (7%) were physicians, 114 (72%) were other hospital personnel, 26 (17%) were unrelated to hospital, and 6 (4%) were treated patients' relatives. 93 (59%) of consultations were about the consulter himself and the rest were about a relative or a friend. 41 (26%) were requests for a second opinion. The estimated percentage of not reported cases was 10-40%; when the number of consultations was corrected for these figures, it reached 208 consultations in 2 months. In this prospective study, six participating surgeons recorded 158 informal consultation requests in 2 months. If a correction is performed, it averages 0.6 consultations a day for a surgeon (or, if only workdays are counted-0.8 consultations a day). Orthopedic surgeons should be aware of this frequent habit and send these patients to a

  7. Communication with Orthopedic Trauma Patients via an Automated Mobile Phone Messaging Robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Chris A; Volkmar, Alexander; Shah, Apurva S; Willey, Mike; Karam, Matt; Marsh, J Lawrence

    2017-12-20

    Communication with orthopedic trauma patients is traditionally problematic with low response rates (RRs). The purpose of this investigation was to (1) evaluate the feasibility of communicating with orthopedic trauma patients postoperatively, utilizing an automated mobile phone messaging platform; and (2) assess the first 2 weeks of postoperative patient-reported pain and opioid use after lower extremity orthopedic trauma procedures. This was a prospective investigation at a Level 1 trauma center in the United States. Adult patients who were capable of mobile phone messaging and were undergoing common, lower extremity orthopedic trauma procedures were enrolled in the study. Patients received a daily mobile phone message protocol inquiring about their current pain level and amount of opioid medication they had taken in the past 24 h starting on postoperative day (POD) 3 and continuing through POD 17. Our analysis considered (1) Patient completion rate of mobile phone questions, (2) Patient-reported pain level (0-10 scale), and (3) Number and percentage of daily prescribed opioid medication patients reported taking. Twenty-five patients were enrolled in this investigation. Patients responded to 87.5% of the pain and opioid medication inquiries they received over the 2-week study period. There were no differences in RRs by patient age, sex, or educational attainment. Patient-reported pain decreased over the initial 2-week study period from an average of 4.9 ± 1.7 on POD 3 to 3 ± 2.2 on POD 16-17. Patients took an average of 68% of their maximum daily narcotic prescription on POD 3 compared with 35% of their prescribed pain medication on POD 16-17. We found that in orthopedic trauma patients, an automated mobile phone messaging platform elicited a high patient RR that improved upon prior methods in the literature. This method may be used to reliably obtain pain and medication utilization data after trauma procedures.

  8. Declining trends in invasive orthopedic interventions for people with hemophilia enrolled in the Universal Data Collection program (2000–2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    TOBASE, P.; LANE, H.; SIDDIQI, A.-E-A.; INGRAM-RICH, R.; WARD, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recurrent joint hemarthroses due to hemophilia (Factor VIII and Factor IX deficiency) often lead to invasive orthopedic interventions to decrease frequency of bleeding and/or to alleviate pain associated with end-stage hemophilic arthropathy. Aim Identify trends in invasive orthopedic interventions among people with hemophilia who were enrolled in the Universal Data Collection (UDC) program during the period 2000–2010. Methods Data were collected from 130 hemophilia treatment centers in the United States annually during the period 2000–2010, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The number of visits in which an invasive orthopedic intervention was reported was expressed as a proportion of the total visits in each year of the program. Invasive orthopedic interventions consisted of arthroplasty, arthrodesis, and synovectomy. Joints included in this study were the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, and ankle. Results A 5.6% decrease in all invasive orthopedic interventions in all joints of people with hemophilia enrolled in the UDC program over the 11-year study period was observed. Conclusions These data reflect a declining trend in invasive orthopedic interventions in people with hemophilia. Further research is needed to understand the characteristics that may influence invasive orthopedic interventions. PMID:27030396

  9. The Highest-Impact Combat Orthopedic and Extremity Injury Articles in the Past 70 Years: A Citation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jason; Do, Woo S; Stinner, Daniel J; Wenke, Joseph C; Orman, Jean A; Kragh, John F

    The objective of this study was to identify the most-cited peer-reviewed combat orthopedic and extremity injury articles published during the past 70 years. Orthopedic trauma presents ongoing challenges to both US civilian and military healthcare personnel. Improvements in combat trauma and extremity injury survival and quality of life are the result of advances in orthopedic trauma research. The Web of Science (including Science Citation Index) was searched for the most cited articles related to combat orthopedic trauma, published from 1940 to 2013. The most-cited article was by Owens et al. (Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, 2007; 137 citations). Between the 1990s and 2000s, there was a 256% increase in the number of highly cited publications. A total of 69% of the articles were on the topics of comorbid vascular trauma (25%), epidemiology (23%), or orthopedic trauma (21%). This study identifies some of the most important contributions to combat orthopedic trauma and research and the areas of greatest scientific interest to the specialty during the past seven decades and highlights key research that has contributed to the evolution of modern combat orthopedic traumatology. 2017.

  10. Presurgical functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) with intravenous echo enhancing agent SonoVue enables determination of language lateralization in epilepsy patients with poor temporal bone windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Patrick M; Brückner, Katja E; Lohmann, Hubertus H

    2011-03-01

    Presurgical determination of language lateralization is important for planning and outcome estimation of neurosurgical interventions in patients with drug-refractory epilepsy. Functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) provides an established measure for language lateralization using the temporal bone windows for continuous recording of the cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in both middle cerebral arteries (MCAs). However, because of insufficient temporal bone windows, fTCD cannot be applied properly in every patient. Here, we established stable and sufficient CBFV signals in both MCAs using continuous intravenous application of echo-enhancing agent SonoVue in 7 of 10 patients with poor temporal bone windows and were thus able to determine language lateralization. We conclude that the application of SonoVue can solve one principal disadvantage of fTCD and improves the applicability of the technique as a presurgical functional language lateralization procedure. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. FDG PET/CT diagnostic criteria may need adjustment based on MRI to estimate the presurgical risk of extrapelvic infiltration in patients with uterine endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, Satoko; Sakuragi, Noriaki [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Gynecology, Sapporo (Japan); Hattori, Naoya; Manabe, Osamu; Hirata, Kenji; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kitaku, Sapporo (Japan); Kato, Fumi; Mimura, Rie; Magota, Keiichi; Sugimori, Hiroyuki [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Sapporo (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    The staging of endometrial cancer requires surgery which carries the risk of morbidity. FDG PET/CT combined with anatomical imaging may reduce the number of unnecessary lymphadenectomies by demonstrating the risk of extrapelvic infiltration. The purpose of this study was to optimize FDG PET/CT diagnostic criteria for risk assessment in endometrial cancer after first-line risk triage with MRI. The study population comprised 37 patients who underwent curative surgery for the treatment of endometrial cancer. First, the risk of extrapelvic infiltration was triaged using MRI. Second, multiple glucose metabolic profiles of the primary lesion were assessed with FDG PET/CT, and these were correlated with the histopathological risk of extrapelvic infiltration including lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI) and high-grade malignancy (grades 2 and 3). The results of histological correlation were used to adjust FDG PET/CT diagnostic criteria. Presurgical assessment using MRI was positive for deep (>50 %) myometrial invasion in 17 patients. The optimal FDG PET/CT diagnostic criteria vary depending on the results of MRI. Specifically, SUVmax (≥16.0) was used to indicate LVSI risk with an overall diagnostic accuracy of 88.2 % in patients with MRI findings showing myometrial invasion. High-grade malignancy did not correlate with any of metabolic profiles in this patient group. In the remaining patients without myometrial invasion, lesion glycolysis (LG) or metabolic volume were better indicators of LVSI than SUVmax with the same diagnostic accuracy of 80.0 %. In addition, LG (≥26.9) predicted high-grade malignancy with an accuracy of 72.2 %. Using the optimized cut-off criteria for LVSI, glucose metabolic profiling of primary lesions correctly predicted lymph node metastasis with an accuracy of 73.0 %, which was comparable with the accuracy of visual assessment for lymph node metastasis using MRI and FDG PET/CT. FDG PET/CT diagnostic criteria may need adjustment based on the

  12. Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Asian American > Infant Health & Mortality Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders Among Asian/Pacific ... as compared to non-Hispanic white mothers. Infant Mortality Rate Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live ...

  13. Epidemiological study of orthopedic injuries in hemodialysis patients in Taiwan: a fixed cohort survey, 2004–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang NT

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nien-Tzu Chang,1,2,* Yi-Hui Lee,2,3 Jiin-Chyr Hsu,4 Chien-Lung Chan,5 Guey-Shiun Huang,2 Jenn-Huei Renn,1,6,* Nan-Ping Yang1,4,* 1Community Health Research Center and Institute of Public Health, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Nursing, School of Nursing, Chang-Gang University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 4Department of Medical Research and Biostatistics Office, Tao-Yuan General Hospital, Department of Health, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 5Department of Information Management, Yuan-Ze University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 6Department of Orthopedics, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Executive Yuan, Kaohsiung, Taiwan*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD is a growing concern worldwide. The prevalence of hemodialysis in Taiwan is the highest in the world, and this may increase the prevalence of orthopedic fractures. The aim of this study was to explore the incidences of various orthopedic injuries and the related risk factors.Methods: A nationwide prospective study based on the Taiwan National Health Insurance dataset was conducted during 2004–2008. A total of 82,491 CKD patients were selected as the fixed cohort population. The International Classification of Diseases 9-CM diagnosis codes and treatment codes were identified as the inclusion criteria for orthopedic injury.Results: A total of 82,491 Taiwanese people with CKD were identified in 2004, and 4915 orthopedic injuries occurred during the 5-year follow-up period. The cumulative incidences of orthopedic injuries were 42.56‰ for lower limb fractures, and 12.93‰, 3.27‰, and 1.64‰ for upper limb fractures, vertebrae fractures, and joint dislocations, respectively. All three types of orthopedic fractures were more common in the oldest age stratum (≥65 years old. In the CKD patients, the risk ratio of osteoporosis was 3.47 (95

  14. Infant nutrition in Saskatoon: barriers to infant food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partyka, Brendine; Whiting, Susan; Grunerud, Deanna; Archibald, Karen; Quennell, Kara

    2010-01-01

    We explored infant nutrition in Saskatoon by assessing current accessibility to all forms of infant nourishment, investigating challenges in terms of access to infant nutrition, and determining the use and effectiveness of infant nutrition programs and services. We also examined recommendations to improve infant food security in Saskatoon. Semi-structured community focus groups and stakeholder interviews were conducted between June 2006 and August 2006. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes related to infant feeding practices and barriers, as well as recommendations to improve infant food security in Saskatoon. Our study showed that infant food security is a concern among lower-income families in Saskatoon. Barriers that limited breastfeeding sustainability or nourishing infants through other means included knowledge of feeding practices, lack of breastfeeding support, access and affordability of infant formula, transportation, and poverty. Infant nutrition and food security should be improved by expanding education and programming opportunities, increasing breastfeeding support, and identifying acceptable ways to provide emergency formula. If infant food security is to be addressed successfully, discussion and change must occur in social policy and family food security contexts.

  15. Infant Statistical Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffran, Jenny R.; Kirkham, Natasha Z.

    2017-01-01

    Perception involves making sense of a dynamic, multimodal environment. In the absence of mechanisms capable of exploiting the statistical patterns in the natural world, infants would face an insurmountable computational problem. Infant statistical learning mechanisms facilitate the detection of structure. These abilities allow the infant to compute across elements in their environmental input, extracting patterns for further processing and subsequent learning. In this selective review, we summarize findings that show that statistical learning is both a broad and flexible mechanism (supporting learning from different modalities across many different content areas) and input specific (shifting computations depending on the type of input and goal of learning). We suggest that statistical learning not only provides a framework for studying language development and object knowledge in constrained laboratory settings, but also allows researchers to tackle real-world problems, such as multilingualism, the role of ever-changing learning environments, and differential developmental trajectories. PMID:28793812

  16. Surgical Management and Reconstruction Training (SMART) Course for International Orthopedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao-Hua; Patel, Kushal R; Caldwell, Amber M; Coughlin, R Richard; Hansen, Scott L; Carey, Joseph N

    The burden of complex orthopedic trauma in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is exacerbated by soft-tissue injuries, which can often lead to amputations. This study's purpose was to create and evaluate the Surgical Management and Reconstruction Training (SMART) course to help orthopedic surgeons from LMICs manage soft-tissue defects and reduce the rate of amputations. In this prospective observational study, orthopedic surgeons from LMICs were recruited to attend a 2-day SMART course taught by plastic surgery faculty in San Francisco. Before the course, participants were asked to assess the burden of soft-tissue injury and amputation encountered at their respective sites of practice. A survey was then given immediately and 1-year postcourse to evaluate the quality of instructional materials and the course's effect in reducing the burden of amputation, respectively. Fifty-one practicing orthopedic surgeons from 25 countries attended the course. No participant reported previously attempting a flap reconstruction procedure to treat a soft-tissue defect. Before the course, participants cumulatively reported 580-970 amputations performed annually as a result of soft-tissue defects. Immediately after the course, participants rated the quality and effectiveness of training materials to be a mean of ≥4.4 on a Likert scale of 5 (Excellent) in all 14 instructional criteria. Of the 34 (66.7%) orthopedic surgeons who completed the 1-year postcourse survey, 34 (100%, P soft-tissue defects. Flap procedures prevented 116 patients from undergoing amputation; 554 (93.3%) of the cumulative 594 flaps performed by participants 1 year after the course were reported to be successful. Ninety-seven percent of course participants taught flap reconstruction techniques to colleagues or residents, and a self-reported estimate of 28 other surgeons undertook flap reconstruction as a result of information dissemination by 1 year postcourse. The SMART Course can give orthopedic surgeons

  17. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Infant Deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Infant Deaths (from Linked Birth / Infant Death Records) online databases on CDC WONDER provide counts and rates for deaths of children under 1 year...

  18. Breastfeeding the preterm infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Corvaglia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its peculiar nutritional and non-nutritional contents, which include long-chain polyunsatured fatty acids (LC-PUFA, prebiotics, immunological factors, hormones and growth factors, breast milk shows significant advantages over infant formulas in nourishing preterm infants. Better neurocognitive outcomes, which are reported to persist far beyond the early childhood, have been largely observed in breastfed preterm infants; a role of LC-PUFA in promoting neural and retinal development is assumed. As far as the gastrointestinal tract is concerned, several evidences have reported a dose-related reduction in NEC incidence among preterm infants fed on human milk. Moreover, the higher amount of immunological factors as secretory IgA within preterm breast milk might play a remarkable role in reducing the overall infections. Despite breastfeeding in preterm infants is generally linked with lowered growth rates which might potentially affect neurocognitive outcomes, the beneficial effects of human milk on neurodevelopment prevail. Fortified human milk might better fulfill the particular nutritional needs of preterm infants. However, as breast milk fortification is difficult to carry out after the achievement of full oral feeding, some concerns on the nutritional adequacy of exclusive breastfeeding during hospitalization as well as after discharge have been raised. Finally, breastfeeding also entails maternal psychological beneficial effects, as promoting the motherhood process and the mother-child relationship, which could be undermined in those women experiencing preterm delivery. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  19. Cranioplasty using presurgically fabricated presterilised polymethyl methacrylate plate by a simple, cost-effective technique on patients with and without original bone flap: study on 29 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharavanan, G M; Jayabalan, Suresh; Rajasukumaran, K; Veerasekar, Ganesh; Sathya, G

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the clinical effectiveness of presurgically fabricated pre-sterilized polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) plate as a cranioplasty material. The study group consisted of 29 patients with skull defect following decompressive craniectomy. Some patients had their original bone flap preserved and some were without it. In either group pre-sterilized prefabricated PMMA plate was used. On each visit, patients were clinically assessed; CT scans were taken in immediate follow up period but if needed more films were taken in subsequent follow ups. Post-op complications that include infection, post-op hematoma, chronic pain, aesthetic, biocompatibility, post-op dimensional changes of prosthesis were evaluated. Mean follow up was 7 1/2 months. Five patients developed swelling and pain in the subsequent follow ups. One patient was treated conservatively with antibiotics. Tapping was performed in couple of patients. Surgical evacuation of hematoma was performed in one patient. Of the five infected plates, one demanded removal from the patient. One complained of chronic pain. Post-op follow up assessed clinically and by CT scan confirmed good aesthetic result, biocompatibility and dimensional stability of prosthesis. The result of this study support the view that the use of prefabricated pre-sterilized PMMA plate as cranioplasty material is a simple, reliable, convenient way that brings acceptable function and aesthetics to patients who underwent decompressive craniectomy, in an inexpensive way.

  20. Endometrial carcinoma: merit of magnetic resonance in pre-surgical staging; Carcinoma de endometrio: valor de la estadificacion prequirurgica por resonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, E.; Barrera, M. C.; Gervas, C.; Salvador, E.; Rivero, B. [Hospital Donostia. San sebastian (Spain); Sentis, M. [Corporacio Sanitaria Pare Tauli. Sabadell (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    To evaluate MR capacity in assessing deep myometrial and cervical infiltrations in cases of endometrial carcinoma. A series of 30 consecutively diagnosed endometrial cancer patients was pre-surgically evaluated by means of magnetic resonance (MR). TSE-T2 sequences with fat saturation and dynamic FFe sequence were used after gadolinium administration. A correlation with post-surgical histological stating was made. There were then determined sensitivity (S), specificity (SP), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for the deep myometrial infiltration and cervical invasion. Cases of overestimation and underestimation were analyzed. Values obtained for myometrium and cervix were, respectively, S of 67% and 63%, SP of 89% and 91%, PPV of 80% and 71% and NPV of 80% and 87%. Two cases each were over valued for myometrial infiltration and cervix: four cases and 3 cases, respectively, were undervalues. MR stating in cases of endometrial carcinoma is a highly reliable diagnostic technique, but it does present certain limitations. (Author) 19 refs.

  1. Cerebral oxygenation in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Karinna L; Yiallourou, Stephanie R; Wong, Flora Y; Odoi, Alexsandria; Walker, Adrian M; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2014-09-01

    Prone sleeping is a major risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and preterm infants are at significantly increased risk. In term infants, prone sleeping is associated with reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cerebral tissue oxygenation index (TOI). However, little is known about the effects of sleeping position on TOI and MAP in preterm infants. We aimed to examine TOI and MAP in preterm infants after term-equivalent age, during the period of greatest SIDS risk. Thirty-five preterm and 17 term infants underwent daytime polysomnography, including measurement of TOI (NIRO-200 spectrophotometer, Hamamatsu Photonics KK, Japan) and MAP (Finapress Medical Systems, Amsterdam, Netherlands) at 2 to 4 weeks, 2 to 3 months, and 5 to 6 months postterm age. Infants slept prone and supine in active and quiet sleep. The effects of sleep state and position were determined by using 2-way repeated measures analysis of variance and of preterm birth by using 2-way analysis of variance. In preterm infants, TOI was significantly lower when prone compared with supine in both sleep states at all ages (P preterm compared with term infants at 2 to 4 weeks, in both positions (P preterm infants in the prone position at 2 to 3 months (P position in preterm infants and is lower compared with age-matched term infants, predominantly in the prone position when MAP is also reduced. This may contribute to their increased SIDS risk. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Fever in Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Fever in Infants and ChildrenBecause young children are not ... Facial Swelling Feeding Problems in Infants and Children Fever Fever in Infants and Children Foot Problems Genital ...

  3. Bone- and dentoalveolar-anchored dentofacial orthopedics for Class III malocclusion: new approaches, similar objectives? : a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Fernández, Marta; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Yañez-Vico, Rosa Maria; Mendoza-Mendoza, Asuncion; Solano-Reina, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    To analyze the scientific literature and compare in the results of conventional orthopedic appliances with those obtained from recent bone-anchored orthopedics for Class III malocclusion. The literature was systematically reviewed using PubMed/Medline, Scopus, and Scirus databases up to January 2012. Articles were selected by two different researchers (kappa index  =  0.83), based on established inclusion/exclusion criteria. Methodologic quality was classified as high, medium, or low quality. The search strategy identified 1020 titles. Thirty studies were selected after applying the criteria (high quality  =  9, medium quality  =  21). Protraction rates differed within a range of one- to twofold between bone-anchored and dentoalveolar therapies (P orthopedics (P orthopedics.

  4. Comparative study of scientific publications in orthopedics journals originating from USA, Japan and China (2000-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Li-Feng; Daubs, Michael David; Phan, Kevin H; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-01

    To compare orthopedics publications from USA, Japan and China. Scientific papers belong to ''Orthopedics'' category of Science Citation Index Expanded subject categories were retrieved from the "PubMed'' and ''Web of Knowledge'' online databases. In the field of orthopedics, the annual number increased significantly from 2000 to 2012 in the three countries (porthopedics field and ranked 1st; Japan contributed 5.9% and ranked 4th; China contributed 5.2% and ranked 5th. Publications from USA had the highest accumulated IFs and the highest total citations of articles (USA > Japan > China, porthopedics journals (USA (14355) > Japan (1702) > China (487), porthopedics journals, it still lags far behind USA and Japan in the field of orthopedics in terms of quantity and quality.

  5. Role of Damage Control Orthopedics and Early Total Care in the Multiple Injured Trauma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The care of multiply injured patients with orthopedic injuries has evolved from prolonged periods in traction to early total care (ETC. ETC is advantageous in ease of nursing care and aiding patient recovery. However, concerns have been raised that this ‘second hit’ of surgery places these severely injured patients at risk of excessive inflammatory responses that can lead to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS. Damage control was initially used in abdominal trauma but has been adapted for use in orthopedics. The mainstay of treatment involves external fixation of long bone and pelvic fractures which acts to defer definitive fixation until physiologic stability is restored. The indications for implementing each approach are not clear and this article provides a narrative review of the topic.

  6. Clinical applicability of nursing outcomes in the evolution of orthopedic patients with Impaired Physical Mobility 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Marcos Barragan; Almeida, Miriam de Abreu; Panato, Bruna Paulsen; Siqueira, Ana Paula de Oliveira; da Silva, Mariana Palma; Reisderfer, Letícia

    2015-01-01

    AIM: to evaluate the clinical applicability of outcomes, according to the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) in the evolution of orthopedic patients with Impaired Physical Mobility METHOD: longitudinal study conducted in 2012 in a university hospital, with 21 patients undergoing Total Hip Arthroplasty, evaluated daily by pairs of trained data collectors. Data were collected using an instrument containing five Nursing Outcomes, 16 clinical indicators and a five point Likert scale, and statistically analyzed. RESULTS: The outcomes Body Positioning: self-initiated, Mobility, Knowledge: prescribed activity, and Fall Prevention Behavior presented significant increases in mean scores when comparing the first and final evaluations (p<0.001) and (p=0.035). CONCLUSION: the use of the NOC outcomes makes it possible to demonstrate the clinical progression of orthopedic patients with Impaired Physical Mobility, as well as its applicability in this context. PMID:25806631

  7. Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of tendinopathy and other orthopedic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyant Nadar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of tendinopathy and other orthopedic diseases. Patients and methods: 35 patients received shock wave therapy using Econolith 2000 lithotripter 19 patients had isolated lateral epicondylitis, 12 medical epicondylitis and 4 plantar fascitis. A total of 120 shock waves were given in the first sitting. Each patient received a total of three sittings with a gap of one week between each of them. Results: Based on the patients′ self-assessment, about 75% pain relief was observed in 60% of the patients. Fur-ther, in patients having isolated tendinopathies, the pain relief was better. Conclusion: The study indicated that the application of shock waves is not restricted to the fragmentation of urinary calculi. The shock waves can be effectively used for the pain relief in the common orthopedic diseases. Thus, the urologists can widen the application of lithotripters, in a cost-effective manner, to the other medical speciali-ties.

  8. The Medical Education and Best Practice in Orthopedic Patient Care in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2012-07-01

    The leadership organization focuses on education, teamwork, customer relationship and developing strategy which help in building added value, in managing activities, time and quality. Everyday orthopedic experience shows that medical education is a mixture of: specific knowledge, skills and attitudes of people working together, and that creates effective teamwork in a hospital environment. Apart from the main reason of medical education, teaching about disease treatment and health problem solving, medical education should also concentrate on human factors and behavioral aspects of patient treatment in hospital.Assessment of an organization and medical education process by cultural and teamwork criteria, offers a powerful new way to think about performance at the frontlines of healthcare and in the future it could be gold standard for assessing the success of an organization, and standards in medical education, not only in orthopedics.

  9. Societal impacts of regenerative medicine: reflections on the views of orthopedic professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemansburg, Sophie L; Tempels, Tjidde H; Dhert, Wouter J A; van Delden, Johannes J M; Bredenoord, Annelien L

    2015-01-01

    As the amount of clinical studies in orthopedic regenerative medicine (RM) is increasing, it is time to take into account its impact on society. A total of 36 biomedical professionals working at the front row of orthopedic RM were interviewed to explore their attitudes, opinions and expectations regarding the societal impacts of RM. Professionals mainly recognized the societal impacts of counteraction of aging, prevention of disease and social justice. The 'soft' sides of these impacts were hardly mentioned. Whereas they did not perceive themselves in the position to mitigate these impacts, professionals should take up their role as actor and become involved in the societal debate. This is important as they can co-shape the societal impacts during the developmental process of technologies and thereby stimulate responsible innovation.

  10. [On practicability of implementing the speciality "podiatry" in traumatology and orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The absence of single opinion concerning the classification of foot and ankle joint pathology does not permit to formulate universal and practical approach to the identification of pathological syndromes in case of patient foot lesion. The situation is aggravated by the unsolved issues related to the terminological definition of podiatry as a direction in orthopedics to solve the issues of foot and ankle joint pathology. In actual conditions the implementation of new technologies into the structure of traumatological orthopedics care is needed. This approach permits to combine the qualities of models of effective and optimized care to patients with foot and ankle joint pathology. The study of issue related to the systematization of podiatric pathology revealed that actually no single universal classification easy-to-use in practice exists. Hence the development of original applied working scheme of foot and ankle joint pathology is proposed.

  11. Tissue-specific endothelial cells: a promising approach for augmentation of soft tissue repair in orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebaschi, Amir; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Wada, Susumu; Cong, Guang-Ting; Rodeo, Scott A

    2017-12-01

    Biologics are playing an increasingly significant role in the practice of modern medicine and surgery in general and orthopedics in particular. Cell-based approaches are among the most important and widely used modalities in orthopedic biologics, with mesenchymal stem cells and other multi/pluripotent cells undergoing evaluation in numerous preclinical and clinical studies. On the other hand, fully differentiated endothelial cells (ECs) have been found to perform critical roles in homeostasis of visceral tissues through production of an adaptive panel of so-called "angiocrine factors." This newly discovered function of ECs renders them excellent candidates for novel approaches in cell-based biologics. Here, we present a review of the role of ECs and angiocrine factors in some visceral tissues, followed by an overview of current cell-based approaches and a discussion of the potential applications of ECs in soft tissue repair. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Priming the Surface of Orthopedic Implants for Osteoblast Attachment in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The development of better orthopedic implants is incessant. While current implants can function reliably in the human body for a long period of time, there are still a significant number of cases for which the implants can fail prematurely due to poor osseointegration of the implant with native bone. Increasingly, it is recognized that it is extremely important to facilitate the attachment of osteoblasts on the implant so that a proper foundation of extracellular matrix (ECM) can be laid down for the growth of new bone tissue. In order to facilitate the osseointegration of the implant, both the physical nanotopography and chemical functionalization of the implant surface have to be optimized. In this short review, however, we explore how simple chemistry procedures can be used to functionalize the surfaces of three major classes of orthopedic implants, i.e. ceramics, metals, and polymers, so that the attachment of osteoblasts on implants can be facilitated in order to promote implant osseointegration.

  13. Brandon Research, Inc. Orthopedic Implant Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, W.R.

    1999-04-22

    The project was a joint research effort between the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Kansas City Plant (KCP) and Brandon Research, Inc. to develop ways to improve implants used for orthopedic surgery for joint replacement. The primary product produced by this study is design information, which may be used to develop implants that will improve long-term fixation and durability in the host bone environment.

  14. Readability of Spine-Related Patient Education Materials From Leading Orthopedic Academic Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Justine H; Yi, Paul H

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sectional analysis of online spine-related patient education materials from leading academic centers. To assess the readability levels of spine surgery-related patient education materials available on the websites of academic orthopedic surgery departments. The Internet is becoming an increasingly popular resource for patient education. Yet many previous studies have found that Internet-based orthopedic-related patient education materials from subspecialty societies are written at a level too difficult for the average American; however, no prior study has assessed the readability of spine surgery-related patient educational materials from leading academic centers. All spine surgery-related articles from the online patient education libraries of the top five US News & World Report-ranked orthopedic institutions were assessed for readability using the Flesch-Kincaid (FK) readability test. Mean readability levels of articles amongst the five academic institutions and articles were compared. We also determined the number of articles with readability levels at or below the recommended sixth- or eight-grade levels. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability of readability assessment were assessed. A total of 122 articles were reviewed. The mean overall FK grade level was 11.4; the difference in mean FK grade level between each department varied significantly (range, 9.3-13.4; P level at or below the eighth grade level, and only one (0.8%) was at or below the sixth grade level. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability were both excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient of 1 for both). Online patient education materials related to spine from academic orthopedic centers are written at a level too high for the average patient, consistent with spine surgery-related patient education materials provided by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and spine subspecialty societies. This study highlights the potential difficulties patients might have in reading

  15. Upright Biplanar Slot Scanning in Pediatric Orthopedics: Applications, Advantages, and Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Nathan C; Binkovitz, Larry A; Schueler, Beth A; Kolbe, Amy B; Larson, A Noelle

    2015-07-01

    Digital slot scanning is a relatively new technology that has been used for imaging of pediatric orthopedic conditions such as scoliosis and leg-length discrepancies. This article will review the clinical applications, advantages, and unique artifacts of this new technology. Upright biplanar slot scanners acquire high-resolution radiographs simultaneously in two orthogonal planes with reduced radiation dose. Other advantages include a more physiologic weightbearing imaging position, improved Cobb angle measurements, and 3D modeling.

  16. Evaluation of antibiotic prophylaxis administration at the orthopedic surgery clinic of tertiary hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksum Radji

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing surgical site infections, at orthopedic surgery unit in tertiary hospital, Dr. Mintohardjo Navy Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional study conducted retrospectively on the orthopedic unit of the Dr. Mintohardjo Navy Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia between January to December 2012. Assessment of appropriateness of antibiotic prophylaxis was carried out based on the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines and The National Guidelines of Antibiotic Usage in Indonesia. Results: A total of 163 samples consisted of men (73% and women (27% with an age range less than 12 years (9.8%, 12-25 years (23.3%, 26-65 years (58.9% and over 65 years (8.0%. The most commonly antibiotic prophylaxis used in this study was ceftriaxone (87.8%, followed by gentamycin (3.7%, cefotaxime (3.7%, cefoporaxone (1.2%, siprofloksasin (1.2%, fosfomycin (0.6%, meropenem (0.6%, and vancomycin (0.6%. Of the 163 patients 8 (4.9% patients developed a surgical site infection of all orthopedic surgical patients who received antibiotic prophylaxis. The pathogens isolated from surgical site infection were Escherichia coli (23.08%, coliform (18.62%, Staphylococcus aureus (18.00%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12.15%, and Alkaligenes sp. (9.31%. Conclusions: The Compliance of antibiotics prophylaxis administration at orthopedic surgery unit in Dr. Mintohardjo Naval Hospital has not been in accordance with the guidelines of the national or international standards. Therefore it is necessary to do some improvements to ensure better compliance with standard guidelines.

  17. Novel Antibacterial Coating on Orthopedic Wires To Eliminate Pin Tract Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Gil, Dmitry; Shuvaev, Sergey; Frank-Kamenetskii, Anastasia; Reukov, Vladimir; Gross, Christopher; Vertegel, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Novel approaches to the prevention of microbial infections after the insertion of orthopedic external fixators are in great demand because of the extremely high incidence rates of such infections, which can reach up to 100% with longer implant residence times. Monolaurin is an antimicrobial agent with a known safety record that is broadly used in the food and cosmetic industries; however, its use in antimicrobial coatings of medical devices has not been studied in much detail. Here, we report...

  18. ADVERSE REACTIONS TO ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS IN INTERNAL MEDICINE AND ORTHOPEDIC SERVICES. JOSINA MACHEL HOSPITAL, 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Mateus Sebastião João Fernandes; Héctor Lara Fernández; Vladimir Calzadilla Moreira

    2015-01-01

    A descriptive, prospective study was conducted to characterize the incidence and type of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADR) to antimicrobial agents in patients hospitalized in internal medicine and Orthopedic services at “Josina Machel” Central Hospital, in Luanda, in the period from January to February 2014 . The occurrence of adverse drug reactions was assessed by daily review of the clinical history of the patients with active search for potentially adverse effects associated with prescription a...

  19. Embalmed and fresh frozen human bones in orthopedic cadaveric studies: which bone is authentic and feasible?

    OpenAIRE

    Topp, Tobias; Müller, Thorben; Huss, Sebastian; Kann, Peter Herbert; Weihe, Eberhard; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Zettl, Ralph Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose The most frequently used bones for mechanical testing of orthopedic and trauma devices are fresh frozen cadaveric bones, embalmed cadaveric bones, and artificial composite bones. Even today, the comparability of these different bone types has not been established. Methods We tested fresh frozen and embalmed cadaveric femora that were similar concerning age, sex, bone mineral density, and stiffness. Artificial composite femora were used as a reference group. Testing para...

  20. Implementation of an Integrated Orthopedic Curriculum to Increase Clinical and Procedural Competency amongst Pediatric Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-05

    59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 7 FEB 2016 1. Your paper, entitled Implementation of an Integrated Orthopedic Curriculum...presentation, slale the type (e g case report QA/QI study. program evaluation study. informational report /briefing, etc.) in the "Protocol TiUe" box. 4...scientific publication. please conlact the 59 CRDIPublications and Presentations Section al 292· 7141. This information Is reported to the 59 MOW/CC

  1. In-vivo orthopedic implant diagnostic device for sensing load, wear, and infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen; Thundat, Thomas G.; Komistek, Richard D.; Dennis, Douglas A.; Mahfouz, Mohamed

    2006-08-29

    A device for providing in vivo diagnostics of loads, wear, and infection in orthopedic implants having at least one load sensor associated with the implant, at least one temperature sensor associated with the implant, at least one vibration sensor associated with the implant, and at least one signal processing device operatively coupled with the sensors. The signal processing device is operable to receive the output signal from the sensors and transmit a signal corresponding with the output signal.

  2. Safety, Efficacy, and Cost-effectiveness of Tranexamic Acid in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zilan X; Woolf, Shane K

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative bleeding and postsurgical hemorrhage are common in invasive surgical procedures, including orthopedic surgery. Tranexamic acid (TXA) is a pharmacologic agent that acts through an antifibrinolytic mechanism to stabilize formed clots and reduce active bleeding. It has been used successfully in orthopedics to reduce perioperative blood loss, particularly in total hip and knee arthroplasty and spine surgery. Numerous research studies have reported favorable safety and efficacy in orthopedic cases, although there is no universal standard on its administration and its use has not yet become the standard of practice. Reported administration methods often depend on the surgeon's preference, with both topical and intravenous routes showing efficacy. The type and anatomic site of the surgery seem to influence the decision making but also result in conflicting opinions. Reported complication rates with TXA use are low. The incidence of both arterial and venous thromboembolic events, particularly deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, has not been found to be significantly different with TXA use for healthy patients. The route of administration and dosage do not appear to affect complication rates either. However, data on patients with higher-risk conditions are deficient. In addition, TXA has shown potential to reduce blood loss, transfusion rates and volumes, perioperative hemoglobin change, and hospital-related costs at various degrees among the published studies. Conservation of blood products, reduced laboratory costs, and shorter hospital stays are likely the major factors driving the cost savings associated with TXA use. This article reviews current data supporting the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of TXA in orthopedic surgery. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Practical X-ray diagnostics orthopedics and trauma surgery. Indication, adjustment technique and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechtenmacher, Johannes; Sabo, Desiderius

    2014-01-01

    The book on X-ray diagnostics in orthopedics and trauma surgery includes the following chapters: 1. Introduction: radiation protection, equipment technology radiological diagnostics of skeleton carcinomas, specific aspects of trauma surgery, special aspects of skeleton radiology for children. 2. X-ray diagnostics of different anatomical regions: ankle joint, knee, hips and pelvis, hand and wrist joint, elbow, shoulder, spinal cord. 3. Appendix: radiation protection according to the X-ray regulations.

  4. Differences in the Clinical Outcome of Osteomyelitis by Treating Specialty: Orthopedics or Infectology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Arias, Carolina; Tamayo Betancur, Maria Carolina; Pinzón, Miguel Alejandro; Cardona Arango, Doris; Capataz Taffur, Cesar Antonio; Correa Prada, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a heterogeneous infection with regard to etiology and treatment, and currently no single management protocol exists. Management of the condition is typically an interdisciplinary approach between orthopedics and infectious disease; however, the orthopedist is often the person who manages treatment. The aim of the study was to determine differences in the outcome of osteomyelitis according to its treating specialty and to identify factors associated with the recurrence of the disease. An ambispective cohort study of 129 patients with osteomyelitis was conducted and the proportions for qualitative variables and central tendency and dispersion measures for quantitative variables were calculated; the latter were tested for normality using the Shapiro-Wilk test. A bivariate analysis was conducted with measures of association based on the chi square test and crude relative risk. A logistic regression model was applied and statistical significance was set at p orthopedics or infectious disease. Patients who were treated by an orthopedist alone presented a greater risk of relapse or reinfection (RR = 4.6; 95% CI 2.3;8.9). Risk factors of osteomyelitis recurrence as determined in the regression model included the following: age of 57 years or older (RR = 1.3; 95% 0.3;5.2), long bones (RR = 1.9; 95% CI 0.5;7.1), fracture (RR = 5.0; 95% CI 0.4;51.4), monotherapy (RR = 3.0; 95% CI 0.6;14.5), receiving less than 4 weeks of antibiotics (RR = 1.5; 95% CI 0.2;10.1), inadequate treatment (RR = 3.1; 95% CI 0.4;20.1), and receiving orthopedics treatment (RR = 5.5; 95% CI 1.6;18.2). Most patients evaluated jointly by orthopedics and infectious disease received adequate treatment for osteomyelitis and had fewer relapses.

  5. THE NEW METHOD OF LONG BONE MULTILEVEL DEFORMITIES CORRECTION USING THE ORTHOPEDIC HEXAPOD (PRELIMINARY REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Solomin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For the treatment of patients with multilevel deformities when there are contraindications for an acute single step correction the external fixation should be applied including orthopedic hexapods. At the same time a separate orthopedic hexapod is used for each level of deformity. This leads to a significant bulkiness of the overall frame assembly. Calculation of deformity correction in the presence of an intermediate fragment (fragments and practical implementation of correction represent by no means a simple task.Purpose of the study – to perform a clinical approbation of “spring” technique for multilevel correction of long bones deformities and to evaluate the results.Materials and methods. The authors developed an original technique for correcting multilevel deformities using a single orthopedic hexapod. During the procedure the hexapod struts are fixed only to the proximal and distal rings, and the intermediate ring (rings is fixed to the adjacent supports using the springs – a so-called “spring” technique. The new method has been successfully tested in the treatment of 7 patients with 2 and 3-level deformities of long bones.Results. The reported correction accuracy was 97.6%. The fixation period averaged 47 weeks (from 37 to 54 weeks. In 2 cases the authors observed soft tissues inflammation around of transosseous elements eradicated by the administration of antibiotics. In one patient with post-traumatic deformity a premature consolidation was observed at one of the levels which required re-osteotomy with further correction using two hexapods.Conclusion. Preliminary results demonstrated that the use of simultaneous correction of deformities at several levels applying one orthopedic hexapod Ortho-SUV and springs simplifies correction calculations, provides optimal timing for deformity correction while maintaining the minimal frame dimensions.

  6. Knowledge deficiency of work-related radiation hazards associated with psychological distress among orthopedic surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoxin; Wang, Yueye; Guo, Changfeng; Lei, Xuefeng; He, Shisheng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Knowledge and concern degree about work-related radiation hazards remained unknown among orthopedic surgeons. The aim of the cross-sectional study is to investigate whether the knowledge degree of work-related radiation is associated with psychological distress among orthopedic surgeons. This cross-sectional study sent electronic questionnaire via WeChat to orthopedic surgeons nationwide. Concern and knowing degree over radiation exposure was evaluated by a single self-reported question. Professional evaluation of concern degree was reflected by general psychological distress, which was assessed with the Kessler 10 scale (K10) and depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Only 43.23% (115/266) respondents knew well about radiation and a total of 78.20% (208/266) respondents considered radiation exposure as a great concern. Among those who reported concerns about radiation exposure, a total of 57.69% (120/208) respondents reported knowing little about radiation. Respondents who reported concerns over radiation exposure were significantly associated with higher scores on CES-D and K10 (P < .05). Among respondents who reported concerns over radiation exposure, those who have fewer knowledge about radiation, had higher CES-D and K10 scores than those who knew well about radiation (P < .05). Among respondents who reported no concerns over radiation exposure, those who knew little about radiation still had higher CES-D and K10 scores (P < .05). Fewer radiation knowledge tends to induce more radiation concerns associated with higher psychological distress in orthopedic surgeons. Radiation knowledge should be enhanced for surgeons who daily work with radiation-related fluoroscopy. PMID:28538368

  7. Patient Satisfaction Is Associated With Time With Provider But Not Clinic Wait Time Among Orthopedic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brendan M; Eskildsen, Scott M; Clement, R Carter; Lin, Feng-Chang; Olcott, Christopher W; Del Gaizo, Daniel J; Tennant, Joshua N

    2017-01-01

    Clinic wait time is considered an important predictor of patient satisfaction. The goal of this study was to determine whether patient satisfaction among orthopedic patients is associated with clinic wait time and time with the provider. The authors prospectively enrolled 182 patients at their outpatient orthopedic clinic. Clinic wait time was defined as the time between patient check-in and being seen by the surgeon. Time spent with the provider was defined as the total time the patient spent in the examination room with the surgeon. The Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey was used to measure patient satisfaction. Factors associated with increased patient satisfaction included patient age and increased time with the surgeon (P=.024 and P=.037, respectively), but not clinic wait time (P=.625). Perceived wait time was subject to a high level of error, and most patients did not accurately report whether they had been waiting longer than 15 minutes to see a provider until they had waited at least 60 minutes (P=.007). If the results of the current study are generalizable, time with the surgeon is associated with patient satisfaction in orthopedic clinics, but wait time is not. Further, the study findings showed that patients in this setting did not have an accurate perception of actual wait time, with many patients underestimating the time they waited to see a provider. Thus, a potential strategy for improving patient satisfaction is to spend more time with each patient, even at the expense of increased wait time. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):43-48.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Prognostic Value of Serum Procalcitonin After Orthopedic Surgery in the Elderly Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, Hélène; Chenevier-Gobeaux, Camille; Villain, Cédric; Cohen-Bittan, Judith; Ray, Patrick; Epelboin, Loïc; Verny, Marc; Riou, Bruno; Khiami, Frédéric; Boddaert, Jacques

    2017-03-01

    Orthopedic surgery is more and more frequent in the older patients and is associated with a high mortality rate. Although serum procalcitonin levels are associated with prognosis in young adults, data are still lacking in the elderly population, and especially after surgery. The main objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of procalcitonin levels in a large geriatric orthopedic population, and we compared it with clinical variables and biomarkers. This is a prospective study including patients admitted in our dedicated geriatric postoperative unit, after orthopedic surgery with immediate postoperative measured procalcitonin levels. Collected data included age, sex, medical history, functional status (activities of daily living [ADL]), fracture type, Cumulative Illness Rating scale (CIRS), postoperative complications, and biological data. The primary endpoint was the 30-day mortality. 436 patients (age 85±6 years) were included. Hip fracture surgery was the most frequent (n = 310; 71%), and the 30-day mortality rate was 6.9%. Compared with C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, CIRS, and ADL, procalcitonin had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for predicting 30-day mortality (0.74; 95% CI: 0.70-0.78). Using a cutoff at 1 µg/L, procalcitonin was more specific than CIRS to predict 30-day mortality (92 vs 77%; p < .001). In a multivariable analysis, procalcitonin level higher than 0.39 µg/L is a significant predictor of mortality within 30 days (odds ratio 3.84; 95% CI: 1.61-9.14, p = .002). Elevated procalcitonin values were strongly and significantly associated with mortality within 30 days in older patients after orthopedic surgery. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A novel phased-concept course for the delivery of anatomy and orthopedics training in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, Stefan; Hepp, Pierre; Löffler, Sabine; Cornwall, Jon; Hammer, Niels

    2017-07-01

    Integration of anatomy and clinical teaching is a theoretical ideal, yet there is a worldwide paucity of such amalgamation. These teaching models provide support for medical trainees, an important element in Germany where orthopedic intern numbers have declined and anecdotal evidence suggests disinterest in orthopedics. The aim of the study was to develop an integrated anatomy-surgical course for undergraduate medical training, assess the model developed, and explore how medical students perceive orthopedics as a career. The course was to deliver medical anatomy and clinical orthopedic training, focusing on interdisciplinary teaching and learning, vertical integration of clinical knowledge and skills, and professional interaction. Survey evaluation of the course and students' perceptions of orthopedic careers was performed, including Likert-type responses rating variables of interest. A phased-concept program of five courses, each optional and under one-week in duration, was developed parallel to the undergraduate medical program. Delivered by anatomists and surgeons, courses included biomechanics, advanced dissection, surgical approaches, casts and implants, and sports medicine. Course data indicate positive support for course format, stimulation of interest, and high clinical relevance. Students are generally interested in surgery, and identify hierarchy, lawsuits, bureaucracy and physical stress as barriers to orthopedic careers. This novel phased-concept successfully delivers combined anatomy and surgery training in a vertically-integrated format while addressing students' clinical and professional skills. The format facilitates an appreciation of potential career options in orthopedics, while fostering professional skills during medical training. Barriers to careers in orthopedics can now be addressed in future courses. Anat Sci Educ 10: 372-382. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  10. SPECIFICS OF PHYSIOTHERAPY OF PATIENTS TRANSFERRED AFTER ORTHOPEDIC OPERATIONS DIRECTLY ON THE SO-CALLED SPA BUNK

    OpenAIRE

    JOHANUSOVÁ, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    This bachelor thesis addresses the specificity of physiotherapy of patients, transferred to a so-called spa bed, after orthopedic surgery. Among the most performed orthopedic surgeries are the total hip replacement and the total knee replacement. Arthrosis is the most common reason for the implantation of joint replacements. It is a painful and life-aggravating disease which has a tremendous impact on the patient's quality of life. In order to lower the risk of the patient having to take a re...

  11. Infant formulas - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to cow's milk may also be allergic to soy milk. Soy-based formulas should be used for infants with galactosemia , a rare condition. These formulas can also be used ... have allergies to milk protein and for those with skin rashes or ...

  12. Hip Problems in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A hip problem in infants is known as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). It is when the ball of the ... later in life? Resources International Hip Dysplasia Institute, Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) International Hip Dysplasia Institute, Hip-Healthy Swaddling ...

  13. Colic in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, Peter

    2010-02-05

    Colic in infants causes one in six families (17%) with children to consult a health professional. One systematic review of 15 community-based studies found a wide variation in prevalence, which depended on study design and method of recording. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for colic in infants? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 27 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: advice to increase carrying, advice to reduce stimulation, casein hydrolysate milk, cranial osteopathy, crib vibrator device, focused counselling, gripe water, infant massage, low-lactose milk, simethicone, soya-based infant feeds, spinal manipulation, and whey hydrolysate milk.

  14. Chikungunya infection in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Menezes Bezerra Duarte

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: the infection of chikungunya virus presents clinical manifestations variables, particularly in infants in which may present multiple cutaneous manifestations. Description: a case series study was carried out in an analytical character of 14 infants (>28 days to < 2 years old admitted in a hospital between November 2015 and January 2016 with suspected case of chikungunya, by a specific IgM reactive serology. Patients positive for dengue fever, Zika virus, bacterial infections and other exanthematic diseases were excluded. Fever and cutaneous alterations were the most frequent clinical manifestations in 100% of the cases, followed by irritability (64.3%, vomits and arthralgia/arthritis in 35.7% each. Three children presented alterations in the cerebrospinal fluid compatible to meningitis. Anemia frequency was 85.7%. The median white blood cells count was 7.700/mm3 (2.600 to 20.300/mm3. High levels of aminotransferases were observed in three cases (230 to 450 U/L. Antibiotic therapy was indicated in 64.3% of the cases. Two infants needed opioid derivatives for analgesia while others took acetaminophen and/or dipyrone. Discussion: the study shows evident multi-systemic involvement of chikungunya infection in infants. The treatment is supportive, giving special attention to hydration, analgesia, skin care, and rational use of antibiotic therapy.

  15. Parenting Your Infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sing songs. Show and talk about simple picture books. This is the way your baby learns how to talk. Infants Love To Explore You may have noticed that your baby is becoming interested in everything within reach, especially simple toys with bright colors and ...

  16. Milk Allergy in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Milk Allergy in Infants KidsHealth / For Parents / Milk Allergy in ... Alergia a la leche en bebés About Milk Allergy People of any age can have a milk ...

  17. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the womb (breech position) babies with a family history of DDH Also, DDH occurs more frequently in girls than boys and among first-born infants. Doctors will consider all of these factors when deciding whether a baby's hips should be checked by ultrasound. In addition, a ...

  18. Orthopedic Injuries and Their Treatment in Children During Earthquakes: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Ilaria; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Bortolin, Michelangelo

    2015-10-01

    Orthopedic injuries commonly affect children during earthquakes, but reports about them are rare. This setting may lead to different standards of care, but guidelines are still missing in this field. A systematic review was performed to: (1) assess type and body distribution of pediatric earthquake-related injuries, treatment performed, length of stay, and complications; and (2) identify starting points to define standards of care. PubMed database was researched for papers (1999-2014 period) in agreement with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement. Inclusion criteria were: English, French, Spanish, or Italian language and data reported about orthopedic lesions in children (≤18 years old). Reviews, letters, commentaries, editorials, and single case reports were excluded. Two independent reviewers selected articles after abstract and full-text reading. Traumatic injuries caused child hospital admissions ranging from 46.9% to 100.0%; 16% to 53% suffered fractures. Lower limbs mostly were involved. Soft-tissue injuries affected 55% of patients. Debridement and external fixation (EF) were the most frequent surgical treatments. Amputation rates varied from 5% to 11%. This study revealed that field hospitals should be prepared to: (1) treat mainly lower extremities fractures in children; and (2) use especially EF techniques. The presence of orthopedic surgeons familiar with pediatric traumatology should be considered.

  19. Orthopedic Trauma and Aging: It Isn't Just About Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Blake E; Jiwanlal, Aneel; Della Rocca, Gregory J; Crist, Brett D

    2015-03-01

    The elderly (age 70+) patient with orthopedic trauma is a rapidly growing subset of patients in the United States. Due to increased medical comorbidities and decreased physiological reserve, morbidity and mortality after trauma may significantly differ from those patients younger than 70 years old. A retrospective review was performed to investigate the effect of age on orthopedic trauma. A total of 870 records of patients with orthopedic trauma from 2006 to 2009 at our Level One trauma center were reviewed. A database was created to include demographics, type and number of comorbid conditions at presentation, injuries, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay, and description of the fracture. Patients aged 70 years and older had an increased number of comorbidities per person (3.3214-P aged 70 years and older was not significantly greater than that of the younger patients. They spent an average of 14.76 days in the hospital compared to 13.42 days for the combined younger patients (P = .45), but they spent significantly (P age-group when compared to younger populations (P fall and less likely to have solid organ injuries. As the number of elderly patients increase, continued research in the management of elderly patients with trauma can lead to protocols and practice guidelines to improve outcomes.

  20. Occupational radiation exposure to anesthetists from fluoroscopic projections during orthopedic operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abas, A A; Rahman, R A; Yahya, N; Kamaruzaman, E; Zainuddin, K; Manap, N A

    2014-01-01

    The role of anesthetists during orthopedic fluoroscopic procedures exposes them to radiation. We conducted a prospective, descriptive study to estimate the radiation exposure to anesthetists during procedures over a six-month period in the orthopedic trauma operating theatres which had the most fluoroscopic usage. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were placed two metres away from the radiation source, in three positions to simulate the anesthetist's position in the operating theatre during the fluoroscopic procedures as well as their radiation safety practices. The three positions were above the lead gown, behind the lead gown and behind the protective lead screen. The fourth TLD chip was assigned as a control measure to account for background radiation. The radiation exposure was measured at every end of each month during the period of six consecutive months. The TLD chips were sent to the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology (MINT) for the analysis. From the study, the annual exposure without a protective shield at a 2 metre distance from the projection source was estimated to be 0.70 milliSievert (mSv)/year. With the use of lead gowns and protective lead screens, the annual exposure was estimated to be 0.08 mSv / year. All the radiation levels measured were within the maximum permissible dose of 50 mSv / year. During fluoroscopic assisted orthopedic procedures, the anesthetists in UKMMC are exposed to a small amount of radiation which is well below the annual maximum permissible limit as determined by local and international regulatory bodies.

  1. Orthopedic Lesions in Tethered Cord Syndrome: The Importance of Early Diagnosis and Treatment on Patient Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Gharedaghi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Many of the patients with tethered cord syndrome (TCS are admitted because of neurological symptoms, while some are admitted because of their orthopedic, urologic, anorectal, and dermatologic manifestations.Consequently, this study aimed to evaluate the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of tethered cord syndrome on patient outcome. Methods: Fourty-three patients who underwent surgery because of tethered cord syndrome from 2006 to 2010 were studied. Many of these cases were referred by orthopedic surgeons. All of the findings were recorded and follow up was done twice (1 and 3 years after surgery. Results: Thirty-seven patients were less than 7 years old and 6 were between 17 to 33 years old. According to clinical and neurological exams, satisfactory results were achieved in both groups. Those with early surgical intervention, especially in their early follow up assessment, had the best results. Seventeen cases were referred by an orthopedic surgeon because of manifestations such as leg weakness and numbness, leg pain and spasticity, pes cavus, claw toes, and leg or foot length discrepancy. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in 3 cases after surgery and 1 showed pseudomeningocele formation. Conclusions: After one year of follow up, initially the results of the treatment were better in early operated cases, but in later follow up assessment (after 3 years the results were almost the same in both of the groups.

  2. 3D Crack Behavior in the Orthopedic Cement Mantle of a Total Hip Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderahmen Sahli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The total hip replacement is an operation that replaces a diseased hip with a mechanical articulation. Both components of the mechanical articulation (stem and the cup are bonded to bone using orthopedic cement, whose reliability determines the longevity of the implant. The cement around the metallic stem forms a mantle whose strength and toughness determine its resistance to fatigue and failure by fracture. Typical cements are acrylic polymers that often suffer from internal cracks and other defects created during polymerization. This study is a systematic analysis of preexisting 3D crack behavior in the orthopedic cement mantle when subjected to external body forces. Different crack orientations and angular positions around the mantle are studied to identify which locations will propagate the crack. This is accomplished by a global stress analysis of the mantle followed by a failure analysis. Amongst others, the existence of a crack in the proximal region of the orthopedic cement is identified as a critical area, especially in the lateral sides of the stem in the radial direction.

  3. A touch probe method of operating an implantable RFID tag for orthopedic implant identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Berger, J Lee; Ogirala, Ajay; Mickle, Marlin H

    2013-06-01

    The major problem in operating an implantable radio-frequency identification (RFID) tag embedded on an orthopedic implant is low efficiency because of metallic interference. To improve the efficiency, this paper proposes a method of operating an implantable passive RFID tag using a touch probe at 13.56 MHz. This technology relies on the electric field interaction between two pairs of electrodes, one being a part of the touch probe placed on the surface of tissue and the other being a part of the tag installed under the tissue. Compared with using a conventional RFID antenna such as a loop antenna, this method has a better performance in the near field operation range to reduce interference with the orthopedic implant. Properly matching the touch probe and the tag to the tissue and the implant reduces signal attenuation and increases the overall system efficiency. The experiments have shown that this method has a great performance in the near field transcutaneous operation and can be used for orthopedic implant identification.

  4. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency and Its Association With Metabolic Disease in Korean Orthopedic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Tack; Kang, Kyung-Chung; Shin, Dong-Eun; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kwon, Tae-Yoon

    2015-10-01

    Vitamin D is considered essential for bone and muscle health, and some studies have demonstrated the positive effects of vitamin D on metabolic diseases and cancer. Nevertheless, a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency has been reported in various populations, regardless of country or race. However, no studies regarding the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Korean orthopedic patients currently exist. This cross-sectional study included 272 male and 937 female patients aged 50 years and older who were consecutively admitted to the authors' orthopedic department. Vitamin D (25-hydroxy vitamin D), bone turnover markers (osteocalcin, c-telopeptide), and bone mineral density were measured. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its association with other factors were evaluated. Mean patient age was 67.2 ± 8.9 years, and mean level of vitamin D was 16.1 ± 9.1 ng/mL. Overall, 91.2% of patients had deficient (orthopedic patients of this region was extremely low, regardless of sex and age. Although vitamin D was not directly associated with bone mineral density, there were significant associations between vitamin D and other factors related to bone health and metabolic diseases. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among orthopedic trauma surgeons: an OTA survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlQahtani, Saad M.; Alzahrani, Mohammad M.; Harvey, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Occupational injuries and hazards have gained increased attention in the surgical community in general and in the orthopedic literature specifically. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence and characteristics of musculoskeletal disorders among orthopedic trauma surgeons and the impact of these injuries on the surgeons’ practices. Methods We sent a modified version of the physical discomfort survey to surgeon members of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) via email. Data were collected and descriptive statistics were analyzed. Results A total of 86 surgeons completed the survey during the period of data collection; 84.9% were men, more than half were 45 years or older and 40.6% were in practice for 10 years or more. More than 66% of respondents reported a musculoskeletal disorder that was related to work; the most common was low back pain (29.3%). The number of body regions involved and disorders diagnosed was associated with increasing age and number of years in practice (p = 0.033). Time off work owing to these disorders was associated with working in a private setting (p = 0.045) and working in more than 1 institute (p = 0.009). Conclusion To our knowledge, our study is the first to report a high percentage of orthopedic trauma surgeons sustaining occupational injuries some time in their careers. The high cost of management and rehabilitation of these injuries in addition to the related number of missed work days indicate the need for increased awareness and implementation of preventive measures. PMID:26812408

  6. Survey Finds Few Orthopedic Surgeons Know The Costs Of The Devices They Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okike, Kanu; O’Toole, Robert V.; Pollak, Andrew N.; Bishop, Julius A.; McAndrew, Christopher M.; Mehta, Samir; Cross, William W.; Garrigues, Grant E.; Harris, Mitchel B.; Lebrun, Christopher T.

    2014-01-01

    Orthopedic procedures represent a large expense to the Medicare program, and costs of implantable medical devices account for a large proportion of those procedures’ costs. Physicians have been encouraged to consider costs in the selection of devices, but several factors make acquiring information about costs difficult. To assess physicians’ levels of knowledge about costs, we asked orthopedic attending physicians and residents at seven academic medical centers to estimate the costs of thirteen commonly used orthopedic devices between December 2012 and March 2013. The actual cost of each device was determined at each institution; estimates within 20 percent of the actual cost were considered correct. Among the 503 physicians who completed our survey, attending physicians correctly estimated the cost of the device 21 percent of the time, and residents did so 17 percent of the time. Thirty-six percent of physicians and 75 percent of residents rated their knowledge of device costs “below average” or “poor.” However, more than 80 percent of all respondents indicated that cost should be “moderately,” “very,” or “extremely” important in the device selection process. Surgeons need increased access to information on the relative prices of devices and should be incentivized to participate in cost-containment efforts. PMID:24395941

  7. Increasing Trends in Orthopedic Fellowships Are Not due to Inadequate Residency Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Almansoori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthopedic residents have one of the highest fellowship participation rates among medical specialities and there are growing concerns that inadequate residency training may be contributing to this trend. Therefore, a mixed-exploratory research survey was distributed to all 148 graduating Canadian orthopedic residents to investigate their perceptions and attitudes for pursuing fellowships. A response rate of 33% (n=49 was obtained with the majority of residents undertaking one (27% or two (60% fellowships. Surgical-skill development was reported as the most common motivating factor, followed by employment and marketability; malpractice protection and financial reasons were the least relevant. The overwhelming majority of residents (94%, n=46 felt adequately prepared by their residency training for independent general practice, and 84% (n=41 of respondents did not feel that current fellowship trends were due to poor residency training. Three common themes were expressed in their comments: the growing perceived expectation by healthcare professionals and employers to be fellowship-certified, the integration of fellowship training into the surgical education hierarchy, and the failure of residency training curriculums to accommodate for this trend. In conclusion, Canadian orthopedic residents are confident of their residency training and are increasingly pursuing fellowships to primarily develop their surgical skills and expertise.

  8. Prevalence and Impact of Self-Citation in Academic Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Kamath, Atul F

    2018-03-01

    The h-index is a commonly utilized metric for academic productivity. Previous studies have proposed that self-citation may limit the utility of the h-index. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of self-citation on the h-index among orthopedic investigators. The study cohort consisted of program directors, chairpersons, and faculty at orthopedic surgery residency programs in the United States. The Scopus database was used to determine the h-index and number of citations ± self-citations. The total number of publications was correlated with the change in the h-index via self-citation. A total of 463 researchers were included (198 National Institutes of Health-funded faculty, 147 chairpersons, 118 program directors). Of these researchers, 83.8% cited previous work at least once (mean, 123.9 ± 277.6). Self-citations accounted for 5.8% of all citations. Including these citations increased the author h-index from 18.5 ± 14.9 to 19.2 ± 15.6 (P citation (range, 0-11). The proportional increase in the h-index via self-citation was positively related to the number of publications (P citation is prevalent in orthopedics, its impact on the h-index is minimal for most researchers. With more publications, researchers can increase their h-index to a greater degree via self-citation.

  9. Albumin and fibrinogen levels’ relation with orthopedics traumatic patients’ outcome after massive transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazavar, Mohammadreza; Tabrizi, Ali; Abedini, Naghi; Elmi, Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe bleeding is common during limb trauma. It can lead to hemorrhagic shock required to massive blood transfusion. Coagulopathy is the major complication of massive transfusion-induced increased mortality rate. Aim of this study was evaluation of fibrinogen and albumin levels association with orthopedics traumatic patients’ outcome who received massive transfusion. Methods: In a cross sectional study, 23 patients with severe limb injury admitted to orthopedic emergency department were studied. All the patients received massive transfusion, that is, >10 unit blood. Albumin and fibrinogen levels are measured at admission and 24 h later, and compared according to final outcome. Results: Twenty-three traumatic patients with severe limb injuries were studied, out of which ten (43.2%) died and 13 (56.8%) were alive. There was significant difference between patients outcome in fibrinogen level after 24 h, but no difference was observed in albumin levels. Based on regression model, fibrinogen after 24 h had a significant role in determining the final outcome in traumatic patients who received massive transfusion (odds ratio 0.48, 95% confidence interval 0.15–0.92, P = 0.02). Conclusions: According to our results, fibrinogen level is the most important factor in determination of orthopedics traumatic patients when received massive transfusion. However, serum albumin does not play any role in patients’ outcome. PMID:24665235

  10. [Implementation of the eLearning project NESTOR. A network for students in traumatology and orthopedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, D A; Haberstroh, N; Hoff, E; Plener, J; Haas, N P; Perka, C; Schmidmaier, G

    2012-01-01

    Modern internet-based information technologies offer great possibilities to create and improve teaching methods for students. The eLearning tool NESTOR (Network for Students in Traumatology and Orthopedics) presented here was designed to complement the existing clinical teaching in orthopedics and traumatology at the Charité, University Medicine Berlin. Using a learning management system, videos, podcasts, X-ray diagnosis, virtual patients, tests and further tools for learning and study information were combined. After implementation the eLearning project was evaluated by students. The NESTOR project offers various possibilities for knowledge acquisition. Students using the program voluntarily showed a high acceptance whereby 82.4% were very satisfied with the contents offered and 95.3% supported the idea of a future use of NESTOR in teaching. The blended learning approach was positively evaluated by 93.5% of the students. The project received the eLearning seal of quality of the Charité University Medicine Berlin. Using complex eLearning tools, such as the NESTOR project represents a contemporary teaching approach in the teaching of traumatology and orthopedics and should be offered in a blended learning context as they are well accepted by students.

  11. Sol-Gel Derived Hydroxyapatite Coating on Mg-3Zn Alloy for Orthopedic Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Manoj Kumar, R.; Kuntal, Kishor Kumar; Gupta, Pallavi; Das, Snehashish; Jayaganthan, R.; Roy, Partha; Lahiri, Debrupa

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, magnesium and its alloys have gained a lot of interest as orthopedic implant constituents because their biodegradability and mechanical properties are closer to that of human bone. However, one major concern with Mg in orthopedics is its high corrosion rate that results in the reduction of mechanical integrity before healing the bone tissue. The current study evaluates the sol-gel-derived hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on a selected Mg alloy (Mg-3Zn) for decreasing the corrosion rate and increasing the bioactivity of the Mg surface. The mechanical integrity of the coating is established as a function of the surface roughness of the substrate and the sintering temperature of the coating. Coating on a substrate roughness of 15-20 nm and sintering at 400°C shows the mechanical properties in similar range of bone, thus making it suitable to avoid the stress-shielding effect. The hydroxyapatite coating on the Mg alloy surface also increases corrosion resistance very significantly by 40 times. Bone cells are also found proliferating better in the HA-coated surface. All these benefits together establish the candidature of sol-gel HA-coated Mg-3Zn alloy in orthopedic application.

  12. Results of single-event multilevel orthopedic surgery in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmed Tomov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Single-event multilevel orthopedic surgery is a modern approach in the operative treatment of children with cerebral palsy. Methods: Single-event multilevel orthopedic surgery was carried out in 108 patients with cerebral palsy. Patients’ average age was 11.3±1.7 years. Surgical results were analyzed at follow-up after 18 to 24 months, by way of detailed physical examination, functional assessment, imaging, the Edinburgh Visual Gait Score and Gillette Functional Assessment Questionnaire. Results: In our series, 647 procedures were performed during 141 surgeries. Patients had an average of 4.59 procedures per surgery. Observational gait analysis showed an improvement in stance and swing gait phases in ambulatory children. According to the Gillette Functional Assessment Questionnaire, an increase of functional level was noted in 50 patients but did not change in 32 patients. Conclusions: For children with cerebral palsy, single-event multilevel surgery is defined as two or more surgical procedures of the soft tissue or bone at two or more anatomical levels during one operative procedure. In cases where a large volume of surgery is required, two separate operations with a short break in between, but requiring only one hospital admission and one rehabilitation period, are also included. This approach requires adapted methods of surgical intervention, and appropriate methods of anesthesia and pain control in the postoperative period to the start of rehabilitation. Compliance with the above principles allowed the necessary correction of orthopedic complications to be achieved in all cases.

  13. Learning styles of first-year orthopedic surgical residents at 1 accredited institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulley, Lisa; Wadey, Veronica; Freeman, Risa

    2012-01-01

    This study represents 1 arm of a 5-year prospective study investigating the learning styles of orthopedic residents and their surgical educators. This project investigates the learning styles of the 2009-2010 year 1 orthopedic surgical residents. A cross-sectional survey using the Kolb Learning Style Inventory was completed by 13 first year orthopedic residents. Direct 1-to-1 interviews were completed with the primary investigator and each participant using the Kolb Learning Style Inventory and learning styles were determined. Converging learning style was the most common among the residents (53.8%). Residents demonstrated a high tendency toward the learning skill of abstract conceptualization combined with active experimentation, and a transition from action-oriented to more reflective learning style with age and postgraduate education. These results may be useful in creating strategies specific to each learning style that will be offered to residents to enhance future teaching and learning. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Orthopedic surgery and bone fracture pain are both significantly attenuated by sustained blockade of nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majuta, Lisa A; Longo, Geraldine; Fealk, Michelle N; McCaffrey, Gwen; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2015-01-01

    The number of patients suffering from postoperative pain due to orthopedic surgery and bone fracture is projected to dramatically increase because the human life span, weight, and involvement in high-activity sports continue to rise worldwide. Joint replacement or bone fracture frequently results in skeletal pain that needs to be adequately controlled for the patient to fully participate in needed physical rehabilitation. Currently, the 2 major therapies used to control skeletal pain are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates, both of which have significant unwanted side effects. To assess the efficacy of novel therapies, mouse models of orthopedic and fracture pain were developed and evaluated here. These models, orthopedic surgery pain and bone fracture pain, resulted in skeletal pain-related behaviors that lasted 3 weeks and 8 to 10 weeks, respectively. These skeletal pain behaviors included spontaneous and palpation-induced nocifensive behaviors, dynamic weight bearing, limb use, and voluntary mechanical loading of the injured hind limb. Administration of anti-nerve growth factor before orthopedic surgery or after bone fracture attenuated skeletal pain behaviors by 40% to 70% depending on the end point being assessed. These data suggest that nerve growth factor is involved in driving pain due to orthopedic surgery or bone fracture. These animal models may be useful in developing an understanding of the mechanisms that drive postoperative orthopedic and bone fracture pain and the development of novel therapies to treat these skeletal pains.

  15. Eosinophilic colitis in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Chebar Lozinsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the literature for clinical data on infants with allergic or eosinophilic colitis. DATA SOURCE: MEDLINE search of all indexes was performed using the words ''colitis or procto-colitis and eosinophilic'' or ''colitis or proctocolitis and allergic'' between 1966 and February of 2013. All articles that described patients' characteristics were selected. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 770 articles were identified, of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. The 32 articles included a total of 314 infants. According to the available information, 61.6% of infants were male and 78.6% were younger than 6 months. Of the 314 patients, 49.0% were fed exclusively breast milk, 44.2% received cow's milk protein, and 6.8% received soy protein. Diarrheal stools were described in 28.3% of patients. Eosinophilia was found in 43.8% (115/263 of infants. Colonic or rectal biopsy showed infiltration by eosinophils (between 5 and 25 perhigh-power field in 89.3% (236/264 of patients. Most patients showed improvement with theremoval of the protein in cow's milk from their diet or the mother's diet. Allergy challenge tests with cow's milk protein were cited by 12 of the 32 articles (66 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Eosinophilic colitis occurs predominantly in the first six months of life and in males. Allergy to cow's milk was considered the main cause of eosinophilic colitis. Exclusion of cow'smilk from the diet of the lactating mother or from the infant's diet is generally an effective therapeutic measure.

  16. Infant Neurobehavioral Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Barry M.; Miller, Robin J.; Hawes, Katheleen; Salisbury, Amy; Bigsby, Rosemarie; Sullivan, Mary C.; Padbury, James F.

    2011-01-01

    The trend toward single-room neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) is increasing; however scientific evidence is, at this point, mostly anecdotal. This is a critical time to assess the impact of the single-room NICU on improving medical and neurobehavioral outcomes of the preterm infant. We have developed a theoretical model that may be useful in studying how the change from an open-bay NICU to a single-room NICU could affect infant medical and neurobehavioral outcome. The model identifies mediating factors that are likely to accompany the change to a single-room NICU. These mediating factors include family centered care, developmental care, parenting and family factors, staff behavior and attitudes, and medical practices. Medical outcomes that plan to be measured are sepsis, length of stay, gestational age at discharge, weight gain, illness severity, gestational age at enteral feeding, and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Neurobehavioral outcomes include the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS) scores, sleep state organization and sleep physiology, infant mother feeding interaction scores, and pain scores. Preliminary findings on the sample of 150 patients in the open-bay NICU showed a “baseline” of effects of family centered care, developmental care, parent satisfaction, maternal depression, and parenting stress on the neurobehavioral outcomes of the newborn. The single-room NICU has the potential to improve the neurobehavioral status of the infant at discharge. Neurobehavioral assessment can assist with early detection and therefore preventative intervention to maximize developmental outcome. We also present an epigenetic model of the potential effects of maternal care on improving infant neurobehavioral status. PMID:21255702

  17. Magnitude and meaningfulness of change in SF-36 scores in four types of orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchbinder Rachelle

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Medical Outcomes General Health Survey (SF-36 is a widely used health status measure; however, limited evidence is available for its performance in orthopedic settings. The aim of this study was to examine the magnitude and meaningfulness of change and sensitivity of SF-36 subscales following orthopedic surgery. Methods Longitudinal data on outcomes of total hip replacement (THR, n = 255, total knee replacement (TKR, n = 103, arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM, n = 74 and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL, n = 62 were used to estimate the effect sizes (ES, magnitude of change and minimal detectable change (sensitivity at the group and individual level. To provide context for interpreting the magnitude of changes in SF-36 scores, we also compared patients' scores with age and sex-matched population norms. The studies were conducted in Sweden. Follow-up was five years in THR and TKR studies, two years in ACL, and three months in APM. Results On average, large effect sizes (ES≥0.80 were found after orthopedic surgery in SF-36 subscales measuring physical aspects (physical functioning, role physical, and bodily pain. Small (0.20–0.49 to moderate (0.50–0.79 effect sizes were found in subscales measuring mental and social aspects (role emotional, vitality, social functioning, and mental health. General health scores remained relatively unchanged during the follow-up. Despite improvements, post-surgery mean scores of patients were still below the age and sex matched population norms on physical subscales. Patients' scores on mental and social subscales approached population norms following the surgery. At the individual level, scores of a large proportion of patients were affected by floor or ceiling effects on several subscales and the sensitivity to individual change was very low. Conclusion Large to moderate meaningful changes in group scores were observed in all SF-36 subscales except General Health

  18. Urinary protein profiles in ketorolac-associated acute kidney injury in patients undergoing orthopedic day surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Filippo Mariano,1 Chiara Cogno,1 Fulvia Giaretta,2,3 Ilaria Deambrosis,2,3 Simona Pozza,4 Maurizio Berardino,5 Giuseppe Massazza,6 Luigi Biancone1,3 1Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 2Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Laboratory of Nephrology and Immunopathology, City of Health and Science, Molinette Hospital, Turin, 3Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, 4Department of Radiology and Radiotherapy, CTO Radiology, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 5Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care 5, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 6Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Week Hospital Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, and University of Turin, Turin, Italy Background: Parenteral administration of ketorolac is very effective in controlling postoperative pain for orthopedic surgery. Ketorolac can induce clinically relevant renal alterations in elderly patients, whereas its short course is considered safe for young adults with normal preoperative renal function. In this study, of a cohort of young adults undergoing elective orthopedic day surgery, we sought cases complicated by readmission due to acute kidney injury (AKI.Patients and methods: Among 1397 young adults, aged 18–32 years who were admitted to undergo orthopedic day surgery from 2013 to 2015, four patients (0.29%, three males/one female treated in postprocedure with ketorolac (from 60 to 90 mg/day for 1–2 days were readmitted for suspected severe AKI. We evaluated functional outcome, urinary protein profiles and kidney biopsy (1 patient.Results: After day surgery discharge, they experienced gastrointestinal disturbances, flank pain and fever. Readmitted on post-surgery days 3–4, they presented with oliguric AKI (creatinine range 158.4–466.4 µmol/L and

  19. Pre-surgical study of the biological effects of the selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib in patients with primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lesley-Ann; Davies, Giles L S; Weigel, Marion T; Betambeau, Nadine; Hills, Margaret J; Salter, Janine; Walsh, Geraldine; A'Hern, Roger; Dowsett, Mitch

    2010-10-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2) is implicated in the regulation of aromatase transcription in malignant breast tissue and has been considered as a potential target for tissue specific aromatase suppression. We initiated a randomised controlled pre-surgical study of celecoxib versus no treatment in women with primary breast cancer to determine the effects of COX-2 inhibition on markers of biological response. Postmenopausal women (50-80 years of age) with stage I or II, primary breast cancer, were randomised 2:1 to receive 400 mg/day celecoxib or no treatment for 14 days prior to surgery. A core biopsy was obtained pre- and post-treatment. Paired baseline and endpoint biopsies were analysed for Ki67, apoptosis, COX-2, CD31, estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR). Comparisons between the treatment groups were conducted using the Mann-Whitney test with a two-sided 5% significance. Of the 25 patients treated, 23 had evaluable data and 19 (83%) were ER positive. Overall the geometric mean change in Ki67, the primary end point, relative to baseline in the celecoxib arm was -16.6% (P = 0.056). The change in the no-treatment group was -8.1% (P = 0.24). There was no statistically significant difference in the change between the two groups. Celecoxib did not significantly affect apoptosis, COX-2, ER or PgR expression. There is only modest evidence for a biological effect of celecoxib in primary breast cancer. However, the trend towards a reduction in Ki67 in ER-positive breast cancer warrants further investigations in a larger cohort of patients.

  20. Comparison of intra-aortic computed tomography angiography to conventional angiography in the presurgical visualization of the Adamkiewicz artery: first results in patients with thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarencon, Frederic; Maria, Federico di; Cormier, Evelyne; Sourour, Nader; Gabrieli, Joseph; Iosif, Christina; Chiras, Jacques; Gaudric, Julien; Koskas, Fabien; Jenny, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity of intra-aortic computed tomography angiography (IA-CTA) to that of regular spinal digital subtraction angiography for the presurgical location of the Adamkiewicz artery (AKA). Thirty patients (21 males, 9 females; mean age 64 years) had an IA-CTA for the location of the AKA before surgery of aneurysm (n = 24) or dissection (n = 6) of the thoracoabdominal aorta. After femoral artery puncture, a pigtail catheter was positioned at the origin of the descending aorta. CT acquisition was performed with an intra-aortic iodinated contrast media injection (15 mL/s, 120 mL). The visualization of the AKA and the location of the feeder(s) to the AKA were independently evaluated by two observers. Interrater agreement was calculated using a kappa test. Spinal angiogram by selective catheterization was systematically performed to confirm the results of the IA-CTA. The AKA was visualized by the IA-CTA in 27/30 cases (90 %); in 26/31 (84 %) cases, the continuity with the aorta was satisfactorily seen. Interrater agreement was good for the visualization of the AKA and its feeder(s): 0.625 and 0.87, respectively. In 75 % of the cases for which the AKA was visualized, the selective catheterization confirmed the results of the IA-CTA. In the remaining 25 % of the cases, the selective catheterization could not be performed due to marked vessels' tortuosity or ostium stenosis. IA-CTA is a feasible technique in a daily practice that presents a good sensitivity for the location of the AKA. (orig.)