WorldWideScience

Sample records for prepared registered nurses

  1. A return to diploma-prepared registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, June F

    2009-01-01

    A quarter of a century ago, the nursing profession in Canada took a bold step: to establish baccalaureate preparation in nursing as the standard for practice as a registered nurse in Canada. Towards that end, hospital schools of nursing gave way to collaborative programs designed to help hospital and college diploma nursing students make the transition into baccalaureate nursing programs. It is thus paradoxical that, today, the nursing profession in Canada should do anything to jeopardize its goal to have RNs prepared at the baccalaureate level. The purpose of this paper is to focus Canadian nurse leaders' attention on that very possibility, given that some professional nursing organizations in Canada have conceptualized a future RN practice that could result in the emergence of a new kind of healthcare professional and a return to diploma preparation of RNs.

  2. Nursing: Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a diploma from an approved nursing program. Registered nurses also must be licensed. Education In all nursing education programs, students take courses in anatomy, physiology, microbiology, chemistry, nutrition, psychology, and other social and ...

  3. Do Associate Degree Registered Nurses Fare Differently in the Nurse Labor Market Compared to Baccalaureate-Prepared RNs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, David I; Buerhaus, Peter I; Staiger, Douglas O

    2015-01-01

    Roughly 40% of the nearly 3 million registered nurses (RNs) in the United States have an associate's degree (ADN) as their highest level of nursing education. Yet even before the recent Institute of Medicine report on The Future of Nursing, employers of RNs have increasingly preferred baccalaureate-prepared RNs (BSNs), at least anecdotally. Data from the American Community Survey (2003-2013) were analyzed with respect to employment setting, earnings, and employment outcomes of ADN and BSN-prepared RNs. The data reveal a divergence in employment setting: the percentage of ADN-prepared RNs employed in hospitals dropped from 65% to 60% while the percentage of BSN-prepared RNs employed in hospitals grew from 67% to 72% over this period. Many ADNs who would have otherwise been employed in hospitals seem to have shifted to long-term care settings.

  4. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  5. Emotional intelligence levels in baccalaureate-prepared early career registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda S Reemts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The increasing complexity of the healthcare environment calls for increasing emotional intelligence (EI competence in nurses. This study assessed the EI competence of 164 baccalaureate nursing alumni who graduated during the years 2007-2010 from three Benedictine institutions located in the Midwestern United States to see if there was growth of EI with experience as a registered nurse (RN, and to determine if age, gender, grade point average (GPA, and years of total healthcare work experience prior to graduation predicted EI. Methods: Participants completed the web-based Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT and a demographic survey. Results: Findings indicated 79.4% of participants were competent or higher on the MSCEIT total EI score. Percentages of nurses scoring in the competent or higher range on each of the four branch scores of perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions were 80.6%, 72.7%, 84.2%, and 84.9% respectively. There were no significant differences on EI scores between graduates with 1-2 years compared to 3-5 years of experience as a RN. Results of a linear stepwise regression indicated being female was a significant predictor on the MSCEIT total EI score (P = 0.015 and using emotions branch (P = 0.047. Findings also indicated GPA (P < 0.001 and being female (P = 0.023 were significant predictors of EI on the understanding emotions branch. Conclusions: The findings indicate there is work to be done to improve the EI competence of nursing graduates. Continued research on the topic of EI and nursing is needed to build the knowledge base on how to promote positive patient outcomes.

  6. Registered Nurse Education and the Registered Nurse Job Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Howard Allan

    This effort compares the graduates of the three types of Registered Nurse (RN) education programs (three-year Diploma in Nursing, two-year Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), and four-year Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing). The basic objective is to determine whether they are perfect substitutes, especially whether ADN graduates can adequately…

  7. Transitioning from military medics to registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita MD

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed D Keita,1 Valerie J Diaz,1,2 Audrey P Miller,1 Maria Olenick,1 Sharon R Simon1 1Department of Undergraduate Nursing, Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, 2Operational Health Support Unit Jacksonville, United States Navy Nurse Corps, Jacksonville, FL, USA Abstract: The nursing shortage in the USA is expected to reach 260,000 registered nurses (RNs by 2025. The most profound shortages are expected in California and Florida, translating into 109,779 and 128,364 RN jobs, respectively. Despite a foreseen growth in nursing career opportunities nationwide, the supply of nurses will be insufficient to meet the corresponding demand. Capitalizing on prior education, experience, and skills of military clinical personnel to fill these jobs could significantly reduce the projected nursing shortage. Florida International University's Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences is circumventing barriers to recruit, retain, and graduate transitioning veteran medics and corpsmen as Bachelor of Science in Nursing prepared RNs who reintegrate into the civilian workforce. The Veteran Bachelor of Science in Nursing (VBSN program is in the form of a cooperative agreement between Florida International University and the US Health Resources and Services Administration. The VBSN program's main objective is to build upon the unique leadership skills, clinical education, and training of military medics and corpsmen to ensure successful completion of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing curriculum. VBSN students, as veterans themselves, have unique knowledge and exposure to the specific health issues and needs of the veteran population overall. They are poised and best prepared to effectively care for the US population, particularly the current 22 million US veterans and 1.6 million Florida veterans. Additionally, the VBSN program will alleviate the challenges, such as the lack of recognition of

  8. The Storied Experiences of Registered Nurses' Transition from Paper to Electronic Nursing Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeff S.

    2010-01-01

    This narrative inquiry was designed to bring to life the storied experiences of registered nurses who have transitioned from paper to electronic nursing documentation and to provide a foundation for others who may be preparing to implement electronic documentation and wish to consider the significance of these nurses' stories of change in their…

  9. National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (NSSRN) Download makes data from the survey readily available to users in a one-stop download. The Survey has been...

  10. Political participation of registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenhouten, Christine L; Malakar, Crystalmichelle L; Kubsch, Sylvia; Block, Derryl E; Gallagher-Lepak, Susan

    2011-08-01

    Level of political participation and factors contributing to participation were measured among Midwest RNs (n = 468) via an online survey (Cronbach's α = .95). Respondents reported engaging in primarily "low cost" activities (e.g., voting, discussing politics, and contacting elected officials), with fewer reporting speaking at public gatherings, participating in demonstrations, and membership in nursing organizations. Psychological engagement was most predictive (p nursing organizations need to model and cultivate greater psychological engagement among students and nurses.

  11. Caring for adolescent females with anorexia nervosa: registered nurses' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S J; de Sales Turner

    2000-07-01

    This phenomenological study was undertaken to explore in depth the experiences of registered nurses caring for adolescent anorexic females within paediatric wards of general hospitals in Victoria, Australia. A qualitative design underpinned by the philosophy of Edmund Husserl was employed for this study. Audio taped in-depth interviews with five registered nurses working within the public health care system were conducted. Using Colaizzi's procedural steps of analysis, six themes of meaning were explicated. They were: (a) personal core values of nurses; (b) core values challenged; (c) emotional turmoil; (d) frustration; (e) turning points; and (f) resolution. These themes, when taken together, described the essence of the journey undertaken by registered nurses who cared for adolescent anorexic females. The findings of this study indicated that there is a need for extensive registered nurse preparation, on-going support, and development of education programmes to enable registered nurses to care for these patients with greater understanding. Further, the participants identified the need for new care regimes and protocols to be developed that incorporated new ways of thinking. They also expressed a desire to be have greater involvement in the planned care of their patients.

  12. Registered nurse participation in performance appraisal interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Deborah Gail; Wood, Elizabeth E

    2007-01-01

    Performance appraisal interviews have, over the past two decades, become a common phenomenon in nursing. Yet evidence--both anecdotal and those reported in the literature--suggest that these interviews provide minimal satisfaction and are thus not always effective. This article presents the findings of an interpretive study that explored and documented the meaning and impact of participating in performance appraisal interviews. Data gleaned from nine New Zealand registered nurses employed by a single district health board provide evidence that nurses are often disappointed by the process of performance appraisal. Although they believe in the potential value of performance appraisal interviews, they seldom experience the feedback, direction, and encouragement necessary for an effective appraisal process. Changes to the current professional development program and its accompanying performance appraisal will require skilled commitment on the part of nurses, managers, and the employing organization to improve and develop the assessment and promotion of nursing practice.

  13. Predictors of successful transition to registered nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Craig; Esterman, Adrian; Smith, Colleen; Kenny, Amanda

    2013-06-01

    To identify predictors of successful transition from undergraduate student to registered nurse and to identify whether any particular pre-registration paid employment choice impacted on transition. Nursing students in Australia and internationally, engage in a variety of paid employment whilst completing their university studies. However, there is little empirical evidence about the different types of employment chosen by students and any relationship to graduate nurse transition. A descriptive questionnaire survey. This cross-sectional study was conducted with newly graduated nurses throughout Australia. The survey data were collected over 4 months in 2011, with 392 registered nurses completing a questionnaire. Respondents were categorized into four groups, according to their chosen work type (hospitality/retail, enrolled nurse, other healthcare worker, and non-worker) and transition scores were identified. Transition scores were significantly higher for undergraduates who were employed compared with non-workers. Postregistration institutional work factors appeared to be stronger predictors of successful transition than pre-registration employment factors. Assistance in dealing with complex patients, orientation to a new environment, and respect from colleagues were the best predictors for successful transition. Engaging in some form of paid employment in the final year of undergraduate university study is beneficial. However, it is not pre-registration employment choice per se that is the best predictor of successful transition, but the influence of work factors which new graduates experience in their first year of practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses in nursing homes: Experiences and opinions of administrators and nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, Ramona; Verbeek, Hilde; van Rossum, Erik; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Hamers, Jan P H

    2017-07-12

    To understand how nursing homes employ baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses (BRNs) and how they view the unique contributions of baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses to staff and residents in their organizations. Although providing care for nursing home residents is complex and thus requires a high level of skills, organizations often struggle to recruit and retain BRNs. Some nursing home organizations do not employ baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses at all. Among those that do, it is unknown how well these organizations make use of baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses' expertise or if their roles are different from those of other staff. A qualitative study, consisting of 26 individual and three group interviews was conducted in the Netherlands. Interviews were conducted at the board-, management- and staff-level in six nursing home organizations. Data were collected between January 2016-May 2016. Organizations employed baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses to fulfil an informal leadership role for direct care teams. Organizations that do not employ baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses were unable to articulate their role in the nursing home setting. Difficulties baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses experienced during role implementation depended on role clarity, the term used to refer to the baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurse, the extent to which nurses received support, openness from direct care teams and baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses' own behaviour. The unique contribution of baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses perceived by respondents differed between and in organizations. Our findings suggest that there is no "one size fits all" approach to employing baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses in nursing homes. To ensure the satisfaction of both baccalaureate-educated Registered Nurses and the organizations that employ them, careful implementation and evaluation of their role is crucial. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons

  15. Assessing registered nurses' clinical skills in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Sonya; McDonald, Sinead; Rainey, Debbie

    The aim of this article is to explore the views of registered nurses undertaking the new Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), incorporating an integrated preparatory skills workshop. The workshop and the OSCE were audited with particular regard to the student experience. This article describes the audit process and the results of three questionnaires: one carried out before the OSCE assessment, a second immediately after the workshop and a third four days after the assessment. The results provide an insight into the student experience.

  16. Spiritual care perspectives of Danish Registered Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kirsten Haugaard; Turner, de Sales

    2008-01-01

    respects patients’ values, religion, customs, and spiritual beliefs. Literature however revealed that the phenomenon of spiritual care is complex and variously interpreted, and that there seems to be a lack of conceptual clarity regarding what constitutes spiritual care. A phenomenological and hermeneutic......Spiritual care perspectives of Danish Nurses The purpose of this study was to explore how Danish registered nurses understand the phenomenon of spiritual care and how their understanding impacts on their interventions with their patients. Nurses are responsible for the provision of care which...... would engage in provision of spiritual care. The participants acknowledged that their understanding of spirituality influenced their provision of spiritual care, which was recognized as a challenge requiring the nurse’s initiative and courage. Spirituality was primarily understood as a patient’s private...

  17. Competence of newly qualified registered nurses from a nursing college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BG Morolong

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The South African education and training system, through its policy of outcomesbased education and training, has made competency a national priority. In compliance to this national requirement of producing competent learners, the South African Nursing Council ( 1999 B require that the beginner professional nurse practitioners and midwives have the necessary knowledge, skills, attitudes and values which will enable them to render efficient professional service. The health care system also demands competent nurse practitioners to ensure quality in health care. In the light of competency being a national priority and a statutory demand, the research question that emerges is, how competent are the newly qualified registered nurses from a specific nursing college in clinical nursing education? A quantitative, non-experimental contextual design was used to evaluate the competence of newly qualified registered nurses from a specific nursing college. The study was conducted in two phases. The first phase dealt with the development of an instrument together with its manual through the conceptualisation process. The second phase focused on the evaluation of the competency of newly qualified nurses using the instrument based on the steps of the nursing process. A pilot study was conducted to test the feasibility of the items of the instrument. During the evaluation phase, a sample of twenty-six newly qualified nurses was selected by simple random sampling from a target population of thirty-six newly qualified registered nurses. However, six participants withdrew from the study. Data was collected in two general hospitals where the newly qualified registered nurses were working. Observation and questioning were used as data collection techniques in accordance with the developed instrument. Measures were taken to ensure internal validity and reliability of the results. To protect the rights of the participants, the researcher adhered to DENOSA’S (1998

  18. Priorities for the professional development of registered nurses in nursing homes: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Emily; Spilsbury, Karen; McCaughan, Dorothy; Thompson, Carl; Butterworth, Tony; Hanratty, Barbara

    2017-01-08

    To establish a consensus on the care and professional development needs of registered nurses (RNs) employed by UK care homes. Two-stage, online modified Delphi study. A panel (n = 352) of individuals with experience, expertise or interest in care home nursing: (i) care home nurses and managers; (ii) community healthcare professionals (including general practitioners, geriatricians, specialist and district nurses); and (iii) nurse educators in higher education. RNs employed by nursing homes require particular skills, knowledge, competence and experience to provide high-quality care for older residents. The most important responsibilities for the nursing home nurse were: promoting dignity, personhood and wellbeing, ensuring resident safety and enhancing quality of life. Continuing professional development priorities included personal care, dementia care and managing long-term conditions. The main barrier to professional development was staff shortages. Nursing degree programmes were perceived as inadequately preparing nurses for a nursing home role. Nursing homes could improve by providing supportive learning opportunities for students and fostering challenging and rewarding careers for newly RNs. If nurses employed by nursing homes are not fit for purpose, the consequences for the wider health and social-care system are significant. Nursing homes, the NHS, educational and local authorities need to work together to provide challenging and rewarding career paths for RNs and evaluate them. Without well-trained, motivated staff, a high-quality care sector will remain merely an aspiration.

  19. Educators' expectations of roles, employability and career pathways of registered and enrolled nurses in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Elisabeth R; McKenna, Lisa; D'Amore, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    In Australia, like other countries, two levels of nurse are registered for entry to practice. Educational changes for second level nurses in Australia have led to questions regarding roles and career options. This paper reports on interviews with nursing course coordinators to examine educator expectations of roles and career pathways of registered and enrolled nurses. Coordinators of eight degree (registered) and diploma (enrolled) nursing programs were interviewed to determine their opinions on roles and careers that students were prepared for. Transcripts were thematically analysed. Educators reported similar graduate roles, although high acuity care was primarily the role of registered nurses. Career expectations differed with enrolled nurses having limited advancement opportunity, and registered nurses greater career options. Health organisations were unprepared to accommodate increased practice scope of enrolled nurses and limited work practice through policies stipulating who could perform procedures. Organisational health policies need to accommodate increased enrolled nurse skill base. Education of practising nurses is necessary regarding increased scope of enrolled nurse practice to ensure they are used to their full potential. Increasing patient acuity requires more registered nurses, as enrolled nurses are unprepared to care for complex or deteriorating patients.

  20. Factors influencing professionalism in nursing among Korean American registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Godwin, Yeoun Soo; Baek, Hee Chong; Wynd, Christine A

    2010-01-01

    Although significant numbers of foreign nurses are currently employed in the United States, little research about nursing professionalism exists for this population. The study assessed the levels of professionalism and examined factors associated with professionalism among Korean American registered nurses (RNs). Hall's Professionalism Inventory (HPI) scale was used for this correlational descriptive study. Data were collected, using a mailing survey, with a convenience sample of Korean American RNs living in the United States (n = 221). Current position in nursing, current employment status, work setting, total years of nursing experience, total years of nursing experience in the United States, location of final degree attainment, and duration of nursing education in the United States were associated with the level of professionalism among Korean American RNs. Variables predicting professionalism included membership in professional organizations (beta = .204, P nursing experience in the United States (beta = .198, P = .001), and they accounted for 8.6% of the total variance in the HPI score. The findings suggest that multiple internal and external factors are associated with professionalism among Korean American RNs and provide an understanding of trends in professionalism from an international perspective. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The use of physical assessment skills by registered nurses in Australia: issues for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birks, Melanie; Cant, Robyn; James, Ainsley; Chung, Catherine; Davis, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of pre-service nursing education programs is to prepare competent graduates who are able to function as safe, professional registered nurses. An extensive element of these programs is the teaching of physical assessment skills, with most programs educating students to perform over 120 such skills. Previous research from North America suggests that the majority of skills taught to nurses in their pre-service programs are not used in practice. As part of a larger study, an online survey was used to explore use of 121 physical assessment skills by Australian nurses. Recruitment occurred via mailed invitation to members of the Australian Nursing Federation. Data were extracted from 1220 completed questionnaires returned by nurses who were mostly employed in New South Wales, were female and experienced nurses. Respondents indicated that they used only 34% of skills routinely. Results reinforce evidence found in the literature that many of the skills taught to nurses are either not used at all (35.5%) or are used rarely (31%). These findings have implications for the teaching of physical assessment skills in pre-service nursing programs, and raise questions about the value of extensive skills teaching in the context of contemporary health care. Further research into barriers to the use of physical assessment skills in nursing and the need for comprehensive skills preparation for the generalist nurse is likely to offer some solutions to these questions.

  2. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  3. The role of the nurse executive in fostering and empowering the advanced practice registered nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbert, Tukea L

    2012-06-01

    The nurse executive plays a critical role in the design, oversight, and outcomes of the delivery of care and a key role in the success of the integration of advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) into an organization. The critical areas that nurse executives must consider to foster and empower APRNs are: (1) knowledge and self preparation, especially of political initiatives that affect the role, (2) visionary leadership and development of clear role expectations and appropriate credentialing, (3) strategies to reduce disconnection between the APRN and their practice setting, and (4) appropriate education and marketing of the role to stakeholders.

  4. Exploring the transition from registered nurse to family nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poronsky, Cathlin Buckingham

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information available regarding the transition from registered nurse (RN) to family nurse practitioner (FNP). Several authors described this transition as taking place in 4 stages, and others described it as a 2-phase process. However, there is a lack of consensus about the definition of these stages and phases and at what point they occur for nurses who are making the transition from an RN to an FNP. From what is known, this multistage/2-phase transition is accompanied by feelings of anxiety, stress, role confusion, and emotional turmoil. As a nurse faculty member, the author theorized that nurse faculty might be in a position to provide support for graduate students making this transition in role. However, there was little information available about the transition phases, stages, and needs of students during graduate school. The search for a framework to explore transition yielded transition theory, which is described and applied to FNP transition in this article. Transition theory may be useful for examining more fully the phases and stages of RN-to-FNP transition. In this time of increased need for qualified primary care providers, it is essential that graduates of FNP programs transition into practice following graduation.

  5. Homophobia in Registered Nurses: Impact on LGB Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Christopher W.; Kiehl, Ermalynn M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall attitudes and homophobia towards gays and lesbians in the workplace. Homophobia scores, represented by the Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men (ATLG) Scale, was the dependent variable. Overall homophobia scores were assessed among a randomized stratified sample of registered nurses licensed in the…

  6. Registered nurse-administered sedation for gastrointestinalendoscopic procedure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The rising use of nonanesthesiologist-administeredsedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy has clinicalsignificances. Most endoscopic patients require someforms of sedation and/or anesthesia. The goals ofthis sedation are to guard the patient's safety, minimizephysical discomfort, to control behavior and todiminish psychological responses. Generally, moderatesedation for these procedures has been offered by thenon-anesthesiologist by using benzodiazepines and/oropioids. Anesthesiologists and non-anesthesiologistpersonnel will need to work together for these challengesand for safety of the patients. The sedationtraining courses including clinical skills and knowledgeare necessary for the registered nurses to facilitate thepatient safety and the successful procedure. However,appropriate patient selection and preparation, adequatemonitoring and regular training will ensure that the useof nurse-administered sedation is a feasible and safetechnique for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures.

  7. Taking Part: Registered Nurses and the Labour Market in 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seccombe, I.; Smith, G.

    The labor market participation, pay, job satisfaction, employment patterns, and turnover of registered nurses in the United Kingdom were examined through an analysis of data from the 1997 Royal College of Nursing (RCN) Survey. Of the random sample of 5,984 nurses from the RCN membership records surveyed, 4,288 (72%) returned usable questionnaires.…

  8. A Case Study of Connecticut Community Colleges Nursing Programs to Describe Gerontological Content Inclusion in Associate Degree Registered Nursing Programs Using an Educational Curriculum Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Leslie J.

    2013-01-01

    The population of adults over age 65 must have competently prepared registered nurses to meet their current and future health care needs. There is a societal component in nursing to ensure that all nurses have the content, skills, and strategies, which includes a focus on basic gerontology preparation. Therefore, the purpose of this descriptive…

  9. A Case Study of Connecticut Community Colleges Nursing Programs to Describe Gerontological Content Inclusion in Associate Degree Registered Nursing Programs Using an Educational Curriculum Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Leslie J.

    2013-01-01

    The population of adults over age 65 must have competently prepared registered nurses to meet their current and future health care needs. There is a societal component in nursing to ensure that all nurses have the content, skills, and strategies, which includes a focus on basic gerontology preparation. Therefore, the purpose of this descriptive…

  10. Assessment and documentation of patients' nutritional status: perceptions of registered nurses and their chief nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persenius, Mona Wentzel; Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise; Bååth, Carina; Larsson, Bodil Wilde

    2008-08-01

    To study, within municipal care and county council care, (1) chief nurses' and registered nurses' perceptions of patient nutritional status assessment and nutritional assessment/screening tools, (2) registered nurses' perceptions of documentation in relation to nutrition and advantages and disadvantages with a documentation model. Chief nurses and registered nurses have a responsibility to identify malnourished patients and those at risk of malnutrition. In this descriptive study, 15 chief nurses in municipal care and 27 chief nurses in county council care were interviewed by telephone via a semi-structured interview guide. One hundred and thirty-one registered nurses (response rate 72%) from 14 municipalities and 28 hospital wards responded to the questionnaire, all in one county. According to the majority of chief nurses and registered nurses, only certain patients were assessed, on admission and/or during the stay. Nutritional assessment/screening tools and nutritional guidelines were seldom used. Most of the registered nurses documented nausea/vomiting, ability to eat and drink, diarrhoea and difficulties in chewing and swallowing, while energy intake and body mass index were rarely documented. However, the majority documented their judgement about the patient's nutritional condition. The registered nurses perceived the VIPS model (Swedish nursing documentation model) as a guideline as well as a model obstructing the information exchange. Differences were found between nurses (chief nurses/registered nurses) in municipal care and county council care, but not between registered nurses and their chief nurses. All patients are not nutritionally assessed and important nutritional parameters are not documented. Nutritionally compromised patients may remain unidentified and not properly cared for. Assessment and documentation of the patients' nutritional status should be routinely performed in a more structured way in both municipal care and county council care

  11. A phenomenographic study of registered nurses' understanding of their role in student learning--an Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, Jillian

    2006-11-01

    Students may be 'buddied' with registered nurses during their clinical experience since the designated clinical facilitator cannot be available for each student at all times. Little is known about the way registered nurses understand this informal role. The rationale for this study was to gain an insight of the variation of understanding registered nurses have of their role with students, and explored the qualitatively different ways registered nurses perceive their role with students on clinical experience and the implications of this understanding for student learning. A phenomenographic approach was used to identify the variation of understanding and meaning of the role of the registered nurse with students on clinical practice from the perspective of the registered nurse. Phenomenography is a field of descriptive research concerned with the variation in ways people experience and understand similar phenomena. A purposive sample of 30 registered nurses from 15 public and private hospitals in central and south eastern Queensland, Australia. Individual semi-structured interviews from a final sample of 28 interviews were analysed to identify Categories of Description. Eight variations of understanding registered nurses have of their informal role with students were identified. The registered nurses' understanding varies from a focus that is 'student-centred', to 'completion of workload-centred', to 'registered nurse control', to a preference for no contact with students. As a consequence some students may have positive learning experiences while others will have limited learning opportunities. The research highlights the varied ways registered nurses understand their role with students that may promote or impede the quality of student learning and development to meet professional competency standards. Formal recognition of the complexity of the registered nurse role by health care agencies and tertiary education providers is essential to ensure registered nurses

  12. The emotional intelligence of registered nurses commencing critical care nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette Nagel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Critical care is described as complex, detailed healthcare in a unique, technologically rich environment. Critical care nursing requires a strong knowledge base and exceptional clinical and technological skills to cope in this demanding environment. Many registered nurses (RNs commencing work in these areas may lack resilience, and because of the stress of the critical care environment, coping mechanisms need to be developed. To prevent burnout and to enable critical care nurses to function holistically, emotional intelligence (EI is essential in the development of such coping mechanisms.Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the EI of RNs commencing work in critical care units in a private hospital group in Gauteng, South Africa.Method: The design used for this study was a quantitative descriptive survey. The target population were RNs commencing work in critical care units. Data were collected from RNs using the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire – Short Form and analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software.Results: The sample (n = 30 had a mean age of 32 years. Most of the participants (63% qualified through the completion of a bridging course between 2010 and 2012. The majority (62% of the sample had less than 2 years’ experience as RNs.Conclusion: The EI of RNs commencing work in a critical care environment was indicative of a higher range of Global EI, with the well-being factor scoring the highest, followed by the emotionality factor, then self-control, with the sociability factor scoring the lowest.

  13. Attitudes of registered nurses regarding their own undergraduate clinical education

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    A descriptive survey style study was conducted in order to describe the attitudes of recently graduated registered nurses towards the structure and supervision of their own undergraduate clinical education. This thesis presents and explores the findings of the study. The sample was obtained from Grade 1 and Grade 2 Year 1 Registered Nurses working within two metropolitan teaching hospitals. One hundred and twenty four (124) subjects participated by returning the questionnaire. The data collec...

  14. Identification of Anticipated Job Stressors of Registered Nurse Refresher Students as They Prepare to Reenter the Work Force Following a Career Break

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Multifactorial reasons have produced a growing nursing shortage. One possible group that could reverse this shortage is inactive nurses. Many stakeholders wonder about allocating scarce resources to identify, locate, educate, and redeploy this group into active practice. The purpose of this one-phase embedded validating quantitative mixed…

  15. Scholarship in nursing: Degree-prepared nurses versus diploma-prepared nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizeth Roets

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: The global nursing crisis, nor the nursing profession, will benefit by only training more nurses. The profession and the health care sector need more degree prepared nurses to improve scholarship in nursing.

  16. Predicting National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    The Baccalaureate Nursing program in San Antonio, Texas experienced a decrease in National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) on the first attempt for students graduating between 2009 and 2014 without a clear explanation for the decline. The purpose of this quantitative non-experimental correlational study was to…

  17. Being a team leader: newly registered nurses relate their experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Louise; Idvall, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study that explores how newly qualified registered nurses experience their leadership role in the ward-based nursing care team. A nurse's clinical leadership affects the quality of care provided. Newly qualified nurses experience difficulties during the transition period from student to qualified professional and find it challenging to lead nursing care. Twelve nurses were interviewed and the transcribed texts analysed using qualitative content analysis to assess both manifest and latent content. Five themes were identified: feeling stranded; forming well-functioning teams; learning to lead; having the courage, strength, and desire to lead; and ensuring appropriate care. The findings indicate that many factors limit nurses' leadership but some circumstances are supportive. The leadership prerequisites for newly registered nurses need to improve, emphasizing different ways to create a supportive atmosphere that promotes professional development and job satisfaction. To increase nurse retention and promote quality of care, nurse managers need to clarify expectations and guide and support newly qualified nurses in a planned way. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Registered Nurse Staffing Mix and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hongsoo; Harrington, Charlene; Greene, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing mix and quality of nursing home care measured by regulatory violations. Design and Methods: A retrospective panel data study (1999-2003) of 2 groups of California freestanding nursing homes. One group was 201 nursing homes that consistently met the state's minimum standard…

  19. Nursing 2000: Collaboration to Promote Careers in Registered Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Connie S.; Mitchell, Barbara S.

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of the collaborative Nursing 2000 model in promoting nursing careers was evaluated through a survey of 1,598 nursing students (637 responses). Most effective techniques were the "shadow a nurse" program, publications, classroom and community presentations, and career-counseling telephone calls. (SK)

  20. Registered nurses integrate traditional Chinese medicine into the triage process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Sharon W

    2012-02-01

    People in the United States often consult registered nurses (nurses) for advice when they want to explore alternatives to Western medicine, such as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Nurses find themselves confronting dilemmas when they are caught between these radically different worlds of medical cultures and thinking. Twenty Minnesota nurses were interviewed to learn how they integrate TCM into their triage process. Symbolic interactionism was the research framework used, and mixed coding methods facilitated data analysis. Several sociological theories explain the findings. The major finding is that nurses use a four-step triage process that begins from the Western medical perspective and includes consideration of TCM use. Nurses' recommendations are influenced by their situational roles and relationships, and by the cues they read from the person who is asking their advice. The results point to nurses being natural disseminators of TCM information and education in their resource role for others making health care decisions.

  1. Retainment incentives in three rural practice settings: variations in job satisfaction among staff registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, T D; Dunkin, J W; Juhl, N; Geller, J M

    1995-05-01

    Researchers have demonstrated repeatedly the importance of the relationship linking job satisfaction to employee retention. In rural areas of the country, where a persistent maldistribution of nurses continues to hamper health care delivery, the potential benefits of bolstering retention via enhancements in job satisfaction are of utmost utility to administrators and providers alike. Data were gathered from a multistate survey of registered nurses (RNs) practicing in rural hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, and community/public health settings (N = 1,647; response rate = 40.3%). The investigators found that the use of tuition reimbursement corresponded significantly with increased levels of job satisfaction among nurses in all three practice environments, as did day care services for nurses in acute care settings. Also, among hospital-based RNs, level of nursing education was found to be a significant factor in the relationship between tuition reimbursement and job satisfaction, with the highest level occurring among diploma-prepared nurses.

  2. [Important role of a nurse parctitioner-like specialized registered nurse in a cardiac surgery team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izutani, Hironori

    2012-11-01

    Team medical practice by physician, nurse, and other co-medical staffs has been performed and it provides numerous values to the patients. Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare reported that a registered nurse was a key person of medicine. The importance of nurse's role expansion and involving medical cure by a registered nurse was emphasized in the report. Japanese nurse practitioner for a new profession is going to start in near future. In our institute, a specialized registered nurse has joined a cardiac surgery team. She plays an important role of assisting and consulting cardiac physicians for patient cure and care as a member of the surgery team. Cardiac surgery team including specialized registered nurse gives quality surgical results and patient satisfaction.

  3. Evaluation through research of a three-track career ladder program for registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Carol; Eliades, Aris Beoglos

    2010-01-01

    A descriptive study design was employed to survey registered nurse participants in a career ladder program comprising of three tracks: clinical, education, and management. Findings indicate that participation allows nurses of varying education preparation and roles to demonstrate professional development. Implications for staff development include efficacy of the online survey technique, provision of a reliable tool to evaluate a career ladder, and evaluation of a career ladder that includes the staff development educator.

  4. Registered nurses in Israel - workforce employment characteristics and projected supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirel Nurit

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surveys of nursing supplies around the world have furnished a better understanding of the structure of the workforce, helped identify shortages, and plan professional training. This study aimed to examine the employment and workforce characteristics of registered nurses and the projected supply in Israel as a tool for planning. Methods 1. A survey of a national sample of 10% of the RNs of working age (3,200 nurses. 2. Analysis of administrative data from the Ministry of Health' Nursing Division and the Central Bureau of Statistics. Results Most registered nurses are employed (89% - 67% work full time. The workforce is mature (45% are above 45, trained (55% qualified beyond the basic course, 48% hold a BA, 18% hold an MA or PhD, and stable: few quit the profession altogether. The likelihood of "survival" in the profession after 10 years is 93%; after 20 years - 88%. 23% have made some transition in the last 10 years (most - a single transition. Most of the transitions are from hospital to community work. Supply projections show a decrease in the total number of RNs in the nursing workforce from 28,500 in 2008 to 21,201 in 2028 - i.e., of 25% by the end of the period. As for the ratio per 1,000 population, the drop is from 4 registered nurses/1,000 in 2008 to 2/1,000 in 2028. Conclusions The study findings provide more rigorous projections of supply than in the past on the declining rates of the nursing workforce in the coming decades, and contribute to decision making about the scope of training and recruitment. The study also points to the implications for policy decisions regarding the findings that the young nursing workforce is less stable, that there are advantages to recruiting a more mature workforce, and that post-basic education is connected with workforce stability.

  5. Job satisfaction of Malaysian registered nurses: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atefi, Narges; Abdullah, Khatijah L; Wong, Li P

    2016-01-01

    Job satisfaction is an important factor in health care settings. Strong empirical evidence supports a causal relationship between job satisfaction, patient safety and quality of care. However, there have not been any studies exploring the job satisfaction of Malaysian nurses. The main purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the factors related to feelings of job satisfaction as well as job dissatisfaction experienced by registered nurses in Malaysia. A convenient sample of 46 Malaysian nurses recruited from a large hospital (number of beds = 895) participated in the study. A total of seven focus group discussions were conducted with nurses from surgical, medical and critical care wards. A semi-structured interview guide was used to facilitate the interviews, which were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and checked. The transcripts were used as data and were analysed using a thematic approach. The study identified three main themes that influenced job satisfaction: (1) nurses' personal values and beliefs; (2) work environment factors and (3) motivation factors. Concerning the nurses' personal values and beliefs, the ability to help people made the nurses felt honoured and happy, which indirectly contributed to job satisfaction. For work environment factors, team cohesion, benefit and reward, working conditions play an important role in the nurses' job satisfaction. Motivation factors, namely, professional development and clinical autonomy contributed to job satisfaction. It is important for nurse leaders to provide more rewards, comfortable work environments and to understand issues that affect nurses' job satisfaction. Our findings highlight the importance of factors that can improve nurses' job satisfaction. The study provides basic information for hospital administrators in planning effective and efficient policies to improve nursing job satisfaction in order to increase the quality of patient care and decrease nursing turnover. © 2014

  6. Letting go: How newly graduated registered nurses in Western Canada decide to exit the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachula, Kathryn M; Myrick, Florence; Yonge, Olive

    2015-07-01

    The Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) estimates a nursing shortage in Canada will rise to 60,000 registered nurses by 2022. Further compounding this crisis is the approximate 14-61% of new nursing graduates who will change nursing roles or exit the profession. To explore the factors and basic psychosocial process involved in the decisions of newly graduated registered nurses in Western Canada who permanently exit the nursing profession within five years. Data was collected through unstructured and semi-structured interviews using the Glaserian grounded theory method. Participants were found to be in a process of letting go of nursing that commenced as students and continued as they entered practice as registered nurses. Four major themes were identified. 1) Navigating constraints of the healthcare system and workplace: participants encountered difficulties adjusting to shiftwork and workload. 2) Negotiating social relationships, hierarchies, and troublesome behaviors; specifically hierarchal and horizontal violence. 3) Facing fears, traumas and challenges. 4) Weighing competing rewards and tensions which resulted in leaving the nursing profession. Students and subsequently new nursing graduates require a variety of supports to establish a nursing identity and remain in the profession. These supports include a manageable workload; meaningful orientation; interprofessional teamwork; and engagement within transformational and authentic leadership constructs. New nurses require a sense of being welcomed, valued, respected and accepted into the workplace environment, as well as constructive feedback, emotional support and debriefing to face workplace challenges. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Caring relationships in home-based nursing care - registered nurses' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The caring relationship between the nurse and the person in need of nursing care has been described as a key concept in nursing and could facilitate health and healing by involving the person's genuine needs. The aim of this study was to explore registered nurses' experiences of their relationships with persons in need of home-based nursing care. Individual interviews with nurses (n=13 registered nurses and 11 district nurses) working in home-based nursing care were performed. A thematic content analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews and resulted in the main theme Good nursing care is built on trusting relationship and five sub-themes, Establishing the relationship in home-based nursing care, Conscious efforts maintains the relationship, Reciprocity is a requirement in the relationship, Working in different levels of relationships and Limitations and boundaries in the relationship. A trusting relationship between the nurse and the person in need of healthcare is a prerequisite for good home-based nursing care whether it is based on face-to-face encounters or remote encounters through distance-spanning technology. A trusting relationship could reduce the asymmetry of the caring relationship which could strengthen the person's position. The relationship requires conscious efforts from the nurse and a choice of level of the relationship. The trusting relationship was reciprocal and meant that the nurse had to communicate something about themself as the person needs to know who is entering the home and who is communicating through distance-spanning technology.

  8. Nurse Anesthetists: Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the above minimums. A complete list of nurse anesthesia programs and information about each of them can be found at ... educational modules in four content areas, including airway management ... anesthesia equipment and technology; and pass a comprehensive examination ...

  9. Effects of leadership characteristics on pediatric registered nurses' job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Turner, Reneé; Hinds, Pamela S; Nelson, John; Pryor, Juanda; Robinson, Nellie C; Wang, Jichuan

    2014-01-01

    Job satisfaction levels among registered nurses (RNs) influence RN recruitment, retention, turnover, and patient outcomes. Researchers examining the relationship between characteristics of nursing leadership and RN job satisfaction have treated RNs as a monolithic group with little research on the satisfaction of hospital-based pediatric RNs. This study assessed the relationship of transformational and transactional nursing leadership characteristics and RN job satisfaction reported by pediatric RNs. This single site study included 935 hospital-based pediatric RNs who completed validated survey items regarding nursing leadership and job satisfaction. A structural equation model (SEM) was applied to assess how autonomy (transformational leadership) and distributive justice (transactional leadership) influence RN job satisfaction, and how RN socio-demographic characteristics influence job satisfaction via autonomy and distributive justice. Findings revealed that both autonomy and distributive justice had significant positive effects on RN job satisfaction but the largest source of influence was autonomy.

  10. What makes nursing satisfying: a comparison of college students' and registered nurses' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, A E; Lawrence, J A; Wearing, A J

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports a study of nurses' perceptions of the positive and negative features of the work environment and their contribution to satisfaction with nursing. The concept of a 'work space' was developed to describe nurses' mental images of the features of their work environment. Eighty-four final-year student nurses and 75 registered nurses rated questionnaire items designed to examine perceptions of opportunities for professional development, sources of satisfaction, difficulties, time constraints and problematic interactions with other hospital personnel. There was general agreement among nurses about the aspects of their work that they found satisfying, but student nurses were more pessimistic than registered nurses that nursing would give them opportunities for recognition of their worth. Students returning from practica in critical care wards reported more stressful interactions with other personnel than students returning from general ward practica. Structural equation modelling of the causal relations between sources of satisfaction with nursing revealed that recognition and self-perceptions of work as a nurse were the strongest predictors of overall satisfaction with nursing. Caring for patients contributed only indirectly through its influence on nurses' feelings about themselves. The data indicate the significance of personal and social implications of nursing careers.

  11. An evaluation of the drug calculation skills of registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Sandra; Brady, Anne-Marie; Malone, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical skill and proficiency underpin a number of nursing activities, with the most common application being in relation to drug dosage calculation and administration. Medication errors have been identified as the most common type of error affecting patient safety and the most common single preventable cause of adverse events and they can occur as a result of mathematical calculation error and or conceptual error. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the drug calculation skills of registered nurses (n = 124) on commencement of employment. The findings of this study indicate that there are inconsistencies in the amount of pharmacology content and drug calculation skills delivered within nursing curricula. The most frequent type of drug calculation errors are attributed to conceptual errors and participants identified ward based education on drug calculation as a pathway for improving the drug calculation skills of registered nurses. The study recommends that medication education, encompassing mathematical and conceptual drug calculation skills should be identified as a distinct competency in nursing curricula and continuing education programme.

  12. The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses' Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Inga E; Sahlsten, Monika J M

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses at the bedside are accountable for and oversee completion of patient care as well as directly leading and managing the provision of safe patient care. These nurses have an informal leadership role that is not associated with any given position. Leadership is a complex and multifaceted concept and its meaning is unclear, especially in the staff nurse context. The aim was to describe registered nurses' perceptions of what it entails to be the leader at the bedside in inpatient physical care. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Interviews were performed with Swedish registered nurses (n = 15). Five descriptive categories were identified: demonstrating clinical knowledge, establishing a good atmosphere of collaboration, consciously structuring the work in order to ensure patients' best possible nursing care, customized presence in the practical work with patients according to predetermined prerequisites, and monitoring coworkers' professional practice. Registered nurses informal role as leader necessitates a social process of deliberate effort to attain and maintain leader status and authority. Participants used deliberate communicative approaches and interactive procedures. Leader principles grounded in the core values of the nursing profession that ensure nursing values and person-centered attributes were a key aspect.

  13. Competency profile for registered nurses: NIC in gerontological nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A number of RNs provide both direct care and leadership in geriatric-care facilities. In this specialized area of care, the contributions of the RN are not well recognized. In this issue, we focus on gerontological nursing and how NIC can be used to describe and communicate this highly specialized role.

  14. Position statement. Restructuring, work redesign, and the job and career security of registered nurses. American Nurses Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The American Nurses Association (ANA) is committed to safeguarding the public, protecting and advancing the careers of professional nurses, supporting individual and collective efforts by registered nurses to protect their clients and enhancing the professional development and job security of registered nurses. As the nation's health care system is restructured, ANA is actively engaged in initiatives to strengthen the economic and general welfare of registered nurses, the safety and care for the public, and, in partnership with the state nurses associations (SNAs), oppose efforts to replace registered nurses with inappropriate substitutes.

  15. Measuring Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Organizational Climate: Instrument Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald; Poghosyan, Lusine

    2017-08-01

    No tool exists measuring certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) organizational climate. The study's purpose is to adapt a validated tool to measure CRNA organizational climate. Content validity of the Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Organizational Climate Questionnaire (CRNA-OCQ) was established. Pilot testing was conducted to determine internal reliability consistency of the subscales. Experts rated the tool as content valid. The subscales had high internal consistency reliability (with respective Cronbach's alphas): CRNA-Anesthesiologist Relations (.753), CRNA-Physician Relations (.833), CRNA-Administration Relations (.895), Independent Practice (.830), Support for CRNA Practice (.683), and Professional Visibility (.772). Further refinement of the CRNA-OCQ is necessary. Measurement and assessment of CRNA organizational climate may produce evidence needed to improve provider and patient outcomes.

  16. Associations between rates of unassisted inpatient falls and levels of registered and non-registered nurse staffing

    OpenAIRE

    Staggs, Vincent S.; Dunton, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Objective To enhance understanding of how nurse staffing relates to unassisted falls by exploring non-linear associations between unassisted fall rates and levels of registered nurse (RN) and non-RN staffing on 5 nursing unit types, thereby enabling managers to improve patient safety by making better-informed decisions about staffing. Design Cross-sectional analysis of routinely collected data using hierarchical negative binomial regression. Settings 8069 nursing units in 1361 U.S. hospitals ...

  17. Registered nurses' self-nurturance and life and career satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemcek, Mary Ann

    2007-08-01

    Knowledge of factors that help nurses thrive, including satisfaction with life and self-nurturance, can be used to enhance retention of a healthy work force. This study determined whether nurses are happy or satisfied with their lives; how self-nurturing or "good to self" they are; and whether a relationship exists among self-nurturance, life satisfaction, and career satisfaction. A descriptive, correlational study of 136 registered nurses involving measures of self-nurturance and life and career satisfaction was conducted. Mean scores for life satisfaction and self-nurturance were consistent with those from studies of well adults. Self-nurturance, life satisfaction, and career satisfaction were positively correlated with each other; thus, improving one is expected to improve the others. Knowledge of the significant positive correlation among life satisfaction, self-nurturance, and career satisfaction may prove useful in improving the mental health and safety of nurses. Strategies consistent with Magnet hospital characteristics are suggested for the occupational health nurse.

  18. Retaining early career registered nurses: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jane; Chamberlain-Salaun, Jennifer; Harrison, Helena; Yates, Karen; O'Shea, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A core objective of the Australian health system is to provide high quality, safe health care that meets the needs of all Australians. To achieve this, an adequate and effective workforce must support the delivery of care. With rapidly changing health care systems and consumer demographics, demand for care is increasing and retention of sufficient numbers of skilled staff is now a critical priority to meet current and future health care demands. Nurses are the largest cohort of professionals within the health workforce. Reducing the rates at which nurses leave the profession and supporting nurses to practice in their profession longer will have beneficial implications for the sustainability of a nursing workforce and, ultimately, to patient outcomes. The aim of the study was to describe and explain early career registered nurses' (ECRNs) experiences and support requirements during the first five years of practice for the purposes of identifying strategies that would support greater retention of ECRNs. A single case study design focused on early career registered nurses (ECRNs) working in a hospital and health service in northern Australia. The research team adopted Djukic et al's definition of ECRNs as "RNs who have practiced for less than 5 years". Data was collected via three individual interviews and two focus groups. Thirty-five ECRNs participated in the study. Qualitative analysis of data generated during interviews and focus groups, identified the key themes of receiving career advice and choice or no choice. Analysis of study data in the context of the broader literature resulted in the researchers identifying six areas of focus for ECRN retention: 1) well-planned, supported and structured transition periods; 2) consideration of rotation through different areas with a six month minimum for skills development; 3) empowering decision making; 4) placement opportunities and choice in decisions of where to work; 5) career advice and support that considers ECRNs

  19. Registered nurse peer evaluation in the perioperative setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Melanie B

    2006-09-01

    ANNUAL PERFORMANCE evaluations can be difficult to prepare and may rely, in part, on anecdotal information. PERIOPERATIVE RNs at CHRISTUS St Patrick Hospital, Lake Charles, La, developed and implemented a peer evaluation as part of nurses' annual performance evaluations. THE EVALUATION FORMS created were considered to be useful and fair by both staff members and managers.

  20. Predictors of Retention and Passing National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The current nursing shortage has challenged colleges to educate nurses at a faster pace than in previous times. Successful completion of the nursing programs and passing the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) exam is important for the students, faculty, and nursing programs. The purpose of this retrospective…

  1. In-service education and training as experienced by registered nurses

    OpenAIRE

    T.F. Norushe; D Van Rooyen; J. Strumpher

    2004-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic profession that is subject to rapid changes in health care provision, hence the need for inservice training programmes for nurses. Newly employed registered nurses require in-service training in order to update them regarding the latest developments in nursing practice. The researcher noted that some newly appointed registered nurses were not competent in all aspects relating to their tasks. This could have been due to a knowledge deficit relating to either new developmen...

  2. Registered nurse retention strategies in nursing homes: a two-factor perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Selina R; Probst, Janice C; Haddock, Kathlyn S; Moran, Robert; Baker, Samuel L; Anderson, Ruth A; Corazzini, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    As the American population ages and the proportion of individuals over the age of 65 expands, the demand for high-quality nursing home care will increase. However, nursing workforce instability threatens care quality and sustainability in this sector. Despite increasing attention to nursing home staff turnover, far less is known about registered nurse (RN) retention. In this study, the relationships between retention strategies, employee benefits, features of the practice environment, and RN retention were explored. Further, the utility of Herzberg's two-factor theory of motivation as a framework for nursing home retention studies was evaluated. This study was a secondary analysis of the nationally representative 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. The final sample of 1,174 participating nursing homes were either certified by Medicare or Medicaid or licensed by state agencies. We used a weighted multinomial logistic regression using an incremental approach to model the relationships. Although most nursing homes offered some combination of retention programs, the majority of strategies did not have a significant association with the level of RN retention reported by facilities. Director of nursing tenure and other extrinsic factors had the strongest association with RN retention in adjusted analyses. To improve RN retention, organizations may benefit greatly from stabilizing nursing home leadership, especially the director of nursing position. Second, managers of facilities with poor retention may consider adding career ladders for advancement, awarding attendance, and improving employee benefits. As a behavioral outcome of motivation and satisfaction, retention was not explained as expected using Herzberg's two-factor theory.

  3. Influenza vaccination by registered nurses: a personal decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Donna M Pierrynowski; Vollman, Ardene Robinson; Sethi, Sarla

    2009-01-01

    Influenza is a contagious respiratory virus that causes high rates of morbidity and mortality and is associated with life-threatening complications. Despite the wide availability of a highly effective influenza vaccine, nurses are reluctant to receive influenza vaccination and vaccination rates among them are low. The purpose of this study was to generate a substantive theory/theoretical model regarding the phenomenon of influenza vaccination uptake by registered nurses (RNs). The study used grounded theory to develop a deeper understanding of RNs' decision-making regarding the acceptance or refusal to be vaccinated against influenza in Nova Scotia, Canada. Data were collected from 11 RNs using an unstructured and conversational interview format and analysed using the constant comparative method. The primary finding of this study is that nurses consider getting vaccinated to be a personal decision (the core variable). Their decisions are based on sources of information (including formal education, continuing education and the media); personal knowing (personal philosophy, perceived risks and benefits and personal experience); and personal modifiers (the availability and accessibility of the vaccine). The process of making a personal decision defined in this study provides a framework for creating more effective influenza immunization education and delivery programs.

  4. Job satisfaction among psychiatric registered nurses in New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, T P

    2008-06-01

    This research used Herzberg et al.'s two-factor theory as a framework with which to examine job satisfaction in a sample of 161 registered psychiatric nurses in the states of Connecticut, Maine and Massachusetts (USA). Weiss et al.'s Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire short form was used to measure possible relationships between ability utilization, compensation, co-workers, achievement and job satisfaction. Findings support Herzberg et al.'s theory, showing moderate correlations among nurses' ability utilization, achievement and job satisfaction. Mean general satisfaction of respondents was closer to satisfied than neutral; respondents indicated greatest satisfaction with ability utilization (86%) and achievement (83%); 67% were satisfied with co-workers, and 52% with compensation. Respondents were least satisfied with compensation, with 14% indicating that they were very dissatisfied. Although compensation was an issue, it is possible that other factors, such as safety, management conflict, and balancing the needs of job and family, if addressed, may help increase job satisfaction and retention of psychiatric nursing staff.

  5. The experience of registered nurses nursing in the general audit intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Pope

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article a phenomenological qualitative research study is discussed. More attention will be given to the methodology of the research. The objectives of the study are two-fold: firstly to explore and describe the experience of registered nurses nursing in the adult intensive care unit (this is the first phase of the research and to describe guidelines based on the information obtained in the first phase to support the nurses in the form of a support programme in the second phase. The units of research are the registered nurses in the intensive care unit. The characteristics of the unit of research led to the emergence of a qualitative phenomenological research design of an explorative, descriptive and contextual nature. In the discussion of research methodology attention will be given to phase one: data gathering (ethical considerations and informed consent; purposive selection, phenomenological interviews and field notes; data analysis (Tesch’s method of data analysis, methods to ensure trustworthiness, organisation of raw data and integration of findings supported by literature. Five themes were identified through the data analysis: impaired communication with management; discrimination: white on black racism; lack of fair, competitive remuneration and disregard for professional worth; non-conducive physical environment, and stressful working environment. Phase two: Guidelines were described to support the registered nurses in the intensive care unit based on the information obtained in phase one of the research.

  6. Caring for prisoners-patients: a quandary for registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Ruth; Turner, de Sales

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to unveil the complexity of registered nurse (RN) care for prisoner-patients in an acute care perioperative setting. The study design was based on phenomenology and the philosophy of Hans George Gadamer. This study used researcher journaling and two audio-taped in-depth interviews with each of the 12 nurse participants. Five key fused horizons or joint understandings emerged that resonated for all participants. They were the following: • RNs give prisoner-patients perfunctory care; • Prisoner-patient care is reactive; • Caring for prisoner-patients is emotionally draining; • Knowing or imagining a prisoner-patient's crime creates practice dilemmas; and • Expressions of care straddle ideal and real caring perspectives. In the caring literature, caring is altruistically presented as an ideal that (ought to) guide RN interactions with patients. However, the study findings call into question the assumptions that are made about what it means to care and how RNs enact their caring role, particularly in vexatious situations. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Registered nurses' clinical reasoning skills and reasoning process: A think-aloud study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuHee; Lee, Young Joo; Bae, JuYeon; Seo, Minjeong

    2016-11-01

    As complex chronic diseases are increasing, nurses' prompt and accurate clinical reasoning skills are essential. However, little is known about the reasoning skills of registered nurses. This study aimed to determine how registered nurses use their clinical reasoning skills and to identify how the reasoning process proceeds in the complex clinical situation of hospital setting. A qualitative exploratory design was used with a think-aloud method. A total of 13 registered nurses (mean years of experience=11.4) participated in the study, solving an ill-structured clinical problem based on complex chronic patients cases in a hospital setting. Data were analyzed using deductive content analysis. Findings showed that the registered nurses used a variety of clinical reasoning skills. The most commonly used skill was 'checking accuracy and reliability.' The reasoning process of registered nurses covered assessment, analysis, diagnosis, planning/implementation, and evaluation phase. It is critical that registered nurses apply appropriate clinical reasoning skills in complex clinical practice. The main focus of registered nurses' reasoning in this study was assessing a patient's health problem, and their reasoning process was cyclic, rather than linear. There is a need for educational strategy development to enhance registered nurses' competency in determining appropriate interventions in a timely and accurate fashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Utilization of registered nurses in primary care teams: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norful, Allison; Martsolf, Grant; de Jacq, Krystyna; Poghosyan, Lusine

    2017-05-20

    Registered nurses are increasingly becoming embedded in primary care teams yet there is a wide variability in nursing roles and responsibilities across organizations. Policy makers are calling for a closer look at how to best utilize registered nurses in primary care teams. Lack of knowledge about effective primary care nursing roles and responsibilities challenges policy makers' abilities to develop recommendations to effectively deploy registered nurses in primary care needed to assure efficient, evidence-based, and quality health care. To synthesize international evidence about primary care RN roles and responsibilities to make recommendations for maximizing the contributions of RNs in team-based primary care models. Systematic review. The Meta-Analysis and Systematic Reviews of Observational Studies framework guided the conduct of this review. Five electronic databases (OVID Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, PubMed and Cochrane Library) were searched using MeSH terms: primary care, roles, and responsibilities. The term "nurs*" was truncated to identify all literature relevant to nursing. The initial search yielded 2243. Abstracts and titles were screened for relevance and seventy-one full text reviews were completed by two researchers. Inclusion criteria included: (1) registered nurses practicing in interprofessional teams; (2) description of registered nursing roles and responsibilities; (3) primary care setting. All eligible studies underwent quality appraisal using the Integrative Quality Criteria for Review of Multiple Study Designs tool. Eighteen studies met eligibility across six countries: Australia, United States, Spain, Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa. Registered nurses play a large role in chronic disease management, patient education, medication management, and often can shift between clinical and administrative responsibilities. There are a limited number of registered nurses that participate in primary care policy making and research. Integrating

  9. Relationships between registered nurse staffing, processes of nursing care, and nurse-reported patient outcomes in chronic hemodialysis units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Flynn, Linda; Clarke, Sean P

    2008-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the effects of registered nurse (RN) staffing and processes of nursing care on patient outcomes in hemodialysis units. This research examined the effects of patient-to-RN ratios and necessary tasks left undone by RNs on the likelihood of nurse-reported frequent occurrences of adverse patient events in chronic hemodialysis units. Study findings revealed that high patient-to-RN ratios and increased numbers of tasks left undone by RNs were associated with an increased likelihood of frequent occurrences of dialysis hypotension, skipped dialysis treatments, shortened dialysis treatments, and patient complaints in hemodialysis units. These findings indicate that federal, state, and dialysis organization policies must foster staffing structures and processes of care in dialysis units that effectively utilize the invaluable skills and services of professional, registered nurses.

  10. Registered nurses' perceptions of new nursing graduates' clinical competence: A systematic integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missen, Karen; McKenna, Lisa; Beauchamp, Alison

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decade, many questions have been raised about graduates' clinical competence and fitness for practice upon completion of their undergraduate education. Despite the significance of this issue, the perspectives of registered nurses have rarely been examined. This systematic review explores the perceptions of experienced registered nurses regarding the clinical competence of new nursing graduates. Original research studies published between 2004-2014 were identified using electronic databases, reference lists, and by searching "grey literature." Papers were critically reviewed and relevant data extracted and synthesized using an approach based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis. From 153 studies initially identified, 15 original research papers were included. Four main research themes were identified: clinical/technical skills, critical thinking, interaction/communication, and overall readiness for practice. Areas of concern in relation to the clinical competence of new nursing graduates specifically related to two themes: critical thinking and clinical/technical skills. Further research is required on strategies identified within the literature with the ultimate aim of ensuring new nursing graduates are safe and competent practitioners.

  11. Registering Nursing Interventions in Electronic Environments in Accordance with Nursing Process: an Example from Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Ay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As being a professional occupation, development of nursing is affected by technological advancements in other fields. Aim of nursing is offering a safe, efficient and quality care. In general, lots of data, both quantitive and qualitative, is registered by nurses to the system of health records. Also usage of care plansadapted to computer environment has the benefits like eased risk management and analysis, standardization of given care, establishment of the communication between multi-discipliner care members, eased reading of documents.Aim: To determine the characteristics of electronic records to be able to employ nursing process successfully, a computer software which takes into account and reflects both the thinking process and condition of working places needs to be developed.Results: While computer and care plan usage have many positive ways, generally in Turkey it’s observed that usage of both are not at a desired level in nursing services. The computer software which is used to improve patient care quality must have qualities like being systematic, permanent, enabling diagnosises to be analyzed viadiscussions and to be systematically assessed, and giving guidance to nursing applications.Conclusion: Electronic patient registration system used by nurses should make time-saving possible, be easily used with easy menus, save all applications exactly, have warning and alarm systems, display necessary interventions at appropriate times, be a guide for patient care.

  12. Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Atittudes toward and Perceptions of Teamwork in the Operating Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiner, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurse anesthetists are an important part of an operating room team, yet little research has investigated how they perceive teamwork or approach team related issues specific to the operating room. This mixed methods study evaluated junior and senior student registered nurse anesthetists' attitudes toward and perceptions of…

  13. Student Registered Nurse Anesthetists' Atittudes toward and Perceptions of Teamwork in the Operating Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiner, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    Student registered nurse anesthetists are an important part of an operating room team, yet little research has investigated how they perceive teamwork or approach team related issues specific to the operating room. This mixed methods study evaluated junior and senior student registered nurse anesthetists' attitudes toward and perceptions of…

  14. Reflections on Distributive Leadership for Work-Based Mobile Learning of Canadian Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlman, Dorothy

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquity, flexibility, and accessibility of mobile devices can transform how registered nurses in Canada learn beyond the confines of traditional education/training boundaries in their work settings. Many Canadian registered nurses have actively embraced mobile technologies for their work-based learning to meet their competency requirements…

  15. Nursing Transition: An Individualized Course To Promote Mobility from the LVN to RN Role. Registered Nurse Shortage Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Marcia; Malague, Marianne

    To address a regional shortage of registered nurses (RN's), a special transition course was developed at the North Harris Montgomery Community College District in Houston, Texas, to allow licensed vocational nurses to articulate into the second year of a two-year Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program. Students completing the ADN program are…

  16. Implementing a collaborative framework for academic support for registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Debra; Ugboma, Debra; Knight, Jessica

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the collaboration between a national health service acute hospital trust and a higher education institution, to implement a framework for academic support for registered nurses undertaking learning beyond registration. A small percentage of the educational budget was utilised to fund two academic staff (0.6 whole time equivalent) to work within the trusts' own learning and development department. The initial aim of the project was to maximise the utilisation of the funding available for learning beyond registration study. The focus of the project was at both a strategic level and with individual staff. Embedding within the culture of the trust was important for the academic staff to understand and gain the service/user perspective to some of the barriers or issues concerning learning beyond registration. Following a scoping exercise, the multiplicity of issues that required action led to the creation of an academic support framework. This framework identified potential for intervention in 4 phases: planning for study, application and access to learning, during study and outcome of study. Interventions were identified that were complimentary and adjuncts to the academic support provided by the higher education institution. New resources and services were also developed such as pathway planning support and study skill workshops. One important resource was a dedicated point of contact for staff. A "live" database also proved useful in tracking and following-up students.

  17. Report on the July 1991 National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David F.; Gober, Susan L.

    Factors associated with an unusually high rate of failure on the July 1991 National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) were analyzed for nursing students at Angelo State University in San Angelo (Texas). Of the 111 nursing degree recipients who took the examination for the first time in July 1991, 18 (16.2%) failed.…

  18. How does care coordination provided by registered nurses "fit" within the organisational processes and professional relationships in the general practice context?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Carolyn; Kendall, Elizabeth; St John, Winsome

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop understanding about how a registered nurse-provided care coordination model can "fit" within organisational processes and professional relationships in general practice. In this project, registered nurses were involved in implementation of registered nurse-provided care coordination, which aimed to improve quality of care and support patients with chronic conditions to maintain their care and manage their lifestyle. Focus group interviews were conducted with nurses using a semi-structured interview protocol. Interpretive analysis of interview data was conducted using Normalization Process Theory to structure data analysis and interpretation. Three core themes emerged: (1) pre-requisites for care coordination, (2) the intervention in context, and (3) achieving outcomes. Pre-requisites were adequate funding mechanisms, engaging organisational power-brokers, leadership roles, and utilising and valuing registered nurses' broad skill base. To ensure registered nurse-provided care coordination processes were sustainable and embedded, mentoring and support as well as allocated time were required. Finally, when registered nurse-provided care coordination was supported, positive client outcomes were achievable, and transformation of professional practice and development of advanced nursing roles was possible. Registered nurse-provided care coordination could "fit" within the context of general practice if it was adequately resourced. However, the heterogeneity of general practice can create an impasse that could be addressed through close attention to shared and agreed understandings. Successful development and implementation of registered nurse roles in care coordination requires attention to educational preparation, support of the individual nurse, and attention to organisational structures, financial implications and team member relationships.

  19. Differences in medication knowledge and risk of errors between graduating nursing students and working registered nurses: comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nurses experience insufficient medication knowledge; particularly in drug dose calculations, but also in drug management and pharmacology. The weak knowledge could be a result of deficiencies in the basic nursing education, or lack of continuing maintenance training during working years. The aim of this study was to compare the medication knowledge, certainty and risk of error between graduating bachelor students in nursing and experienced registered nurses. Methods: Bac...

  20. 76 FR 72619 - User Fee To Take the Registered Tax Return Preparer Competency Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... Competency Examination AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Final regulations. SUMMARY... a ] user fee for individuals to take the registered tax return preparer competency examination. The final regulations affect individuals who take the registered tax return preparer competency...

  1. Perceptions of the clinical competence of newly registered nurses in the North West province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Moeti

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical competence of newly registered nurses relating to the care of individual Clients, depends on their ability to correlate theoretical knowledge learned in the classroom with practice and the development of clinical skills. Its foundation lies in the ability to identify and solve problems that emanate from critical thinking, analytical reasoning and reflective practice. It is clear that the quality of clinical exposure plays a leading role in the development of nursing professionals. Nursing skills alone cannot ensure quality care of clients without the application of theory. Facilitation of this theory to practice therefore remains an essential component of nursing education. This study was aimed at identifying areas of incompetence of newly registered nurses (1998- 2001 in the clinical area by determining the newly registered nurses1 and professional nurses1 perceptions of the competence of the newly registered nurses. A quantitative, non-experimental, descriptive survey was used to collect the data regarding the clinical competence of newly registered nurses (1998-2001.

  2. [Career guidance for registered nurse in the UK].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón Melchor, Lucía; Simón Melchor, Alba

    2014-04-01

    Cuts in temporary contracts has had big consequences for newly qualified nurses with regards to finding employment. This cut in contracts has resulted in a doubling in the rate of unemployment in this profession. In the past nurses emigrated to other countries for purposes like knowledge of the language or to extend their training and experience, however today the emigration has become the only way out for many professional nurses. The reputation of nurses in Spain is recognised internationally, with the UK being one of the countries with the largest demand for Spanish nurses. Due to the great amount of job opportunities that are emerging in the UK, nurses need help and guidance in their careers, and also nurses need training in areas such as Professional Body, developing a curriculum, facing an interview etc...

  3. Nursing Faculty Roles in Teaching Racially and Ethnically Diverse Nursing Students in a Registered Nurse Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Kenya V.

    2009-01-01

    Racial and ethnic health care disparities continue to plague the United States, placing a tremendous personal and societal burden on individuals. A culturally diverse nursing work force can help eliminate these disparities and improve the quality of health care that is delivered. However, the nursing profession does not reflect the nation's…

  4. New graduate registered nurses' knowledge of patient safety and practice: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Melanie; Sundin, Deborah; Cope, Vicki

    2017-03-02

    To critically appraise available literature and summarise evidence pertaining to the patient safety knowledge and practices of new graduate registered nurses. Responsibility for patient safety should not be limited to the practice of the bedside nurses, rather the responsibility of all in the healthcare system. Previous research identified lapses in safety across the health care, more specifically with new practitioners. Understanding these gaps and what may be employed to counteract them is vital to ensuring patient safety. A focused review of research literature. The review used key terms and Boolean operators across a 5-year time frame in CINAHL, Medline, psycINFO and Google Scholar for research articles pertaining to the area of enquiry. Eighty-four articles met the inclusion criteria, 39 discarded due to irrelevant material and 45 articles were included in the literature review. This review acknowledges that nursing has different stages of knowledge and practice capabilities. A theory-practice gap for new graduate registered nurses exists, and transition to practice is a key learning period setting new nurses on the path to becoming expert practitioners. Within the literature, there was little to no acknowledgement of patient safety knowledge of the newly registered nurse. Issues raised in the 1970s remain a concern for today's new graduate registered nurses. Research has recognised several factors affecting transition from nursing student to new graduate registered nurse. These factors are leaving new practitioners open to potential errors and risking patient safety. Understanding the knowledge of a new graduate registered nurse upon entering clinical practice may assist in organisations providing appropriate clinical and theoretical support to these nurses during their transition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Transformational leadership: effect on the job satisfaction of Registered Nurses in a hospital in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Chontawan, Ratanawadee; Nantsupawat, Raymoul

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the relationship between the transformational leadership of nurse managers and job satisfaction among clinical Registered Nurses at a tertiary care hospital in China. The healthcare system is changing rapidly. Research in Western countries has shown that transformational leadership affects job satisfaction. However, very little research related to this subject has been conducted in healthcare settings in China. The sample consisted of 238 nurses who work at a tertiary care hospital in China. Data were collected from April to August 2006. Research instruments included a demographic data form, a Leadership Practice Inventory and a Job Satisfaction Scale for clinical registered nurses. Both the transformational leadership of nurse managers and job satisfaction among clinical Registered Nurses were at a moderate level. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the transformational leadership of nurse managers and job satisfaction (r = 0·556, P transformational leadership of nurse managers could have an effect on the job satisfaction of clinical Registered Nurses. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The views of registered nursing students from different cultures on attitude and knowledge regarding elderly sexuality

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Shan; Chen, Lihong; Han, Ruwang

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the knowledge and the attitude of registered nursing students regarding elderly sexuality, in order to raise the awareness of sexual needs of the aging. This study also aims to identify attitude towards elderly sexuality among registered nursing students from different cultural backgrounds. The research questions of this thesis are: What is the attitude towards elderly sexuality among students from different cultural backgrounds? To what extent does reg...

  7. The Determination of the Relationship between Academic Achievement in Nursing Courses and Success on the Registered Nurse Licensure Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millican, Julie E.

    The objective of a study was to determine if academic achievement in nursing courses could be used to predict success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). It investigated the relationship between NCLEX outcomes and academic achievement in theory and clinical courses and the relationship between NCLEX…

  8. Professional Nursing in State Service: Needs and Recommendations. A Skills Inventory of Registered Nurses Employed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Barbara

    This study analyzed factors in attracting and recruiting professional nurses into Massachusetts state service. Although Massachusetts had relatively many registered nurses (RN), 45% were inactive. Resulting shortages were great, especially in state hospitals. All agencies had high turnover, with impending staffing crises in some agencies because…

  9. Identifying ethical issues of the Department of the Army civilian and Army Nurse Corps certified registered nurse anesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Constance L; Elliott, Aaron R; Harris, Janet R

    2006-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the ethical issues Department of the Army civilian and Army Nurse Corps certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) encountered in their anesthesia practice and how disturbed they were by these issues. This descriptive study used a secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional survey of Army Nurse Corps officers and Department of the Army civilian registered nurses (N = 5,293). The CRNA subset (n = 97) was obtained from questionnaires that indicated a primary practice setting as anesthesia. The most frequently occurring ethical issue identified was conflict in the nurse-physician relationship, whereas the most disturbing issue was working with incompetent/impaired colleagues. Unresolved ethical conflicts can negatively influence the nurses' morale, leading to avoidance of the issue and contributing to burnout. Identifying the ethical issues and disturbance level experienced by CRNAs should contribute to the development of an ethics education program that addresses issues encountered in CRNA practice.

  10. A Model for Intervention and Predicting Success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heupel, Carol

    1994-01-01

    The relationship of selected academic variables to National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) performance was studied and a "best set" of indicators predictive of NCLEX-RN success was identified. Results indicated that selected nursing theory courses and the junior year grade point average could be used to…

  11. The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses’ Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga E. Larsson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Registered nurses at the bedside are accountable for and oversee completion of patient care as well as directly leading and managing the provision of safe patient care. These nurses have an informal leadership role that is not associated with any given position. Leadership is a complex and multifaceted concept and its meaning is unclear, especially in the staff nurse context. The aim was to describe registered nurses’ perceptions of what it entails to be the leader at the bedside in inpatient physical care. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Interviews were performed with Swedish registered nurses (n=15. Five descriptive categories were identified: demonstrating clinical knowledge, establishing a good atmosphere of collaboration, consciously structuring the work in order to ensure patients’ best possible nursing care, customized presence in the practical work with patients according to predetermined prerequisites, and monitoring coworkers’ professional practice. Registered nurses informal role as leader necessitates a social process of deliberate effort to attain and maintain leader status and authority. Participants used deliberate communicative approaches and interactive procedures. Leader principles grounded in the core values of the nursing profession that ensure nursing values and person-centered attributes were a key aspect.

  12. 42 CFR 57.313 - Loan cancellation for full-time employment as a registered nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... section 836(h) of the Act. The regulations set forth in 42 CFR 57.316 (a) and (b)(6) (1976), as adopted on... registered nurse. 57.313 Section 57.313 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... nurse. (a) For loans made after November 18, 1971, and before September 29, 1979. A person who:...

  13. In-service education and training as experienced by registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.F. Norushe

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Nursing is a dynamic profession that is subject to rapid changes in health care provision, hence the need for inservice training programmes for nurses. Newly employed registered nurses require in-service training in order to update them regarding the latest developments in nursing practice. The researcher noted that some newly appointed registered nurses were not competent in all aspects relating to their tasks. This could have been due to a knowledge deficit relating to either new developments or of the procedure relating to a specific task. In some institutions newly-appointed registered nurses on probation reported not receiving in-service training for six months or longer, yet they were still expected to perform their tasks efficiently. The objectives of the study were to, firstly, explore and describe the experiences of registered nurses regarding in-service training programmes in their institutions and, secondly, to make recommendations to Nursing Service Managers relating to the development of effective inservice training programmes in their institutions. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive design was implemented. Data was analysed using Tesch’s descriptive approach.

  14. Ratings of the Performances of Practicing Internists by Hospital-Based Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenrich, Marjorie D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    In a survey, 1,851 registered nurses evaluated 232 internists' humanistic qualities, communication skills, and selected aspects of their clinical skills. Their ratings corresponded moderately with peer physician evaluations and had a common structure but were lower for several humanistic qualities. A reliable assessment required 11-15 nurses'…

  15. Gerontological nursing. Faculty preparation for teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchuck, E R; Kee, C C

    1991-10-01

    1. As the number of older adults in the US increases, nurse educators must be prepared to teach gerontological nursing to their students. A 3-year project addresses the need for faculty development in gerontological nursing. 2. A major objective of the project is to provide basic knowledge of gerontological nursing to regional nursing faculty through a series of 1-week workshops that include didactic content and clinical observation experiences. 3. All 1990 workshops were filled to capacity, with participants exhibiting wide variation in their gerontological knowledge base.

  16. Success-Failure on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses by Nurse Candidates from an Accelerated Baccalaureate Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Andrew C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Nine years of data from first-time nurse candidates taking the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) were examined to identify predictors of successful performance and determine probabilities of success. Variables placing nurse candidates at risk included first-semester grade point average, sex, and whether they…

  17. Exploring factors affecting registered nurses' pursuit of postgraduate education in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Linda; Eley, Robert; Tuckett, Anthony

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the factors influencing registered nurses' pursuit of postgraduate education in specialty nursing practice in Australia. Despite the increased requirement for postgraduate education for advanced practice, little has been reported on the contributory factors involved in the decision to undertake further education. The Nurses' Attitudes Towards Postgraduate Education instrument was administered to 1632 registered nurses from the Nurses and Midwives e-Cohort Study across Australia, with a response rate of 35.9% (n = 568). Data reduction techniques using principal component analysis with varimax rotation were used. The analysis identified a three-factor solution for 14 items, accounting for 52.5% of the variance of the scale: "facilitators," "professional recognition," and "inhibiting factors." Facilitators of postgraduate education accounted for 28.5% of the variance, including: (i) improves knowledge; (ii) increases nurses' confidence in clinical decision-making; (iii) enhances nurses' careers; (iv) improves critical thinking; (v) improves nurses' clinical skill; and (vi) increased job satisfaction. This new instrument has potential clinical and research applications to support registered nurses' pursuit of postgraduate education. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Pressure ulcer knowledge of registered nurses, assistant nurses and student nurses: a descriptive, comparative multicentre study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunningberg, Lena; Mårtensson, Gunilla; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Florin, Jan; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa; Bååth, Carina

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the knowledge of registered nurses (RNs), assistant nurses (ANs) and student nurses (SNs) about preventing pressure ulcers (PUs). PU prevention behaviours in the clinical practice of RNs and ANs were also explored. A descriptive, comparative multicentre study was performed. Hospital wards and universities from four Swedish county councils participated. In total, 415 participants (RN, AN and SN) completed the Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Assessment Tool. The mean knowledge score for the sample was 58·9%. The highest scores were found in the themes 'nutrition' (83·1%) and 'risk assessment' (75·7%). The lowest scores were found in the themes 'reduction in the amount of pressure and shear' (47·5%) and 'classification and observation' (55·5%). RNs and SNs had higher scores than ANs on 'aetiology and causes'. SNs had higher scores than RNs and ANs on 'nutrition'. It has been concluded that there is a knowledge deficit in PU prevention among nursing staff in Sweden. A major educational campaign needs to be undertaken both in hospital settings and in nursing education.

  19. Occupational stress, sense of coherence, coping, burnout and work engagement of registered nurses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna J. van der Colff

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the occupational stress, sense of coherence, coping, burnout and work engagement of registered nurses in South Africa. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The study population consisted of 818 registered nurses. The Nursing Stress Inventory, the Orientation to Life Questionnaire, the COPE, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey, and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were administered. The results show that the experience of depletion of emotional resources and feelings of depersonalisation by registered nurses were associated with stress due to job demands and a lack of organisational support, focus on and ventilation of emotions as a coping strategy, and a weak sense of coherence. Work engagement was predicted by a strong sense of coherence and approach-coping strategies.

  20. Valuing teamwork: Insights from newly-registered nurses working in specialist mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Mannix, Judy; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Jackson, Debra

    2011-12-01

    In this qualitative study, the experiences of a small cohort of registered nurses (RN) during the first 2 years of mental health employment were documented. A total of 13 semistructured interviews were completed from within a specialist mental health setting. Eleven issues were identified: (i) teamwork; (ii) experiential learning; (iii) self-development; (iv) confidence; (v) listening; (vi) rapport; (vii) keen observation; (viii) patience; (ix) empathy; (x) learning from colleagues; and (xi) maintaining a positive approach towards patients. The nurses focused on the here-and-now circumstances, rather than on future plans, or past preparation, and were able to elucidate the qualities and skills that they brought to their clinical work. Participants were most proud of achievements that bridged the personal and professional, such as self-development, working closely with patients to develop rapport, experiential learning, and teamwork. Findings highlight the importance of teamwork to newly-graduated RN entering the mental health environment. It is known that teamwork can convey a sense of belonging and help create an environment in which applied experiential clinical learning can occur. Therefore, it is important that efforts are made to facilitate team building and opportunities for teamwork when new graduates are transitioning into the mental health clinical practice environment.

  1. Factors influencing the retention of registered nurses in the Gauteng Province of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokoka, Kgaogelo E; Ehlers, Valerie J; Oosthuizen, Martha J

    2011-12-14

    South Africa is a source country for many destination countries that recruit registered nurses who emigrate for personal and/or professional reasons. A large number of South African nurses belong to the baby boomer generation (born between 1943 and 1964) who will retire within the foreseeable future. Statistics from the South African Nursing Council show a decline of 42.0% in the number of nurses who completed their training in South Africa from 1996 to 2005. These aspects combine to predict a potential dire shortage of nurses in South Africa within the foreseeable future. Retention of registered nurses should be the focus of health-care planners to avoid crises in South Africa's health-care services. This study attempted to identify factors that would influence registered nurses' decisions to stay with their current employers in the Gauteng Province of South Africa. An exploratory descriptive quantitative design was adopted and questionnaires were sent to a sample of nurses, registered with the South African Nursing Council (SANC), with addresses in the Gauteng Province. A total of 108 nurses completed and returned questionnaires, of whom 77 (73.1%) had considered leaving their current employers. The most important factors that would influence more than 90.0% of these nurses' decisions to stay with their current employers related to finances, safety and security, equipment and/or supplies, management, staff and patients. In terms of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Theory, deficiency needs (physiological, safety and social needs) should be met by improved salaries revised on an annual basis, paying long-service and outstanding-service bonuses, and improving the safety and security, as well the available equipment and supplies, at institutions. Sufficient numbers of nurses should be employed and vacancies should be filled rapidly. However, not all changes required to enhance nurses' retention rates involve increased costs. Managers should lead by example and respect

  2. Shared governance and empowerment in registered nurses working in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Agnes M; Griffin, Mary T Quinn; Donahue, Moreen; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2011-01-01

    Empowerment of registered nurses through professional practice models inclusive of shared governance has been proposed as essential to improve quality patient care, contain costs, and retain nursing staff. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between perceptions of governance and empowerment among nurses working in acute care hospital units in which a shared governance model had been in place for 6 to 12 months. The 158 nurses who participated perceived themselves to be moderately empowered and in an early implementation stage of shared governance. There was a statistically significant positive relationship between perceptions of shared governance and empowerment. Recommendations for professional practice and future research are included.

  3. Functional redundancy and the process of professionalization: the case of registered nurses in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, M

    1980-01-01

    Registered nurses have been attempting to achieve professional status for nearly a century. Historical investigation of their efforts in the United States and a case study of the 1976 Seattle Nurses' strike indicate major obstacles to the professionalizing project. The most important of these are the inability of the nurses to control the labor supply, and their failure to define or monopolize a distinct set of tasks. One result is functional redundancy: there is no job nurses perform that is not also performed by some other occupation.

  4. Primary care clinical placements: The views of Australian registered nurse mentors and pre-registration nursing students (part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Hardy, Jennifer; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    An increased burden of chronic and complex conditions treated in the community and an aging population have exacerbated the primary care workload. Predicted nursing shortages will place further stressors on this workforce. High quality clinical placements may provide a strategic pathway to introduce and recruit new nurses to this speciality. This paper is Part 2 of a two part series reporting the findings of a mixed methods project. Part 1 reported on the qualitative study and Part 2 reports on the quantitative study. Forty-five pre-registration nursing students from a single Australian tertiary institution and 22 primary care Registered Nurse (RN) mentors who supervised student learning completed an online survey. Students largely regarded their primary care placement positively and felt this to be an appropriate learning opportunity. Most RNs were satisfied with mentoring pre-registration nursing students in their setting. Furthermore, the RNs desire to mentor students and the support of general practitioners (GPs) and consumers were seen as key enablers of pre-registration nursing placements. Findings from this study provide a preliminary impression of primary care clinical placements from the perspective of pre-registration nursing students and registered nurse mentors. Further research should examine whether a broader scope of non-traditional health settings such as non-government organisations, charities, pharmacies, welfare and social services can also provide appropriate learning environments for pre-registration nursing students.

  5. Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses' views about nursing work: a survey of motivation and maintenance factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Isabel; Kirk, Ray; Wright, Sarah; Andrew, Cathy

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this article was to report on the analysis of qualitative, open text data, received from a national on-line survey of what factors Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses wish to change about nursing and consideration of the potential policy and practice impacts of these requests on their retention. Prior to the economic recession of 2007-2010, the growing shortage of nurses in New Zealand presented a serious concern for the healthcare workforce. Given the ageing New Zealand nursing workforce, an ageing population and the increasing demands for health care, it is imperative that issues of retention of Generation Y nurses are resolved prior to the imminent retirement of more experienced nurses. A descriptive exploratory approach using a national wide, on-line survey, eliciting both quantitative and qualitative data was used. The survey, conducted from August 2009-January 2010, collected data from Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses (n = 358) about their views about nursing, work and career. Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene theory was used as the framework for the analysis of the open text data. The factors that nurses wanted changed were skewed towards Herzberg's hygiene-maintenance factors rather than motivating factors. This is of concern because hygiene-maintenance factors are considered to be dissatisfiers that are likely to push workers to another employment option.

  6. Preparing Today's Nursing Students for Tomorrow's Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Federal directives, nursing and nursing education associations, as well as accrediting bodies emphasize the importance of integrating health information technology and EHRs into nursing practice. Additionally, informatics is a required competency of baccalaureate nursing graduates. Nursing education's efforts to enhance students' learning in the area of electronic documentation is at its peak. The goal of enabling nurses to make healthcare safer, more effective, efficient, patient-centered, timely and equitable can only be achieved if a variety of technologies are clearly integrated into nursing education. Therefore, some schools have developed educational innovations to incorporate academic EHRs. As the mental health setting is unique, extraordinary attention has to be provided during the education of electronic documentation. Nursing education efforts must focus on interventions that provide resources that enhance the participant's knowledge and skills related to electronic documentation in a variety of clinical settings. Additionally, implementing academic EHRs in clinical settings offers nursing educators an opportunity to note the benefits. The state of nursing education depends on the accessibility to utilize academic EHRs in the nursing curriculum within the clinical setting to effectively prepare students for real-word practice.

  7. Voices That Care: Licensed Practical Nurses and the Emotional Labour Underpinning Their Collaborative Interactions with Registered Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truc Huynh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing the emotional labour underlying interprofessional collaborations (IPCs could be considered a crucial step towards building a cohesive nursing team. Although IPCs between registered nurses (RNs and licensed practical nurses (LPNs have been linked to quality nursing care, little is known about the emotions experienced by LPNs during their interactions with RNs or those factors that influence IPCs. A questionnaire administered to 309 LPNs found that (1 the professional identity of LPNs has evolved into a that of a unique social group; (2 LPNs define IPC as an interpersonal process of exploring similar or dissimilar assessments of a patient's status with RNs and, together, establishing a course of nursing actions; (3 the primary organizational factor facilitating IPCs is inclusive nursing leadership; (4 the interpersonal factor promoting IPCs is the level of trust RNs extend to LPNs; and (5 an LPN's emotional labour (i.e., internal emotional regulation is most tangible during uncollaborative interactions with RNs.

  8. Integrating interprofessional collaboration skills into the advanced practice registered nurse socialization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Kathleen; Payne, Camille; Heye, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of interprofessional collaboration and practice as a means to provide patient-centered care and to decrease the current fragmentation of health care services in the 21st century provides a clear and unique opportunity for the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) to assume a key role. For APRNs and other health care providers, to participate effectively as team members requires an interprofessional mindset. Development of interprofessional skills and knowledge for the APRN has been hindered by a silo approach to APRN role socialization. The Institute of Medicine Report (IOM; 2010) states that current health care systems should focus on team collaboration to deliver accessible, high-quality, patient-centered health care that addresses wellness and prevention of illness and adverse events, management of chronic illness, and increased capacity of all providers on the team. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the need to incorporate interprofessional education (IPE) into the socialization models used in advanced practice nursing programs. IPE requires moving beyond profession-specific educational efforts to engage students of different health care professions in interactive learning. Being able to work effectively as member of a clinical team while a student is a fundamental part of that learning (Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel, 2011). The objective of IPE curriculum models in graduate nursing programs is to educate APRNs in the development of an interprofessional mindset. Interprofessional collaboration and coordination are needed to achieve seamless transitions for patients between providers, specialties, and health care settings (IOM, 2010). Achieving the vision requires the continuous development of interprofessional competencies by APRNs as part of the learning process, so that upon entering the workforce, APRNs are ready to practice effective teamwork and team-based care. Socialization of the professional APRN

  9. The value of portfolio building and the registered nurse: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColgan, Karen

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to explore the value of portfolio building and the registered nurse under the following themes: assessment of competence; work-based reflection; lifelong learning; creating career pathways and the contribution a portfolio makes to the professional development of the nurse. This review concludes that for portfolios to work effectively, nurses and their employers require a working partnership to see the value and the opportunities that exist through the development of a personal portfolio. The need exists for an organisational culture of learning that encourages a facilitative environment combined with nurses who support their colleagues and explore their skills through experiential learning. This work was submitted in part fulfilment for the Degree of Master of Science in Nursing at Queen's University of Belfast, School of Nursing and Midwifery in 2007 and was supported by ERFF.

  10. The Gulf Coast Health Services Steering Committee: a business-education partnership to solve the registered nurse shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Karen; McPherson, Robert; Distefano, Susan; Rice, Tabitha

    2006-12-01

    The need to increase the registered nurse work-force has historically been the concern only of nursing school administrators and educators and, occasionally, the focus of hospital administrators during spikes in demand. How can nursing educators develop and sustain a productive partnership with local hospitals and the business community? The authors describe their experience in creating and developing a long-term, employer-led, and sustainable partnership for increasing their own registered nurse workforce.

  11. Prior depression and incident back pain among military registered nurses: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D Alan; Menzel, Nancy; Horoho, Patricia

    2017-06-28

    Occupational back pain rates are substantial among registered nurses, and nurses also report high rates of depression. The role of depression as a potential predictor of back pain among nurses appears understudied. The objective of the study was to determine whether a history of depression predicted incident back pain in a population of military registered nurses when controlling for relevant risk factors. We employed a retrospective cohort approach using longitudinal data in which gender-specific subject groups were followed from the beginning of duty as a registered nurse to the occurrence of an outcome, or to censoring due to completion of service or the end of available data. This study included all United States Army registered nurses who began work during 2011-2014 without evidence of prior back pain in clinical records. Data from automatically-collected medical and administrative sources were combined and used to provide 2134 person-years of observation on 1248 individuals. These data were organized at the person-month level in a panel data structure to support discrete-time multivariable logistic regression models. The models examined the relationships between prior depression, Body Mass Index, the presence of prior combat duty and selected control variables and the outcome, the incident occurrence of back pain. The incidence rate of back pain was 18.6 per 100 person-years and the period prevalence was 31.7%. Prior depression was a statistically-significant predictor of incident back pain among female subjects (odds ratio [OR]: 1.75, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08-2.83, P-valueback pain for male and female nurses. The study's findings provide the first evidence of a temporal link between antecedent depression and later back pain among female military nurses. High Body Mass Index was found to be a further, modifiable risk factor for back pain in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Study of Civilian Registered Nurse Recruitment at Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    127 H. A MARKETING MIX FOR CIVILIAN REGISTERED NURSE *RECRUITMENT AT MADIGAN ARMY MEDICAL CENTER ... ... 131 SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY...employement should be promoted to this market. RN Recruitment Marketing Mix for Madigan The major finding in the market analysis of civilian RN...should be targeted; all gain their impetus from MAMC nursing management. A sumimary of the marketing mix is tabulated at Appendix H. This brief listing of

  13. Mock Code: A Code Blue Scenario Requested by and Developed for Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, Janice; Pritchett-Kelly, Sherry; McDonald, Melissa; Mullins-Richards, Paula; Dubrowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The use of simulation in medical training is quickly becoming more common, with applications in emergency, surgical, and nursing education. Recently, registered nurses working in surgical inpatient units requested a mock code simulation to practice skills, improve knowledge, and build self-confidence in a safe and controlled environment. A simulation scenario using a high-fidelity mannequin was developed and will be discussed herein. PMID:28123919

  14. Hiring and incorporating doctor of nursing practice-prepared nurse faculty into academic nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agger, Charlotte A; Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R

    2014-08-01

    Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 deans and directors of nursing programs across the United States to gain an understanding of how Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-prepared nurses seeking academic positions are hired and used in schools of nursing. Interviews sought to gain information regarding (a) differences and similarities in the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)-prepared faculty, (b) educational advancement and mentoring of DNP-prepared nurse faculty, (c) recruitment of doctorally prepared nurse faculty, and (d) shortages of nursing faculty. DNP- and PhD-prepared nurse faculty are hired for varying roles in baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing, some similar to other faculty with master's degrees and others similar to those with PhDs; in associate degree in nursing programs, they are largely hired for the same type of work as nurse faculty with master's degrees. Regardless of program or degree type, the main role of DNP-prepared faculty is teaching. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. [The registered nurse and the battle against tuberculosis in Brazil: 1961-1966].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Hercília Regina do Amaral; de Almeida Filho, Antonio José; Santos, Tânia Cristina Franco; Lourenço, Lucia Helena Silva Corrêa

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the circumstances that promoted the implementation of the new Program for Action Against Tuberculosis in Brazil (Programa de Ação na Luta contra a Tuberculose no Brasil) and discuss the strategies used by registered nurses from the Santa Maria State Hospital, Guanabara State, to adjust nursing care to the new program against tuberculosis. This was performed through document research, interviews, and statements from nurses working at the time of the reorganization. Documents were analyzed based on the concepts of habitus, field, and symbolic power by Pierre Bourdieu, and included written and oral documents as well as secondary sources. The reorganization of the nursing service was performed under the leadership of a nurse whose symbolic capital assigned power and prestige to implement the necessary changes. It is concluded that the work of that nurse made it possible to implement the new program and contributed to establishing the position and importance of the registered nurse in providing care to individuals with tuberculosis, for prevention and cure.

  16. Migration of Spanish nurses 2009-2014. Underemployment and surplus production of Spanish nurses and mobility among Spanish registered nurses: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbany-Estragués, Paola; Nelson, Sioban

    2016-11-01

    After the financial crisis of 2008, increasing numbers of nurses from Spain are going abroad to work. To examine the health and workforce policy trends in Spain between 2009 and 2014 and to analyze their correlation with the migration of nurses. Single embedded case study. We examined data published by: Health Statistics, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (1996 to 2013); Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports (2006 to 2013); Ministry of Employment and Social Security (2009 to 2014); Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality (1997 to 2014); and National Institute of Statistics (1976 to 2014). In addition to reviewing the scholarly literature on the topic in Spanish and English, we also examined Spanish mobility laws and European directives. We used the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development definition of "professionally active nurses" which defines practising nurses and other nurses as those for whom their education is a prerequisite for employment as a nurse. Moreover, we used the term "nursing graduate" as defined by Spanish Ministry of Education to describe those who have obtained a recognized qualification in nursing in a given year, the term "registered nurses" is defined by Spanish law as nurses registered in the Nurses Associations and "unemployed nurses" are those without work and registered as seeking employment. A transformation of the Spanish health system has reduced the number of employed nurses per capita since 2010. Moreover, reductions in public spending, labour market reforms and widespread unemployment have affected nurses in two ways: first by increasing the number of applicants per vacancy between 2009 and 2013, and second, by an increase in casual positions. However, despite the poor job market and decreasing job security, the number of registered nurses and nursing graduates in Spain per year has continued to grow, increasing the pressure on the labour market. Spain is transforming from a stable

  17. Evolution of the chronic care role of the registered nurse in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Candia Baker; Beisel, Marie

    2010-01-01

    High-quality, accessible, and efficient primary care is needed as the U.S. health care system undergoes significant change. Advancing the role of registered nurses in the primary care setting is important to the solution. A large academic health center implemented five initiatives to improve the care of chronically ill patients through the expanded role of RNs in the context of the health care team. Role evolution of nurses in the pilots required some continuing education and some additional nursing support to release the pilot nurses from their usual duties. These strategies allowed the nurses to apply interventions that enhanced the coordination of care and promoted patient self-management skills. Some short-term improvements in health status were realized and barriers to self-care were identified and resolved.

  18. Predictors of Success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses among Transfer BSN Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    This quantitative research study (N=175) examined predictors of first time success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) among transfer students in a baccalaureate degree program (BSN). The predictors were chosen after an extensive literature review yielded few studies related to this population. Benner's…

  19. Spirit at work and hope among the ruins: registered nurses' covenant of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Joan I J; Gregory, David M

    2015-09-01

    To explore registered nurses' (RNs) perspectives about the health care system, management/leadership, patients and spirit at work (SAW). Researchers investigating RNs experiences of reduced job satisfaction and diminishing organisational commitment are looking carefully at spirit at work as a means to foster healthier workplaces. A descriptive, cross-sectional mixed methods design was used to measure and explore the relationships between spirit at work, job satisfaction and organisational commitment. A 2012 postal survey sent by the provincial licensing body to a random sample of 217 surgical and 158 home care registered nurses' in western Canada returned 179 surveys. Seventy-five respondents answered the open-ended survey question. Their responses warrant further content analysis and serve as the foundation of this article. Participants noted that organisational structures and policies, combined with unsupportive leadership, were associated with a reduced sense of community, lack of trust and diminished accountability. Spirit at work was described as sustaining registered nurses' and providing them with hope as they fulfilled their covenant of care with patients. Leadership attention to the advancement of SAW may support the covenant of care between the registered nurses and patient while fostering healthier workplaces. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Registered nurses' self-efficacy for assessing and responding to woman abuse in emergency department settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Erin; Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn

    2006-12-01

    Enhanced knowledge regarding the factors that influence and support the self-efficacy of emergency department (ED) registered nurses and their provision of care to women who have experienced abuse is necessary for the promotion of optimal health care. The purpose of this study was to examine the self-efficacy of registered nurses with respect to assessing and responding to woman abuse in the ED. Study hypotheses and research questions were derived from Bandura's theory of self-efficacy. A secondary analysis (N = 158) of data from the Violence against Women: Health Care Provider Survey was completed. Originally, survey questions were not developed to operationalize the concepts outlined by Bandura. However, they were found to be good indicators. Four scales were developed from the item pool, validated through factor analysis and used to operationalize study variables. Positive relationships were found between self-efficacy information available to ED registered nurses and their self-efficacy for assessing and responding to woman abuse (r= .73, p Bandura's theory and demonstrate that the clinical responses of ED registered nurses are complex and must be understood in terms of self-efficacy and the factors that support its development.

  1. Factors influencing the retention of registered nurses in the Gauteng Province of South Africa

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    Kgaogelo E. Mokoka

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: South Africa is a source country for many destination countries that recruit registered nurses who emigrate for personal and/or professional reasons. A large number of South African nurses belong to the baby boomer generation (born between 1943 and 1964 who will retire within the foreseeable future. Statistics from the South African Nursing Council show a decline of 42.0% in the number of nurses who completed their training in South Africa from 1996 to 2005. These aspects combine to predict a potential dire shortage of nurses in South Africa within the foreseeable future.Objectives: Retention of registered nurses should be the focus of health-care planners to avoid crises in South Africa’s health-care services. This study attempted to identify factors that would influence registered nurses’ decisions to stay with their current employers in the Gauteng Province of South Africa.Methods: An exploratory descriptive quantitative design was adopted and questionnaires were sent to a sample of nurses, registered with the South African Nursing Council (SANC, with addresses in the Gauteng Province. A total of 108 nurses completed and returned questionnaires, of whom 77 (73.1% had considered leaving their current employers.Results: The most important factors that would influence more than 90.0% of these nurses’ decisions to stay with their current employers related to finances, safety and security, equipment and/or supplies, management, staff and patients.Conclusions: In terms of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Theory, deficiency needs (physiological, safety and social needs should be met by improved salaries revised on an annual basis, paying long-service and outstanding-service bonuses, and improving the safety and security, as well the available equipment and supplies, at institutions. Sufficient numbers of nurses should be employed and vacancies should be filled rapidly. However, not all changes required to enhance nurses’ retention

  2. Registered nurse job satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Karen; Griffin, Mary Quinn; Donahue, Moreen; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the initial assessment of job satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice environment of registered nurses working on units where a professional practice model was implemented and the relationship between these two variables. The nursing shortage has been linked to overall job satisfaction and specifically to nurses' satisfaction with the professional practice environment. Initiatives to increase retention and recruitment and decrease turnover have been linked to work satisfaction among nurses. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used with participants (N = 101) from four patient care units; this represented a 55% response rate. The nurses were moderately satisfied with the professional practice environment but had overall low job satisfaction. There was a significant negative relationship between overall work satisfaction and satisfaction with the professional practice environment (P job satisfaction that were not being met. Thus, the nurses may have become more knowledgeable about the potential needs in these areas. Nurse managers and leaders must recognize that job satisfaction consists of many dimensions, and each of these dimensions is important to nurse retention. Implementation of a professional practice model may heighten awareness of the missing components within a practice environment and lead to decreased overall satisfaction. A broader understanding of characteristics associated with increased satisfaction may aid in development of organizational change necessary to retain and attract nurses. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. A systematic review of Registered Nurses; experiences of the influence of workplace culture and climatic factors on nursing workloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Walker, Cheryl; Rogers-Clark, Cath; Pearce, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Nursing workload is an issue that effects both the recruitment and retention of nurses, and patient safety. Historically, measurement has focussed on the delivery of direct patient care and excluded workload of facilitating hands-on care and supporting the organisation via duties that reflect organisation cultural and climate needs. Qualitative research is appropriate to understand this complexity. To determine the best available evidence in relation to registered nurses experiences of workplace cultural and climatic factors that influence nursing workloads, in an acute health care setting. This review sought high quality studies which explored registered nurses' experiences of the influence of cultural and climatic factors on their workloads. Qualitative research studies and opinion-based text were considered. An extensive search of the literature was conducted to identify published and unpublished studies between January 1990 and June 2011 in English, and indexed in the following databases: CINAHL, Medline, Medline-In Process, PsychINFO, Emerald, Current Contents, TRIP, JSTOR Nursing Consult Psychology & Behavioural Sciences collections, Emerald Management Reviews, Emerald Full Text Journals, Embase, Dissertation Abstracts, ERIC, Proquest and MedNar, EBSCOhost, Science Direct, Wiley Interscience. Two independent reviewers (CRW and CRC), using appraisal tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI), assessed fifteen articles; one was excluded. Data were extracted from included papers using standardised tools developed by the JBI. Data from qualitative studies and textual/opinion papers were meta-synthesised separately using standardised instruments. Data synthesis involved the pooling of findings, then grouped into categories on the basis of similarity of meaning. The categories were further aggregated into synthesised findings. 14 papers were identified as high quality and meeting the inclusion criteria. 81 findings were identified from the 10 qualitative research

  4. The subject of pedagogy from theory to practice--the view of newly registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, Bodil; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2009-07-01

    The aim was to describe, from the newly registered nurses' perspective, specific events when using their pedagogical knowledge in their everyday clinical practice. The design was qualitative and the critical incident technique was used. Data was collected via interviews with ten newly registered nurses who graduated from the same University program 10 months earlier and are now employed at a university hospital. Two categories emerged in the analyses. The first category was "Pedagogical methods in theory" with the sub-categories Theory and the application of the course in practice, Knowledge of pedagogy and Information as a professional competence. The second category was "Pedagogical methods in everyday clinical practice" with sub-categories Factual knowledge versus pedagogical knowledge, Information and relatives, Difficulties when giving information, Understanding information received, Pedagogical tools, Collaboration in teams in pedagogical situations, and Time and giving information. By identifying specific events regarding pedagogical methods the findings can be useful for everyone from teachers and health-care managers to nurse students and newly registered nurses, to improve teaching methods in nurse education.

  5. Rationalising Transgression: A Grounded Theory Explaining how Emergency Department Registered Nurses Rationalise Erroneous Behaviour

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    Tracy Flenady

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this classic grounded theory study was to unearth the main concern of emergency department (ED registered nurses (RN when they perform respiratory rate observations to generate a substantive theory that explicates how the identified problem is resolved. Analysis of data collected from 79 registered nurses revealed that health sector forced compliance in recording observations meant that ED RNs are more than likely to record a respiratory rate without actually counting respirations. This erroneous behaviour provokes varying degrees of emotional discomfort as the nurses’ actions are often incongruent with their professional values and beliefs. The theory Rationalising Transgression explains how nurses continually resolve this issue by compensating, minimalizing, or trivialising to titrate the level of emotional discomfort associated with erroneous behaviour, consequently facilitating the rationalisation of transgression.

  6. Patient involvement climate: views and behaviours among registered nurses in myocardial infarction care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Judith E; Zhdanova, Ludmila

    2015-02-01

    To introduce and define the patient involvement climate and measure its quality and strength via views and behaviours among nurses in coronary care units. Patient involvement is receiving increased attention among healthcare providers. To better understand and optimise the interpersonal dynamics of patient involvement, it is important to study the organisational context in which the patient-provider interaction occurs. Cross-sectional, self-report questionnaire study. Registered nurses across 12 coronary care units (n = 303) completed a questionnaire reporting their views and behaviours regarding patient involvement. Analyses assessed climate quality (the positive or negative nature of nurses' perceptions) and climate strength (the degree of consensus within coronary care units). Climate quality and strength were greatest for the dimensions measuring nurses' views of patient involvement, the nurse-patient information exchange process and nurses' responsiveness to patient needs. Climate quality and strength were weaker for the dimensions measuring nurses' views of the hindrances associated with patient involvement, discussion of daily activities and efforts to motivate patients to take responsibility for their health. In units with consensus that patient involvement poses hindrances, nurses were less likely to address patient needs. When nurses perceived patient involvement as less of a hindrance in their work, they were more responsive to patient needs. A patient involvement climate characterised by motivational behaviour among nurses was marked by better information exchange and discussion of suitable activities postdischarge. Managers can capitalise on positive climate aspects by encouraging ward activities that facilitate active patient involvement among nurses. One suggestion is educational interventions at the workplace focused on reducing perceptions of patient involvement as a hindrance and encouraging the attitudes that it can enrich nursing work and

  7. Registered nurses' experiences of patient violence on acute care psychiatric inpatient units: an interpretive descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kelly N; Jack, Susan M; O'Mara, Linda; LeGris, Jeannette

    2015-01-01

    Nurses working in acute care psychiatry settings experience high rates of patient violence which influences outcomes for nurses and the organization. This qualitative study explored psychiatric nurses' experiences of patient violence in acute care inpatient psychiatric settings. An interpretive descriptive design guided this study that included 17 semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of 12 Canadian registered nurses who self-reported experiencing patient violence within acute care inpatient psychiatry. Thematic analysis and constant comparison techniques were used for analysis. A problem, needs and practice analysis was also used to structure overall data interpretation. Thirty three unique exposures to patient violence among the sample of nurses were analysed. Nurses reported experiencing physical, emotional and verbal violence. For many, patient violence was considered "part of the job." Nurses often struggled with role conflict between one's duty to care and one's duty to self when providing care following a critical incident involving violence. Issues of power, control and stigma also influenced nurse participant perceptions and their responses to patient violence. Nurses used a variety of strategies to maintain their personal safety and to prevent, and manage patient violence. Nurses endorsed the need for improved education, debriefing following an incident, and a supportive work environment to further prevent patient violence. Present findings have implications for reducing the barriers to reporting violent experiences and the creation of best practice guidelines to reduce patient violence in the workplace. Understanding the perspectives and experiences of nurses in acute inpatient psychiatry leads to greater understanding of the phenomenon of patient violence and may inform the development of interventions to prevent and to respond to patient violence, as well as support nurses working within the acute care setting.

  8. Registered Nurse-Performed Flexible Sigmoidoscopy in Ontario: Development and Implementation of the Curriculum and Program

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    Mary Anne Cooper

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although colorectal cancer is a leading cause of death in Canada, it is curable if detected in the early stages. Flexible sigmoidoscopy has been shown to reduce the incidence and mortality of colorectal cancer in patients who are at average risk for this disease and, therefore, is an appropriate screening intervention. Moreover, it may be performed by nonphysicians. A program to enable registered nurses to perform flexible sigmoidoscopy to increase colorectal cancer screening capacity in Ontario was developed. This program incorporated practical elements learned from other jurisdictions as well as specific regional considerations to fit within the health care system of Ontario. The nurses received structured didactic and simulation training before performing sigmoidoscopies on patients under physician supervision. After training, nurses were evaluated by two assessors for their ability to perform complete sigmoidoscopies safely and independently. To date, 17 nurses have achieved independence in performing flexible sigmoidoscopy at 14 sites. In total, nurses have screened >7000 Ontarians, with a cancer detection rate of 5.1 per 1000 screened, which is comparable with rates in other jurisdictions and with sigmoidoscopy performed by gastroenterologists, surgeons and other trained nonphysicians. We have shown, therefore, that with proper training and program structure, registered nurses are able to perform flexible sigmoidoscopy in a safe and thorough manner resulting in a significant increase in access to colorectal cancer screening.

  9. Turnover and vacancy rates for registered nurses: do local labor market factors matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondeau, Kent V; Williams, Eric S; Wagar, Terry H

    2008-01-01

    Turnover of nursing staff is a significant issue affecting health care cost, quality, and access. In recent years, a worldwide shortage of skilled nurses has resulted in sharply higher vacancy rates for registered nurses in many health care organizations. Much research has focused on the individual, group, and organizational determinants of turnover. Labor market factors have also been suggested as important contributors to turnover and vacancy rates but have received limited attention by scholars. This study proposes and tests a conceptual model showing the relationships of organization-market fit and three local labor market factors with organizational turnover and vacancy rates. The model is tested using ordinary least squares regression with data collected from 713 Canadian hospitals and nursing homes. Results suggest that, although modest in their impact, labor market and the organization-market fit factors do make significant yet differential contributions to turnover and vacancy rates for registered nurses. Knowledge of labor market factors can substantially shape an effective campaign to recruit and retain nurses. This is particularly true for employers who are perceived to be "employers-of-choice."

  10. Comparative Analysis of Registered Nurses' and Nursing Students' Attitudes and Use of Nonpharmacologic Methods of Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Malcolm; Cox-Davenport, Rebecca A

    2015-08-01

    Despite the benefits that nonpharmacologic methods of pain management have to offer, nurses cite barriers that inhibit their use in practice. The purpose of this research study was to compare the perceptions of prelicensed student nurses (SNs) and registered nurses (RNs) toward nonpharmacologic methods of pain management. A sample size of 64 students and 49 RNs was recruited. Each participant completed a questionnaire about their use and perceptions nonpharmacologic pain control methods. Sixty-nine percent of RNs reported a stronger belief that nonpharmacologic methods gave relief to their patients compared with 59% of SNs (p = .028). Seventy-five percent of student nurses felt they had adequate education about nonpharmacologic pain modalities compared with 51% of RN who felt less than adequately educated (p = .016). These findings highlight the need for education about nonpharmacologic approaches to pain management. Applications of these findings may decrease barriers to the use of nonpharmacologic methods of pain management.

  11. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  12. Relationships among structural empowerment, psychological empowerment, and burnout in registered staff nurses working in outpatient dialysis centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Janice L

    2011-01-01

    This study explored relationships among structural empowerment, psychological empowerment, and burnout in registered staff nurses working in outpatient hemodialysis settings. The sample consisted of 233 registered staff nurses. The Emotional Exhaustion Subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Conditions for Work Effectiveness II Questionnaire, and Psychological Empowerment Instrument were used to measure variables. Findings indicate that in this population of nurses, there is a significant inverse relationship between structured empowerment and burnout.

  13. Gender, politics, and regionalism: factors in the evolution of registered psychiatric nursing in Manitoba, 1920-1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    In Canada, psychiatric nursing care is provided by two kinds of nurses. East of Manitoba, it is provided by registered nurses who may or may not have specialized psychiatric nursing education. In the four western provinces, a distinct professional group, registered psychiatric nurses, also provide care. Saskatchewan was the first province to achieve distinct legislation, in 1948, followed by British Columbia in 1951, Alberta in 1955, and Manitoba in 1960. Several factors coalesced to sway Manitoba to adopt the distinct profession model. First, there was little interest by the general nursing body in mental hospital nursing. Second, the other three western provinces had formed a Canadian Council of Psychiatric Nursing that encouraged mental hospital attendants and nurses in Manitoba. Third, a group of male attendants took on leadership roles supported by the mental hospital superintendents. Finally, Manitoba was culturally and geographically more aligned with western than eastern Canada.

  14. A prospective cohort study examining the preferred learning styles of acute care registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrow, Judy; Yevchak, Andrea; Lewis, Peter

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports on the preferred learning styles of Registered Nurses practicing in acute care environments and relationships between gender, age, post-graduate experience and the identified preferred learning styles. A prospective cohort study design was used. Participants completed a demographic questionnaire and the Felder-Silverman Index of Learning Styles (ILS) questionnaire to determine preferred learning styles. Most of the Registered Nurse participants were balanced across the Active-Reflective (n = 77, 54%), and Sequential-Global (n = 96, 68%) scales. Across the other scales, sensing (n = 97, 68%) and visual (n = 76, 53%) were the most common preferred learning style. There were only a small proportion who had a preferred learning style of reflective (n = 21, 15%), intuitive (n = 5, 4%), verbal (n = 11, 8%) or global learning (n = 15, 11%). Results indicated that gender, age and years since undergraduate education were not related to the identified preferred learning styles. The identification of Registered Nurses' learning style provides information that nurse educators and others can use to make informed choices about modification, development and strengthening of professional hospital-based educational programs. The use of the Index of Learning Styles questionnaire and its ability to identify 'balanced' learning style preferences may potentially yield additional preferred learning style information for other health-related disciplines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Knowledge and attitudes to HIV/AIDS in Chinese registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Li, Yinglan; Zeng, Kai; Wu, Ying

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the current knowledge and attitudes towards people living with HIV/AIDS (PWHAs) in Chinese registered nurses (RNs) and describe the relationships between the nurses' HIV/AIDS related knowledge and attitudes towards PWHAs. A cohort of 1350 RNs from 51 comprehensive hospitals in Hunan, China were studied over a 4-month period. A 3-stage random sampling method was used. The total correct rate in AIDS Knowledge Scale was 63.2%. Most nurses were good at conceptions of routes of AIDS infection and some basic characteristics, with more than 80% of the correct responses rate of relevant items. Their weakness was in the knowledge of some activities which would not transfer AIDS, such as "eating in a restaurant where the cook has AIDS may infect HIV", with less than 50% of the correct response rate of relevant items. As for attitudes, 94% of the nurses sympathized with HIV patients. About 82.7% of the nurses showed little sympathy to patients getting HIV by sexual promiscuity. Among all the AIDS related knowledge, nurses' conception of non-infectious activities was significantly related to their attitudes to HIV/AIDS. Chinese nurses waster well about HIV/AIDS basic characteristics and the routes of infection, and most nurses sympathize with PWHAs. Their weakness is in the knowledge of non-HIV-infectious activities and they hold different attitudes to those patients getting HIV/AIDS in different ways. There are some barriers for Chinese nurses to take care of all patients equally. Professional development programs are urgently needed to remedy this situation including clarifying the nurses' misconceptions on AIDS related knowledge, developing non-judgmental professional attitudes, and using universal prevention measures when they take care of all patients.

  16. Turning the tide: Registered nurses' job withdrawal intentions in a Finnish university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna M. Salminen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Given the global shortage of registered nurses, it is important to investigate the intentions for job withdrawal of nurses, and resolve these, in order to retain nurses in the field.Research purpose: The objective was to examine the intentions for job withdrawal of ageing and younger nurses, and the antecedents of these intentions, with special reference to job control and perceived development opportunities. The age of 45 was adopted as a starting point when referring to ageing employees.Motivation for the study: Different forms of job withdrawal have rarely been studied together and associated.Research design, approach and method: A quantitative study was applied with logistic regression analyses. Respondents were registered nurses working in a university hospital in Finland. The response rate was 46.1% (N = 343.Main findings: A quarter (25% of the nurses had frequently thought about leaving the profession and 19% of the nurses had thought about taking early retirement. Factors that increased the likelihood of intentions for occupational turnover were young age, low job satisfaction, low organisational commitment, low work ability and skills in balance with or above present work demands. The intention to take early retirement was increased with older age, being male, working shifts, low work ability, low job satisfaction and poor job control.Practical/managerial implications: A nurse’s job satisfaction and work ability should be regularly monitored and opportunities should be offered them, to apply their skills and to control their work, in order to retain them.Contribution/value–added: The article added information about the factors that contribute to a nurse’s intentions for job withdrawal.

  17. Relationship of Academic Variables to National Council for Licensure Examination for Registered Nurse Performance of Graduates in a Selected Associate Degree Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naron, Rosarica G.; Widlak, Frederic

    This report addresses the unstable and unsatisfactory performance of Chicago, Illinois' Olive-Harvey College's (OHC) associate degree nursing (ADN) graduates on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). An ex post facto correlation study was designed to determine the worthiness of pre-nursing admission course…

  18. Perceptions of registered nurses in four state health insititutions on continuing formal education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Richards

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated registered nurses in four selected state health institutions’perceptions with regard to continuing formal education. The relevance of continuing formal education is being emphasised globally by the increasing quest for quality assurance and quality management systems within an ethos of continuous improvement.According to Tlholoe (2006:5, it is important to be committed to continual learning, as people’s knowledge become less relevant because skills gained early in a career are insufficient to avoid costly mistakes made through ignorance. Continuing formal education in nursing is a key element to the maintenance of quality in health care delivery. The study described: registered nurses’ views on continuing formaleducation registered nurses’ perceived barriers to continuing formal educationA quantitative descriptive survey design was chosen using a questionnaire for data collection. The sample consisted of 40 registered nurses working at four state health institutions in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Convenience sampling was selected to include registered nurses who were on duty on the days during which there searcher visited the health institutions to distribute the questionnaires. The questionnaire contained mainly closed-ended and a few open-ended questions. Content validity of the instrument was ensured by doing a thorough literature review before construction of items and a pretest. Reliability was established by the pretest and providing the same information to all respondents before completion of the questionnaires.The ethical considerations of informed consent, anonymity and confidentiality were adhered to and consent to conduct the study was obtained from relevant authorities. Descriptive statistics, based on calculations using the Microsoft (MSExcel (for Windows 2000 programme, were used to summarise and describe the research results. The research results indicated that most registered nurses

  19. An exploratory study of role transition from student to registered nurse (general, mental health and intellectual disability) in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Deasy, Christine; Doody, Owen; Tuohy, Dympna

    2011-01-01

    peer-reviewed 3rd International Nurse Education Conference Nursing Education in a Global Community Ireland has seen much change in nurse education resulting in four year degree programmes since 2002. A unique aspect of these programmes was the incorporation of rostered internship. This study explored role transition for a cohort of students at pre and post-registration. The sample consisted of fourth year students registered on BSc nursing programmes (general, mental health and intellec...

  20. A Delphi approach to developing a core competency framework for family practice registered nurses in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaveni, Azadeh; Gallinaro, Anna; Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Callahan, Sheilagh; Hammond, Melanie; Oandasan, Ivy

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the results of a Delphi panel process to gain consensus on a role description and competency framework for family practice registered nurses (FP-RNs) in Ontario. Based on the findings from interviews and focus groups with family practice registered nurses and their inter-professional colleagues throughout Ontario, a core competency framework for FP-RNs emerged consisting of six distinct roles - Professional, Expert, Communicator, Synergist, Health Educator and Lifelong Learner - with accompanying enabling competency statements. This framework was refined and validated by a panel of experts from various nursing and family medicine associations and organizations through a Delphi consensus process. This core competency framework for FP-RNs was developed as a stepping stone for clarifying this very important and poorly understood role in family practice. As a result of this research, we expect a greater acknowledgement of the contributions and expertise of the FP-RN as well as the need to celebrate and profile this role. This work has already led to the establishment of a network of stakeholders from nursing organizations in Ontario who are considering opportunities to move the development and use of the competency framework forward.

  1. Registered Nurse Care Coordination: Creating a Preferred Future for Older Adults with Multimorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Jean; Minaudo, Judith

    2015-09-30

    The concept of care coordination is often touted as the preferred way to streamline care for complex patients. Care coordination is even more popular with the mention of it in the Affordable Care Act of 2010 and with new Medicare payment models. The purpose of this article is to define care coordination, briefly describe trends for older adults and care coordination, and explore roles for registered nurses. We describe elder-appropriate models of care coordination useful for older adults with multimorbidity. A brief exemplar provides an example of evidence-based care coordination services provided by a nursing and social work team, a model supported by recent literature. As a result of this discussion, readers will become informed about possibilities for the future of care delivery and the future of professional nursing practice.

  2. Exploring registered Psychiatric Nurses' responses towards Service Users with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrath, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    This study explored registered psychiatric nurses\\' (RPNs\\') interactions and level of empathy towards service users with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD). A qualitative approach was used, and 17 RPNs were interviewed using a semistructured interview schedule incorporating the "staff-patient interaction response scale" (SPIRS). Four themes emerged following data analysis: "challenging and difficult," "manipulative, destructive and threatening behaviour," "preying on the vulnerable resulting in splitting staff and other service users," and "boundaries and structure." Additionally, low levels of empathy were evident in the majority of participants\\' responses to the SPIRS. The findings provide further insight on nurses\\' empathy responses and views on caring for service users with BPD and further evidence for the need for training and education for nurses in the care of service users diagnosed with BPD.

  3. Exploring Registered Psychiatric Nurses' Responses towards Service Users with a Diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget McGrath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored registered psychiatric nurses' (RPNs' interactions and level of empathy towards service users with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD. A qualitative approach was used, and 17 RPNs were interviewed using a semistructured interview schedule incorporating the “staff-patient interaction response scale” (SPIRS. Four themes emerged following data analysis: “challenging and difficult,” “manipulative, destructive and threatening behaviour,” “preying on the vulnerable resulting in splitting staff and other service users,” and “boundaries and structure.” Additionally, low levels of empathy were evident in the majority of participants' responses to the SPIRS. The findings provide further insight on nurses' empathy responses and views on caring for service users with BPD and further evidence for the need for training and education for nurses in the care of service users diagnosed with BPD.

  4. Barriers to advanced practice registered nurse scope of practice: issue analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Whitney J; Allen, Patricia E

    2012-09-01

    Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) have the unique potential to affect the changing needs of health care in the United States, but are restricted in care provision by varying state regulations and reimbursement policies. Although research shows APRN care to be safe, cost-effective, and of high quality, most medical professional organizations continue to oppose the removal of scope-of-practice barriers, citing patient safety concerns. Nursing organizations at the state and national levels have already begun to invest the time and resources needed for policy change. However, empirical evidence of APRN quality of care must be shared with policymakers, funding entities, and the public. Additionally, support must be garnered from the public and other health care disciplines. Scope-of-practice policy change will occur through the emergence of strong individuals within nursing professional organizations and the joining together of organizations to form one voice.

  5. Care priorities- Registered Nurses' clinical daily work in municipal elderly care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norell, Margaretha; Ziegert, Kristina; Kihlgren, Annica

    2013-06-01

    Common in Swedish elderly home care is that Registered Nurses work independently, and lead the care team without being a part of it. People involved in the care of the patient can be social services, physician, Registered Nurse (RN), nurses in inpatient care and family. In according to current model for nursing documentation RNs interventions is described as participation, information/education, support, environment, general care, training, observation/surveillance, special care drug administration and coordination. Time pressure is perceived as high, but the nurses have the opportunity to influence their daily work situation and make priorities. The purpose of this study was to investigate how RNs prioritise interventions in municipal elderly care settings. A quantitative descriptive method was used for the study. Data were collected during the months of April and October 2004 - 2008, using a web-based form. The nurses filled in patient's type of housing, performed interventions, and if the interventions were delegated. Interventions were described as keywords and were attributed a certain amount of time, calculated in previous time studies. The inclusion criteria were: all patients 80 years of age and older, in a municipality in south-western Sweden, who received some form of health care from a RN, or performed by non-certified staff by delegation. Results indicate that differences in priority could be observed, depending on the patient's gender, or whether the patient was living in independent or sheltered housing. Drug administration was prioritised for female patients, while coordination became a priority for patients living in ordinary housing. Support received the highest priority, regardless if the patient lived in ordinary or sheltered housing. However, it is not entirely clear what support signifies in municipal health care settings, and this issue would therefore require further investigation.

  6. Marketing and the Most Trusted Profession: The Invisible Interactions Between Registered Nurses and Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Quinn; Bero, Lisa A; Malone, Ruth E

    2016-06-07

    The mainstay for addressing conflicts of interest in health care is disclosure of personal financial ties to industry. However, this approach fails to capture the complexity of industry interactions that are built into clinical practice. Further, the policy climate focuses on physicians and traditional pharmaceutical marketing. To describe industry activities targeted at registered nurses. Qualitative, ethnographic study conducted from January 2012 to October 2014. Four acute care hospitals in a western U.S. city. A purposive sample of 72 participants with direct experience with industry, including staff nurses, administrators, and industry and supply chain professionals. Fieldwork, including observations (102 hours), semistructured in-depth interviews (n = 51), focus groups (n = 4), and documents analysis. Nurses' reported financial relationships with industry were similar to those reported by prescribers. However, nurses reported that their most significant interactions with industry occurred in daily practice. The current policy environment rendered these interactions invisible, leaving nurses with little guidance to ensure that the boundary between service and sales remained intact. This study could not determine the frequency or prevalence of nurse-industry interactions. The sample is not representative. Nurse-industry interactions may be common and influential, but they remain invisible in the current policy climate. Although some aspects of these interactions may be beneficial, others may pose financial risks to hospitals or safety risks to patients. Disclosure strategies alone do not provide health professionals with adequate support to manage day-to-day interactions. Management of industry interactions must include guidance for nurses. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; Canadian Institutes of Health Research; and University of California, San Francisco.

  7. Motivational pathways of occupational and organizational turnover intention among newly registered nurses in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernet, Claude; Trépanier, Sarah-Geneviève; Demers, Mireille; Austin, Stéphanie

    Staff turnover is a major issue for health care systems. In a time of labor shortage, it is critical to understand the motivational factors that underlie turnover intention in newly licensed nurses. To examine whether different forms of motivation (the reasons for which nurses engage in their work) predict intention to quit the occupation and organization through distinct forms (affective and continuance) and targets (occupation and organization) of commitment. Cross-sectional data were collected from a sample of 572 French-Canadian newly registered nurses working in public health care in the province of Quebec, Canada. The hypothesized model was tested by structural equation modeling. Autonomous motivation (nurses accomplish their work primarily out of a sense of pleasure and satisfaction or because they personally endorse the importance or value of their work) negatively predicts intention to quit the profession and organization through target-specific affective commitment. However, although controlled motivation (nurses accomplish their work mainly because of internal or external pressure) is positively associated with continuance commitment to the occupation and organization, it directly predicts, positively so, intention to quit the occupation and organization. These results highlight the complexity of the motivational processes at play in the turnover intention of novice nurses, revealing distinct forms of commitment that explain how motivation quality is related simultaneously to intention to quit the occupation and organization. Health care organizations are advised to promote autonomous over controlled motivation to retain newly recruited nurses and sustain the future of the nursing workforce. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Disaster nursing: Self-reported competence of nursing students and registered nurses, with focus on their readiness to manage violence, serious events and disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Jan; Johansson, Eva; Carlsson, Marianne; Florin, Jan; Leksell, Janeth; Lepp, Margret; Lindholm, Christina; Nordström, Gun; Theander, Kersti; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Gardulf, Ann

    2016-03-01

    The World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses recognises the importance of nurses' involvement in disaster preparedness and response. The aim of this study was to describe and compare self-reported disaster nursing competence (DNC) among nursing students (NSs) and among registered nurses (RNs) with professional experience. Further to investigate possible associations between self-reported DNC and background factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted of 569 NSs and 227 RNs. All respondents completed the 88-item Nurse Professional Competence Scale, including three items assessing DNC. Significant differences were found among the NSs depending on which University/University College they had attended. RNs reported significantly higher overall DNC and better ability to handle situations involving violence, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events. RNs working in emergency care reported significantly better DNC ability, compared with RNs working in other areas of healthcare. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that working night shift and working in emergency care were positively associated with high self-reported overall DNC. The results indicate that workplace experience of serious events increase the readiness of registered nurses to handle violence, to act in accordance with safety regulations, and to apply principles of disaster medicine during serious events.

  9. Understanding cultural competence in a multicultural nursing workforce: registered nurses' experience in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Adel F; McCarthy, Alexandra; Gardner, Glenn E

    2015-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia, the health system is mainly staffed by expatriate nurses from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Given the potential risks this situation poses for patient care, it is important to understand how cultural diversity can be effectively managed in this multicultural environment. The purpose of this study was to explore notions of cultural competence with non-Saudi Arabian nurses working in a major hospital in Saudi Arabia. Face-to-face, audio-recorded, semistructured interviews were conducted with 24 non-Saudi Arabian nurses. Deductive data collection and analysis were undertaken drawing on Campinha-Bacote's cultural competence model. The data that could not be explained by this model were coded and analyzed inductively. Nurses within this culturally diverse environment struggled with the notion of cultural competence in terms of each other's cultural expectations and those of the dominant Saudi culture. The study also addressed the limitations of Campinha-Bacote's model, which did not account for all of the nurses' experiences. Subsequent inductive analysis yielded important themes that more fully explained the nurses' experiences in this environment. The findings can inform policy, professional education, and practice in the multicultural Saudi setting. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Belief in the "free choice" model of homosexuality: a correlate of homophobia in registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Christopher W

    2007-01-01

    A great amount of social science research has supported the positive correlation between heterosexuals' belief in the free choice model of homosexuality and homophobia. Heterosexuals who believe gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) persons consciously choose their sexual orientation and practice a lifestyle conducive to that choice are much more likely to possess discriminatory, homophobic, homonegative, and heterosexist beliefs. In addition, these individuals are less likely to support gay rights initiatives such as nondiscrimination policies or same-sex partner benefits in the workplace or hate crime enhancement legislation inclusive of GLBT persons. Although researchers have demonstrated this phenomenon in the general population, none have specifically assessed it in the nursing workforce. The purpose of this study was to examine registered nurses' overall levels of homophobia and attitudes toward a workplace policy protective of gays and lesbians. These variables were then correlated with belief in the free choice model of homosexuality. Results indicated that belief in the free choice model of homosexuality was the strongest predictor of homophobia in nurses. Implications for nursing leadership and management, nursing education, and future research are discussed.

  11. The role of the registered nurse in the marketing of primary healthcare services, as part of health promotion

    OpenAIRE

    M Rail; SM Meyer

    2006-01-01

    Existing literature on the marketing of primary healthcare services was reviewed to determine the role of registered nurses in this regard. The systematic review included “— five searches and ensured wide coverage of the results of available primary research studies on the topic. The results were summarised and the role of registered nurses in the marketing of primary healthcare services was identified. Primary research sources on the topic included textbooks on marketing by experts in the fi...

  12. Barriers to and facilitators of research utilization: a survey of registered nurses in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ping Wang

    Full Text Available AIMS: This survey aims to describe the perception of barriers to and facilitators of research utilization by registered nurses in Sichuan province, China, and to explore the factors influencing the perceptions of the barriers to and facilitators of research utilization. METHODS: A cross sectional survey design and a double cluster sampling method were adopted. A total of 590 registered nurses from 3 tertiary level hospitals in Sichuan province, China, were recruited in a period from September 2006 to January 2007. A modified BARRUERS Scale and a Facilitators Scale were used. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, rank transformation test, and multiple linear regression. RESULTS: Barriers related to the setting subscale were more influential than barriers related to other subscales. The lack of authority was ranked as the top greatest barrier (15.7%, followed by the lack of time (13.4% and language barrier (15.0%. Additional barriers identified were the reluctance of patients to research utilization, the lack of funding, and the lack of legal protection. The top three greatest facilitators were enhancing managerial support (36.9%, advancing education to increase knowledge base (21.1%, and increasing time for reviewing and implementing (17.5%, while cooperation of patients to research utilization, establishing a panel to evaluate researches, and funding were listed as additional facilitators. Hospital, educational background, research experience, and knowledge on evidence-based nursing were the factors influencing perceptions of the barriers and facilitators. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses in China are facing a number of significant barriers in research utilization. Enhancing managerial support might be the most promising facilitator, given Chinese traditional culture and existing health care system. Hospital, educational background, research experience and knowledge on evidence-based nursing should be taken into account to promote research

  13. Violence in municipal care of older people in Sweden as perceived by registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsson, Karin; Sonde, Lars; Wahlin, Tarja-Brita Robins

    2007-05-01

    The main aim was to describe registered nurses' perceptions of violence and threats, as well as their access to prevention measures and routines for handling violent behaviour in municipal care of older people. Another aim was to compare nurses' perceptions working solely in dementia care with those working in general elder care where older people have diverse diagnoses. Violence is often reported in care of older people. The development of dementia units and the implementation of reform have changed care of older people. Dementia disorders have been shown to be a predisposing factor to violence. A non-experimental, descriptive design with a survey research approach was used. The setting was 60 special types of housing with subunits in a large town. The response rate was 62% (n = 213). Forty-five per cent (n = 95) of the nurses worked in dementia care and 55% (118) in general elder care. A questionnaire. Results. Nurses had experienced a high degree indirect threats (dementia care, 45%; general elder care, 51%), direct threats of violent acts (dementia care, 35%; general elder care, 44%) and violent acts (dementia care, 41%; general elder care, 43%). Nurses had witnessed violence and threats towards staff (dementia care, 49%; general elder care, 38%). Even care receivers (dementia care, 20%; general elder care, 19%) were subjected to violence and threats. No statistical differences were found between groups. The nurses in dementia care had more access to education in managing violence and threats, as well as routines for handling violence and a door with a lock to their working unit. Violence occurred frequently in municipal care of older people without any difference between dementia care and general elder care. Nurses in dementia care were more often offered education on how to manage violence and had routines for when violence occurs. Municipal authorities should increase staff education for handling violence and creating safety routines. Violence needs to be

  14. Physical work environment: testing an expanded model of job satisfaction in a sample of registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukic, Maja; Kovner, Christine; Budin, Wendy C; Norman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The impact of personal, organizational, and economic factors on nurses' job satisfaction have been studied extensively, but few studies exist in which the effects of physical work environment--including perceptions of architectural, interior design, and ambient features on job satisfaction-are examined. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of perceived physical work environment on job satisfaction, adjusting for multiple personal, organizational, and economic determinants of job satisfaction. A cross-sectional, predictive design and a Web-based survey instrument were used to collect data from staff registered nurses in a large metropolitan hospital. The survey included 34 questions about multiple job satisfaction determinants, including 18 Likert-type measures with established good validity (comparative fit index = .97, Tucker-Lewis index = .98, root mean square error of approximation = .06) and reliability (r ≥ .70). A response rate of 48.5% resulted in a sample of 362, with 80% power to detect a medium effect of perceived physical environment on job satisfaction. On average, nurses had negative perceptions of physical work environment (M = 2.9, SD = 2.2). Although physical environment was related positively to job satisfaction (r =.256, p = .01) in bivariate analysis, in ordered probit regression, no effect of physical work environment on job satisfaction was found. In future studies, this relationship should be examined in larger and more representative samples of nurses. Qualitative methods should be used to explore how negatively perceived physical work environment impacts nurses. Rebuilding of U.S. hospitals, with a planned investment of $200 billion without considering how physical environment contributes to nurse work outcomes, threatens to exacerbate organizational nurse turnover.

  15. Using problem-based learning in staff development: strategies for teaching registered nurses and new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunta, Kristy S; Katrancha, Elizabeth D

    2010-12-01

    Problem-based learning, described as an active teaching strategy, provides a framework for the development of self-directed learning, self-evaluation, interpersonal communication, critical thinking, and access and retrieval of information. This teaching method can be modified to fit almost any situation. Problem-based learning provides an opportunity to actively engage staff members in learning situations, making it a great asset for teaching in staff development. This article describes the use of problem-based learning for teaching registered nurses and new graduate nurses. It provides a scenario and facilitator guide pertaining to a real patient situation on an inpatient telemetry unit and offers general tips for implementing problem-based learning in staff education.

  16. The Efficacy of ATI Predictive Testing and Remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse Pass Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Alexandra Selman

    2013-01-01

    This project study sought to evaluate the effects of implementing quarterly predictive testing and remediation on National Certification and Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) pass rates of an associate's degree nursing program at a small Midwestern community college. The college's pass rate on the NCLEX-RN has been below both the…

  17. Leadership styles of nurse managers and registered sickness absence among their nursing staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, Jolanda A. H.; Roelen, Corne A. M.; van Zweeden, Nely F.; Jongsma, Dianne; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; Groothoff, Johan W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Sickness absence leads to understaffing and interferes with nursing efficiency and quality. It has been reported in literature that managerial leadership is associated with self-reported sickness absence in the working population. Purposes: This study investigated the relationship betwee

  18. Knowledge assessment and preparation for the certified emergency nurses examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kathleen

    2007-02-01

    With the current emphasis on credentialing in nursing, many nurses have committed to taking the CEN examination. The following questions have been developed to assist in emergency nursing knowledge assessment and in preparation for the CEN examination. Questions, rationale for the correct answers, and references are provided here for your self-evaluation. ENA has developed educational materials that can be used as further resources for CEN preparation: Emergency Nursing Core Curriculum and CEN Review Manual.

  19. Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses’ views about nursing work: a survey of motivation and maintenance factors

    OpenAIRE

    Jamieson, Isabel; Kirk, Ray; Wright, Sarah; Andrew, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim The aim of this article was to report on the analysis of qualitative, open text data, received from a national on‐line survey of what factors Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses wish to change about nursing and consideration of the potential policy and practice impacts of these requests on their retention. Background Prior to the economic recession of 2007–2010, the growing shortage of nurses in New Zealand presented a serious concern for the healthcare workforce. Given th...

  20. Comparative Cost Analysis of Increasing Registered Nursing Staff on the Labor and Delivery Unit at the National Naval Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    recognized L&D Nurses 9 the central role of the registered nurse. In its most recent Accreditation Manual for Hospitals, JCAHO requires that "a...far beyond that of a L&D Nurses 60 comparably-sized civilian instituCion . Above all else NNMC is a Navy hospital, with responsibilities far beyond...1990). Accreditation Manual for Hospitals, 1990. Chicago: Author. Klarman, H. E. (1974). Application of cost-benefit analysis to the health services and

  1. Experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egues, Aida L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore the meaning of the experiences of mentoring influences on the personal and professional growth of Hispanic registered nurses (RNs). Focus group methodology was employed in the New York City metropolitan area with monolingual English or bilingual English/Spanish RNs (N = 20) who perceived themselves to be at all levels of practice. The findings offer a summary of the experiences of mentoring for the 20 Hispanic RNs that includes little advancement support; hesitancy to being mentored; dependency on the self for personal and professional growth; and educational, practice, and socioeconomic barriers. This study suggests that mentoring of Hispanic nurses needs to be reexamined to improve and sustain a culture of mentoring that may enhance the education, recruitment, and retention of Hispanic RNs.

  2. Stress: perceptions, manifestations, and coping mechanisms of student registered nurse anesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipas, Anthony; Cordrey, Dan; Floyd, David; Grubbs, Lindsey; Miller, Sarah; Tyre, Brooks

    2012-08-01

    Stress is a response to change from the norm. Stress affects all individuals to varying degrees and can be positive, such as eustress, or negative, such as distress. The purpose of this qualitative, cross-sectional study was to investigate the stressors of the typical student registered nurse anesthetist (SRNA), with the objective of identifying trends in the perceptions, manifestations, and coping mechanisms of stress. An online (SurveyMonkey) questionnaire composed of 54 study-specific questions was developed to assess stress in the SRNA population. The questionnaire was sent to members of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists via email invitation. The study yielded a sample of 1,282 SRNA participants. Analysis revealed statistically significant relationships between self-reported stress and negative outcomes, such as increased sick days, decreased health and wellness, and depression. The study demonstrated that SRNAs perceive their stress as above average, and it remains a central concern for them.

  3. Attributes of advanced practice registered nurse care coordination for children with medical complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Rhonda G; Kelly, Anne M; Finkelstein, Stanley M; Looman, Wendy S; Garwick, Ann W

    2014-01-01

    Care coordination is an essential component of the pediatric health care home. This study investigated the attributes of relationship-based advanced practice registered nurse care coordination for children with medical complexity enrolled in a tertiary hospital-based health care home. Retrospective review of 2,628 care coordination episodes conducted by telehealth over a consecutive 3-year time period for 27 children indicated that parents initiated the majority of episodes and the most frequent reason was acute and chronic condition management. During this period, care coordination episodes tripled, with a significant increase (p care coordination model has potential for changing the health management processes for children with medical complexity.

  4. Toward a methodology for substate projections of registered nurse supply and demand in New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Sandra; Martiniano, Robert; Moore, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Even as concerns about nursing shortages continue nationwide and for individual states in the United States, there is little information on the impact of nursing shortages at substate levels, such as counties or groups of small counties. National and state level assessments can mask wide geographic variation in the distribution of registered nurses (RNs). The Center for Health Workforce Studies at the School of Public Health, University at Albany, developed a practical approach to projecting RN supply and demand at substate levels. The experimental model used in this research was adapted from a methodology utilized for the RN National Supply Model and National Demand Model developed by the Health Resources and Services Administration in the department of Health and Human Services to make RN supply and demand projections at the broader national and state levels. The Center's research highlighted the value of substate analyses in the identification of RN supply and demand gaps and found that supply and demand gaps vary greatly by region and within regions. This study also provided an in-depth understanding of the dynamics that drive substate labor markets for RNs as well as the need for substate analyses to help policymakers better allocate scarce resources to address nursing shortages.

  5. [The construction of professional images of healthcare assistants and registered nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Dominik; Schaffert, René

    2016-02-01

    In the field of nursing in Switzerland, educations have experienced a fundamental reorganization with the implementation of the new law on Vocational and Professional Education and Training (2004). Among other things, this change affects professional images. To show how the different professional images in the field of nursing are being constructed in the descriptions of professions by graduates after the reshaping of the educations and the occupational field in general. In 110 semi-structured interviews, healthcare assistants and registered nurses (college diploma and Bachelor of Science) in their early careers were asked to explain their professional image. The participant's answers were analysed based on a qualitative content analysis and considering the theoretical background of Berger and Luckmann (1977). The interviews show that professional images emerge on the interaction of societal attributes and individual processes of adoption and revision. Graduates are challenged to adjust stereotypes and to achieve a balance between their own professional image and a missing or inappropriately perceived societal image. There should be further emphasis on the differentiation between the professions and the different educations in the field of nursing in order to achieve a better public perception of the different professions.

  6. The experience of learning to speak up: a narrative inquiry on newly graduated registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Bernice Yee-Shui; Chan, Engle Angela

    2015-07-01

    To explore the process of learning to speak up in practice among newly graduated registered nurses. Speaking up is an important aspect of communication to ensure patient safety within a healthcare team. However, nurses have reported being hesitant about speaking up or being unable to be heard, despite adopting various safety tools. A power differential could be a factor in their hesitation to speak up. While a large number of new graduates are employed in the lower rungs of the hospital hierarchy to resolve local and global nursing shortages, the process of their learning to speak up remains under-explored. The narrative concept of experience is addressed through the three-dimensional space of a narrative inquiry. Eighteen new graduates were recruited. Stories of experiences of speaking up emerged naturally during repeated unstructured interviews and ongoing email conversations with three participants. The complex process of learning to speak up is schematically represented. Three interrelated narrative threads were identified: (1) learning to speak up requires more than one-off training and safety tools, (2) mentoring speaking up in the midst of educative and miseducative experiences and (3) making public spaces safe for telling secret stories. Speaking up requires ongoing mentoring to see new possibilities for sustaining professional identities in the midst of miseducative experiences under the potential shaping of the Chinese culture and generational differences. Appreciative inquiry might be a new approach that can be used to promote positive cultural changes to encourage newly graduated registered nurses to learn to speak up to ensure patient safety. Cultivating a safe and open culture of communication and mentoring new graduates to speak up will benefit patient safety now and in the future by helping to retain committed patient advocates who could mentor future generations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Implementing the supportive supervision intervention for registered nurses in a long-term care home: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilton, Katherine S; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne; Robinson, Angela

    2013-11-01

    This pilot study was conducted in response to the call in 2009 by the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics to focus on effective leadership structures in nursing homes and to develop leadership capacity. Few researchers have evaluated interventions aimed at enhancing the leadership ability of registered nurses in long-term care. The aim of the pilot study was to test the feasibility of a three-part supportive supervisory intervention to improve supervisory skills of registered nurses in long-term care. A repeated measures group design was used. Quantitative data were collected from healthcare aides, licensed practical nurses (i.e., supervised staff), and registered nurses (i.e., supervisors). Focus groups with care managers and supervisors examined perceptions of the intervention. There were nonsignificant changes in both the registered nurse supervisors' job satisfaction and the supervised staff's perception of their supervisors' support. Supervised staff scores indicated an increase in the use of research utilization but did not reflect an increase in job satisfaction. Focus group discussions revealed that the supervisors and care managers perceived the workshop to be valuable; however, the weekly self-reflection, coaching, and mentoring components of the intervention were rare and inconsistent. While the primary outcomes were not influenced by the Supportive Supervision Intervention, further effort is required to understand how best to enhance the supportive supervisory skills of RNs. Examples of how to improve the possibility of a successful intervention are advanced. Effective supervisory skills among registered nurses are crucial for improving the quality of care in long-term care homes. Registered nurses are receptive to interventions that will enhance their roles as supervisors. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  8. Experiences of registered nurses as managers and leaders in residential aged care facilities: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Drew

    2011-12-01

    The phenomenon of an ageing population is being experienced globally, as countries struggle to change and improve residential models of care and provide services to the elderly. The role of the registered nurse (RN) is considered crucial to the clinical governance and management of care given. To date, however, no systematic review has examined the RN's experience in leadership and management. The objective of this review is to critically appraise, synthesise and present best available evidence on the experiences of RNs as clinical leaders and managers in residential aged care facilities. This review considered qualitative research papers that addressed the experiences of RNs as clinical leaders and managers in residential aged care facilities. Participants of interest were RNs, nurse leaders, nurses holding registration and or regulation under a board of nursing, nurses working in residential aged care and long-term care facilities. The diversity and use of language to describe nurses' roles and models of care for the elderly care environment were considered in the review. The search strategy sought to find both published studies and papers, limited to the English language and published between January 1997 and February 2011. An initial limited search was done in Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases to identify the key words contained in the title or abstract and index terms used to describe the relevant terms in the article. A second extensive search was undertaken and extended to other relevant databases using all identified keywords and index terms. The third step involved searching reference lists and bibliographies of chosen articles for additional studies. Each paper was assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological quality prior to inclusion in the review using an appropriate critical appraisal instrument from the System for the Unified Management

  9. Effect of Staff Turnover on Staffing: A Closer Look at Registered Nurses, Licensed Vocational Nurses, and Certified Nursing Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kash, Bita A.; Castle, Nicholas G.; Naufal, George S.; Hawes, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the effects of facility and market-level characteristics on staffing levels and turnover rates for direct care staff, and we examined the effect of staff turnover on staffing levels. Design and Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional data from 1,014 Texas nursing homes. Data were from the 2002 Texas Nursing Facility Medicaid Cost…

  10. Taken-for-granted assumptions about the clinical experience of newly graduated registered nurses from their pre-registration paid employment: A narrative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yee-Shui Bernice; Chan, E Angela

    2016-09-01

    Paid employment within clinical setting, such as externships for undergraduate student, are used locally and globally to better prepare and retain new graduates for actual practice and facilitate their transition into becoming registered nurses. However, the influence of paid employment on the post-registration experience of such nurses remains unclear. Through the use of narrative inquiry, this study explores how the experience of pre-registration paid employment shapes the post-registration experience of newly graduated registered nurses. Repeated individual interviews were conducted with 18 new graduates, and focus group interviews were conducted with 11 preceptors and 10 stakeholders recruited from 8 public hospitals in Hong Kong. The data were subjected to narrative and paradigmatic analyses. Taken-for-granted assumptions about the knowledge and performance of graduates who worked in the same unit for their undergraduate paid work experience were uncovered. These assumptions affected the quantity and quality of support and time that other senior nurses provided to these graduates for their further development into competent nurses and patient advocates, which could have implications for patient safety. It is our hope that this narrative inquiry will heighten awareness of taken-for-granted assumptions, so as to help graduates transition to their new role and provide quality patient care.

  11. Information exchange between registered nurses and district nurses during the discharge planning process: cross-sectional analysis of survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmark, Sofi; Söderberg, Siv; Skär, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Discharge planning is an important care process for managing transitions from the hospital to the community. It has been studied for >20 years, but few studies clarify the information exchanged between healthcare providers. This study aimed to describe nurses' experiences and perceptions of information exchange during the discharge planning process, focused on what, when and how information is exchanged between the hospital and primary healthcare. Method: A web-based census survey was used to collect data; the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi-squared test. A questionnaire was distributed to 194 registered nurses (129 respondents) from a central county hospital and 67 district nurses (42 respondents) working in 13 primary healthcare centres. Results: The results show a significant difference between given and received information between the two groups. Both groups thought the information exchange worked best when all participants met at the discharge planning conference and that the electronic information system was difficult to use. Conclusion: This study shows difficulties knowing what patient-related information needs to give and not receiving the expected information. These results can be used to develop knowledge about roles, work tasks and needs to enhance the outcome of the process and the information exchanged.

  12. Nursing home facility risk factors for infection and hospitalization: importance of registered nurse turnover, administration, and social factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Sheryl; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Hebel, J Richard; Sloane, Philip D; Magaziner, Jay

    2002-12-01

    Determine the relationship between a broad array of structure and process elements of nursing home care and (a) resident infection and (b) hospitalization for infection. Baseline data were collected from September 1992 through March 1995, and residents were followed for 2 years; facility data were collected at the midpoint of follow-up. A stratified random sample of 59 nursing homes across Maryland. Two thousand fifteen new admissions aged 65 and older. Facility-level data were collected from interviews with facility administrators, directors of nursing, and activity directors; record abstraction; and direct observation. Main outcome measures included infection (written diagnosis, a course of antibiotic therapy, or radiographic confirmation of pneumonia) and hospitalization for infection (indicated on medical records). The 2-year rate of infection was 1.20 episodes per 100 resident days, and the hospitalization rate for infection was 0.17 admissions per 100 resident days. Except for registered nurse (RN) turnover, which related to both infection and hospitalization, different variables related to each outcome. High rates of incident infection were associated with more Medicare recipients, high levels of physical/occupational therapist staffing, high licensed practical nurse staffing, low nurses' aide staffing, high intensity of medical and therapeutic services, dementia training, staff privacy, and low levels of psychotropic medication use. High rates of hospitalization for infection were associated with for-profit ownership, chain affiliation, poor environmental quality, lack of resident privacy, lack of administrative emphasis on staff satisfaction, and low family/friend visitation rates. Adjustment for resident sex, age, race, education, marital status, number of morbid diagnoses, functional status, and Resource Utilization Group, Version III score did not alter the relationship between the structure and process of care and outcomes. The association between RN

  13. The role of the registered nurse in the marketing of primary healthcare services, as part of health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, M; Meyer, S M

    2006-03-01

    Existing literature on the marketing of primary healthcare services was reviewed to determine the role of registered nurses in this regard. The systematic review included five searches and ensured wide coverage of the results of available primary research studies on the topic. The results were summarised and the role of registered nurses in the marketing of primary healthcare services was identified. Primary research sources on the topic included textbooks on marketing by experts in the field and relevant journal articles by authorities on healthcare marketing. The data were analysed and four main categories identified. To ensure the trustworthiness of the research, Lincoln and Guba's (1981: 215-216) criteria, as explained by Krefting (1991: 217), were applied. Because the population consisted of only literature, ethical considerations concerning human subjects were irrelevant. Results indicated that the basic commercial marketing principles (the so-called 4Ps--product, price, place, and promotion) could be adapted for the health sector. The conclusion was that registered nurses could contribute to the marketing of primary healthcare services by communicating with the community (promotion) and by ensuring effective service (product) delivery at the right price and place. Registered nurses could influence the community's perceptions of health care and facilitate behaviour changes, thereby promote health. The implementation of the findings and recommendations of this research could create a new awareness among registered nurses of their role in the marketing of primary healthcare services in South Africa and improve their skills in this regard.

  14. The effect of preceptor role effectiveness on newly licensed registered nurses' perceived psychological empowerment and professional autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Chanell; Hart, Patricia L; Mareno, Nicole

    2016-03-01

    The first year turnover rate for newly licensed registered nurses is roughly 30% and increases to about 57% in the second year (Twibell et al., 2012). An effective preceptorship has been shown to better facilitate the first year transition (Hodges et al., 2008) and increase retention rates (Pine and Tart, 2007). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between newly licensed registered nurses' perceived preceptor role effectiveness, psychological empowerment and professional autonomy. A prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive research design was used. Sixty-nine newly licensed registered nurses were recruited and surveyed. Newly licensed registered nurses were found to have moderately high levels of perceived preceptor role effectiveness, psychological empowerment, and professional autonomy. Preceptor role effectiveness had significant, moderately, positive relationships with professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. There was also a significant relationship found between professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. Results show that preceptor role effectiveness is linked to increased professional autonomy and psychological empowerment. Therefore, effective preceptorships are necessary in easing the newly licensed registered nurse's transition to practice. Strategies to ensure effective preceptorships and enhance the NRLN's transition to practice are proposed.

  15. Emotional intelligence as a noncognitive factor in student registered nurse anesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Shawn

    2013-12-01

    Current nurse anesthesia program admissions requirements usually focus on high grade point averages, Graduate Record Examination scores, number of years of acute care experience, and a personal interview to assist in predicting those who will succeed in these intensive academic and clinical programs. Some people believe these criteria may not be sufficient in predicting success and have suggested that the use of noncognitive criteria such as emotional intelligence measurements may be helpful. The purpose of this cross-sectional correlational study was to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence and academic factors of student registered nurse anesthetists at 3 points in a program--matriculation, at 1 year of study, and in the last semester of study--and the relationship of these to clinical scores and National Certification Examination scores. An ex post facto cross-sectional study design was used to gather data at 3 critical times in nurse anesthesia programs to explore the relationships between emotional intelligence scores, preadmission demographics, clinical scores, and National Certification Examination scores. The online Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test instrument provided 15 individual emotional intelligence scores for each subject. The statistical relationship between variables was examined.

  16. The effectiveness of problem-based learning and concept mapping among Taiwanese registered nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hui-Chen; Chou, Fan-Hao; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Ko, Hsun-Kuei; Jian, Shu-Yuan; Weng, Wei-Che

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of adopting problem-based learning (PBL) and concept mapping (CM) in the educational programs for Taiwanese registered nursing (RN) students. We used a quasi-experimental design with experimental and control groups to evaluate the effectiveness of PBL-CM in three time schedules: before the course began (pre-test), at the end of the course (post-test), and six months after the end of the course (follow-up test). A convenience sample of 120 RN students participated, 51in the experimental group and 69 in the control group. Finding showed that the experimental group had higher scores than the control group for the Critical-Thinking Scale, Self-Directed Learning Scale, and Students' Performance in PBL Tutorial Sessions Questionnaire at the post-test and follow-up test stages. The PBL-CM increased students' critical-thinking skills and personal accountability for self-directed learning, and it would enhance the skills of independent study, reasoning, group interaction and active participation. This study offers guidelines for new nurse-training programs and continuing nursing education in clinical practice.

  17. Barriers to Research Utilization among Registered Nurses in Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. As there might be relevant differences with regard to research utilization in the general hospitals, we aimed to study research utilization among registered nurses working in traditional Chinese medicine hospitals. Methods. A total of 648 registered nurses from 4 tertiary-level hospitals in China were recruited for participation. A modified BARRIERS Scale and self-designed questionnaires were used for data collection. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, t-tests, and one-way ANOVAs and Spearman correlation analysis. Results. Overall, items which belong to the subscale “Research” were identified as the most important barriers. Among the individual items, the lack of time on the job was ranked as the top barrier, followed by the lack of knowledgeable colleagues and by overwhelming research publications. Clinical experience, working pressure, job satisfaction, and research experience could be identified as associated factors for barriers to research utilization. Conclusions. Registered nurses in traditional Chinese medicine hospitals felt high barriers to research utilization. Reducing registered nurses’ working pressure, promoting their positive attitude to nursing, and improving research training might be helpful for increasing research utilization. Close cooperation between clinical and nursing schools or academic research centres might facilitate the necessary change in nursing education and routine.

  18. Cancer incidence and adverse pregnancy outcome in registered nurses potentially exposed to antineoplastic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Nhu D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the relationships of potential occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs with cancer incidence and adverse pregnancy outcomes in a historical prospective cohort study of female registered nurses (RNs from British Columbia, Canada (BC. Methods Female RNs registered with a professional regulatory body for at least one year between 1974 and 2000 formed the cohort (n = 56,213. The identifier file was linked to Canadian cancer registries. An RN offspring cohort from 1986 was created by linkages with the BC Birth and Health Status Registries. Exposure was assessed by work history in oncology or cancer agencies (method 1 and by estimating weighted duration of exposure developed from a survey of pharmacists and nursing unit administrators of all provincial hospitals and treatment centers and the work history of the nurses (method 2. Relative risks (RR were calculated using Poisson regression for cancer incidence and odds ratios (OR were calculated for congenital anomaly, stillbirth, low birth weight, and prematurity incidence, with 95% confidence intervals. Results In comparison with other female RNs, method 1 revealed that RNs who ever worked in a cancer center or in an oncology nursing unit had an increased risk of breast cancer (RR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.03 - 3.23, 12 cases and their offspring were at risk for congenital anomalies of the eye (OR = 3.46, 95% CI = 1.08 - 11.14, 3 cases. Method 2 revealed that RNs classified as having the highest weighted durations of exposure to antineoplastic drugs had an excess risk of cancer of the rectum (RR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.07 - 3.29, 14 cases. No statistically significant increased risks of leukemia, other cancers, stillbirth, low birth weight, prematurity, or other congenital anomalies in the RNs' offspring were noted. Conclusions Female RNs having had potential exposure to antineoplastic drugs were not found to have an excess risk of leukemia, stillbirth, or congenital

  19. Opioid therapy for chronic low back pain: prescribing considerations for advanced practice registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, Maureen Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common, disabling, and costly condition, and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) must carefully evaluate patients before considering long-term opioid therapy as a management strategy. APRNs should refer patients suspected of having a serious condition, or identifiable etiology, for specialist evaluation, as many patients improve with physical therapy, interventional pain management procedures, or surgical intervention. For patients unresponsive to nonopioid treatment, APRNs with an understanding of opioids, and the experience to assess and manage the risks of opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion, may consider long-term opioid therapy as part of a multimodal management plan. Such prescribing necessitates careful patient selection; informed consent; prudent opioid dosing and titration; and monitoring for response to treatment, adverse effects, and aberrant drug-taking behavior. Treatment and regulatory guidelines can assist APRNs in providing safe and effective care to patients with chronic low back pain.

  20. Disrupted by disaster: shared experiences of student registered nurse anesthetists affected by hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisz-Everson, Marjorie A; Bennett, Marsha J; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Biddle, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this focused ethnography was to describe the shared experiences of student registered nurse anesthetists (SRNAs) whose senior year of education and training was disrupted by Hurricane Katrina, as well as to determine the storm's psychosocial impact on them. A convenience sample of 10 former SRNAs participated in focus groups that were audiorecorded, transcribed, and qualitatively analyzed. Three major themes emerged from the study: Seriousness of Urgency, Managing Uncertainty, and Stability Equaled Relief. The themes represented how the SRNAs appraised and coped with the stressful events surrounding Hurricane Katrina. The psychosocial impact of Hurricane Katrina on the SRNAs resulted mainly in temporary increased alcohol consumption and short-term anxiety. One person started smoking. The results of this study should serve as a guide to formulate policies regarding the education of SRNAs during and immediately after a disaster and to provide a framework for future disaster studies regarding SRNAs. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Using operations research to plan the british columbia registered nurses' workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavieri, Mariel S; Regan, Sandra; Puterman, Martin L; Ratner, Pamela A

    2008-11-01

    The authors explore the power and flexibility of using an operations research methodology known as linear programming to support health human resources (HHR) planning. The model takes as input estimates of the future need for healthcare providers and, in contrast to simulation, compares all feasible strategies to identify a long-term plan for achieving a balance between supply and demand at the least cost to the system. The approach is illustrated by using it to plan the British Columbia registered nurse (RN) workforce over a 20-year horizon. The authors show how the model can be used for scenario analysis by investigating the impact of decreasing attrition from educational programs, changing RN-to-manager ratios in direct care and exploring how other changes might alter planning recommendations. In addition to HHR policy recommendations, their analysis also points to new research opportunities.

  2. Hospital workplace experiences of registered nurses that have contributed to their resignation in the Durban metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L A; McInerney, P A

    2006-11-01

    Hospital workplace experiences of registered nurses that have contributed to their resignation in the Durban Metropolitan Area. The purpose of this research was to explore and describe the hospital workplace experiences that had contributed to the resignations of Registered Nurses in the Durban Metropolitan Area. The broad perspective governing this research is qualitative in nature. The researcher employed a phenomenological approach specifically because the researcher was interested in identifying, describing and understanding the subjective experiences of individual nurses at the two Private and two Provincial health care institutions selected to participate in the study - in respect of their decision (s) to resign from their employment, and/or to leave the nursing profession. Two semistructured interviews were conducted with each participant by the researcher. The researcher applied the principle of theoretical saturation and a total of fifteen participants were interviewed and thirty interviews were conducted. Experiential themes and subthemes in the data were identified by a process of meaning condensation, and the data were managed by means of a qualitative software package - NVIVO (QSR - NUD*IST). The resignations of registered nurses in the Durban Metropolitan Area were found to be linked to their respective hospital workplace experiences. These experiences related to their physical working conditions and environment and included the following: unsupportive management structures, autocratic and dehumanizing management styles, negative stereotypy of nurses and the nursing profession, lack of autonomy in the workplace, professional jealousies and fractures within the profession, sub-optimal physical working conditions and shortage of staff, equipment and lack of appropriate surgical supplies, concerns regarding occupational safety e.g. the increasing exposure of health care personnel to HIV and AIDS; lack of opportunities for promotion or continuing one

  3. Educational Preparation for the Role of the School Nurse: Perceptions of School Nurses in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify the perceptions of currently practicing school nurses regarding their baccalaureate nursing education and determine if they felt adequately prepared to effectively practice in the role of a school nurse. A descriptive, quantitative on-line survey was conducted of Washington State…

  4. Supply and distribution of primary healthcare registered nurses in british columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sabrina T; Watson, Diane E; Young, Ella; Mooney, Dawn

    2009-11-01

    WHAT DID WE DO?: This study uses an existing data source to (a) describe the population and geographic distribution of registered nurses (RNs) working in primary healthcare (PHC) in British Columbia, (b) compare this workforce to PHC physicians and (c) assess the distribution of PHC-RNs relative to population health status. WHAT DID WE LEARN?: Of the 27,570 practising RNs in British Columbia in 2000, there were 3,179 (12%) in the PHC workforce. This translates into 147 people per practising RN and 1,277 people per PHC-RN. In 2000, there were 990 people per PHC physician. PHC-RNs represented 43% of the combined PHC workforce of physicians and RNs. A large proportion (47%) of PHC-RNs worked in community health centres, whereas less than 2% worked in physicians' offices. Geographic distribution of PHC-RNs is similar to the distribution of PHC physicians and is not associated with population health status. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS?: There seem to be sufficient PHC-RNs to implement policy objectives in support of interdisciplinary PHC teams, but physicians and nurses will increasingly need to practice in the same location or have access to electronic information systems to support coordination, continuity and comprehensiveness of PHC. The PHC workforce could be better deployed to align with population health status.

  5. The competencies of Registered Nurses working in care homes: a modified Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanyon, Miriam Ruth; Goldberg, Sarah Elizabeth; Astle, Anita; Griffiths, Amanda; Gordon, Adam Lee

    2017-07-01

    registered Nurses (RNs) working in UK care homes receive most of their training in acute hospitals. At present the role of care home nursing is underdeveloped and it is seen as a low status career. We describe here research to define core competencies for RNs working in UK care homes. a two-stage process was adopted. A systematic literature review and focus groups with stakeholders provided an initial list of competencies. The competency list was modified over three rounds of a Delphi process with a multi-disciplinary expert panel of 28 members. twenty-two competencies entered the consensus process, all competencies were amended and six split. Thirty-one competencies were scored in round two, eight were agreed as essential, one competency was split into two. Twenty-four competencies were submitted for scoring in round three. In total, 22 competencies were agreed as essential for RNs working in care homes. A further 10 competencies did not reach consensus. the output of this study is an expert-consensus list of competencies for RNs working in care homes. This would be a firm basis on which to build a curriculum for this staff group.

  6. Beyond the classroom: nurse leader preparation and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Formal academic education and experience as a nurse are established preparation for the chief nurse executive (CNE) or upcoming nurse leaders. This article proposes that the nurse leader must build on these fundamentals through self-discipline, lifelong learning, and practice. Three critical ingredients are discussed to guide the nurse leader on a life/career for the CNE and the nurse leader at every level. These include fostering relationships, feeding intellectual curiosity, and engaging in self-care practices. These indispensable ingredients of the successful nurse leader serve as an augmentation to formal education and experience for the nurse aspiring to reach the CNE level and beyond as well as for the current CNE mentoring future leaders.

  7. Reinforcing communication skills while registered nurses simultaneously learn course content: a response to learning needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSimone, B B

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the implementation and evaluation of Integrated Skills Reinforcement (ISR) in a baccalaureate nursing course entitled "Principles of Health Assessment" for 15 registered nurse students. ISR is a comprehensive teaching-learning approach that simultaneously reinforces student writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills while they learn course content. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of ISR on writing skills and student satisfaction. A learner's guide and teacher's guide, created in advance by the teacher, described specific language activities and assignments that were implemented throughout the ISR course. During each class, the teacher promoted discussion, collaboration, and co-inquiry among students, using course content as the vehicle of exchange. Writing was assessed at the beginning and end of the course. The influence of ISR on the content, organization, sentence structure, tone, and strength of position of student writing was analyzed. Writing samples were scored by an independent evaluator trained in methods of holistic scoring. Ninety-three per cent (14 of 15 students) achieved writing growth from .5 to 1.5 points on a scale of 6 points. Student response to both the ISR approach and specific ISR activities was assessed by teacher-created surveys administered at the middle-end of the course. One hundred per cent of the students at the end of this project agreed that the ISR activities, specifically the writing and reading activities, helped them better understand the course content. These responses differed from evaluations written by the same students at the middle of the course. The ISR approach fostered analysis and communication through active collaboration, behaviors cited as critical for effective participation of nurses in today's complex health care environment.

  8. Presentation skills for nurses: how to prepare more effectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield-Law, L

    Many clinical nurses are changing the way they deliver care for the benefit of their patients. In order to share ideas, knowledge and opinions more widely, nurses need to either speak or write within the public arena. For all nurses, presentation skills are not just useful, they are essential, whether for sharing practice, influencing colleagues or seeking a new job. Such skills can be learnt, building on characteristics most nurses already possess. Effective presentations usually require learning to control nervousness and preparing properly. This article provides a framework for preparation and suggestions for ways to achieve calm and confidence.

  9. What nurses say they do and need: implications for the educational preparation of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Julianne; Jones, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    The scope of contemporary nursing is a critical factor in determining the appropriate educational preparation of nurses today and in the future. This qualitative study involved interviewing nurses throughout Australia in a variety of work and geographical settings to develop a snapshot of what nurses are doing, the skills needed and the challenges faced.The snapshot of contemporary practice that emerged is one of considerable diversity, which poses challenges for educators of nurses in terms of what constitutes appropriate or adequate educational preparation for nurses. Understandings of what constitutes clinical skills, and consequently clinical education, are explored as is what calls for 'more' clinical education may actually mean. Caution is raised about educating for present needs that are based on limited conceptions of what constitutes a nursing workplace. It is argued that education for nurses, both initial and on going, must be cognizant of educating for what might be, not simply somewhat short-term imperatives.

  10. What's my line? A narrative review and synthesis of the literature on Registered Nurses' communication behaviours between shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitson, Alison L; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa; Elliott, Janice; Cant, Megan L

    2014-06-01

    To describe, appraise and synthesize the seminal and empirical literature around Registered Nurses' communication behaviours between shifts in acute hospital settings. Effective communication between shifts (at nursing handover) is acknowledged as a prerequisite to safe and high-quality patient-centred care. However, gaps and inconsistencies continue to prevail. Narrative review and synthesis. The electronic databases PubMED, CINAHL and Scopus were used. English language, peer-reviewed papers published between 1970-April 2012 were considered for review. Criteria included Registered Nurses' communication during handovers in adult hospital settings. Twenty-nine papers were reviewed. The research lacks a clear conceptual framework to define the core purposes of Nurses' communication behaviours between shifts. Seven themes were identified: overall purpose; report givers and receivers; seeing the whole picture; teaching and education; language; patient-centred care; and social cohesion. Two main communication processes are required - one articulating the whole picture and the other detailing information about patients. This area of research is challenged by lack of consistency in terminology and methodological rigour. While recent research has confirmed the findings from the seminal work, it has not been able to elaborate on some of the key challenges to refine the knowledge base. A more integrated approach is required to understand the complex process of improving nursing communication behaviours, particularly around the nursing handover. A neglected area of study is the role of the unit lead in determining the communication standards of the whole nursing team. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. To lead and to be led in municipal elderly care in Sweden as perceived by registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsson, Karin; Hansson, Margareta

    2011-05-01

    To describe registered nurses' (RNs) perceptions of their own leadership and of their immediate line management, as well as leadership's organizational prerequisites in municipal elderly care. Nursing leadership is a main factor influencing care quality. In spite of this, there is a leadership crisis in municipal elderly care. A descriptive design utilizing a questionnaire. The setting was 60 residential care homes in Sweden with 213 participating nurses. The response rate was 62%. Most nurses (59%) viewed themselves as leaders of a smaller group, whereas 28% did not consider themselves as leaders at all. Few nurses had the will to develop their leadership competence. In all, 25% of the nurses had unresolved serious conflicts with their immediate line management. Half perceived receiving no or little feedback from their immediate line management. A majority had no organized supervision. They perceived, on average, organizational prerequisites as unclear, with few possibilities for leadership competence development. Nurses need to be more willing to develop their leadership skills. Nurses need managers to support them in their leadership roles. They need distinct and supportive organizational prerequisites for leadership. It is crucial to provide distinct and supportive organizational prerequisites for nursing leadership. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. The role of the registered nurse in the marketing of primary healthcare services, as part of health promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rail

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Existing literature on the marketing of primary healthcare services was reviewed to determine the role of registered nurses in this regard. The systematic review included “— five searches and ensured wide coverage of the results of available primary research studies on the topic. The results were summarised and the role of registered nurses in the marketing of primary healthcare services was identified. Primary research sources on the topic included textbooks on marketing by experts in the field and relevant journal articles by authorities on healthcare marketing. The data were analysed and four main categories identified. To ensure the trustworthiness of the research, Lincoln and Guba’s (1981:215-216 criteria, as explained by Krefting (1991:217, were applied. Because the population consisted of only literature, ethical considerations concerning human subjects were irrelevant. Results indicated that the basic commercial marketing principles (the so-called 4Ps - product, price, place, and promotion could be adapted for the health sector. The conclusion was that registered nurses could contribute to the marketing of primary healthcare services by communicating with the community (promotion and by ensuring effective service (product delivery at the right price and place. Registered nurses could influence the community’s perceptions of health care and facilitate behaviour changes, thereby promote health. The implementation of the findings and recommendations of this research could create a new awareness among registered nurses of their role in the marketing of primary healthcare services in South Africa and improve their skills in this regard.

  13. Experiences of registered nurses with regard to accessing health information at the point-of-care via mobile computing devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Ricks

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The volume of health information necessary to provide competent health care today has become overwhelming. Mobile computing devices are fast becoming an essential clinical tool for accessing health information at the point-of-care of patients.Objectives: This study explored and described how registered nurses experienced accessing information at the point-of-care via mobile computing devices (MCDs.Method: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual design was used. Ten in–depth interviews were conducted with purposively sampled registered nurses employed by a state hospital in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality (NMBM. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using Tesch’s data analysis technique. Ethical principles were adhered to throughout the study. Guba’s model of trustworthiness was used to confirm integrity of the study.Results: Four themes emerged which revealed that the registered nurses benefited from the training they received by enabling them to develop, and improve, their computer literacy levels. Emphasis was placed on the benefits that the accessed information had for educational purposes for patients and the public, for colleagues and students. Furthermore the ability to access information at the point-of-care was considered by registered nurses as valuable to improve patient care because of the wide range of accurate and readily accessible information available via the mobile computing device.Conclusion: The registered nurses in this study felt that being able to access information at the point-of-care increased their confidence and facilitated the provision of quality care because it assisted them in being accurate and sure of what they were doing.

  14. Creative thinking in nursing education: preparing for tomorrow's challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Storti, A J; Cullen, P A; Hanzlik, E M; Michiels, J M; Piano, L A; Ryan, P L; Johnson, W

    1999-01-01

    The present health care environment requires creative change, a thought that evokes both excitement and apprehension and offers a clear challenge for the contemporary nurse. In this era of capitation, re-engineering, and redesign in the health care system, nursing programs must prepare nurses who can successfully perform in an environment that demands innovative problem solving. Integrating creative problem solving into this BSN program has (1) provided students with information and experience in the creative process, (2) fostered the personal creative development of nurses, (3) challenged students to use creative thinking in solving nursing problems, and most important, (4) further established and reinforced a new, higher level of nursing practice--a level that appropriately sees the nurse as a creative and innovative member of the health care team.

  15. Understanding the supply and distribution of registered nurses: where are the data and what can they tell us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiniano, Robert; Mcginnis, Sandra; Moore, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Health workforce researchers routinely conduct studies to determine whether a profession is currently in short supply and whether future shortages are likely. This is particularly important for registered nursing since the profession has experienced periodic shortages over the past three decades. Registered nurse (RN) forecast studies can be valuable in quantifying supply and demand gaps and identifying the most appropriate strategies to avert future shortages. In order to quantify RN supply/demand gaps, it is important to have accurate data on RNs, including the number of active RNs as well as their demographic, education, and practice characteristics, and work location(s). A lack of relevant and timely data on the nursing workforce is a significant barrier to identifying where nursing shortages exist, where they are most severe, and determining the factors that contribute to them. This lack of understanding impedes the development of effective health workforce programs and policies to mitigate shortages and the ability to evaluate these programs and policies for effectiveness. This study describes the national data sources available to nursing researchers to study the supply and distribution of the RN workforce and assesses the sources' strengths and limitations. This study also explores the potential for using state-level data for nursing workforce research.

  16. Preparation for Community Health Nursing: Issues and Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; White, Caroline

    1980-01-01

    Highlights of a survey of community health nursing agencies and faculty suggest the need for better planning and collaboration between service and education in preparing students for this field. Survey data tables are included. (CT)

  17. Lost in transition--a review of qualitative literature of newly qualified Registered Nurses' experiences in their transition to practice journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Yen Tjuin Eugene; Pua, Lay Hoon; Chan, Moon Fai

    2013-02-01

    The failure of newly qualified Registered Nurses to be appropriately transitioned into the new practice has been mentioned in numerous nursing literatures. Along with the need to decrease turnover rates, increase satisfaction rate of nurses and improve patient outcomes, nursing educators in Singapore are interested in the experiences of these nurses in their transition to practice journey. In this paper, the author attempts to critically review qualitative research conducted in that area to identify why nurses are leaving the profession and how nursing educators in Singapore can reduce stress and uncertainty in the newly qualified Registered Nurses during their transition to practice journey. In conducting a qualitative literature review, the author aims to explore interpretation of these nurses' subjective experiences and description of their social context, ultimately paying attention to lay knowledge as human behaviour is context specific rather than being represented in the quantitative form.

  18. Preparation of nursing students for change and innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Begeny, Suzanne

    2010-03-01

    As health care technology advances and patients require more care, nurses will need to be prepared to change old and incorporate new care practices and systems. Nurses must not only be able to deliver quality nursing care, but will also need to be capable of creating innovative approaches, reacting quickly, and taking calculated risks. Using the Organizational Engineering Model, this study examines the informational processing styles of students entering the nursing profession and in turn, measures the way they process information at the end of their education. The information processing style predicts the ability to innovate, take risks, and change. The findings of this study demonstrate that we attract nursing students who fall within the Conservator information processing style. Conservators focus on outcome certainty and a deliberate response. Schools of nursing also graduate students with this same profile, indicating that we have not altered their information processing style during their education.

  19. How fast will the registered nurse workforce grow through 2030? Projections in nine regions of the country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, David I; Buerhaus, Peter I; Staiger, Douglas O

    After an unprecedented increase in nursing school enrollment and graduates in the past 10 years, projected shortages of nurses have been erased at a national level. However, nursing markets are local, and an uneven distribution of health care providers of all types is a longstanding feature of health care in the United States. The purpose of this study was to understand how the outlook for future registered nurse (RN) supply varies regionally across the United States. We apply our nursing supply model to the nine U.S. Census Divisions to produce separate supply forecasts for each region. We find dramatic differences in expected future growth of the nursing workforce across U.S. regions. These range from zero expected growth in the number of RNs per capita in New England and in the Pacific regions between 2015 and 2030 to 40% growth in the East South Central region (Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky) and in the West South Central region (Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana). Assuming growth in the demand for RNs per population, some regions of the United States are expected to face shortfalls in their nursing workforce if recent trends do not change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nurses’ Perceptions of Critical Issues Requiring Consideration in the Development of Guidelines for Professional Registered Nurse Staffing for Perinatal Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice; Lyndon, Audrey; Wilson, Jane; Ruhl, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Objective To solicit input from registered nurse members of the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) on critical considerations for review and revision of existing nurse staffing guidelines. Design Thematic analysis of responses to a cross-sectional on-line survey question: “Please give the staffing task force your input on what they should consider in the development of recommendations for staffing of perinatal units.” Participants N = 884 AWHONN members. Main Outcome Measure Descriptions of staffing concerns that should be considered when evaluating and revising existing perinatal nurse staffing guidelines. Results Consistent themes identified included the need for revision of nurse staffing guidelines due to requirements for safe care, increases in patient acuity and complexity, invisibility of the fetus and newborn as separate and distinct patients, difficulties in providing comprehensive care during labor and for mother-baby couplets under current conditions, challenges in staffing small volume units, and the negative effect of inadequate staffing on nurse satisfaction and retention. Conclusion Participants overwhelmingly indicated current nurse staffing guidelines were inadequate to meet the needs of contemporary perinatal clinical practice and required revision based on significant changes that had occurred since 1983 when the original staffing guidelines were published. PMID:22690743

  1. Qualitative Inquiry into Challenges Experienced by Registered General Nurses in the Emergency Department: A Study of Selected Hospitals in the Volta Region of Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adatara, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Registered General Nurses (RGNs) play crucial roles in emergency departments (EDs). EDs in Ghana are primarily staffed by RGNs who have had no additional formal education in emergency care. Additionally, basic, master's, or doctoral level nursing education programs provide limited content on the complexities of emergency nursing. Nurses in EDs are affected by many challenges such as growing patient population, financial pressures, physical violence, verbal abuse, operational inefficiencies, overcrowding, and work overload. There is a paucity of research on challenges experienced by RGNs in EDs in the Volta Region of Ghana. In this qualitative study, twenty RGNs in EDs from three selected hospitals in the Volta Region of Ghana were interviewed. All recorded interviews were transcribed, reviewed several times by researchers and supervisors, and analyzed using content analysis. Five thematic categories were identified. These thematic categories of challenges were lack of preparation for ED role, verbal abuse from patients relatives, lack of resources in ED, stressful and time consuming nature of ED, and overcrowding in ED. Formal education of RGNs in the advanced role of emergency care, adequate supply of resources, increased hospital management support, and motivations for RGNs working in ED are necessary to improve the practice of emergency care. PMID:27885343

  2. Nursing and eHealth: are we preparing our future nurses as automatons or informaticians?

    OpenAIRE

    Honey, Michelle; Procter, Paula; Wilson, Marisa; Moen, Anne; Dal Sasso, Grace

    2016-01-01

    The Education Working Group of IMIA NI present this thought provoking panel where the changing and challenging role of nursing will be explored within the information intensive eHealth arena. The session will be of interest to any nurse as the discussion will be driven by the objective of trying to understand how best to prepare nurses to be actively engaged in information and communication technology (ICT) developments that enhance care assessment, delivery, evaluation and audit. As a balanc...

  3. Patient safety culture in acute care: a web-based survey of nurse managers' and registered nurses' views in four Finnish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Hannele; Partanen, Pirjo; Kvist, Tarja; Miettinen, Merja; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2013-12-01

    Nurse managers (NMs) and registered nurses (RNs) have key roles in developing the patient safety culture, as the nursing staff is the largest professional group in health-care services. We explored their views on the patient safety culture in four acute care hospitals in Finland. The data were collected from NMs (n = 109) and RNs (n = 723) by means of a Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture instrument and analyzed statistically. Both groups recognized patient safety problems and critically evaluated error-prevention mechanisms in the hospitals. RNs, in particular, estimated the situation more critically. There is a need to develop the patient safety culture of hospitals by discussing openly about them and learning from mistakes and by developing practices and mechanisms to prevent them. NMs have central roles in developing the safety culture at the system level in hospitals in order to ensure that nurses caring for patients do it safely.

  4. Preparing a nursing department for downshifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R

    1993-01-01

    1. Downshifting is a movement away from intense job attention and a focus toward the family. Many individuals in all parts of America are shifting their focus away from materialism and financial prosperity, and toward a simpler lifestyle and homelier values. This increasing focus on family--rather than career--can also be seen in nursing. 2. Motivation to downshift because of decreasing interest in career is less likely when the employee is a nurse. However, rising emphasis on the hazards of latchkey children and the need for quality parenting have increased nurses' concerns about the effect of being out of the home for extended periods. 3. With today's nursing shortage, personnel policies must be responsive to the priorities of the prospective job applicant. To be desirable, an employer must appear responsive to personal needs. The national trend to make positions more compatible with home responsibilities must be incorporated in personnel strategies if nurses are to remain in nursing positions and be satisfied.

  5. Dual loyalties: Everyday ethical problems of registered nurses and physicians in combat zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Kristina; Kjellström, Sofia; Sandman, Lars

    2017-01-01

    When healthcare personnel take part in military operations in combat zones, they experience ethical problems related to dual loyalties, that is, when they find themselves torn between expectations of doing caring and military tasks, respectively. This article aims to describe how Swedish healthcare personnel reason concerning everyday ethical problems related to dual loyalties between care and military tasks when undertaking healthcare in combat zones. Abductive qualitative design. Participants and research context: Individual interviews with 15 registered nurses and physicians assigned for a military operation in Mali. Ethical considerations: The participants signed up voluntarily, and requirements for informed consent and confidentiality were met. The research was approved by the Regional Ethics Review Board in Gothenburg (D no. 816-14; 24 November 2014). Three main categories emerged: reasons for not undertaking combat duties, reasons for undertaking combat duties and restricted loyalty to military duties, and 14 subcategories. Reasons for not undertaking combat duties were that it was not in their role, not according to ethical codes or humanitarian law or a breach towards patients. Reasons for undertaking combat duties were that humanitarian law does not apply or has to be treated pragmatically or that it is a case of force protection. Shortage of resources and competence were reasons for both doing and not doing military tasks. Under some circumstances, they could imagine undertaking military tasks: when under threat, if unseen or if not needed for healthcare duties. These discrepant views suggest a lack of a common view on what is ethically acceptable or not, and therefore we suggest further normative discussion on how these everyday ethical problems should be interpreted in the light of humanitarian law and ethical codes of healthcare personnel and following this, further training in ethical reflection before going on military operations.

  6. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Needle Stick Injuries among Registered Nurses in Public Sector Tertiary Care Hospitals of Pakistan '

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    Haris Habib

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Needle stick injuries remain the main cause of Hep B, Hep C and HIV which lead to mortality and morbidity in health care providers especially in nurses all over the world. Although needle stick injuries have been well studied in developed countries, data from developing countries is limited.Aim & Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of needle stick injuries among nurses and its associated factors in public sector tertiary care hospitals of Pakistan. Methods: This cross sectional survey was conducted in 3 major tertiary care hospitals of Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Study duration was from March 2010 to May 2010 (3 months. Two Hundred and Sixteen (216 nurses were selected by simple random sampling with proportionate sampling. All those registered nurses who were working in allied hospitals of Rawalpindi and involved in clinical work were included, while all those who were on administrative positions, students, retired or on maternity leave were excluded from the study. Pre structured questionnaire was used and data was collected by questionnaire having optional choices and few open ended questions. The questionnaire was piloted among thirty nurses in a tertiary care hospital and their comments were incorporated accordingly to redesign the final questionnaire. The data was analysed using SPSS 16.Results: Sixty Seven (67% of nurses got needle stick injury during job. Almost all (99% nurses said that they didn’t report their injury because of no reporting system in their hospital (p value < 0.05. Injection and needles (72% are the most injury causing instrument and needle stick injuries mostly occurred (81% at bedside and ward (p value < 0.05. Sixty six percent (66% of nurses said that they didn’t attended any educational session, seminar or workshop related to needle stick injuries during their job. Conclusion: The frequency of needle stick injuries among nurses is quite high in public sector hospitals of Rawalpindi Pakistan. Non

  7. E-Mentoring: Confidence Intervention for Senior Nursing Students Preparing for Readiness to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRose, Patrick S., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the registered nurse has evolved over the years as technology has changed and the practice of nursing has advanced. There are many factors that influence how a new nurse enters practice; however, confidence appears to play a large role in the way nursing students see themselves and how this self perception regulates transition to…

  8. E-Mentoring: Confidence Intervention for Senior Nursing Students Preparing for Readiness to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRose, Patrick S., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the registered nurse has evolved over the years as technology has changed and the practice of nursing has advanced. There are many factors that influence how a new nurse enters practice; however, confidence appears to play a large role in the way nursing students see themselves and how this self perception regulates transition to…

  9. Use of aptitude to understand bachelor of science in nursing student attrition and readiness for the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Sarah E; Moore, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Attrition is a serious issue among Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students with attrition rates around 50% nationwide. To help minimize BSN student attrition, many nursing programs use commercially available standardized nursing aptitude tests as adjuncts to scholastic aptitude data, usually operationalized as pre-nursing grade point average, to select students for admission. Little is known regarding the usefulness of scholastic and nursing aptitude data for predicting long-term retention in a BSN program and readiness for the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe the relationships among scholastic aptitude, nursing aptitude, BSN student attrition prior to the final semester of the curriculum, and BSN student readiness for the NCLEX-RN. This study's findings, along with other findings in the literature, suggest the need for a parsimonious explanatory model of BSN student attrition that can be used to guide admission and progression policies, and ensure that students ready for the NCLEX-RN are the ones graduating from BSN programs.

  10. Factors That Impact Registered Nurses' Decisions to Continue Providing Care to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosfield, Saundra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if there is a significant difference in the following: (a) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics between age groups (those over 40 years of age and those under 40 years of age); (b) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics and personality traits; (c) nurses' likelihood to remain in geriatrics…

  11. The Effect of Mentoring on Career Satisfaction of Registered Nurses and Intent to Stay in the Nursing Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Bette

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring is important in the career development of novice and experienced nurses. With the anticipated shortage in nursing, it is important to explore factors such as mentoring that may contribute to career satisfaction and intent to stay in the profession. This study explored the effects of mentoring on career satisfaction and intent to stay in nursing, and the relationship between career satisfaction and intent to stay in nursing. It was conducted through a mailed survey of RNs 55 years or younger currently in practice, education, administration, or research. Career satisfaction was measured through the use of the newly developed Mariani Nursing Career Satisfaction Scale. Findings revealed no statistically significant effect of mentoring on career satisfaction and intent to stay in nursing. There was a statistically significant relationship between career satisfaction and intent to stay in nursing. The majority of nurses reported participating in a mentoring relationship. Although the findings related to mentoring, career satisfaction, and intent to stay were not statistically significant, there was a prevalence of mentoring in nursing, thus suggesting the need for future research to identify outcomes of mentoring. In addition, the study contributed a newly developed instrument to measure the concept of career satisfaction in nursing. PMID:22645673

  12. Self-perception of readiness for clinical practice: A survey of accelerated Masters program graduate registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantlay, Andrew; Salamanca, Jennifer; Golaw, Cherie; Wolf, Daniel; Maas, Carly; Nicholson, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    Accelerated nursing programs are gaining momentum as a means of career transition into the nursing profession for mature age learners in an attempt to meet future healthcare workforce demands in Australia. With a gap in the literature on readiness for practice of graduates from accelerated nursing programs at the Masters level the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the program based on graduates' preparedness for practice and graduate outcomes. Using a descriptive, exploratory design an online survey was used to explore the perception of graduate nurses' readiness for clinical practice. Forty-nine graduates from a nursing Masters program at an Australian university completed the survey defining readiness for practice as knowledge of self-limitations and seeking help, autonomy in basic clinical procedures, exhibiting confidence, possessing theoretical knowledge and practicing safe care. Graduates perceived themselves as adequately prepared to work as a beginner practitioner with their perception of readiness for clinical practice largely positive. The majority of participants agreed that the program had prepared them for work as a beginner practitioner with respondents stating that they felt adequately prepared in most areas relating to clinical practice. This would suggest that educational preparation was adequate and effective in achieving program objectives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Registered nurses views of caring in coronary care--a deductive and inductive content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ewa K; Sjöström-Strand, Annica; Willman, Ania; Borglin, Gunilla

    2015-12-01

    To extend nurses' descriptions of how they understood caring, as reflected in the findings of an earlier study (i.e. the hierarchical outcome space) and to gain additional understandings and perspectives of nurses' views of caring in relation to a coronary care patient case. Scientific literature from the 1970s-1990s contains descriptions of caring in nursing. In contrast, the contemporary literature on this topic--particularly in the context of coronary care--is very sparse, and the few studies that do contain descriptions rarely do so from the perspective of nurses. Qualitative descriptive study. Twenty-one nurses were interviewed using the stimulated recall interview technique. The data were analysed using deductive and inductive qualitative content analysis. The results of the iterative and integrated content analysis showed that the data mainly reproduced the content of the hierarchical outcome space describing how nurses could understand caring; however, in the outcome space, the relationship broke up (i.e. flipped). The nurses' views of caring could now also be understood as: person-centredness 'lurking' in the shadows; limited 'potential' for safeguarding patients' best interests; counselling as virtually the 'only' nursing intervention; and caring preceded by the 'almighty' context. Their views offered alternative and, at times, contrasting perspectives of caring, thereby adding to our understanding of it. Caring was described as operating somewhere between the nurses caring values and the contextual conditions in which caring occurred. This challenged their ability to sustain caring in accordance with their values and the patients' preferences. To ensure that the essentials of caring are met at all times, nurses need to plan and deliver caring in a systematic way. The use of systematic structures in caring, as the nursing process, can help nurses to work in a person-centred way, while sustaining their professional values. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Prevalence of Sexual Harassment and its Associated Factors among Registered Nurses Working in Government Hospitals in Melaka State, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhaila, O; Rampal, K G

    2012-10-01

    This study focuses on sexual harassment, a form of psycological hazard that female registered nurses face throughout their day to day routine. The objective of this study is to find the prevalence of sexual harassment among female registered nurses working in government hospitals in Melaka, Malaysia and factors affecting them. This is a cross sectional study conducted on 455 female registered nurses who have worked more than one year in the present 3 government hospitals in Melaka, Malaysia. A validated and pre tested questionnaires were given for the respondents to answer. Before respondents answer the questionaires, they are required to read the definition and the forms of sexual harassment provided. This is to help them to understand the correct definition and forms of sexual harassment that they could have experienced. The researcher is available during the distribution of the questionnaires and the respondents are free to ask the researcher anything that they do not understand about it. The results of this study show that the prevalence of sexual harassment among these nurses was 51.2% with the past one year incidence recorded at 22.8%. The most common forms of sexual harassment were verbal (46.6% ), visual (24.8% ), psycological (20.9%), physical (20.7%) and non -verbal (16.7% ). The study showed that 74.7% of the victims suffered from psychological effects brought upon by their encounter with various types of sexual harrasement at work. The study also found that the victims' self-perception of their physicality was a contributing factor to the prevalance of this situation. Those who were pretty, with attractive body figure, a friendly character and easy going had a higher prevalence of sexual harassment in the workplace. Meanwhile, those who were strict, and those who had a fierce character were not prone to sexual harassment. The prevalence of sexual harassment among registered nurses in the workplace found in this study was high and self-perception profile

  15. Obesity as a Possible Risk Factor for Lost-time Injury in Registered Nurses: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Jordan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Time-loss injuries are still a major occurrence in Canada, injuring thousands of Canadian workers each year. With obesity rates on the rise across the country, as well as around the world, it is important that the possible effects of obesity in the workplace be fully understood, especially those effects linked to lost-time injuries. The aim of this paper was to evaluate predictors of workplace lost-time injuries and how they may be related to obesity or high body mass index by examining factors associated with lost-time injuries in the health care sector, a well-studied industry with the highest number of reported time loss injuries in Canada. A literature review focusing on lost-time injuries in Registered Nurses (RNs was conducted using the keywords and terms: lost time injury, workers' compensation, occupational injury, workplace injury, injury, injuries, work, workplace, occupational, nurse, registered nurse, RN, health care, predictors, risk factors, risk, risks, cause, causes, obese, obesity, and body mass index. Data on predictors or factors associated with lost-time injuries in RNs were gathered and organized using Loisel's Work Disability Prevention Management Model and extrapolated upon using existing literature surrounding obesity in the Canadian workplace.

  16. Perceptions of Writing Confidence, Critical Thinking, and Writing Competence among Registered Nurse-Learners Studying Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lorraine

    2008-01-01

    Historically, nursing education has recognized that writing enhances critical thinking, the basis of the clinical reasoning process. The online learning recently adopted by Nursing involves considerable writing, which may enhance critical thinking more than face-to-face courses. In the study reported here, the critical thinking and writing…

  17. The Relationship between Curriculum Change and Student Outcomes in a Registered Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Nursing schools face the challenge of improving student academic performance and completion rates. The current supply of newly graduated nurses fails to meet the increasing demands of society. In 2009, Cochise College responded by implementing a major change in their curriculum to improve student retention and academic performance. The problem…

  18. Perceptions of Writing Confidence, Critical Thinking, and Writing Competence among Registered Nurse-Learners Studying Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lorraine

    2008-01-01

    Historically, nursing education has recognized that writing enhances critical thinking, the basis of the clinical reasoning process. The online learning recently adopted by Nursing involves considerable writing, which may enhance critical thinking more than face-to-face courses. In the study reported here, the critical thinking and writing…

  19. Effects of marital status and shift work on family function among registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Shu-Yu; Lin, Pei-Chen; Chen, Yao-Mei; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Pan, Chih-Hong; Pan, Shung-Mei; Lee, Chung-Yin; Huang, Chia-Tsuan; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to assess the interactive effect of marital status and shift work on family function. A population-based sample of 1,438 nurses between the ages of 20-45 yr was recruited from Taiwan during the period from July 2005 to April 2006 using a mailed questionnaire. The self-administered questionnaire contained information about demographic data, work status, shift work schedule, and the Family APGAR (Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve) Scale, to evaluate family function. Compared to day shift nurses, non-night and rotation shift nurses had 1.53- and 1.38-fold (95% CI=1.09-2.14 and 1.01-1.88) risk to have poor family function after adjusting for other covariates. Married nurses, by contrast, had a 0.44-fold (95% CI=0.29-0.66) risk to have poor family function compared to single nurses. In addition, married nurses who worked non-night or rotation shifts had a significantly higher percent of poor family function than those married nurses working day shifts; however, similar results were not replicated in single nurses. We concluded that shift work and marital status could influence family function.

  20. Preparing emotionally intelligent doctor of nursing practice leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Michelle T; Rutledge, Carolyn; Shepherd, Laurel

    2012-08-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified the need for interdisciplinary teams that collaborate, communicate, and integrate care across settings to improve health care delivery. Focusing on innovative strategies that address leadership skills in graduate nursing education could have an effect on interdisciplinary partnerships, transformation of patient care, and new styles of leadership to change current practice models. In response to the IOM guidelines, we incorporated emotional intelligence as a component in our Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) leadership curriculum. This article describes a new action-oriented leadership model that prepares the DNP graduate for leadership roles to serve the public and the nursing discipline during a time of radical changes in health care. Behavioral profile, nontraditional readings, and online discussions form the basis of the model. The principles and strategies in this article can be applied to nursing education in multiple arenas, at both the undergraduate and graduate settings.

  1. Clinical nurses' perceptions and expectations of the role of doctorally-prepared nurses: a qualitative study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, Mohammad-Ali; Jasper, Melanie; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Nurses with doctorates are increasing in number throughout the world, yet the multitude of roles they play following graduation is unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe clinical nurses' perceptions and expectations of the role of doctorally-prepared nurses in Iran. A qualitative study, using a content analysis approach was conducted with 43 clinical nurses chosen using a purposive sampling strategy. Oral, semi-structured and written interviews were used to generate data. During data analysis, three main themes emerged; "advantages of the doctoral degree", "clarification of doctorally-prepared nurses' role in clinical practice", and "unmet expectations of doctorally-prepared nurses". An understanding of the expectations of nurses on the role of doctorally-prepared nurses is needed to improve the collaboration between clinical nurses and doctorally-prepared nurses; remove misunderstandings on the abilities and skills of doctorally-prepared nurses; incorporate the expectations into doctoral education in order to facilitate their collaboration; and also remove the theory and practice gap through the utilisation of doctorally-prepared nurses' knowledge and skills in practice.

  2. Compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, anxiety, depression and stress in registered nurses in Australia: phase 2 results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Vicki; Craigie, Mark; Francis, Karen; Aoun, Samar; Hegney, Desley G

    2014-05-01

    This is the first two-phase Australian study to explore the factors impacting upon compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, anxiety, depression and stress and to describe the strategies nurses use to build compassion satisfaction into their working lives. Compassion fatigue has been found to impact on job satisfaction, the quality of patient care and retention within nursing. This study provides new knowledge on the influences of anxiety, stress and depression and how they relate to compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue. In Phase 2 of the study, 10 nurses from Phase 1 of the study participated in individual interviews and a focus group. A semi-structured interview schedule guided the conversations with the participants. Data analysis resulted in seven main themes: social networks and support;infrastructure and support; environment and lifestyle; learning; leadership; stress; and suggestions to build psychological wellness in nurses. Findings suggest that a nurse’s capacity to cope is enhanced through strong social and collegial support, infrastructure that supports the provision of quality nursing care and positive affirmation. These concepts are strongly linked to personal resilience. for nursing management These findings support the need for management to develop appropriate interventions to build resilience in nurses.

  3. The characteristics of registered nurses whose licenses expire: why they leave nursing and implications for retention and re-entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Susan M; Palazzo, Lorella; Hart, L Gary; Keepnews, David

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about RNs who drop their licenses and their potential re-entry into the nursing workforce. The results of this study provide insight into reasons nurses leave their careers and the barriers to re-entry, all important indicators of the current professional climate for nursing. While representing only one state, these findings suggest that RNs who allow their licenses to expire do so because they have reached retirement age or, among those who do not cite age as a factor, because many are unable or unwilling to work in the field. Inactive nurses who might otherwise appear to be likely candidates for re-entry into the profession may not be easily encouraged to practice nursing again without significant changes in their personal circumstances or the health care work environment. Effective ways to address current and pending RN workforce shortages include expanding RN education capacity to produce more RNs who can contribute to the workforce across the coming decades, and promote work environments in which RNs want to, and are able to, practice across a long nursing career.

  4. Factors affecting effective communication between registered nurses and adult cancer patients in an inpatient setting: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Li Hui; Hegney, Desley; Ang, Emily

    2011-06-01

    To establish the best available evidence regarding the factors affecting effective communication between registered nurses and inpatient cancer adults. Electronic databases (CINAHL, Ovid, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus and Wiley InterScience) were searched using a three-step search strategy to identify the relevant quantitative and qualitative studies published in English. The grey literature was not included in the review. The identified studies were evaluated using the guidelines from the Joanna Briggs Institute System for the Unified Management, Assessment and Review of Information. A total of three studies were included in the quantitative component of the review, and the data were presented in a narrative summary. Five studies were included in the qualitative component of the review, and the findings were categorised in a meta-synthesis which generated four synthesised findings. The factors that were found to influence effective communication were identified in the characteristics of nurses, patients and the environment. The promoting factors in nurses included genuineness, competency and effective communication skills. The role of post-basic training in improving nurse-patient communication remained inconclusive. Conversely, nurses who were task-orientated, who feared death and who had low self-awareness of their own verbal behaviours inhibited communication. Nurses were also observed to communicate less effectively when delivering psychosocial aspects of care and in emotionally charged situations. On the other hand, patients who participated actively in their own care and exhibited information-seeking behaviour promoted communication with the nurses. However, patients' unwillingness to discuss their disease/feelings, their preference to seek emotional support from their family/friends and their use of implicit cues were some of the factors that were found to inhibit communication. A supportive ward environment increased facilitative behaviour in nurses

  5. School Nurse Intention to Pursue Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a…

  6. Teamwork in Acute Care: Perceptions of Essential but Unheard Assistive Personnel and the Counterpoint of Perceptions of Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellury, Lanell; Hodges, Helen; Camp, Amanda; Aduddell, Kathie

    2016-10-01

    Teams of unlicensed personnel and registered nurses have provided hospital-based nursing care for decades. Although ineffective teamwork has been associated with poor patient outcomes, little is known of the perspectives of nursing assistive personnel (NAP). The purpose of this study was to gain insights into the perceptions of NAP and professional registered nurses (RNs) on teamwork in acute care. In a qualitative descriptive approach in a metropolitan hospital in the southeastern United States, 33 NAP participated in audio-recorded focus group sessions, and 18 RNs provided responses to open-ended electronic survey questions. Findings were examined in relation to previously identified coordinating mechanisms of teamwork: shared mental models, closed-loop communication, and mutual trust. None of the mechanisms was strongly represented in these data. In contrast to RNs' mental models, NAP perceptions of teamwork included the centrality of holistic caring to the NAP role, functional teams as NAP-only teams, NAPs and RNs working in parallel spheres rather than together, and team coordination in silos. Closed-loop communication was less common than one-way requests. Mutual trust was desired, but RNs' delegation of tasks conveyed to NAP a lack of value and respect for the NAP role, while RNs perceived a professional obligation to delegate care to ensure quality of care amid changing patient priorities. Further empirical research into NAP practice is needed to enhance understanding of teamwork issues and direct effective interventions to improve work environments and ultimately patient outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Registered Nurses and Discharge Planning in a Taiwanese ED: A Neglected Issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen; Goopy, Suzanne; Lin, Chun-Chih; Barnard, Alan; Liu, Hsueh-Erh; Han, Chin-Yen

    2016-10-01

    Published research on discharge planning is written from the perspective of hospital wards and community services. Limited research focuses on discharge planning in the emergency department (ED). The objective of this study was to identify ED nurses' perceptions of factors influencing the implementation of discharge planning. This qualitative study collected data from 25 ED nurses through in-depth interviews and a drawing task in which participants were asked to depict on paper the implementation of discharge planning in their practice. Factors influencing discharge planning were grouped into three categories: discharge planning as a neglected issue in the ED, heavy workload, and the negative attitudes of ED patients and their families. The study highlighted a need for effective discharge planning to be counted as an essential clinical competency for ED nurses and factored into their everyday workload. Nurses perceived that organizational culture, and parents' and relatives' attitudes were barriers to implementing discharge teaching in the ED.

  8. Compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, anxiety, depression and stress in registered nurses in Australia: study 1 results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegney, Desley G; Craigie, Mark; Hemsworth, David; Osseiran-Moisson, Rebecca; Aoun, Samar; Francis, Karen; Drury, Vicki

    2014-05-01

    To explore compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction with the potential contributing factors of anxiety, depression and stress. To date, no studies have connected the quality of work-life with other contributing and co-existing factors such as depression, anxiety and stress. A self-report exploratory cross sectional survey of 132 nurses working in a tertiary hospital. The reflective assessment risk profile model provides an excellent framework for examining the relationships between the professional quality of work factors and contributing factors within the established risk profiles. The results show a definite pattern of risk progression for the six factors examined for each risk profile. Additionally, burnout and secondary traumatic stress were significantly related to higher anxiety and depression levels. Higher anxiety levels were correlated with nurses who were younger, worked full-time and without a postgraduate qualification. Twenty percent had elevated levels of compassion fatigue: 7.6% having a very distressed profile. At-risk nurses' stress and depression scores were significantly higher than nurses with higher compassion satisfaction scores. The employed nurse workforce would benefit from a psychosocial capacity building intervention that reduces a nurse's risk profile, thus enhancing retention. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A report on the development and implementation of a preceptorship training programme for registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June D. Jeggels

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical supervision represents an important aspect in the development of nursing students’ clinical skills. At the School of Nursing (SoN the clinical supervisors employed by the University of the Western Cape (UWC have limited contact sessions with students in the clinical setting. However, with the increase in student numbers a need was identified to strengthen the support given to nursing students in the service setting.Objective: A preceptorship training programme for nurses was developed in 2009, aimed at improving the clinical teaching expertise of professional nurses. The planning phase, based on a preceptorship model, represents a collaborative undertaking by the higher education institution and the nursing directorate of the Provincial Government Western Cape. Method: A two-week, eight credit, short course was approved by the university structures and presented by staff members of the school. The teaching and learning strategies included interactive lectures, small group activities and preceptor-student encounters in simulated and real service settings. Some of the course outcomes were: applying the principles of clinical teaching and learning within the context of adult education, understanding the preceptor role and managing Results: To date, fifty-four participants have attended the course. Following an internal review of the pilot programme in 2010, relevant adjustments to the programme were made. Conclusion: It is recommended that all the stakeholders be involved in the development and implementation of a contextually relevant preceptorship training programme. It is further recommended that the school embarks on an extensive programme evaluation.

  10. Correlating Emotional Intelligence and Job Performance Among Jordanian Hospitals' Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Zaid; Oweidat, Islam Ali; Al-Faouri, Ibrahim; Codier, Estelle

    2017-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is an ability to recognize our and others' emotions, and manage emotions in ourselves and in relationships with other people. A large body of research evidence outside nursing shows that measured (EI) abilities correlated with employee performance, motivation, and job satisfaction; and preliminary nursing research evidence shows the correlation between EI ability and nurses' clinical performance. There is less research on the EI ability of Jordanian nurses, and the present study was undertaken to address this gap. A descriptive, cross-sectional, correlation comparative design (nonexperimental) was employed. Six Jordanian hospitals were included in the study. Two hundred fifty questionnaires were distributed to prospective participants. One hundred ninety-four questionnaires were returned, giving a response rate of 78%. EI was measured using the Genos Instrument. Clinical performance was measured using a self-report measure. Findings demonstrated significant positive relationships between all subscales of EI and job performance, ranging from r = .250, p = .000 to r = .193, p = .007. Regression analysis indicated working in medical-surgical wards, recognizing and expressing emotions scores (β = 0.186, p = .048), and controlling emotions (β = 0.255, p = .027) explained 19.1% of variance in nurses' job performance. The study findings confirm the correlation between nurse EI ability and clinical performance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Ready for the World: preparing nursing students for tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Bonnie L; Lee, Jan L

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, a 5-year plan of international and intercultural education was developed by the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) to help students become ready for the changing world in which they will live. This program is called "Ready for the World." The University of Tennessee College of Nursing in Knoxville has integrated many of the suggestions from this program into the undergraduate nursing curriculum to prepare students for the world by making the world their classroom. Intercultural learning includes both a solid base of knowledge obtained in the classroom and multiple experiences that involve cultural interaction. Experiences begin on UTK's diverse campus and expand to the surrounding city of Knoxville, including interactions with vulnerable populations such as the homeless or elderly persons, then to nearby Appalachian communities, and on to Central America. Many of these experiences are offered for credit in the Community Health Nursing or the Transcultural Nursing courses. The knowledge nursing students acquire and their varied experiences will help them gain cultural competence for their future nursing practice.

  12. Work-Family Conflict Among Newly Licensed Registered Nurses: A Structural Equation Model of Antecedents and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruh, Lynn Y; Raffenaud, Amanda; Fottler, Myron

    2016-01-01

    Conflict between work and family is a human resource management issue that is particularly relevant for nurses. Nursing is a demanding profession, and a high proportion of nurses are women, who tend to have greater family responsibilities than men. Little is known regarding work-family conflict among nurses, and even less is known about how this affects newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs), who can be stressed from their new jobs and careers. This study empirically tests a model of antecedents and outcomes of work-family and family-work conflict among a sample of NLRNs. We developed a model of the relationships between personal and work environment characteristics, work-family and family-work conflicts, job satisfaction, and intent to leave the job and profession. We used structural equation modeling (Amos, IBM SPSS) to test the model with data from.a survey of NLRNs. We examined a number of latent variables, as well as direct and mediating relationships. The measurement models for all latent variables were validated. The final model indicated that age, health, and family responsibilities are antecedents of family-work conflict; job demands lead to work-family conflict; family-work conflict contributes to job difficulties, which lowers job satisfaction, which, in turn, increases the intent to leave the job and profession; and work-family conflict increases the intent to leave the job and profession (but does not directly affect job satisfaction). Policies to help NLRNs with family responsibilities could reduce family-work conflict, which might reduce job difficulties and improve satisfaction and retention. In addition, policies to reduce job demands could reduce work-family conflict and improve retention.

  13. Current Assessments of Quality and Safety Competencies in Registered Professional Nurses: An Examination of Nurse Leader Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elaine Lois

    2012-01-01

    Quality and safety in healthcare is a national concern. It has been proposed that nurses and other clinicians need to develop a new set of competencies in order to make significant improvements in the quality and safety of patient care. These new competencies include: patient-centered care; teamwork and collaboration; evidence-based practice;…

  14. A report on the development and implementation of a preceptorship training programme for registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June D. Jeggels

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical supervision represents an important aspect in the development of nursing students’ clinical skills. At the School of Nursing (SoN the clinical supervisors employed by the University of the Western Cape (UWC have limited contact sessions with students in the clinical setting. However, with the increase in student numbers a need was identified to strengthen the support given to nursing students in the service setting. Objective: A preceptorship training programme for nurses was developed in 2009, aimed at improving the clinical teaching expertise of professional nurses. The planning phase, based on a preceptorship model, represents a collaborative undertaking by the higher education institution and the nursing directorate of the Provincial Government Western Cape.Method: A two-week, eight credit, short course was approved by the university structures and presented by staff members of the school. The teaching and learning strategies included interactive lectures, small group activities and preceptor-student encounters in simulated and real service settings. Some of the course outcomes were: applying the principles of clinical teaching and learning within the context of adult education, understanding the preceptor role and managingResults: To date, fifty-four participants have attended the course. Following an internal review of the pilot programme in 2010, relevant adjustments to the programme were made.Conclusion: It is recommended that all the stakeholders be involved in the development and implementation of a contextually relevant preceptorship training programme. It is further recommended that the school embarks on an extensive programme evaluation. 

  15. Terms of the nursing language identified in registers of an UIT neonatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candice Cavalcanti de Alburquerque

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of the nursing records was always an essential part of the professional development; however, it is not still possible to describe the content of the practice, because the language used in the care didn't become sufficiently univocal. In that perspective it is noticed the relevance of the identification of a specific language used by the male nurses, for the registration of your activities. This study aimed to identify the terms used by the components of the nursing team, in the nursing records of the Unit of Intensive Therapy Neonatal (UITN of a hospital school; and to cross map the identified terms with the constants in the seven axes of CIPE® Version 1. In the collection of data it was used the retrospective method. After the extraction and normalization of terms, it was found 161 terms constants in the seven axes of CIPE® 1, and 603 not constants. Analyzing the 166 constants, observed 45 in the axis Focus, 8 in the axis Judgment, 23 in the axis Means, 39 in the axis Action, 12 in the axis Time, 30 in the axis Location, and 4 in the axis Client, which were analyzed to verify their relevance for UITN. According to the results, it can be concluded that the objectives of this research were reached and that the methodological paths were appropriate. This study is considered of great importance to the knowledge of the vocabulary used in UITN, contributing for the construction of a specific nomenclature for this unit.

  16. The Influence of Organizational Culture on Affinity for Knowledge Management Practices of Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the problems of hospitals' duplicated effort and ad hoc knowledge management (KM) practices. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the focus and type of organizational culture in order to describe and predict the relationship between organizational culture and the affinity for KM of nurses working in health…

  17. Seven Years On: Distance Learning Courses for First Level Registered Nurses and Midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogerson, Elizabeth C. B.; Harden, Ronald M.

    1999-01-01

    At the University of Dundee (Scotland), distance learning is used to provide inservice opportunities for nurses and midwives. The modular courses feature problem-based and work-based learning, text-based study guides, and strategies to provide continuous learner support. (SK)

  18. Reinforcing Communication Skills While Registered Nurses Simultaneously Learn Course Content: A Response to Learning Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Barbara B.

    1994-01-01

    Fifteen nursing students participated in Integrated Skills Reinforcement, an approach that reinforces writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills while students learn course content. Pre-/postassessment of writing showed that 93% achieved writing improvement. All students agreed that the approach improved understanding of course content, a…

  19. [National survey on the application of the reform of the state-registered nurse diploma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monguillon, Dominique

    2013-05-01

    Following its first national enquiry, the French Directorate General for Health (DGOS) presents here its findings on the reform of the nurse training which focuses on four main areas: partnership with universities, pedagogical content and methods, work placement resources, attribution of European credits.

  20. Educational Experiences and the Professional Reintegration of Registered Nurses Returning for Baccalaureate Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einhellig, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological research study was to understand the experiences of RN to BSN graduates within their educational experience and their subsequent reintegration into professional practice. The goal of the study was to elucidate the experiences of nurses as they returned for a baccalaureate degree in order to more fully…

  1. Beyond the classroom to coaching: preparing new nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCampli, Pamela; Kirby, Karen K; Baldwin, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Few would question that frontline nurse managers are critical to the success of any organization. They are the key interface with patients, nursing staff, medical staff, other clinical and ancillary staff, and administration. This makes the role one of the most difficult and one of the most important in any healthcare setting. Despite the importance of the role, many new managers receive little, if any, formal preparation. While hospitals are starting to send nurse managers to formal educational programs, the new manager receives little benefit if they do not have help putting it into practice. Even when there is a preceptor, chances are that new managers are still not getting what they need. Preceptors have multiple demands on their time and little, if any, formal preceptor training. One hospital that has successfully tackled this issue is Bryn Mawr Hospital, a Main Line Health System Magnet-designated hospital in suburban Philadelphia. Bryn Mawr Hospital engaged an experienced nurse executive to coach new nurse managers for 4 months on site. While participants agree face-to-face coaching is the most important component of this program, they also say having a seasoned coach gives them the confidence to ask questions they would not have felt comfortable exploring otherwise.

  2. The lived experiences of acute-care bedside registered nurses caring for patients and their families with limited English proficiency: A silent shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jami-Sue; Angosta, Alona D

    2017-03-01

    To explore the lived experiences of acute-care bedside nurses caring for patients and their families with limited English proficiency. Approximately 8.6% of the total US population is considered limited English proficient. In the hospital setting, registered nurses provide the most direct contact with patients and their families. Effective communication between patients and healthcare professionals is essential when providing quality health care. There are only few published studies about registered nurses' experiences caring for patients with language barriers, but studies among nurses' experiences on patients with limited English proficiency and their families in an acute-care setting have not been explored. A qualitative exploratory study was performed. The phenomenology research approach provides the most meaningful ways to describe and understand the entirety of the bedside nurses' experiences. A convenience, purposive sample of 40 registered nurses who work in bedside care in a 380-bed hospital in the western USA were interviewed. Each nurse had a minimum of three years of acute-care experience. The sample size was determined by data saturation. Four themes emerged from the data of this research including: Desire to Communicate; Desire to Connect; Desire to Provide Care; and Desire to Provide Cultural Respect and Understanding. Care of patients with limited English proficiency is a challenge to many nurses and other healthcare providers. This study reinforces the need to give acute-care nurses a voice to share their experiences and ideas for solutions to the challenges they face in the care they provide. Findings from this study have the potential to identify clinically relevant concerns, barriers to communication, resources for effective communication, and needs or concerns of the bedside nurses when providing care. A look at the process and organisational system may suggest opportunities for improvement in support of the nurses' expressed desires to provide

  3. The relationship of burnout, use of coping strategies and curricular program of registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceslowitz, S B

    1990-03-01

    This study examined the relationships of nursing curricular program, burnout, and use of coping strategies among 150 randomly selected staff nurses from four hospitals. The instruments used were the frequency dimension of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (Maslach & Jackson, 1981) and the Ways of Coping (Revised) (Folkman & Lazarus, 1985). Discriminant analysis demonstrated that (a) diploma graduates differed from associate-degree graduates in their greater experience of Emotional Exhaustion (p less than .05) and (b) baccalaureate-degree graduates differed from associate-degree graduates in their greater use of Planful Problem Solving and Confronting Coping (p less than .05). Recommendations include additional research to discover relevant factors for the greater experience of Emotional Exhaustion among diploma graduates. If related to perceptions of limited career mobility due to the lack of a baccalaureate degree, expansion of educational opportunities is indicated. Another recommendation is curricular incorporation of content on burnout and coping.

  4. Integrative review of clinical decision support for registered nurses in acute care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn Lopez, Karen; Gephart, Sheila M; Raszewski, Rebecca; Sousa, Vanessa; Shehorn, Lauren E; Abraham, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    To report on the state of the science of clinical decision support (CDS) for hospital bedside nurses. We performed an integrative review of qualitative and quantitative peer-reviewed original research studies using a structured search of PubMed, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Applied Health Literature (CINAHL), Scopus, Web of Science, and IEEE Xplore (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Xplore Digital Library). We included articles that reported on CDS targeting bedside nurses and excluded in stages based on rules for titles, abstracts, and full articles. We extracted research design and methods, CDS purpose, electronic health record integration, usability, and process and patient outcomes. Our search yielded 3157 articles. After removing duplicates and applying exclusion rules, 28 articles met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies were single-site, descriptive or qualitative (43%) or quasi-experimental (36%). There was only 1 randomized controlled trial. The purpose of most CDS was to support diagnostic decision-making (36%), guideline adherence (32%), medication management (29%), and situational awareness (25%). All the studies that included process outcomes (7) and usability outcomes (4) and also had analytic procedures to detect changes in outcomes demonstrated statistically significant improvements. Three of 4 studies that included patient outcomes and also had analytic procedures to detect change showed statistically significant improvements. No negative effects of CDS were found on process, usability, or patient outcomes. Clinical support systems targeting bedside nurses have positive effects on outcomes and hold promise for improving care quality; however, this research is lagging behind studies of CDS targeting medical decision-making in both volume and level of evidence.

  5. Registered nurses' perspectives on health care and the 2008 presidential election.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerhaus, Peter I; Ulrich, Beth; Donelan, Karen; DesRoches, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    As this historic presidential election draws near, what do RNs think of our nation's priorities? Which candidates do they think will be most effective in shaping our health care system and addressing the most pressing issues of our time? The results of this survey show that RNs do not identify overwhelmingly with one political ideology or party and, in fact, they closely resemble the public on these political dimensions. The data also show that RNs identify health care issues as the most important problem facing the nation. RNs who believe that it is the responsibility of the government to provide health insurance to those without it, have more confidence in the government to achieve this outcome, and are more likely to be Democrats than Republicans. The presidential election is expected to be highly contested and could be determined by a relatively small margin of votes and, thus, nurses should recognize their chances of influencing the outcome of the election. The data from this survey provide baseline information potentially useful to increasing the political influence of the nursing profession, informing other organizations about where they might align with nurses, and helping candidates and the political parties compete more effectively in seeking the support of roughly 3 million RN voters.

  6. Use and development of clinical pathways by registered nurses in an acute paediatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Pamela; Boldy, Duncan; Robertson, Jeanette

    2005-10-01

    Clinical pathways are widely regarded as providing valuable knowledge about specific types of patients and their care, as well as providing direct guidance in clinical practice. In Australia, the use of care pathways has occurred with seemingly minimal professional nursing debate as to their benefits in practice. Comments supporting the introduction of pathways into clinical practice have focused on assistance to decision making, facilitation of clinical judgements about care, assistance in improving practice and utility as educational tools, particularly for new staff, new graduates and casual employees. A survey of 259 nurses working in an acute paediatric setting sought to gain their views about pathways of care with regard to satisfaction with use, content of pathway, ability to use in practice, effect on practice and commitment to use. While the most positive findings to emerge from the research indicated that nurses liked clinical pathways because they saved time and reduced documentation requirements, issues were also raised about the need for a broader, more inclusive development process for pathways, and an improved education program for staff use. The implications to arise from these findings are important for senior staff and educators who are responsible for staff orientation programs and ongoing staff development as well as for those responsible for the development and implementation of clinical pathways into practice.

  7. Years worked at night and body mass index among registered nurses from eighteen public hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griep, Rosane Härter; Bastos, Leonardo S; Fonseca, Maria de Jesus Mendes da; Silva-Costa, Aline; Portela, Luciana Fernandes; Toivanen, Susanna; Rotenberg, Lucia

    2014-11-29

    Employees working night shifts are at a greater risk of being overweight or obese. Few studies on obesity and weight gain analyze the years of exposure to night work. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the years of exposure to night work and body mass index (BMI) among registered nurses. A cross-sectional analysis was performed in 18 largest public hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A total of 2,372 registered nurses (2,100 women) completed a comprehensive questionnaire concerning sociodemographic, professional, lifestyle, and health behavioral data. Current and past exposures to night shifts as well as BMI values were measured as continuous variables. A gamma regression model was used with an identity link function to establish the association. The association between years of exposure to night work and BMI was statistically significant for both women and men after adjusting for all covariates [β = 0.036; CI95% = 0.009-0.063) and β = 0.071 (CI95% = 0.012-0.129), respectively]. The effect of night work was greater among men than women. For example, for those women who have worked at night for 20 years the estimated average BMI was 25.6 kg/m2 [range, 25.0-26.2]. In relation to men, after 20 years of exposure to night work the estimated average BMI was 26.9 kg/m2 [range, 25.6-28.1]. These findings suggest that night shift exposure is related to BMI increases. Obesity prevention strategies should incorporate improvements in work environments, such as the provision of proper meals to night workers, in addition to educational programs on the health effects of night work.

  8. Neutral to positive views on the consequences of nurse prescribing: results of a national survey among registered nurses, nurse specialists and physicians.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Dijk, L. van; Groenewegen, P.P.; Rond, M. de; Veer, A.J.E. de; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over the last two decades, the number of countries where nurses are legally permitted to prescribe medication has grown considerably. A lack of peer support and/or objections by physicians can act as factors hampering nurse prescribing. Earlier research suggests that physicians are gener

  9. Neutral to positive views on the consequences of nurse prescribing: results of a national survey among registered nurses, nurse specialists and physicians.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Dijk, L. van; Groenewegen, P.P.; Rond, M. de; Veer, A.J.E. de; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over the last two decades, the number of countries where nurses are legally permitted to prescribe medication has grown considerably. A lack of peer support and/or objections by physicians can act as factors hampering nurse prescribing. Earlier research suggests that physicians are gener

  10. Program Exit Examinations in Nursing Education: Using a Value Added Assessment as a Measure of the Impact of a New Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Tama; Hancock, Dawson

    2008-01-01

    To become a registered nurse in the United States, one must pass the National Council License Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). To address the growing national nursing shortage, nurse preparation programs must better prepare students to pass this national licensure examination. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a new…

  11. Strengths and weaknesses of Problem Based Learning from the professional perspective of registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cónsul-Giribet

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify competency strengths and weaknesses as perceived by nursing professionals who graduated with a integrated curriculum and competency-based through Problem Based Learning in small groups.METHOD: an intrinsic case study method was used, which analyzes this innovation through former students (from the first class with three years of professional experience. The data were collected through a questionnaire and discussion groups.RESULTS: the results show that their competency level is valued in a very satisfactory manner. This level paradoxically contrasts with the lack of theoretical knowledge they perceived at the end of their education, when they started working in clinical practice.CONCLUSIONS: the teaching strategy was key to motivate an in-depth study and arouse the desire to know. In addition, Problem Based Learning favors and reinforces the decision to learn, which is that necessary in the course of professional life.

  12. Non-verbal communication between Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability and people with an intellectual disability: an exploratory study of the nurse's experiences. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anne-Marie; Connor-Fenelon, Maureen O'; Lyons, Rosemary

    2012-03-01

    This is the first of two articles presenting the findings of a qualitative study which explored the experiences of Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability (RNIDs) of communicating with people with an intellectual disability who communicate non-verbally. The article reports and critically discusses the findings in the context of the policy and service delivery discourses of person-centredness, inclusion, choice and independence. Arguably, RNIDs are the profession who most frequently encounter people with an intellectual disability and communication impairment. The results suggest that the communication studied is both complicated and multifaceted. An overarching category of 'familiarity/knowing the person' encompasses discrete but related themes and subthemes that explain the process: the RNID knowing the service-user; the RNID/service-user relationship; and the value of experience. People with an intellectual disability, their families and disability services are facing a time of great change, and RNIDs will have a crucial role in supporting this transition.

  13. Non-verbal communication between Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability and people with an intellectual disability: an exploratory study of the nurse's experiences. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anne-Marie; Connor-Fenelon, Maureen O'; Lyons, Rosemary

    2012-06-01

    This is the second of two articles presenting the findings of a qualitative study which explored the experiences of Registered Nurses Intellectual Disability (RNIDs) of communicating with people with an intellectual disability who communicate non-verbally. While Part 1 outlined the study background, context and methodology along with the overarching, multi-dimensional category of 'familiarity/knowing the person', the current article critically discusses the themes and subthemes encapsulated in this category. Each theme is considered in the light of current policies, strategies and philosophies shaping the provision of services to people with an intellectual disability in Ireland. The results suggest that the RNID is ideally located and key to supporting the implementation of these policies and strategies due to their highly developed and proficient skill set as well as experience of communicating with people with an intellectual disability who communicate non-verbally.

  14. Perspectives of Australian nursing directors regarding educational preparation for mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

    2014-11-01

    There is an ongoing global shortage of mental health nurses. Within Australia, the principal strategy of offering a postgraduate education programme with various incentives to encourage nurses back to study has not been successful. This has led to the consideration of radical alternatives, including the return to pre-registration specialisation in mental health. The successful introduction of this strategy would require the full support of industry partners. To date, the voice of industry has not been heard in relation to this issue. The aim of this paper is to present the views of an Australian sample of mental health nursing directors regarding the resources and other factors required, should undergraduate specialist programmes in mental health be developed, to ensure they are relevant and likely to be successful. A qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken to explore the perspectives and opinions of industry partners. In-depth interviews were conducted with nursing directors (n = 12) in Queensland Australia. Five main themes were identified: relationships with universities; clinical placement preparation and support; workplace culture; facilitators and preceptors; and practical student learning. Genuine collaboration between the two organisations was considered crucial for delivering a quality programme and providing the required support for students. Transformative leadership could inform this collaboration by promoting acknowledgement of and respect for differences.

  15. Perceptions of registered nurses regarding factors influencing service delivery in expanding programmes in a primary healthcare setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnoi. A. Xaba

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore and describe the perceptions of registered nurses regarding factors influencing service delivery regarding expansion programmes in a primary healthcare setting, using a qualitative approach. The registered nurses, who have been working in the clinics for more than two years and have been exposed to the expansion programmes there, were purposively sampled. Two focus group interviews were conducted in a neutral place and the data collected by the researcher Nnoi A. Xaba (N.A.X.. Data were analysed by the researcher and an independent co-coder using the Tesch method. Categories, subcategories and themes were identified; those that formed the basis of discussion were disabling factors, enabling factors, client-related factors, service-related factors and solutions to problems. It is recommended that integration of programmes and coordination be done at a provincial level and planned together with the training centres in order to alleviate problems in service delivery. Training on expansion programmes in the form of in-service education should be carried out continually in the region.Die doel van die studie was om die persepsie van geregistreerde verpleegkundiges met betrekking tot die faktore wat dienslewering van die uitbreidingsprogramme in ‘n primêre gesondheid opset beinvloed; te eksploreer en te beskryf. ‘n Kwalitatiewe benadering is gevolg in die iutvoering van die studie. ‘n Doelgerigte steekproef is uitgevoer vanuit geregistreerde verpleegkundiges wat vir langer as twee jaar in die klinieke werksaam was en blootgestel is aan die uitbreiding programme. Twee fokus groep onderhoude is deur die navorser Nnoi A. Xaba (N.A.X. in ‘n neutrale opset uitgevoer. Data is deur die navorser en ʼn onafhanklike kodeerder ontleed volgens Tesch se metode van analise. Kategorieë, sub-kategorieë en temas was geidentifiseer. Die kategorieë fundamenteel tot die bespreking behels: remmende faktore, bydraende faktore

  16. Systematic review and meta-analysis of educational interventions designed to improve medication administration skills and safety of registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härkänen, Marja; Voutilainen, Ari; Turunen, Elina; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the nature, quality and effectiveness of educational interventions designed to increase the medication administration skills and safety of registered nurses working in hospitals. A systematic review with meta-analysis. Intervention studies designed to increase the medication administration skills and safety of nurses, indexed in one or more databases (CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane, PsycInfo, or Medic), and published in peer-reviewed journals between January 2000 and April 2015. The nature of the interventions was evaluated by narrative analysis, the quality of studies was assessed using the Effective Public Health Practise Project Quality Assessment Tool and the effectiveness of the interventions was ascertained by calculating effect sizes and conducting a meta-analysis. A total of 755 studies were identified and 14 intervention studies were reviewed. Interventions differed by their nature, including traditional classroom training, simulation, e-learning, slide show presentations, interactive CD-ROM programme, and the use of posters and pamphlets. All interventions appeared to improve medication administration safety and skills based on original p-values. Only five studies reached strong (n=1) or moderate (n=4) quality ratings and one of them had to be omitted from the meta-analysis due unclear measures of dispersion. The meta-analysis favoured the interventions, the pooled effect size (Hedges' g) was large, 1.06. The most effective interventions were a blended learning programme including e-learning and a 60-min PowerPoint presentation. The least effective educational intervention, an interactive internet-based e-learning course, was reported in the study that achieved the only strong quality rating. It is challenging to recommend any specific intervention, because all educational interventions seem to have a positive effect, although the size of the effect greatly varies. In the future, studies sharing similar contents and

  17. 76 FR 59329 - User Fees Relating to the Registered Tax Return Preparer Competency Examination and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... retirement plan agent, or enrolled actuary who signs the tax return or claim for refund prepared by the..., certified public accountants, enrolled agents, enrolled retirement plan agents, and enrolled actuaries...

  18. A case study exploring the current issues faced by diploma-prepared nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droskinis, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic and rapidly progressing field. As the profession changes over time, it is vital to study how these transformations influence the workforce. In this study, the aim was to explore how diploma-prepared nurses are functioning in the acute care setting and how modifications in educational requirements and technological advancement have affected their nursing practice.

  19. Demographic and occupational predictors of stress and fatigue in French intensive-care registered nurses and nurses' aides: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gabrielle; Hocine, Mounia; Salomon, Jérôme; Dab, William; Temime, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) working in intensive-care units (ICUs) are exposed to high physical and mental demands potentially affecting their health or having repercussions on patient care. Although several studies have explored the links between some aspects of working conditions in hospitals and HCW health, the complex dynamics at play are not fully understood. This study aimed to explore the impact of a wide array of demographic, employment and organizational factors related to fatigue and stress of French ICU HCWs. A cross-sectional study was conducted in ICUs of Paris-area hospitals between January 18, 2013 and April 2, 2013. All types of adult ICUs were included (medical, surgical and polyvalent). Included in the study were HCWs with patient contact (doctors, residents, registered nurses, nurse's aides and physical therapists). Participation was proposed to all eligible HCWs present during on-site visits. Temporary staff not typically assigned to the given ICU was excluded. Data were collected using an individual questionnaire administered in interviews during day and night shifts (N=682). Stress and fatigue outcomes included the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS10), the Nottingham Health Profile sleep and energy level rubrics and the current fatigue state at the interview. Multivariate analysis was restricted to nurse and nurse's aide data (n=536). Doctors and residents reported fewer sleep difficulties but were more likely to report a tired current state. Female gender was associated with higher stress levels and greater fatigue for all outcomes, while greater social support of supervisor or colleagues decreased stress and fatigue. At the organizational level, longer shifts (12 h vs. 8 h) were associated with tired current state and greater sleep difficulties. Personnel on rotating shifts had lower stress and a better current state, while those on night shifts had greater sleep and energy level difficulties. Even when controlling for demographic factors

  20. Components of US Associate Degree Nursing Programs and Their Relationship to the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Graduate Pass Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Caroline A.

    2011-01-01

    The nursing shortage has accelerated the need for nursing programs to discover program components related to success on the NCLEX-RN. As the demand for nurses is growing, nursing programs have been called upon to help find solutions to the problem. This study attempted to contribute to the resolution of the shortage and provide nursing educators…

  1. Meeting the needs of children with medical complexity using a telehealth advanced practice registered nurse care coordination model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Rhonda G; Erickson, Mary; Lunos, Scott; Finkelstein, Stanley M; Looman, Wendy; Celebreeze, Margaret; Garwick, Ann

    2015-07-01

    Effective care coordination is a key quality and safety strategy for populations with chronic conditions, including children with medical complexity (CMC). However, gaps remain in parent report of the need for care coordination help and receipt of care coordination help. New models must close this gap while maintaining family-centered focus. A three-armed randomized controlled trial conducted in an established medical home utilized an advanced practice registered nurse intervention based on Presler's model of clinic-based care coordination. The model supported families of CMC across settings using telephone only or telephone and video telehealth care coordination. Effectiveness was evaluated from many perspectives and this paper reports on a subset of outcomes that includes family-centered care (FCC), need for care coordination help and adequacy of care coordination help received. FCC at baseline and end of study showed no significant difference between groups. Median FCC scores of 18.0-20.0 across all groups indicated high FCC within the medical home. No significant differences were found in the need for care coordination help within or between groups and over time. No significant difference was found in the adequacy of help received between groups at baseline. However, this indicator increased significantly over time for both intervention groups. These findings suggest that in an established medical home with high levels of FCC, families of CMC have unmet needs for care coordination help that are addressed by the APRN telehealth care coordination model.

  2. Does Moral Distress Differ Between California Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists in Independent Versus Medically Supervised Practice: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumouchel, Michael; Boytim, Michael; Gorman, Nicholas; Weismuller, Penny

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive study was to determine if moral distress levels differed between certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs) working in medically supervised versus independent practice in California. A 63-question survey was administered to 1,190 California CRNAs. Moral distress was measured by the included Ethics Stress Scale. The response rate was 14.7%, yielding demographic and Ethics Stress scores for 175 respondents. Sixty-five participants answered an open-ended question about moral distress yielding qualitative data. Medically supervised CRNAs had a lower mean moral distress scores (176.8) versus independent practice CRNAs (187.8) (p = .002). Lower scores on the ESS indicate higher moral distress. Qualitative data demonstrated that CRNAs experienced moral distress in the following situations: when pressured to give anesthesia to unoptimized patients, when differences of opinion regarding anesthetic plans occurred, in dealing with end-of-life issues, when working with incompetent providers, and during interprofessional struggles between CRNAs and anesthesiologists. In order to reduce moral distress among CRNAs, implications for practice include increased administrative support, increased communication and reciprocated collegial respect between anesthesiologists and CRNAs, and CRNA representation on ethics committees.

  3. Management of coronary risk factors by registered nurses versus usual care in patients with unstable angina pectoris (a chest pain evaluation in the emergency room [CHEER] substudy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, T G; Farkouh, M E; Smars, P A; Evans, R W; Squires, R W; Gabriel, S E; Kopecky, S L; Gibbons, R J; Reeder, G S

    2000-07-15

    This study examined whether nurses could manage coronary risk factors in patients with unstable angina more effectively than physicians practicing usual care. Three hundred twenty-six patients were randomized in the emergency room to a 6-month program of risk factor management by a registered nurse versus participation in usual care. The nurse intervention consisted of a 30-minute counseling visit at 6 to 10 days after the chest pain episode and a second 30-minute session 1 month later. Multiple risk factors were assessed and addressed: smoking, blood lipids, blood pressure, blood glucose, physical inactivity, weight, psychological stress, and social isolation. Compared with usual care, nurse intervention patients significantly reduced both triglycerides (-29 +/- 8 vs 5 +/- 6 mg/dl; p chest pain is feasible and more effective than usual care in terms of fostering lifestyle changes that may lower coronary risk.

  4. Registered nurses' thoughts on blended learning in a postgraduate course in cancer care--content analyses of web surveys and a focus group interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arving, Cecilia; Wadensten, Barbro; Johansson, Birgitta

    2014-06-01

    Purpose of the research was to describe registered nurses' (RNs) (n = 53) thoughts on the blended learning format in a 'specialist nursing programme in cancer care'. The study was conducted in autumn 2007 and 2008. A content analysis of answers to open-ended questions in a web-based questionnaire and a focus group interview were carried out. The analysis revealed that the RNs appreciated blended learning. The web lectures facilitated learning and gave RNs access to the education at any time. However, according to the RNs, knowledge is gained through interaction between RNs and teachers, and this aspect needed to be improved. The RNs also thought that the content of the seminars on campus should focus on evidence-based nursing knowledge and practical skills, not just taught as stable facts and procedures. The result from the present study could help to improve the design and content of advanced nursing courses using a blended learning format.

  5. Valoración enfermera geriátrica: Un modelo de registro en residencias de ancianos Geriatric nurse assessment: A model of register in nursing home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Manuel Vallejo Sánchez

    2007-06-01

    detect the needs of the elder, to consider the risk of geriatric syndromes appearance and to plan the suitable care. Methods: Creation of workgroup, establishment of aims by consensus, bibliographical review, development of elaboration's criteria, coordination with the rest of the staff and validation of the document. Results: We obtain a nurse assessment register for elder institutionalized in nursing home care, of 8 pages, with opened and closed items, based on the model of Virginia Henderson's 14 needs and supported by nine scales of valuation, with its own cumplimentation guide. Conclusions: The time used in the geriatric nurse assessment is a necessary investment to assure a suitable and adequate assistance. It represents a useful tool for the nurses and the rest of the staff, as it allows to individualize the care, to quantify the disabilities and to provide the most adapted level of assistance to every single resident.

  6. Preservice Interdisciplinary Preparation of Early Intervention Specialists in a College of Nursing: Faculty Reflections and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Athleen B.

    1995-01-01

    This article relates experiences and insights gained by a nurse educator directing the University of Utah College of Nursing's Utah Early Intervention Personnel Preparation project, a graduate-level interdisciplinary program to prepare early intervention specialists. Recommendations are offered for development of preservice or inservice…

  7. Taking action: An exploration of the actions of exemplary oncology nurses when there is a sense of hopelessness and futility perceived by registered nurses at diagnosis, during treatment, and in palliative situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Katherine J; Perry, Beth

    2015-01-01

    "There is nothing more that can be done" is a phrase that may occasionally cross the minds of oncology nurses. This paper reports on the actions of exemplary oncology nurses who were faced with such situations where their colleagues gave up or turned away. The research question, "What actions do exemplary clinical oncology nurses (RNs) undertake in patient-care situations where further nursing interventions seem futile?" prefaced data collection via a secure website where 14 Canadian clinical oncology registered nurses (RNs) provided narratives documenting their actions. Thematic analysis utilized QRS NVivo 10 software and hand coding. Four themes were generated from data analysis: advocacy, not giving up, genuine presence, and moral courage. Implications for practice and future research are provided.

  8. Predictors for Success on the NCLEX-RN for Associate Degree Nursing Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Katrina C.

    2012-01-01

    The nursing shortage is a national issue that has ignited an increasing demand to address the importance of preparing students to be successful on the initial National Council of Licensure Examination for Registered Nursing (NCLEX-RN). Nursing programs are charged by the Board of Nursing to prepare graduates to be successful on the initial…

  9. Life values as predictors of pain, disability and sick leave among Swedish registered nurses: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denison Eva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prospective studies on high-risk populations, such as subgroups of health care staff, are limited, especially prospective studies among staff not on sick-leave. This paper is a report of a longitudinal study conducted to describe and compare the importance and consistency of life domains among registered nurses (RNs working in a Swedish hospital and evaluate a model based on the consistency of valued life domains for prediction of pain, disability and sick leave. Method Importance and consistency ratings of life values, in 9 domains, were collected during 2003 and 2006 from 196 RNs using the Valued Living Questionnaire (VLQ. Logistic regression analyses were used for prediction of pain, disability and sick leave at the three-year follow-up. The predictors family relations, marriage couples/intimate relations, parenting, friends/social life, work, education, leisure time, psychological well-being, and physical self-care were used at baseline. Results RNs rated life values regarding parenting as most important and with the highest consistency both at baseline and at follow-up. No significant differences were found between RNs' ratings of importance and consistency over the three-year period, except for friends/social relations that revealed a significant decrease in importance at follow-up. The explanatory models for pain, disability and sick leave significantly predicted pain and disability at follow-up. The odds of having pain were significantly increased by one consistency rating (psychological well-being, while the odds were significantly decreased by physical self-care. In the model predicting disability, consistency in psychological well-being and education significantly increased the odds of being disabled, while consistency in physical self-care significantly decreased the odds. Conclusion The results suggest that there might be a link between intra-individual factors reflecting different aspects of appraised life

  10. A collaboration of student nurse coaches and students with mental illnesses in a college preparation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Nancye L

    2010-01-01

    With refined diagnostic tools, earlier recognition, new pharmacological and other treatment modalities, individuals living with mental illnesses are able to experience considerable recovery. Some individuals require support and guidance to build confidence and to manage in everyday situations. Previous to their illness, many had been functioning and able to meet their needs in most aspects of their lives, including academics, but, following illness, lacked confidence or skill to continue their education. This pilot program was designed to socialize students with a mental illness to life at college. To develop the pilot concept, college departments including nursing faculty and community mental health personnel collaborated together. Potential students attended informational sessions where those interested, applied for entry into the pilot. Each student was paired with a coach, a third year nursing student, with whom they established and evaluated goals geared towards registering independently in a college course the following semester. Evaluation of the program was measured in terms of attendance, registration in a college course for the following semester or job readiness, and focus group evaluation sessions. By the end of the semester, 12 of the 13 students completed the program. With support and guidance of their coaches, students gained confidence, developed a social support network and learned skills needed to be able to navigate the college system. This type of college preparation program is effective in assisting students with mental illness to access college courses and it is recommended that there be further similar programs offered as an orientation at the college level for students with mental illness in preparation for their registration and attendance at college. To minimize cost factors and gain administrative support, practitioners wishing to replicate this study would do well to consider sources of funding, as well as resource personal or volunteers

  11. Exploring early and future use of DNP prepared nurses within healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Catherine; O'Connor, Nancy; Dunn, Deborah

    2014-02-01

    A strategy to gather data on DNP utilization and impact was designed using Donabedian's conceptual model and was piloted by surveying chief nursing officers (CNOs) leading Michigan's public and teaching hospital systems. Few of the responding CNOs reported currently employing DNP-prepared nurses. The majority reported gaps in knowledge related to role expectations and projected outcomes from a DNP-prepared nurse. Nurse leaders should become familiar with the role competencies of the DNP in order to maximize the potential contribution of this new level of care provider to improving care quality and access.

  12. College of the Canyons Nursing Alumni Surveys, Spring 2001. Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuschke, Daylene M; Dixon, P. Scott; Gribbons, Barry C.

    In the summer of 2001, College of the Canyons (California) conducted of study of registered nursing (RN) and licensed vocational nursing (LVN) alumni, as well as their employers, to assess satisfaction with the preparation and training they received through the College's nursing programs. Out of the 89 invited nursing alumni, 33 surveys were…

  13. Recent RN graduate perceptions of educational preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Lori; Bowles, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    Nursing education programs strive to deliver curricula that prepare and transition graduates not just to survive but to truly thrive in any workplace environment. It is therefore important to reach out to those who have recently entered the nursing workforce to understand their views on educational preparation for practice. The purpose of this descriptive survey was to examine the perceptions of recent nurse graduates with regard to how well their educational programs prepared them for practice in their first jobs as registered nurses. Three hundred fifty-two nurses registered in the state of Nevada who graduated from a basic nursing program within the past five years completed the Survey of Nurses' Perceptions of Educational Preparation. Respondents perceived they were inadequately prepared in pharmacology, clinical practice, leadership/management, and the use of patient electronic medical records. In addition, respondents felt their programs prepared them more for success on the NCLEX-RN than for practice. Recommendations for addressing these issues are offered.

  14. Development and validation of the work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support scales among registered nurses with multiple roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijuan; Song, Rhayun

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support scales, and to validate the psychometrics of those scales among registered nurses with multiple roles. The concepts, generation of items, and the scale domains of work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support scales were constructed based on a review of the literature. The validity and reliability of the scales were examined by administering them to 201 registered nurses who were recruited from 8 university hospitals in South Korea. The content validity was examined by nursing experts using a content validity index. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were used to establish the construct validity. The correlation with depression was examined to assess concurrent validity. Finally, internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach's alpha coefficients. The work-family-school role conflicts scale comprised ten items with three factors: work-school-to-family conflict (three items), family-school-to-work conflict (three items), and work-family-to-school conflict (four items). The role-related social support scale comprised nine items with three factors: support from family (three items), support from work (three items), and support from school (three items). Cronbach's alphas were 0.83 and 0.76 for the work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support scales, respectively. Both instruments exhibited acceptable construct and concurrent validity. The validity and reliability of the developed scales indicate their potential usefulness for the assessment of work-family-school role conflict and role-related social support among registered nurses with multiple roles in Korea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New Graduate Nurses' Preparation for Recognition and Prevention of Failure to Rescue: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Elizabeth K

    2017-08-17

    To explore new graduate nurses' experiences with recognition and prevention of failure to rescue. Failure to rescue is recognized as a quality of care indicator, a core measure of nursing care in hospitals, and a determinant for staffing in acute care facilities. Clinical reasoning is an essential component in preventing failure to rescue and should be emphasized in nursing education and new graduate orientation. Many nurses graduate without the ability to use clinical reasoning in providing patient care which can lead to adverse patient outcomes. A descriptive phenomenological design was used. A purposive sample of 14 new graduate nurses from a nursing program in the Southeastern United States, in practice for no more than eighteen months, was recruited. Individual one on one interviews were conducted from January to June 2016 and audio recorded for accuracy. Data were evaluated using the consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ) guidelines. Recordings were professionally transcribed and reviewed. Using Giorgi's methods for data analysis, five main themes were discerned in the data: clinical preparation in school; experience with emergent situations; development of clinical reasoning; low confidence as a new graduate; and responding to emergencies. Within each theme, subthemes emerged. The words of the participants provided rich detail into the preparation of new graduate nurses and how nurse educators, managers, and preceptors can better focus learning opportunities to prepare them for practice. Experiential learning combined with collaboration among education stakeholders will lead to a better prepared and more confident nursing work force. Better preparation and continued support of new graduate nurses leads to positive patient outcomes and more satisfaction with their choice of nursing as a profession. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Preparing nurses to use standardized nursing language in the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Staub, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Research demonstrated nurses' education needs to be able to document nursing diagnoses, interventions and patient outcomes in the EHR. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Guided Clinical Reasoning, a learning method to foster nurses' abilities in using standardized language. In a cluster randomized experimental study, nurses from 3 wards received Guided Clinical Reasoning (GCR), a learning method to foster nurses in stating nursing diagnoses, related interventions and outcomes. Three wards, receiving Classic Case Discussions, functioned as control group. The learning effect was measured by assessing the quality of 225 nursing documentations by applying 18 Likert-type items with a 0-4 scale of the measurement instrument "Quality of Nursing Diagnoses, Interventions and Outcomes" (Q-DIO). T-tests were applied to analyze pre-post intervention scores. GCR led to significantly higher quality of nursing diagnosis documentation; to etiology-specific nursing interventions and to enhanced nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. Before GCR, the pre-intervention mean in quality of nursing documentation was = 2.69 (post-intervention = 3.70; peffective nursing interventions and to reach enhanced patient outcomes. Nursing diagnoses (NANDA-I) with related interventions and patient outcomes provide a knowledgebase for nurses to use standardized language in the EHR.

  17. Nurse practitioner role in preparing families for pediatric outpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Ashley M; Johnson, Arlene; Timmons, Shirley; Weatherford, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Due to medical advances in surgery and anesthesia and cost of hospital stays, more elective pediatric surgical procedures are being performed in outpatient settings. One proposed advantage of outpatient surgery is decreased anxiety or a shorter period of anxiety for pediatric patients and their families because they are able to go home shortly after the surgery. A literature review was conducted to describe anxiety experienced by pediatric patients and their families in the outpatient surgery setting and to explore ways to decrease that anxiety. Both children and parents reported not feeling emotionally and educationally prepared for outpatient surgery. Developmentally appropriate pre-surgical educational programs and parental involvement in the surgical experience can help alleviate the anxiety of both children and parents during the pediatric surgical experience. Nurse practitioners (NPs) are currently being used in pre-operative outpatient settings to conduct physical examinations and provide pre-op education. Pre-op education programs provided by NPs are beneficial in decreasing the anxiety state among children and parents prior to surgery.

  18. The quality of work life of registered nurses in Canada and the United States: a comprehensive literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrouzi, Behdin; Giddens, Emilia; Gohar, Basem; Schoenenberger, Sandrine; Bautista, Mary Christine; Casole, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    Workplace environment is related to the physical and psychological well-being, and quality of work life (QWL) for nurses. The aim of this paper was to perform a comprehensive literature review on nurses' quality of work life to identify a comprehensive set of QWL predictors for nurses employed in the United States and Canada. Using publications from 2004-2014, contributing factors to American and Canadian nurses' QWL were analyzed. The review was structured using the Work Disability Prevention Framework. Sixty-six articles were selected for analysis. Literature indicated that changes are required within the workplace and across the health care system to improve nurses' QWL. Areas for improvement to nurses' quality of work life included treatment of new nursing graduates, opportunities for continuing education, promotion of positive collegial relationships, stress-reduction programs, and increased financial compensation. This review's findings support the importance of QWL as an indicator of nurses' broader work-related experiences. A shift in health care systems across Canada and the United States is warranted where health care delivery and services are improved in conjunction with the health of the nurses working in the system.

  19. Development and validation of a web-based survey on the use of personal communication devices by hospital registered nurses: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Deborah L; Levasseur, Sandra A; Li, Dongmei

    2013-11-26

    The use of personal communication devices (such as basic cell phones, enhanced cell phones or smartphones, and tablet computers) in hospital units has risen dramatically in recent years. The use of these devices for personal and professional activities can be beneficial, but also has the potential to negatively affect patient care, as clinicians may become distracted by these devices. No validated questionnaire examining the impact of the use of these devices on patient care exists; thus, we aim to develop and validate an online questionnaire for surveying the views of registered nurses with experience of working in hospitals regarding the impact of the use of personal communication devices on hospital units. A 50-item, four-domain questionnaire on the views of registered nursing staff regarding the impact of personal communication devices on hospital units was developed based on a literature review and interviews with such nurses. A repeated measures pilot study was conducted to examine the psychometrics of a survey questionnaire and the feasibility of conducting a larger study. Psychometric testing of the questionnaire included examining internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability in a sample of 50 registered nurses. The response rate for the repeated measures was 30%. Cronbach coefficient alpha was used to examine the internal consistency and reliability, and in three of the four question groups (utilization, impact, and opinions), the correlation was observed to be very high. This suggests that the questions were measuring a single underlying theme. The Cronbach alpha value for the questions in the performance group, describing the use of personal communication devices while working, was lower than those for the other question groups. These values may be an indication that the assumptions underlying the Cronbach alpha calculation may have been violated for this group of questions. A Spearman rho correlation was used to determine the test

  20. Leadership, job satisfaction and intention to leave among registered nurses in the North West and Free State provinces of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremia S. Sojane

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The nurse leadership of a hospital is identified as the single most important aspect of the practice environment that impacts nurse outcomes. When nurses are satisfied with their jobs, they tend to remain with their employers and become more productive in their workplaces.Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between leadership, job satisfaction and intentions to leave among registered nurses (RNs working in hospitals in the North West and Free State provinces of South Africa.Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was adopted. The population (N = 680 with the sample (n = 204 included RNs in medical–surgical units in both private and public hospitals in the two provinces. Data were collected using the RN4CAST questionnaire.Results: RNs were satisfied with the items pertaining to leadership except for praise and recognition (55.7%. They also indicated high levels of overall job satisfaction (70.5% but were dissatisfied with wages (50%, study leave (40.9% and opportunities for advancement (40.1%. Furthermore, 46.1% of the RNs intended to leave their current hospitals. The results indicated a relationship between leadership and job satisfaction (r = 0.47; p = 0.00 and between intention to leave and job satisfaction (d = 0.50.Conclusion: The nurse managers played a significant role influencing RN’s level of job satisfaction, while job satisfaction was highly correlated with intention to leave. The nurse leadership can improve job satisfaction by giving praise and recognition to the RNs for jobs well done, and RNs should be afforded the opportunity to advance their careers through further studies.Keywords: Leadership,  job satisfaction, intention to leave, Nurse

  1. Experiences of registered nurses transitioning from employment in acute care to primary health care-quantitative findings from a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Christine; Halcomb, Elizabeth; Brown, Angela; Peters, Kath

    2017-06-15

    To describe the experiences of registered nurses who transition from acute to primary health care (PHC) employment. Internationally the provision of health care in PHC settings is increasing. Nurses are moving from acute care employment to meet the growing demand for a PHC workforce. However, little is known about the transition experiences of these nurses. A sequential mixed-methods study comprising a survey, and semi-structured interviews. This study reports on survey findings relating to the transition experience. Convenience and snowballing techniques were used to recruit 111 registered nurses who had transitioned from Australian acute settings to PHC employment within the last 5 years. An online survey gathered data relating to personal and professional demographics, type of PHC setting and transition experiences. Most respondents (n = 90, 81.1%) reported receiving some orientation, although the length and content varied considerably. Those working in metropolitan locations were more likely to report concerns associated with their orientation, with respondents from rural or remote locations more likely to have access to a preceptor than city/metropolitan respondents. Just under half of respondents found prioritising workload (n = 47; 42.7%) or organisational knowledge (n = 45; 40.9%) difficult or very difficult, and 47.7% (n = 53) felt isolated or unsupported. 49.5% (n = 55) reported being overwhelmed with the new role either sometimes or regularly. Barriers to transitioning successfully included limited employer support to attend professional development activities. Availability of specific support measures may assist in the transition process. Findings from our study should be considered by employers when recruiting nurses new to PHC, and when designing orientation and ongoing education programmes. This study highlights the challenges faced by nurses who transition from acute care into PHC employment. Understanding the barriers and facilitators to

  2. Business Continuity Planning for Nursing Schools: Preparation for Potential Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwic, Julie J; Rosen, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Nursing schools are vulnerable to disasters, ranging from pandemics to weather emergencies, fires, and acts of terrorism. To ensure minimal disruptions to teaching, provision of care, research, and other critical missions, nursing faculty and administrative leaders should develop a business continuity plan. The business continuity plan can help faculty, students, and administration identify critical functions and alternative plans if an emergency occurs. We offer our experience as a guide for other nursing schools.

  3. Awareness of self and expanding consciousness: using nursing theories to prepare nurse-therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemark, Lisa M

    2006-07-01

    Psychotherapy is an accepted role of the advanced practice psychiatric nurse. Nursing theorists, notably Hildegard Peplau and Margaret Newman, offer guidance on the psychological and professional development of the nurse. This paper examines Newman's theory of health as expanding consciousness and the concept of awareness of self in Peplau's theory, and suggests that psychiatric advanced practice nursing programs consider the need for nurses to develop self-knowledge to facilitate the nurse-patient relationship and to improve outcomes of patient care in psychotherapy.

  4. Head Nurse Leadership Style and Staff Nurse Job Satisfaction: Are They Related.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    inservices to be provided to the nurse leaders of organizations; and encouraging the pursuit of higher education for all nurse leaders, specifically to...related more often to satisfaction. Longest (1974) reported differences in the way I practicing registered nurses and nursing educators perceived...Length of nursing career; (b) educational preparation; (c) length of time worked on unit; (d) work status (part-time or full-time); (e) shift primarily

  5. The big Cs - contemplating on the competency and credibility of master's-prepared early career nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linda

    2014-09-01

    The landscape in master's-prepared nursing education has vastly changed. Programs are constantly expanding and evolving to respond to changing trends and needs in healthcare. Simultaneously, the demographic profile of nurses returning to graduate studies has immeasurably diversified. While it can be argued that developing advanced practice nurses (APNs) at an earlier time point may lengthen their leadership careers such that they build stronger portfolios to effect more substantive healthcare changes, it is also worth questioning whether limited clinical experience in our new generation of nurse leaders will ultimately widen our proverbial knowledge-practice gap.

  6. Leadership Opportunities for Mental Health Nurses in the Field of Disaster Preparation, Response, and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranse, Jamie; Hutton, Alison; Wilson, Rhonda; Usher, Kim

    2015-05-01

    Disasters occur internationally and are nondiscriminatory. The loss resulting from the destruction associated with disasters leads to the development of various levels of psychological trauma in survivors. Health teams provide assistance to survivors before, during and after disasters, and mental health nurses make an important contribution to these teams. However, the leadership role of mental health nurses in disaster situations has not been extensively explored in the literature. This article discusses aspects of mental health nursing leadership in preparation for, response to and recovery from disasters. In particular, recommendations are made to enhance the leadership of mental health nurses in the context of disasters.

  7. Leadership opportunities for mental health nurses in the field of disaster preparation, response, and recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranse, Jamie; Hutton, Alison; Wilson, Rhonda

    2015-01-01

    health nurses make an important contribution to these teams. However, the leadership role of mental health nurses in disaster situations has not been extensively explored in the literature. This article discusses aspects of mental health nursing leadership in preparation for, response to and recovery......Disasters occur internationally and are nondiscriminatory. The loss resulting from the destruction associated with disasters leads to the development of various levels of psychological trauma in survivors. Health teams provide assistance to survivors before, during and after disasters, and mental...... from disasters. In particular, recommendations are made to enhance the leadership of mental health nurses in the context of disasters....

  8. An Analysis of Academic Programs Preparing Nursing Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepura, Barbara A.; Tilbury, Mary S.

    Key elements of the master's level programs offering majors and/or minors in nursing administration and accredited by the National League for Nursing were assessed. The focus was admission and graduation stipulations and curriculum content. Courses were classified according to content and categorized as either administration, research,…

  9. Transition from Associate's Degree in Nursing to Bachelor's of Science in Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allar, Deborah T.

    2014-01-01

    Areas throughout the United States lack baccalaureate-prepared registered nurses to meet the health care needs of individuals, forcing health care providers to rely on associate degree nurses (ADN). In an effort to increase the numbers of Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students, technical colleges and state and private universities have…

  10. A proof-of-concept implementation of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) role: structural empowerment, role clarity and team effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feistritzer, Nancye R; Jones, Pam O

    2014-03-01

    The quest for decreased cost of care and improved outcomes has created the need for highly effective clinical roles and teams. This article describes the role of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) within a proof-of-concept implementation of a new care delivery model, the Vanderbilt Anticipatory Care Team. Role clarity is central to both structural empowerment of the APRN and team effectiveness. A modified PeaceHealth Team Development Measure tool measured baseline role clarity as a component of overall team effectiveness. A role description for the unit-based APRN based on a comprehensive assessment of the proof-of-concept unit is provided.

  11. A cognitive behavioral course for at-risk senior nursing students preparing to take the NCLEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Susan G; Mastorovich, Melissa L; Liberto, Terri L; Gerwick, Michele

    2010-01-01

    For some nursing students, the stress of preparing for and taking the NCLEX can lead to maladaptive behaviors such as poor test performance and inadequate preparation. A different approach to NCLEX preparation for at-risk seniors is described. A 3-credit course that combines cognitive behavioral techniques, metacognitive strategies, test-taking strategies, and simulated NCLEX experience with practice questions is presented. Students also develop an individualized plan of preparation from graduation until they take the NCLEX.

  12. Outcomes of ADN-BSN partnerships to increase baccalaureate prepared nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Mary H; Robbins, Leslie K; Hoke, Mary M; Billings, Diane M

    2007-01-01

    The limited supply of BSN nurses hinders efforts to increase patient care quality and address health disparities. In largely rural and economically disadvantaged areas, associate degree prepared nurses provide the majority of nursing services. To address a statewide need, a BSN Program and 3 ADN Programs formed a partnership to take BSN education to rural and medically underserved areas. This article describes the program planning, implementation, and evaluation using an adapted assessment framework with partnership principles as its foundation. Interactive television, internet education components, local clinical experiences, and distant nursing faculty liaisons were used. The nursing course sequence was completed by 101 of 102 students. Hall's Professionalism Scale, the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory, and the California Critical Thinking Skills Test measured the increases found in professional socialization and critical thinking. Use of the adapted theoretical framework represented a strategic approach to developing a distance delivered nursing education program.

  13. Developing palliative care competencies for the education of entry level baccalaureate prepared Canadian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacono, Brenda; Young, Lynne; Baker, Cynthia; Richardson, Holly R L; Cable-Williams, Beryl; Jewers, Heather; Lavoie, Mireille; Librach, Larry; Bidgood, Darcee; Mitchell, Mitzi Grace

    2011-08-15

    Educational preparation of health professionals for Palliative and End of Life Care (PEOLC) is inadequate, and nurses are no exception. In 2004, the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing struck a Task Force to develop PEOLC competencies to address this issue. The development of national PEOLC nursing competencies involved a multi-step, emergent, interactive, and iterative process. An overarching principle guiding this process was building national consensus about the essential PEOLC specific competencies for nurses among experts in this field while simultaneously generating, revising, and refining them. There have been three stages in this iterative, multi-step process: 1) Generating a preliminary set of competencies, 2) Building a national consensus among educators and experts in the field on PEOLC specific competencies for nurses, and 3) Refining the consensus based competencies for curriculum development. Ongoing follow up work for this project is focusing on the integration of these competencies into nursing curricula.

  14. Towards a values-based person specification for recruitment of compassionate nursing and midwifery candidates: a study of registered and student nurses' and midwives' perceptions of prerequisite attributes and key skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Anne; Smith, Dave; Horsburgh, Dorothy; Gray, Morag

    2014-09-01

    Selection and retention of preregistration nursing and midwifery students are issues that exercise educators, universities and commissioning bodies both nationally and internationally. It has recently become an expectation that a values-based approach is used within recruitment and selection activities in the UK. The desirability of a person specification to support transparent recruitment and selection is well recognised. An online survey of registered and student nurses and midwives found consensus around the desirability of several personal attributes and key skills. There was consensus in the top seven ranked attributes which were honesty and trustworthiness, communication skills, being a good listener, patience and tactfulness, sensitivity and compassion, the ability to seek and act on guidance and being a good team worker; this was between registered and unregistered nurses and midwives and also between participants representing all fields of nursing and midwifery practice. Some of the responses from Practice Education Facilitators (PEFs) (n=5) and senior managers (n=15) differed from those of other registrants surveyed. The attribute 'Able to draw on knowledge and experience' was considered more important by PEFs and 'Observant and able to act on your own initiative within your level of responsibility' and 'Able to draw on knowledge and experience' were ranked more highly by senior managers.

  15. El hábito tabáquico en el colectivo de colegiados en enfermería de la Comunidad de las Islas Baleares The smoking habits of registered nurses in the community of the Balearic Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Pericás

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Se pretende evidenciar las conductas, creencias y actitudes relacionadas con el hábito tabáquico, del colectivo de colegiados de enfermería de las Islas Baleares. Sujetos y métodos: Estudio descriptivo transversal, mediante entrevista telefónica personal a 430 profesionales aleatorizados a partir de una población total de 4.800 colegiados de las Islas Baleares. La entrevista constaba de una parte dirigida a todos los colegiados independientemente de su hábito tabáquico, en la que se valoraban variables demográficas y actitudes ante la problemática del tabaquismo, tanto a nivel de creencias como de conductas y actitudes ante los pacientes, y otra parte específicamente dirigida a fumadores y exfumadores con la intención de caracterizar su hábito tabáquico. Resultados: De los 430 encuestados el 80% son mujeres. La media de edad es de 38 años. El 26,7% de la población es fumador. Los fumadores preguntan menos por el hábito tabáquico, se consideran peor formados en su manejo y aconsejan menos que abandonen el tabaco a sus pacientes que los no fumadores. Fuman menos en Atención Primaria que en Atención Especializada. Conclusión: Debería incrementarse la formación académica y laboral en tabaquismo ya que la mitad de los profesionales no se sienten preparados para su manejo.Introduction: This study aims to show the conducts, beliefs and attitudes towards smoking issues held by registered nurses in the Balearic Islands. Subjects and methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted through personal phone interviews with 430 nursing professionals selected randomly from the 4,800 registered nurses in Balearic Islands. The first part of the interview was directed to all nurses, whether addicted to tobacco or not, and rated demographic variables and attitudes towards smoking issues in terms of beliefs, as well as conducts and attitudes towards patients. The second part was specifically addressed to smokers and

  16. Systematic Preparation for Teaching in a Nursing Doctor of Philosophy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Ruth; Degenhardt, Marguerite; Engstrom, Janet L

    2015-01-01

    Lack of preparation for the faculty role, particularly for teaching, has long been an area of concern in graduate nursing education. This article describes a systematic approach to preparing students in a doctor of philosophy (PhD) program for their future roles as nurse educators. All PhD students at Rush University are required to take a nursing education course that contains four modules: the teacher, learner, and learning environment; the basics of curriculum and course design; evaluation of the learner, course, program, and institution; and the new faculty member. Students also complete a practicum in the course. Students are interviewed before the course begins and complete a self-assessment of their teaching experiences. Based on their learning needs, students are enrolled in the course for variable credit. The course has received excellent evaluations since its inception. The success of this course demonstrates that an education course can be an essential component of the nursing PhD curriculum.

  17. Challenges and opportunities associated with the introduction of assistant practitioners supporting the work of registered nurses in NHS acute hospital trusts in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilsbury, Karen; Adamson, Joy; Atkin, Karl; Bloor, Karen; Carr-Hill, Roy; McCaughan, Dorothy; McKenna, Hugh; Wakefield, Ann

    2011-04-01

    To understand the challenges and opportunities associated with the introduction of assistant practitioner (AP) roles supporting the work of ward-based registered nurses (RNs) in National Health Service (NHS) acute hospital trusts in England. Three case studies of NHS acute hospital trusts. This paper presents qualitative findings, drawing on documentary data sources and data generated through interviews and focus group discussions. Introduction of APs into ward-based nursing teams has been variable, and often driven by external pressures rather than perceived organizational need. This, along with little national guidance, has created some confusion about the role, but at the same time has permitted flexible role development through 'negotiated compromise' at local level. While there are various areas of potential improvement in policy and practice, APs are generally perceived to have the potential to make a valuable contribution to patient care. Findings from this study will help policy-makers, organizations and practitioners understand factors that enable and/or inhibit the integration of new assistant roles within existing occupational structures to develop innovative services and enhance patient care. These factors are important when considering how care will be delivered to maximize the skills of the entire nursing workforce.

  18. A comparative analysis of ethical development of student nurses registered for a basic degree and basic diploma programme in KwaZulu Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NG Mtshali

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A comparative descriptive study was conducted to establish whether the Comprehensive Basic Nursing Course (CBNC is able to develop students ethically, and how educational preparation from two different programmes (basic degree and basic diploma influence their ethical development. This study was conducted because of the concerns on the escalating number of litigations instituted against nurses. Several studies have indicated that some of these litigations are as a result of the growing complexity of the health care system and the society’s increasing awareness of their human rights. Some studies have shown that nurses are failing to make principled and ethically sound decisions because they are inadequately prepared to handle ethical issues in an ethically responsible manner. A purposively selected sample of third and fourth year students from both programmes was used. Data was collected from both groups through the use of questionnaires. The findings revealed that the students are developing ethically in a CBNC but the level of ethical development is influenced by their educational preparation, teaching approaches and strategies used, clinical environment, hospital bureaucracy, rules and policies.

  19. What Nurses Say They Do and Need: Implications for the Educational Preparation of Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Julianne; Jones, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    In-depth descriptions of practice of 38 Australian nurses in 17 settings were derived from interviews. Cross-case comparisons yielded themes with implications for nursing education: flexibility and adaptability, competence in interacting with diverse people, assessment abilities, communication and leadership skills, and coping with challenges…

  20. Career trends of master's prepared family nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, J; Zoeller, L H; Talashek, M; Sullivan, J A

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the career trends of family nurse practitioner (FNP) graduates of one master's program. A questionnaire was mailed to all FNPs (N = 113) who graduated 1-11 years earlier; there was a response rate of 83%. The survey revealed that for both first and present jobs the majority were providing direct patient care as a primary care provider or practicing in an indirect role. The study findings indicate that for these graduates there is a long term commitment (demonstrated through continued employment) as well as opportunity to practice in the nurse practitioner role in a direct or indirect capacity.

  1. Preparing Nursing Students for Leadership Using a Disaster-Related Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sherrill; Farra, Sharon; Dempsey, Anita; Arms, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers and severity of disasters across the globe require nurses to be prepared to provide leadership in disaster situations. To address this need, a combination of didactic and simulation exercises was used to provide a daylong experience emphasizing application of nursing leadership skills in disasters to senior baccalaureate students. Evaluation of learning outcomes demonstrated significant improvement in student self-efficacy related to leadership in disasters.

  2. Pre-registration children's and young people's nurse preparation. A SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jim; McEwing, Gillian; Glasper, Edward Alan

    2006-12-01

    An investigation was undertaken into the views of nurse educators on current approaches to preparing children's and young people's nurses in the UK. A convenience sample of lead academics in 17 child health nursing departments of British universities was contacted by email and invited to liaise with colleagues to generate lists of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) of the educational system. Thirteen departments provided data that were analysed and themed. Major themes included the common foundation programme, clinical skills learning, clinical placements and employment. More detailed evaluative work should be undertaken before wholesale changes are made to a relatively new curriculum.

  3. Hospital organizational factors influence work-family conflict in registered nurses: Multilevel modeling of a nation-wide cross-sectional survey in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leineweber, C; Chungkham, H S; Westerlund, H; Tishelman, C; Lindqvist, R

    2014-05-01

    The present shortage of registered nurses (RNs) in many European countries is expected to continue and worsen, which poses a substantial threat to the maintenance of healthcare in this region. Work-family conflict is a known risk factor for turnover and sickness absence. This paper empirically examines whether the nurse practice environment is associated with experienced work-family conflict. A multilevel model was fit with the individual RN at the 1st, and the hospital department at the 2nd level using cross-sectional RN survey data from the Swedish part of RN4CAST, an EU 7th framework project. The data analyzed here is based on a national sample of 8356 female and 592 male RNs from 369 hospital departments. We found that 6% of the variability in work-family conflict experienced by RNs was at the department level. Organizational level factors significantly accounted for most of the variability at this level with two of the work practice environment factors examined, staffing adequacy and nurse involvement in hospital affairs, significantly related to work-family conflict. Due to the design of the study, factors on ward and work group levels could not be analyzed, but are likely to account for additional variance which in the present analysis appears to be on the individual level, with private life factors likely explaining another major part. These results suggest that higher level organizational factors in health care have a significant impact on the risk of work-family conflict among RNs through their impact on the nurse practice environment. Lower level organizational factors should be investigated in future studies using hierarchical multilevel sampling. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Registered nurses' beliefs of the benefits of exercise, their exercise behaviour and their patient teaching regarding exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Eileen M; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2011-08-01

    Recommendations by experts have been in place for > 10 years encouraging every adult to participate in ≥ 30 min of daily moderate-intensity physical activity. Despite extensive research supporting the value of physical activity, only about one-third of all adults meet physical activity recommendations. Using Pender's Health Promotion Theory as the framework, this study was focused on the relationships between nurses' beliefs regarding the benefits of exercise, their exercise behaviour and their recommendation of exercise for health promotion or as part of a treatment plan. Results showed positive correlations between exercise benefits, physical activity and recommendation of exercise to patients. Nurses who believe in health promotion and embrace healthy behaviours are more likely to be positive role models and teach healthy behaviours to their patients. Recommendations for practice and future research are included.

  5. The continued success of registered nurse care coordination in a state evaluation of aging in place in senior housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantz, Marilyn; Popejoy, Lori L; Galambos, Colleen; Phillips, Lorraine J; Lane, Kari R; Marek, Karen Dorman; Hicks, Lanis; Musterman, Katy; Back, Jessica; Miller, Steven J; Ge, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Older adults prefer to age in place, remaining in their home as their health care needs intensify. In a state evaluation of aging in place (AIP), the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing and Americare System Inc, Sikeston, MO, developed an elder housing facility to be an ideal housing environment for older adults to test the AIP care delivery model. An evaluation of the first 4 years (2005-2008) of the AIP program at TigerPlace (n = 66) revealed that the program was effective in restoring health and maintaining independence while being cost-effective. Similar results evaluating the subsequent 4 years (2009-2012) of the program (N = 128) revealed positive health outcomes (fall risk, gait velocity, Functional Ambulation Profile, handgrips, Short-Form 12 Physical Health, Short-Form 12 Mental Health, and Geriatric Depression Scale); slightly negative activities of daily living, independent activities of daily living, and Mini-Mental State Examination; and positive cost-effectiveness results. Combined care and housing costs for any resident who was receiving additional care services and qualified for nursing home care (n = 44) was about $20,000 less per year per person than nursing home care. Importantly, residents continued to live in private apartments and were encouraged to be as independent as possible through the end of life.

  6. A study of the lived experiences of registered nurses who have provided end-of-life care within an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holms, Natalie; Milligan, Stuart; Kydd, Angela

    2014-11-01

    End-of-life care (EOLC) in the intensive care unit (ICU) has received little attention in the literature in comparison to the considerable amount of existing literature available on EOLC in other areas of nursing. The ethos of the ICU is to preserve life, but as many patients die in this environment, EOLC should be an integral part of the ICU nurse's role. This qualitative study explored the experiences of ICU nurses who had provided EOLC to patients and their families. Participants were purposively recruited within one local ICU (n=5). A semi-structured interview format was used to guide in-depth interviews. The themes identified from the interview analysis were; use of integrated care systems, communication, the environment, education and training, staff distress. The findings suggest that ICU nurses do not feel adequately prepared to give proficient EOLC. Those who felt more confident in EOLC had learned what to do over time. Appropriate training, support and improved communication between staff, patients and families is necessary for good EOLC in ICUs.

  7. Requirements for the register of physical persons for the preparation, use and handling radioactive sources; Requisitos para o registro de pessoas fisicas para o preparo, uso e manuseio de fontes radioativas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-15

    This norm establishes the process for register of superior level profession nals enabled to the preparation, using, and handling of radioactive sources. This norm applies to the physical persons candidates applying to the register for preparation, use and handling of radioactive sources in radioactive installations at the industry, agriculture, teaching and researching.

  8. Preparing nurses for the new world order: a faculty development focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Anne; Roat, Cheryl; Kemper, Mori

    2012-01-01

    The new world order demands nursing faculty members be as competent in teaching and coaching students as they are about the art and science of nursing. The complexity associated with classroom management requires mastery of innovative learning modalities to assist students to think critically using research-based evidence in making patient care decisions. Grand Canyon University has made faculty competence a priority to ensure quality student outcomes. The College of Nursing has embraced a systematic process for creating faculty excellence through a comprehensive faculty development initiative. Developing faculty requires university support through policy and resources that is essential to prepare nurses for the new world order and therefore closing the education practice gap.

  9. A model for preparing faculty to teach model C clinical nurse leader students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Sherry; McKeon, Leslie

    2014-07-01

    Model C clinical nurse leader (CNL) programs are complex because they must meet the The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice and The Essentials of Master's Education in Nursing, as well as the graduate level competencies outlined in the white paper Competencies and Curricular Expectations for Clinical Nurse Leader Education and Practice. Faculty assigned to teach in these programs may be experts in education or areas of clinical specialty, but they may not have a clear understanding of the CNL role to teach and mentor CNL students. This article describes a faculty development model that includes an introduction to the CNL role, course mapping of the essentials, integration of CNL professional values into clinical evaluation, consultation with practicing model C graduates, and participation in a comprehensive CNL certification review course. The model was effective in preparing faculty to teach and mentor students in a model C CNL program.

  10. Professional resilience in baccalaureate-prepared acute care nurses: first steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Helen F; Keeley, Ann C; Troyan, Patricia J

    2008-01-01

    New nurses typically begin their practice in acute care settings in hospitals, where their work is characterized by time constraints, high safety risks for patients, and layers of complexity and difficult problems. Retention of experienced nurses is an issue central to patient safety. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the nature of professional resilience in new baccalaureate-prepared nurses in acute care settings and to extrapolate pedagogical strategies that can be developed to support resilience and career longevity. Findings revealed a common process of evolving resilience among participants. New nurses spend a significant amount of time learning their place in the social structure. With positive experiences, they begin to feel more competent with skills and relationships and become increasingly aware of discrepancies between their ideas of professional nursing and their actual experiences in the work setting. The risk of new nurses leaving their practice is constantly present during these struggles. Acceptable compromises yield a reconciliation of the current crisis, typically occurring long after formal precepting has ended. Personal growth is evident by the evolving clarity of professional identity, an edifying sense of purpose, and energy resources to move forward. For new nurses, professional resilience yields the capacity for self-protection, risk taking, and moving forward with reflective knowledge of self.

  11. Effects of registered nurse staffing level on hospital-acquired conditions in cardiac surgery patients: A propensity score matching analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaocong; Bowman, Stephen M; Smith, Tyler C

    The ramifications of inadequate nurse staffing may have serious consequences due to reimbursement policies. To determine the effects of registered nurse staffing on hospital-acquired conditions in cardiac surgery patients. Data from the 2009 to 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample were used to construct a propensity score-matched cohort. Multivariate regressions were performed to compare the probability, length of stay, mortality, and costs of three common hospital-acquired conditions between low- and high-staffing hospitals. A total of 439,365 patients in low-staffing hospitals were 1:1 matched to patients in high-staffing hospitals. High-staffing hospitals had 10% to 25% fewer cases (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.75-0.90, p < .0001), 5% to 20% lower mortality (AOR 0.80-0.95, p < .0001), and 4% to 6% shorter length of stay (coefficient -0.06 to -0.04, p < .0001). The costs for patients with hospital-acquired conditions were 13% to 17% greater in high-staffing hospitals (coefficient 0.13-0.17, p < .0001). Alternatives to the current staffing and reimbursement policies should be considered to reduce hospital-acquired conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Interprofessional Obstetric Ultrasound Education: Successful Development of Online Learning Modules; Case-Based Seminars; and Skills Labs for Registered and Advanced Practice Nurses, Midwives, Physicians, and Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Young-Lin, Nichole; Bearman, Sage; Dau, Kim; Vargas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important aid in the clinical diagnosis and management of normal and complicated pregnancy and childbirth. The technology is widely applied to maternity care in the United States, where comprehensive standard ultrasound examinations are routine. Targeted scans are common and used for an increasing number of clinical indications due to emerging research and a greater availability of equipment with better image resolution at lower cost. These factors contribute to an increased demand for obstetric ultrasound education among students and providers of maternity care, despite a paucity of data to inform education program design and evaluation. To meet this demand, from 2012 to 2015 the University of California, San Francisco nurse-midwifery education program developed and implemented an interprofessional obstetric ultrasound course focused on clinical applications commonly managed by maternity care providers from different professions and disciplines. The course included matriculating students in nursing and medicine, as well as licensed practitioners such as registered and advanced practice nurses, midwives, and physicians and residents in obstetrics and gynecology and family medicine. After completing 10 online modules with a pre- and posttest of knowledge and interprofessional competencies related to teamwork and communication, trainees attended a case-based seminar and hands-on skills practicum with pregnant volunteers. The course aimed to establish a foundation for further supervised clinical training prior to independent practice of obstetric ultrasound. Course development was informed by professional guidelines and clinical and education research literature. This article describes the foundations, with a review of the challenges and solutions encountered in obstetric ultrasound education development and implementation. Our experience will inform educators who wish to facilitate obstetric ultrasound competency development among new and experienced

  13. Towards a Framework for Professional Preparation: Lessons from Teacher and Nurse Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Neville; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Research findings from nursing and teacher education identify three stages of concern in professional preparation: self (survival as a learner); task (mastery of professional role); and impact (promotion of client care). The developmental process of preservice and inservice education is enhanced by reflection at each stage as a means of…

  14. Do the pre-service education programmes for midwives in India prepare confident 'registered midwives'? : A survey from India

    OpenAIRE

    Bharati Sharma; Ingegerd Hildingsson; Eva Johansson; Malvarappu Prakasamma; K V Ramani; Kyllike Christensson

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The graduates of the diploma and degree programmes of nursing and midwifery in India are considered skilled birth attendants (SBAs). This paper aimed to assess the confidence of final-year students from pre-service education programmes (diploma and bachelor's) in selected midwifery skills from the list of midwifery competencies of the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM). Design: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Gujarat, India, involving 633 final-year students fr...

  15. The Relationship between Selected Variables and the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses: A Comparative Analysis of Pass/Fail Performance for Traditional and Second-Degree Baccalaureate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Nadine Cozzo

    2009-01-01

    This retrospective study was conducted to examine the relationship between selected variables and performance on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Data were collected from one hundred twenty graduates of a baccalaureate program; graduates completed either the traditional four-year track or an accelerated…

  16. Preparing for practice: Nursing intern and faculty perceptions on clinical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlThiga, Hanan; Mohidin, Sharifah; Park, Yoon Soo; Tekian, Ara

    2017-04-01

    Clinical experience and exposure to real patients are required elements of nursing education. Trainees in nursing are expected to be prepared adequately for the hard-working environment, increasing patient complexity, and higher-level competencies. This study investigates differences between nursing interns and clinical faculty on actual and perceived importance of educational preparation and development of clinical competencies, focusing on the nursing curriculum and transition to practice. A convenient sampling technique with a mixed-methods design was used to collect quantitative and qualitative data, by surveying and interviewing nursing interns and faculty members from King Abdul-Aziz University in Saudi Arabia; data collection occurred in December 2015. The survey (23 items) and focused interviews measured perceptions of clinical instruction and experience. Descriptive statistics and t-tests were used to analyze differences in mean ratings between actual and perceived importance. Themes collected from narrative interview data were summarized. Significant differences were found between nursing interns (n = 46) and faculty (n = 29) perceptions of actual clinical teaching and experiences and its importance including the clinical teaching and the development of clinical competence, p interns rated actual experiences of knowledge base and skills significantly lower than faculty perceptions, p = .001. Narrative data provided in-depth information on factors contributing and hindering the learning and teaching environment. Findings from this study call for clinical instruction and experiences to take a step further to meet current practice standards and to improve patient safety in the health professions education of nurses.

  17. Robot-assisted preparation of oncology drugs: the role of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Elisabetta; Bufarini, Celestino

    2012-12-15

    Since 2007, the preparation of cancer drugs at the Pharmacy of the University Hospital of Ancona has been progressively robotized. Currently, the process of preparation of intravenous cancer drugs is almost totally automated (95%). At present, the Cytotoxic laboratory of Ancona is the sole, in Europe, that can count on two robots. The robots handle 56 oncology molecules, which correspond to more than 160 different vials. The production rate in 2011 exceeded 19,000 preparations. The quality of compounding and the sterility controls are satisfactory, every step of the process is traceable. The nursing staff played a fundamental role in the robot development process. The nursing staff and the pharmacists are still collaborating with the robotic engineers in order to increase efficiency, ergonomics and user-friendliness of the robots.

  18. Preparing for a Nursing and Midwifery Council visit in the community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Jacqui; Aston, Liz; Pitt, Margaret; Kelly, Alison

    2013-05-01

    Preparing for a Nursing and Midwifery Council placement monitoring visit can appear daunting if practitioners have not previously participated in the process. This paper identifies why visits are required and how practitioners and the local higher education provider representatives can work together to prepare. Based on the experience of the authors it is proposed that the visit is an opportunity to disseminate good practice linked to the education and mentorship of students. Suggestions linked to successful preparation are also shared to assist community nurse teams who encounter the process in the future. It is advocated that feedback from the visit can be used to further strengthen the practice learning experience for both mentors and students.

  19. Preparing nursing students to be competent for future professional practice: applying the team-based learning-teaching strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Liou, Shwu-Ru; Hsu, Tsui-Hua; Pan, Mei-Yu; Liu, Hsiu-Chen; Chang, Chia-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) has been used for many years in business and science, but little research has focused on its application in nursing education. This quasi-experimental study was to apply the TBL in four nursing courses at a university in Taiwan and to evaluate its effect on students' learning outcomes and behaviors. Adult health nursing, maternal-child nursing, community health nursing, and medical-surgical nursing were the 4 designated courses for this study. Three hundred ninety-nine students in 2-year registered nurse-bachelor of science in nursing, and regular 4-year nursing programs enrolled in the designated courses were contacted. Three hundred eighty-seven students agreed to participate in the data collection. Results showed that the TBL significantly improved the learning behaviors of students in both programs, including class engagement (p learning (p learning behaviors and academic performance. These learning behaviors are important and beneficial for the students' future professional development. The TBL method can be considered for broader application in nursing education.

  20. Advancing Information and Communication Technology Knowledge for Undergraduate Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Procter, Paula M.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic profession; for registered nurses their role is increasingly requiring greater information process understanding and the effective management of information to ensure high quality safe patient care. This paper outlines the design and implementation of Systems of eCare. This is a course which advances information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students within a Faculty of Health and Wellbeing appropriately preparing nurses for their profes...

  1. Development of a nursing intervention to prepare frail older patients for cardiac surgery (the PREDOCS programme), following phase one of the guidelines of the Medical Research Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettema, Roelof G A; Hoogendoorn, Marga E; Kalkman, Cor J; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2014-12-01

    In older patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery, the timely identification and preparation of patients at risk for frequent postoperative hospital complications provide opportunities to reduce the risk of these complications. We developed an evidence-based, multi-component nursing intervention (Prevention of Decline in Older Cardiac Surgery Patients; the PREDOCS programme) for application in the preadmission period to improve patients' physical and psychosocial condition to reduce their risk of postoperative complications. This paper describes in detail the process used to design and develop this multi-component intervention. In a team of researchers, experts, cardiac surgeons, registered cardiac surgery nurses, and patients, the revised guidelines for developing and evaluating complex interventions of the Medical Research Council (MRC) were followed, including identifying existing evidence, identifying and developing theory and modelling the process and outcomes. Additionally, the criteria for reporting the development of complex interventions in healthcare (CReDECI) were followed. The intervention is administered during a consultation by the nurse two to four weeks before the surgery procedure. The consultation includes three parts: a general part for all patients, a second part in which patients with an increased risk are identified, and a third part in which selected patients are informed about how to prepare themselves for the hospital admission to reduce their risk. Following the MRC guidelines, an extended, stepwise, multi-method procedure was used to develop the multi-component nursing intervention to prepare older patients for cardiac surgery, creating transparency in the assumed working mechanisms. Additionally, a detailed description of the intervention is provided. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013.

  2. Preparing nursing students for the future: an innovative approach to clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Ann E; Noone, Joanne; Voss, Heather; Mathews, Launa Rae

    2013-07-01

    A clinical education model was developed and implemented by nursing faculty in the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education undergraduate curriculum to improve clinical learning for preparation of nurses to practice in the 21st century. This clinical education model, developed though collaborative work by nursing practice and education representatives throughout the state, moves away from a "random access opportunity" model of clinical education reliant on "total patient care" experiences to an intentional design of clinical learning activities based on course competencies appropriate to student level. Five elements of the model were proposed: case-based, concept-based, intervention skill-based, focused direct client care and integrative experiences. Different elements are dominant in early, middle and late clinical experiences to best support the developmental level of the student. Expectations for faculty, students and clinical staff were also developed to enhance best practices in clinical learning. Preparation of clinical partners for a change in clinical learning and student accountability are essential for optimal learning. This paper provides an overview of the model with clinical application examples for each element with a particular emphasis on case-based, concept-based and integrative clinical experiences.

  3. Use of NCLEX preparation strategies in a hospital orientation program for graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Karen; Whitehead, Tanya; Setter, Robyn; Treas, Leslie

    2006-01-01

    This article describes outcomes from the first year of a hospital orientation program for graduate nurses that was expanded to systematize and enrich preparation of graduate nurses for success on the NCLEX-RN licensure examination. The study protocol provided the Assessment Technologies Institute predictor examination to assess risk for licensure examination failure, review materials, and a meeting with an education specialist to identify and prioritize study needs. Those at highest risk for failure were also provided an in-depth written study plan and ongoing follow-up and support until the licensure examination was taken. The study sample consisted of 90 graduate nurses who were hired from May through August of 2005 at the University of Kansas Hospital. The pass rate for participants was 86.7% on the first attempt in year 1 of the program. At-risk graduates who reported that the predictor results impacted their study habits and followed the study recommendations were more likely to pass the licensure examination. Graduate nurses reported a high level of satisfaction with the support provided. Specific challenges faced by hospital nurse administrators in recruitment and retention and return on investment over a 3-year improvement plan are described.

  4. Examining Harasim's Online Collaborative Learning Theory for Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Henny

    2013-01-01

    Online nursing education has been evolving at a rapid pace as it is recognized as offering the flexibility needed for practicing associate degree (ADN) and diploma prepared Registered Nurses to return to school to earn their BSN. At the same time, there is a paradigm shift in how nursing education is delivered. The focus has shifted from content…

  5. Role Stress and Strain among Nondoctorally Prepared Undergraduate Faculty in a School of Nursing with a Doctoral Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Judy Wright; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A qualitative study looked at role stress in 11 nondoctorally prepared undergraduate nursing faculty in a southern university school of nursing with a doctoral program. Faculty reported that role stress and strain affect both their teaching and their decisions to remain in academia. (JOW)

  6. Clinical Boot Camp: An Innovative Simulation Experience to Prepare Nursing Students for Obstetric and Pediatric Clinicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogewood, Connie; Smith, Tedra; Etheridge, Sherita; Britt, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Obstetric and pediatric patients require unique specialized care not included in traditional adult health education. To prepare nursing students for clinical rotations beginning the second week of class, faculty developed an innovative one-day simulation seminar, the OB/PEDS Boot Camp, in which groups of students rotated through six stations of obstetric and pediatric simulation exercises. This article provides insight on the development and implementation of the OB/PEDS Boot Camp.

  7. International nurse education: implications for providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchin, M

    1998-12-01

    This exploratory study conducted in 1996 described the profiles, roles and preparation of twelve South Australian registered nurses in relation to their provision of education programs for nurses from South East Asia. The research showed respondents were well qualified and highly experienced educators whose roles were complex. Their preparation for providing education programs for nurse from South East Asia had been haphazard and inadequate. Consequently respondents considered they were not fully prepared for the providing this specialised education. Career planning and a more strategic approach to the development of specific expertise are essential to support an international approach to nurse education. Nurse education that values intercultural awareness, and is multicultural and global would benefit both local and international students. Development of germane knowledge, skill, attitudes and behaviours is recommended to ensure excellence in the provision of international nurse education. An action research model is proposed as an alternative to traditional professional development to prepare providers of international education.

  8. Preparation for high-acuity clinical placement: confidence levels of final-year nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter J

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Joanne Porter, Julia Morphet, Karen Missen, Anita Raymond School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Churchill, VIC, Australia Aim: To measure final-year nursing students’ preparation for high-acuity placement with emphasis on clinical skill performance confidence. Background: Self-confidence has been reported as being a key component for effective clinical performance, and confident students are more likely to be more effective nurses. Clinical skill performance is reported to be the most influential source of self-confidence. Student preparation and skill acquisition are therefore important aspects in ensuring students have successful clinical placements, especially in areas of high acuity. Curriculum development should aim to assist students with their theoretical and clinical preparedness for the clinical environment. Method: A modified pretest/posttest survey design was used to measure the confidence of third-year undergraduate nursing students (n = 318 for placement into a high-acuity clinical setting. The survey comprised four questions related to clinical placement and prospect of participating in a cardiac arrest scenario, and confidence rating levels of skills related to practice in a high-acuity setting. Content and face validity were established by an expert panel (α = 0.90 and reliability was established by the pilot study in 2009. Comparisons were made between confidence levels at the beginning and end of semester. Results: Student confidence to perform individual clinical skills increased over the semester; however their feelings of preparedness for high-acuity clinical placement decreased over the same time period. Reported confidence levels improved with further exposure to clinical placement. Conclusion: There may be many external factors that influence students’ perceptions of confidence and preparedness for practice. Further research is recommended to identify causes of poor self-confidence in final-year nursing

  9. Quality of drug prescribing in elderly people in nursing homes and special care units for dementia: a cross-sectional computerized pharmacy register analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Jonny; Bergman, Asa; Carlsten, Anders; Oké, Thimothy; Bernsten, Cecilia; Schmidt, Ingrid K; Fastbom, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Drug prescribing to the elderly is extensive and often inappropriate. Furthermore, the number of drugs used is the most important risk factor for adverse drug reactions. Despite this, drug prescribing in the elderly in Sweden is high and increasing. In 2003 the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare launched a set of indicators to evaluate the quality of drug therapy in the elderly. Use of this tool in combination with the Swedish computerized national register covering all persons receiving multi-dose drug dispensing (drugs dispensed in one dose unit bag for each dose occasion) would enable detection of inappropriate drug prescribing and could help reduce the risk of drug-related problems among the elderly. To assess the extent and quality of drug prescribing in younger and older elderly residents receiving multi-dose drug dispensing in ordinary nursing homes (NHs) and special care units for dementia (NHDs), and to evaluate the relationship between the quality of prescribing and the number of prescribers per resident, in a Swedish county. The computerized national pharmacy drug register provided the database and a cross-sectional design was used. Selected drug-specific quality indicators proposed by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare in 2003 were used to assess the quality of drug prescribing. This study included 3705 residents. Their mean age was 85 years and 72% were women. The mean number of prescribed drugs was 10.3 per resident. The proportion of residents with prescriptions for psychotropic drugs was 80% in NHs and 85% in NHDs. The prevalence of each drug-specific quality indicator was as follows: long-acting benzodiazepines 16.4% (NHs) versus 11.7% (NHDs), anticholinergic drugs 20.7% versus 18.5%, drug duplication 14.6% versus 13.6%, three or more psychotropic drugs 25.6% versus 35.3%, class C interactions (drug combinations that may require dose adjustment) 41.9% versus 38.7% and class D interactions (drug combinations that should be

  10. Onward in my journey: preparing nurses for a new age of cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Tom; Mercer, Dave

    2003-10-01

    Cancer nursing education in the United Kingdom currently is the subject of widespread debate. The imperative to improve cancer care is driven by professional and ethical obligations for clinical excellence and an aggressive political agenda seeking to demonstrate tangible improvements through centrally administered targets and benchmarks. Attempts to provide a holistic approach to care have engendered a range of alternative approaches underpinned by an appreciation of the "cancer journey." Despite the laudable intent of national policy initiatives aimed at improving the experience of cancer treatment, they have evidenced an emerging polarization in the practice arena. Nursing interventions, priorities, and goals are at risk of becoming confused by the competing paradigms of an outcome-driven strategy and a less focused humanistic philosophy of care. This dilemma presents significant problems in the planning of appropriate and effective education preparation for cancer nurses. This article aims to address the tensions produced by a dichotomy between the pragmatics of clinical practice and a professional quest for holism. It focuses on a specialist practitioner cancer nursing program, using case examples to illustrate innovations in teaching and learning. Embracing a postmodern perspective, reflection, and critical thinking, the discussion offers a challenge to diagnostic clinical language through the discursive structures of metaphor, narrative, and story.

  11. Hiring Intentions of Directors of Nursing Programs Related to DNP- and PhD-Prepared Faculty and Roles of Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R; Agger, Charlotte A

    2016-01-01

    This study surveyed administrators of associate degree in nursing (ADN) and bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) programs across the United States to identify hiring intentions and describe the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and PhD-prepared faculty members. The final sample included 253 ADN and 229 BSN programs. ADN programs were neither intentionally hiring nor looking to hire doctorally prepared nurse faculty. Deans and directors of BSN programs reported an average of 3 openings for the next academic year, 2 projected for new PhD-prepared faculty and 1 for a faculty member with a DNP. Schools have made varying decisions regarding the type of appointment (tenure or nontenure track) for DNP-prepared faculty members. Challenges that DNP-prepared faculty members encountered in meeting the role and promotion expectations in their schools focused predominantly on scholarship.

  12. Methanol oxidation on carbon supported Pt-Ru catalysts prepared by electrodeposition - Evaluation of Nafion {sup registered} 117 film effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieben, J.M. [Instituto de Ingenieria Electroquimica y Corrosion (INIEC), Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253 (B8000CPB) Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Duarte, M.M.E.; Mayer, C.E. [Instituto de Ingenieria Electroquimica y Corrosion (INIEC), Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253 (B8000CPB) Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CIC) (Argentina)

    2010-03-15

    Diverse electrochemical techniques were performed in order to obtain meaningful information about the methanol oxidation reaction on nanostructured planar carbon supported Pt-Ru electrodes prepared by electrodeposition, on which a layer of Nafion ionomer was incorporated. A metallic deposit consisting of dendritic agglomerates (between 50 and 200 nm) constituted by smaller particles (6 nm) was obtained. The average bulk Ru content obtained by EDX analysis was between 23 and 25 at. %. A decrease of the activity in the electrodes for methanol oxidation was determined when the thickness of the Nafion 117 film was increased. These results may be associated with the partial blocking of the surface active sites by hydrophobic domains of the polymer, and the presence of CO{sub 2} molecules retained within the Nafion hydrophilic microchannels. EIS results indicated that methanol electro-oxidation mechanism does not change with Nafion presence. (author)

  13. Saving the On-Scene Time for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients: The Registered Nurses' Role and Performance in Emergency Medical Service Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Wu, Che-Yu; Pan, Chih-Long; Tian, Zhong; Wen, Jyh-Horng

    2017-01-01

    For out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients, every second is vital for their life. Shortening the prehospital time is a challenge to emergency medical service (EMS) experts. This study focuses on the on-scene time evaluation of the registered nurses (RNs) participating in already existing EMS teams, in order to explore their role and performance in different EMS cases. In total, 1247 cases were separated into trauma and nontrauma cases. The nontrauma cases were subcategorized into OHCA (NT-O), critical (NT-C), and noncritical (NT-NC) cases, whereas the trauma cases were subcategorized into collar-and-spinal board fixation (T-CS), fracture fixation (T-F), and general trauma (T-G) cases. The average on-scene time of RN-attended cases showed a decrease of 21.05% in NT-O, 3.28% in NT-C, 0% in NT-NC, 18.44% in T-CS, 13.56% in T-F, and 3.46% in T-G compared to non-RN-attended. In NT-O and T-CS cases, the RNs' attendance can notably save the on-scene time with a statistical significance (P = .016 and .017, resp.). Furthermore, the return of spontaneous circulation within two hours (ROSC2 h) rate in the NT-O cases was increased by 12.86%. Based on the findings, the role of RNs in the EMTs could save the golden time in the prehospital medical care in Taiwan. PMID:28280734

  14. Global trends, local impact: the new era of skilled worker migration and the implications for nursing mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Sioban

    2013-01-01

    The global movement towards free trade and market integration has enabled greater mobility for skilled professionals, including nurses. As of 2015, newly graduated Canadian nurses will enter the register with an exam prepared by the US-based National Council of State Boards of Nursing, making Canadian nurses possibly the most mobile skilled workers in North America. But given the fragmentation of Canada's internal labour market, it is the United States that stands to benefit most from greater nurse mobility.

  15. Preparing Student Nurses for the Future of Wound Management: Telemedicine in a Simulated Learning Enviroment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sytter; Rethmeier, Anita

    2015-01-01

    was to integrate the concept of telemedicine for wound care into a simulation-based class for undergraduate student nurses and to evaluate their experiences with this integrated learning method. Methods: Five medium-fidelity mannequins were used in a simulated learning environment consisting of a simulated....... Findings: Students found the concept of telemedicine relevant and enjoyable, and the challenges and benefits of telemedicine clearly emerged in the simulated learning environment. Conclusions: Based on student evaluations and the need to prepare students for “real-life” telemedicine for wound management......, the simulated learning environment seems to be a constructive didactic method. The simulated learning environment should also be tested with postgraduate nurses with less experience in telemedicine....

  16. Preparing prelicensure and graduate nursing students to systematically communicate bad news to patients and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Jeanne; Bolick, Beth Nachtsheim

    2014-01-01

    Communicating bad news, otherwise known as difficult conversations, is a complex communication skill that requires didactic learning and practical application. Students learn that what may be interpreted as bad news is determined by the recipient and not by the person who is delivering the news. Learning a systematic approach, such as the SPIKES (Setting, Perception, Invitation, Knowledge, Empathy, Strategy/Summary) mnemonic, prepares prelicensure and graduate nursing students for difficult conversations with patients and families in the clinical setting. Role-playing commonly includes clinical scenarios, and using video recording and playback of the encounters in such scenarios is one method of learning the systematic approach to communicating bad news. Follow-up practice after application in the clinical setting and feedback from faculty and mentors are essential for nursing students to achieve competence in this complex set of communication skills.

  17. Retracted: 'A model of abusive supervision, self-efficacy and work engagement among Registered Nurses: the mediating role of self-efficacy' by Lv D.-M., Zheng Q.-L., Sun N., Li Q.-J., Fan Y.-Y., Hong S. & Liu S.-Q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The above article, published in the Journal of Advanced Nursing on 21st July2016 on Early View, Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement of the journal Editor-in-Chief, Prof. Roger Watson, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The article has been retracted due to significant overlap with the following article published in the Journal of Nursing Management. Fan Y., Zheng Q., Liu S. & Li Q. (2016) Construction of a new model of job engagement, psychological empowerment and perceived work environment among Chinese registered nurses at four large university hospitals: implications for nurse managers seeking to enhance nursing retention and quality of care. Journal of Nursing Management 24(5), 646-655. Fan Y., Zheng Q., Liu S. & Li Q. (2016) Construction of a new model of job engagement, psychological empowerment and perceived work environment among Chinese registered nurses at four large university hospitals: implications for nurse managers seeking to enhance nursing retention and quality of care. Journal of Nursing Management 24(5), 646-655. Lv D.-M., Zheng Q.-L., Sun N., Li Q.-J., Fan Y.-Y., Hong S. & Liu S.-Q. (2016) A model of abusive supervision, self-efficacy and work engagement among Registered Nurses: the mediating role of self-efficacy. Journal of Advanced Nursing 72(12), 3216. doi:10.1111/jan.13057. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Do the pre-service education programmes for midwives in India prepare confident ‘registered midwives’? A survey from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharati Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The graduates of the diploma and degree programmes of nursing and midwifery in India are considered skilled birth attendants (SBAs. This paper aimed to assess the confidence of final-year students from pre-service education programmes (diploma and bachelor's in selected midwifery skills from the list of midwifery competencies of the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM. Design: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Gujarat, India, involving 633 final-year students from 25 educational institutions (private or government, randomly selected, stratified by the type of programme (diploma and bachelor's. Students assessed their confidence on a four-point scale, in four midwifery competency domains – antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, and newborn care. Explorative factor analysis was used to reduce skill statements into separate subscales for each domain. Results: Overall, 25–40% of students scored above the 75th percentile and 38–50% below the 50th percentile of confidence in all subscales for antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, and newborn care. The majority had not attended the required number of births prescribed by the Indian Nursing Council. Conclusions: The pre-service education offered in the diploma and bachelor's programmes in Gujarat does not prepare confident SBAs, as measured on selected midwifery competencies of the ICM. One of the underlying reasons was less clinical experience during their education. The duration, content, and pedagogy of midwifery education within the integrated programmes need to be reviewed.

  19. The 'switch on-switch off model': Strategies used by nurses to mentally prepare and disengage from work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manomenidis, Georgios; Panagopoulou, Efharis; Montgomery, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    There is considerable research on the experience of nurses during both their work and non-work time. However, we know relatively little about the strategies nurses use immediately before and immediately after their shift. This crossover period, from one shift to another, has critical impact for patient outcomes. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore strategies nurses employ to mentally prepare for their shift (switch on), and mentally disengage after the end of it (switch off). Eleven Greek hospital nurses were recruited for the study. Interviews were audio-taped and analysed using a content analysis approach. Five themes were identified as strategies nurses use to mentally prepare and disengage from their shift: (i) personal care/grooming; (ii) religious rituals; (iii) nicotine/caffeine; (iv) social interaction; and (v) listening to music. Nurses reported using the same strategies before and after their shift, but for different purposes. The authors propose a 'switch on-switch off' model to describe the process of mental preparation and mental disengagement from work. The switch-on/off approach represents an opportunity to increase nurses' resilience and identify individual and organizational factors that contribute to patient outcomes.

  20. Exploratory study of mental health consultation-liaison nursing in Australia: Part 2. Preparation, support and role satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Paul; Bryant, Jenni; Forster, John; Sharrock, Julie; Happell, Brenda

    2008-06-01

    Mental health Consultation-Liaison (CL) nursing continues to develop and gain recognition as a subspecialty of mental health nursing. CL roles are particularly important given the significant number of people experiencing mental illness and other mental health problems within the general health-care settings. However, despite the potential value of these roles, the literature provides little information about these roles and about the nurses who work in these roles. This is the second part of a two-part paper describing a survey of CL nurses in Australia. Part 1 describes demographic data and characteristics of the CL role. Part 2 provides an exploration of the following factors: educational preparation, support, and work satisfaction. The findings identified specific educational needs in preparation and ongoing support for the role. However, overall the participants expressed a high level of satisfaction with their work. Given the current recruitment problems in mental health nursing, the promotion of the CL nursing role might enhance a more positive view of this branch of nursing.

  1. Analysis of Anxiety Levels of Nursing Students While Preparing Their Thesis

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    Aynur SARUHAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out as a descriptive study in order to determine the anxiety levels of third and last year students of Ege University School of Nursing while preparing their thesis and the factors affecting this. The research was performed with 142 students from third and last year students studying at Ege University School of Nursing. Data was collected using a questionnaire prepared by the researchers and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. It was determined that, 52,1% of the students were above the age of 23 years, 53,5% were last year students, 44,4% stayed in dormitory, 61,3% indicated that they experienced anxiety problems while determining the subject of thesis, and 38,7% got sufficient assistance from their supervisor. State anxiety average was 49,11± 12,23 and Trait anxiety average was 45,14± 7,8. Age groups, year of their study, staying with parents or receiving help from the supervisor were determined not to be effective in anxiety levels. Guiding and supporting attitudes of the teaching staff were thought to be helpful in increasing self-confidence of young people by reducing anxiety.

  2. Type of oral solid medication packaging and medication preparation time in nursing homes: A direct observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cready, C M; Hudson, C; Dreyer, K

    2017-06-05

    Medication administration is a substantial portion of the workday in nursing homes, with the medication preparation step being the most time-consuming. However, little is known about how medication preparation time is affected by the type of packaging used for oral solid medications (ie, tablets/capsules). We examined the effects of two types of packaging. As fewer steps are associated with strip packaging compared to bingo card packaging, we hypothesized that the increase in medication preparation seconds per resident with each additional oral solid medication would be smaller when strip packaging was used. A total of 430 medication preparations conducted by eight nurses during the regularly scheduled morning medication administration period in two nursing homes-using strip packaging and bingo card packaging, respectively-were observed. Each medication preparation observation was matched to its corresponding medication administration record and observations averaged across resident. Using the resident sample (N=149), we estimated three regression models (adjusting the standard errors for the clustering of resident by nurse). The first model regressed medication preparation seconds on the number of oral solid medications. The second model added the type of packaging used and the control variables (type of unit [long-term care, post-acute care], the number of one-half pills and the dosage form diversity in the preparation). To test our hypothesis, the third model added an interaction term between the number of oral solid medications and the type of packaging used. As hypothesized, all else equal, the number of oral solid medications tended to increase medication preparation time per resident in both nursing homes, but the increase was smaller in the strip packaging nursing home (Phome increased medication preparation by an average of 13 seconds (b=13.077), whereas each oral solid medication administered in the strip packaging nursing home increased medication

  3. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  4. Registered partnerships

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, family patterns have changed significantly. National laws have taken these changes into account, recognizing new forms of unions, different to heterosexual marriage. Indeed, recently some countries have given the possibility to same-sex couples to enter into various forms of unions. Staff regulations of international organizations are not directly affected by national laws, but in the context of diversity policies, the lack of recognition of these new forms of unions, may appear to discriminate based on sexual orientation and to limit the freedom of choosing marital status. A study by the International Service for Remunerations and Pensions (iSRP) of the OECD in January 2015 (PROS Report (1015) 04) shows that in comparison with other international organizations, CERN offers the least favorable social conditions for its Staff with in a registered partnership. As part of the Five-year review in 2015, it is important that CERN aligns itself with the practice of these other organizations...

  5. The effectiveness of Tai Chi, yoga, meditation, and Reiki healing sessions in promoting health and enhancing problem solving abilities of registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raingruber, Bonnie; Robinson, Carol

    2007-10-01

    Given the current necessity of retaining qualified nurses, a self-care program consisting of Yoga, Tai Chi, Meditation classes, and Reiki healing sessions was designed for a university-based hospital. The effectiveness of these interventions was evaluated using self-care journals and analyzed using a Heideggerian phenomenological approach. Outcomes of the self-care classes described by nurses included: (a) noticing sensations of warmth, tingling, and pulsation which were relaxing, (b) becoming aware of an enhanced problem solving ability, and (c) noticing an increased ability to focus on patient needs. Hospitals willing to invest in self-care options for nurses can anticipate patient and work related benefits.

  6. Nurse Preparation and Organizational Support for Supervision of Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in Nursing Homes: A Qualitative Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Elena O.; Young, Heather M.; Mitchell, Pamela H.; Shannon, Sarah E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Nursing supervision of the routine daily care (e.g., grooming, feeding, and toileting) that is delegated to unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) is critical to nursing home service delivery. The conditions under which the supervisory role is organized and operationalized at the work-unit level, taking into account workloads, registered…

  7. Relationship of academic courses and clinical internships to performance on the National Qualified Examination for Registered Professional Nurses (NQEX-RPN

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    Huimin Xiao

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Surgical-medicine nursing, Community health care, Computer basics and clinical internships are beneficial in assisting students and educators to identify the risk of students' performance in the NQEX-RPN.

  8. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  9. Preparing nurses to intervene in the tobacco epidemic: Developing a model for faculty development and curriculum redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Anne Berit; Meyer, Bonnie; Sachs, Bonnie L; Bialous, Stella A; Cataldo, Janine K

    2017-07-01

    As the largest group of health professionals, nurses have a tremendous potential to help curb the tobacco epidemic. However, studies conducted across a range of global settings continue to indicate that both practicing nurses and nursing student have limited knowledge, skills and confidence needed to implement evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions. A contributing factor is the limited inclusion of tobacco control content in nursing curricula. Additionally, there is limited understanding of nurse educators' knowledge and perceptions about teaching tobacco dependence content. This paper presents the Loma Linda University School of Nursing's concurrent experience with both faculty development and curriculum redesign in the area of tobacco dependence prevention and treatment. An internal survey was administered at baseline and at 2-year follow-up to assess faculty's knowledge, perceptions and practices related to teaching tobacco dependence content and skills (n = 42). Faculty and curriculum development strategies and resources utilized, evaluation findings and subsequent lessons learned are described. The findings have implications for nursing programs seeking to enhance their curricula and commitment to ensuring that their graduates are prepared to provide evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions with each patient they encounter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. New Rural Acute Care Nurses Speak Up: "We're it" But We're Not Ready.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, Monique; Pijl-Zieber, Em M

    2015-01-01

    Many novice registered nurses feel ill-prepared for rural nursing practice. Using a mixed method design, an assessment of the learning needs of new graduate nurses (NGNs) working in rural hospitals in Alberta, Canada, was undertaken. NGNs in rural practice indicated that they struggle with becoming "multispecialists." Consequently, administrators and nurse educators need to tailor workplace structures by establishing collaborative programs with urban facilities and using orientation tailored to the learning needs of NGNs.

  11. A study of critical thinking, teacher-student interaction, and discipline-specific writing in an online educational setting for registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lorraine M; Rukholm, Ellen

    2008-03-01

    Based on work conducted by Laurentian University's School of Nursing and Centre for Continuing Education in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, working in conjunction with community partners, this article looks at the findings of an analysis of nurses' writing activity in a university-level web-based module for evidence of critical thinking using Johns' Model of Structured Reflection (1995). Also considered are student-teacher interactions and discipline-specific writing. The findings suggest that high levels of critical thinking by nurse learners and growth in thinking and writing competence over time can occur in an online setting. Further highlighted are the role of the instructor, assignment design, and support in fostering such development.

  12. Nurse practitioner graduates "Speak Out" about the adequacy of their educational preparation to care for older adults: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jacqueline; Kotthoff-Burrell, Ernestine; Kass-Wolff, Jane; Brownrigg, Vicki

    2015-12-01

    With a shortage of primary care providers prepared to care for an aging U.S. population, nurse practitioner (NP) programs are integrating gerontological content. This qualitative descriptive study explored NP graduate perceptions on the adequacy of their education to prepare them to care for seniors. Twenty-three graduates of NP program options at two universities in the western U.S. participated in focus group discussions or interviews. Participants shared their perceptions of their NP educational preparation and suggestions for enhancing gerontologic curriculum. Four main domains emerged from analysis of qualitative data: (a) "Getting your boots on and getting into the role"; (b) "Older people are more complex than we were prepared to care for"; (c) "It is very different as a provider, but I am so glad I was a nurse with experience first"; (d) "NPs have a scope of practice, physician assistants (PAs) have a job description-but I wish we had their [procedural] preparation." Graduates identified a need for more educational content and clinical experiences specific to the care of older adults. Some suggested a postgraduate residency or mentoring option to assist NP role transition and progression and limit role confusion. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  13. Oxidative Stress Induced in Nurses by Exposure to Preparation and Handling of Antineoplastic Drugs in Mexican Hospitals: A Multicentric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Miranda-Mendoza, Gerardo Daniel; Cabrera-Galeana, Paula Anel; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; SanJuan-Reyes, Nely; Neri-Cruz, Nadia; García-Medina, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The impact of involuntary exposure to antineoplastic drugs (AD) was studied in a group of nurses in diverse hospitals in Mexico. The results were compared with a group of unexposed nurses. Anthropometric characteristics and the biochemical analysis were analyzed in both groups. Also, lipid peroxidation level (LPX), protein carbonyl content (PCC), and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were evaluated in blood of study participants as oxidative stress (OS) biomarkers. The group of occupationally exposed (OE) nurses consisted of 30 individuals ranging in age from 25 to 35 years. The control group included 30 nurses who were not occupationally exposed to the preparation and handling of AD and whose anthropometric and biochemical characteristics were similar to those of the OE group. All biomarkers evaluated were significantly increased (P < 0.5) in OE nurses compared to the control group. Results show that the assessment of OS biomarkers is advisable in order to evaluate exposure to AD in nurses. PMID:24719678

  14. Oxidative Stress Induced in Nurses by Exposure to Preparation and Handling of Antineoplastic Drugs in Mexican Hospitals: A Multicentric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leobardo Manuel Gómez-Oliván

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of involuntary exposure to antineoplastic drugs (AD was studied in a group of nurses in diverse hospitals in Mexico. The results were compared with a group of unexposed nurses. Anthropometric characteristics and the biochemical analysis were analyzed in both groups. Also, lipid peroxidation level (LPX, protein carbonyl content (PCC, and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were evaluated in blood of study participants as oxidative stress (OS biomarkers. The group of occupationally exposed (OE nurses consisted of 30 individuals ranging in age from 25 to 35 years. The control group included 30 nurses who were not occupationally exposed to the preparation and handling of AD and whose anthropometric and biochemical characteristics were similar to those of the OE group. All biomarkers evaluated were significantly increased (P<0.5 in OE nurses compared to the control group. Results show that the assessment of OS biomarkers is advisable in order to evaluate exposure to AD in nurses.

  15. The Mediating Effects of Basic Psychological Needs at Work on the Relationship between the Dimensions of the Learning Organization and Organizational Commitment in Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Bonni Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mediating effects of the Basic Psychological Needs at Work, comprised of competence, autonomy and relatedness, on the relationship between the Dimensions of the Learning Organization and affective and normative organizational commitment in the United States nursing population. The study incorporated…

  16. The incidence of technological stress among baccalaureate nurse educators using technology during course preparation and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Mary S

    2009-01-01

    The concept of technology-related stress was first introduced in the 1980s when computers became more prevalent in the business and academic world. Nurse educators have been impacted by the rapid changes in technology in recent years. A review of the literature revealed no research studies that have been conducted to investigate the incidence of technological stress among nurse educators. The purpose of this descriptive-correlational study was to describe the technological stressors that Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators experienced while teaching nursing theory courses. A researcher-developed questionnaire, the nurse educator technostress scale (NETS) was administered to a census sample of 311 baccalaureate nurse educators in Louisiana. Findings revealed that Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators are experiencing technological stress. The variable, perceived administrative support for use of technology in the classroom, was a significant predictor in a regression model predicting Louisiana baccalaureate nurse educators' technological stress (F=14.157, p<.001).

  17. Undergraduate surgical nursing preparation and guided operating room experience: A quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Paula

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine if guided operating theatre experience in the undergraduate nursing curricula enhanced surgical knowledge and understanding of nursing care provided outside this specialist area in the pre- and post-operative surgical wards. Using quantitative analyses, undergraduate nurses were knowledge tested on areas of pre- and post-operative surgical nursing in their final semester of study. As much learning occurs in nurses' first year of practice, participants were re-tested again after their Graduate Nurse Program/Preceptorship year. Participants' results were compared to the model of operating room education they had participated in to determine if there was a relationship between the type of theatre education they experienced (if any) and their knowledge of surgical ward nursing. Findings revealed undergraduates nurses receiving guided operating theatre experience had a 76% pass rate compared to 56% with non-guided or no experience (p < 0.001). Graduates with guided operating theatre experience as undergraduates or graduate nurses achieved a 100% pass rate compared to 53% with non-guided or no experience (p < 0.001). The research informs us that undergraduate nurses achieve greater learning about surgical ward nursing via guided operating room experience as opposed to surgical ward nursing experience alone.

  18. Implementación de guías de buenas prácticas clínicas elaboradas por Registered Nurses Association of Ontario (RNAO en el curriculum de Enfermería Universidad de Chile / Implementation of Clinical Best Practice Guidelines Done by The Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO in the Nursing Curriculum at Universidad de Chile / Implementação de manuais de boas práticas clínicas desenvolvidas por Registered Nurses Association of Ontario (RNAO no currículo de Enfermagem da Universidade do Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Silva-G, Lic. en Enf. y Obstetricia, Mg., PhD. (c

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La investigación desarrollada en enfermería en el último tiempo ha permitido generar conocimientos que aportan a mejorar el cuidado de salud que otorgan los profesionales, se han confeccionado protocolos y guías clínicas con la finalidad de ofrecer a los profesionales de la salud la mejor evidencia para la práctica clínica, viéndose beneficiadas con ello, principalmente, las personas que requieren cuidados y también las instituciones al disminuir sus costos. Para llegar a esta meta es indispensable la capacitación continua de los profesionales de la salud y la inclusión de la formación de estos contenidos en los programas de las instituciones formadoras. Objetivo: Este artículo presenta la experiencia de implementación de cuatro guías de buena práctica clínica elaboradas por Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO en dos planes de formación que se encontraba desarrollando en el Departamento / Escuela de Enfermería de la Universidad de Chile para los profesionales de enfermería. Metodología: Para la metodología de implementación se consideró como marco de referencia el material elaborado para este fin por parte de la organización RNAO denominado “Recursos para el Docente”, se apoya en modelos de desarrollo y progresión del aprendizaje como el modelo de Patricia Benner para la elaboración de la hipótesis de progresión de los contenidos en el curriculum de Enfermería, como también la pirámide de Miller para la evaluación de las competencias. Conclusiones: se espera que los estudiantes una vez terminada su formación cuenten con las herramientas implementadas bajo esta metodología, las cuales les permitan un desempeño profesional fundamentado en cuidados de enfermería basados en la evidencia científica. [Silva-G A. Implementación de guías de buenas prácticas clínicas elaboradas por Registered Nurses Association of Ontario (RNAO en el curriculum de Enfermería Universidad de Chile

  19. Changing the way that I am: students experience of educational preparation for advanced nursing roles in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Andrea; Aranda, Kay F; De Goeas, Sharon M; Lindley, Penny J

    2013-09-01

    The redesign of the healthcare workforce in the United Kingdom (UK) has resulted in the rapid introduction of more 'advanced' community nursing roles. This presents varying challenges for universities seeking to prepare practitioners for these roles. This paper reports on a qualitative study conducted at one university in England which sought to explore the educational experiences of students preparing for and engaging in advanced nursing roles. Data was collected through focus groups and semi-structured interviews. This study found that educational preparation for advanced nursing roles in the community is varied and complex and involved a number of claims, concerns and issues, captured in three themes: 1. Re-inventing roles; 2. Re-creating selves; and 3. Re-engaging with learning. The findings reveal how those in advanced roles work across occupational boundaries and manage conflicts, using differentiated and complex sources and forms of knowledge and skills. Learning occurs in non-linear ways and is a good example of expansive or sideways learning. There is a need for further research on the type of curriculum and methods to best support students preparing for these roles and further study on the impact on patient experience and outcomes.

  20. Preparing New Graduates for Interprofessional Teamwork: Effectiveness of a Nurse Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Julie L; Bromley, Gail E

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine whether a nurse residency program was effective in improving satisfaction with new graduates' performance competence in interprofessional collaboration. This was a cross-sectional survey design, comparing the satisfaction ratings of nurse leaders and staff nurses at a mid-western academic medical center to national benchmark data obtained from the 2007 Nursing Practice Readiness Tool. The sample consisted of 149 nurses who worked in inpatient units where new graduates practice. Thirty-five had 1 year or less of experience in nursing and 114 had at least 2 years of experience. Managers, experienced nurses, and new graduate nurses varied in their satisfaction ratings regarding interprofessional collaboration. Satisfaction of new graduates' competencies by nurse managers and staff nurses were rated higher in each category, compared with the national study, with 63% of nurse leaders satisfied with new graduates' ability to communicate with the interprofessional team, compared with the national average of 38%. Participants reported 56% satisfaction in the ability to work as a team, compared with 37% reported in the national study.

  1. Nurses for Wisconsin: A Collaborative Initiative to Enhance the Nurse Educator Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda K; Adams, Jan L; Lundeen, Sally; May, Katharyn A; Smith, Rosemary; Wendt, L Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Wisconsin, like much of the nation, is currently suffering from a growing nursing shortage. The University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire College of Nursing and Health Sciences, in partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and University of Wisconsin Oshkosh nursing programs, took advantage of a University of Wisconsin System Incentive Grant for economic and workforce development to address this problem. With a $3.2 million award, the Nurses for Wisconsin goal is to increase the number of baccalaureate registered nurses by expanding the nursing education capacity within the University of Wisconsin System. Nurses for Wisconsin is accelerating the preparation of nursing faculty by supporting nurses to enroll in doctor of nursing practice or nursing doctor of philosophy programs with pre- and postdoctoral fellowship awards ranging from $21,500 to $90,000 and the recruitment of faculty with a loan repayment program of up to $50,000. In exchange for the financial support, fellows and faculty must make a 3-year commitment to teach in a UW System nursing program. Two conferences for program participants are also funded through the award. The first conference was held in October 2014. The second conference is scheduled for summer 2015. With the first year of the 2-year project completed, this article describes Nurses for Wisconsin from inception to implementation and midterm assessment with a focus on lessons learned. A follow-up article addressing final outcomes and next steps is planned.

  2. Effectiveness of Simulation Preparation on Novice Nurses' Competence and Self-Efficacy in a Multiple-Patient Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Ashley E; Gubrud-Howe, Paula; Sideras, Stephanie; Lee, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the influence of three simulation preparation methods (expert modeling/intervention, voice-over PowerPoint/active control, and reading assignments/passive control) on improving novice nurses' competence and self-efficacy for providing care to multiple simulated patients. Both competence and self-efficacy were measured at baseline and following a five-week intervention. Twenty senior pre-licensure nursing students participated in the trial. One-way ANOVAs and parametric/nonparametric correlations were used. Voice-over PowerPoint and expert modeling resulted in greater improvements in self-efficacy compared with traditional reading assignments as simulation preparation. However, there was no relationship between change in competence and self-efficacy over time.

  3. Advancing information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Paula M

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is a dynamic profession; for registered nurses their role is increasingly requiring greater information process understanding and the effective management of information to ensure high quality safe patient care. This paper outlines the design and implementation of Systems of eCare. This is a course which advances information and communication technology knowledge for undergraduate nursing students within a Faculty of Health and Wellbeing appropriately preparing nurses for their professional careers. Systems of eCare entwines throughout the three year programme mapping to the curriculum giving meaning to learning for the student. In conclusion comments from students convey their appreciation of the provision of this element of the undergraduate programme.

  4. Effects of Discipline-based Career Course on Nursing Students' Career Search Self-efficacy, Career Preparation Behavior, and Perceptions of Career Barriers

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    Soonjoo Park, RN, PhD

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: The discipline-based career course was effective in decreasing perceptions of career barriers and increasing career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior among nursing students.

  5. Preparing Air Force Nurses to Deliver Health Care in a Unique Operational Environment: Detainee Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    challenging. Weiskopf described the inmate nursing care experience,‘It’s not like a hospital, because the whole purpose is the offender is there...facility’s primary mission focuses on custody of the detainee, not care of the detainee. Nursing care in prison systems has already been identified as...for custody; the offender is not there incarcerated to improve their health.ʹ 1 It is difficult for nurses to transition from an environment in

  6. Exploring the opinions of registered nurses working in a clinical transfusion environment on the contribution of e-learning to personal learning and clinical practice: results of a small scale educational research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Susan; Donaldson, Jayne H

    2013-05-01

    To explore the opinions of registered nurses on the Learnbloodtransfusion Module 1: Safe Transfusion Practice e-learning programme to meeting personal learning styles and learning needs. A qualitative research methodology was applied based on the principles of phenomenology. Adopting a convenience sampling plan supported the recruitment of participants who had successfully completed the e-learning course. Thematic analysis from the semi-structured interviews identified common emerging themes through application of Colaizzis framework. Seven participants of total sample population (89) volunteered to participate in the study. Five themes emerged which included learning preferences, interactive learning, course design, patient safety and future learning needs. Findings positively show the e-learning programme captures the learning styles and needs of learners. In particular, learning styles of a reflector, theorist and activist as well as a visual learner can actively engage in the online learning experience. In an attempt to bridge the knowledge practice gap, further opinions are offered on the course design and the application of knowledge to practice following completion of the course. The findings of the small scale research study have shown that the e-learning course does meet the diverse learning styles and needs of nurses working in a clinical transfusion environment. However, technology alone is not sufficient and a blended approach to learning must be adopted to meet bridging the theory practice gap supporting the integration of knowledge to clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Using the factors that have a positive impact on the retention of low socioeconomic students to prepare accelerated enrolled nurses for the science units of a nursing degree. A Practice Report

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    Sheila Doggrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available At a campus in a low socioeconomic (SES area, our University allows enrolled nurses entry into the second year of a Bachelor of Nursing, but attrition is high.  Using the factors, described by Yorke and Thomas (2003 to have a positive impact on the attrition of low SES students, we developed strategies to prepare the enrolled nurses for the pharmacology and bioscience units of a nursing degree with the aim of reducing their attrition.  As a strategy, the introduction of review lectures of anatomy, physiology and microbiology, was associated with significantly reduced attrition rates. The subsequent introduction of a formative website activity of some basic concepts in bioscience and pharmacology, and a workshop addressing study skills and online resources, were associated with a further reduction in attrition rates of enrolled nursing students in a Bachelor of Nursing

  8. Preparing palliative home care nurses to act as facilitators for physicians' learning: Evaluation of a training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pype, Peter; Mertens, Fien; Wens, Johan; Stes, Ann; Van den Eynden, Bart; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-05-01

    Palliative care requires a multidisciplinary care team. General practitioners often ask specialised palliative home care teams for support. Working with specialised nurses offers learning opportunities, also called workplace learning. This can be enhanced by the presence of a learning facilitator. To describe the development and evaluation of a training programme for nurses in primary care. The programme aimed to prepare palliative home care team nurses to act as facilitators for general practitioners' workplace learning. A one-group post-test only design (quantitative) and semi-structured interviews (qualitative) were used. A multifaceted train-the-trainer programme was designed. Evaluation was done through assignments with individual feedback, summative assessment through videotaped encounters with simulation-physicians and individual interviews after a period of practice implementation. A total of 35 nurses followed the programme. The overall satisfaction was high. Homework assignments interfered with the practice workload but showed to be fundamental in translating theory into practice. Median score on the summative assessment was 7 out of 14 with range 1-13. Interviews revealed some aspects of the training (e.g. incident analysis) to be too difficult for implementation or to be in conflict with personal preferences (focus on patient care instead of facilitating general practitioners' learning). Training palliative home care team nurses as facilitator of general practitioners' workplace learning is a feasible but complex intervention. Personal characteristics, interpersonal relationships and contextual variables have to be taken into account. Training expert palliative care nurses to facilitate general practitioners' workplace learning requires careful and individualised mentoring. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Online learning communities can provide support for nurses preparing for certification examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethtel, Pam

    2005-01-01

    Achieving certification is a benefit to the nurses, to their patients, and to the organizations that support them. Developing an online learning community is a simple way for the institution to offer support to the nursing staff. Providing the resources for creation of online learning communities demonstrates the facility's commitment to communication, education, and professional development.

  10. Nursing Revalidation

    OpenAIRE

    F. Cannon; McCutcheon, K.

    2016-01-01

    This article details the Nursing and Midwifery Council revalidation requirements essential for all registered nurses and midwives in the United Kingdom. Nursing revalidation is effective from April 2016 and is built on the pre-existing Post-registration education and practice. Unlike the previous process, revalidation provides a more robust system which is clearly linked to the Code and should assist towards the delivery of quality and safe effective care

  11. Motivations of nursing students regarding their educational preparation for mental health nursing in Australia and the United Kingdom: a survey evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Edward, Karen-leigh; Warelow, Philip; Hemingway, Steve; Hercelinskyj, Gylo; Welch, Anthony; McAndrew, Sue; Stephenson, John

    2015-01-01

    Background There has been much debate by both academics and clinical agencies about the motivations and abilities of nurse graduates to work in mental health nursing. The aim of this study was to recruit student nurses from a dedicated mental health nursing program in the United Kingdom (UK) and a comprehensive nursing program in Australia and illuminate their motivations towards considering mental health nursing as a career choice. Methods This study comprised of two UK and four Australian S...

  12. Who should provide continuous renal replacement therapies? Nephrology nurses are better prepared to provide CRRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Kathy

    2007-01-01

    Although critical care nurses are fully capable of learning CRRT, there are substantial, irrefutable challenges to achieving and sustaining proficiency. There is also diminished opportunity and motivation for critical care nurses to advance CRRT practice through quality initiatives, education, or research when it is a small piece of their practice. Consequently, I believe that it is incumbent upon acute care nephrology nurses to clarify the magnitude and value of what we do and to support our critical care colleagues in doing what they do best. The debate as to who should perform CRRT began in an effort to explore the better opportunity for cost-saving; but, in the end, it really boils down to the better opportunity for life-saving. I suspect improving outcomes for patients requiring CRRT will ultimately save hospitals more money than the short-sighted gains from critical care nurses performing tasks outside of universally-applied critical care RN processes.

  13. Preparing for export? Medical and nursing student migration intentions post-qualification in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin George

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The migration of health professionals can have a profound impact on health systems around the globe. The International Organization for Migration’s (IOM Mobility of Health Professionals Research Project (MoHProf aimed to improve knowledge about the migration of healthcare professionals and understand migration intentions and factors influencing the migration of medical and nursing students.Objectives: The study aimed to determine the proportion of nursing and medical studentswho were intending to emigrate, their attitudes and beliefs about, and the factors influencing their decision to emigrate.Method: This study was conducted at three medical schools and one nursing school in SouthAfrica (n = 298 amongst 260 medical and 38 nursing students. One hundred and twenty-five students were in the final year of their studies and 143 were in their prefinal year. Thirty students did not indicate the year of their studies. Every student present on the day of data collection completed a questionnaire comprising psychometric and survey-based questions. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data.Results: More than a third (37% of the respondents intended to work or specialise abroad.The majority of medical (58.9% and nursing (66.6% students intended to leave SA within five years of completing their medical or nursing studies. The perception of poor working conditions within the health sector, such as long work hours, high patient loads, inadequate resources and occupational hazards, influenced medical students to consider emigrating from South Africa.Conclusion: The high number of medical and nursing students intending to emigrate requires a reassessment of effectiveness of retention strategies for doctors and nurses in the South African healthcare system and actions to improve working conditions in the public healthcare sector.

  14. Preparing for export? Medical and nursing student migration intentions post-qualification in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin George

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The migration of health professionals can have a profound impact on health systems around the globe. The International Organization for Migration’s (IOM Mobility of Health Professionals Research Project (MoHProf aimed to improve knowledge about the migration of healthcare professionals and understand migration intentions and factors influencing the migration of medical and nursing students.Objectives: The study aimed to determine the proportion of nursing and medical studentswho were intending to emigrate, their attitudes and beliefs about, and the factors influencing their decision to emigrate.Method: This study was conducted at three medical schools and one nursing school in SouthAfrica (n = 298 amongst 260 medical and 38 nursing students. One hundred and twenty-five students were in the final year of their studies and 143 were in their prefinal year. Thirty students did not indicate the year of their studies. Every student present on the day of data collection completed a questionnaire comprising psychometric and survey-based questions. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data.Results: More than a third (37% of the respondents intended to work or specialise abroad.The majority of medical (58.9% and nursing (66.6% students intended to leave SA within five years of completing their medical or nursing studies. The perception of poor working conditions within the health sector, such as long work hours, high patient loads, inadequate resources and occupational hazards, influenced medical students to consider emigrating from South Africa.Conclusion: The high number of medical and nursing students intending to emigrate requires a reassessment of effectiveness of retention strategies for doctors and nurses in the South African healthcare system and actions to improve working conditions in the public healthcare sector.

  15. Preparing underemployed Latino U.S. nurses through the Mexico NCLEX-RN Success Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lujan, Josefina; Little, Kermit

    2010-12-01

    The critical nursing shortage in U.S. communities along the United States-Mexico border is compounded by the need for nurses who are linguistically and culturally concordant with the growing number of Latinos in these communities. The innovative 16-week Mexico NCLEX-RN Success Program responds to this need by helping underemployed Latino nurses, who were educated in Mexico and live in the United States, adapt linguistically and culturally to multiple-choice testing. Ten of the program students have taken the NCLEX-RN with a 50% pass rate, which is twice as high as the internationally educated candidate passing average. This demonstrates potential for the program to build the human capacity of U.S. communities along the United States-Mexico border by infusing linguistically and culturally concordant nurses into the workforce and materializing the dream of underemployed Latino nurses to implement their hard-earned and urgently needed nursing skills. Lessons learned from the program are discussed.

  16. A literature review exploring the preparation of mental health nurses for working with people with learning disability and mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adshead, Stephanie; Collier, Elizabeth; Kennedy, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this literature review is to explore whether mental health nurses are being appropriately prepared to care for learning disabled patients who also suffer from mental ill health. A systematic approach was adopted in order to identify relevant literature for review on the topic. Five electronic databases were searched; CINAHL, Medline, ERIC, PubMed and Scopus. Searches were limited to the years 2001-2013. A total of 13 articles were identified as relevant to the topic area for review. Three main themes were identified relating to (a) attitudes (b) practice and (c) education. There appears to be a lack of research that directly addresses this issue and the existing literature suggests that there are considerable deficits in the ability of mental health nurses to be able to provide appropriate care for those with both a learning disability and mental ill health. The findings of this review would suggest that this topic area is in urgent need of further investigation and research. Further research into this area of practice could possibly help to inform education regarding this subject at pre-registration and post qualifying levels, which could therefore in turn, improve the delivery of mental health nursing care to this particular client group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Nursing Workforce Diversity Project: Strategies for Recruitment, Retention, Graduation, and NCLEX-RN Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ted A; Pole, David C; Ciarlo, Erica M; Holmes, Shearon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a collaborative project designed to recruit and retain students from underrepresented minorities and disadvantaged backgrounds into nursing education. Ethnic minorities remain underrepresented in the nursing workforce in comparison to the general population. The numbers of minorities enrolled in nursing education programs are insufficient to meet the health care workforce diversity needs of the future. High school students were provided with a preprofessional education program to prepare them for admission into a nursing program. Retention strategies were implemented for newly admitted and enrolled nursing education students. Twenty-one high school students enrolled in a nursing education program. The students enrolled in the nursing education program graduated and passed the licensure examination. Early recruitment and multiprong retention programs can be successful in diversifying the registered nurse workforce.

  18. A cross-sectional study on job burnout and its influence factors among registered nurses%在职注册护士职业倦怠及影响因素现况调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈燕勤; 王锡唯

    2014-01-01

    目的:了解在职注册护士职业倦怠现状并探讨其主要影响因素。方法按浙江省28家医院注册护士总数的10%抽取1740名护士,进行Maslach职业倦怠调查量表调查;再按情绪耗竭、去个性化和职业效能3个维度分析,并对不同医院等级、年龄和护龄的护士进行比较。结果护士轻度倦怠占48.90%,中度倦怠占46.60%,重度倦怠占4.50%。三甲医院护士的职业倦怠总平均得分最高,为3.25±0.96;外科护士年龄30~40岁,护龄5年以上职业倦怠得分高于护龄5年以下者( P<0.05)。结论浙江省护士职业倦怠总体处于轻中度水平,医院等级、工龄是影响职业倦怠度的重要因素。%Objective This study aimed to investigate the status of job burnout among registered nurses in Zhejiang province and to analyze its main influential factors. Methods Maslach Burnout Inventory General Survey( MBI-GS)was used to measure the job burnout situation of 1740 nurses selected from 28 hospitals. Three dimensions including emotional exhaustion,depersonalization and occupation efficacy were analyzed and compared among different stratifications of hospital,age and working years etc. Results The proportion of mild burnout,moderate burnout and severe burnout nurses was 48. 90%,46. 60% and 4. 50% respectively. The highest score(3. 25 ± 0. 96)of MBI -GS was found in Grade Three A general hospitals. Nurses of more than 5 years working experience,were surgical related,with a bachelor degree and aged 30 to 40 had higher scores than who were not(all P<0. 05). Multiple linear stepwise regression analysis showed that the main influence factors were hospital grade,working years and working passion(all P<0. 05). Conclusion The job burnout situation of nurses is mainly at mild to moderate level. The grade of hospital and the work experience are the main influential factors.

  19. National Register Historic Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The National Register Historic District layer is a shape file showing the boundaries of Historic Districts that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

  20. The School Nurse Role- A Changing Concept in Preparation and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Loretta C.

    1970-01-01

    Personal views on need for change in nurse function from "illness orientation to "wellness orientation , from stress on the child in school to the child as a member of family and community. Presented at American School Health Association, Philadelphia 1969. (CJ)

  1. Are you prepared to S.A.V.E. your nursing student from suicide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, C S

    1998-02-01

    According to the most recently available data presented in the Statistical Abstract of the United States 1994 (United States Bureau of the Census, 1994), 17,100 young Americans (15 to 44 years old) died in 1991 due to suicide. At no other time during the life span were suicide rates so high. Suicide among college and university students is estimated by some to be 50% higher than for other Americans of comparable age (Westefeld & Pattilo, 1987). Not only is suicide considered by many authors to be the number one health problem on the nation's campuses (Mathiasen, 1988), but the suicide rate for this population has tripled over the past 25 years (Hardin & Weast, 1989). Professional nursing students could perhaps be at an even higher risk for suicide than other college students. Manicini, Lavecchia, and Clegg point out that "[n]ursing students are more doubtful than other college students about their academic performance. They encounter stress in adjusting to a rigorous program of theory and practice. The reality is often far different from a prospective student's image of it" (cited in Lampkin, Cannon, & Fairchild, 1985, p. 148). Because of the longevity of contact hours spent with nursing students in both lecture and clinical milieus, nursing faculty are in a uniquely favorable position to identify and assess those students who appear to be at risk for suicide. In addition, as most nurse educators provide supportive relationships, rich with caring and trust for their students, distressed students are usually open to talking to a faculty member. If a suicidal risk is found during the assessment interview, the faculty member should then provide an immediate referral for further psychiatric evaluation and intervention. To assist faculty in the quick recall of the essential components of this helping process the acronym S.A.V.E. is used: 1. S: Suicidal behaviors. 2. A: Assessment interview. 3. V: Value student. 4. E: Evaluation-Referral.

  2. Revealing sexuality: have nurses' knowledge and attitudes changed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, L S; Wood, P J

    1998-07-01

    All nurses should be adequately prepared for assisting clients with issues relating to sexuality. This article describes a descriptive study undertaken between 1988 and 1991 which used a questionnaire to survey the knowledge and attitudes of New Zealand pre- and post-registration nursing students regarding sexuality. The results of this study have previously been available only in an unpublished report. As interest in this area of research is increasing overseas, and as it is now time to consider resurveying New Zealand nurses, it is useful to have a summary of the findings available to a wider audience. Phase One analysed the responses of a convenience sample of 319 registered nurses undertaking a one-year post-registration programme in four New Zealand schools of nursing in either 1988 or 1989. Phase Two analysed 575 questionnaires completed by a convenience sample of nursing students in their first and/or third years of a three-year programme leading to nursing registration. Analysis of the 35 true/false items showed that students near the completion of their programme were as knowledgeable or more knowledgeable than registered nurses, although there were areas where both groups lacked information. Analysis of the 33 items measuring attitudes on a 5-point Likert scale suggested that the attitudes of both pre- and post-registration students were more liberal than conservative, but with some differences discernible when participants were grouped by demographic variables. Importantly, the study found that 55% of pre-registration students, and 88% of registered nurse participants, felt that nurses were inadequately prepared for helping clients with concerns about sexual matters. The findings are compared with those of studies undertaken overseas this decade.

  3. Are Nurse Leaders Prepared to Lead Across the Continuum of Care in the New Paradigm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, O Ed; Malin, Shelly

    2017-05-01

    The movement toward linking reimbursement with outcomes necessitates providing care across a continuum of settings, leading to the need for a new healthcare paradigm. Issues related to shifting to this new paradigm include disagreement about what this paradigm encompasses, the fragmentation of the healthcare system, and overreliance on the medical model as a framework for driving health policy decisions. We advocate for nurse leaders to guide the development of this new paradigm.

  4. Preparing practice scholars: teaching knowledge application in the Doctor of Nursing Practice curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Susan Weber; Budd, Geraldine M; Courtney, Maureen R; Neiheisel, Mary B; Hammersla, Margaret; Carlson, Elizabeth D

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the scholarship role of the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and the associated knowledge and skills required for success. There are excellent competencies provided by national organizations that present guidelines for design and application of this practice scholar's contributions. Although evidence-based research translation is known to be essential for the DNP scholar, a consensus does not exist about the required research knowledge and skill levels that are needed. A model was developed to depict the scholarship roles of the DNP and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). This model indicates both DNP and PhD scholars are alike in their enactment of active scholarship but have different areas of expertise. They are different in their major roles that lead to the development of practice science; the DNP is the expert in knowledge application while the PhD is the expert in knowledge generation. A nurse practice scholar needs to have a fundamental and strong understanding of research design and interpretation in order to appraise and implement research-based evidence into practice and conduct clinical projects. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  5. Infusing evidence-based instructional strategies to prepare today's military practical nurses for tomorrow's practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Richard A; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L

    2014-01-01

    Is there one best method to provide instruction to today's nursing students? The evidence found in the current literature clearly states the answer is no. The student of today is technology oriented. But for them, it's not about technology, it's about the learning that technology provides. With this understanding, this article provides a review of the efforts by the staff of the US Army Practical Nurse Course (68WM6) to infuse evidence-based instructional strategies into curriculum. Five strategies that were integrated into the curriculum are presented: computer assisted learning, gaming software, classroom response system, human patient simulators, and video recordings. All of the initiatives discussed in this article were implemented into the program of instruction over a 6-year period in an attempt to incorporate the use of appropriate technology in the learning process. The results are a testimony to the necessity of using a combination of strategies for teaching today's nursing students. In doing so, the organization not only improved the learning process, but found significant financial savings.

  6. Effects of Discipline-based Career Course on Nursing Students' Career Search Self-efficacy, Career Preparation Behavior, and Perceptions of Career Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soonjoo

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a discipline-based career course on perceptions of career barriers, career search self-efficacy, and career preparation behavior of nursing students. Differences in career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior by the students' levels of career barriers were also examined. The study used a modified one-group, pretest-posttest design. The convenience sample consisted of 154 undergraduate nursing students in a university. The discipline-based career course consisted of eight sessions, and was implemented for 2 hours per session over 8 weeks. The data were collected from May to June in 2012 and 2013 using the following instruments: the Korean Career Indecision Inventory, the Career Search Efficacy Scale, and the Career Preparation Behavior Scale. Descriptive statistics, paired t test, and analysis of covariance were used to analyze the data. Upon the completion of the discipline-based career course, students' perceptions of career barriers decreased and career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior increased. Career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior increased in students with both low and high levels of career barriers. The difference between the low and high groups was significant for career search self-efficacy but not for career preparation behavior. The discipline-based career course was effective in decreasing perceptions of career barriers and increasing career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior among nursing students. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Research Issues: Nursing & Professionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Peri

    Nursing has always been viewed as a "women's profession" as evidenced by the fact that 97 percent of the 1.9 million registered nurses in the United States are female. The values of helping others, altruism, compassion, and sacrifice are associated with women and with nursing. However, because many young people today do not view these values as…

  8. District nursing in Dominica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, PME; Luteijn, AJ; Nasiiro, RS; Bruney, [No Value; Smith, RJA; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    1998-01-01

    District nurses constitute the basis of the primary health care services in Dominica. All encounters of three district nurses were registered using the international classification of primary care. Information on other aspects of district nursing was collected by participating observation and the us

  9. District nursing in Dominica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, PME; Luteijn, AJ; Nasiiro, RS; Bruney, [No Value; Smith, RJA; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    1998-01-01

    District nurses constitute the basis of the primary health care services in Dominica. All encounters of three district nurses were registered using the international classification of primary care. Information on other aspects of district nursing was collected by participating observation and the

  10. Comparing the frequency of physical examination techniques performed by associate and baccalaureate degree prepared nurses in clinical practice: does education make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddens, Jean

    2006-03-01

    Rapid changes in health care have underscored the need for reform in health professions education, including nursing education. One of many problems cited in the nursing and other health sciences education literature is overcrowded curricula; therefore, an evaluation of content is necessary. The purpose of this study was to determine whether differences exist in the frequency that physical examination techniques are performed by associate and baccalaureate degree prepared nurses. Participants completed a survey on performance of various physical examination techniques. A Mann-Whitney test showed no differences between the two groups in terms of frequency of techniques performed. A small negative correlation was found between frequency and years of experience with the nutrition assessment category. A comparison of physical examination content covered in baccalaureate and associate degree nursing programs is needed to further understand these findings.

  11. The Danish Twin Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyvik, K O; Christensen, Kaare; Skytthe, A;

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Population based twin registers represent a valuable tool for genetic epidemiological research, since twin studies aim at separating the effect of genes and environment for complex traits. The Danish Twin Register's history, size, ascertainment and completeness of data, as well as data...... accessibility and availability are described. RESULTS: The Danish Twin Register comprises 14,051 twin pairs born 1870-1930, representing all twins surviving to age six years, and 20,888 twin pairs born 1953-1982, representing 75% of those born 1953-1967 and 95% of those born 1968-1982. The birth cohorts 1931......-1952 og 1983-1993 are being ascertained at the moment. The register is available for research given certain conditions are fulfilled. CONCLUSION: This register will in a few years be the most comprehensive twin register in the world. It is a very valuable Danish research resource....

  12. The Danish Twin Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyvik, K O; Christensen, Kaare; Skytthe, A

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Population based twin registers represent a valuable tool for genetic epidemiological research, since twin studies aim at separating the effect of genes and environment for complex traits. The Danish Twin Register's history, size, ascertainment and completeness of data, as well as data...... accessibility and availability are described. RESULTS: The Danish Twin Register comprises 14,051 twin pairs born 1870-1930, representing all twins surviving to age six years, and 20,888 twin pairs born 1953-1982, representing 75% of those born 1953-1967 and 95% of those born 1968-1982. The birth cohorts 1931......-1952 og 1983-1993 are being ascertained at the moment. The register is available for research given certain conditions are fulfilled. CONCLUSION: This register will in a few years be the most comprehensive twin register in the world. It is a very valuable Danish research resource....

  13. Spiritual care perspectives of Danish Registered Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kirsten Haugaard; Turner, de Sales

    2008-01-01

    respects patients’ values, religion, customs, and spiritual beliefs. Literature however revealed that the phenomenon of spiritual care is complex and variously interpreted, and that there seems to be a lack of conceptual clarity regarding what constitutes spiritual care. A phenomenological and hermeneutic...

  14. From healthcare support worker to registered nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driffield, Amanda

    2016-09-01

    Workforce planning, education and training are essential for achieving an appropriate mix of skilled and motivated staff, but the NHS's financial challenges mean new ways of providing safe staffing levels and balancing the books are required. This article describes the development of an education programme for band 1 to band 4 unregistered support workers that led to the introduction of an assistant practitioner (AP) role. It also explains how the programme evolved from a one-year certificate in higher education to a foundation degree in health care, and has since produced over 100 APs in a range of clinical areas who deliver high quality, competent and patient-centred care in a cost-effective, sustainable way.

  15. Depoimentos de enfermeiras hospitalares da década de 60: subsídios para a compreensão da enfermagem atual Declaraciones de enfermeras hospitalarias de la década del sesenta: ayuda para la comprensión de la enfermería actual Declarations of registered nurses from the 1960's: elements to comprehend nursing today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Paciência Vietta

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo é parte de um projeto mais amplo que visa resgatar aspectos significativos relacionados à evolução da assistência de enfermagem nas décadas de 50 a 90. Este resgate é feito através da técnica de depoimentos orais de enfermeiros em exercício e aposentados, no contexto de um Hospital Escola do interior Paulista. O presente estudo particulariza os resultados obtidos, referentes à década de 60. Como resultado evidencia-se o esforço empreendido pelos enfermeiros na luta pelo reconhecimento e prestígio da profissão, as transformações intensa e profundas aos novos papéis da enfermeira enquanto líder da equipe e membro da equipe médica.Este estudio es parte de un proyecto más ámplio que apunta rescatar aspestos significativos relacionados a la evolución de la asistencia de enfermería en las décadas del 50 al 90. Este rescate es hecho a través de la técnica de declaraciones de enfermeros en ejercicio y pensionados, en el contexto de un Hospital Escuela del interior Paulista. El presente estudio particulariza los resultados obtenidos, referentes a la década del 60. Como resultado se evidencia el esfuerzo empreendido por los enfermeros en la lucha por elreconocimiento y prestigio de la prefesión, las transformaciones intensas y profundas a los nuevos papeles de enfermería, como líder del grupo de enfermería y miembro del equipo médico.This study is part of a more extensive project that proposes to recover significant aspects related to the evolution of nursing care from 1950's to 1990's. This report is made through the technique of oral declaration by active and retired registered nurses, in the context of an University-hospital from the interior of São Paulo State. The present study emphasizes the outcomes related 1960s. The results show the effort undertaken by nurses in the struggle for profession's recognition and prestige; intense and deep changes related to nurse's new roles as leaders of the nursing

  16. Arthroplasty register for Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: The annual number of joint replacement operations in Germany is high. The introduction of an arthroplasty register promises an important contribution to the improvement of the quality of patient’s care. Research questions: The presented report addresses the questions on organization and functioning, benefits and cost-benefits as well as on legal, ethical and social aspects of the arthroplasty registers. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in September 2008 in the medical databases MEDLINE, EMBASE etc. and was complemented with a hand search. Documents describing arthroplasty registers and/or their relevance as well as papers on legal, ethical and social aspects of such registers were included in the evaluation. The most important information was extracted and analysed. Results: Data concerning 30 arthroplasty registers in 19 countries as well as one international arthroplasty register were identified. Most of the arthroplasty registers are maintained by national orthopedic societies, others by health authorities or by their cooperation. Mostly, registries are financially supported by governments and rarely by other sources.The participation of the orthopedists in the data collection process of the arthroplasty registry is voluntary in most countries. The consent of the patients is usually required. The unique patient identification is ensured in nearly all registers.Each data set consists of patient and clinic identification numbers, data on diagnosis, the performed intervention, the operation date and implanted prostheses. The use of clinical scores, patient-reported questionnaires and radiological documentation is rare. Methods for data documentation and transfer are paper form, electronic entry as well as scanning of the data using bar codes. The data are mostly being checked for their completeness and validity. Most registers offer results of the data evaluation to the treating orthopedists and

  17. The Danish Adoption Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Liselotte; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2011-01-01

    The Danish Adoption Register was established in 1963-1964 to explore the genetic and environmental contribution to familial aggregation of schizophrenia.......The Danish Adoption Register was established in 1963-1964 to explore the genetic and environmental contribution to familial aggregation of schizophrenia....

  18. The Danish Pathology Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Beth; Larsen, Ole B

    2011-01-01

    The National Board of Health, Denmark in 1997 published guidelines for reporting of pathology data and the Danish Pathology Register (DPR) was established.......The National Board of Health, Denmark in 1997 published guidelines for reporting of pathology data and the Danish Pathology Register (DPR) was established....

  19. A Critique of the Undergraduate Nursing Preceptorship Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Sedgwick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The preceptorship model is a cornerstone of clinical undergraduate nursing education in Canadian nursing programs. Their extensive use means that nursing programs depend heavily on the availability and willingness of Registered Nurses to take on the preceptor role. However, both the health service and education industries are faced with challenges that seem to undermine the effectiveness of the preceptorship clinical model. Indeed, the unstable nature of the clinical setting as a learning environment in conjunction with faculty shortages and inadequate preparation for preceptors and supervising faculty calls us to question if the preceptorship model is able to meet student learning needs and program outcomes. In a critical analysis of preceptorship, we offer a deconstruction of the model to advance clinical nursing education discourse.

  20. Care of the Patient with Renal Disease: Peritoneal Dialysis and Transplants, Nursing 321A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulburd, Kimberly

    A description is provided of a course, "Care of the Patient with Renal Disease," offered at the community college level to prepare licensed registered nurses to care for patients with renal disease, including instruction in performing the treatments of peritoneal dialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The first…

  1. Nursing Education and the Black Nurse ... An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Samson

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1907, Cecilia Makiwane passed the final examination for general nurses of the Cape Colonial Medical Council, and on 7 January 1908 became the first Black registered professional nurse in South Africa (1:269. On 31 December 1977 there were 18 362 Black nurses on the registers of the South African Nursing Council3. At the time when a new Health Act (63/1977 and a new Nursing Act (50/1978 have been promulgated, and “Curationis” makes its début, it is well to look at the highlights of the development of nursing education for Blacks during the past 70 years.

  2. Standardized Nursing Languages. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Carolyn; Endsley, Patricia; Chau, Elizabeth; Morgitan, Judith

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that standardized nursing languages (SNL) are essential communication tools for registered professional school nurses (hereinafter, school nurses) to assist in planning, delivery, and evaluation of quality nursing care. SNL help identify, clarify and document the nature and…

  3. Integrating a Career Planning and Development Program into the Baccalaureate Nursing Curriculum. Part II. Outcomes for New Graduate Nurses 12 Months Post-Graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Janice; Spalding, Karen; Navarro, Justine; Jancar, Sonya; Canizares, Genevieve

    2015-11-28

    New graduate nurses' (NGNs) transition into the nursing workforce is characterized as stressful and challenging. Consequently, a high percentage of them leave their first place of employment or the profession entirely within one year of graduation. Nursing literature describes this complicated shift from student to registered nurse, however, limited attention has focused on strategies that could be implemented during students' academic programs to prepare them for this difficult transition period. Therefore, a longitudinal intervention study was conducted to examine the influence of a career planning and development (CPD) program on the development of career resilience in baccalaureate nursing students and at 12 months post-graduation (NGN). The findings support including structured and progressive curriculum-based CPD opportunities in academic programs, not only for the positive outcomes that accrue to students, but also because of the benefits they extend to NGNs as they make the transition to their first professional nursing role.

  4. The Lived Experience of Masters-Prepared Academic Nurse Educators Decision-Making Process for Pursuing Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Nursing professionals represent one of the largest groups of healthcare professions in the United States. Nurses who educate in academic institutions across the states require higher education. Many nurse educators have completed master's level education and are considering obtaining doctoral education for various reasons. This study explored…

  5. Preparing to thrive during career transitions: tools for the occupational health nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Judy A

    2005-05-01

    Whether planned or unexpected, career transition can have positive results that lead to personal growth and a more fulfilling work life. The transition period should be recognized as an opportunity to assess the past and positively shape the future. Occupational health nurses who enhance their professional and communication skills and maintain up-to-date tools are likely to have a competitive advantage during career transitions. Recommended job search tools include an up-to-date and scannable resume and a portfolio that includes summaries of key accomplishments and recognition received, business references, and a network of contacts. Networking is most effective when it is a mutual exchange. Tullier (1998) suggests individuals remember to seek opportunities to provide value to those who have provided assistance, and to become a resource to those in need of assistance. Ways to support and mentor others include sharing a current article of interest or information about an event they might wish to attend, recommending them as speakers, nominating them for awards, volunteering assistance on a special project or to a charity they support, and acknowledging and congratulating them on their accomplishments. Developing a personal action plan might include objectives such as initiating more frequent contact with individuals in one's network, developing or updating job search tools, improving speaking or writing skills, or increasing involvement in professional or community organizations. Whatever the action items identified and completed, the result will be future career transitions that are more likely to yield positive outcomes.

  6. IT Risk register

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical part of the thesis analyzes several selected methodologies and best-practices related to information technology risks management, with focus on documents and guidance developed by ISACA. It builds a set of ideas and basic requirements for effective model of an IT risk register. Strong emphasis is placed on mapping CobiT 4.1 based Risk IT to COBIT 5. The practical part describes implementation of an exploratory web-based IT risk register in Python programming language utilizing...

  7. Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Dardir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were prepared by the reaction of linolenic acid and hexanamide (derived from the reaction of hexanoic acid and diethanolamine. The chemical structure for the newly prepared hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were elucidated using elemental analysis, (FTIR, H 1NMR and chemical ionization mass spectra (CI/Ms spectroscopic techniques. The results of the spectroscopic analysis indicated that they were prepared through the right method and they have high purity. The new prepared esters have high biodegradability and lower toxicity (environmentally friendly so they were evaluated as a synthetic-based mud (ester-based mud for oil-well drilling fluids. The evaluation included study of the rheological properties, filtration and thermal properties of the ester based-muds formulated with the newly prepared esters compared to the reference commercial synthetic-based mud.

  8. Supportive leadership in Swedish community night nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Christine; Fagerberg, Ingegerd; Asp, Margareta

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the support night nurses' give to staff in community night nursing. Studies have shown that support given to staff is one of night registered nurses' (RNs') experiences of the meaning of caring. This support, that community RNs display for staff in night-time care, is sparsely described. All community night-duty nurses in a medium-sized municipal in Sweden participated in the present study. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse data from observations. The support given by RNs to staff is described using three themes: (1) a conditional supporting stance, (2) preparing propitious conditions for caring and (3) confidence in the abilities of individual staff members and adaptation to their individual needs. The results reveal that RNs consider support to staff in terms of nursing leadership. Out of 'concern for the staff' the RNs try to be there for them, which corresponds to nursing leadership. Such concern also arises from the RNs' awareness that by giving support to staff this affects the staffs' caring for older people. The current municipal social care organization of community nursing of older people in which RNs have extensive responsibilities with insufficient control, is a working condition with a risk for decreased quality of care and a high risk for work-related stress syndrome. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. First-line nurse administrators in academe: how are they prepared, what do they do, and will they stay in their jobs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princeton, J C; Gaspar, T M

    1991-01-01

    This article examines the role characteristics, responsibilities, and anticipated career patterns of first-line nurse administrators employed in university-based nursing education programs throughout the nation. First-line administration is the first level on the administrative ladder, and these administrators are most frequently entitled department chairpersons; division, program, and level directors; or coordinators. This was an exploratory and descriptive research project, and the questions addressed were (1) How are first-line nurse administrators in academe formally educated and informally prepared for their administrative role? (2) What are the administrative competencies important for this administrative role? (3) What strains, conflicts, and work overload are associated with the first-line administrative role, and what strategies are used to cope? (4) What do these administrators anticipate as a career pattern in administration based on their experiences as first-line administrators? Fifty-six first-line nurse administrators were interviewed from 42 schools of nursing that offer both bachelor's degree and graduate nursing programs. Data indicated that one third of the study participants completed graduate level courses in administration, and the majority had worked with administrative mentors. They ranked having character and integrity as their most important competency, which was defined as being trusted by faculty, other administrators, and students. Settling priorities for their administrative work caused them their greatest strain, and work overload was most predominant. Role conflict was present consistently as they attempted to meet the traditional triad of faculty responsibilities (research and scholarship, teaching, service) plus administrative duties. Numerous time-management strategies were used to cope, but nonetheless, one half will not continue in an administration career pathway. Implications for academic nurse administrators are cited.

  10. 42 CFR 405.2416 - Visiting nurse services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Visiting nurse services. 405.2416 Section 405.2416... Health Center Services § 405.2416 Visiting nurse services. (a) Visiting nurse services are covered if: (1... are furnished by a registered nurse, licensed practical nurse, or licensed vocational nurse who...

  11. Nursing Educator Retention: The Relationship between Job Embeddedness and Intent to Stay among Nursing Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Amy S.

    2013-01-01

    The United States is in the midst of an increasingly worsening shortage of registered nurses, due, in part, to the nursing educator shortage. Further, nursing programs nationwide are turning away qualified applicants because of a lack of nursing educators. Unfortunately, the nursing educator shortage is not a problem that will be easily fixed. As…

  12. Nursing presence: putting the art of nursing back into hospital orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostovich, Carol Toliuszis; Clementi, Pamela S

    2014-01-01

    Nursing presence, the "doing for" and "being with" patients, embodies the holistic work of the registered nurse. However, nursing presence is seldom reflected in hospital orientation curricula. Programs traditionally orient nurses to policies and psychomotor tasks but exclude emphasizing how to "be with" patients. This article describes how one Midwestern academic medical center incorporated both the art and science of nursing into orientation.

  13. Registered nurses' (RNS) perception of the nursing profession and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background A healthy work environment has tremendous benefits on ... teamwork and collegiality 60(36.4); clear and comprehensive description of their job ... health and safety policies and procedures at the work place to create a more ...

  14. Processor register error correction management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Pradip; Cher, Chen-Yong; Gupta, Meeta S.

    2016-12-27

    Processor register protection management is disclosed. In embodiments, a method of processor register protection management can include determining a sensitive logical register for executable code generated by a compiler, generating an error-correction table identifying the sensitive logical register, and storing the error-correction table in a memory accessible by a processor. The processor can be configured to generate a duplicate register of the sensitive logical register identified by the error-correction table.

  15. To be involved - A qualitative study of nurses' experiences of caring for dying patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Erika; Salickiene, Zivile; Rosengren, Kristina

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe nurses' experiences (>two years) of caring for dying patients in surgical wards. Palliative care is included in education for nurses. However, the training content varies, and nurse educators need to be committed to the curriculum regarding end-of-life situations. A lack of preparation among newly graduated nurses regarding dying and death could lead to anxiety, stress and burnout. Therefore, it is important to improve knowledge regarding end-of-life situations. A qualitative descriptive study was carried out in two surgical wards in the southern part of Sweden. The study comprised six interviews with registered nurses and was analysed using manifest qualitative content analysis, a qualitative method that involves an inductive approach, to increase our understanding of nurses' perspectives and thoughts regarding dying patients. The results formed one category (caring-to be involved) and three subcategories (being supportive, being frustrated and being sensitive in the caring processes). Nurses were personally affected and felt unprepared to face dying patients due to a lack of knowledge about the field of palliative care. Their experiences could be described as processes of transition from theory to practice by trial and error. Supervision is a valuable tool for bridging the gap between theory and practice in nursing during the transition from novice to expert. Improved knowledge about palliative care during nursing education and committed nursing leadership at the ward level facilitate preparation for end-of-life situations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Stepping up, stepping back, stepping forward: Student nurses' experiences as peer mentors in a pre-nursing scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Annetta; Beattie, Michelle; Kyle, Richard G

    2015-11-01

    Mentorship is an essential part of the registered nurse's role, yet few opportunities exist for student nurses to mentor others during pre-registration programmes. This paper reports student nurses' experiences of mentoring school pupils during a pre-nursing scholarship. Focus groups were conducted with fifteen final year student nurses (14 female, 1 male) in two university campuses in Scotland. Discussions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and data analysed thematically. Three interconnected themes emerged: 1) stepping up; 2) stepping back; 3) stepping forward. 'Stepping up' was a process through which student nurses rapidly assumed responsibility for mentoring pupils, facilitated through the attitudes and actions of students' mentors and students' control over pupils' practice experiences. 'Stepping back' encapsulated attitudes and behaviours that enabled student nurses to mentor pupils that involved considerable judgement around how unfolding events in practice could provide learning and development opportunities, and emotional acuity to support pupils through, sometimes challenging, practice situations. 'Stepping forward' described how students' mentoring experience allowed them to appraise and affirm nursing knowledge and skills, and gain greater appreciation of the reality and complexity of mentorship in clinical practice. Peer mentoring may prepare student nurses for future mentoring roles and aid their transition into clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Register file soft error recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Bruce M.; Fox, Thomas W.; Wait, Charles D.; Muff, Adam J.; Watson, III, Alfred T.

    2013-10-15

    Register file soft error recovery including a system that includes a first register file and a second register file that mirrors the first register file. The system also includes an arithmetic pipeline for receiving data read from the first register file, and error detection circuitry to detect whether the data read from the first register file includes corrupted data. The system further includes error recovery circuitry to insert an error recovery instruction into the arithmetic pipeline in response to detecting the corrupted data. The inserted error recovery instruction replaces the corrupted data in the first register file with a copy of the data from the second register file.

  18. The Danish Education Registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vibeke Myrup; Würtz Rasmussen, Astrid

    Collection of systematic information on education is a long established practice in Denmark. Since 1910, the Danish Ministry of Education’s annual reports collects information about individual-level test scores in e.g. compulsory schooling. Today, several registers from compulsory schooling to ad...... of missing information on immigrants, the level is still low in an international context....

  19. Register for Suicide Attempts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Erik; Jensen, Børge Frank

    2004-01-01

    The Register for Suicide Attempts (RSA) is a product of the WHO research project "WHO/Euro Multicentre Study on Parasuicide", which, among other things, had the purpose of collecting data on suicide attempts from 13 European countries. Data is collected in order to calculate trends and identify...

  20. Hello! Are You Registered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute for Political/Legal Education, Sewell, NJ.

    Organizational procedures and appropriate forms for high school students to conduct a community survey of non-registered voters are provided. Duties for student coordinator, field staff, and clerical staff are described and a flow chart depicts the relationship of personnel to one another and to the community. Students are instructed to notify…

  1. The Danish heart register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildstrøm, Steen Z; Madsen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Danish Heart Register (DHR) is a clinical database of invasive procedures within cardiology. Content: All providers of these procedures have been obliged to report to DHR since 2000. DHR is used to monitor the activity and quality of the procedures and serves as a data source...

  2. Register for Suicide Attempts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Erik; Jensen, Børge Frank

    2004-01-01

    The Register for Suicide Attempts (RSA) is a product of the WHO research project "WHO/Euro Multicentre Study on Parasuicide", which, among other things, had the purpose of collecting data on suicide attempts from 13 European countries. Data is collected in order to calculate trends and identify...

  3. Hello! Are You Registered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute for Political/Legal Education, Sewell, NJ.

    Organizational procedures and appropriate forms for high school students to conduct a community survey of non-registered voters are provided. Duties for student coordinator, field staff, and clerical staff are described and a flow chart depicts the relationship of personnel to one another and to the community. Students are instructed to notify…

  4. An Exploration of the Relationship between Clinical Decision-Making Ability and Educational Preparation among New Graduate Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Kamilah V.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of accelerated nursing direct entry master's programs on the development of clinical decision-making skills of new graduate nurses that completed the Performance Based Development System (PBDS) assessment during the study period of 2008-2012 at a healthcare organization. Healthcare today is practiced in a…

  5. On becoming a Nurse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrysøe, Lars

      Ph.D. Student: Mlp. Lars Thrysøe   Enrolment: 1 September 2006   Project Title: "On becoming a nurse. A Study on the Expectations of Final Nursing Student And Their Experiences on Becoming Registered Nurses"   Supervisors: Professor Lis Wagner Dr.PH, RN, and Associate Professor Lise Hounsgaard.......d., mag.art. Steen Wackerhausen, Department of Philosophy , Institute of Philosophy and History of Ideas, University of Aarhus   Institute: Institute of Clinical Research   Research Unit: Research Unit of Nursing   Aim The aim of the Study is to gain insight into the experiences of final year nursing...... students transitioning into their new roles as Registered Nurses, and how their interactions with other health personnel affect their experiences.   Background It is important to gain more knowledge about what characterizes this transition in order to better understand and counteract the current decline...

  6. Preparing new nurse graduates for practice in multiple settings: a community-based academic-practice partnership model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Nikki; Berman, Audrey; Karshmer, Judith; Prion, Susan; Van, Paulina; Wallace, Jonalyn

    2014-06-01

    Responding to local and national concerns about the nursing workforce, the California Institute for Nursing and Health Care worked with private and public funders and community health care partners to establish community-based transition-to-practice programs for new RN graduates unable to secure nursing positions in the San Francisco Bay Area. The goals were to retain new RN graduates in nursing and further develop their skills and competencies to increase their employability. Leaders from academic and inpatient, ambulatory, and community-based practice settings, as well as additional community partners, collaboratively provided four 12- to 16-week pilot transition programs in 2010-2011. A total of 345 unemployed new nurse graduates enrolled. Eighty-four percent of 188 respondents to a post-program survey were employed in inpatient and community settings 3 months after completion. Participants and clinical preceptors also reported increases in confidence and competence.

  7. Rethinking theory and practice: pre-registration student nurses experiences of simulation teaching and learning in the acquisition of clinical skills in preparation for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Angela; Garside, Joanne; Prescott, Stephen

    2011-10-01

    In the United Kingdom (UK) simulation learning has been recognised in the form of a regulatory agreement that may replace hours from clinical practice. This integration has become an embedded feature of the pre-registration nursing programme at a University in the North of England, along with strategic investment in staff and simulation suites developed to underpin this curriculum change albeit in the absence of sparse empirical evidence, hence the rationale for the study which was designed to explore the relationship between simulation, theory and practice. The study features a thematic analysis of evaluation questionnaires from pre-registration student nurses (n=>500) collected over a 2 year period which informed subsequent focus group interviews to explore the themes in more detail. Consistent data findings were the students' positive response to simulation as a learning approach facilitating the application of theory in a safe controlled environment. Students reported that they felt prepared for practice, recognising that simulated learning improved their humanistic and problem solving abilities as well as the development of psychomotor, technical skills, and overall confidence. The theory-practice gap is a recurring narrative in the nursing literature, the findings of this study recognises that simulation offers an opportunity to enact the integration of theory and practice illuminating this relationship in a controlled environment thus, reinforcing the theory-practice relationship for nursing students.

  8. Nursing Professional Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Catallo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nurses have great potential to contribute to the development of health policy through political action. We undertook a systematic website review of international- and national-level professional nursing organizations to determine how they engaged registered nurses in health policy activities, including policy priority setting, policy goals and objectives, policy products, and mechanisms for engaging nurses in policy issues. We reviewed 38 organizations for eligibility and 15 organization websites met our inclusion criteria. Six professional nursing organizations had comprehensive websites with a discussion of specific policy goals and objectives, policy-related products and mechanisms for nurses to become engaged. Future research is needed to evaluate how nursing professional organizations establish policy priorities and to evaluate the effectiveness of the strategies used to politically engage nurses.

  9. Nurses' Resolutions of Six Ethical Dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jeanette A.; Crisham, Patricia

    Six ethical dilemmas related to nursing practice were developed and presented to registered and trainee nurses for their resolution. A non-nurse group of university students also gave decisions about what a nurse should do in each ethically-loaded situation. A dilemma was classified as recurrent if its core problem was spontaneously mentioned by…

  10. Educational background of nurses and their perceptions of the quality and safety of patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Reece P; Pretorius, Ronel; Klopper, Hester

    2015-04-30

    International health systems research confirms the critical role that nurses play in ensuring the delivery of high quality patient care and subsequent patient safety. It is therefore important that the education of nurses should prepare them for the provision of safe care of a high quality. The South African healthcare system is made up of public and private hospitals that employ various categories of nurses. The perceptions of the various categories of nurses with reference to quality of care and patient safety are unknown in South Africa (SA). To determine the relationship between the educational background of nurses and their perceptions of quality of care and patient safety in private surgical units in SA. A descriptive correlational design was used. A questionnaire was used for data collection, after which hierarchical linear modelling was utilised to determine the relationships amongst the variables. Both the registered- and enrolled nurses seemed satisfied with the quality of care and patient safety in the units were they work. Enrolled nurses (ENs) indicated that current efforts to prevent errors are adequate, whilst the registered nurses (RNs) obtained high scores in reporting incidents in surgical wards. From the results it was evident that perceptions of RNs and ENs related to the quality of care and patient safety differed. There seemed to be a statistically-significant difference between RNs and ENs perceptions of the prevention of errors in the unit, losing patient information between shifts and patient incidents related to medication errors, pressure ulcers and falls with injury.

  11. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ANA Staff Nurses Advanced Practice Nurses Nurse Managers Nursing Research Student Nurses Educators What is Nursing? NursingWorld About ... Online Course Alert! The Ins and Outs of Nursing Research 11/09/16 ANA Ready to Work with ...

  12. Register / Andri Ksenofontov

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ksenofontov, Andri, 1962-

    2007-01-01

    Näitused: Eesti Kujundusgraafikute Liidu aastanäitus "Register 2007" Kunstihoone galeriis, Signe Kivi "Võimuvaibad ja vaimukleidid" Arhitektuuri- ja Disainigaleriis, "Kehaturg / Sex market" (Dagmar Kase, Eveli Variku tööd) Tallinna Kunstihoones, Andrei Maksimjuki "Surematu klassika" Ühispanga galeriis, Katrin Veegeni "Varsti" A-galeriis, Eda Lõhmuse "Ülespoole" ja Rein Kelpmani "Grosso modo" ArtDepoo Galeriis, Jaan Elkeni "Valge valgus" Galeriis 008, Paul Rodgersi "Transplants" Hobusepea galeriis, Masayo Ave "Haptic Interface Design" Arhitektuuri- ja Disainigaleriis ja workshop Eesti Kunstiakadeemias

  13. The Danish Education Registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vibeke Myrup; Rasmussen, Astrid Würtz

    2011-01-01

    Collection of systematic information on education is a long established practice in Denmark. Since 1910, the Danish Ministry of Education’s annual reports collects information about individual-level test scores in e.g. compulsory schooling. Today, several registers from compulsory schooling...... to adults continuing education and training stem from administrative education reports. Therefore, for cohorts born 1945-1990, 97 percent of the Danish population has a valid education identifier. For the immigrant population born in the same cohorts the coverage is 85-90 percent. Despite a higher level...

  14. The Danish Education Registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vibeke Myrup; Rasmussen, Astrid Würtz

    Collection of systematic information on education is a long established practice in Denmark. Since 1910, the Danish Ministry of Education's annual reports collects information about individual-level test scores in e.g. compulsory schooling. Today, several registers from compulsory schooling...... to adults continuing education and training stem from administrative education reports. Therefore, for cohorts born 1945-1990, 97 percent of the Danish population has a valid education identifier. For the immigrant population born in the same cohorts the coverage is 85-90 percent. Despite a higher level...

  15. Register / Andri Ksenofontov

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ksenofontov, Andri, 1962-

    2007-01-01

    Näitused: Eesti Kujundusgraafikute Liidu aastanäitus "Register 2007" Kunstihoone galeriis, Signe Kivi "Võimuvaibad ja vaimukleidid" Arhitektuuri- ja Disainigaleriis, "Kehaturg / Sex market" (Dagmar Kase, Eveli Variku tööd) Tallinna Kunstihoones, Andrei Maksimjuki "Surematu klassika" Ühispanga galeriis, Katrin Veegeni "Varsti" A-galeriis, Eda Lõhmuse "Ülespoole" ja Rein Kelpmani "Grosso modo" ArtDepoo Galeriis, Jaan Elkeni "Valge valgus" Galeriis 008, Paul Rodgersi "Transplants" Hobusepea galeriis, Masayo Ave "Haptic Interface Design" Arhitektuuri- ja Disainigaleriis ja workshop Eesti Kunstiakadeemias

  16. The Danish Education Registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vibeke Myrup; Würtz Rasmussen, Astrid

    to adults continuing education and training stem from administrative education reports. Therefore, for cohorts born 1945-1990, 97 percent of the Danish population has a valid education identifier. For the immigrant population born in the same cohorts the coverage is 85-90 percent. Despite a higher level......Collection of systematic information on education is a long established practice in Denmark. Since 1910, the Danish Ministry of Education’s annual reports collects information about individual-level test scores in e.g. compulsory schooling. Today, several registers from compulsory schooling...

  17. An example of qualitative comparative analysis in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Frank; Wiechula, Richard

    2013-07-01

    To describe an example of qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) in a study about the role of clinical placement, nursing education and patient outcomes. Clinical placement is often considered an essential aspect of nursing education and an invaluable way to prepare students for the reality of nursing. However, many questions about the role of clinical placement remain unanswered, such as duration, style and learning outcomes. QCA is a novel approach to data analysis, which has been used for some time in social science research, and may be useful in tackling such questions. Participants (n= 16) involved in a case study using questionnaire, in-depth interview and document analysis. Few examples of QCA exist in nursing-related research. Examination of approaches to social sciences and educational research, and the conditions that influence nursing education and clinical placement were conducted via a number of online database searches. The paper presents an example of how QCA was used to consider whether there is any causal relationship between certain features of clinical placement, such as duration, level of preparation, level of benefit, and the capacity of recently graduated registered nurses to provide a range of nursing interventions for pneumonia, falls and pressure-area care. Effective and contemporary curriculum design requires examination of the components of clinical placement that influence graduates and their learning, particularly important at a time when access to the clinical placement setting is becoming increasingly difficult. This paper should stimulate nurse researchers to consider the potential for QCA and case study in addressing many of the complex questions that lend themselves to research designs with small numbers of participants. This paper will be of interest to nurse researchers looking for innovative approaches to data analysis and educators responsible for curriculum design and the delivery of clinical placement experience. A greater

  18. Nutrition Knowledge of Nurses in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crogan, Neva L.; Shultz, Jill A.; Massey, Linda K.

    2001-01-01

    The average score of 44 nursing-home nurses on a nutrition knowledge questionnaire was 65%. Scores of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses were significantly different. Nutritional assessment activity correlated with nutritional knowledge. The need for further training regarding nutritional concerns of nursing-home residents was…

  19. Cross border nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutshall, P

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, the Canadian Nurses Association asked a professional nurse from British Columbia to help nurses in Nepal develop their association an work on nursing legislation. Nepal had about 3000 nurses, including assistant nurse-midwives, 500 of whom were members of the Trained Nurses Association of Nepal (TNAN). It wanted to expand nursing's contribution to health care in Nepal. The nurses wanted to increase the visibility of the association, to become a self-sustaining organization, to establish a licensing law, and to improve the availability of continuing education. The Canadian nurse helped the Nepalese nurses with a workshop on association management covering record keeping and meeting plans. She helped a newly formed committee with licensing law and with decision factors in pursuing self-regulation for nursing. She discussed a work plan and a lobby strategy. She helped another committee develop objectives for the next year. A follow-up visit the next year revealed that the office was operating well and the association was keeping good records. TNAN sponsored workshops on professionalism and leadership. This visit yielded further progress on a licensing law and on identifying ways to become self-sufficient. The nurses discussed the Norwegian Nurses Association's (NNA) interest in providing funds to buy a building for TNAN use and to derive income from rent. NNA eventually donated the funds. By the 1992 visit, the nurses had revised and registered their constitution and bylaws. They had sponsored workshops on HIV/AIDS and mental health. The name was now the Nursing Association of Nepal (NAN). The newly created executive council had met frequently. NAN had expanded from 6 to 11 local branches. It had created 5 committees: fund raising, research, international coordination, nurses welfare, and publications. A workshop in western Nepal centered on quality nursing care. NAN had a role in the government's progress in primary health care and mental health services.

  20. California's minimum-nurse-staffing legislation and nurses' wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Barbara; Harless, David W; Spetz, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, California became the first state to implement minimum-nurse-staffing ratios in acute care hospitals. We examined the wages of registered nurses (RNs) before and after the legislation was enacted. Using four data sets-the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, the Current Population Survey, the National Compensation Survey, and the Occupational Employment Statistics Survey-we found that from 2000 through 2006, RNs in California metropolitan areas experienced real wage growth as much as twelve percentage points higher than the growth in the wages of nurses employed in metropolitan areas outside of California.

  1. A qualitative study describing nursing home nurses sensemaking to detect medication order discrepancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsmeier, Amy; Anderson, Ruth A; Anbari, Allison; Ganong, Lawrence; Farag, Amany; Niemeyer, MaryAnn

    2017-08-04

    Medication reconciliation is a safety practice to identify medication order discrepancies when patients' transitions between settings. In nursing homes, registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs), each group with different education preparation and scope of practice responsibilities, perform medication reconciliation. However, little is known about how they differ in practice when making sense of medication orders to detect discrepancies. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe differences in RN and LPN sensemaking when detecting discrepancies. We used a qualitative methodology in a study of 13 RNs and 13 LPNs working in 12 Midwestern United States nursing homes. We used both conventional content analysis and directed content analysis methods to analyze semi-structured interviews. Four resident transfer vignettes embedded with medication order discrepancies guided the interviews. Participants were asked to describe their roles with medication reconciliation and their rationale for identifying medication order discrepancies within the vignettes as well as to share their experiences of performing medication reconciliation. The analysis approach was guided by Weick's Sensemaking theory. RNs provided explicit stories of identifying medication order discrepancies as well as examples of clinical reasoning to assure medication order appropriateness whereas LPNs described comparing medication lists. RNs and LPNs both acknowledged competing demands, but when performing medication reconciliation, RNs were more concerned about accuracy and safety, whereas LPNs were more concerned about time. Nursing home nurses, particularly RNs, are in an important position to identify discrepancies that could cause resident harm. Both RNs and LPNs are valuable assets to nursing home care and keeping residents safe, yet RNs offer a unique contribution to complex processes such as medication reconciliation. Nursing home leaders must acknowledge the differences

  2. Nurse Educators' Lived Experiences with Values Changes in Baccalaureate Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenda, Skip

    2012-01-01

    Values education in nursing can be a highly emotional topic. Values in nursing education can be linked to general societal values at any given point in time. Values are transmitted by nursing educators and institutions not only consciously in the nursing curriculum, but also unconsciously in the hidden curriculum. Each year many registered nurses…

  3. [Preparing the awakening of Lilith: gender in nursing in articles of REBEn in th 80s and 90s].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Lucia Helena Rodrigues

    2002-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of the conditions of women/nurses in the articles published by REBEn (Brazilian Journal of Nursing) in the 1980's and 1990's. Initially, the researcher intended to analyze specifically those articles which had some reference to gender. However, in the beginnings of the 1980's, some articles pointed in the direction of the social problems involving women and the implication of these problems to nurses, without making explicit reference to gender category. Thus, the author decided to evaluate abstracts and the content of different articles, in order to detect those which were related to the subject of investigation. Eleven articles and two thematic editorials selected show that REBEn, although timidly, is a magazine which is updated regarding decisive moments of women's worldwide movement.

  4. Understanding unassisted falls: effects of nurse staffing level and nursing staff characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staggs, Vincent S; Knight, Jeff E; Dunton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Hierarchical Poisson modeling was used to explore hospital and nursing unit characteristics as predictors of the unassisted fall rate. Longitudinal data were collected from 1502 units in 248 US hospitals. The relation between the fall rate and total nurse staffing was positive at lower staffing levels and negative for levels around and above the median. The fall rate was negatively associated with registered nurse skill mix and average registered nurse tenure on the unit.

  5. Creativity and effective factors on hospital nurses Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melika Ahbabi Tabarestani1

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Creativity in people is one of the most important issue to provide better solutions to problems, create opportunities and better use of them, increase cooperation and responses to changing environments and the various factors effect on it. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the creativity and the factors influencing on nurses at Shafizadeh Children's Hospital at 2012.This study is an applied investigation that has been prepared as descriptive - correlation. Sampling method is as full number, including 114 registered nurses at Shafizadeh Children's Hospital in Babol, finally 102 questionnaires were returned and data was collected by "demographics" and "creativity pediatric nurses' research. Questionnaire validity was in content and appearance validity method. The reliability was performed as internal consistency and stability method. After entering data to SPSS, it was analyzed by the related tests. The creativity of nurses is 64 percent, the highest creativity (73.5% is relevant to solve problems in collaboration with others (fluency and the highest medium creative (82.4% is relevant to prepare a list of ways to communicate (Initiative. The highest rate of low creativity (61.8% is for ease of report writing in nursing (expansion. The highest creativity is related to fluency (70 % and the lowest is in areas of expansion and innovation (50 %. Factors such as marital status and number of children in care are basic steps to keep the nurses creativity that with promotion of creative innovations, appropriate factors should be applied.

  6. AWHONN Position Statement. The Role of Unlicensed Assistive Personnel (Nursing Assistive Personnel) in the Care of Women and Newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) recognizes that unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) also known as nursing assistive personnel (NAP) can function as supportive members of the health care team under the direction of the professional registered nurse (AWHONN, 2010). The professional registered nurse is ultimately responsible for the coordination and delivery of nursing care to women and newborns.

  7. Estresse e qualidade do sono entre enfermeiros que utilizam medicamentos para dormir Estrés y calidad del sueño de enfermeros que utilizan medicamentos para dormir Stress and sleep quality among registered nurses who use sleeping pills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecília Pires da Rocha

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Identificar os níveis de estresse, analisar a utilização de medicamentos para dormir e correlacionar níveis de estresse, qualidade do sono e uso de medicamentos. MÉTODOS: Estudo quantitativo, transversal, descritivo e comparativo, realizado com 203 enfermeiros de uma instituição hospitalar da cidade de Campinas, São Paulo, Brasil. Foi utilizado um questionário de identificação, Escala Bianchi de Stress modificada (EBSm e o Índice de Qualidade do Sono de Pittsburgh. RESULTADOS: Dentre 203 enfermeiros, 17,7% utilizavam medicamentos para dormir. Dos enfermeiros que utilizaram medicamentos para dormir 48,6% demonstraram estado de alerta e alto nível de estresse (p = 0, 016 e apresentaram na sua totalidade (n=36 uma qualidade de sono ruim. CONCLUSÃO: Os enfermeiros que utilizaram medicamentos para dormir apresentaram níveis de estresse mais elevados e prejuízos que comprometem a qualidade do sono.OBJETIVOS: Identificar los niveles de estrés, analizar la utilización de medicamentos para dormir y correlacionar niveles de estrés, calidad del sueño y el uso de medicamentos. MÉTODOS: Estudio cuantitativo, transversal, descriptivo y comparativo, realizado con 203 enfermeros de una institución hospitalaria de la ciudad de Campinas, Sao Paulo - Brasil. Fue utilizado un cuestionario de identificación, Escala Bianchi de Stress modificada (EBSm y el Índice de Calidad del Sueño de Pittsburgh. RESULTADOS: De 203 enfermeros, el 17,7% utilizaba medicamentos para dormir. De los enfermeros que utilizaron medicamentos para dormir el 48,6% demostró estado de alerta y alto nivel de estrés (p = 0, 016 y presentaron en su totalidad (n=36 una calidad de sueño malo. CONCLUSIÓN: Los enfermeros que utilizaron medicamentos para dormir presentaron niveles de estrés más elevados y perjuicios que comprometen la calidad del sueño.OBJECTIVE: To describe the stress level and the use of sleeping pills among registered nurses and to examine

  8. As mental health nursing roles expand, is education expanding mental health nurses? An emotionally intelligent view towards preparation for psychological therapies and relatedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, John; Rankin, Robert

    2008-09-01

    Mental health nurses (MHN) in the UK currently occupy a challenging position. This positioning is one that offers a view of expanding roles and responsibilities in both mental health act legislation and the delivery of psychological therapies, while simultaneously generic pre-registration training is being considered. Clearly, the view from this position, although not without challenge and internal discipline dispute, can also offer growing professional prestige, influence and respect from other health disciplines, as well as the wider public. Conversely, if the training, education and strategic enactment for new MHN roles is formulated and delivered from predominantly non-MHN axiomatic and epistemological stances, MHN identity can be seriously and potentially permanently diminished. This paper offers the construct of emotional intelligence as a framework to respond to these future challenges through making individual MHN enablement a primacy. This enablement of MHNs through enhanced emotional intelligence competencies is argued as requiring priority over the standard approach of enhancing strategies alone.

  9. Using advanced mobile devices in nursing practice--the views of nurses and nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Pauline; Petersson, Göran; Saveman, Britt-Inger; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2014-09-01

    Advanced mobile devices allow registered nurses and nursing students to keep up-to-date with expanding health-related knowledge but are rarely used in nursing in Sweden. This study aims at describing registered nurses' and nursing students' views regarding the use of advanced mobile devices in nursing practice. A cross-sectional study was completed in 2012; a total of 398 participants replied to a questionnaire, and descriptive statistics were applied. Results showed that the majority of the participants regarded an advanced mobile device to be useful, giving access to necessary information and also being useful in making notes, planning their work and saving time. Furthermore, the advanced mobile device was regarded to improve patient safety and the quality of care and to increase confidence. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of health care, advanced mobile devices adjusted for nursing practice should be further developed, implemented and evaluated in research.

  10. Nurse managers' role in older nurses' intention to stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong-Stassen, Marjorie; Freeman, Michelle; Cameron, Sheila; Rajacic, Dale

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a model of the underlying mechanisms linking perceived availability of human resource (HR) practices relevant to older nurses and older nurses' intentions to stay with their hospitals. Quantitative data were collected from randomly selected older registered nurses (N=660) engaged in direct patient care in hospitals in Canada. Structural equation modelling was used to test the hypothesized model. The relationship between perceptions of HR practices (performance evaluation, recognition/respect) and intentions to stay was mediated by the perceived fairness with which nurse managers managed these HR practices and nurse manager satisfaction. When nurse managers were perceived to administer the HR practices fairly (high perceived procedural justice), older nurses were more satisfied with their nurse manager and, in turn, more likely to intend to stay. The cross-sectional research design does not allow determination of causality. It is important that nurse managers receive training to increase their awareness of the needs of older nurses and that nurse managers be educated on how to manage HR practices relevant to older nurses in a fair manner. Equally important is that hospital administrators and HR managers recognize the importance of providing such HR practices and supporting nurse managers in managing these practices. The findings increase the understanding of how HR practices tailored to older nurses are related to the intentions of these nurses to remain with their hospital, and especially the crucial role that first-line nurse managers play in this process.

  11. Motivating Nursing Faculty to Use Active Learning Strategies: A Qualitative Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardell, Traci Lee

    2011-01-01

    The nursing shortage remains of great concern to the nursing profession and to nursing educators. With the projected need for Registered Nurses high and the attrition rate in nursing programs remaining high, a focus on retention of qualified nursing students may be needed. One way to contribute to enhanced retention is using active learning…

  12. Relationships between Self-Regulating Behaviors and Predictor Exam Scores for Senior Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Low pass rates on the National Council Licensure Exam for Registered Nurses have directed nursing faculty to examine how to predict the readiness of the nursing student. Exit exam testing that predicts readiness has become one way to assess the nursing student's readiness. Nursing students at the research site's school of nursing are…

  13. Forecasting Nursing Student Success and Failure on the NCLEX-RN Using Predictor Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    A severe and worsening nursing shortage exists in the United States. Increasing numbers of new graduate nurses are necessary to meet this demand. To address the concerns of increased nursing demand, leaders of nursing schools must ensure larger numbers of nursing students graduate. Prior to practicing as registered nurses in the United States,…

  14. Nursing Delegation to Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in the School Setting. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagginello, Joan; Blackborow, Mary; Porter, Jessica; Disney, Jody; Andresen, Kathleen; Tuck, Christine

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the delegation of nursing tasks in the school setting can be a valuable tool for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse), when based on the nursing definition of delegation (American Nurses Association [ANA], 2012) and in…

  15. USAR Nurse Referral and Retention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, J E; Foley, B J

    1992-09-01

    In 1987, the 804th Hospital Center made alleviating the shortfall of registered nurses in the Command a priority. The Command had only 79% of its registered nurse positions filled at the time. Using the recruitment strategies of an employee referral program and a mailing list, the Command reached 100% fill in 2 years and maintained those gains for an additional year. Retention strategies were also implemented which lowered the attrition rate. This paper describes the Army Nurse Referral and Retention Program developed and implemented at the 804th Hospital Center that relieved the shortfall of registered nurses in the United States Army Reserve in New England.

  16. Nursing professionalism: a national survey of professionalism among Japanese nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Michiko; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the professionalism of nurses in Japan. The Japanese version of the Behavioural Inventory for Professionalism in Nursing was conducted as a national survey. Computer-generated random selection of nurses in Japan obtained responses from 1501 nurses. A descriptive design examined the levels of and differences in nursing professionalism. Comparisons of the total level of professionalism in educational preparation, current position, years of experience, and current practice setting were analysed by one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison test. The results revealed that Japanese nurses had low levels of professionalism, and professionalism was related significantly to higher educational preparation, years of experience as a nurse, and current position as a nursing administrator or faculty. The results can be used as a benchmark for continued assessments of the level of nursing professionalism and for further development of nursing professionalism. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. A student nurse experience of an intervention that addresses the perioperative nursing shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, J Carter

    2015-11-01

    Registered nurses are the largest group of professionals in the global healthcare system. The number of nurses is estimated to be 19.3 million throughout the world (Flinkman et al 2013). In the United States the need for registered nurses is growing. It has been predicted that 260,000 positions for registered nurses will remain unfilled by the year 2025 (Harris et al 2014) with a shortage of registered nurses projected to spread across the United States between 2009 and 2030 (Juraschek et al 2012). Compounding the projected nursing shortage is the increased attrition rate, which is as high as 61% within the first year (Pine & Tart 2007). There are several reasons for this shortage including supply and demand issues, projected changes to healthcare and the aging population. Additionally, the number of college graduates who have majored in nursing has not met the demand (Dunn 2014).

  18. Introducing ADN students to nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, R; Smutko, P W

    1998-01-01

    Every nurse, regardless of educational preparation, should be involved in and benefit from nursing research. The research process needs to become an integral part of nursing practice. In this article, the authors emphasize the importance of nursing research in the associate degree nursing curriculum, emphasizing strategies that enable the ADN graduate to appreciate research reports and use the knowledge in the clinical practice setting.

  19. An educational model for preparing Christian nurses and church congregations to offer local whole-person health programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Anne Wordsworth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The implications of the Tübingen declarations for congregational involvement in health provide the setting for this commentary. Using an example from the United Kingdom, where government health provision has become economically challenging and largely disease focused, the author demonstrates how it is possible to introduce the kind of education for nurses and congregations that will lead to them becoming important sources of whole-person health promotion. In this way, parish nurses and church congregations may make a distinctive contribution that will complement state and private health provision. This model has relevance across all Christian denominations. It is already being followed in 28 different countries, and with appropriate respect to culture, language and health policy, could be globally transferable.

  20. Low-perceived work ability, ageing and intention to leave nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Camerino, Donatella; Conway, Paul Maurice; Van der Heijden, Beatrice Isabella Johanna Maria

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports a study exploring nurses' perceived work ability and its associations with age and intention to leave nursing in a representative sample of registered nurses in 10 european countries....

  1. 辱虐管理与护士心理授权的关系研究鄢%Construction of a correlating model of abusive supervision and psychological empowerment of registered nurses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍文雅; 郑秋兰; 尹永娜; 孙雨松; 杨梓含; 范宇莹

    2016-01-01

    目的:了解护士感知到的辱虐管理和心理授权现状,并建立两者的关系模型。方法采用辱虐管理问卷和心理授权量表对702名护士进行调查。结果702名护士感知的辱虐管理总分为(23.25±10.72)分,心理授权总分为(45.00±7.34)分;护士感知到的辱虐管理与心理授权及其各维度均呈负相关(P<0.01)。辱虐管理对心理授权的直接效应为-0.38,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01)。结论护士感知到的护士长辱虐管理处于偏低水平,护士心理授权处于中上水平。护士感知到的护士长辱虐管理能直接影响护士心理授权。护理管理者应从正负面视角全面完善护士长领导行为、提高领导力,才能更好地促进护士心理授权的内在动力。%Objective To study the current state of abusive supervision as perceived by nurses and examine nurses'psychological empowerment to identify the relationships between the two variables. Methods Data were collected using a questionnaire examining perceptions of abusive supervision as well as a scale for nurse′s psychological empowerment. A large-scale survey was conducted on 702 clinical nurses who were recruited through convenience sampling. Results The total scores of nurses′ perceived abusive supervision and psychological empowerment were 23.25 ± 10.72 and 45.00 ± 7.34. Abusive supervision and psychological empowerment were significantly negatively correlated (P<0.01) and had direct effect(r=-0.38) on psychological empowerment(P<0.01). Conclusion Nurses′perceived abusive superusion was low,and their psychological empowerment was high. Their perceived abusive superusion can affect their psychological empowerment directly. Nurse managers should manage abusive supervision in order to increase nurses′psychological empowerment.

  2. The reorganization of the nursing labor process: from team to primary nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, R L

    1990-01-01

    The author presents a labor process analysis of recent changes in nursing work on hospital wards. In the immediate post-World War II decades, hospital nursing was organized to include stratified nurses--registered and auxiliary nurses (licensed practical nurses and nurses' aides)--in a common labor process called "team nursing." Team nursing adapted Taylorist principles to sharply demarcate tasks between registered nurses (RNs) and auxiliaries. In the 1970s and 1980s, team nursing increasingly replaced by "primary nursing" with a majority of RNs. Auxiliaries were displaced as RNs assumed undivided responsibility for complete nursing care. The transition to primary nursing is partly explained through the convergence of managerial interests with the professionalizing interests of nursing's elite. However, primary nursing was not simply imposed from the top down. Team nursing produced divisiveness between RNs and auxiliaries at the same time that it forced these workers to violate the official differentiation of tasks and held RNs responsible for work performed by auxiliaries. Primary nursing eliminates the problems of team nursing as RNs perform reunified tasks in an unmediated RN-patient relationship. However, primary nursing has produced a new set of contradictions, including an intensified labor process.

  3. [Occupational nursing specialization: proposed change of paradigm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, M Y

    1998-01-01

    The course of Labour Nursing aimed at preparing nurses for companies security and workers health. It started in 1974 as a result of the efforts of DESP/EEAN/UFRJ and ABEn close to the Ministry of Labour in Rio de Janeiro and based on the Resolution 112/59--OMS/OIT. Later, this course was spread out to other Universities and Brazil's regions and 13 courses have been provided until 1985. In the beginning, the courses follwed the orientation and control of FUNDACENTRO, until 1996 and were directed to the industry. From this time on, these courses register was sent to CORENs and accomplished independently at Nursing Schools, based on Resolution 12/86--MEC, Rec. 161/93--OIT. Instructions from the Ministry of Labour and Ministry of Health. At the EEAN, up to 1995, 11 Specialisation Courses have been accomplished, based on ANENT orientations and fundamental by the subjects: Scientific Investigation Methodology, Methodology of Nursing Teaching and Education for Health; Worker's Health Politics; Labour Organisational and Social Sciences; Environment Sanitation; Work Safety and Hygiene and Human Ecology; Ergonomy; Labour Process; Occupational Risks; Labour Accidents and Illnesses; Labour Legislation; Labour Nursing; Technical Visits and Practice in Workers Health Services at Companies Programmes and Public Health. The course enables nurses of essential, educative, managing and investigative activities and their formation culminates with a dissertation that has as a study object, emerging problems of nursing practice for workers. This programme has been studied by the author herself aiming at a better adjustment for these professionals insertion into the work market.

  4. Doctoral specialization in nursing informatics.

    OpenAIRE

    Gassert, C. A.; Mills, M. E.; Heller, B R

    1991-01-01

    A prototype program of doctoral study has been developed at the University of Maryland School of Nursing to prepare students with nursing expertise in the conceptualization and research of computer based information systems in hospitals, industry and other health care organizations. The graduate will be prepared to design effective nursing information systems; create innovative information technology; conduct research regarding integration of technology with nursing practice, administration, ...

  5. Critical thinking of nurse managers related to staff RNs' perceptions of the practice environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zori, Susan; Nosek, Laura J; Musil, Carol M

    2010-09-01

    BACKGROUND INFORMATION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Critical thinking (CT) skills and the inclination to engage in critical thinking are essential for nurse managers to function as transformational leaders capable of influencing staff to align with organizational goals. In an extensive literature review, numerous studies were found examining the concept of CT in students and no studies were found exploring CT in nurse managers. Identifying the attributes, such as CT, that lead to success in the nurse manager role is useful when preparing nurse managers to lead effectively in the current healthcare climate. Is there a difference between nurse managers' CT dispositions and their respective staff nurses' perceptions of the practice environment? A convenience sample of 12 nurse managers and a random sample of 132 of their respective staff registered nurses (RNs) participated in this descriptive study. CT in nurse managers was measured by the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI). Staff RNs' perceptions of the practice environment were measured by the Practice Environment Scale (PES). The research question was answered using a t test. Significant (p managers' CCTDI scores for open-mindedness, analyticity, and critical thinking confidence, and significant differences (p managers and their respective staff RNs' perceptions of the practice environment. Nurse managers with stronger CT dispositions may be better able to create positive practice environments that are conducive to job satisfaction and thus the retention of staff RNs. Inclusion of strategies to support the development and use of CT in nurse managers is recommended. CT and other leadership attributes and skills including emotional and social intelligence and management of change through an appreciative inquiry process may provide opportunities to improve leadership effectiveness in nurse managers. Enhancing critical thinking skills and dispositions of nurse managers may help to create positive work

  6. Does nursing assistant certification increase nursing student's confidence level of basic nursing care when entering a nursing program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stombaugh, Angie; Judd, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore nursing student's confidence level with basic nursing care when entering the nursing program after implementation of required nursing assistant certification for program admission. In addition, the relationship between being employed as a nursing assistant and confidence level with basic nursing care when entering the nursing program was explored. A Likert-scale survey assessing confidence levels of basic nursing care was sent to 156 nursing students admitted to a nursing program prior to their first nursing course. Confidence level with nursing skills, nursing assistant employment, and length of nursing assistant employment were assessed. Students were most confident in hand washing (M = 5.87, SD = 0.36), gloving and gowning (M =5.46, SD = 0.75), making an unoccupied bed (M = 5.38, SD = 0.88), and oral temperature (M = 5.30, SD = 0.87). Students were least confident in the fitting for cane (M = 1.74, SD = 1.16) and ambulation with crutches on steps (M =1.81, SD = 1.27). Nursing assistant employment increased student confidence with basic nursing care. Nursing programs cannot assume that students are prepared in basic nursing care based on a nursing assistant certification. © 2014.

  7. Between two roles - Experiences of newly trained nurse practitioners in surgical care in Sweden: A qualitative study using repeated interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangland, Eva; Yngman Uhlin, Pia; Arakelian, Erebouni

    2016-11-01

    The position of Nurse Practitioner is a new role in Nordic countries. The transition from a registered nurse to the Nurse Practitioner role has been reported to be a personal challenge. This study, guided by the Nordic theoretical model for use in the education of advanced practice nurses, represents a unique opportunity to describe this transition for newly graduated Nurse Practitioners in an interprofessional surgical care team in Sweden. The aim was to explore how the first Nurse Practitioners in surgical care experienced the transition into a new role and what competences they used in the team. Eight new Nurse Practitioners with parallel work in clinical practice were interviewed twice around the time of their graduation. The qualitative analyses show that the participants integrated several central competences, but the focus in this early stage in their new role was on direct clinical praxis, consultation, cooperation, case management, and coaching. Transition from the role of clinical nurse specialist to nurse practitioner was a challenging process in which the positive response from patients was a driving force for the new Nurse Practitioners. The participants felt prepared for and determined to solve the challenging situations they approached working in the interprofessional team.

  8. On becoming a Nurse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrysøe, Lars

    students transitioning into their new roles as Registered Nurses, and how their interactions with other health personnel affect their experiences.   Background It is important to gain more knowledge about what characterizes this transition in order to better understand and counteract the current decline...... their 6th semester, following clinical internship at a somatic hospital (Part I), and again a half-year into their new roles as Registered Nurses (Part II). Fieldwork and interviews focuses on the interaction and collaboration between participants and other health personnel as well as the Expectations...

  9. Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants and Certified Nurse Midwives in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Univ., San Francisco. Center for California Health Workforce Studies.

    Surveys were mailed to all nurse practitioners (NPs), physician assistants (PAs) and certified nurse midwives (CNMs) registered in California, asking questions about education, labor force participation, specialty, and location and type of practice site, as well as the demographic characteristics of these professionals and their patients. Response…

  10. Registros de enfermería sobre el sueño y percepción de los pacientes en una unidad psiquiátrica: Estudio comparativo Nursing registers on sleep and patient perception in a psychiatric unit: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Antomás

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento. El insomnio es un problema frecuente en las personas que sufren enfermedades mentales. El personal de enfermería controla y registra si los pacientes duermen o no. El objetivo de este trabajo es analizar la concordancia entre las percepciones de los pacientes de una unidad psiquiátrica de agudos sobre la calidad de su sueño y las notas recogidas en el evolutivo de enfermería al respecto. Material y métodos. Estudio comparativo entre las respuestas dadas por pacientes de nuestra unidad a 126 cuestionarios sobre insomnio en noches concretas y lo reflejado en sus historias de enfermería. Se utilizó una versión reducida de la Escala Atenas de Insomnio (EAI-5. Resultados. El valor medio obtenido según las respuestas de los pacientes es superior (peor sueño al dado por las enfermeras, tanto de manera global como por ítem. La historia de enfermería refleja valores mucho más bajos que los otorgados por el paciente, el análisis de correlación de Pearson proporcionó un coeficiente de 0,26. El análisis de grado de acuerdo proporcionó un ICC de 0,13 y no difiere de manera significativa al acuerdo nulo. Conclusiones. Hay discordancia entre las observaciones de enfermería y las sensaciones subjetivas de los pacientes sobre cómo duermen. Refieren dormir peor de lo que refleja la historia de enfermería. La observación externa y la autopercepción no son aspectos antagónicos, sino dos aspectos complementarios del sueño de los pacientes.Background. Insomnia is a frequent problem in people who suffer from mental illnesses. The nursing staff control and register whether or not patients sleep. The aim of this article is to analyze the concordance between the perceptions of the patients of a psychiatric unit on the quality of sleep, and the notes in this respect contained in the nursing records. Methods. A comparative study between the answers given by the patients of our unit to 126 questions on insomnia on specific nights, and

  11. Nursing Diagnoses in Inpatient Psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frauenfelder, F.; Achterberg, T. van; Needham, I.; Staub, M. Muller

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study explored how well NANDA-I covers the reality of adult inpatient psychiatric nursing care. METHODS: Patient observations documented by registered nurses in records were analyzed using content analysis and mapped with the classification NANDA-I. FINDINGS: A total of 1,818 notes wer

  12. A Behavioral Inventory for Professionalism in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Barbara K.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    An inventory based on Miller's Model for Professionalism in Nursing was completed by 515 of 1,600 registered nurses. The majority demonstrated professional behaviors in continuing education activities, autonomous quality assurance participation, community service, and theory-based nursing practice. (Author/JOW)

  13. Current Factors Contributing to Professionalism in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynd, Christine A.

    2003-01-01

    Statistical analyses of responses from 774 of 1,850 registered nurses on the Professionalism Inventory found that professionalism was related to years of experience as a nurse, higher education degrees in nursing, organizational membership and service as an officer, and specialty certification. (Contains 52 references.) (SK)

  14. Registering Researchers in Authority Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Yoshimura, Karen; Altman, Micah; Conlon, Michael; Cristán, Ana Lupe; Dawson, Laura; Dunham, Joanne; Hickey, Thom; Hook, Daniel; Horstmann, Wolfram; MacEwan, Andrew; Schreur, Philip; Smart, Laura; Wacker, Melanie; Woutersen, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Written by OCLC Research Program Officer Karen Smith-Yoshimura and the 13 members of the Registering Researchers in Authority Files Task Group comprised of specialists from the US, UK, and the Netherlands, this report summarizes their research into approaches to providing authoritative researcher identifiers. Registering researchers in some type…

  15. The Danish National Patient Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Sandegaard, Jakob Lynge; Rebolj, Matejka

    2011-01-01

    The Danish National Patient Register (NPR) was established in 1977, and it is considered to be the finest of its kind internationally.......The Danish National Patient Register (NPR) was established in 1977, and it is considered to be the finest of its kind internationally....

  16. Feasibility of a nursing intervention to prepare frail older patients for cardiac surgery: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettema, Roelof; Schuurmans, Marieke J; Schutijser, Bernadette; van Baar, Mark; Kamphof, Nicole; Kalkman, Cor J

    2015-08-01

    Given the growing number of vulnerable, older cardiac surgery patients, the preadmission PREvention Decline in Older Cardiac Surgery patients (PREDOCS) programme was developed to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications. Before the clinical effects of such a complex multicomponent intervention can be evaluated, the feasibility needs to be determined to detect possible problems with the acceptability, compliance and delivery. The purpose of this study was to test the PREDOCS programme on its feasibility and estimate theoretical cost savings. In a mixed-methods multicentre study, the Medical Research Council (MRC) guidelines concerning testing feasibility were followed, and theoretical cost savings were calculated. We used data from interviews and the continuous data registry at three hospitals. The results were reported following the criteria for reporting the feasibility of complex interventions (CReDECI). Twenty-one females and 49 males out of 114 eligible patients completed the intervention and provided full data. Patients were equally satisfied with the usual care and the PREDOCS programme (satisfaction rate respectively standard deviation (SD): 7.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 6.4-8.7) and 7.6 (6.6-8.6)). The involved nurses were satisfied with the tools for guiding patients to reduce their risk of postoperative complications and considered the PREDOCS programme as complementary to usual care. Integrating PREDOCS into current hospital structures appeared to be difficult. Both patients and nurses indicated that the additional consult was tiresome for the patient. The PREDOCS programme will be cost-effective when postoperative complications are prevented in six to sixteen of 1000 cardiac surgery patients. The PREDOCS programme is acceptable for patients and nurses but should be built into the hospital's cardiac surgery pathway or applied in home care. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  17. The relationship between the nursing environment and delivering culturally sensitive perinatal hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixer, Sandra J; Lindley, Lisa; Wallace, Heather; Fornehed, Mary Lou; Wool, Charlotte

    2015-09-01

    Wide variations exist among perinatal hospices, and barriers to perinatal palliative care exist at the healthcare level. Research in the area of culturally sensitive perinatal palliative care has been scarce, a gap which this study addresses. To evaluate the relationship between the nurse work environment and the delivery of culturally sensitive perinatal hospice care. This retrospective, correlational study used data from the National Home and Hospice Care Survey, which includes a nationally representative sample of hospice care providers. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to estimate the relationship between the delivery of culturally sensitive care and the nurse work environment. Accreditation, teaching status, and baccalaureate-prepared registered nurse staff had an impact on the provision of culturally sensitive perinatal care Conclusions: The hospice and nursing unit environments, specifically in regards to education and technology, may be important contributors to the delivery of culturally sensitive care.

  18. The Lived Experience of Novice Nursing Faculty in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Shirley S.

    2013-01-01

    To relieve the nursing faculty shortage, notable numbers of master's prepared clinical nurse experts are entering the ranks of nursing faculty to teach the prelicensure nursing student. The transition from clinical practice to the academia raises concern about the adequacy of preparation for the complex specialization role of nurse educator. In…

  19. [Evaluation of nursing care systematization through the phases of nursing process performance and registration in a teaching hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppetto, Maria Angela; de Souza, Mariana Fernandes

    2005-01-01

    This descriptive study was carried out in a teaching hospital at São Paulo city and had as objective to identify the phases performance and registration of nursing care systematization and the most frequent nursing diagnoses. Data were collected retrospectively from 135 patients records of three units: Cardiology, Adult Infectious Diseases and Neurosurgery, from January to July, 2002. The phases: history, nursing diagnoses, prescription, evolution and assessment were performed and registered in the three units, however, it was verified systematization gaps performance related to nursing diagnoses registered without the realization of nursing history and nursing prescriptions without evolution. The most frequent nursing diagnosis in the three units was risk for infection.

  20. The GAMMA® nursing measure: Its development and testing for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-03

    Mar 3, 2014 ... registered nurses in order to explore the GAMMA's nursing utility. Descriptive data .... a progressive loss of muscle anabolic hormones and growth factors, leading to ..... completed, the GAMMA manual for training, testing and.

  1. Foreign nurse importation and the supply of native nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Patricia; Pan, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    The importation of foreign registered nurses has been used as a strategy to ease nursing shortages in the United States. The effectiveness of this policy depends critically on the long-run response of native nurses. We examine the effects of immigration of foreign-born registered nurses on the long-run employment and occupational choice of native nurses. Using a variety of empirical strategies that exploit the geographical distribution of immigrant nurses across US cities, we find evidence of large displacement effects - over a ten-year period, for every foreign nurse that migrates to a city, between 1 and 2 fewer native nurses are employed in the city. We find similar results using data on nursing board exam-takers at the state level - an increase in the flow of foreign nurses significantly reduces the number of natives sitting for licensure exams in more dependent states relative to less dependent states. Using data on self-reported workplace satisfaction among a sample of California nurses, we find suggestive evidence that part of the displacement effects could be driven by a decline in the perceived quality of the workplace environment.

  2. Development of the Hospital Nurse Surveillance Capacity Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Kutney-Lee, Ann; Lake, Eileen T.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2009-01-01

    Better patient outcomes are often achieved through effective surveillance, a primary function of nurses. The purpose of this paper is to define, operationalize, measure, and evaluate the nurse surveillance capacity of hospitals. Nurse surveillance capacity is defined as the organizational features that enhance or weaken nurse surveillance. It includes a set of registered nurse (staffing, education, expertise, experience) and nurse practice environment characteristics. Empirical referents were...

  3. Questionário multidimensional para análise da imagem do enfermeiro Cuestionario multidimensional para análisis de la imagen del enfermero A multidimensional questionnaire to evaluate the image of registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Barizon Luchesi

    2010-01-01

    óstico, el instrumento podrá ser utilizado en estudios experimentales.OBJECTIVE: To develop a multidimensional questionnaire to evaluate the perceptions of high school students regarding nursing and to conduct the content, face, and semantic validation of the instrument. METHODS: This was a quantitative-qualitative study. The theoretical-methodological approaches of Pasquali, Siva, and Ribeiro-Filho guided the steps of concept/construct definition, development of items, and instrument validation. RESULTS: The items of the instruments were developed from the literature in social psychology, nursing history, and vocational decision. After content, face, and semantic validation, the instrument was pilot tested among 269 students. CONCLUSIONS: The items of the instrument were found to be easy to understand. Besides diagnostic analysis, the instrument may be used in experimental studies.

  4. Controle social na saúde: discutindo os resultados de uma pesquisa com enfermeiras Control social en salud: discutiendo los resultados de una investigación con enfermeras Health-related social control study: discussion of the findings with registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Irene Spinelli Arantes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, neste trabalho, relatar a experiência de um processo de discussão dos resultados de uma pesquisa sobre controle social na atenção básica à saúde. Descreve-se o processo de planejamento, desenvolvimento e avaliação de dois encontros educativos participativos realizados com 12 enfermeiras. Apresentam-se as expectativas e a avaliação das participantes; suas reflexões sobre os resultados da pesquisa; e a re-elaboração das ações de fortalecimento do controle social na saúde. Foram apontadas novas possibilidades de atuação na área e os diferentes responsáveis pela sua execução. Foram relatadas ações de responsabilidade do profissional de enfermagem, evidenciando a existência de um papel no âmbito do controle social a ser desempenhado pelo enfermeiro na atenção básica à saúde.En este estudio se tuvo como objetivo, relatar la experiencia de un proceso de discusión de los resultados de una investigación sobre control social en la atención básica de salud. Se describe el proceso de planificación, desarrollo y evaluación de dos encuentros educativos participativos realizados con 12 enfermeras. Se presentan las expectativas y la evaluación de las participantes; sus reflexiones sobre los resultados de la investigación; y la reelaboración de las acciones de fortalecimiento del control social en la salud. Fueron señaladas nuevas posibilidades de actuación en el área y los diferentes responsables por su ejecución. Así mismo se relataron acciones de responsabilidad del profesional de enfermería, evidenciando la existencia de un papel en el ámbito del control social a ser desempeñado por el enfermero en la atención básica de salud.The objective of this study was to discuss the findings of a study on social control in primary care services with registered nurses. The planning, development, and evaluation of two educational meetings with 12 registered nurses are described. Participants' expectations

  5. Concussions--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Anne L.; Wyckoff, Leah J.

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is an essential member of the team addressing concussions. As the school-based clinical professional on the team, the school nurse has the knowledge and skills to provide concussion prevention…

  6. Chronic Health Conditions Managed by School Nurses. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgitan, Judith; Bushmiaer, Margo; DeSisto, Marie C.; Duff, Carolyn; Lambert, C. Patrice; Murphy, M. Kathleen; Roland, Sharon; Selser, Kendra; Wyckoff, Leah; White, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that students with chronic health conditions have access to a full-time registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse). School districts should include school nurse positions in their full-time instructional support personnel to provide health services…

  7. Organizational Characteristics Associated with Staff Turnover in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Engberg, John

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The association between certified nurse aide, licensed practical nurse, and registered nurse turnover and the organizational characteristics of nursing homes are examined. Design and Methods: Hypotheses for eight organizational characteristics are examined (staffing levels, top management turnover, resident case mix, facility quality,…

  8. Nursing errors and effect on health care: Perception of risk factors from view of nurse in Qazvin

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Zeighami; Mostafa Shokati Ahmadabad; Aref Mohammadian; Mahmoud Alipoor Heydari; Hossein Rafiei

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: In order to plan for preventing and decreasing the rate of nursing errors, understanding of nurse’s perception of nursing errors could be very helpful. This study was thus designed to examine the critical care nurses perception of nursing errors from view point of critical care nurses. Methods: This study was conducted in 9 hospitals in Qazvin province located in north of Iran. Using convenience sampling, all registered nurses who worked in critical care units were inv...

  9. The Current State of U.S. Geropsychiatric Graduate Nursing Education: Results of the National Geropsychiatric Graduate Nursing Education Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Caroline E; Harris, Melodee; Buron, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) must be prepared to care for the rapidly increasing numbers of older adults with mental health needs. All 363 graduate nursing programs in the United States were surveyed regarding the nature and extent of geropsychiatric nursing (GPN) content across program curricula and their perceptions of the influence that the APRN Consensus Model has exerted on preparing the next generation of APRNs to meet the growing needs of the older adult population. Of the 202 schools responding, 138 reported GPN content in one or more clinical programs, with the majority of content in non-PMHNP programs. Only 17 schools reported offering a GPN program, track, or minor. The majority of schools (n = 169) perceived that they were adequately well-prepared to meet the APRN Consensus Model's guidelines regarding inclusion of aging-related didactic and clinical educational experiences in all APRN education programs; nearly two thirds (n = 132) perceived a moderate to significant influence of the Consensus Model on institutional infusion of GPN into curricula. Compared with a similar survey 10 years ago, there was little change in the proportion of schools reporting GPN in clinical programs and few schools provide GPN programs, tracks, or minors. Implications for nursing education and practice are discussed.

  10. The benefits and challenges of providing nursing student clinical rotations in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinny, Betsy; Brady, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    The goal of providing a clinical rotation in a basic nursing program is to integrate skills and knowledge from the classroom setting into the clinical practice setting. In the intensive care unit (ICU), nursing students have the ability to learn about the complex health issues of critically ill patients, practice selected technical skills, and develop communication skills. There are both benefits and challenges to having nursing students in the intensive care setting. With preparation, the student is able to immerse in the ICU environment, acquire new knowledge and skills, and participate alongside the nurse caring for critically ill patients. The staff nurse must balance patient care with the added responsibilities of helping the student meet the clinical goals. It is optimal to have faculty that are also intensive care clinically competent and can facilitate the clinical experience. The school, the hospital, and the ICU need to collaborate to provide a positive clinical experience that is safe for the patient. In return, the hospital can recruit student nurses and clinical faculty. Planned with thought and intention, rotations in the ICU can be an ideal clinical setting for upper-level student nurses to learn the role of the registered nurse.

  11. Good nurse, bad nurse....

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, C; Cattoni, J

    1995-02-01

    The construction of the nursing subject is discussed. The paper takes a historical perspective, arguing that the range of speaking positions available to the nurse is limited by gender, class and education. It evaluates the position of nursing in the university, showing how this also has propensity to limit the development of the nursing profession.

  12. Nursing Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Nurse transformational leaders can serve in academic settings and at local, national, international professional nursing organizations and community-based groups. As a transformational leader, nurses can lead in any workplace. According to a study by Stanley (2012), clinical leaders are not sought for their capacity to outline a vision, but for their values and beliefs on display that are easily recognized in their actions. This encompasses the moral component of transformational leadership. It is the APRNs duty to continue to strive towards a better vision for the well-being of all nurses, patients, and colleagues. Autonomous APRNs are happier, healthier, and better prepared to provide the best patient care to their patients. We should not be happy to sit back and let others fight this fight. APRNs need to be on the frontline, leading the way. This is only an insight that I have gained after many frustrating years of cheering our profession and then being made to feel inferior at the same time. Only nurses, who have that nurturing spirit, would hold back if they felt it might hurt others. Don't back off or hold back! It might hurt those that follow!

  13. Registering Researchers in Authority Files

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altman, M.; Conlon, M.; Cristan, A.L.; Dawson, L.; Dunham, J.; Hickey, T.; Hook, D.; Horstmann, W.; MacEwan, A.; Schreur, P.; Smart, L.; Smith-Yoshimura, K.; Wacker, M.; Woutersen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Registering researchers in some type of authority file or identifier system has become more compelling as both institutions and researchers recognize the need to compile their scholarly output. The report presents functional requirements and recommendations for six stakeholders: researchers, funders

  14. The Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundtoft, Per Hviid; Varnum, Claus; Pedersen, Alma Becic

    2016-01-01

    through the DHR. Approximately 9,000 primary THAs and 1,500 revisions are reported to the register annually. CONCLUSION: The DHR is important for monitoring and improvement of treatment with THA and is a valuable tool for research in THA surgery due to the high quality of prospective collected data....... All Danish orthopedic departments - both public and private - report to the register, and registration is compulsory. MAIN VARIABLES: The main variables in the register include civil registration number, indication for primary and revision surgery, operation date and side, and postoperative...... complications. Completeness of primary and revision surgery is evaluated annually and validation of a number of variables has been carried out. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: A total of 139,525 primary THAs and 22,118 revisions have been registered in the DHR between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2014. Since 1995...

  15. Low-perceived work ability, ageing and intention to leave nursing: a comparison among 10 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camerino, Donatella; Conway, Paul Maurice; van der Heijden, Beatrice; Estryn-Behar, Madeleine; Consonni, Dario; Gould, Dinah; Hasselhorn, Hans Martin

    2006-01-01

    Aim: This paper reports a study exploring nurses' perceived work ability and its associations with age and intention to leave nursing in a representative sample of Registered Nurses in 10 European countries. Background: Throughout Europe, there is now a substantial shortage of Registered Nurses and

  16. Review of Nursing Literature: Evolution of Gerontological Education in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipose, Vimala; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A literature review found that (1) many students and nurses held negative views of the elderly, affecting career choices; (2) gerontological content in baccalaureate nursing programs ranged from little or none to adequate; and (3) a severe shortage of faculty prepared to teach gerontological nursing and negative attitudes toward this…

  17. Interrater reliability of a national acute myocardial infarction register

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govatsmark RES

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ragna Elise Støre Govatsmark,1,2 Sylvi Sneeggen,2 Hanne Karlsaune,2 Stig Arild Slørdahl,2 Kaare Harald Bønaa,1–3 1Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 2Department of Medical Quality Registries, 3Clinic for Heart Disease, St. Olav’s University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway Background: Disease-specific registers may be used for measuring and improving healthcare and patient outcomes, and for disease surveillance and research, provided they contain valid and reliable data. The aim of this study was to assess the interrater reliability of all variables in a national myocardial infarction register.Methods: We randomly selected 280 patients who had been enrolled from 14 hospitals to the Norwegian Myocardial Infarction Register during the year 2013. Experienced audit nurses, who were blinded to the data about the 280 patients already in the register, completed the Norwegian Myocardial Infarction paper forms for 240 patients by review of medical records. We then extracted all registered data on the same patients from the Norwegian Myocardial Infarction Register. To compare the interrater reliability between the register and the audit nurses, we calculated intraclass correlations coefficient for continuous variables, Cohen’s kappa and Gwet’s first agreement coefficient (AC1 for nominal variables, and quadratic weighted Cohen’s kappa and Gwet’s second AC for ordinal variables.Results: We found excellent (AC1 >0.80 or good (AC1 0.61–0.80 agreement for most variables, including date and time variables, medical history, investigations and treatments during hospitalization, medication at discharge, and ST-segment elevation or non-ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. However, only moderate agreement (AC1 0.41–0.60 was found for family history of coronary heart disease, diagnostic electrocardiography, and complications during hospitalization, whereas fair agreement (AC1

  18. Diabetes knowledge in nursing homes and home-based care services: a validation study of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Haugstvedt, Anne; Aarflot, Morten; Igland, Jannicke; Landbakk, Tilla; Graue, Marit

    2016-01-01

    Background Providing high-quality diabetes care in nursing homes and home-based care facilities requires suitable instruments to evaluate the level of diabetes knowledge among the health-care providers. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test adapted for use among nursing personnel. Methods The study included 127 nursing personnel (32 registered nurses, 69 nursing aides and 26 nursing assistants) at three nursing homes and...

  19. Integrating Correctional and Community Health Care: An Innovative Approach for Clinical Learning in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchaud, Mary T; Swan, Beth Ann

    2017-01-01

    With an evolving focus on primary, community-based, and patient-centered care rather than acute, hospital-centric, disease-focused care, and recognition of the importance of coordinating care and managing transitions across providers and settings of care, registered nurses need to be prepared from a different and broader knowledge base and skills set. A culture change among nurse educators and administrators and in nursing education is needed to prepare competent registered nurses capable of practicing from a health promotion, disease prevention, community- and population-focused construct in caring for a population of patients who are presenting health problems and conditions that persist across decades and/or lifetimes. While healthcare delivery is moving from the hospital to ambulatory and community settings, community-based educational opportunities for nursing students are shrinking due to a variety of reasons, including but not limited to increased regulatory requirements, the presence of competing numbers of nursing schools and their increased enrollment of students, and decreasing availability of community resources capable and willing to precept students in an all-day interactive learning environment. A detailed discussion of one college of nursings' journey to find an innovative solution and approach to the dilemma of limited and decreasing available community clinical sites to prepare senior level prelicensure baccalaureate nursing students for healthcare practice in the twenty-first century. This article demonstrated how medium/maximum prisons can provide an ideal learning experience for not only technical nursing skills but more importantly for reinforcing key learning goals for community-based care, raising population-based awareness, and promoting cultural awareness and sensitivity. In addition, this college of nursing overcame the challenges of initiating and maintaining clinical placement in a prison facility, collaboratively developed strategies

  20. Indicadores de qualidade no gerenciamento de recursos humanos em enfermagem: elementos constitutivos segundo percepção de enfermeiros Indicadores de calidad en la administración de recursos humanos en enfermería: elementos constitutivos según percepción de los enfermeros Quality indicators of the management of human resources in nursing: point of view of registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Mirarchi Vieira

    2010-01-01

    y desarrollo compuesta por las unidades de significado: número de horas de entrenamiento de personal, inversión financiera en el entrenamiento de personal, y existencia de un cronograma de entrenamiento; y 3 la categoría desempeño personal/profesional constituida por las unidades de significado: ausentismo, número de licencias médicas, rotación de personal y satisfacción/insatisfacción en el trabajo. CONCLUSIÓN: Las unidades de significado rescatadas y sus respectivas categorías entregaron subsidios significativos para la construcción de indicadores de calidad en la administración de recursos humanos en enfermería.OBJECTIVES: To examine point of view of registered nurses regarding quality indicators of the management of human resources, and to identify essential elements of the management process of human resources for the development of quality indicator in health services. METHODS: Data were collected through interviews with two registered nurses from a continuing education department. RESULTS: Three themes emerged from content analysis: (a scheduling of personnel considering number of staff needed, professional qualification and competency of staff; (b training and professional development consisting of hours needed for training, financial investment in training, and training schedule; and (c personal and professional performance concerning absenteism, medical leave, turn-over, and job satisfaction. CONCLUSION: The idenfication of essential elements of the management process and its sub-categories provide significative support for the development of quality indicators of the management of human resources in nursing.