WorldWideScience

Sample records for preliminary field guide

  1. Design, Development and Preliminary Student Evaluation of Virtual Field Guides as aids to teaching and learning in the Earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Tim

    2010-05-01

    In Universities the benefits of teaching and learning through fieldwork has been brought under closer examination in recent years (e.g. Andrews et al., 2003) and the notion of supporting fieldwork in the Geography, Earth and Environmental Science (GEES) disciplines has been gathering momentum over the past decade as evidenced by conferences on ‘Supporting fieldwork using information technology' (Maskall et al., 2007) and a Higher Education Academy GEES Virtual Fieldwork Conference at University of Worcester (May 2007). Virtual environments and e-learning resources have been shown to help students become active rather than passive learners by appealing to their multi-sensory learning ability with interactive media (Fletcher et al., 2002; 2007). Research on glacial and fluvial processes has been conducted since 2003 by Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) staff, sometimes in collaboration with other Universities, at field sites in the French Alps, Swiss Alps and Cariboo Mountains in British Columbia. A virtual field guide (VFG) (www.virtualalps.co.uk) has been developed which uses maps, site photos, panorama movies, video clips, a google earth tour, student exercises using hydrological and glacial datasets collected in the field and revision exercises. A preliminary evaluation of this learning resource has been carried out with two groups of LJMU students and an article written (Stott et al. 2009a). The Ingleton Waterfalls VFG (http://www.ljmu.ac.uk/BIE/ingleton/) was developed by LJMU staff to meet the needs of Foundation degree and undergraduate students. A workshop was presented at the Earth Science Teachers Association 2008 Annual Conference at LJMU, and a subsequent article written (Stott et al. 2009b). The final section of this presentation will summarise some staff perspectives and raises some questions and issues concerned with development and accessibility of VFGs in the light of new developments of a ‘semantic web' at LJMU (Carmichael, 2009). Andrews

  2. Moving Field Guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassie Meador; Mark Twery; Meagan. Leatherbury

    2011-01-01

    The Moving Field Guides (MFG) project is a creative take on site interpretation. Moving Field Guides provide an example of how scientific and artistic endeavors work in parallel. Both begin with keen observations that produce information that must be analyzed, understood, and interpreted. That interpretation then needs to be communicated to others to complete the...

  3. Field Guide to Radiometry

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Written from a systems engineering perspective, this SPIE Field Guide covers topics in optical radiation propagation, material properties, sources, detectors, system components, measurement, calibration, and photometry. The book's organization and extensive collection of diagrams, tables, and graphs will enable the reader to efficiently identify and apply relevant information to radiometric problems arising amid the demands of today's fast-paced technical environment.

  4. A Guide to the Field Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural History, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides a compilation of recommended field guides which deal with birds, mammals, trees, and wildflowers. Each recommended volume is described, noting its distinguishing features and evaluating its organization, photography, and text. Includes the author, publisher, and suggested retail price. (TW)

  5. MR-guided transgluteal biopsies with an open low-field system in patients with clinically suspected prostate cancer: technique and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zangos, Stephan [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Eichler, Katrin; Engelmann, Kerstin; Ahmed, Mukhtiar; Dettmer, Sebastian; Herzog, Christopher; Pegios, Wasilios; Wetter, A.; Lehnert, Thomas; Mack, Martin G.; Vogl, Thomas J. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and safety of MR-guided biopsies with a transgluteal approach in patients with uncertain or suspicious prostate lesions. Twenty-five patients with uncertain or suspicious focal prostate lesions detected by high-field MR imaging of the prostate gland using endorectal coil imaging were biopsied with a transgluteal approach in a low-field MRI system (0.2 T, Concerto, Siemens). The procedures were guided using T1-weighted FLASH sequences. The prostate gland was biopsied repeatedly with a coaxial technique through a 15-gauge pencil tip with a 16-gauge biopsy handy (median 3.8 samples per patient). Complications and biopsy findings were documented retrospectively. Using T1-weighted sequences biopsy procedures were performed successfully with MR guidance in all cases without any side effects or complications. The median intervention time was 11.3 min. Pathological findings revealed ten cases of hyperplasia or atrophy, three cases of prostatitis, ten cases of carcinoma and two cases of normal tissue. The clinical follow-up showed that in two patients prostate cancer was missed at MR-guided biopsy. Transgluteal MR-guided biopsy of the prostate gland is a safe and promising approach for histological clarification of uncertain or suspicious lesions. (orig.)

  6. New librarianship field guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lankes, R David

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a guide for librarians who see their profession as a chance to make a positive difference in their communities -- librarians who recognize that it is no longer enough to stand behind a desk waiting to serve. R. David Lankes, author of "The Atlas of New Librarianship," reminds librarians of their mission: to improve society by facilitating knowledge creation in their communities. In this book, he provides tools, arguments, resources, and ideas for fulfilling this mission. Librarians will be prepared to become radical positive change agents in their communities, and other readers will learn to understand libraries in a new way. The librarians of Ferguson, Missouri, famously became positive change agents in August 2014 when they opened library doors when schools were closed because of civil unrest after the shooting of an unarmed teen by police. Working with other local organizations, they provided children and their parents a space for learning, lunch, and peace. But other libraries serve othe...

  7. Field guide to nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Powers, Peter E

    2013-01-01

    Optomechanics is a field of mechanics that addresses the specific design challenges associated with optical systems. This [i]Field Guide [/i]describes how to mount optical components, as well as how to analyze a given design. It is intended for practicing optical and mechanical engineers whose work requires knowledge in both optics and mechanics. This Field Guide is designed for those looking for a condensed and concise source of key concepts, equations, and techniques for nonlinear optics. Topics covered include technologically important effects, recent developments in nonlinear optics

  8. Tripolar electric field Structure in guide field magnetic reconnection

    OpenAIRE

    S. Fu; S. Huang; M. Zhou; B. Ni; X. Deng

    2018-01-01

    It has been shown that the guide field substantially modifies the structure of the reconnection layer. For instance, the Hall magnetic and electric fields are distorted in guide field reconnection compared to reconnection without guide fields (i.e., anti-parallel reconnection). In this paper, we performed 2.5-D electromagnetic full particle simulation to study the electric field structures in magnetic reconnection under different initial guide fields (Bg). Once the amplit...

  9. Field guide to geometrical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Greivenkamp, John E

    2004-01-01

    This Field Guide derives from the treatment of geometrical optics that has evolved from both the undergraduate and graduate programs at the Optical Sciences Center at the University of Arizona. The development is both rigorous and complete, and it features a consistent notation and sign convention. This volume covers Gaussian imagery, paraxial optics, first-order optical system design, system examples, illumination, chromatic effects, and an introduction to aberrations. The appendices provide supplemental material on radiometry and photometry, the human eye, and several other topics.

  10. Tripolar electric field Structure in guide field magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Song; Huang, Shiyong; Zhou, Meng; Ni, Binbin; Deng, Xiaohua

    2018-03-01

    It has been shown that the guide field substantially modifies the structure of the reconnection layer. For instance, the Hall magnetic and electric fields are distorted in guide field reconnection compared to reconnection without guide fields (i.e., anti-parallel reconnection). In this paper, we performed 2.5-D electromagnetic full particle simulation to study the electric field structures in magnetic reconnection under different initial guide fields (Bg). Once the amplitude of a guide field exceeds 0.3 times the asymptotic magnetic field B0, the traditional bipolar Hall electric field is clearly replaced by a tripolar electric field, which consists of a newly emerged electric field and the bipolar Hall electric field. The newly emerged electric field is a convective electric field about one ion inertial length away from the neutral sheet. It arises from the disappearance of the Hall electric field due to the substantial modification of the magnetic field and electric current by the imposed guide field. The peak magnitude of this new electric field increases linearly with the increment of guide field strength. Possible applications of these results to space observations are also discussed.

  11. Tripolar electric field Structure in guide field magnetic reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the guide field substantially modifies the structure of the reconnection layer. For instance, the Hall magnetic and electric fields are distorted in guide field reconnection compared to reconnection without guide fields (i.e., anti-parallel reconnection. In this paper, we performed 2.5-D electromagnetic full particle simulation to study the electric field structures in magnetic reconnection under different initial guide fields (Bg. Once the amplitude of a guide field exceeds 0.3 times the asymptotic magnetic field B0, the traditional bipolar Hall electric field is clearly replaced by a tripolar electric field, which consists of a newly emerged electric field and the bipolar Hall electric field. The newly emerged electric field is a convective electric field about one ion inertial length away from the neutral sheet. It arises from the disappearance of the Hall electric field due to the substantial modification of the magnetic field and electric current by the imposed guide field. The peak magnitude of this new electric field increases linearly with the increment of guide field strength. Possible applications of these results to space observations are also discussed.

  12. A field guide to digital color

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Maureen Stone's field guide to digital color presents a survey of digital color with special emphasis on those fields important for computer graphics. The book provides the foundation for understanding color and its applications, discusses color media and color management and the use of color in computer graphics, including color design and selection. The book provides a guide for anyone who wants to understand and apply digital color. An annotated bibliography provides in-depth references for further study on each topic.

  13. Surface multipole guide field for plasma injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breun, R.A.; Rael, B.H.; Wong, A.Y.

    1977-01-01

    Described here is a surface guide field system which is useful for injection of plasmas into confinement devices. Experimental results are given for 5--25-eV hydrogen plasmas produced by a coaxial discharge (Marshall) gun. It is found that better than 90% of the plasma produced by the gun is delivered to the end of the guide 180 cm away, while the neutral component falls by more than an order of magnitude. For these results the rod current providing the magnetic field had to be large enough to provide at least 1.5-ion gyroradii from the center of the guide to the surface of the inner rod

  14. Ontario hydro radioactive material transportation field guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, W.

    1987-01-01

    The recent introduction of both the AECB Transport Packaging of Radioactive Material Regulations and Transport Canada's Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations have significantly altered the requirements for transporting radioactive material in Canada. Extensive additional training as well as certification of several hundred Ontario Hydro employees has been necessary to ensure compliance with the additional and revised regulatory requirements. To assist in the training of personnel, an 'active' corporate Ontario Hydro Field Guide for Radioactive Material Transport document has been developed and published. The contents of this Field Guide identify current Ontario Hydro equipment and procedures as well as the updated relevant regulatory requirements within Canada. In addition, to satisfying Ontario Hydro requirements for this type of information over two thousand of these Field Guides have been provided to key emergency response personnel throughout the province of Ontario to assist in their transportation accident response training

  15. The Astrobiology Field Guide in World Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalice, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    In collaboration with the Australian Centre for Astrobiology (ACA), and NASA Learning Technologies (NLT), and utilizing the powerful visualization capabilities of their "World Wind" software, the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) is crafting a prototype "Astrobiology Field Guide" to bring the field experiences and stories of astrobiology science to the public and classrooms around the world. The prototype focuses on one region in particular - The Pilbara in Western Australia. This first Field Guide "hotspot" is an internationally recognized area hosting the best known example of the earliest evidence of life on Earth - a stromatolitic chert precipitation in the 3.45 Ga Warrawoona Group. The goal of the Astrobiology Field Guide is to engage students of all ages with the ongoing field expeditions of today's astrobiologists as they explore the ends of the Earth searching for clues to life's origin, evolution, and distribution in the Universe. The NAI hopes to expand this Field Guide to include many more astrobiologically relevant areas across the globe such as Cuatro Cienegas in Mexico, the Rio Tinto in Spain, Yellowstone National Park in the US, and the Lost City hydrothermal vent field on the mid-Atlantic ridge - and possibly sites on Mars. To that end, we will be conducting feasibility studies and evaluations with informal and formal education contacts. The Astrobiology Field Guide is also serving as a cornerstone to educational materials being developed focused on the Pilbara region for use in classrooms in Australia, the UK, and potentially the US. These materials are being developed by the Australian Centre for Astrobiology, and the ICT Innovations Centre at Macquarie University in Sydney, in collaboration with the NAI and the Centre for Astronomy and Science Education at the University of Glamorgan in the UK.

  16. A guide to introducing burnup credit, preliminary version (English translation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Suyama, Kenya; Ryufuku, Susumu

    2017-06-01

    There is an ongoing discussion on the application of burnup credit to the criticality safety controls of facilities that treat spent fuels. With regard to such application of burnup credit in Japan, this document summarizes the current technical status of the prediction of the isotopic composition and criticality of spent fuels, as well as safety evaluation concerns and the current status of legal affairs. This report is an English translation of A Guide to Introducing Burnup Credit, Preliminary Version, originally published in Japanese as JAERI-Tech 2001-055 by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility Safety Research Committee. (author)

  17. Efficient Injection of Electron Beams into Magnetic Guide Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chorny, V.; Cooperstein, G.; Dubyna, V.; Frolov, O.; Harper-Slaboszewicz, V.; Hinshelwood, D.; Schneider, R.; Solovyov, V.; Tsepilov, H.; Vitkovitsky, I.; Ware, K.

    1999-01-01

    Preliminary experimental and modeling study of injection and transport of high current electron beams in current-neutralized background gas has been performed. Initial analysis of the results indicates that high current triaxial ring diode operates very reproducibly in the pinch mode. High current density beam can be injected efficiently into the drift region, using azimuthal guide field with reduced intensity near the injection region. This was shown to improve the effectiveness of capturing the beam for the transport. The transport length was insufficient to measure losses, such as would arise from scattering with the background gas

  18. Night sky a falcon field guide

    CERN Document Server

    Nigro, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Night Sky: A Falcon Field Guide covers both summer and winter constellations, planets, and stars found in the northern hemisphere. Conveniently sized to fit in a pocket and featuring detailed photographs, this informative guide makes it easy to identify objects in the night sky even from one's own backyard. From information on optimal weather conditions, preferred viewing locations, and how to use key tools of the trade, this handbook will help you adeptly navigate to and fro the vast and dynamic nighttime skies, and you'll fast recognize that the night sky's the limit.

  19. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Birren, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis: A Practical Guide is the first laboratory manual to describe the theory and practice of this technique. Based on the authors' experience developing pulsed field gel instruments and teaching procedures, this book provides everything a researcher or student needs to know in order to understand and carry out pulsed field gel experiments. Clear, well-tested protocols assume only that users have a basic familiarity with molecular biology. Thorough coverage of useful data, theory, and applications ensures that this book is also a lasting resource for more adv

  20. Empirical trials of plant field guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, W D; Cable, S; Marshall, C A M

    2014-06-01

    We designed 3 image-based field guides to tropical forest plant species in Ghana, Grenada, and Cameroon and tested them with 1095 local residents and 20 botanists in the United Kingdom. We compared users' identification accuracy with different image formats, including drawings, specimen photos, living plant photos, and paintings. We compared users' accuracy with the guides to their accuracy with only their prior knowledge of the flora. We asked respondents to score each format for usability, beauty, and how much they would pay for it. Prior knowledge of plant names was generally low (<22%). With a few exceptions, identification accuracy did not differ significantly among image formats. In Cameroon, users identifying sterile Cola species achieved 46-56% accuracy across formats; identification was most accurate with living plant photos. Botanists in the United Kingdom accurately identified 82-93% of the same Cameroonian species; identification was most accurate with specimens. In Grenada, users accurately identified 74-82% of plants; drawings yielded significantly less accurate identifications than paintings and photos of living plants. In Ghana, users accurately identified 85% of plants. Digital color photos of living plants ranked high for beauty, usability, and what users would pay. Black and white drawings ranked low. Our results show the potential and limitations of the use of field guides and nonspecialists to identify plants, for example, in conservation applications. We recommend authors of plant field guides use the cheapest or easiest illustration format because image type had limited bearing on accuracy; match the type of illustration to the most likely use of the guide for slight improvements in accuracy; avoid black and white formats unless the audience is experienced at interpreting illustrations or keeping costs low is imperative; discourage false-positive identifications, which were common; and encourage users to ask an expert or use a herbarium for

  1. Preliminary Phase Field Computational Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yulan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Ke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suter, Jonathan D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McCloy, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Bradley R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-15

    experiments, special experimental methods were devised to create similar boundary conditions in the iron films. Preliminary MFM studies conducted on single and polycrystalline iron films with small sub-areas created with focused ion beam have correlated quite well qualitatively with phase-field simulations. However, phase-field model dimensions are still small relative to experiments thus far. We are in the process of increasing the size of the models and decreasing specimen size so both have identical dimensions. Ongoing research is focused on validation of the phase-field model. Validation is being accomplished through comparison with experimentally obtained MFM images (in progress), and planned measurements of major hysteresis loops and first order reversal curves. Extrapolation of simulation sizes to represent a more stochastic bulk-like system will require sampling of various simulations (i.e., with single non-magnetic defect, single magnetic defect, single grain boundary, single dislocation, etc.) with distributions of input parameters. These outputs can then be compared to laboratory magnetic measurements and ultimately to simulate magnetic Barkhausen noise signals.

  2. Field trials results of guided wave tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volker, Arno; Zon, Tim van; Leden, Edwin van der

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Guided wave travel time tomography is a method capable of providing an absolute wall thickness map. This method is currently making the transition from the laboratory to the field. For this purpose a dedicated data acquisition system and special purpose EMAT sensor rings have been developed. The system can be deployed for permanent monitoring and inspections. Field trials have been conducted on various pipes with different diameters, containing either liquid or gas. The main focus has been on pipe supports. The results demonstrate the successful operation of the technology in the field. Expected corrosion damage was clearly visible on the produced results enabling asset owner to make calculated decisions on the pipelines safety, maintenance and operations

  3. Field trials results of guided wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volker, Arno; van Zon, Tim; van der Leden, Edwin

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Guided wave travel time tomography is a method capable of providing an absolute wall thickness map. This method is currently making the transition from the laboratory to the field. For this purpose a dedicated data acquisition system and special purpose EMAT sensor rings have been developed. The system can be deployed for permanent monitoring and inspections. Field trials have been conducted on various pipes with different diameters, containing either liquid or gas. The main focus has been on pipe supports. The results demonstrate the successful operation of the technology in the field. Expected corrosion damage was clearly visible on the produced results enabling asset owner to make calculated decisions on the pipelines safety, maintenance and operations.

  4. SharePoint 2010 Field Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Steven; Gazmuri, Pablo; Caravajal, Steve; Wheeler, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Hands-on solutions for common SharePoint 2010 challenges Aimed at the more than 100 million licensed SharePoint 2010 users, this indispensable field guide addresses an abundance of common SharePoint 2010 problems and offers proven solutions. A team of authors encourages you to customize SharePoint beyond the out-of-the-box functionality so that you can build more complex solutions to these challenges. You?ll discover intricate details and specific full-scale solutions that you can then implement to your own SharePoint 2010 solutions.Tackles a variety of SharePoint 2010 problems ranging from si

  5. A guide to safe field operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yobbi, D.K.; Yorke, T.H.; Mycyk, R.T.

    1996-01-01

    Most functions of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Water Resources Division (WRD) require employees to participate in numerous field activities ranging from routine meetings with cooperators, other federal and public officials, and private citizens to potentially hazardous assignments, such as making flood measurements and scuba diving to service underwater instruments. It is paramount that each employee be aware of safety procedures and operational policies of the WRD to ensure that (1) their activities avoid or minimize personal injury to the employee, coworkers, or anyone in the vicinity of the field activity, and (2) their conduct does not infringe on the personal or property rights of any individual or organization. The purpose of the guide is to familiarize employees with the operational and safety procedures expected to be followed by each employee as a representative of the WRD. It is also intended as a training tool for all new employees and a document to be reviewed by each employee before undertaking a field assignment. It includes general procedures that are standard and applicable to all field operations, such as communication, vehicle operation, and adequate preparation for anticipated weather conditions. It also includes a discussion of specific procedures and safety considerations for most of the routine field assignments undertaken by hydrologists and hydrologic technicians of the WRD. The guide is not intended to be a technical handbook outlining step-by-step procedures for performing specific tasks or a comprehensive discussion of every possible activity that may be undertaken by a USGS employee. Employees are referred to the Techniques for Water-Resources Investigations (TWRI) series for specific technical procedures and to the U.S. Geological Survey Safety and Environmental Health Handbook 445-1-H (USGS, August 1989), USGS Occupational Hazards and Safety Procedures Handbook 445-2-H (December 1993), the WRD notebook on Safety Policy and

  6. Intermittency in Hall-magnetohydrodynamics with a strong guide field

    OpenAIRE

    Imazio, P. Rodriguez; Martin, L. N.; Dmitruk, P.; Mininni, P. D.

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed study of intermittency in the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations of compressible Hall-magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with an external guide field. To solve the equations numerically, a reduced model valid when a strong guide field is present is used. Different values for the ion skin depth are considered in the simulations. The resulting data are analyzed computing field increments in several directions perpendicular to the guide field, and building structure funct...

  7. Magnetic Field Measurements in Beam Guiding Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Henrichsen, K N

    1998-01-01

    Electromagnets used as beam guiding elements in particle accelerators and colliders require very tight tole-rances on their magnetic fields and on their alignment along the particle path. This article describes the methods and equipment used for magnetic measurements in beam transport magnets. Descriptions are given of magnetic resonance techniques, various induction coil methods, Hall generator measurements, the fluxgate magnetometer as well as the recently developed method of beam based alignment. References of historical nature as well as citations of recent work are given. The present commercial availability of the different sensors and asso-ciated equipment is indicated. Finally we shall try to analyze possible future needs for developments in those fields.

  8. Malware Forensics Field Guide for Windows Systems Digital Forensics Field Guides

    CERN Document Server

    Malin, Cameron H; Aquilina, James M

    2010-01-01

    Dissecting the dark side of the Internet with its infectious worms, botnets, rootkits, and Trojan horse programs (known as malware) is a treaterous condition for any forensic investigator or analyst. Written by information security experts with real-world investigative experience, Malware Forensics Field Guide for Windows Systems is a "tool" with checklists for specific tasks, case studies of difficult situations, and expert analyst tips. *A condensed hand-held guide complete with on-the-job tasks and checklists *Specific for Windows-based systems, the largest running OS in the world

  9. Field Guides Made Easy. 4-H Leader's Guide L-5-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Diane Held; Krasny, Marianne E.

    This illustrated leader's guide describes activities for teaching children to use field guides to identify trees and birds. Background information for leaders explains the two types of field guides, those that use a series of steps in what is called a key to identify things in nature, such as trees, and those that use groupings based on…

  10. Metric quantum field theory: A preliminary look

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    Spacetime coordinates are involved in uncertainty relations; spacetime itself appears to exhibit curvature. Could the continua associated with field variables exhibit curvature? This question, as well as the ideas that (a) difficulties with quantum theories of gravitation may be due to their formulation in an incorrect analogy with other quantum field theories, (b) spacetime variables should not be any more basic than others for describing physical phenomena, and (c) if field continua do not exhibit curvature, the reasons would be of interest, motivated the formulation of a theory of variable curvature and torsion in the electromagnetic four-potential's reciprocal space. Curvature and torsion equation completely analogous to those for a gauge theory of gravitation (the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory) are assumed for this continuum. The interaction-Hamiltonian density of this theory, to a first approximation, implies that in addition to the Maxwell-Dirac field interaction of ordinary quantum electrodynamics, there should also be an interaction between Dirac-field vector and pseudovector currents unmediated by photons, as well as other interactions involving two or three Dirac-field currents interacting with the Maxwell field at single spacetime events. Calculations expressing Bhabha-scattering cross sections for incident beams with parallel spins differ from those of unmodified quantum electrodynamics by terms of first order in the gravitational constant of the theory, but the corresponding cross section for unpolarized incident beams differs from that of the unmodified theory only by terms of higher order in that constant. Undesirable features of the present theory include its nonrenormalizability, the obscurity of the meaning of its inverse field operator, and its being based on electrodynamics rather than electroweak dynamics

  11. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Guiding Relativistic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, S.; Demoulin, P.; Dasso, S.; Klein, K. L.

    2011-01-01

    The origin and the propagation of relativistic solar particles (0.5 to few Ge V) in the interplanetary medium remains a debated topic. These relativistic particles, detected at the Earth by neutron monitors have been previously accelerated close to the Sun and are guided by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines, connecting the acceleration site and the Earth. Usually, the nominal Parker spiral is considered for ensuring the magnetic connection to the Earth. However, in most GLEs the IMF is highly disturbed, and the active regions associated to the GLEs are not always located close to the solar footprint of the nominal Parker spiral. A possible explanation is that relativistic particles are propagating in transient magnetic structures, such as Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). In order to check this interpretation, we studied in detail the interplanetary medium where the particles propagate for 10 GLEs of the last solar cycle. Using the magnetic field and the plasma parameter measurements (ACE/MAG and ACE/SWEPAM), we found widely different IMF configurations. In an independent approach we develop and apply an improved method of the velocity dispersion analysis to energetic protons measured by SoHO/ERNE. We determined the effective path length and the solar release time of protons from these data and also combined them with the neutron monitor data. We found that in most of the GLEs, protons propagate in transient magnetic structures. Moreover, the comparison between the interplanetary magnetic structure and the interplanetary length suggest that the timing of particle arrival at Earth is dominantly determined by the type of IMF in which high energetic particles are propagating. Finally we find that these energetic protons are not significantly scattered during their transport to Earth.

  12. Preliminary experiments with a cusp-field ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; O'Hagan, J.B.

    1980-12-01

    Preliminary experiments with a cusp field ion source have been completed. Measurements were made of the total ion current and mass and energy distributions as a function of source operating conditions and cusp field geometry. These experiments have indicated that a cusp field source may be used in the Sandia Neutron Generator for Cancer Therapy and may permit the incorporation of a simplified unpumped accelerator design. Suggestions for future work are briefly outlined

  13. Collaboration and Team Science Field Guide - Center for Research Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaboration and Team Science: A Field Guide provides insight into the practices of conducting collaborative work. Since its 2010 publication, the authors have worked and learned from teams and organizations all over the world. Learn from these experiences in the second edition of the Team Science Field Guide.

  14. Field guide to diseases & insects of the Rocky Mountain Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest Health Protection. Rocky Mountain Region

    2010-01-01

    This field guide is a forest management tool for field identification of biotic and abiotic agents that damage native trees in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming, which constitute the USDA Forest Service's Rocky Mountain Region. The guide focuses only on tree diseases and forest insects that have significant economic, ecological, and/ or...

  15. Electron wind in strong wave guide fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krienen, F.

    1985-03-01

    The X-ray activity observed near highly powered waveguide structures is usually caused by local electric discharges originating from discontinuities such as couplers, tuners or bends. In traveling waves electrons move in the direction of the power flow. Seed electrons can multipactor in a traveling wave, the moving charge pattern is different from the multipactor in a resonant structure and is self-extinguishing. The charge density in the wave guide will modify impedance and propagation constant of the wave guide. The radiation level inside the output wave guide of the SLAC, 50 MW, S-band, klystron is estimated. Possible contributions of radiation to window failure are discussed.

  16. Gravity field of Venus - A preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R. J.; Sjogren, W. L.; Abbott, E. A.; Smith, J. C.; Wimberly, R. N.; Wagner, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    The gravitational field of Venus obtained by tracking the Pioneer Venus Orbiter is examined. For each spacecraft orbit, two hours of Doppler data centered around periapsis were used to estimate spacecraft position and velocity and the velocity residuals obtained were spline fit and differentiated to produce line of sight gravitational accelerations. Consistent variations in line of sight accelerations from orbit to orbit reveal the presence of gravitational anomalies. A simulation of isostatic compensation for an elevated region on the surface of Venus indicates that the mean depth of compensation is no greater than about 100 km. Gravitational spectra obtained from a Fourier analysis of line of sight accelerations from selected Venus orbits are compared to the earth's gravitational spectrum and spherical harmonic gravitational potential power spectra of the earth, the moon and Mars. The Venus power spectrum is found to be remarkably similar to that of the earth, however systematic variations in the harmonics suggest differences in dynamic processes or lithospheric behavior.

  17. Interaction between laser-produced plasma and guiding magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Jun; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Transportation properties of laser-produced plasma through a guiding magnetic field were examined. A drifting dense plasma produced by a KrF laser was injected into an axisymmetric magnetic field induced by permanent ring magnets. The plasma ion flux in the guiding magnetic field was measured by a Faraday cup at various distances from the laser target. Numerical analyses based on a collective focusing model were performed to simulate plasma particle trajectories and then compared with the experimental results. (author)

  18. Influence of a guide field on collisionless driven reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Ritoku; Usami, Shunsuke; Ohtani, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    The influence of a guide field on collisionless driven reconnection is investigated by means of two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulation in an open system. In a quasi-steady state when reconnection electric field evolves fully, a current layer evolves locally in a narrow kinetic region and its scale decreases in proportion to an electron meandering scale as the guide field is intensified. Here, the meandering scale stands for an average spatial scale of nongyrotropic motions in the vicinity of the reconnection point. Force terms associated with off-diagonal components of electron and ion pressure tensors, which are originating from nongyrotropic motions of charged particles, becomes dominant at the reconnection point and sustain the reconnection electric field even when the guide field is strong. It is also found that thermalization of both ions and electrons is suppressed by the guide field. For the weak guide field, an electron nonthermal component is significantly created through a fast outburst from the kinetic region, while for the strong guide field, an ion nonthermal component is generated through the acceleration by an in-plane electric field near the magnetic separatrix. (author)

  19. Intermittency in Hall-magnetohydrodynamics with a strong guide field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Imazio, P.; Martin, L. N.; Dmitruk, P.; Mininni, P. D.

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed study of intermittency in the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations of compressible Hall-magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with an external guide field. To solve the equations numerically, a reduced model valid when a strong guide field is present is used. Different values for the ion skin depth are considered in the simulations. The resulting data are analyzed computing field increments in several directions perpendicular to the guide field, and building structure functions and probability density functions. In the magnetohydrodynamic limit, we recover the usual results with the magnetic field being more intermittent than the velocity field. In the presence of the Hall effect, field fluctuations at scales smaller than the ion skin depth show a substantial decrease in the level of intermittency, with close to monofractal scaling

  20. Magnetic Field Analysis of Plasma Guide in Galathea Trimyx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Xianji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available You Galathea Trimyx is a kind of small size, multipole magnetic confinement devices in controlled thermonuclear fusion. Plasma guide is one of important part in Galathea Trimyx which is responsible for transporting fast and slow plasma bunches ejected from plasma gun. The distribution and uniformity of magnetic field in completed plasma guide is analyzed in detail, including in x -axis direction and in z-axis direction. On the basis, the motion of plasma in the guide is discussed.

  1. Field trip guide to the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reidel, S.P.; Lindsey, K.A.; Fecht, K.R.

    1992-11-01

    This report is designed to provide a guide to the key geologic and hydrologic features of the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site located in south-central Washington. The guide is divided into two parts. The first part is a general introduction to the geology of the Hanford Site and its relation to the regional framework of south-central Washington. The second part is a road log that provides directions to important geologic features on the Hanford Site and descriptions of the locality. The exposures described were chosen for their accessibility and importance to the geologic history of the Hanford Site and to understanding the geohydrology of the Site

  2. A Guided Inquiry Activity for Teaching Ligand Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian J.; Graham, Kate J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe a guided inquiry activity for teaching ligand field theory. Previous research suggests the guided inquiry approach is highly effective for student learning. This activity familiarizes students with the key concepts of molecular orbital theory applied to coordination complexes. Students will learn to identify factors that…

  3. Field guide to fishes of the chesapeake bay

    CERN Document Server

    Murdy, Edward O.

    2013-01-01

    The only comprehensive field guide to the Chesapeake’s fishes, this book is an indispensable resource for both anglers and students of the Bay. Vivid illustrations by Val Kells complement the expertise of researchers Edward O. Murdy and John A. Musick. They describe fishes that inhabit waters ranging from low-salinity estuaries to the point where the Bay meets the Atlantic Ocean. Key features of this field guide include• full-color illustrations of more than 200 species• text that is presented adjacent to illustrations for easy reference• detailed descriptions of physical characteristics, range, occurrence in the Bay, reproduction, diet, and statistics from fisheries research• spot illustrations that highlight critical features of certain fish• illustrations of juveniles when they look different from adults• appendices that include identification keys Formatted as a compact field guide for students, scientists, researchers, and fishermen, Field Guide to Fishes of the Chesapeake Bay should be a ...

  4. Observing the sun a pocket field guide

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jamey L

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive solar observing guide for use at the telescope by amateur astronomers at all three levels: beginning, intermediate, and advanced. Users will find invaluable information for identifying features through photos, charts, diagrams in a logical, orderly fashion and then interpreting the observations. Because the Sun is a dynamic celestial body in constant flux, astronomers rarely know for certain what awaits them at the eyepiece. All features of the Sun are transient and sometimes rather fleeting. Given the number of features and the complex life cycles of some solar features, it can be a challenging hobby, and this guide provides all of the guidance necessary to inform observers about the sights and events unfolding before their eyes on the most active and powerful member of our Solar System.

  5. Field guide to forest plants of northern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia A. Patterson; Kenneth E. Neiman; Jonalea K. Tonn

    1985-01-01

    This field guide -- designed for use by people with minimal botanical training -- is an identification aid for nearly 200 plant species having ecological indicator value in northern Idaho forest habitat types. It contains line drawings, simplified taxonomic descriptions , characteristics tables, conspectuses, and keys. It emphasizes characteristics useful for field...

  6. Field Guide for Evaluating Cottonwood Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.M. Broadfoot

    1960-01-01

    Two field methods have been developed at the Stoneville Research Center for estimating the capability of Midsouth soils to grow eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.). Data for establishing the procedures were collected from 155 plots* at the locations indicated in Figure 1.The methods give site index-that is, tree-growing...

  7. Field Guide to Meteors and Meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, O. Richard

    2008-01-01

    Imagine the unique experience of being the very first person to hold a newly-found meteorite in your hand – a rock from space, older than Earth! "Weekend meteorite hunting" with magnets and metal detectors is becoming ever more popular as a pastime, but of course you can’t just walk around and pick up meteorites in the same way that you can pick up seashells on the beach. Those fragments that survived the intense heat of re-entry tend to disguise themselves as natural rocks over time, and it takes a trained eye – along with the information in this book – to recognize them. Just as amateur astronomers are familiar with the telescopes and accessories needed to study a celestial object, amateur meteoriticists have to use equipment ranging from simple hand lenses to microscopes to study a specimen, to identify its type and origins. Equipment and techniques are covered in detail here of course, along with a complete and fully illustrated guide to what you might find and where you might find it. In fact, th...

  8. Guiding-center equations for electrons in ultraintense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.E.; Fisch, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    The guiding-center equations are derived for electrons in arbitrarily intense laser fields also subject to external fields and ponderomotive forces. Exhibiting the relativistic mass increase of the oscillating electrons, a simple frame-invariant equation is shown to govern the behavior of the electrons for sufficiently weak background fields and ponderomotive forces. The parameter regime for which such a formulation is valid is made precise, and some predictions of the equation are checked by numerical simulation

  9. Field testing a soil site field guide for Allegheny hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.B. Jones

    1991-01-01

    A site quality evaluation decision model, developed for Allegheny hardwoods on the non-glaciated Allegheny Plateau of Pennsylvania and New York, was field tested by International Paper (IP) foresters and the author, on sites within the region of derivation and on glaciated sites north and west of the Wisconsin drift line. Results from the field testing are presented...

  10. Preliminary field demonstration of a fiber-optic TCE sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel, S.M.; Langry, K.; Roe, J.; Colston, B.W. Jr.; Daley, P.F.; Milanovich, F.P.

    1991-02-01

    We have developed a differential-absorption fiber-optic sensor for use in groundwater and vadose zone monitoring of certain volatile organochlorines. The principle of detection is a quantitative, irreversible chemical reaction that forms visible light-absorbing products. The sensor has been evaluated against gas chromatographic (GC) standard measurements and has demonstrated accuracy and sensitivity sufficient for the environmental monitoring of trace levels of trichloroethylene (TCE) and chloroform. This sensor is currently under evaluation in monitoring well and vadose zone applications. In this paper, we describe the principles of the existing single measurement sensor technology and show preliminary field-test results. 3 refs., 8 figs

  11. The wireshark field guide analyzing and troubleshooting network traffic

    CERN Document Server

    Shimonski, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The Wireshark Field Guide provides hackers, pen testers, and network administrators with practical guidance on capturing and interactively browsing computer network traffic. Wireshark is the world's foremost network protocol analyzer, with a rich feature set that includes deep inspection of hundreds of protocols, live capture, offline analysis and many other features. The Wireshark Field Guide covers the installation, configuration and use of this powerful multi-platform tool. The book give readers the hands-on skills to be more productive with Wireshark as they drill

  12. Effects of the reconnection electric field on crescent electron distribution functions in asymmetric guide field reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessho, N.; Chen, L. J.; Hesse, M.; Wang, S.

    2017-12-01

    In asymmetric reconnection with a guide field in the Earth's magnetopause, electron motion in the electron diffusion region (EDR) is largely affected by the guide field, the Hall electric field, and the reconnection electric field. The electron motion in the EDR is neither simple gyration around the guide field nor simple meandering motion across the current sheet. The combined meandering motion and gyration has essential effects on particle acceleration by the in-plane Hall electric field (existing only in the magnetospheric side) and the out-of-plane reconnection electric field. We analyze electron motion and crescent-shaped electron distribution functions in the EDR in asymmetric guide field reconnection, and perform 2-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to elucidate the effect of reconnection electric field on electron distribution functions. Recently, we have analytically expressed the acceleration effect due to the reconnection electric field on electron crescent distribution functions in asymmetric reconnection without a guide field (Bessho et al., Phys. Plasmas, 24, 072903, 2017). We extend the theory to asymmetric guide field reconnection, and predict the crescent bulge in distribution functions. Assuming 1D approximation of field variations in the EDR, we derive the time period of oscillatory electron motion (meandering + gyration) in the EDR. The time period is expressed as a hybrid of the meandering period and the gyro period. Due to the guide field, electrons not only oscillate along crescent-shaped trajectories in the velocity plane perpendicular to the antiparallel magnetic fields, but also move along parabolic trajectories in the velocity plane coplanar with magnetic field. The trajectory in the velocity space gradually shifts to the acceleration direction by the reconnection electric field as multiple bounces continue. Due to the guide field, electron distributions for meandering particles are bounded by two paraboloids (or hyperboloids) in the

  13. Development of a fast-water field guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, K.A.

    2001-01-01

    There are several manuals for oil spill response, but few have information on fast-water conditions. Between 1992 and 1997, approximately 58 per cent of all the oil spilled by volume in the United States happened in waterways with currents exceeding one knot, and the Coast Guard recognized the absence of standard terminology that could be used for fast-water responses. For that reason, an initiative was undertaken to create a document that addresses only fast-water issues. The resulting field guide can be used for training or responding to spills in fast-water. The user must rely on other manuals for issues on toxicity and shoreline cleanup as well as local contingency and site safety plans. The fast-water guide allows on-scene commanders and area supervisors the ability to define techniques and terminology for the responders in the field. It is particularly useful for Coast Guard Marine Safety Units when working with Coast Guard operational units during an emergency response. The current version of the guide that is under review by the working group contains 9 chapters and 9 appendices. The guide includes a decision-matrix that identifies various fat-water scenarios and provides recommended strategies. It then links to other sections of the document that contain details about the necessary equipment configurations. Photographs are provided to reinforce the concepts. The guide includes a checklist of the issues that must be addressed in any spill, such as weather and nature of the spill with some fast water issues added. Links to appropriate Internet sites are also included in the guide. Information within the guide can be condensed to one sheet for use in the field. 9 refs., 4 tabs., 11 figs

  14. A field guide for well site geologists: Cable tool drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, G.V.; Liikala, T.L.

    1987-12-01

    This field is intended for use by Pacific Northwest Laboratory well site geologists who are responsible for data collection during the drilling and construction of monitoring wells on the Hanford Site. This guide presents standardized methods for geologic sample collection and description, and well construction documentation. 5 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

    1996-10-01

    The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

  16. Clinical utility of an endorectal MRI-guided prostate probe: preliminary examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tödter Julia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is one of the most common cancer diseases in men in the western countries [1]. Besides the palpation, and the amount of prostate-specific-antigen’s (PSA inside the blood, the current diagnostic imaging technologies are not appropriate. Early diagnosis defining the exact tumor location, spread and margins could make efficient targeted biopsies and image-guided surgery. A multimodal imaging technique containing a transmit-receive surface coil for anatomical MR imaging, a (SPET detector module, consisting of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM, for functional imaging and an ultrasound (US probe are placed as close as possible to the prostate designed as an endorectal tube to increase sensitivity and spatial resolution. All materials that are used are non-magnetic. Advantages of the SiPM are diversified, like non-sensitive to magnetic fields, higher gain (105–106 than standard avalanche photodiodes (APD, good timing properties and compactness. The PET detector should reach approximately 1mm3 spatial resolution together with 60ps FWHM Time-of-Flight resolution and a high efficiency to reduce scanning time and injected dose. A home-made transmit-receive coil surrounding the PET module improves signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR with respect to standard coils will be present. The system will be used as a MRI-insert and be able to visualize anatomic and metabolic information together. The US-probe is guiding examination for correct overlapping of the multimodal images. This procedure will save time, costs and the need of co-registration. By combining all advantages of each system, it will necessarily update the non-invasive treatment of PCa. The system is adapted and tested to a 3 Tesla MR scanner called Trio A Tim system and Allegra system from the company Siemens healthcare with a larmor frequency of 123.2 MHz and an input of 50 Ω free from artifacts. First results on homogeneity of the transmit-receive coil will be presented. Preliminary

  17. [New visual field testing possibilities (a preliminary report)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erichev, V P; Ermolaev, A P; Antonov, A A; Grigoryan, G L; Kosova, D V

    2018-01-01

    There are currently no portable mobile perimeters that allow visual field testing outside ophthalmologist's examination rooms. To develop a mobile perimetry technique based on use of a virtual reality headset (VR). The study involved 26 patients (30 eyes) with II-III stage primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) with compensated IOP. Perimetry was performed for each patient twice - on Humphrey analyzer (test 30-2, 76 points) and employing similar strategy on a perimeter integrated into VR headset (Total Vision, Russia). Visual field testing was performed with an interval from 1 hour to 3 days. The results were comparatively analyzed. Patients tolerated the examination well. Comparative analysis of preliminary perimetry results obtained with both methods showed high degree of identity, so the results were concluded to be comparable. By visually isolating the wearer, VR headset achieves elimination of distractions and stable light conditions for visual field testing. The headset-perimeter is compact, mobile, easily transportable, can be used in the work of visiting medical teams and for examination at home.

  18. Endogenous electric fields as guiding cue for cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Richard H. W.

    2015-01-01

    This review covers two topics: (1) “membrane potential of low magnitude and related electric fields (bioelectricity)” and (2) “cell migration under the guiding cue of electric fields (EF).”Membrane potentials for this “bioelectricity” arise from the segregation of charges by special molecular machines (pumps, transporters, ion channels) situated within the plasma membrane of each cell type (including eukaryotic non-neural animal cells). The arising patterns of ion gradients direct many cell- and molecular biological processes such as embryogenesis, wound healing, regeneration. Furthermore, EF are important as guiding cues for cell migration and are often overriding chemical or topographic cues. In osteoblasts, for instance, the directional information of EF is captured by charged transporters on the cell membrane and transferred into signaling mechanisms that modulate the cytoskeleton and motor proteins. This results in a persistent directional migration along an EF guiding cue. As an outlook, we discuss questions concerning the fluctuation of EF and the frequencies and mapping of the “electric” interior of the cell. Another exciting topic for further research is the modeling of field concepts for such distant, non-chemical cellular interactions. PMID:26029113

  19. A Field Guide to Constructivism in the College Science Classroom: Four Essential Criteria and a Guide to Their Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, R. Todd; Baviskar, Sandhya; Smith, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    This field guide provides four essential criteria for constructivism as well as a guide for using these criteria to identify and assess the level of constructivism being used in an educational experience. The criteria include: 1) prior knowledge, 2) cognitive dissonance, 3) application with feedback, and 4) metacognition. This guide provides…

  20. Localized Electron Heating by Strong Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuehan; Sugawara, Takumichi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ono, Yasushi; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field (typically Bt 15Bp) using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in Univ. Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. The region of high electron temperature, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field, was found to have a round shape with radius of 2 [cm]. Also, it was localized around the X-point and does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et .jt . When we include a guide-field effect term Bt / (Bp + αBt) for Et .jt where α =√{ (vin2 +vout2) /v∥2 } , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus,'' a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  1. Electric field with bipolar structure during magnetic reconnection without a guide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun

    2014-05-01

    We present a study on the polarized electric field during the collisionless magnetic reconnection of antiparallel fields using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations demonstrate clearly that electron holes and electric field with bipolar structure are produced during magnetic reconnection without a guide field. The electric field with bipolar structure can be found near the X-line and on the separatrix and the plasma sheet boundary layer, which is consistent with the observations. These structures will elongate electron's time staying in the diffusion region. In addition, the electric fields with tripolar structures are also found in our simulation.

  2. Mechanisms influencing student understanding on an outdoor guided field trip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Nourah Al-Rashid

    Field trips are a basic and important, yet often overlooked part of the student experience. They provide the opportunity to integrate real world knowledge with classroom learning and student previous personal experiences. Outdoor guided field trips leave students with an increased understanding, awareness and interest and in science. However, the benefits of this experience are ambiguous at best (Falk and Balling, 1982; Falk and Dierking, 1992; Kisiel, 2006.) Students on an outdoor guided field trip to a local nature park experienced a significant increase in their understanding of the rock cycle. The changes in the pre-field trip test and the post-field trip test as well as their answers in interviews showed a profound change in the students' understanding and in their interest in the subject matter. The use of the "student's voice" (Bamberger and Tal, 2008) was the motivation for data analysis. By using the students' voice, I was able to determine the mechanisms that might influence their understanding of a subject. The central concepts emerging from the data were: the outdoor setting; the students' interest; the social interaction. From these central concepts, a conceptual model was developed. The outdoor setting allows for the freedom to explore, touch, smell and movement. This, in turn, leads to an increased interest in subject matter. As the students are exploring, they are enjoying themselves and become more open to learning. Interest leads to a desire to learn (Dewey, 1975). In addition to allowing the freedom to explore and move, the outdoor setting creates the condition for social interaction. The students talk to each other as they walk; they have in-depth discourse regarding the subject matter---with the teachers, each other and with the guides. The guides have an extremely important role in the students' learning. The more successful guides not only act as experts, but also adjust to the students' needs and act or speak accordingly. The

  3. Earth magnetism a guided tour through magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Wallace H

    2001-01-01

    An introductory guide to global magnetic field properties, Earth Magnetism addresses, in non-technical prose, many of the frequently asked questions about Earth''s magnetic field. Magnetism surrounds and penetrates our Earth in ways basic science courses can rarely address. It affects navigation, communication, and even the growth of crystals. As we observe and experience an 11-year solar maximum, we may witness spectacular satellite-destroying solar storms as they interact with our magnetic field. Written by an acknowledged expert in the field, this book will enrich courses in earth science, atmospheric science, geology, meteorology, geomagnetism, and geophysics. Contains nearly 200 original illustrations and eight pages of full-color plates.* Largely mathematics-free and with a wide breadth of material suitable for general readers* Integrates material from geomagnetism, paleomagnetism, and solar-terrestrial space physics.* Features nearly 200 original illustrations and 4 pages of colour plates

  4. Forest pests in central America: Field guide. Technical manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    In Central America, plant health problems have grown to an unprecedented level during the past few years along with the establishment of extensive homogeneous forest plantations, at times leading to the such drastic solutions as widespread felling of trees or massive use of pesticides. This field guide on forest pests was commissioned by the Multipurpose Tree Crop Dissemination (MADELENA) project and focuses on pests found in Costa Rica, home of PIROF (Programa Interinstitucional de Proteccion Forestal), a pioneer in forest pest research. The guide offers fast identification of forest pests and some general information on their biology and epidemiology. It consists of two sections: (1) lists of the specific pests (insects, vertebrates, pathogens, and parasites) of 18 priority forest tree species, and lists of the specific tree part or developmental stage they afflict.

  5. MR image-guided portal verification for brain treatment field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Fangfang; Gao Qinghuai; Xie Huchen; Nelson, Diana F.; Yu Yan; Kwok, W. Edmund; Totterman, Saara; Schell, Michael C.; Rubin, Philip

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate a method for the generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs directly from MR images (DRR-MRI) to guide a computerized portal verification procedure. Methods and Materials: Several major steps were developed to perform an MR image-guided portal verification procedure. Initially, a wavelet-based multiresolution adaptive thresholding method was used to segment the skin slice-by-slice in MR brain axial images. Some selected anatomical structures, such as target volume and critical organs, were then manually identified and were reassigned to relatively higher intensities. Interslice information was interpolated with a directional method to achieve comparable display resolution in three dimensions. Next, a ray-tracing method was used to generate a DRR-MRI image at the planned treatment position, and the ray tracing was simply performed on summation of voxels along the ray. The skin and its relative positions were also projected to the DRR-MRI and were used to guide the search of similar features in the portal image. A Canny edge detector was used to enhance the brain contour in both portal and simulation images. The skin in the brain portal image was then extracted using a knowledge-based searching technique. Finally, a Chamfer matching technique was used to correlate features between DRR-MRI and portal image. Results: The MR image-guided portal verification method was evaluated using a brain phantom case and a clinical patient case. Both DRR-CT and DRR-MRI were generated using CT and MR phantom images with the same beam orientation and then compared. The matching result indicated that the maximum deviation of internal structures was less than 1 mm. The segmented results for brain MR slice images indicated that a wavelet-based image segmentation technique provided a reasonable estimation for the brain skin. For the clinical patient case with a given portal field, the MR image-guided verification method provided an excellent match between

  6. Self-Guided Field Explorations: Integrating Earth Science into Students' Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, K. C.; Kirkby, S.

    2013-12-01

    Self-guided field explorations are a simple way to transform an earth science class into a more pedagogically effective experience. Previous experience demonstrated that self-guided student explorations of museum and aquarium exhibits were both extremely popular and remarkably effective. That success led our program to test an expansion of the concept to include self-guided student explorations in outdoor field settings. Preliminary assessment indicates these self-guided field explorations are nearly as popular with students as the museum and aquarium explorations and are as pedagogically effective. Student gains on post-instruction assessment match or exceed those seen in instructor-assisted, hands-on, small group laboratory activities and completely eclipse gains achieved by traditional lecture instruction. As importantly, self-guided field explorations provide a way to integrate field experiences into large enrollment courses where the sheer scale of class trips makes them logistically impossible. This expands course breadth, integrating new topics that could not be as effectively covered by the original class structure. Our introductory program assessed two models of self-guided field explorations. A walking/cycling exploration of the Saint Anthony Falls area, a mile from campus, focuses on the intersections of geological processes with human history. Students explore the geology behind the waterfalls' evolution as well as its subsequent social and economic impacts on human history. A second exploration focuses on the campus area geology, including its building stones as well as its landscape evolution. In both explorations, the goal was to integrate geology with the students' broader understanding of the world they live in. Although the explorations' creation requires a significant commitment, once developed, self-guided explorations are surprisingly low maintenance. These explorations provide a model of a simple, highly effective pedagogical tool that is

  7. Field Guide to Nonindigenous Marine Fishes of Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Schofield, Pamela J.; Morris, Jr., James A.; Akins, Lad

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this field guide is to provide information on nonindigenous (i.e., non-native) fishes that have been observed in Florida’s marine waters. Introductions of non-native marine fishes into Florida’s waters could be intentional or unintentional, and are likely from a variety of sources, including aquarium releases, escape from aquaculture, loss due to extreme weather events (e.g., flooding from hurricanes), and possibly transfer with ballast water or hull-fouling. Presently the lion...

  8. Practical guide to organic field effect transistor circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Sou, Antony

    2016-01-01

    The field of organic electronics spans a very wide range of disciplines from physics and chemistry to hardware and software engineering. This makes the field of organic circuit design a daunting prospect full of intimidating complexities, yet to be exploited to its true potential. Small focussed research groups also find it difficult to move beyond their usual boundaries and create systems-on-foil that are comparable with the established silicon world.This book has been written to address these issues, intended for two main audiences; firstly, physics or materials researchers who have thus far designed circuits using only basic drawing software; and secondly, experienced silicon CMOS VLSI design engineers who are already knowledgeable in the design of full custom transistor level circuits but are not familiar with organic devices or thin film transistor (TFT) devices.In guiding the reader through the disparate and broad subject matters, a concise text has been written covering the physics and chemistry of the...

  9. Cone-guided fast ignition with no imposed magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strozzi D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Simulations are presented of ignition-scale fast ignition targets with the integrated Zuma-Hydra PIC-hydrodynamic capability. We consider a spherical DT fuel assembly with a carbon cone, and an artificially-collimated fast electron source. We study the role of E and B fields and the fast electron energy spectrum. For mono-energetic 1.5 MeV fast electrons, without E and B fields, ignition can be achieved with fast electron energy Efig = 30kJ. This is 3.5× the minimal deposited ignition energy of 8.7 kJ for our fuel density of 450 g/cm3. Including E and B fields with the resistive Ohm's law E = ηJb gives Efig = 20kJ, while using the full Ohm's law gives Efig > 40 kJ. This is due to magnetic self-guiding in the former case, and ∇n ×∇T magnetic fields in the latter. Using a realistic, quasi two-temperature energy spectrum derived from PIC laser-plasma simulations increases Efig to (102, 81, 162 kJ for (no E/B, E = ηJb, full Ohm's law. Such electrons are too energetic to stop in the optimal hot spot depth.

  10. Turbulent transport in 2D collisionless guide field reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, P. A.; Büchner, J.; Kilian, P.

    2017-02-01

    Transport in hot and dilute, i.e., collisionless, astrophysical and space, plasmas is called "anomalous." This transport is due to the interaction between the particles and the self-generated turbulence by their collective interactions. The anomalous transport has very different and not well known properties compared to the transport due to binary collisions, dominant in colder and denser plasmas. Because of its relevance for astrophysical and space plasmas, we explore the excitation of turbulence in current sheets prone to component- or guide-field reconnection, a process not well understood yet. This configuration is typical for stellar coronae, and it is created in the laboratory for which a 2.5D geometry applies. In our analysis, in addition to the immediate vicinity of the X-line, we also include regions outside and near the separatrices. We analyze the anomalous transport properties by using 2.5D Particle-in-Cell code simulations. We split off the mean slow variation (in contrast to the fast turbulent fluctuations) of the macroscopic observables and determine the main transport terms of the generalized Ohm's law. We verify our findings by comparing with the independently determined slowing-down rate of the macroscopic currents (due to a net momentum transfer from particles to waves) and with the transport terms obtained by the first order correlations of the turbulent fluctuations. We find that the turbulence is most intense in the "low density" separatrix region of guide-field reconnection. It is excited by streaming instabilities, is mainly electrostatic and "patchy" in space, and so is the associated anomalous transport. Parts of the energy exchange between turbulence and particles are reversible and quasi-periodic. The remaining irreversible anomalous resistivity can be parametrized by an effective collision rate ranging from the local ion-cyclotron to the lower-hybrid frequency. The contributions to the parallel and the perpendicular (to the magnetic

  11. Neural field model of memory-guided search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P; Poll, Daniel B

    2017-12-01

    Many organisms can remember locations they have previously visited during a search. Visual search experiments have shown exploration is guided away from these locations, reducing redundancies in the search path before finding a hidden target. We develop and analyze a two-layer neural field model that encodes positional information during a search task. A position-encoding layer sustains a bump attractor corresponding to the searching agent's current location, and search is modeled by velocity input that propagates the bump. A memory layer sustains persistent activity bounded by a wave front, whose edges expand in response to excitatory input from the position layer. Search can then be biased in response to remembered locations, influencing velocity inputs to the position layer. Asymptotic techniques are used to reduce the dynamics of our model to a low-dimensional system of equations that track the bump position and front boundary. Performance is compared for different target-finding tasks.

  12. Scales of guide field reconnection at the hydrogen mass ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapenta, G.; Markidis, S.; Divin, A.; Goldman, M.; Newman, D.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the signatures of component reconnection for a Harris current sheet with a guide field using the physical mass ratio of hydrogen. The study uses the fully kinetic particle in cell code IPIC3D to investigate the scaling with mass ratio of the following three main component reconnection features: electron density cavities along the separatrices, channels of fast electron flow within the cavities, and electron phase space holes due to the Buneman instability in the electron high speed channels. The width and strength of the electron holes and of the electron cavities are studied up the mass ratio proper of hydrogen, considering the effect of the simulation box size, and of the boundary conditions. The results compare favorably with the existing data from the Cluster and Themis missions and provide quantitative predictions for realistic conditions to be encountered by the planned magnetospheric multiscale mission.

  13. Neural field model of memory-guided search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P.; Poll, Daniel B.

    2017-12-01

    Many organisms can remember locations they have previously visited during a search. Visual search experiments have shown exploration is guided away from these locations, reducing redundancies in the search path before finding a hidden target. We develop and analyze a two-layer neural field model that encodes positional information during a search task. A position-encoding layer sustains a bump attractor corresponding to the searching agent's current location, and search is modeled by velocity input that propagates the bump. A memory layer sustains persistent activity bounded by a wave front, whose edges expand in response to excitatory input from the position layer. Search can then be biased in response to remembered locations, influencing velocity inputs to the position layer. Asymptotic techniques are used to reduce the dynamics of our model to a low-dimensional system of equations that track the bump position and front boundary. Performance is compared for different target-finding tasks.

  14. Geologic field-trip guide to Long Valley Caldera, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy

    2017-07-26

    This guide to the geology of Long Valley Caldera is presented in four parts: (1) An overview of the volcanic geology; (2) a chronological summary of the principal geologic events; (3) a road log with directions and descriptions for 38 field-trip stops; and (4) a summary of the geophysical unrest since 1978 and discussion of its causes. The sequence of stops is arranged as a four-day excursion for the quadrennial General Assembly of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI), centered in Portland, Oregon, in August 2017. Most stops, however, are written freestanding, with directions that allow each one to be visited independently, in any order selected.

  15. A hand-held imaging probe for radio-guided surgery: physical performance and preliminary clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitre, S.; Menard, L.; Charon, Y.; Solal, M.; Garbay, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Improvements in the specificity of radiopharmaceutical compounds have been paralleled by an upsurge of interest in developing small detectors to assist surgeons in localizing tumour tissue during surgery. This study reports the main technical features and physical characteristics of a new hand-held gamma camera dedicated to accurate and real-time intra-operative imaging. First clinical experience is also reported. The POCI (Per-operative Compact Imager) camera consists of a head module composed of a high-resolution interchangeable lead collimator and a CsI(Na) crystal plate optically coupled to an intensified position-sensitive diode. The current prototype has a 40-mm diameter field of view, an outer diameter of 9.5 cm, a length of 9 cm and a weight of 1.2 kg. Overall detector imaging characteristics were evaluated by technetium-99m phantom measurements. Three patients with breast cancer previously scheduled to undergo sentinel lymph node detection were selected for the preliminary clinical experience. Preoperative images of the lymphatic basin obtained using the POCI camera were compared with conventional transcutaneous explorations using a non-imaging gamma probe. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) spatial resolution was investigated in both air and scattering medium; when the phantom was placed in contact with the collimator, the POCI camera exhibited a 3.2 mm FWHM. The corresponding sensitivity was 290 cps/MBq. The preliminary clinical results showed that POCI was able to predict the number and location of all SLNs. In one case, two deep radioactive nodes missed by the gamma probe were detected on the intra-operative images. This very initial experience demonstrates that the physical performance of the POCI camera is adequate for radio-guided surgery. These results are sufficiently encouraging to prompt further evaluation studies designed to determine the specific and optimal clinical role of intra-operative imaging devices

  16. Multifractionated image-guided and stereotactic intensity-modulated radiotherapy of paraspinal tumors: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshiya; Lovelock, D. Michael; Yenice, Kamil M.; Bilsky, Mark H.; Hunt, Margaret A.; Zatcky, Joan; Leibel, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    irradiated patients, respectively. More than 90% of patients experienced palliation from pain, weakness, or paresthesia; 75% and 81% of secondary and primary lesions, respectively, exhibited local control at the time of last follow-up. No cases of radiation-induced myelopathy or radiculopathy have thus far been encountered. Conclusions: Precision stereotactic and image-guided paraspinal IMRT allows the delivery of high doses of radiation in multiple fractions to tumors within close proximity to the spinal cord while respecting cord tolerance. Although preliminary, the clinical results are encouraging

  17. A Field Guide to Outdoor Learning in Powell County, Biome Descriptions, Field Activities, Field Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell County High School, Deer Lodge, MT.

    Serving as a guide to the outdoor areas of Powell County, Montana, and the surrounding area, this resource book is useful for teachers who wish to explore the out-of-doors with their students, particularly those interested in nature studies. Its aim is to produce a citizenry that is knowledgeable concerning the biophysical environment and its…

  18. Preliminary assessment of the dose to the interventional radiologist in fluoro-CT-guided procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, M. F.; Alves, J. G.; Sarmento, S.; Santos, J. A. M.; Sousa, M. J.; Gouvea, M.; Oliveira, A. D.; Cardoso, J. V.; Santos, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the occupational dose to the intervention radiologist received in fluoroscopy computerised tomography (CT) used to guide the collection of lung and bone biopsies is presented. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the capability of the reading system as well as of the available whole-body (WB) and extremity dosemeters used in routine monthly monitoring periods to measure per procedure dose values. The intervention radiologist was allocated 10 WB detectors (LiF: Mg, Ti, TLD-100) placed at chest and abdomen levels above and below the lead apron, and at both right and left arms, knees and feet. A special glove was developed with casings for the insertion of 11 extremity detectors (LiF:Mg, Cu, P, TLD-100H) for the identification of the most highly exposed fingers. The H p (10) dose values received above the lead apron (ranged 0.20-0.02 mSv) depend mainly on the duration of the examination and on the placement of physician relative to the beam, while values below the apron are relatively low. The left arm seems to receive a higher dose value. H p (0.07) values to the hand (ranged 36.30-0.06 mSv) show that the index, middle and ring fingers are the most highly exposed. In this study, the wrist dose was negligible compared with the finger dose. These results are preliminary and further studies are needed to better characterise the dose assessment in CT fluoroscopy. (authors)

  19. MR image-guided portal verification for brain treatment field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, F.-F.; Gao, Q.H.; Xie, H.; Nelson, D.F.; Yu, Y.; Kwok, W.E.; Totterman, S.; Schell, M.C.; Rubin, P.

    1996-01-01

    and marrow information within the skull. Next, a ray-tracing method is used to generate a projection (pseudo-portal) image at the planned treatment position. In this situation, the ray-tracing is simply performed on pixels rather than attenuation coefficients. The skull and its relative positions are also projected to the pseudo-portal image and are used as 'hint' for the search of similar features in the portal images. A Canny edge detector is applied to the region of treatment field and is used to enhance brain contour and skull. The skull in the brain is then identified using a snake technique which is guided by the ''hint'', the projected features from MR images. Finally, a Chamfer matching technique is used to correlate features between the MR projection and portal images. Results: MR image-guided portal verification technique is evaluated using a clinical patient case who has an astrocytoma brain tumor and is treated by radiation therapy. The segmented results for brain MR slice images indicate that a wavelet-based image segmentation technique provides a reasonable estimation for the brain skull. Compared to the brain portal image, the method developed in this study for the generation of brain projection images provides skull structure about 3 mm differences. However, overall matching results are within 2 mm compared to the results between portal and simulation images. In addition, tumor volume can be accurately visualized in the projection image and be mapped over to portal images for treatment verification with this approach. Conclusions: A method for MR image-guided portal verification of brain treatment field is being developed. Although the projection image from MR images dose not have the similar radiographic appearance as portal images, it provides certain essential anatomical features (landmarks and gross tumor) as well as their relative locations to be used as references for computerized portal verification

  20. Electron cyclotron maser instability (ECMI in strong magnetic guide field reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The ECMI model of electromagnetic radiation from electron holes is shown to be applicable to spontaneous magnetic reconnection. We apply it to reconnection in strong current-aligned magnetic guide fields. Such guide fields participate only passively in reconnection, which occurs in the antiparallel components to both sides of the guide-field-aligned current sheets with current carried by kinetic Alfvén waves. Reconnection generates long (the order of hundreds of electron inertial scales electron exhaust regions at the reconnection site X point, which are extended perpendicular to the current and the guide fields. Exhausts contain a strongly density-depleted hot electron component and have properties similar to electron holes. Exhaust electron momentum space distributions are highly deformed, exhibiting steep gradients transverse to both the reconnecting and guide fields. Such properties suggest application of the ECMI mechanism with the fundamental ECMI X-mode emission beneath the nonrelativistic guide field cyclotron frequency in localized source regions. An outline of the mechanism and its prospects is given. Potential applications are the kilometric radiation (AKR in auroral physics, solar radio emissions during flares, planetary emissions and astrophysical scenarios (radiation from stars and compact objects involving the presence of strong magnetic fields and field-aligned currents. Drift of the exhausts along the guide field maps the local field and plasma properties. Escape of radiation from the exhaust and radiation source region still poses a problem. The mechanism can be studied in 2-D particle simulations of strong guide field reconnection which favours 2-D, mapping the deformation of the electron distribution perpendicular to the guide field, and using it in the numerical calculation of the ECMI growth rate. The mechanism suggests also that reconnection in general may become a source of the ECMI with or without guide fields. This is

  1. Electron cyclotron maser instability (ECMI) in strong magnetic guide field reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang

    2017-08-01

    The ECMI model of electromagnetic radiation from electron holes is shown to be applicable to spontaneous magnetic reconnection. We apply it to reconnection in strong current-aligned magnetic guide fields. Such guide fields participate only passively in reconnection, which occurs in the antiparallel components to both sides of the guide-field-aligned current sheets with current carried by kinetic Alfvén waves. Reconnection generates long (the order of hundreds of electron inertial scales) electron exhaust regions at the reconnection site X point, which are extended perpendicular to the current and the guide fields. Exhausts contain a strongly density-depleted hot electron component and have properties similar to electron holes. Exhaust electron momentum space distributions are highly deformed, exhibiting steep gradients transverse to both the reconnecting and guide fields. Such properties suggest application of the ECMI mechanism with the fundamental ECMI X-mode emission beneath the nonrelativistic guide field cyclotron frequency in localized source regions. An outline of the mechanism and its prospects is given. Potential applications are the kilometric radiation (AKR) in auroral physics, solar radio emissions during flares, planetary emissions and astrophysical scenarios (radiation from stars and compact objects) involving the presence of strong magnetic fields and field-aligned currents. Drift of the exhausts along the guide field maps the local field and plasma properties. Escape of radiation from the exhaust and radiation source region still poses a problem. The mechanism can be studied in 2-D particle simulations of strong guide field reconnection which favours 2-D, mapping the deformation of the electron distribution perpendicular to the guide field, and using it in the numerical calculation of the ECMI growth rate. The mechanism suggests also that reconnection in general may become a source of the ECMI with or without guide fields. This is of particular

  2. A Guide to Field Notes for Qualitative Research: Context and Conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippi, Julia; Lauderdale, Jana

    2018-02-01

    Field notes are widely recommended in qualitative research as a means of documenting needed contextual information. With growing use of data sharing, secondary analysis, and metasynthesis, field notes ensure rich context persists beyond the original research team. However, while widely regarded as essential, there is not a guide to field note collection within the literature to guide researchers. Using the qualitative literature and previous research experience, we provide a concise guide to collection, incorporation, and dissemination of field notes. We provide a description of field note content for contextualization of an entire study as well as individual interviews and focus groups. In addition, we provide two "sketch note" guides, one for study context and one for individual interviews or focus groups for use in the field. Our guides are congruent with many qualitative and mixed methodologies and ensure contextual information is collected, stored, and disseminated as an essential component of ethical, rigorous qualitative research.

  3. Electrical field of electrical appliances versus distance: A preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, Nur Badariah Ahmad; Nordin, Farah Hani; Ismail, Fakaruddin Ali Ahmad; Alkahtani, Ammar Ahmed; Balasubramaniam, Nagaletchumi; Hock, Goh Chin; Shariff, Z A M

    2013-01-01

    Every household electrical appliance that is plugged in emits electric field even if it is not operating. The source where the appliance is plugged into and the components of household electrical appliance contribute to electric field emission. The electric field may cause unknown disturbance to the environment or also affect the human health and the effect might depends on the strength of the electric field emitted by the appliance. This paper will investigate the strength of the electric field emitted by four different electrical appliances using spectrum analyser. The strength will be captured at three different distances; (i) 1m (ii) 2m and (iii) 3m and analysis of the strength of the electrical field is done based on the three different distances. The measurement results show that the strength of the electric field is strongest when it is captured at 1m and the weakest at 3m from the electrical appliance. The results proved that the farther an object is located from the electrical appliance; the less effect the magnetic field has.

  4. Book review: Peeters, H. 2007. Field guide to owls of California and the West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric D. Forsman

    2010-01-01

    Field Guide to Owls of California and the West. Written primarily for nonprofessionals,this little field guide is a treasure trove of published and unpublished information on the natural history and distribution of owls in the western United States. It covers just about everything you could want to know about owls, from why they take dust baths, to facultative...

  5. Invasive Plants Field and Reference Guide: An Ecological Perspective of Plant Invaders of Forests and Woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cynthia D. Huebner; Cassandra Olson; Heather C. Smith; Heather C. Smith

    2005-01-01

    There are many field guides available about invasive plants and their identification. The purpose of this particular field guide is to give a scientific synthesis of what is known about the behavior of such species in managed, disturbed, and pristine forested systems in addition to key information for accurate identification.

  6. Variation-Aware Design of Custom Integrated Circuits A Hands-on Field Guide A Hands-on Field Guide

    CERN Document Server

    McConaghy, Trent; Dyck, Jeffrey; Gupta, Amit

    2013-01-01

    This book targets custom IC designers who are encountering variation issues in their designs, especially for modern process nodes at 45nm and below, such as statistical process variations, environmental variations, and layout effects.  The authors have created a field guide to show how to handle variation proactively, and to understand the benefits of doing so. Readers facing variation challenges in their memory, standard cell, analog/RF, and custom digital designs will find easy-to-read, pragmatic solutions.   Reviews the most important concepts in variation-aware design, including types of variables and variation, useful variation-aware design terminology, and an overview and comparison of high-level design flows. Describes and compares a suite of approaches and flows for PVT corner-driven design and verification. Presents Fast PVT, a novel, confidence-driven global optimization technique for PVT corner extraction and verification that is both rapid and reliable. Presents a visually-oriented overview of ...

  7. Ulysses Observations of Tripolar Guide-Magnetic Field Perturbations Across Solar Wind Reconnection Exhausts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S.; Peng, B.; Markidis, S.; Gosling, J. T.; McComas, D. J.; Lapenta, G.; Newman, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    We report observations from 15 solar wind reconnection exhausts encountered along the Ulysses orbit beyond 4 AU in 1996-1999 and 2002-2005. The events, which lasted between 17 and 45 min, were found at heliospheric latitudes between -36o and 21o with one event detected as high as 58o. All events shared a common characteristic of a tripolar guide-magnetic field perturbation being detected across the observed exhausts. The signature consists of an enhanced guide field magnitude within the exhaust center and two regions of significantly depressed guide-fields adjacent to the center region. The events displayed magnetic field shear angles as low as 37o with a mean of 89o. This corresponds to a strong external guide field relative to the anti-parallel reconnecting component of the magnetic field with a mean ratio of 1.3 and a maximum ratio of 3.1. A 2-D kinetic reconnection simulation for realistic solar wind conditions reveals that tripolar guide fields form at current sheets in the presence of multiple X-lines as two magnetic islands interact with one another for such strong guide fields. The Ulysses observations are also compared with the results of a 3-D kinetic simulation of multiple flux ropes in a strong guide field.

  8. Preliminary validation of a Monte Carlo model for IMRT fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Tracy; Lye, Jessica; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Full text: A Monte Carlo model of an Elekta linac, validated for medium to large (10-30 cm) symmetric fields, has been investigated for small, irregular and asymmetric fields suitable for IMRT treatments. The model has been validated with field segments using radiochromic film in solid water. The modelled positions of the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves have been validated using EBT film, In the model, electrons with a narrow energy spectrum are incident on the target and all components of the linac head are included. The MLC is modelled using the EGSnrc MLCE component module. For the validation, a number of single complex IMRT segments with dimensions approximately 1-8 cm were delivered to film in solid water (see Fig, I), The same segments were modelled using EGSnrc by adjusting the MLC leaf positions in the model validated for 10 cm symmetric fields. Dose distributions along the centre of each MLC leaf as determined by both methods were compared. A picket fence test was also performed to confirm the MLC leaf positions. 95% of the points in the modelled dose distribution along the leaf axis agree with the film measurement to within 1%/1 mm for dose difference and distance to agreement. Areas of most deviation occur in the penumbra region. A system has been developed to calculate the MLC leaf positions in the model for any planned field size.

  9. Radial electrical field effects in TJ-II. (Preliminary study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of the radial electric field upon the neoclassical transport coefficients of TJ-II helical axis Stellarator has been calculated as well on the microwave heating stage (ECRH) as on the neutral injection one (NBI). The influence of the solutions for the self-consistent ambipolar field on confinement times and temperatures has been studied by means of a zero-dimensional energy balance. The simultaneous presence of two roots, the electronic and the ionic one, is observed for the ECRH phase, while for NBI only the ionic root appears, although with a strong field intensity that could produce a favourable effect on confinement. The interest and need of the extension of these calculations to include radial profile effects by using spatial dependent transport codes in stressed

  10. A Preliminary Field Test of an Employee Work Passion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigarmi, Drea; Nimon, Kim; Houson, Dobie; Witt, David; Diehl, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Four dimensions of a process model for the formulation of employee work passion, derived from Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, and Diehl (2009), were tested in a field setting. A total of 447 employees completed questionnaires that assessed the internal elements of the model in a corporate work environment. Data from the measurements of work affect,…

  11. Effects of a Guide Field on the Larmor Electric Field and Upstream Electron Temperature Anisotropy in Collisionless Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ek-In, Surapat; Ruffolo, David [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Malakit, Kittipat [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Techonology, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani (Thailand); Shay, Michael A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Cassak, Paul A., E-mail: kmalakit@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2017-08-20

    We perform the first study of the properties of the Larmor electric field (LEF) in collisionless asymmetric magnetic reconnection in the presence of an out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field for different sets of representative upstream parameters at Earth’s dayside magnetopause with an ion temperature greater than the electron temperature (the ion-to-electron temperature ratio fixed at 2) using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We show that the LEF does persist in the presence of a guide field. We study how the LEF thickness and strength change as a function of guide field and the magnetospheric temperature and reconnecting magnetic field strength. We find that the thickness of the LEF structure decreases, while its magnitude increases when a guide field is added to the reconnecting magnetic field. The added guide field makes the Larmor radius smaller, so the scaling with the magnetospheric ion Larmor radius is similar to that reported for the case without a guide field. Note, however, that the physics causing the LEF is not well understood, so future work in other parameter regimes is needed to fully predict the LEF for arbitrary conditions. We also find that a previously reported upstream electron temperature anisotropy arises in the vicinity of the LEF region both with and without a guide field. We argue that the generation of the anisotropy is linked to the existence of the LEF. The LEF can be used in combination with the electron temperature anisotropy as a signature to effectively identify dayside reconnection sites in observations.

  12. Effects of a Guide Field on the Larmor Electric Field and Upstream Electron Temperature Anisotropy in Collisionless Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek-In, Surapat; Ruffolo, David; Malakit, Kittipat; Shay, Michael A.; Cassak, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    We perform the first study of the properties of the Larmor electric field (LEF) in collisionless asymmetric magnetic reconnection in the presence of an out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field for different sets of representative upstream parameters at Earth’s dayside magnetopause with an ion temperature greater than the electron temperature (the ion-to-electron temperature ratio fixed at 2) using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We show that the LEF does persist in the presence of a guide field. We study how the LEF thickness and strength change as a function of guide field and the magnetospheric temperature and reconnecting magnetic field strength. We find that the thickness of the LEF structure decreases, while its magnitude increases when a guide field is added to the reconnecting magnetic field. The added guide field makes the Larmor radius smaller, so the scaling with the magnetospheric ion Larmor radius is similar to that reported for the case without a guide field. Note, however, that the physics causing the LEF is not well understood, so future work in other parameter regimes is needed to fully predict the LEF for arbitrary conditions. We also find that a previously reported upstream electron temperature anisotropy arises in the vicinity of the LEF region both with and without a guide field. We argue that the generation of the anisotropy is linked to the existence of the LEF. The LEF can be used in combination with the electron temperature anisotropy as a signature to effectively identify dayside reconnection sites in observations.

  13. Preliminary study on the flow field over Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pissimanis, D; Karras, G; Notaridou, V; Bartzis, J.G.

    1989-02-01

    Full text: For radiation risk assessment from long distance sources, the knowledge of the synoptic air flow field patterns over the territory under consideration is required. In the present study a first representation of the air flow field in the atmospheric boundary layer over Greece is attempted. For this purpose, synoptic weather maps at 850mb available for a ten-years period, as well as sounding data from six meteorological stations were utilized, while the Greek territory was divided into four parts, i.e. NW, NE, SW, SE, with a number of stations in each sector. It was shown that the prevailing wind directions of the upper flow are either of the W/SW sector (winter, spring) or the northern sector (summer, autumn). In the SE sector a stronger tendency towards winds from the nothern sector was shown, due to the thermal low near Cyprus. The main characteristics of the surface flow is the strong influence by topographical features. Typical examples are the strong NW winds in Northern Greece due to the Vardar Valley, and the sea breeze circulations at coastal environments. (author)

  14. Field guide to the forest trees of Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Hawthorne, William

    1990-01-01

    This guide has been produced to help foresters identify trees in Ghanaian rain forest. The range and definition of forest types covered are the same as those described by Hall and Swaine (1981). Although the guide is designed primarily for use by Technical Officers in the Forestry Department, it is hoped that other interested parties will find it useful as well: technical jargon has been kept to a minimum and the leaves of most species are illustrated. It is designed to be used in conjunction...

  15. Subsolar magnetopause observation and kinetic simulation of a tripolar guide magnetic field perturbation consistent with a magnetic island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S.; Cassak, P. A.; Retinò, A.; Mozer, F. S.

    2016-04-01

    The Polar satellite recorded two reconnection exhausts within 6 min on 1 April 2001 across a subsolar magnetopause that displayed a symmetric plasma density, but different out-of-plane magnetic field signatures for similar solar wind conditions. The first magnetopause crossing displayed a bipolar guide field variation in a weak external guide field consistent with a symmetric Hall field from a single X line. The subsequent crossing represents the first observation of a tripolar guide field perturbation at Earth's magnetopause in a strong guide field. This perturbation consists of a significant guide field enhancement between two narrow guide field depressions. A particle-in-cell simulation for the prevailing conditions across this second event resulted in a magnetic island between two simulated X lines across which a tripolar guide field developed consistent with the observation. The simulated island supports a scenario whereby Polar encountered the asymmetric quadrupole Hall magnetic fields between two X lines for symmetric conditions across the magnetopause.

  16. Suitability for field service in 4 breeds of guide dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ennik, E.; Liinamo, A.E.; Leighton, E.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the relative importance of a longer than normal 4-month training period, or being ¿passed back¿ from the original training class to join a class in which dogs are at an earlier stage of their training, on the overall probability that a dog entering guide dog training will

  17. On Multiple Reconnection X-lines and Tripolar Perturbations of Strong Guide Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S.; Lapenta, G.; Newman, D. L.; Phan, T. D.; Gosling, J. T.; Lavraud, B.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Carr, C. M.; Markidis, S.; Goldman, M. V.

    2015-05-01

    We report new multi-spacecraft Cluster observations of tripolar guide magnetic field perturbations at a solar wind reconnection exhaust in the presence of a guide field BM which is almost four times as strong as the reversing field BL. The novel tripolar field consists of two narrow regions of depressed BM, with an observed 7%-14% ΔBM magnitude relative to the external field, which are found adjacent to a wide region of enhanced BM within the exhaust. A stronger reversing field is associated with each BM depression. A kinetic reconnection simulation for realistic solar wind conditions and the observed strong guide field reveals that tripolar magnetic fields preferentially form across current sheets in the presence of multiple X-lines as magnetic islands approach one another and merge into fewer and larger islands. The simulated ΔBM/ΔXN over the normal width ΔXN between a BM minimum and the edge of the external region agree with the normalized values observed by Cluster. We propose that a tripolar guide field perturbation may be used to identify candidate regions containing multiple X-lines and interacting magnetic islands at individual solar wind current sheets with a strong guide field.

  18. ON MULTIPLE RECONNECTION X-LINES AND TRIPOLAR PERTURBATIONS OF STRONG GUIDE MAGNETIC FIELDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, S.; Gosling, J. T.; Lapenta, G.; Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V.; Phan, T. D.; Lavraud, B.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Carr, C. M.; Markidis, S.

    2015-01-01

    We report new multi-spacecraft Cluster observations of tripolar guide magnetic field perturbations at a solar wind reconnection exhaust in the presence of a guide field B M   which is almost four times as strong as the reversing field B L . The novel tripolar field consists of two narrow regions of depressed B M , with an observed 7%–14% ΔB M magnitude relative to the external field, which are found adjacent to a wide region of enhanced B M within the exhaust. A stronger reversing field is associated with each B M depression. A kinetic reconnection simulation for realistic solar wind conditions and the observed strong guide field reveals that tripolar magnetic fields preferentially form across current sheets in the presence of multiple X-lines as magnetic islands approach one another and merge into fewer and larger islands. The simulated ΔB M /ΔX N over the normal width ΔX N between a B M minimum and the edge of the external region agree with the normalized values observed by Cluster. We propose that a tripolar guide field perturbation may be used to identify candidate regions containing multiple X-lines and interacting magnetic islands at individual solar wind current sheets with a strong guide field

  19. ON MULTIPLE RECONNECTION X-LINES AND TRIPOLAR PERTURBATIONS OF STRONG GUIDE MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, S.; Gosling, J. T. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Lapenta, G. [Center for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V. [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Phan, T. D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lavraud, B. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Khotyaintsev, Yu. V. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden); Carr, C. M. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Markidis, S., E-mail: eriksson@lasp.colorado.edu [High Performance Computing and Visualization Department, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-05-20

    We report new multi-spacecraft Cluster observations of tripolar guide magnetic field perturbations at a solar wind reconnection exhaust in the presence of a guide field B{sub M} {sub  }which is almost four times as strong as the reversing field B{sub L}. The novel tripolar field consists of two narrow regions of depressed B{sub M}, with an observed 7%–14% ΔB{sub M} magnitude relative to the external field, which are found adjacent to a wide region of enhanced B{sub M} within the exhaust. A stronger reversing field is associated with each B{sub M} depression. A kinetic reconnection simulation for realistic solar wind conditions and the observed strong guide field reveals that tripolar magnetic fields preferentially form across current sheets in the presence of multiple X-lines as magnetic islands approach one another and merge into fewer and larger islands. The simulated ΔB{sub M}/ΔX{sub N} over the normal width ΔX{sub N} between a B{sub M} minimum and the edge of the external region agree with the normalized values observed by Cluster. We propose that a tripolar guide field perturbation may be used to identify candidate regions containing multiple X-lines and interacting magnetic islands at individual solar wind current sheets with a strong guide field.

  20. Interaction between Gaming and Multistage Guiding Strategies on Students' Field Trip Mobile Learning Performance and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Liu, Guan-Zhi; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an integrated gaming and multistage guiding approach was proposed for conducting in-field mobile learning activities. A mobile learning system was developed based on the proposed approach. To investigate the interaction between the gaming and guiding strategies on students' learning performance and motivation, a 2 × 2 experiment was…

  1. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Embrechts, M.J.; Schnurr, N.M.; Battat, M.E.; LaBauve, R.J.; Davidson, J.W.

    1984-08-01

    The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment [i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems]. In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development

  2. Escompte Field Experiment : Some Preliminary Results About The Iop 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, B.; Durand, P.; Ancellet, G.; Calpini, B.; Frejafon, E.; Jambert, C.; Serça, D.; Sol, B.; Wortham, H.; Zephoris, M.

    One of the main goals of the ESCOMPTE programme is to create an appropriate -3D data base including emissions, transport and air composition measurements during urban pollution episodes. ESCOMPTE will as well as provide a highly documented framework for dynamical and chemical studies. For this purpose a field campaign was carried out in Marseille -Berre area in the south-eastern of France from June 4 to July 13, 2001. Five pollution events (IOP) were documented. The second one called IOP2 is particularly interesting in term of photochemical pollution. The chemical evolution of the urban and industrial plumes and the orographic influence are analysed from surface, remote sensing and airborne measurements. This IOP 2 of six days duration ( June 21 to June 26) will be presented . It began with a moderate S/SW wind (an end of Mistral situation) , clear skies and hot temperature (>30rC). Marseille and Berre plumes extended towards the East and over the sea. The highest surface ozone concentration were found around Toulon area. This first period (23-26/06) so called IOP 2a was followed by IOP 2b, three days of very hot temperature (>34rC) and high surface concentration in ozone - 100 ppbv over the whole domain , 125 ppbv all around Aix on the 24 up to 150 ppbv in the durance valley on the 25.

  3. Book Review Helm Field Guides — Birds of Chile including the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review Helm Field Guides — Birds of Chile including the Antarctic Peninsula, the Falkland Islands and South Georgia by Albaro Jaramillo with illustrations by Peter Burke and David Beadle (2003)

  4. Creating Your Own Case Studies: A Guide for Early Field Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio-Ruane, Susan

    1990-01-01

    A guide for creating case studies is provided for teacher educators to share with students. Suggestions are offered for becoming a participant observer in a classroom. The appendix contains sample appropriate and inappropriate field notes. (SM)

  5. Aerobic Biodegradation of Oily Wastes: A Field Guide For Federal On-scene Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intentionally limited in scope to best serve the requirements of the Region 6 Oil Program, this field guide consists of three parts complemented by appendices. Helps evaluate environment and consider factors, existing regulations/policies, operation issues

  6. Electronic Field Guides and User Communities in the Eco-informatics Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Stevenson

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The recognition that taxonomy is central to the conservation of biodiversity has reestablished the critical role of taxonomy in biology. However, many of the tools taxonomists produce for the identification and characterization of species, e.g., dichotomous keys, have been difficult to use and largely ignored by the general public in favor of field guides, which are essentially browsable picture guides. We review the role of field guides in species identification and discuss the application of a host of digital technologies to produce user-friendly tools for identification that are likely to greatly enhance species identification in the field by nonspecialists. We suggest that wider adoption of the citizen science model and the use of electronic field guides will enhance public understanding and participation in biodiversity monitoring.

  7. Imaging-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Adrenal Metastases: Preliminary Results at a Single Institution with a Single Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrafiello, G.; Lagana, D.; Recaldini, C.; Giorgianni, A.; Ianniello, A.; Lumia, D.; D'Ambrosio, A.; Petulla, M.; Dionigi, G.; Fugazzola, C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the feasibility, safety, imaging appearance, and short-term efficacy of image-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of adrenal metastases (AM). Seven imaging-guided percutaneous RFA treatments were performed in six patients (two men and four women; mean age, 67.2 years; range, 55-74 years) with six AM who were referred to our institution from 2003 to 2006. One patient was treated twice for recurrence after first treatment. The average diameter of the treated AM was 29 mm (range, 15-40 mm). In all patients, the diagnosis was obtained with CT current protocols in use at our institution and confirmed by pathology with an image-guided biopsy. No major complications occurred. In one patient shortly after initiation of the procedure, severe hypertension was noted; another patient developed post-RFA syndrome. In five of six lesions, there was no residual enhancement of the treated tumor. In one patient CT examination showed areas of residual enhancement of the tumor after treatment. Our preliminary results suggest that imaging-guided percutaneous RFA is effective for local control of AM, without major complications and with a low morbidity rate related to the procedure. Long-term follow-up will need to be performed and appropriate patient selection criteria will need to be determined in future randomized trials.

  8. Preliminary design of high-power wave-guide/transmission system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... CW klystron followed by wave-guide filter, dual directional coupler, high-power circulator, three 3 dB magic TEE power dividers to split the main channel into four equal channels of 250 kW each. Each individual channel has dual directional couplers, flexible wave-guide sections and high power ceramic vacuum window.

  9. Field Guide to Marine Ecology of Kenyan Coast.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    This guide introduces you to a model of Kenyan coast: from sandy shore across a lagoon of shallow water with sea grass and coral garden, out to the flinging reef where the waves break and the coral rises like a wall from the depths of the ocean. The beach and lagoon are in a marine park where shells, plants, fish and other marine life is protected. In the marine ecosystem here there are 6 habitats, which have their own plants and animals that adapted to the particular environment.

  10. Energy Dissipation and Dynamics in Large Guide Field Turbulence Driven Reconnection at the Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    TenBarge, J. M.; Shay, M. A.; Sharma, P.; Juno, J.; Haggerty, C. C.; Drake, J. F.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Hakim, A.

    2017-12-01

    Turbulence and magnetic reconnection are the primary mechanisms responsible for the conversion of stored magnetic energy into particle energy in many space and astrophysical plasmas. The magnetospheric multiscale mission (MMS) has given us unprecedented access to high cadence particle and field data of turbulence and magnetic reconnection at earth's magnetopause. The observations include large guide field reconnection events generated within the turbulent magnetopause. Motivated by these observations, we present a study of large guide reconnection using the fully kinetic Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell component of the Gkeyll simulation framework, and we also employ and compare with gyrokinetics to explore the asymptotically large guide field limit. In addition to studying the configuration space dynamics, we leverage the recently developed field-particle correlations to diagnose the dominant sources of dissipation and compare the results of the field-particle correlation to other energy dissipation measures.

  11. Particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with a non-uniform guide field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, F.; Neukirch, T.; Harrison, M. G.; Hesse, M.; Stark, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Results are presented of a first study of collisionless magnetic reconnection starting from a recently found exact nonlinear force-free Vlasov–Maxwell equilibrium. The initial state has a Harris sheet magnetic field profile in one direction and a non-uniform guide field in a second direction, resulting in a spatially constant magnetic field strength as well as a constant initial plasma density and plasma pressure. It is found that the reconnection process initially resembles guide field reconnection, but that a gradual transition to anti-parallel reconnection happens as the system evolves. The time evolution of a number of plasma parameters is investigated, and the results are compared with simulations starting from a Harris sheet equilibrium and a Harris sheet plus constant guide field equilibrium.

  12. Quantum field theory a tourist guide for mathematicians

    CERN Document Server

    Folland, Gerald B

    2008-01-01

    Quantum field theory has been a great success for physics, but it is difficult for mathematicians to learn because it is mathematically incomplete. Folland, who is a mathematician, has spent considerable time digesting the physical theory and sorting out the mathematical issues in it. Fortunately for mathematicians, Folland is a gifted expositor. The purpose of this book is to present the elements of quantum field theory, with the goal of understanding the behavior of elementary particles rather than building formal mathematical structures, in a form that will be comprehensible to mathematicians. Rigorous definitions and arguments are presented as far as they are available, but the text proceeds on a more informal level when necessary, with due care in identifying the difficulties. The book begins with a review of classical physics and quantum mechanics, then proceeds through the construction of free quantum fields to the perturbation-theoretic development of interacting field theory and renormalization theor...

  13. Standard Guide for Conducting Corrosion Tests in Field Applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures for conducting corrosion tests in plant equipment or systems under operating conditions to evaluate the corrosion resistance of engineering materials. It does not cover electrochemical methods for determining corrosion rates. 1.1.1 While intended primarily for immersion tests, general guidelines provided can be applicable for exposure of test specimens in plant atmospheres, provided that placement and orientation of the test specimens is non-restrictive to air circulation. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. See also 10.4.2.

  14. Three-dimensional modeling of electron quasiviscous dissipation in guide-field magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Masha; Schindler, Karl; Birn, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    A numerical study of guide-field magnetic reconnection in a three-dimensional model is presented. Starting from an initial, perturbed, force-free current sheet, it is shown that reconnection develops to an almost translationally invariant state, where magnetic perturbations are aligned primarily along the main current flow direction. An analysis of guide-field and electron flow signatures indicates behavior that is very similar to earlier, albeit not three-dimensional, simulations. Furthermore, a detailed investigation of electron pressure nongyrotropies in the central diffusion region confirms the major role the associated dissipation process plays in establishing the reconnection electric field

  15. The Effect of a Guide Field on the Structures of Magnetic Islands: 2D PIC Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.; Lu, Q.; Lu, S.; Wang, P.; Wang, S.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic island plays an important role in magnetic reconnection. Using a series of 2D PIC simulations, we investigate the magnetic structures of a magnetic island formed during multiple X-line magnetic reconnection, considering the effects of the guide field in symmetric and asymmetric current sheets. In a symmetric current sheet, the current in the direction forms a tripolar structure inside a magnetic island during anti-parallel reconnection, which results in a quadrupole structure of the out-of-plane magnetic field. With the increase of the guide field, the symmetry of both the current system and out-of-plane magnetic field inside the magnetic island is distorted. When the guide field is sufficiently strong, the current forms a ring along the magnetic field lines inside magnetic island. At the same time, the current carried by the energetic electrons accelerated in the vicinity of the X lines forms another ring at the edge of the magnetic island. Such a dual-ring current system enhance the out-of-plane magnetic field inside the magnetic island with a dip in the center of the magnetic island. In an asymmetric current sheet, when there is no guide field, electrons flows toward the X lines along the separatrices from the side with a higher density, and are then directed away from the X lines along the separatrices to the side with a lower density. The formed current results in the enhancement of the out-of-plane magnetic field at one end of the magnetic island, and the attenuation at the other end. With the increase of the guide field, the structures of both the current system and the out-of-plane magnetic field are distorted.

  16. Preliminary investigation on determination of radionuclide distribution in field tracing test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tadao; Mukai, Masayuki; Takebe, Shinichi; Guo Zede; Li Shushen; Kamiyama, Hideo.

    1993-12-01

    Field tracing tests for radionuclide migration have been conducted by using 3 H, 60 Co, 85 Sr and 134 Cs, in the natural unsaturated loess zone at field test site of China Institute for Radiation Protection. It is necessary to obtain confidable distribution data of the radionuclides in the test site, in order to evaluate exactly the migration behavior of the radionuclides in situ. An available method to determine the distribution was proposed on the basis of preliminary discussing results on sampling method of soils from the test site and analytical method of radioactivity in the soils. (author)

  17. Magneto-radiotherapy: using magnetic fields to guide dose deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nettelbeck, H.; Lerch, M.; Takacs, G.; Rosenfeld, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Magneto-radiotherapy is the application of magnetic fields during radiotherapy procedures. It aims to improve the quality of cancer treatment by using magnetic fields to 1 g uide the dose-deposition of electrons in tissue. Monte Carlo (MC) studies have investigated magneto-radiotherapy applied to conventional photon and electron linac beams. In this study, a combination of MC PENELOPE simulations and physical experiments were done to investigate magneto-radiotherapy applied to MRT (Microbeam Radiation Therapy) and conventional linac radiotherapy.

  18. Water harvesting and soil moisture retention: A study guide for farmer field schools

    OpenAIRE

    Duveskog, D.

    2001-01-01

    Metadata only record Since a majority of individuals in Sub-Saharan Africa depend on rainfed agriculture, it is necessary to provide tools that will better equip these individuals to increase their yields and improve their farming techniques. This study guide is intended to assist farmers in learning and experimenting on improved soil and water management. The target groups for the study guide are Farmer Field Schools, village farmers groups and local agricultural extension staff. Avail...

  19. Moonwalk with Your Eyes A Pocket Field Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Plotner, Tammy

    2010-01-01

    Are you ready to take a quarter of a million mile journey with just your eyes? Then welcome to "Moon Walk with Your Eyes"! We often take the beauty of our nearest astronomical neighbor for granted. How often do we really stop to think about why it looks the way it does or what a closer look will reveal? In this book, written in easy-to-understand language by one backyard astronomer to another, we'll explore the Moon night by night, as it goes through a full cycle. Every lunar day has something new to learn! And along your journey, you will be reading about the history, mystery, poetry, and legends that are associated with our Moon. Charts will help guide you to specific lunar features, as well as annotated photographic maps that pinpoint important or unusual craters. You'll soon learn to identify major features at just a glance and be able to create your own world-class images. You'll have right at hand the times and dates for every lunar day, phase, and eclipse for years to come. Imagine yourself at the tele...

  20. Preliminary study of ergonomic behavior during simulated ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia using a head-mounted display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Ankeet D; Harrison, T Kyle; Howard, Steven K; Kim, T Edward; Brock-Utne, John G; Gaba, David M; Mariano, Edward R

    2012-08-01

    A head-mounted display provides continuous real-time imaging within the practitioner's visual field. We evaluated the feasibility of using head-mounted display technology to improve ergonomics in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia in a simulated environment. Two anesthesiologists performed an equal number of ultrasound-guided popliteal-sciatic nerve blocks using the head-mounted display on a porcine hindquarter, and an independent observer assessed each practitioner's ergonomics (eg, head turning, arching, eye movements, and needle manipulation) and the overall block quality based on the injectate spread around the target nerve for each procedure. Both practitioners performed their procedures without directly viewing the ultrasound monitor, and neither practitioner showed poor ergonomic behavior. Head-mounted display technology may offer potential advantages during ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

  1. Field Encapsulation Library The FEL 2.2 User Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Patrick J.; Henze, Chris; Ellsworth, David

    1999-01-01

    This document describes version 2.2 of the Field Encapsulation Library (FEL), a library of mesh and field classes. FEL is a library for programmers - it is a "building block" enabling the rapid development of applications by a user. Since FEL is a library intended for code development, it is essential that enough technical detail be provided so that one can make full use of the code. Providing such detail requires some assumptions with respect to the reader's familiarity with the library implementation language, C++, particularly C++ with templates. We have done our best to make the explanations accessible to those who may not be completely C++ literate. Nevertheless, familiarity with the language will certainly help one's understanding of how and why things work the way they do. One consolation is that the level of understanding essential for using the library is significantly less than the level that one should have in order to modify or extend the library. One more remark on C++ templates: Templates have been a source of both joy and frustration for us. The frustration stems from the lack of mature or complete implementations that one has to work with. Template problems rear their ugly head particularly when porting. When porting C code, successfully compiling to a set of object files typically means that one is almost done. With templated C++ and the current state of the compilers and linkers, generating the object files is often only the beginning of the fun. On the other hand, templates are quite powerful. Used judiciously, templates enable more succinct designs and more efficient code. Templates also help with code maintenance. Designers can avoid creating objects that are the same in many respects, but not exactly the same. For example, FEL fields are templated by node type, thus the code for scalar fields and vector fields is shared. Furthermore, node type templating allows the library user to instantiate fields with data types not provided by the FEL

  2. Bowel lesions: percutaneous US-guided 18-gauge needle biopsy--preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, G R; Rodgers, P M; West, K P

    1999-08-01

    Ultrasonography-guided percutaneous biopsy was performed with local anesthesia and an 18-gauge needle in 10 patients with bowel-wall lesions. All patients underwent clinical review within 1 month. Biopsy was diagnostic in all patients. There were no complications, and all patients tolerated the procedure well. The technique appears to be safe and had an excellent diagnostic yield in our series.

  3. Field guide to Muddy Formation outcrops, Crook County, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

    1993-11-01

    The objectives of this research program are to (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline bamer reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. This report contains the data and analyses collected from outcrop exposures of the Muddy Formation, located in Crook County, Wyoming, 40 miles south of Bell Creek oil field. The outcrop data set contains permeability, porosity, petrographic, grain size and geologic data from 1-inch-diameter core plugs chilled from the outcrop face, as well as geological descriptions and sedimentological interpretations of the outcrop exposures. The outcrop data set provides information about facies characteristics and geometries and the spatial distribution of permeability and porosity on interwell scales. Appendices within this report include a micropaleontological analyses of selected outcrop samples, an annotated bibliography of papers on the Muddy Formation in the Powder River Basin, and over 950 permeability and porosity values measured from 1-inch-diameter core plugs drilled from the outcrop. All data contained in this resort are available in electronic format upon request. The core plugs drilled from the outcrop are available for measurement.

  4. Investigation of the free electron laser with a guide magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, T.; Dawson, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The free electron laser with a static guide magnetic field has been investigated theoretically and by computer simulation using a fully relativistic electromagnetic particle code which has one spatial and three velocity dimensions. By passing a relativistic electron beam through a helical magnetic field, high frequency electromagnetic radiation is generated by its coupling to the negative energy electrostatic beam modes through the helical magnetic field. In the regime of strong guide field where Ω/sub c/e/γ>>k 0 v/sub 0z/, the dispersion relation is obtained by using a fluid model for the electron beam and the growth rates are solved for numerically. Reasonable agreement between the theory and the simulations has been obtained. It was found that the growth rate increases linearly with magnetic ripple strength but decreases with the strength of the guide field. In addition, the growth rates also increase slightly with the beam energy. For a reasonably strong guide field (e.g., Ω/sub c/e=6.0ω/sub p/e), the growth rate can be on the order of 0.1ω/sub p/e and the efficiency of radiation production has been found to be as high as 16%. However, the efficiency decreases with the strength of the guide field. A theory for the saturation level is developed which relates the efficiency to the continued growth of the electromagnetic wave after the onset of trapping by the electrostatic field. It is found that the growth continues for about one bounce time and the observed saturation levels are reasonably well explained

  5. A Visual Astronomer's Photographic Guide to the Deep Sky A Pocket Field Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Rumistrzewicz, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    How many times have you ‘found’ a deep sky object (DSO), ticked it off the list, and moved on, or used the ‘Tour’ function on your GO-TO ‘scope and said, ‘Oh that’s a just a smudge’ or ‘Can’t see it – I’ll move on to the next one.’ If this has happened to you, then this book is for you. It will challenge you to go back to the ‘smudge’ and really look. Can you see the faint wisp or the detail in the southeastern corner? Can you see the small cluster within the cluster? Try to classify the open cluster for yourself. Compare it to the ‘accepted’ Trumpler classification. Whether you have a GO-TO ‘scope or not, this book gets you to rediscover one of the great things that got you into this hobby in the first place – looking through the eyepiece of a telescope. So pack away the DSLR, CCD camera, the guide ‘scope, and laptop and open your pencil case! You’re in for some fun!

  6. Linux malware incident response an excerpt from malware forensic field guide for Linux systems

    CERN Document Server

    Malin, Cameron H; Aquilina, James M

    2013-01-01

    Linux Malware Incident Response is a ""first look"" at the Malware Forensics Field Guide for Linux Systems, exhibiting the first steps in investigating Linux-based incidents. The Syngress Digital Forensics Field Guides series includes companions for any digital and computer forensic investigator and analyst. Each book is a ""toolkit"" with checklists for specific tasks, case studies of difficult situations, and expert analyst tips. This compendium of tools for computer forensics analysts and investigators is presented in a succinct outline format with cross-references to suppleme

  7. On the Electron Diffusion Region in Asymmetric Reconnection with a Guide Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Li-Jen; Bessho, Naoki; Kuznetsova, Masha; Birn, Joachim; Burch, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations in a 2.5-D geometry and analytical theory are employed to study the electron diffusion region in asymmetric reconnection with a guide magnetic field. The analysis presented here demonstrates that similar to the case without guide field, in-plane flow stagnation and null of the in-plane magnetic field are well separated. In addition, it is shown that the electric field at the local magnetic X point is again dominated by inertial effects, whereas it remains dominated by nongyrotropic pressure effects at the in-plane flow stagnation point. A comparison between local electron Larmor radii and the magnetic gradient scale lengths predicts that distribution should become nongyrotropic in a region enveloping both field reversal and flow stagnation points. This prediction is verified by an analysis of modeled electron distributions, which show clear evidence of mixing in the critical region.

  8. Simulation and experimental study on transportation of dual-beam guided by confining magnetic-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Xianchen; Zhang Jiande; Yang Jianhua

    2008-01-01

    Using external longitudinal magnetic-field to guide dual-beam out of the dual-shift tubes is a key step for the practicality of synchronizing dual-beam produced by a single accelerator. On the basis of the simulation of the confining magnetic-field for the solid dual-beam, the experiment of magnetic-field guiding annular dual-beam was presented. When the diode voltage was 380 kV, dual-beam currents of 5.10 kA and 4.92 kA were obtained. The experimental results indicate that the designed magnetic-field system could confine the annular dual-beam effectively, and the critical confining magnetic-field is about 0.5 T. (authors)

  9. Experimental verification of the role of electron pressure in fast magnetic reconnection with a guide field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, W.; Sciortino, F.; Stechow, A. von; Jara-Almonte, J.

    2017-01-01

    We report detailed laboratory observations of the structure of a reconnection current sheet in a two-fluid plasma regime with a guide magnetic field. We observe and quantitatively analyze the quadrupolar electron pressure variation in the ion-diffusion region, as originally predicted by extended magnetohydrodynamics simulations. The projection of the electron pressure gradient parallel to the magnetic field contributes significantly to balancing the parallel electric field, and the resulting cross-field electron jets in the reconnection layer are diamagnetic in origin. Furthermore, these results demonstrate how parallel and perpendicular force balance are coupled in guide field reconnection and confirm basic theoretical models of the importance of electron pressure gradients for obtaining fast magnetic reconnection.

  10. Cognitive-behavioural group therapy versus guided self-help for compulsive buying disorder: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, A; Arikian, A; de Zwaan, M; Mitchell, J E

    2013-01-01

    Compulsive buying (CB) is defined as extreme preoccupation with buying/shopping and frequent buying that causes substantial negative psychological, social, occupational and financial consequences. There exists preliminary evidence that group cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective in the treatment of CB. The present pilot study made a first attempt to compare group CBT for CB with telephone-guided self-help (GSH). Fifty-six patients were allocated randomly to one of the three conditions: (1) group CBT (n = 22); (2) GSH (n = 20); and (3) a waiting list condition (n = 14). The results indicate that face-to-face group CBT is superior not only to the waiting list condition but also to GSH. Patients who received GSH tended to have more success in overcoming CB compared with the waiting list controls. Given the sample size, the results must be considered as preliminary and further research is needed to address the topic whether GSH also could be a helpful intervention in reducing CB. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Asymmetry of the Ion Diffusion Region Hall Electric and Magnetic Fields during Guide Field Reconnection: Observations and Comparison with Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastwood, J. P.; Shay, M. A.; Phan, T. D.; Oieroset, M.

    2010-01-01

    In situ measurements of magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail are presented showing that even a moderate guide field (20% of the reconnecting field) considerably distorts ion diffusion region structure. The Hall magnetic and electric fields are asymmetric and shunted away from the current sheet; an appropriately scaled particle-in-cell simulation is found to be in excellent agreement with the data. The results show the importance of correctly accounting for the effects of the magnetic shear when attempting to identify and study magnetic reconnection diffusion regions in nature.

  12. Minimally Invasive Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Release: Preliminary Clinical Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, P Troy; Yang, Lynda; Awan, Tariq; Lueders, Daniel; Pourcho, Adam M

    2018-04-02

    Ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release was performed on 14 patients (18 wrists) using dynamic expansion of the transverse safe zone. Our patient population included able-bodied patients and those with impairments. The first 8 cases (12 wrists) underwent the procedure in an operating room, the remainder in an outpatient setting. No complications occurred, and all patients were able to immediately resume use of their hands without therapy. Improvements in the Quick Form of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Index and Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire at 3 months were comparable to results reported with mini-open and endoscopic release. Our results show that ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release can be safely and effectively performed in an outpatient setting. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  13. Numerical simulation of flow field in the China advanced research reactor flow-guide tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Changjiang

    2002-01-01

    The flow-guide tank in China advanced research reactor (CARR) acts as a reactor inlet coolant distributor and play an important role in reducing the flow-induced vibration of the internal components of the reactor core. Numerical simulations of the flow field in the flow-guide tank under different conceptual designing configurations are carried out using the PHOENICS3.2. It is seen that the inlet coolant is well distributed circumferentially into the flow-guide tank with the inlet buffer plate and the flow distributor barrel. The maximum cross-flow velocity within the flow-guide tank is reduced significantly, and the reduction of flow-induced vibration of reactor internals is expected

  14. Radiofrequency ablation guided by contrast-enhanced ultrasound for hepatic malignancies: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Y.; Wang, W.-P.; Gan, Y.-H.; Huang, B.-J.; Ding, H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate whether contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be performed effectively in small hepatic malignancies that are invisible or poorly visualized at traditional grey-scale ultrasonography (US). Materials and methods: The institutional ethics committee approved the study, and all patients provided written informed consent before their enrolment. The study focused on 55 patients (43 men, 12 women, age 57.4 ± 10.9 years) with 60 hepatic lesions from May 2010 to March 2011. All lesions were treated with multipolar radiofrequency ablation (RFA). During the RFA procedure, with the injection of ultrasound contrast agent (sulphur hexafluoride; SonoVue, Bracco Imaging Spa, Milan, Italy), RFA was conducted under CEUS guidance when the optimal depiction of a lesion was obtained. Artificial pleural effusions were used in those cases obstructed by the lungs. Twenty-four hours after RFA, contrast-enhanced MRI was used as the reference standard to evaluate the primary effectiveness rate and complete tumour necrosis. The follow-up time was 12–24 months (median 15 months). Results: Among 60 hepatic malignancies, CEUS detected 57 lesions (95%), which was higher than that at US (26.6%). Artificial pleural effusions were performed in three cases, resulting in the detection of three additional lesions. The insertion of RFA electrodes was monitored by CEUS in all lesions. Immediately after RFA, complete tumour necrosis were achieved in all 60 lesions as apparent at MRI, for a primary effectiveness rate of 100%. Conclusion: CEUS-guided RFA is a promising technique for targeting and improving the efficiency of treatment of hepatic malignancies. - Highlights: • CEUS guided RFA improved the detectability of hepatic malignancies indistinctive on gray-scale ultrasound. • Pre-operation CEUS helped localization of indistinctive hepatic malignancies. • CEUS guided RFA of hepatic malignancies achieved a more complete ablation

  15. Ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for abdominal wall endometriosis: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yang; Wang Wei; Wang Longxia; Wang Junyan; Tang Jie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and therapeutic efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for the treatment of abdominal wall endometriosis (AWE). Materials and methods: Twenty-one consecutive patients with AWE were treated as outpatients by US-guided HIFU ablation under conscious sedation. The median size of the AWE was 2.4 cm (range 1.0-5.3 cm). An acoustic power of 200-420 W was used, intermittent HIFU exposure of 1 s was applied. Treatment was considered complete when the entire nodule and its nearby 1 cm margin become hyperechoic on US. Pain relief after HIFU ablation was observed and the treated nodule received serial US examinations during follow-up. Results: All AWE was successfully ablated after one session of HIFU ablation, the ablation time lasted for 5-48 min (median 13 min), no major complications occurred. The cyclic pain disappeared in all patients during a mean follow-up of 18.7 months (range 3-31 months). The treated nodules gradually shank over time, 16 nodules became unnoticeable on US during follow-up. Conclusion: US-guided HIFU ablation appears to be safe and effective for the treatment of AWE.

  16. Ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for abdominal wall endometriosis: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yang [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Wang Wei, E-mail: wangyang301301@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Wang Longxia; Wang Junyan; Tang Jie [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and therapeutic efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for the treatment of abdominal wall endometriosis (AWE). Materials and methods: Twenty-one consecutive patients with AWE were treated as outpatients by US-guided HIFU ablation under conscious sedation. The median size of the AWE was 2.4 cm (range 1.0-5.3 cm). An acoustic power of 200-420 W was used, intermittent HIFU exposure of 1 s was applied. Treatment was considered complete when the entire nodule and its nearby 1 cm margin become hyperechoic on US. Pain relief after HIFU ablation was observed and the treated nodule received serial US examinations during follow-up. Results: All AWE was successfully ablated after one session of HIFU ablation, the ablation time lasted for 5-48 min (median 13 min), no major complications occurred. The cyclic pain disappeared in all patients during a mean follow-up of 18.7 months (range 3-31 months). The treated nodules gradually shank over time, 16 nodules became unnoticeable on US during follow-up. Conclusion: US-guided HIFU ablation appears to be safe and effective for the treatment of AWE.

  17. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage of meniscal cysts: preliminary clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacMahon, P.J.; Brennan, D.D.; Duke, D.; Forde, S.; Eustace, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage of symptomatic meniscal cysts. Materials and methods: Patients with lateral knee joint tenderness and swelling and confirmed meniscal cyst on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were consecutively enrolled for ultrasound-guided percutaneous cyst aspiration. Cysts were injected with local anaesthetic and steroid before completion of procedure. All 18 patients (all male, average age 33 years) were subsequently followed up (average time 10 months) and meniscal cyst symptoms assessed by questionnaire. Fischer's exact test used to analyse the data. Results: In every case the procedure was well tolerated, and each patient indicated that they would be willing to have a repeat procedure in the future. Ten patients reported complete resolution of symptoms secondary to therapeutic cyst aspiration and had resumed participation in high-performance sport. Two patients reported a satisfactory sustained response, reporting only occasional 'twinges of pain'. In the remaining six patients, symptoms returned after an initial pain-free period. The pain-free period ranged from 1-8 weeks. In this study, patient outcome did not significantly correlate with any meniscal cyst characteristic. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration of meniscal cysts is a well-tolerated, simple, and safe procedure. In this small patient series, it was associated with positive early results with favourable outcomes in the mid to long-term. It should be considered in patients unsuitable for surgical debridement or as an interim therapy if surgery is delayed or postponed

  18. Retrospective 5-year analysis of MR-guided biopsies in a low-field MR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zangos, Stephan; Mueller, C.; Mayer, F.; Naguib, N.N.; Nour-Eldin, N.E.A.; Herzog, C.; Hammerstingl, R.M.; Thalhammer, A.; Mack, M.G.; Vogl, T.J.; Eichler, K.; Hansmann, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and clinical value of MR-guided biopsies in an open 0.2 T low-field system. Materials and methods: A total of 322 patients with suspicious lesions of different body regions were biopsied in a low-field MRI system (0.2 T, Concerto, Siemens). The procedures were guided using T1-weighted Flash sequences (TR/TE = 100/9; 70 ). The lesions were repeatedly biopsied using the coaxial technique with a 15-gauge (diameter 2 mm) puncture needle. Complications and biopsy findings were analyzed retrospectively. Results: In all cases the biopsy procedures were successfully performed with MR guidance. In 298 patients diagnosis was able to be confirmed on the basis of the probes. The clinical follow-up showed that in 24 patients the lesions were missed by MR-guided biopsy. From this a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 87% and an accuracy of 93% were calculated. In two patients major complications were observed (morbidity rate 0.6%). Conclusion: MR-guided biopsy can be performed safely and precisely in a low-field MR system and are a supplement to US or CT-guided biopsies. (orig.)

  19. Longitudinal diffusion MRI for treatment response assessment: Preliminary experience using an MRI-guided tri-cobalt 60 radiotherapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingli; Cao, Minsong; Sheng, Ke; Gao, Yu; Chen, Allen; Kamrava, Mitch; Lee, Percy; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Lamb, James; Thomas, David; Low, Daniel; Hu, Peng

    2016-03-01

    To demonstrate the preliminary feasibility of a longitudinal diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) strategy for assessing patient response to radiotherapy at 0.35 T using an MRI-guided radiotherapy system (ViewRay). Six patients (three head and neck cancer, three sarcoma) who underwent fractionated radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. A 2D multislice spin echo single-shot echo planar imaging diffusion pulse sequence was implemented on the ViewRay system and tested in phantom studies. The same pulse sequence was used to acquire longitudinal diffusion data (every 2-5 fractions) on the six patients throughout the entire course of radiotherapy. The reproducibility of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements was assessed using reference regions and the temporal variations of the tumor ADC values were evaluated. In diffusion phantom studies, the ADC values measured on the ViewRay system matched well with reference ADC values with ViewRay MRI. Larger patient cohort studies are warranted to correlate the longitudinal diffusion measurements to patient outcomes. Such an approach may enable response-guided adaptive radiotherapy.

  20. Preliminary results of a new workflow for MRI/CT-based image-guided brachytherapy in cervical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Miho Watanabe; Iwai, Yuma; Togasaki, Gentaro; Kurokawa, Marie; Harada, Rintarou; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Uno, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    We propose a method of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) that combines MRI-based target volume delineation for the first fraction with CT datasets of subsequent fractions, using an automatic, applicator-based co-registration, and report our preliminary experience. The MRI of the first fraction was used for the first brachytherapy planning. For each subsequent brachytherapy fraction, after the same applicator insertion, a new CT scan with the applicator in place was obtained. The MR image set was registered to the subsequent brachytherapy treatment planning CT using the applicator for rigid body registration. To demonstrate the registration quality, we used here the Dice index as a measurement of tandem delineation overlap between CT and MRI. The median Dice index was 0.879 (range 0.610-0.932), which indicated that the contours on CT and MRI fitted well. With this combination method, the median D90 of HR CTV and the calculated D2 cm 3 of the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid in each fraction were 7.2 (4.0-10.4), 5.9 (2.3-7.7), 4.0 (1.9-6.7), and 3.8 (0.6-7.2) Gy, respectively. Our described method of MRI-guided IGBT offers a practical option for the benefits of target delineation.

  1. Preliminary analysis for evolution of redox conditions in the near field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Tamotsu; Miki, Takahito; Inagaki, Manabu; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yui, Mikazu

    1999-06-01

    It is planned that high level radioactive waste is going to be disposed under deep geological environment. It is believed that the chemical condition of deep groundwater is generally anoxic and reducing. However, during construction and operation phase of repository, oxygen will diffuse some distance into the surrounding rock mass, and diffused oxygen may remain in the surrounding rock mass even after repository closure. In such a case, the transitional redox condition around the drift is not preferable in view point of safety assessment for HLW disposal. Hence, it is very important to evaluate evolution of redox conditions in the near field. This report describes results of preliminary analysis for evolution of redox conditions in the near field rock mass and buffer after repository closure based on the model developed by Chiba et al. (1999). The results of preliminary analysis are summarized as follows: The decrease of oxygen in the near field rock mass and buffer are affected by pH of groundwater and surface area of iron-bearing minerals. The decrease of oxygen in the near field rock mass takes place at time scales lower than 500 years in considering the hypothetical reference groundwater pH range for H12 report. It is implicated that the redox conditions in the near field rock mass will recover to reducing conditions. The decrease of oxygen in the buffer takes place at time scales lower several tens years under neutral to weakly alkaline pH values of porewater in the buffer, even if it is assumed that residual oxygen in the near field rock mass after repository closure will diffuse into the buffer. On the other hand, under weakly acid pH values of porewater in the buffer, it may be presumed that oxygen remain in the buffer at time scale more than 500 years. (author)

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations of asymmetric guide-field reconnection: quadrupolar structure of Hall magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, R. G.; Alves, M. V.; Barbosa, M. V. G.

    2017-12-01

    One of the most important processes that occurs in Earth's magnetosphere is known as magnetic reconnection (MR). This process can be symmetric or asymmetric, depending basically on the plasma density and magnetic field in both sides of the current sheet. A good example of symmetric reconnection in terrestrial magnetosphere occurs in the magnetotail, where these quantities are similar on the north and south lobes. In the dayside magnetopause MR is asymmetric, since the plasma regimes and magnetic fields of magnetosheath and magnetosphere are quite different. Symmetric reconnection has some unique signatures. For example, the formation of a quadrupolar structure of Hall magnetic field and a bipolar Hall electric field that points to the center of the current sheet. The different particle motions in the presence of asymmetries change these signatures, causing the quadrupolar pattern to be distorted and forming a bipolar structure. Also, the bipolar Hall electric field is modified and gives rise to a single peak pointing toward the magnetosheat, considering an example of magnetopause reconnection. The presence of a guide-field can also distort the quadrupolar pattern, by giving a shear angle across the current sheet and altering the symmetric patterns, according to previous simulations and observations. Recently, a quadrupolar structure was observed in an asymmetric guide-field MR event using MMS (Magnetospheric Multiscale) mission data [Peng et al., JGR, 2017]. This event shows clearly that the density asymmetry and the guide-field were not sufficient to form signatures of asymmetric reconnection. Using the particle-in-cell code iPIC3D [Markidis et al, Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2010] with the MMS data from this event used to define input parameters, we found a quadrupolar structure of Hall magnetic field and a bipolar pattern of Hall electric field in ion scales, showing that our results are in an excellent agreement with the MMS observations. To our

  3. Field Test of the World Health Organization Multi-Professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Donna; Zheng, Hao; Rousi, Eirini; Leotsakos, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although the importance of training in patient safety has been acknowledged for over a decade, it remains under-utilized and under-valued in most countries. WHO developed the Multi-professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide to provide schools with the requirements and tools for incorporating patient safety in education. It was field tested with 12 participating schools across the six WHO regions, to assess its effectiveness for teaching patient safety to undergraduate and graduate students in a global variety of settings. Methods The evaluation used a combined prospective/retrospective design to generate formative information on the experiences of working with the Guide and summative information on the impacts of the Guide. Using stakeholder interviews and student surveys, data were gathered from each participating school at three times: the start of the field test (baseline), soon after each school started teaching, and soon after each school finished teaching. Results Stakeholders interviewed were strongly positive about the Guide, noting that it emphasized universally important patient safety topics, was culturally appropriate for their countries, and gave credibility and created a focus on patient safety at their schools. Student perceptions and attitudes regarding patient safety improved substantially during the field test, and their knowledge of the topics they were taught doubled, from 10.7% to 20.8% of correct answers on the student survey. Discussion This evaluation documented the effectiveness of the Curriculum Guide, for both ease of use by schools and its impacts on improving the patient safety knowledge of healthcare students. WHO should be well positioned to refine the contents of the Guide and move forward in encouraging broader use of the Guide globally for teaching patient safety. PMID:26406893

  4. Field Test of the World Health Organization Multi-Professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Donna; Zheng, Hao; Rousi, Eirini; Leotsakos, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of training in patient safety has been acknowledged for over a decade, it remains under-utilized and under-valued in most countries. WHO developed the Multi-professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide to provide schools with the requirements and tools for incorporating patient safety in education. It was field tested with 12 participating schools across the six WHO regions, to assess its effectiveness for teaching patient safety to undergraduate and graduate students in a global variety of settings. The evaluation used a combined prospective/retrospective design to generate formative information on the experiences of working with the Guide and summative information on the impacts of the Guide. Using stakeholder interviews and student surveys, data were gathered from each participating school at three times: the start of the field test (baseline), soon after each school started teaching, and soon after each school finished teaching. Stakeholders interviewed were strongly positive about the Guide, noting that it emphasized universally important patient safety topics, was culturally appropriate for their countries, and gave credibility and created a focus on patient safety at their schools. Student perceptions and attitudes regarding patient safety improved substantially during the field test, and their knowledge of the topics they were taught doubled, from 10.7% to 20.8% of correct answers on the student survey. This evaluation documented the effectiveness of the Curriculum Guide, for both ease of use by schools and its impacts on improving the patient safety knowledge of healthcare students. WHO should be well positioned to refine the contents of the Guide and move forward in encouraging broader use of the Guide globally for teaching patient safety.

  5. Trees of Laos and Vietnam: a field guide to 100 economically or ecologically important species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sam, Hoang Van; Nanthavong, Khamseng; Keßler, P.J.A.

    2004-01-01

    This field guide to 100 economically or ecologically important tree species from Laos and Vietnam enables the user to identify the included taxa with user-friendly keys. It includes scientific names, botanical descriptions of families, genera, and species. Specific information on distribution,

  6. Dragonflies and Damselflies of Peninsular India-A Field Guide. E

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K A Subramaniam

    orange coloured segments at the base and end of the abdomen. Male: Eyes: Dark olivaceous ... K.A.Subramanian (2005) Dragonflies and Damselflies of Peninsular India-A Field Guide. E-Book of .... Usually perches on dry twigs near streams.

  7. Field guide for the identification of snags and logs in the interior Columbia River basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catherine G. Parks; Evelyn L. Bull; Torolf R. Torgersen

    1997-01-01

    This field guide contains descriptions and color photographs of snags and logs of 10 coniferous and 3 deciduous tree species found in the interior Columbia River basin. Methods arc described to distinguish among the different species when various amounts of branches, cones, and bark arc missing. Wildlife use of the different species of snags and logs are listed. Snags...

  8. Trees of Laos and Vietnam: a field guide to 100 economically or ecologically important species

    OpenAIRE

    Sam, Hoang Van; Nanthavong, Khamseng; Keßler, P.J.A.

    2004-01-01

    This field guide to 100 economically or ecologically important tree species from Laos and Vietnam enables the user to identify the included taxa with user-friendly keys. It includes scientific names, botanical descriptions of families, genera, and species. Specific information on distribution, habitat, ecology, and uses has been compiled. All specimens examined have been listed.

  9. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume II, Instructor's Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The objective of this instructor's guide is to help provide students with knowledge and skills for employment in the field of wastewater treatment. Included in each chapter outline are: (1) objectives, (2) instructional approach, (3) answers to the objective test in the student's text, and (4) an explanation of these answers. The material…

  10. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants: A Field Study Training Program. Volume I, Instructor's Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Univ., Sacramento. Dept. of Civil Engineering.

    The objective of this instructor's guide is to help provide students with knowledge and skills for employment in the field of wastewater treatment. Included in each chapter outline are: (1) objectives, (2) instructional approach, (3) answers to the objective test in the student's text, and (4) an explanation of these answers. The material…

  11. Preliminary standard review guide for Environmental Restoration/Decontamination and Decommissioning safety analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingson, D.R.

    1993-06-01

    The review guide is based on the shared experiences, approaches, and philosophies of the Environmental Restoration/Decontamination and Decommissioning (ER/D ampersand D) subgroup members. It is presented in the form of a review guide to maximize the benefit to both the safety analyses practitioner and reviewer. The guide focuses on those challenges that tend to be unique to ER/D ampersand D cleanup activities. Some of these experiences, approaches, and philosophies may find application or be beneficial to a broader spectrum of activities such as terminal cleanout or even new operations. Challenges unique to ER/D ampersand D activities include (1) consent agreements requiring activity startup on designated dates; (2) the increased uncertainty of specific hazards; and (3) the highly variable activities covered under the broad category of ER/D ampersand D. These unique challenges are in addition to the challenges encountered in all activities; e.g., new and changing requirements and multiple interpretations. The experiences in approaches, methods, and solutions to the challenges are documented from the practitioner and reviewer's perspective, thereby providing the viewpoints on why a direction was taken and the concerns expressed. Site cleanup consent agreements with predetermined dates for restoration activity startup add the dimension of imposed punitive actions for failure to meet the date. Approval of the safety analysis is a prerequisite to startup. Actions that increase expediency are (1) assuring activity safety; (2) documenting that assurance; and (3) acquiring the necessary approvals. These actions increase the timeliness of startup and decrease the potential for punitive action. Improvement in expediency has been achieved by using safety analysis techniques to provide input to the line management decision process rather than as a review of line management decisions. Expediency is also improved by sharing the safety input and resultant decisions with

  12. Thermal exploitation of shallow aquifers. Guide for the preparation of preliminary studies of technical feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausseur, J.Y.; Sauty, J.P.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents the main devices aimed at exploiting surface aquifers. After an introduction to the different systems of thermal exploitation of aquifers (generalities, very low energy geothermal, sensitive heat storage, interest of thermal exploitation of aquifers, indication of possible systems), this report presents the different possible systems and analyses their characteristics and performance. These systems are: direct exploitation of groundwater bodies at their natural temperature by heat sink and with release in surface networks or by geothermal dipole, or exploitation with artificial thermal refill. Thus the report addresses the single sink device with or without storage, heat pumps on dipole in surface groundwater bodies or very low temperature geothermal, the scanning dipole system, and the dipole system with hot sink and cold sink. It discusses the choice and sizing of the exploitation system. An appendix reports a feasibility preliminary study of nine cases of thermal exploitation of surface aquifers by double drills

  13. Preliminary study of cross-field plasma injection in 2XIIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, D.Y.; Hartman, C.W.; Simonen, T.C.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a study of cross-field plasma injection in the 2XIIB mirror machine. Plasma accelerated by a coaxial deflagration gun was observed to pass 3.5M across the vacuum field, and some trapping was observed when the gun plasma intersected a plasma streaming along B at the center of the magnetic well. Parameters for the experiment are: gun plasma kinetic energy 50 to 200 eV, n/sub gun/ = 3 x 10 13 cm -3 , streaming plasma 25 to 50 eV and n/sub streaming/ = 6 x 10 11 cm -3 , duration of both 100 to 200 μsec. For the trapped plasma, n = 2.4 x 10 12 cm -3 , and the decay time is t/sub 1 / 2 / = 400 μsec consistent with Coulomb scattering loss at 100 eV mean ion energy

  14. A field guide for the protection and treatment of shorelines following an Orimulsion spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, E. O.; Sergy, G.

    1997-01-01

    A field guide for use in marine shoreline protection and treatment for Orimulsion was prepared. Orimulsion is a bitumen-based fuel consisting of 70 per cent bitumen and 30 per cent water, stabilized by a surfactant. The guide addresses a wide range of issues related to the protection and cleanup of Orimulsion contamination. Topics covered include the fate, behaviour, persistence and natural removal rates, recommended techniques for shoreline protection, terminology for assessment documentation, and response decision guidelines. The manual covers both forms of Orimulsion, i.e. the non-sticky dispersed bitumen, as well as the tarry residue that results from weathering. 13 refs., 8 figs

  15. Review of Stat-Spotting: A Field Guide to Identifying Dubious Data by Joel Best

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Swingle

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Best, Joel. Stat-Spotting: A Field Guide to Identifying Dubious Data. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2008 144 pp. $19.95. ISBN 1-978-0-520-25746-7.Stat-Spotting is a practical, do-it-yourself manual for detecting questionable claims reported in the media. Using examples drawn mostly from mass media sources, Stat-Spotting provides readers with a number of useful tips for identifying potentially problematic statistics. The author’s skillful analyses and explanations presented in clear and concise prose make Stat-Spotting an ideal guide for anyone who reads a newspaper, watches television, or surfs the Web. In short, everyone.

  16. Geologic field-trip guide to Medicine Lake Volcano, northern California, including Lava Beds National Monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2017-08-17

    Medicine Lake volcano is among the very best places in the United States to see and walk on a variety of well-exposed young lava flows that range in composition from basalt to rhyolite. This field-trip guide to the volcano and to Lava Beds National Monument, which occupies part of the north flank, directs visitors to a wide range of lava flow compositions and volcanic phenomena, many of them well exposed and Holocene in age. The writing of the guide was prompted by a field trip to the California Cascades Arc organized in conjunction with the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) quadrennial meeting in Portland, Oregon, in August of 2017. This report is one of a group of three guides describing the three major volcanic centers of the southern Cascades Volcanic Arc. The guides describing the Mount Shasta and Lassen Volcanic Center parts of the trip share an introduction, written as an overview to the IAVCEI field trip. However, this guide to Medicine Lake volcano has descriptions of many more stops than are included in the 2017 field trip. The 23 stops described here feature a range of compositions and volcanic phenomena. Many other stops are possible and some have been previously described, but these 23 have been selected to highlight the variety of volcanic phenomena at this rear-arc center, the range of compositions, and for the practical reason that they are readily accessible. Open ground cracks, various vent features, tuffs, lava-tube caves, evidence for glaciation, and lava flows that contain inclusions and show visible evidence of compositional zonation are described and visited along the route.

  17. Apps for Angiosperms: The Usability of Mobile Computers and Printed Field Guides for UK Wild Flower and Winter Tree Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Bethan C.; Donkin, Maria E.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated usability of mobile computers and field guide books with adult botanical novices, for the identification of wildflowers and deciduous trees in winter. Identification accuracy was significantly higher for wildflowers using a mobile computer app than field guide books but significantly lower for deciduous trees. User preference…

  18. CT-guided thin needles percutaneous cryoablation (PCA) in patients with primary and secondary lung tumors: A preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusceddu, Claudio, E-mail: clapusceddu@gmail.com [Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Oncological Radiology, Businco Hospital, Regional Referral Center for Oncologic Diseases, Cagliari, Zip code 09100 (Italy); Sotgia, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.sotgia@gmail.com [Department of Oncological Radiology, Businco Hospital, Regional Referral Center for Oncological Diseases, Cagliari, Zip code 09100 (Italy); Fele, Rosa Maria, E-mail: rosellafele@tiscali.it [Department of Oncological Radiology, Businco Hospital, Regional Referral Center for Oncological Diseases, Cagliari, Zip code 09100 (Italy); Melis, Luca, E-mail: doclucamelis@tiscali.it [Department of Oncological Radiology, Businco Hospital, Regional Referral Center for Oncological Diseases, Cagliari, Zip code 09100 (Italy)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To report the data of our initial experience with CT-guided thin cryoprobes for percutaneous cryoablation (PCA) in patients with primary and secondary pulmonary tumors. Material and methods: CT-guided thin needles PCA was performed on 34 lung masses (11 NSCLC = 32%; 23 secondary lung malignancies = 68%) in 32 consecutive patients (24 men and 8 women; mean age 67 ± 10 years) not suitable for surgical resection. Lung masses were treated using two types of cryoprobes: IceRod and IceSeed able to obtain different size of iceball. The number of probes used ranged from 1 to 5 depending on the size of the tumor. After insertion of the cryoprobes into the lesion, the PCA were performed with two 2 (91%) or 3 (9%) cycles each of 12 min of freezing followed by a 4 min active thawing phase and a 4 min passive thawing phase for each one for all treatments. Results: All cryoablation sessions were successfully completed. All primary and metastatic lung tumors were ablated. No procedure-related deaths occurred. Morbidity consisted of 21% (7 of 34) pneumothorax and 3% (1 of 34) cases asymptomatic small pulmonary hemorrhage, respectively, all of CTCAE grade 1 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events). Low density of entire lesion, central necrosis and solid mass appearance were identify in 21 (62%), 7 (21%) and 6 (17%) of cryoablated tumors, respectively. No lymphadenopathy developed in the region of treated lesions. Technical success (complete lack of enhancement) was achieved in 82%, 97% and 91% of treated lesions at 1-, 3- and 6-months CT follow-up scan, respectively (p < .000). Comparing the tumor longest diameter between the baseline and at 6 month CT images, technical success was revealed in 92% cases (p < .000). Conclusion: Our preliminary experience suggests that PCA is a feasible treatment option. Well-designed clinical trials with a larger patient population are necessary to further investigate the long-term results and prognostic factors.

  19. Removal of focal atheromatous lesions by angioscopically guided high-speed rotary atherectomy. Preliminary experimental observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, S.S.; Auth, D.; Marcus, D.R.; Moore, W.S.

    1988-01-01

    A new high-speed rotary atherectomy device, inserted over a guide wire and directed with an angioscope, offers the potential of restoring patency of outflow vessels by boring out the atheromatous lesion of the orifices of runoff vessels. The device was tested on 68 cadaver arteries with atheromatous lesions involving the superficial femoral, popliteal, and tibial arteries. This was performed with either free segments or in situ with the device placed through a popliteal arteriotomy. The gross results of rotary atherectomy were assessed by angioscopy, angiography, or both. The luminal surfaces were studied with scanning electron microscopy and transverse sections of vessels were studied with light microscopy. The pulverized atheroma, in colloidal suspension, was analyzed for particle size by Coulter counter. The effect of a colloidal suspension of atheromatous particles on distal capillary circulation was measured in animal experiments. Obstructive lesions were successfully removed in 36 of 37 stenotic arteries (97%) and 18 of 31 completely occluded arteries (58%), an overall efficacy of 54 of 68 (79%). In successfully atherectomized arteries, angioscopy and angiography demonstrated a widely patent, smooth, polished surface. Light microscopy demonstrated removal of the diseased intima with maintenance of the outer media and adventitia. The pulverized atheroma particles were generally smaller than red blood cells and injection of the colloidal atheroma into canine femoral arteries failed to produce local tissue injury. We conclude that in the human cadaver this atherectomy device effectively enlarges and recanalizes obstructed superficial femoral, popliteal, and tibial arteries

  20. A preliminary redrafting of the Italian technical guide no.26 on radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tocci, M.

    1993-01-01

    The recent National Energy Plan confirms the need for reprocessing of the nuclear spent fuel arising from the Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) that were definitively put out of operation after Chernobyl accident. Two campaigns concerning the Italian spent fuel reprocessing are starting at this time. The first-one is related to LATINA (MAGNOX, GCR 160 MWe) while the second one will concern GARIGLIANO (BWR 160 MWe), CAORSO (BWR 840 MWe) and TRINO (PWR, 200 MWe). The first campaign will involve about 600 tons of MAGNOX spent fuel arising from LATINA NPP which will be reprocessed in the next future by BNFL (British Nuclear Fuel Limited) at Sellafield. The vitrified High Level Wastes (HLW) shall return to Italy starting from 1994. ENEA-DISP (Italian directorate for Nuclear Safety) has received from BNFL the technical specifications of the glass blocks. The approval of those specifications is scheduled by the end of 1993, in order to allow the delivery of the wastes. During the licensing iter ENEA-DISP will use its own Technical Guide N. 26, which identifies and specifies the basic criteria and requirements for an appropriate waste management policy. (author). 4 figs., 5 refs

  1. MiDAS: the field guide to the microbes of activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Albertsen, Mads; Nierychlo, Marta; McIlroy, Bianca; Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Karst, Søren Michael; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-01-01

    The Microbial Database for Activated Sludge (MiDAS) field guide is a freely available online resource linking the identity of abundant and process critical microorganisms in activated sludge wastewater treatment systems to available data related to their functional importance. Phenotypic properties of some of these genera are described, but most are known only from sequence data. The MiDAS taxonomy is a manual curation of the SILVA taxonomy that proposes a name for all genus-level taxa observed to be abundant by large-scale 16 S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of full-scale activated sludge communities. The taxonomy can be used to classify unknown sequences, and the online MiDAS field guide links the identity to the available information about their morphology, diversity, physiology and distribution. The use of a common taxonomy across the field will provide a solid foundation for the study of microbial ecology of the activated sludge process and related treatment processes. The online MiDAS field guide is a collaborative workspace intended to facilitate a better understanding of the ecology of activated sludge and related treatment processes--knowledge that will be an invaluable resource for the optimal design and operation of these systems. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Field-trip guides to selected volcanoes and volcanic landscapes of the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-06-23

    The North American Cordillera is home to a greater diversity of volcanic provinces than any comparably sized region in the world. The interplay between changing plate-margin interactions, tectonic complexity, intra-crustal magma differentiation, and mantle melting have resulted in a wealth of volcanic landscapes.  Field trips in this guide book collection (published as USGS Scientific Investigations Report 2017–5022) visit many of these landscapes, including (1) active subduction-related arc volcanoes in the Cascade Range; (2) flood basalts of the Columbia Plateau; (3) bimodal volcanism of the Snake River Plain-Yellowstone volcanic system; (4) some of the world’s largest known ignimbrites from southern Utah, central Colorado, and northern Nevada; (5) extension-related volcanism in the Rio Grande Rift and Basin and Range Province; and (6) the eastern Sierra Nevada featuring Long Valley Caldera and the iconic Bishop Tuff.  Some of the field trips focus on volcanic eruptive and emplacement processes, calling attention to the fact that the western United States provides opportunities to examine a wide range of volcanological phenomena at many scales.The 2017 Scientific Assembly of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) in Portland, Oregon, was the impetus to update field guides for many of the volcanoes in the Cascades Arc, as well as publish new guides for numerous volcanic provinces and features of the North American Cordillera. This collection of guidebooks summarizes decades of advances in understanding of magmatic and tectonic processes of volcanic western North America. These field guides are intended for future generations of scientists and the general public as introductions to these fascinating areas; the hope is that the general public will be enticed toward further exploration and that scientists will pursue further field-based research.

  3. Effects of light guide and magnetic field on the characteristics of the short time measuring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshihiro; Ohira, Kyozo

    1977-01-01

    In order to construct the nuclear life-time measurement apparatus with good energy and time resolution, consisting of DuMond type beta-ray spectrometer and plastic scintillator, experimental studies are carried out for the effects of light guide and magnetic field on the time resolution, and for the effects of μ-metal shielding on the energy resolution. It has been found that all these effects could be practically diminished. (auth.)

  4. Ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of thyroid gland: a preliminary study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ji Won; Yoo, Seung Min; Kwak, Seo Hyun

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using radiofrequency ablation as the treatment modality for the benign or malignant thyroid nodules in humans. Therefore, we examined the results of using radiofrequency ablation on the thyroid glands in dogs, in respect of the extent of the ablated tissue and the complications. Five dogs (10 lobes of the thyroid glands) were included in this study. US-guided radiofrequency ablation was undertaken with a 10 mm, uncovered 17 gauge cool-tip needle. The power and duration was 20 wattage and 1 minute in five thyroid lobes (group 1) and 20 wattage and 2 minutes in another 5 thyroid lobes (group 2). The ultrasound scans and the pre-and post-enhancement CT scans were undertaken before and immediately after the procedures, and at 24 hours, 72 hours and 1 week later. The US and CT findings of the ablated tissue and complications were evaluated. Blood sampling was done at the pre-procedure time and 1 week later for evaluating the functional status of the thyroid gland. Laryngoscopy was done at the pre-procedure and post-procedure times, and at 24 hours, 72 hours and 1 week later for the evaluation of any recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. The echo pattern of the ablated thyroid gland at immediately after the radiofrequency ablation appeared as poorly marginated and hyperechoic. On the US obtained 24 hours after radiofrequency ablation, the echo pattern of the ablated thyroid gland was hypoechoic. The maximum diameters after RFA were 9.4 ρ 0.5 mm in group I and 11.4 ρ 0.5 mm in group II. The pre-enhanced CT scan taken at immediately after the radiofrequency ablation showed ill defined hypodense areas in the ablated thyroid gland. Differentiation between the normal and abnormal portions of the thyroid gland was difficult on the contrast enhanced CT scan. Complications induced by radiofrequency ablation were one recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, two perforations of esophagus and five thickenings of the esophageal wall

  5. Ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of thyroid gland: a preliminary study in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ji Won; Yoo, Seung Min [College of Medicine, Chungang University, Seoul, (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Seo Hyun [Seoul Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using radiofrequency ablation as the treatment modality for the benign or malignant thyroid nodules in humans. Therefore, we examined the results of using radiofrequency ablation on the thyroid glands in dogs, in respect of the extent of the ablated tissue and the complications. Five dogs (10 lobes of the thyroid glands) were included in this study. US-guided radiofrequency ablation was undertaken with a 10 mm, uncovered 17 gauge cool-tip needle. The power and duration was 20 wattage and 1 minute in five thyroid lobes (group 1) and 20 wattage and 2 minutes in another 5 thyroid lobes (group 2). The ultrasound scans and the pre-and post-enhancement CT scans were undertaken before and immediately after the procedures, and at 24 hours, 72 hours and 1 week later. The US and CT findings of the ablated tissue and complications were evaluated. Blood sampling was done at the pre-procedure time and 1 week later for evaluating the functional status of the thyroid gland. Laryngoscopy was done at the pre-procedure and post-procedure times, and at 24 hours, 72 hours and 1 week later for the evaluation of any recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. The echo pattern of the ablated thyroid gland at immediately after the radiofrequency ablation appeared as poorly marginated and hyperechoic. On the US obtained 24 hours after radiofrequency ablation, the echo pattern of the ablated thyroid gland was hypoechoic. The maximum diameters after RFA were 9.4 {rho} 0.5 mm in group I and 11.4 {rho} 0.5 mm in group II. The pre-enhanced CT scan taken at immediately after the radiofrequency ablation showed ill defined hypodense areas in the ablated thyroid gland. Differentiation between the normal and abnormal portions of the thyroid gland was difficult on the contrast enhanced CT scan. Complications induced by radiofrequency ablation were one recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, two perforations of esophagus and five thickenings of the esophageal

  6. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-06-21

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. We observed a skull-guided wave propagation over a lateral distance of at least 3 mm, with a half-decay length in the direction perpendicular to the skull ranging from 35 to 300 μm at 6 and 0.5 MHz, respectively. Propagation losses are mostly attributed to the heterogenous acoustic properties of the skull. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  7. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. We observed a skull-guided wave propagation over a lateral distance of at least 3 mm, with a half-decay length in the direction perpendicular to the skull ranging from 35 to 300 μm at 6 and 0.5 MHz, respectively. Propagation losses are mostly attributed to the heterogenous acoustic properties of the skull. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  8. Theory and Praxis in Community Based Language Development: preliminary findings from applications of the Guide for Planning the Future of Our Language

    OpenAIRE

    Eberhard David M.

    2017-01-01

    This study will provide a critique of preliminary results obtained from the application of the ‘Guide for Planning the Future of Our Language’ (Hanawalt, Varenkamp, Lahn, & Eberhard 2015) in minority speech communities. This recent methodological tool was developed to enable and empower minoritized language groups to do their own language planning and to control their own language development. The tool is based on a theoretical approach to community based language development known as the ‘Su...

  9. Free-field ground motions for the nonproliferation experiment: Preliminary comparisons with nearby nuclear events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, K.H.; Peratt, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    Since 1987, we have installed fixed arrays of tri-axial accelerometers in the fire-field near the shot horizons for low-yield (≤ 20 kt) nuclear events in the N-tunnel complex beneath Rainier Mesa. For the Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) we augmented the array to achieve 23 free-field stations. Goals are: (a) to examine robustness and stability of various free-field source function estimates -- e.g., reduced displacement potentials (RDP) and spectra; (b) to compare close-in with regional estimates to test whether detailed close-in free-field and/or surface ground motion data can improve predictability of regional-teleseismic source functions; (c) to provide experimental data for checking two-dimensional numerical simulations. We report preliminary comparisons between experimental free-field data for NPE (1993) and three nearby nuclear events (MISTY ECHO, 1988; MINERAL QUARRY, 1990; HUNTERS TROPHY, 1992). All four working points are within 1 km of each other in the same wet tuff bed, thus reducing concerns about possible large differences in material properties between widely separated shots. Initial comparison of acceleration and velocity seismograms for the four events reveals: (1) There is a large departure from the spherical symmetry commonly assumed in analytic treatments of source theory; both vertical and tangential components are surprisingly large. (2) All shots show similar first-peak particle-velocity amplitude decay rates suggesting significant attenuation even in the supposedly purely elastic region. (3) Sharp (>20 Hz) arrivals are not observed at tunnel level from near-surface pP reflections or spall-closure sources -- but broadened peaks are seen that suggest more diffuse reflected energy from the surface and from the Paleozoic limestone basement below tunnel level

  10. Energy flux due to electromagnetic fluctuations during guide field magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwahata, Akihiro; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi; Yanai, Ryoma

    2016-01-01

    Large electromagnetic fluctuations inside the current sheet and large reconnection electric fields are observed during fast magnetic reconnection in the presence of a guide field. The fluctuations transport 2.5% of the dissipated magnetic energy from the reconnection region. Although the energy gains of the ions and electrons are approximately 60% and 12%, respectively, of the dissipated magnetic energy after the fast reconnection, the energy of fluctuations is not comparable to their energy gains. The fluctuations do not directly contribute to the energy conversion but might cause the fast reconnection leading to the rapid release of magnetic energy. (author)

  11. Impact of field number and beam angle on functional image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Chris M.; Wild, Jim M.; Swinscoe, James A.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hart, Kerry A.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of beam angles and field number on functionally-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) normal lung avoidance treatment plans that incorporate hyperpolarised helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He MRI) ventilation data. Eight non-small cell lung cancer patients had pre-treatment 3He MRI that was registered to inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy planning computed tomography. IMRT plans that minimised the volume of total lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (V20) were compared with plans that minimised 3He MRI defined functional lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (fV20). Coplanar IMRT plans using 5-field manually optimised beam angles and 9-field equidistant plans were also evaluated. For each pair of plans, the Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to compare fV20 and the percentage of planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90). Incorporation of 3He MRI led to median reductions in fV20 of 1.3% (range: 0.2-9.3% p  =  0.04) and 0.2% (range: 0 to 4.1%; p  =  0.012) for 5- and 9-field arrangements, respectively. There was no clinically significant difference in target coverage. Functionally-guided IMRT plans incorporating hyperpolarised 3He MRI information can reduce the dose received by ventilated lung without comprising PTV coverage. The effect was greater for optimised beam angles rather than uniformly spaced fields.

  12. Standard guide for data fields for computerized transfer of digital radiological examination data

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides a listing and description of the fields that are recommended for inclusion in a digital radiological examination data base to facilitate the transfer of such data. This guide sets guidelines for the format of data fields for computerized transfer of digital image files obtained from radiographic, radioscopic, computed radiographic, or other radiological examination systems. The field listing includes those fields regarded as necessary for inclusion in the data base: (1) regardless of the radiological examination method (as indicated by Footnote C in Table 1), (2) for radioscopic examination (as indicated by Footnote E in Table 1), and (3) for radiographic examination (as indicated by Footnote D in Table 1). In addition, other optional fields are listed as a reminder of the types of information that may be useful for additional understanding of the data or applicable to a limited number of applications. 1.2 It is recognized that organizations may have in place an internal format for the...

  13. Illustrated field guide for aquatic insects study: A collection that lets you view life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Castiblanco-Zerda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was developed from the aquatic insects collection (CIA of National Pedagogical University of Colombia, Bogotá. A field guide and ID portable key was outlined, which contributed to the study of aquatic insects with alternative collection methods, through the development of methodologies for observation of living organisms (in situ and in vivo for identification until taxonomic level of family during the field practice and its subsequent return to the habitat, taking into account students’ practical work needs in the field and the active use of Biology Department biological resources. It was concluded that the recognition of aquatic insects families allows articulation between collection and field practices, as well as students’ reflection on methods and goals of the collection, and evaluation of other procedural possibilities as those presented in this work.

  14. Near-field interference for the unidirectional excitation of electromagnetic guided modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fortuño, Francisco J; Marino, Giuseppe; Ginzburg, Pavel; O'Connor, Daniel; Martínez, Alejandro; Wurtz, Gregory A; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2013-04-19

    Wave interference is a fundamental manifestation of the superposition principle with numerous applications. Although in conventional optics, interference occurs between waves undergoing different phase advances during propagation, we show that the vectorial structure of the near field of an emitter is essential for controlling its radiation as it interferes with itself on interaction with a mediating object. We demonstrate that the near-field interference of a circularly polarized dipole results in the unidirectional excitation of guided electromagnetic modes in the near field, with no preferred far-field radiation direction. By mimicking the dipole with a single illuminated slit in a gold film, we measured unidirectional surface-plasmon excitation in a spatially symmetric structure. The surface wave direction is switchable with the polarization.

  15. Ultrasound-guided genicular nerve block for pain control after total knee replacement: Preliminary case series and technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Sotelo, V; Maculé, F; Minguell, J; Bergé, R; Franco, C; Sala-Blanch, X

    2017-12-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an operation with moderate to severe postoperative pain. The Fast-Track models employ local infiltration techniques with anaesthetics at high volumes (100-150ml). We proposed a genicular nerve block with low volume of local anaesthetic. The aim of our study is to evaluate the periarticular distribution of these blocks in a fresh cadaver model and to describe the technique in a preliminary group of patients submitted to TKA. In the anatomical phase, 4 genicular nerves (superior medial, superior lateral, inferior medial and inferior lateral) were blocked with 4ml of local anaesthetic with iodinated contrast and methylene blue in each (16ml in total). It was performed on a fresh cadaver and the distribution of the injected medium was evaluated by means of a CT-scan and coronal anatomical sections on both knees. The clinical phase included 12 patients scheduled for TKA. Ultrasound-guided block of the 4 genicular nerves was performed preoperatively and their clinical efficacy evaluated by assessing pain after the reversal of the spinal block and at 12h after the block. Pain was measured using the numerical scale and the need for rescue analgesia was evaluated. A wide periarticular distribution of contrast was observed by CT-scan, which was later evaluated in the coronal sections. The distribution followed the joint capsule without entering the joint, both in the femur and in the tibia. The pain after the reversal of the subarachnoid block was 2±1, requiring rescue analgesia in 42% of the patients. At 12h, the pain according to the numerical scale was 4±1, 33% required rescue analgesia. The administration of 4ml of local anaesthetic at the level of the 4 genicular nerves of the knee produces a wide periarticular distribution. Our preliminary data in a series of 12 patients undergoing TKA seems to be clinically effective. Nevertheless, extensive case series and comparative studies with local infiltration techniques with anaesthetics are

  16. Field-trip guide to a volcanic transect of the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Dennis; Wolff, John; Harpp, Karen

    2017-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest region of the United States provides world-class and historically important examples of a wide variety of volcanic features. This guide is designed to give a broad overview of the region’s diverse volcanism rather than focusing on the results of detailed studies; the reader should consult the reference list for more detailed information on each of the sites, and we have done our best to recognize previous field trip leaders who have written the pioneering guides. This trip derives from one offered as a component of the joint University of Idaho- Washington State University volcanology class taught from 1995 through 2014, and it borrows in theme from the classic field guide of Johnston and Donnelly-Nolan (1981). For readers interested in using this field guide as an educational tool, we have included an appendix with supplemental references to resources that provide useful background information on relevant topics, as well as a few suggestions for field-based exercises that could be useful when bringing students to these locations in the future. The 4-day trip begins with an examination of lava flow structures of the Columbia River Basalt, enormous lava fields that were emplaced during one of the largest eruptive episodes in Earth’s recent history. On the second day, the trip turns to the High Lava Plains, a bimodal volcanic province that transgressed from southeast to northwest from the Miocene through the Holocene, at the northern margin of the Basin and Range Province. This volcanic field provides excellent examples of welded ignimbrite, silicic lavas and domes, monogenetic basaltic lava fields, and hydrovolcanic features. The third day is devoted to a circumnavigation of Crater Lake, the result of one of the world’s best-documented caldera-forming eruptions. The caldera walls also expose the anatomy of Mount Mazama, a stratovolcano of the Cascade Range. The last day is spent at Newberry Volcano, a back-arc shield volcano topped by a

  17. Image-guided spinal injection procedures in open high-field MRI with vertical field orientation: feasibility and technical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitparth, F.; Walter, T.; Wonneberger, U.; Wagner, M.; Hermann, K.G.; Hamm, B.; Teichgraeber, U. [Charite, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Chopra, S. [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Wichlas, F. [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    We prospectively evaluated the feasibility and technical features of MR-guided lumbosacral injection procedures in open high-field MRI at 1.0 T. In a CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O phantom and five human cadaveric spines, fluoroscopy sequences (proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo (PDw TSE), T1w TSE, T2w TSE; balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP), T1w gradient echo (GE), T2w GE) were evaluated using two MRI-compatible 20-G Chiba-type needles. Artefacts were analysed by varying needle orientation to B{sub 0}, frequency-encoding direction and slice orientation. Image quality was described using the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Subsequently, a total of 183 MR-guided nerve root (107), facet (53) and sacroiliac joint (23) injections were performed in 53 patients. In vitro, PDw TSE sequence yielded the best needle-tissue contrasts (CNR = 45, 18, 15, 9, and 8 for needle vs. fat, muscle, root, bone and sclerosis, respectively) and optimal artefact sizes (width and tip shift less than 5 mm). In vivo, PDw TSE sequence was sufficient in all cases. The acquisition time of 2 s facilitated near-real-time MRI guidance. Drug delivery was technically successful in 100% (107/107), 87% (46/53) and 87% (20/23) of nerve root, facet and sacroiliac joint injections, respectively. No major complications occurred. The mean procedure time was 29 min (range 19-67 min). MR-guided spinal injections in open high-field MRI are feasible and accurate using fast TSE sequence designs. (orig.)

  18. Census of the Local Universe (CLU) Hα Galaxy Survey: Characterization of Galaxy Catalogs from Preliminary Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David O.; Kasliwal, Mansi; Van Sistine, Anglea; Kaplan, David; iPTF

    2018-01-01

    In this talk I introduce the Census of the Local Universe (CLU) galaxy survey. The survey uses 4 wavelength-adjacent, narrowband filters to search for emission-line (Hα) sources across ~3π (26,470 deg2) of the sky and out to distance of 200 Mpc. I will present an analysis of galaxy candidates in 14 preliminary fields (out of 3626) to assess the limits of the survey and the potential for finding new galaxies in the local Universe. We anticipate finding tens-of-thousands of new galaxies in the full ~3π survey. In addition, I present some interesting galaxies found in these fields, which include: newly discovered blue compact dwarfs (e.g., blueberries), 1 new green pea, 1 new QSO, and a known planetary nebula. The majority of the CLU galaxies show properties similar to normal star-forming galaxies; however, the newly discovered blueberries tend to have high star formation rates for their given stellar mass.

  19. The 6 April 2009 earthquake at L'Aquila: a preliminary analysis of magnetic field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Villante

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Several investigations reported the possible identification of anomalous geomagnetic field signals prior to earthquake occurrence. In the ULF frequency range, candidates for precursory signatures have been proposed in the increase in the noise background and polarization parameter (i.e. the ratio between the amplitude/power of the vertical component and that one of the horizontal component, in the changing characteristics of the slope of the power spectrum and fractal dimension, in the possible occurrence of short duration pulses. We conducted, with conventional techniques of data processing, a preliminary analysis of the magnetic field observations performed at L'Aquila during three months preceding the 6 April 2009 earthquake, focusing attention on the possible occurrence of features similar to those identified in previous events. Within the limits of this analysis, we do not find compelling evidence for any of the features which have been proposed as earthquake precursors: indeed, most of aspects of our observations (which, in some cases, appear consistent with previous findings might be interpreted in terms of the general magnetospheric conditions and/or of different sources.

  20. Design of a high efficiency relativistic backward wave oscillator with low guiding magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaoze; Song, Wei; Tan, Weibing; Zhang, Ligang; Su, Jiancang; Zhu, Xiaoxin; Hu, Xianggang; Shen, Zhiyuan; Liang, Xu; Ning, Qi [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China)

    2016-07-15

    A high efficiency relativistic backward wave oscillator working at a low guiding magnetic field is designed and simulated. A trapezoidal resonant reflector is used to reduce the modulation field in the resonant reflector to avoid overmodulation of the electron beam which will lead to a large momentum spread and then low conversion efficiency. The envelope of the inner radius of the slow wave structure (SWS) increases stepwise to keep conformal to the trajectory of the electron beam which will alleviate the bombardment of the electron on the surface of the SWS. The length of period of the SWS is reduced gradually to make a better match between phase velocity and electron beam, which decelerates continually and improves the RF current distribution. Meanwhile the modulation field is reduced by the introduction of nonuniform SWS also. The particle in cell simulation results reveal that a microwave with a power of 1.8 GW and a frequency of 14.7 GHz is generated with an efficiency of 47% when the diode voltage is 620 kV, the beam current 6.1 kA, and the guiding magnetic field 0.95 T.

  1. Sub-solar Magnetopause Observation and Simulation of a Tripolar Guide-Magnetic Field Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S.; Cassak, P.; Retino, A.; Mozer, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Polar satellite recorded two reconnection exhausts within 6 min on 1 April 2001 at a rather symmetric sub-solar magnetopause that displayed different out-of-plane signatures for similar solar wind conditions. The first case was reported by Mozer et al. [2002] and displayed a bipolar guide field supporting a quadrupole Hall field consistent with a single X-line. The second case, however, shows the first known example of a tripolar guide-field perturbation at Earth's magnetopause reminiscent of the types of solar wind exhausts that Eriksson et al. [2014; 2015] have reported to be in agreement with multiple X-lines. A dedicated particle-in-cell simulation is performed for the prevailing conditions across the magnetopause. We propose an explanation in terms of asymmetric Hall magnetic fields due to a presence of a magnetic island between two X-lines, and discuss how higher resolution MMS observations can be used to further study this problem at the magnetopause.

  2. Image-guided, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) for skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma: preliminary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahgal, Arjun; Chan, Michael W; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Masson-Cote, Laurence; Bahl, Gaurav; Yu, Eugene; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Chung, Caroline; Catton, Charles; O'Sullivan, Brian; Irish, Jonathan C; Gilbert, Ralph; Zadeh, Gelareh; Cusimano, Michael; Gentili, Fred; Laperriere, Normand J

    2015-06-01

    We report our preliminary outcomes following high-dose image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for skull base chordoma and chondrosarcoma. Forty-two consecutive IG-IMRT patients, with either skull base chordoma (n = 24) or chondrosarcoma (n = 18) treated between August 2001 and December 2012 were reviewed. The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 3-90 mo) in the chordoma cohort, and 67 months (range, 15-125) in the chondrosarcoma cohort. Initial surgery included biopsy (7% of patients), subtotal resection (57% of patients), and gross total resection (36% of patients). The median IG-IMRT total doses in the chondrosarcoma and chordoma cohorts were 70 Gy and 76 Gy, respectively, delivered with 2 Gy/fraction. For the chordoma and chondrosarcoma cohorts, the 5-year overall survival and local control rates were 85.6% and 65.3%, and 87.8% and 88.1%, respectively. In total, 10 patients progressed locally: 8 were chordoma patients and 2 chondrosarcoma patients. Both chondrosarcoma failures were in higher-grade tumors (grades 2 and 3). None of the 8 patients with grade 1 chondrosarcoma failed, with a median follow-up of 77 months (range, 34-125). There were 8 radiation-induced late effects-the most significant was a radiation-induced secondary malignancy occurring 6.7 years following IG-IMRT. Gross total resection and age were predictors of local control in the chordoma and chondrosarcoma patients, respectively. We report favorable survival, local control and adverse event rates following high dose IG-IMRT. Further follow-up is needed to confirm long-term efficacy. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Field guide for the protection and cleanup of oiled Arctic shorelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, E.H.

    1996-01-01

    Practical suggestions for the protection, treatment and cleanup of oiled shorelines during summer and open-water conditions are described. This manual was developed as a field guide to be used during spill response operations for the rapid identification of shoreline response options. Special attention is given to techniques that are normally available and appropriate for shoreline types and coastal environmental setting that are typical of Arctic regions. The guide is divided into four main sections: (1) shoreline protection, (2) treatment strategy by shoreline type, (3) treatment or cleanup methods, and (4) response strategies for specific environments. The importance of the type and volume of oil spilled, and the environmental factors that should be taken into account in the event of a spill (time of year, weather, ice and wave conditions) are stressed. The presence of sensitive resources such as wildlife, fish stocks, plant communities and human-use activities are also considered. tabs., figs

  4. Mid-latitude Geomagnetic Field Analysis Using BOH Magnetometer: Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junga Hwang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute researchers have installed and operated magnetometers at Mt. Bohyun Observatory to measure the Earth's magnetic field variations in South Korea. We, in 2007, installed a fluxgate magnetometer (RFP-523C to measure H, D, and Z components of the geomagnetic field. In addition, in 2009, we installed a Overhauser proton sensor to measure the absolute total magnetic field F and a three-axis magneto-impedance sensor for spectrum analysis. Currently three types of magnetometer data have been accumulated. In this paper, we provide the preliminary and the first statistical analysis using the BOH magnetometer installed at Mt. Bohyun Observatory. By superposed analysis, we find that daily variations of H, D, and Z shows similar tendency, that is, about 30 minutes before the meridian (11:28 a minimum appears and the time after about 3 hours and 30 minutes (15:28 a maximum appears. Also, a quiet interval start time (19:06 is near the sunset time, and a quiet interval end time (06:40 is near the sunrise time. From the sunset to the sunrise, the value of H has a nearly constant interval, that is, the sun affects the changes in H values. Seasonal variations show similar dependences to the sun. Local time variations show that noon region has the biggest variations and midnight region has the smallest variations. We compare the correlations between geomagnetic variations and activity indices as we expect the geomagnetic variation would contain the effects of geomagnetic activity variations. As a result, the correlation coefficient between H and Dst is the highest (r = 0.947, and other AL, AE, AU index and showed a high correlation. Therefore, the effects of geomagnetic storms and geomagnetic substorms might contribute to the geomagnetic changes significantly.

  5. Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

    2008-02-21

    Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems.

  6. Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

    2008-01-01

    Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems

  7. Image-guided regularization level set evolution for MR image segmentation and bias field correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingfeng; Pan, Chunhong

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) image segmentation is a crucial step in surgical and treatment planning. In this paper, we propose a level-set-based segmentation method for MR images with intensity inhomogeneous problem. To tackle the initialization sensitivity problem, we propose a new image-guided regularization to restrict the level set function. The maximum a posteriori inference is adopted to unify segmentation and bias field correction within a single framework. Under this framework, both the contour prior and the bias field prior are fully used. As a result, the image intensity inhomogeneity can be well solved. Extensive experiments are provided to evaluate the proposed method, showing significant improvements in both segmentation and bias field correction accuracies as compared with other state-of-the-art approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hamiltonian field description of two-dimensional vortex fluids and guiding center plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, P.J.

    1981-03-01

    The equations that describe the motion of two-dimensional vortex fluids and guiding center plasmas are shown to possess underlying field Hamiltonian structure. A Poisson bracket which is given in terms of the vorticity, the physical although noncanonical dynamical variable, casts these equations into Heisenberg form. The Hamiltonian density is the kinetic energy density of the fluid. The well-known conserved quantities are seen to be in involution with respect to this Poisson bracket. Expanding the vorticity in terms of a Fourier-Dirac series transforms the field description given here into the usual canonical equations for discrete vortex motion. A Clebsch potential representation of the vorticity transforms the noncanonical field description into a canonical description

  9. HDR Pathological Image Enhancement Based on Improved Bias Field Correction and Guided Image Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingjiao Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathological image enhancement is a significant topic in the field of pathological image processing. This paper proposes a high dynamic range (HDR pathological image enhancement method based on improved bias field correction and guided image filter (GIF. Firstly, a preprocessing including stain normalization and wavelet denoising is performed for Haematoxylin and Eosin (H and E stained pathological image. Then, an improved bias field correction model is developed to enhance the influence of light for high-frequency part in image and correct the intensity inhomogeneity and detail discontinuity of image. Next, HDR pathological image is generated based on least square method using low dynamic range (LDR image, H and E channel images. Finally, the fine enhanced image is acquired after the detail enhancement process. Experiments with 140 pathological images demonstrate the performance advantages of our proposed method as compared with related work.

  10. Overview for geologic field-trip guides to volcanoes of the Cascades Arc in northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffler, L. J. Patrick; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Grove, Timothy L.; Clynne, Michael A.; Christiansen, Robert L.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Ryan-Davis, Juliet

    2017-08-15

    The California Cascades field trip is a loop beginning and ending in Portland, Oregon. The route of day 1 goes eastward across the Cascades just south of Mount Hood, travels south along the east side of the Cascades for an overview of the central Oregon volcanoes (including Three Sisters and Newberry Volcano), and ends at Klamath Falls, Oregon. Day 2 and much of day 3 focus on Medicine Lake Volcano. The latter part of day 3 consists of a drive south across the Pit River into the Hat Creek Valley and then clockwise around Lassen Volcanic Center to the town of Chester, California. Day 4 goes from south to north across Lassen Volcanic Center, ending at Burney, California. Day 5 and the first part of day 6 follow a clockwise route around Mount Shasta. The trip returns to Portland on the latter part of day 6, west of the Cascades through the Klamath Mountains and the Willamette Valley. Each of the three sections of this guidebook addresses one of the major volcanic regions: Lassen Volcanic Center (a volcanic field that spans the volcanic arc), Mount Shasta (a fore-arc stratocone), and Medicine Lake Volcano (a rear-arc, shield-shaped edifice). Each section of the guide provides (1) an overview of the extensive field and laboratory studies, (2) an introduction to the literature, and (3) directions to the most important and accessible field localities. The field-trip sections contain far more stops than can possibly be visited in the actual 6-day 2017 IAVCEI excursion from Portland. We have included extra stops in order to provide a field-trip guide that will have lasting utility for those who may have more time or may want to emphasize one particular volcanic area.

  11. The role of electron heat flux in guide-field magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Masha; Birn, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    A combination of analytical theory and particle-in-cell simulations are employed in order to investigate the electron dynamics near and at the site of guide field magnetic reconnection. A detailed analysis of the contributions to the reconnection electric field shows that both bulk inertia and pressure-based quasiviscous processes are important for the electrons. Analytic scaling demonstrates that conventional approximations for the electron pressure tensor behavior in the dissipation region fail, and that heat flux contributions need to be accounted for. Based on the evolution equation of the heat flux three tensor, which is derived in this paper, an approximate form of the relevant heat flux contributions to the pressure tensor is developed, which reproduces the numerical modeling result reasonably well. Based on this approximation, it is possible to develop a scaling of the electron current layer in the central dissipation region. It is shown that the pressure tensor contributions become important at the scale length defined by the electron Larmor radius in the guide magnetic field

  12. Relationship between water chemistry and sediment mineralogy in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field: a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valette-Silver, J.N. (Univ. de Perpignan, France); Thompson, J.M.; Ball, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical compositions of waters collected from the Cerro Prieto geothermal production wells and hydrothermal emanations are different. Compared to the Cerro Prieto well waters, the surficial waters generally contain significantly less potassium, slightly less calcium and chloride, and significantly more magnesium and sulfate. In comparison to the unaltered sediments, the changes in the mineralogy of the altered sediments appear to be controlled by the type of emanation (well, spring, mud pot, geyser, fumarole, or cold pool). However, an increase in quartz and potassium feldspar percentages seems to be characteristic of the majority of the sediments in contact with geothermal fluids. Preliminary attempts to model the chemical processes occurring in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field using chemical equilibrium calculations are reported. For this purpose the chemical compositions of thermal waters (well and surficial emanation) were used as input data to make calculations with SOLMNEQ and WATEQ2 computer programs. Then the theoretical mineral composition of altered sediments was predicted and compared to the mineralogy actually observed in the solid samples.

  13. Preliminary considerations concerning neutral plasma beam propagation across a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanahan, W.R.; Faehl, R.J.; Godfrey, B.B.

    1979-08-01

    A plan to address physical questions of interest for exoatmospheric military applications of intense neutralized plasma beams is described. After a brief review of earlier work relevant to this matter and a detailed explanation of why such work cannot answer questions of present interest, a plan employing interactive application of several numerical and analytic techniques to treat relevant phenomena occurring on the various rather disparate time and length scales involved is suggested. The first part of the study would determine the macroscopic features of beam propagation through calculations effected with a magnetohydrodynamical numerical code. Classical transport coefficients would be employed in this initial phase. Using information thus gained concerning gross charge and current distributions, particle-in-cell simulations would be initialized to study those microscopic, phase-space-dependent phenomena which can alter the phenomonological transport coefficients appearing in the fluid description. Insight thereby gained concerning anomaous, collectively induced transport effects would then be applied to yield a refined, accurate description of the macroscopic aspects of neutral plasma beam propagation. Personnel and computational resources available at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are described. Results of a very preliminary particle-in-cell simulation of a neutral plasma beam propagating across a magnetic field are presented

  14. A preliminary investigation: the impact of microscopic condenser on depth of field in cytogenetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liqiang; Qiu, Yuchen; Li, Zheng; Li, Yuhua; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    As one of the important components of optical microscopes, the condenser has a considerable impact on system performance, especially on the depth of field (DOF). DOF is a critical technical feature in cytogenetic imaging that may affect the efficiency and accuracy of clinical diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of microscopic condenser on DOF using a prototype of transmitted optical microscope, based on objective and subjective evaluations. After the description of the relationship between condenser and objective lens and the theoretical analysis of the condenser impact on system numerical aperture and DOF, a standard resolution pattern and several cytogenetic samples are adopted to assess the condenser impact on DOF, respectively. The experimental results of these objective and subjective evaluations are in agreement with the theoretical analysis and show that, under the specific intermediate range of condenser numerical aperture ( NAcond ), the DOF value decreases with the increase of NAcond . Although the above qualitative results are obtained under the experimental conditions with a specific prototype system, the methods presented in this preliminary investigation could offer useful guidelines for optimizing operational parameters in cytogenetic imaging.

  15. Motion of guiding center drift atoms in the electric and magnetic field of a Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmin, S.G.; O'Neil, T.M.

    2005-01-01

    The ApparaTus for High precision Experiment on Neutral Antimatter and antihydrogen TRAP collaborations have produced antihydrogen atoms by recombination in a cryogenic antiproton-positron plasma. This paper discusses the motion of the weakly bound atoms in the electric and magnetic field of the plasma and trap. The effective electric field in the moving frame of the atom polarizes the atom, and then gradients in the field exert a force on the atom. An approximate equation of motion for the atom center of mass is obtained by averaging over the rapid internal dynamics of the atom. The only remnant of the atom internal dynamics that enters this equation is the polarizability for the atom. This coefficient is evaluated for the weakly bound and strongly magnetized (guiding center drift) atoms understood to be produced in the antihydrogen experiments. Application of the approximate equation of motion shows that the atoms can be trapped radially in the large space charge field near the edge of the positron column. Also, an example is presented for which there is full three-dimensional trapping, not just radial trapping. Even untrapped atoms follow curved trajectories, and such trajectories are discussed for the important class of atoms that reach a field ionization diagnostic. Finally, the critical field for ionization is determined as an upper bound on the range of applicability of the theory

  16. Large-scale dynamic compaction demonstration using WIPP salt: Fielding and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, E.H.; Hansen, F.D.

    1995-10-01

    Reconsolidation of crushed rock salt is a phenomenon of great interest to programs studying isolation of hazardous materials in natural salt geologic settings. Of particular interest is the potential for disaggregated salt to be restored to nearly an impermeable state. For example, reconsolidated crushed salt is proposed as a major shaft seal component for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project. The concept for a permanent shaft seal component of the WIPP repository is to densely compact crushed salt in the four shafts; an effective seal will then be developed as the surrounding salt creeps into the shafts, further consolidating the crushed salt. Fundamental information on placement density and permeability is required to ensure attainment of the design function. The work reported here is the first large-scale compaction demonstration to provide information on initial salt properties applicable to design, construction, and performance expectations. The shaft seals must function for 10,000 years. Over this period a crushed salt mass will become less permeable as it is compressed by creep closure of salt surrounding the shaft. These facts preclude the possibility of conducting a full-scale, real-time field test. Because permanent seals taking advantage of salt reconsolidation have never been constructed, performance measurements have not been made on an appropriately large scale. An understanding of potential construction methods, achievable initial density and permeability, and performance of reconsolidated salt over time is required for seal design and performance assessment. This report discusses fielding and operations of a nearly full-scale dynamic compaction of mine-run WIPP salt, and presents preliminary density and in situ (in place) gas permeability results

  17. Preliminary Optical And Electric Field Pulse Statistics From Storm Overflights During The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, D. A.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Desch, M. D.; Houser, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) was conducted during the month of August, 2002 in an area near Key West, Florida. One of the goals of this uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) study was to collect high resolution optical pulse and electric field data from thunderstorms. During the month long campaign, we acquired 5294 lightning generated optical pulses with associated electric field changes. Most of these observations were made while close to the top of the storms. We found filtered mean and median 10-10% optical pulse widths of 875 and 830 microns respectively while the 50-50% mean and median optical pulse widths are 422 and 365 microns respectively. These values are similar to previous results as are the 10-90% mean and median rise times of 327 and 265 microns. The peak electrical to optical pulse delay mean and median were 209 and 145 microns which is longer than one would expect from theoretical results. The results of the pulse analysis will contribute to further validation of the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) satellites. Pre-launch estimates of the flash detection efficiency were based on a small sample of optical pulse measurements associated with less than 350 lightning discharges collected by NASA U-2 aircraft in the early 1980s. Preliminary analyses of the ACES measurements show that we have greatly increased the number of optical pulses available for validation of the LIS and other orbital lightning optical sensors. Since the Altus was often close to the cloud tops, many of the optical pulses are from low-energy pulses. From these low-energy pulses, we can determine the fraction of optical lightning pulses below the thresholds of LIS, OTD, and any future satellite-based optical sensors such as the geostationary Lightning Mapping Sensor.

  18. Preliminary evaluation of a "formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help (fCBT-GSH)" for crisis and transitional case management clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Farooq; Johal, Rupinder K; Mckenna, Claire; Calancie, Olivia; Munshi, Tariq; Hassan, Tariq; Nasar, Amina; Ayub, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is found to be effective for common mental disorders and has been delivered in self-help and guided self-help formats. Crisis and transitional case management (TCM) services play a vital role in managing clients in acute mental health crises. It is, therefore, an appropriate setting to try CBT in guided self-help format. This was a preliminary evaluation of a formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help. Thirty-six (36) consenting participants with a diagnosis of nonpsychotic illness, attending crisis and the TCM services in Kingston, Canada, were recruited in this study. They were randomly assigned to the guided self-help plus treatment as usual (TAU) (treatment group) or to TAU alone (control group). The intervention was delivered over 8-12 weeks. Assessments were completed at baseline and 3 months after baseline. The primary outcome was a reduction in general psychopathology, and this was done using Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure. The secondary outcomes included a reduction in depression, measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and reduction in disability, measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. Participants in the treatment group showed statistically significant improvement in overall psychopathology ( P crisis and TCM clients and can be effective in improving mental health, when compared with TAU. This is the first report of a trial of guided self-help for clients attending crisis and TCM services.

  19. MiDAS Field Guide – a Comprehensive Online Source of Information About the Microbes of Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; McIlroy, Simon Jon; Saunders, Aaron Marc

    this information in MiDAS field guide (www.midasfieldguide.org). MiDAS taxonomy gives a solid foundation for the study of microbial ecology of the wastewater treatment processes. The online MiDAS field guide links the identity of genera that are important for the wastewater treatment process to details about...... guide to the microbes of activated sludge by comparing microbial community composition in 32 WWTPs located worldwide. This will facilitate a better understanding of the ecology of the ecosystem of activated sludge. Reference: McIlroy et al. MiDAS: the field guide to the microbes of activated sludge...... on a survey of 25 full-scale Danish wastewater treatment plants over 6 years and using MiDAS taxonomy, we have collected more than 150 key organisms in activated sludge wastewater treatment systems, linked their identity with available information on their function and distribution and included...

  20. On guided circumferential waves in soft electroactive tubes under radially inhomogeneous biasing fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Su, Yipin; Chen, Weiqiu; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2017-02-01

    Soft electroactive (EA) tube actuators and many other cylindrical devices have been proposed recently in literature, which show great advantages over those made from conventional hard solid materials. However, their practical applications may be limited because these soft EA devices are prone to various failure modes. In this paper, we present an analysis of the guided circumferential elastic waves in soft EA tube actuators, which has potential applications in the in-situ nondestructive evaluation (NDE) or online structural health monitoring (SHM) to detect structural defects or fatigue cracks in soft EA tube actuators and in the self-sensing of soft EA tube actuators based on the concept of guided circumferential elastic waves. Both circumferential SH and Lamb-type waves in an incompressible soft EA cylindrical tube under inhomogeneous biasing fields are considered. The biasing fields, induced by the application of an electric voltage difference to the electrodes on the inner and outer cylindrical surfaces of the EA tube in addition to an axial pre-stretch, are inhomogeneous in the radial direction. Dorfmann and Ogden's theory of nonlinear electroelasticity and the associated linear theory for small incremental motion constitute the basis of our analysis. By means of the state-space formalism for the incremental wave motion along with the approximate laminate technique, dispersion relations are derived in a particularly efficient way. For a neo-Hookean ideal dielectric model, the proposed approach is first validated numerically. Numerical examples are then given to show that the guided circumferential wave propagation characteristics are significantly affected by the inhomogeneous biasing fields and the geometrical parameters. Some particular phenomena such as the frequency veering and the nonlinear dependence of the phase velocity on the radial electric voltage are discussed. Our numerical findings demonstrate that it is feasible to use guided circumferential

  1. Electrical Field Guided Electrospray Deposition for Production of Gradient Particle Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei-Cheng; Xie, Jingwei; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2018-06-06

    Our previous work demonstrated the uniform particle pattern formation on the substrates using electrical field guided electrospray deposition. In this work, we reported for the first time the fabrication of gradient particle patterns on glass slides using an additional point, line, or bar electrode based on our previous electrospray deposition configuration. We also demonstrated that the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coating could result in the formation of uniform particle patterns instead of gradient particle patterns on glass slides using the same experimental setup. Meanwhile, we investigated the effect of experimental configurations on the gradient particle pattern formation by computational simulation. The simulation results are in line with experimental observations. The formation of gradient particle patterns was ascribed to the gradient of electric field and the corresponding focusing effect. Cell patterns can be formed on the particle patterns deposited on PDMS-coated glass slides. The formed particle patterns hold great promise for high-throughput screening of biomaterial-cell interactions and sensing.

  2. A novel coaxial Ku-band transit radiation oscillator without external guiding magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Junpu, E-mail: lingjunpu@163.com; Zhang, Jiande; He, Juntao; Jiang, Tao [College of Photoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2014-02-15

    A novel coaxial transit radiation oscillator without external guiding magnetic field is designed to generate high power microwave at Ku-band. By using a coaxial structure, the space-charge potential energy is suppressed significantly, that is good for enhancing efficient beam-wave interaction. In order to improve the transmission stability of the unmagnetized intense relativistic electron beam, a Pierce-like cathode is employed in the novel device. By contrast with conventional relativistic microwave generators, this kind of device has the advantages of high stability, non-guiding magnetic field, and high efficiency. Moreover, with the coaxial design, it is possible to improve the power-handing capacity by increasing the radial dimension of the Ku-band device. With a 550 keV and 7.5 kA electron beam, a 1.25 GW microwave pulse at 12.08 GHz has been obtained in the simulation. The power conversion efficiency is about 30%.

  3. Self-guiding of high-intensity laser pulses for laser wake field acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umstader, D.; Liu, X.

    1992-01-01

    A means of self-guiding an ultrashort and high-intensity laser pulse is demonstrated both experimentally and numerically. Its relevance to the laser wake field accelerator concept is discussed. Self-focusing and multiple foci formation are observed when a high peak power (P>100 GW), 1 μm, subpicosecond laser is focused onto various gases (air or hydrogen). It appears to result from the combined effects of self-focusing by the gas, and de-focusing both by diffraction and the plasma formed in the central high-intensity region. Quasi-stationary computer simulations show the same multiple foci behavior as the experiments. The results suggest much larger nonlinear electronic susceptibilities of a gas near or undergoing ionization in the high field of the laser pulse. Although self-guiding of a laser beam by this mechanism appears to significantly extend its high-intensity focal region, small-scale self-focusing due to beam non-uniformity is currently a limitation

  4. Degenerate variational integrators for magnetic field line flow and guiding center trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, C. L.; Finn, J. M.; Burby, J. W.; Kraus, M.; Qin, H.; Tang, W. M.

    2018-05-01

    Symplectic integrators offer many benefits for numerically approximating solutions to Hamiltonian differential equations, including bounded energy error and the preservation of invariant sets. Two important Hamiltonian systems encountered in plasma physics—the flow of magnetic field lines and the guiding center motion of magnetized charged particles—resist symplectic integration by conventional means because the dynamics are most naturally formulated in non-canonical coordinates. New algorithms were recently developed using the variational integration formalism; however, those integrators were found to admit parasitic mode instabilities due to their multistep character. This work eliminates the multistep character, and therefore the parasitic mode instabilities via an adaptation of the variational integration formalism that we deem "degenerate variational integration." Both the magnetic field line and guiding center Lagrangians are degenerate in the sense that the resultant Euler-Lagrange equations are systems of first-order ordinary differential equations. We show that retaining the same degree of degeneracy when constructing discrete Lagrangians yields one-step variational integrators preserving a non-canonical symplectic structure. Numerical examples demonstrate the benefits of the new algorithms, including superior stability relative to the existing variational integrators for these systems and superior qualitative behavior relative to non-conservative algorithms.

  5. New shipyard layout design for the preliminary phase & case study for the green field project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Joo; Woo, Jong Hun

    2013-03-01

    For several decades, Asian nations such as Korea, Japan and China have been leading the shipbuilding industry since the decline in Europe and America. However, several developing countries such as India, Brazil, etc. are going to make an entrance into the shipbuilding industry. These developing countries are finding technical partners or information providers because they are in situation of little experiences and technologies. Now, the shipbuilding engineering companies of shipbuilding advanced countries are getting a chance of engineering business against those developing countries. The starting point of this business model is green field project for the construction of new shipyard. This business model is started with a design of the shipyard layout. For the conducting of the shipyard layout design, four kinds of engineering parts are required. Those are civil engineering, building engineering, utility engineering and production layout engineering. Among these parts, production layout engineering is most important because its result is the foundation of the other engineering parts and it determines the shipyard capacity during the shipyard operation lifecycle. Previous researches about the shipyard layout design are out of the range from the business requirements because most research cases are in the tower of ivory, which means that there are little consideration of real ship and shipbuilding operation. In this paper, a shipyard layout design for preliminary phase is conducted for the target of newly planned shipyard at Venezuela of South America with an integrated method that is capable of dealing with actual master data from the shipyard. The layout design method of this paper is differentiated from the previous researches in that the actual product data from the target ship and the actual shipbuilding operation data are used for the required area estimation.

  6. New shipyard layout design for the preliminary phase & case study for the green field project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Joo Song

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available For several decades, Asian nations such as Korea, Japan and China have been leading the shipbuilding industry since the decline in Europe and America. However, several developing countries such as India, Brazil, etc. are going to make an entrance into the shipbuilding industry. These developing countries are finding technical partners or information providers because they are in situation of little experiences and technologies. Now, the shipbuilding engineering companies of shipbuilding advanced countries are getting a chance of engineering business against those developing countries. The starting point of this business model is green field project for the construction of new shipyard. This business model is started with a design of the shipyard layout. For the conducting of the shipyard layout design, four kinds of engineering parts are required. Those are civil engineering, building engineering, utility engineering and production layout engineering. Among these parts, production layout engineering is most important because its result is the foundation of the other engineering parts and it determines the shipyard capacity during the shipyard operation lifecycle. Previous researches about the shipyard layout design are out of the range from the business requirements because most research cases are in the tower of ivory, which means that there are little consideration of real ship and shipbuilding operation. In this paper, a shipyard layout design for preliminary phase is conducted for the target of newly planned shipyard at Venezuela of South America with an integrated method that is capable of dealing with actual master data from the shipyard. The layout design method of this paper is differentiated from the previous researches in that the actual product data from the target ship and the actual shipbuilding operation data are used for the required area estimation.

  7. Black Carbon in Arctic Snow: Preliminary Results from Recent Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, S. G.; Grenfell, T. C.; Radionov, V. F.; Clarke, A. D.

    2007-12-01

    Annual snowpacks act to amplify variations in regional solar heating of the surface due to positive feedback processes associated with areal melting and precipitation. Small amounts of black carbon (BC) in the snow can reduce the albedo and modulate shortwave absorption and transmission affecting the onset of melt and heating of the snow pack. The effect of black carbon on the albedo of snow in the Arctic is estimated to be up to a few percent. The only prior survey of arctic snow was that of Clarke and Noone in 1983-84. We have begun a wide- area survey of the BC content of arctic snow in order to update and expand the 1983/84 survey. Samples of snow have been collected in mid to late spring when the entire winter snowpack was accessible. The samples have been melted and filtered, and the filters analyzed for absorptive impurities. To date, sites in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and in the Arctic Basin have been sampled. In March and April 2007 we also carried out a field program at four sites in northwestern Russia as part of the International Polar Year. Preliminary results based on visual comparison with the standard filters indicate that the snow cover in arctic North America and the Beaufort Sea have lower BC concentrations now than 20 years ago while levels in Greenland are about the same. Background levels of BC in Russia are approximately twice those in North America consistent with modeling predictions of Flanner et al., 2007. More accurate values of absorption will be obtained by measurement of spectral transmission of the filters, which will also allow the relative contributions of BC and soil dust to be determined.

  8. A proposal to pulse the Bevatron/Bevalac main guide field magnet with SCR power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frias, B.; Alonso, J.; Dwinell, R.; Lothrop, F.

    1989-01-01

    The Bevatron/Bevalac Main Guide Field Power Supply was originally designed to provide a 15,250 Volt DC. at sign 8400 Ampere peak magnet pulse. Protons were accelerated to 6.2 Gev. The 128 Megawatt (MW) pulse required two large motor-generator (MG) sets with 67 ton flywheels to store 680 Megajoules of energy. Ignitron rectifiers are used to rectify the generator outputs. Acceleration of heavy ions results in an operating schedule with a broad range of peak fields. The maximum field of 12.5 kilogauss requires a peak pulse of 80 MW. Acceleration of ions to 1.0 kilogauss requires an 8 MW peak pulse. One MG set can provide pulses below 45 MW. Peak pulses of less than 15 MW are now a large block of the operating schedule. A proposal has been made to replace the existing MG system with eight SCR power supplies for low field operation. The SCR supplies will be powered directly from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's 12.3 KV. power distribution system. This paper describes the many advantages of the plan. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  9. The effect of guide-field and boundary conditions on collisionless magnetic reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Works of Tsiklauri and Haruki [Phys. Plasmas 15, 102902 (2008); 14, 112905 (2007)] are extended by inclusion of the out-of-plane magnetic (guide) field. In particular, magnetic reconnection during collisionless, stressed X-point collapse for varying out-of-plane guide-fields is studied using a kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle-in-cell numerical code. For zero guide-field, cases for both open and closed boundary conditions are investigated, where magnetic flux and particles are lost and conserved, respectively. It is found that reconnection rates, out-of-plane currents and density in the X-point increase more rapidly and peak sooner in the closed boundary case, but higher values are reached in the open boundary case. The normalized reconnection rate is fast: 0.10-0.25. In the open boundary case it is shown that an increase of guide-field yields later onsets in the reconnection peak rates, while in the closed boundary case initial peak rates occur sooner but are suppressed. The reconnection current changes similarly with increasing guide-field; however for low guide-fields the reconnection current increases, giving an optimal value for the guide-field between 0.1 and 0.2 times the in-plane field in both cases. Also, in the open boundary case, it is found that for guide-fields of the order of the in-plane magnetic field, the generation of electron vortices occurs. Possible causes of the vortex generation, based on the flow of decoupled particles in the diffusion region and localized plasma heating, are discussed. Before peak reconnection onset, oscillations in the out-of-plane electric field at the X-point are found, ranging in frequency from approximately 1 to 2 ω{sub pe} and coinciding with oscillatory reconnection. These oscillations are found to be part of a larger wave pattern in the simulation domain. Mapping the out-of-plane electric field along the central lines of the domain over time and applying a 2D Fourier transform reveal that

  10. Preliminary design and definition of field experiments for welded tuff rock mechanics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.M.

    1982-06-01

    The preliminary design contains objectives, typical experiment layouts, definitions of equipment and instrumentation, test matrices, preliminary design predictive modeling results for five experiments, and a definition of the G-Tunnel Underground Facility (GTUF) at the Nevada Test Site where the experiments are to be located. Experiments described for investigations in welded tuff are the Small Diameter Heater, Unit Cell-Canister Scale, Heated Block, Rocha Slot, and Miniature Heater

  11. Preliminary study on field buses for the control system of the high voltage of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevet, F.; Chadelas, R.; Montarou, G.

    1996-01-01

    We present here after a preliminary study on field buses for the control system of the high voltage of the photomultipliers of the TILECAL calorimeter. After some generalities, different commercial buses are reviewed (CAN, ARCET, WorldFIP, Profibus and LonWorks). The Profibus and LonWorks solution are more extensively studies as a possible solution for the high voltage system of the TILE hadronic calorimeter. (authors)

  12. Preliminary Analysis on Linac Oscillation Data LI05-19 and Wake Field Energy Loss in FACET Commissioning 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    In this note, preliminary analysis on linac ocsillation data in FACET linac LI05-09 plus LI11-19 is presented. Several quadrupoles are identified to possibly have different strength, compared with their designed strength in the MAD optics model. The beam energy loss due to longitudinal wake fields in the S-band linac is also analytically calculated, also by LITRACK numerical simulations.

  13. Overview for geologic field-trip guides to Mount Mazama, Crater Lake Caldera, and Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles R.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Jensen, Robert A.; Wright, Heather M.

    2017-08-16

    These field-trip guides were written for the occasion of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) quadrennial scientific assembly in Portland, Oregon, in August 2017. The guide to Mount Mazama and Crater Lake caldera is an updated and expanded version of the guide (Bacon, 1989) for part of an earlier IAVCEI trip to the southern Cascade Range. The guide to Newberry Volcano describes the stops included in the 2017 field trip. Crater Lake and Newberry are the two best-preserved and most recent calderas in the Cascades Volcanic Arc. Although located in different settings in the arc, with Crater Lake on the arc axis and Newberry in the rear-arc, both volcanoes are located at the intersection of the arc and the northwest corner region of the extensional Basin and Range Province.

  14. Assessment of electromagnetic fields intensity emitted by cellular phone base stations in surrounding flats - a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmyslony, M.; Politanski, P.; Mamrot, P.; Bortkiewicz, A.

    2006-01-01

    A rapid development of mobile telecommunications (MT) has resulted in an increased concern about possible detrimental health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) emitted by MT systems, and by MT base stations in particular. Research into EMFs effects on the health of inhabitants living in their vicinity requires first of all a solid assessment of the exposure level. Up to now, the reports in this field have been rather scant. This article presents the results of preliminary measurements of EMFs fields in selected flats around selected base stations in the city of Lodz. Measurements of electric field strength, E, to assess EMF exposure were based on the standard procedures currently in force in Poland. As the study is regarded as a preliminary one, the measurements were conducted in buildings with the expected largest radiation. The measurements show that in the flats located up to 500 m from the base station, EMFs are within the limits specified by relevant Polish regulations on the general public and environmental protection. It was also observed that in a few (less than 10%) flats the field with E exceeded 0.8 V/m. The results show that there are no correlations between electric field strength and distance between the flat and the base station. Therefore, the distance from the base station cannot be used to represent the exposure rate; to determine the latter, EMF measurements are necessary. (author)

  15. Preliminary Findings from the One-Year Electric Field Study in the North Slope of Alaska (OYES-NSA), Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, T.; Liu, C.

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies focusing on the comparison of the measured electric field to the physical properties of global electrified clouds have been conducted almost exclusively in the Southern Hemisphere. The One-Year Electric Field Study-North Slope of Alaska (OYES-NSA) aims to establish a long-running collection of this valuable electric field data in the Northern Hemisphere. Presented here is the six-month preliminary data and results of the OYES-NSA Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) field campaign. The local electric field measured in Barrow, Alaska using two CS110 reciprocating shutter field meters, has been compared to simultaneous measurements from the ARM Ka-Band zenith radar, to better understand the influence and contribution of different types of clouds on the local electric field. The fair-weather electric field measured in Barrow has also been analyzed and compared to the climatology of electric field at Vostok Station, Antarctica. The combination of the electric field dataset in the Northern Hemisphere, alongside the local Ka cloud radar, global Precipitation Feature (PF) database, and quasi-global lightning activity (55oN-55oS), allows for advances in the physical understanding of the local electric field, as well as the Global Electric Circuit (GEC).

  16. Compensated Row-Column Ultrasound Imaging System Using Multilayered Edge Guided Stochastically Fully Connected Random Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Daya, Ibrahim; Chen, Albert I H; Shafiee, Mohammad Javad; Wong, Alexander; Yeow, John T W

    2017-09-06

    The row-column method received a lot of attention for 3-D ultrasound imaging. By reducing the number of connections required to address the 2-D array and therefore reducing the amount of data to handle, this addressing method allows for real time 3-D imaging. Row-column still has its limitations: the issues of sparsity, speckle noise inherent to ultrasound, the spatially varying point spread function, and the ghosting artifacts inherent to the row-column method must all be taken into account when building a reconstruction framework. In this research, we build on a previously published system and propose an edge-guided, compensated row-column ultrasound imaging system that incorporates multilayered edge-guided stochastically fully connected conditional random fields to address the limitations of the row-column method. Tests carried out on simulated and real row-column ultrasound images show the effectiveness of our proposed system over other published systems. Visual assessment show our proposed system's potential at preserving edges and reducing speckle. Quantitative analysis shows that our proposed system outperforms previously published systems when evaluated with metrics such as Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio, Coefficient of Correlation, and Effective Number of Looks. These results show the potential of our proposed system as an effective tool for enhancing 3-D row-column imaging.

  17. Student representation of magnetic field concepts in learning by guided inquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatmaryanti, Siska Desy; Suparmi; Sarwanto; Ashadi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the change of student’s representation after the intervention of learning by guided inquiry. The population in this research were all students who took a fundamental physics course, consisted of 28 students academic year 2016, Department of Physics Education, Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, University of Muhammadiyah Purworejo. This study employed a quasi-experimental design with group pre-test and post-test. The result of the research showed that the average of students representation of magnetic field before implementation of guided inquiry was 28,6 % and after implementation was 71,4%. It means that the student’s ability of multi-representation increase. Moreover, the number of students who is able to write and draw based on experiment data increased from 10,7% to 21,4 %. It was also showed that the number of student with no answer decreased from 28,5% to 10,7%. (paper)

  18. Student representation of magnetic field concepts in learning by guided inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desy Fatmaryanti, Siska; Suparmi; Sarwanto; Ashadi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the change of student’s representation after the intervention of learning by guided inquiry. The population in this research were all students who took a fundamental physics course, consisted of 28 students academic year 2016, Department of Physics Education, Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, University of Muhammadiyah Purworejo. This study employed a quasi-experimental design with group pre-test and post-test. The result of the research showed that the average of students representation of magnetic field before implementation of guided inquiry was 28,6 % and after implementation was 71,4%. It means that the student’s ability of multi-representation increase. Moreover, the number of students who is able to write and draw based on experiment data increased from 10,7% to 21,4 %. It was also showed that the number of student with no answer decreased from 28,5% to 10,7%.

  19. The IEEE guide to writing in the engineering and technical fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kmiec, David

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces students and practicing engineers to all the components of writing in the workplace. It teaches readers how considerations of audience and purpose govern the structure of their documents within particular work settings. The IEEE Guide to Writing in the Engineering and Technical Fields is broken up into two sections: "Writing in Engineering Organizations" and "What Can You Do With Writing?" The first section helps readers approach their writing in a logical and persuasive way as well as analyze their purpose for writing. The second section demonstrates how to distinguish rhetorical situations and the generic forms to inform, train, persuade, and collaborate. The emergence of the global workplace has brought with it an increasingly important role for effective technical communication. Engineers more often need to work in cross-functional teams with people in different disciplines, in different countries, and in different parts of the world. Engineers must know how to communicate in a rapid...

  20. Field dose radiation determination by active learning with Gaussian Process for autonomous robot guiding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas Naiff, Danilo de; Silveira, Paulo R.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.

    2017-01-01

    This article proposes an approach for determination of radiation dose pro le in a radiation-susceptible environment, aiming to guide an autonomous robot in acting on those environments, reducing the human exposure to dangerous amount of dose. The approach consists of an active learning method based on information entropy reduction, using log-normally warped Gaussian Process (GP) as surrogate model, resulting in non-linear online regression with sequential measurements. Experiments with simulated radiation dose fields of varying complexity were made, and results showed that the approach was effective in reconstruct the eld with high accuracy, through relatively few measurements. The technique was also shown some robustness in presence measurement noise, present in real measurements, by assuming Gaussian noise. (author)

  1. Field dose radiation determination by active learning with Gaussian Process for autonomous robot guiding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas Naiff, Danilo de; Silveira, Paulo R.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A., E-mail: danilonai1992@poli.ufrj.br, E-mail: paulo@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    This article proposes an approach for determination of radiation dose pro le in a radiation-susceptible environment, aiming to guide an autonomous robot in acting on those environments, reducing the human exposure to dangerous amount of dose. The approach consists of an active learning method based on information entropy reduction, using log-normally warped Gaussian Process (GP) as surrogate model, resulting in non-linear online regression with sequential measurements. Experiments with simulated radiation dose fields of varying complexity were made, and results showed that the approach was effective in reconstruct the eld with high accuracy, through relatively few measurements. The technique was also shown some robustness in presence measurement noise, present in real measurements, by assuming Gaussian noise. (author)

  2. Simulated experimental research on flow field near control rod guide tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Ping'an; Shen Xiuzhong; Yang Guanyue; He Fangzheng; Gao Weiguo; Zhang Zhiyi; Tian Ji'an

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents the velocity measurement in the 1/4 scale transparent model of PWR pressure vessel upper plenum of 300 MW nuclear power plant by employing dynamic resistance strain foil velocity measurement technology and laser Doppler velocity measurement technology which have no effect on the flow field. In the experiment water is chosen as the fluid. As a result of the measurement the hydraulic load on the control rods is clarified and the experimental basis is provided for the analysis of whether the control rods are moving upward and downward freely and drop rapidly in emergency case by order. Meantime it also provides the experimental basis for the optical design of the control rod guide tubes and bundles

  3. Impact of compressibility and a guide field on Fermi acceleration during magnetic island coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Peter; Egedal, Jan; Lichko, Emily; Wetherton, Blake

    2017-10-01

    Previous work has shown that Fermi acceleration can be an effective heating mechanism during magnetic island coalescence, where electrons may undergo repeated reflections as the magnetic field lines contract. This energization has the potential to account for the power-law distributions of particle energy inferred from observations of solar flares. Here, we develop a generalized framework for the analysis of Fermi acceleration that can incorporate the effects of compressibility and non-uniformity along field lines, which have commonly been neglected in previous treatments of the problem. Applying this framework to the simplified case of the uniform flux tube allows us to find both the power-law scaling of the distribution function and the rate at which the power-law behavior develops. We find that a guide magnetic field of order unity effectively suppresses the development of power-law distributions. The work was supported by NASA Grant No. NNX14AC68G, NSF GEM Grant No. 1405166, NSF Award 1404166, and NASA Award NNX15AJ73G.

  4. Field Guide to the Plant Community Types of Voyageurs National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber-Langendoen, Don; Aaseng, Norman; Hop, Kevin; Lew-Smith, Michael

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of the U.S. Geological Survey-National Park Service Vegetation Mapping Program is to classify, describe, and map vegetation for most of the park units within the National Park Service (NPS). The program was created in response to the NPS Natural Resources Inventory and Monitoring Guidelines issued in 1992. Products for each park include digital files of the vegetation map and field data, keys and descriptions to the plant communities, reports, metadata, map accuracy verification summaries, and aerial photographs. Interagency teams work in each park and, following standardized mapping and field sampling protocols, develop products and vegetation classification standards that document the various vegetation types found in a given park. The use of a standard national vegetation classification system and mapping protocol facilitate effective resource stewardship by ensuring compatibility and widespread use of the information throughout the NPS as well as by other Federal and state agencies. These vegetation classifications and maps and associated information support a wide variety of resource assessment, park management, and planning needs, and provide a structure for framing and answering critical scientific questions about plant communities and their relation to environmental processes across the landscape. This field guide is intended to make the classification accessible to park visitors and researchers at Voyageurs National Park, allowing them to identify any stand of natural vegetation and showing how the classification can be used in conjunction with the vegetation map (Hop and others, 2001).

  5. Electron heating in the exhaust of magnetic reconnection with negligible guide field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan; Chen, Li-Jen; Bessho, Naoki; Kistler, Lynn M.; Shuster, Jason R.; Guo, Ruilong

    2016-03-01

    Electron heating in the magnetic reconnection exhaust is investigated with particle-in-cell simulations, space observations, and theoretical analysis. Spatial variations of the electron temperature (Te) and associated velocity distribution functions (VDFs) are examined and understood in terms of particle energization and randomization processes that vary with exhaust locations. Inside the electron diffusion region (EDR), the electron temperature parallel to the magnetic field (Te∥) exhibits a local minimum and the perpendicular temperature (Te⊥) shows a maximum at the current sheet midplane. In the intermediate exhaust downstream from the EDR and far from the magnetic field pileup region, Te⊥/Te∥ is close to unity and Te is approximately uniform, but the VDFs are structured: close to the midplane, VDFs are quasi-isotropic, whereas farther away from the midplane, VDFs exhibit field-aligned beams directed toward the midplane. In the far exhaust, Te generally increases toward the midplane and the pileup region, and the corresponding VDFs show counter-streaming beams. A distinct population with low v∥ and high v⊥ is prominent in the VDFs around the midplane. Test particle results show that the magnetic curvature near the midplane produces pitch angle scattering to generate quasi-isotropic distributions in the intermediate exhaust. In the far exhaust, electrons with initial high v∥ (v⊥) are accelerated mainly through curvature (gradient-B) drift opposite to the electric field, without significant pitch angle scattering. The VDF structures predicted by simulations are observed in magnetotail reconnection measurements, indicating that the energization mechanisms captured in the reported simulations are applicable to magnetotail reconnection with negligible guide field.

  6. [Accelerated partial breast irradiation with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery - preliminary results of a phase II clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Norbert; Major, Tibor; Stelczer, Gábor; Zaka, Zoltán; Mózsa, Emõke; Fodor, János; Polgár, Csaba

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to implement accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by means of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for low-risk early invasive breast cancer. Between July 2011 and March 2014, 60 patients with low-risk early invasive (St I-II) breast cancer who underwent BCS were enrolled in our phase II prospective study. Postoperative APBI was given by means of step and shoot IG-IMRT using 4 to 5 fields to a total dose of 36.9 Gy (9×4.1 Gy) using a twice-a-day fractionation. Before each fraction, series of CT images were taken from the region of the target volume using a kV CT on-rail mounted in the treatment room. An image fusion software was used for automatic image registration of the planning and verification CT images. Patient set-up errors were detected in three directions (LAT, LONG, VERT), and inaccuracies were adjusted by automatic movements of the treatment table. Breast cancer related events, acute and late toxicities, and cosmetic results were registered and analysed. At a median follow-up of 24 months (range 12-44) neither locoregional nor distant failure was observed. Grade 1 (G1), G2 erythema, G1 oedema, and G1 and G2 pain occurred in 21 (35%), 2 (3.3%), 23 (38.3%), 6 (10%) and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively. No G3-4 acute side effects were detected. Among late radiation side effects G1 pigmentation, G1 fibrosis, and G1 fat necrosis occurred in 5 (8.3%), 7 (11.7%), and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively. No ≥G2 late toxicity was detected. Excellent and good cosmetic outcome was detected in 45 (75%) and 15 (25%) patients. IG-IMRT is a reproducible and feasible technique for the delivery of APBI following conservative surgery for the treatment of low-risk, early-stage invasive breast carcinoma. Preliminary results are promising, early radiation side effects are minimal, and cosmetic results are excellent.

  7. Preliminary Results of Emergency Computed Tomography-Guided Ventricular Drain Placement-Precision for the Most Difficult Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Andreas; Wagner, Franca; Söll, Nicole; Hakim, Arsany; Beck, Jürgen; Raabe, Andreas; Z'Graggen, Werner J

    2018-04-05

    External ventricular drainage (EVD) catheter placement is one of the most commonly performed neurosurgical procedures. The study's objective was to compare a computed tomography (CT) bolt scan-guided approach for the placement of EVDs with conventional landmark-based insertion. In this retrospective case-control study, we analyzed patients undergoing bolt-kit EVD catheter placement, either CT-guided or landmark-based, between 2013 and 2016. The CT bolt scan-guided approach was based on a dose-reduced CT scan after bolt fixation with immediate image reconstruction along the axis of the bolt to evaluate the putative insertion axis. If needed, angulation of the bolt was corrected and the procedure repeated before the catheter was inserted. Primary endpoint was the accuracy of insertion. Secondary endpoints were the overall number of attempts, duration of intervention, complication rates, and cumulative radiation dose. In total, 34 patients were included in the final analysis. In the group undergoing CT-guided placement, the average ventricle width was significantly smaller (P = 0.04) and average midline shift significantly more pronounced (P = 0.01). CT-guided placement resulted in correct positioning of the catheter in the ipsilateral frontal horn in all 100% of the cases compared with landmark-guided insertion (63%; P = 0.01). Application of the CT-guided approach increased the number of total CT scans (3.6 ± 1.9) and the overall radiation dose (3.34 ± 1.61 mSv) compared with the freehand insertion group (1.84 ± 2.0 mSv and 1.55 ± 1.66 mSv). No differences were found for the other secondary outcome parameters. CT-guided bolt-kit EVD catheter placement is feasible and accurate in the most difficult cases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cost Finding Principles and Procedures. Preliminary Field Review Edition. Technical Report 26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemer, Gordon; And Others

    This report is part of the Larger Cost Finding Principles Project designed to develop a uniform set of standards, definitions, and alternative procedures that will use accounting and statistical data to find the full cost of resources utilized in the process of producing institutional outputs. This technical report describes preliminary procedures…

  9. Environmental protection appraisals: a suggested guide for US Department of Energy field organization. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barisas, S.; Polich, J.; Surles, T.; Habegger, L.; Anderson, D.; Opelka, J.; Frangos, T.

    1985-03-01

    This manual has been prepared to assist DOE field organizations in conducting environmental protection appraisals of activities at DOE operating-level facilities. Its primary use will be by DOE operations offices in their appraisal of facilities operating under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act. However, the manual can also be used by other DOE field organizations. This manual is organized in modules that parallel those in the internal environmental audit checklist. It is assumed that the contractor is using the guide previously described (Internal Environmental Protection Audits) and that operations office staff members will have the opportunity to review or be cognizant of the contractor's completed internal audit, and other material generated within the facility, in preparation for the appraisal. This manual was developed to facilitate the appraisal process by providing operations office staff with a choice of modules that can be used independently or as a unit. The manual gives guidelines for reviewing information submitted to the operations office before the site visit and for conducting an on-site operating-level appraisal

  10. The Onset of Magnetic Reconnection: Tearing Instability in Current Sheets with a Guide Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daldorff, L. K. S.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Knizhnik, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is fundamental to many solar phenomena, ranging from coronal heating, to jets, to flares and CMEs. A poorly understood yet crucial aspect of reconnection is that it does not occur until magnetic stresses have built to sufficiently high levels for significant energy release. If reconnection were to happen too soon, coronal heating would be weak and flares would be small. As part of our program to study the onset conditions for magnetic reconnection, we have investigated the instability of current sheets to tearing. Surprisingly little work has been done on this problem for sheets that include a guide field, i.e., for which the field rotates by less than 180 degrees. This is the most common situation on the Sun. We present numerical 3D resistive MHD simulations of several sheets and show how the behaviour depends on the shear angle (rotation). We compare our results to the predictions of linear theory and discuss the nonlinear evolution in terms of plasmoid formation and the interaction of different oblique tearing modes. The relevance to the Sun is explained.

  11. Field-trip guide to the geologic highlights of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Robert A.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.

    2017-08-09

    Newberry Volcano and its surrounding lavas cover about 3,000 square kilometers (km2) in central Oregon. This massive, shield-shaped, composite volcano is located in the rear of the Cascades Volcanic Arc, ~60 km east of the Cascade Range crest. The volcano overlaps the northwestern corner of the Basin and Range tectonic province, known locally as the High Lava Plains, and is strongly influenced by the east-west extensional environment. Lava compositions range from basalt to rhyolite. Eruptions began about half a million years ago and built a broad composite edifice that has generated more than one caldera collapse event. At the center of the volcano is the 6- by 8-km caldera, created ~75,000 years ago when a major explosive eruption of compositionally zoned tephra led to caldera collapse, leaving the massive shield shape visible today. The volcano hosts Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which encompasses the caldera and much of the northwest rift zone where mafic eruptions occurred about 7,000 years ago. These young lava flows erupted after the volcano was mantled by the informally named Mazama ash, a blanket of volcanic ash generated by the eruption that created Crater Lake about 7,700 years ago. This field trip guide takes the visitor to a variety of easily accessible geologic sites in Newberry National Volcanic Monument, including the youngest and most spectacular lava flows. The selected sites offer an overview of the geologic story of Newberry Volcano and feature a broad range of lava compositions. Newberry’s most recent eruption took place about 1,300 years ago in the center of the caldera and produced tephra and lava of rhyolitic composition. A significant mafic eruptive event occurred about 7,000 years ago along the northwest rift zone. This event produced lavas ranging in composition from basalt to andesite, which erupted over a distance of 35 km from south of the caldera to Lava Butte where erupted lava flowed west to temporarily block the Deschutes

  12. Preliminary evaluation of a “formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help (fCBT-GSH” for crisis and transitional case management clients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem F

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Farooq Naeem,1,2 Rupinder K Johal,1 Claire Mckenna,1 Olivia Calancie,1 Tariq Munshi,1,2 Tariq Hassan,1 Amina Nasar,3 Muhammad Ayub1 1Department of Psychiatry, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, Canada; 2Addiction and Mental Health Services – Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox & Addington (AMHS-KFLA, Kingston, ON, Canada; 3Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan Background: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT is found to be effective for common mental disorders and has been delivered in self-help and guided self-help formats. Crisis and transitional case management (TCM services play a vital role in managing clients in acute mental health crises. It is, therefore, an appropriate setting to try CBT in guided self-help format.Methods: This was a preliminary evaluation of a formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help. Thirty-six (36 consenting participants with a diagnosis of nonpsychotic illness, attending crisis and the TCM services in Kingston, Canada, were recruited in this study. They were randomly assigned to the guided self-help plus treatment as usual (TAU (treatment group or to TAU alone (control group. The intervention was delivered over 8–12 weeks. Assessments were completed at baseline and 3 months after baseline. The primary outcome was a reduction in general psychopathology, and this was done using Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure. The secondary outcomes included a reduction in depression, measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and reduction in disability, measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0.Findings: Participants in the treatment group showed statistically significant improvement in overall psychopathology (P<0.005, anxiety and depression (P<0.005, and disability (P<0.005 at the end of the trial compared with TAU group. Conclusion: A formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help was feasible for the crisis

  13. A field guide to predict delayed mortality of fire-damaged ponderosa pine: application and validation of the Malheur model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter G. Thies; Douglas J. Westlind; Mark Loewen; Greg. Brenner

    2008-01-01

    The Malheur model for fire-caused delayed mortality is presented as an easily interpreted graph (mortality-probability calculator) as part of a one-page field guide that allows the user to determine postfire probability of mortality for ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.). Following both prescribed burns and wildfires, managers need...

  14. Integrated Pest Management, Preliminary. Curriculum Guide and Instructional Materials for a Secondary School Vo-Ag Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady County Board of Education, Cairo, GA.

    This curriculum guide presents methods to disseminate information to students interested in dealing with pests, or who have concerns about the environmental impacts of modern pest control methods. Options are encouraged for pest control methods using a combination of natural, biological, cultural, and chemical means of control. Specifically…

  15. Neuronavigation-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening: A preliminary study in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Lu, Yu-Jen; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-11-01

    FUS-induced BBB opening is a promising technique for noninvasive and local delivery of drugs into the brain. Here we propose the novel use of a neuronavigation system to guide the FUS-induced BBB opening procedure, and investigate its feasibility in vivo in large animals. We developed an interface between the neuronavigator and FUS to allow guidance of the focal energy produced by the FUS transducer. The system was tested in 29 pigs by more than 40 sonication procedures and evaluated by MRI. Gd-DTPA concentration was quantitated in vivo by MRI R1 relaxometry and compared by ICP-OES assay. Brain histology after FUS exposure was investigated by HE and TUNEL staining. Neuronavigation could successfully guide the focal beam with comparable precision to neurosurgical stereotactic procedures (2.3 ± 0.9 mm). FUS pressure of 0.43 MPa resulted in consistent BBB-opening. Neuronavigation-guided BBB-opening increased Gd-DTPA deposition by up to 1.83 mM (140% increase). MR relaxometry demonstrated high correlation to ICP-OES measurements (r2 = 0.822), suggesting that Gd-DTPA deposition can be directly measured by imaging. Neuronavigation could provide sufficient precision for guiding FUS to temporally and locally open the BBB. Gd-DTPA deposition in the brain could be quantified by MR relaxometry, providing a potential tool for the in vivo quantification of therapeutic agents in CNS disease treatment.

  16. Development and preliminary evaluation of the Child Feeding Guide website and app: A tool to support caregivers with promoting healthy eating in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Haycraft

    2015-10-01

    benefit from it. Health professionals and caregivers with young children were asked to use the newly-developed Child Feeding Guide and provide feedback on its usability, content, appearance and novelty. Results: Over 85% of health professionals agreed that the Child Feeding Guide contains useful information, is a beneficial resource, and is easy to use. 95% would recommend it to the families that they work with. 80% of caregivers reported that using it helped them to better understand their children’s eating behaviour. Caregivers commented that using the Child Feeding Guide had made them aware of how their feeding behaviours can inadvertently affect their child. Other features of the Child Feeding Guide were identified as beneficial, such as: the provision of advice alongside practical and realistic methods for improving mealtimes; tips for not using food for rewards or for comfort; information on common feeding pitfalls. Caregivers also reported finding the Child Feeding Guide novel, interesting and educational, and easy to use. Conclusions: Preliminary user feedback suggests that the Child Feeding Guide is filling a critical gap in available support resources. Caregivers and health professionals report that it is easy to use, helpful and accessible. While initial user testing of the Child Feeding Guide confirms its value, further formal testing of this resource is required prior to wider-scale roll-out.

  17. Geologic field-trip guide to Mount Shasta Volcano, northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Robert L.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2017-08-18

    off, in a field of high-alumina olivine tholeiite lavas (HAOTs, referred to elsewhere in this guide as low-potassium olivine tholeiites, LKOTs). It proceeds around the southern, western, and northern flanks of Mount Shasta and onto a part of the arc axis. The stops feature elements of the Mount Shasta area in an approximately chronological order, from oldest to youngest.

  18. Hebbian Plasticity Guides Maturation of Glutamate Receptor Fields In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrij Ljaschenko

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity shapes the development of functional neural circuits and provides a basis for cellular models of learning and memory. Hebbian plasticity describes an activity-dependent change in synaptic strength that is input-specific and depends on correlated pre- and postsynaptic activity. Although it is recognized that synaptic activity and synapse development are intimately linked, our mechanistic understanding of the coupling is far from complete. Using Channelrhodopsin-2 to evoke activity in vivo, we investigated synaptic plasticity at the glutamatergic Drosophila neuromuscular junction. Remarkably, correlated pre- and postsynaptic stimulation increased postsynaptic sensitivity by promoting synapse-specific recruitment of GluR-IIA-type glutamate receptor subunits into postsynaptic receptor fields. Conversely, GluR-IIA was rapidly removed from synapses whose activity failed to evoke substantial postsynaptic depolarization. Uniting these results with developmental GluR-IIA dynamics provides a comprehensive physiological concept of how Hebbian plasticity guides synaptic maturation and sparse transmitter release controls the stabilization of the molecular composition of individual synapses.

  19. Field-trip guide to Mount Hood, Oregon, highlighting eruptive history and hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, William E.; Gardner, Cynthia A.

    2017-06-22

    This guidebook describes stops of interest for a geological field trip around Mount Hood volcano. It was developed for the 2017 International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) Scientific Assembly in Portland, Oregon. The intent of this guidebook and accompanying contributions is to provide an overview of Mount Hood, including its chief geologic processes, magmatic system, eruptive history, local tectonics, and hazards, by visiting a variety of readily accessible localities. We also describe coeval, largely monogenetic, volcanoes in the region. Accompanying the field-trip guidebook are separately authored contributions that discuss in detail the Mount Hood magmatic system and its products and behavior (Kent and Koleszar, this volume); Mount Hood earthquakes and their relation to regional tectonics and the volcanic system (Thelen and Moran, this volume); and young surface faults cutting the broader Mount Hood area whose extent has come to light after acquisition of regional light detection and ranging coverage (Madin and others, this volume).The trip makes an approximately 175-mile (280-kilometer) clockwise loop around Mount Hood, starting and ending in Portland. The route heads east on Interstate 84 through the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. The guidebook points out only a few conspicuous features of note in the gorge, but many other guides to the gorge are available. The route continues south on the Mount Hood National Scenic Byway on Oregon Route 35 following Hood River, and returns to Portland on U.S. Highway 26 following Sandy River. The route traverses rocks as old as the early Miocene Eagle Creek Formation and overlying Columbia River Basalt Group of middle Miocene age, but chiefly lava flows and clastic products of arc volcanism of late Miocene to Holocene age.

  20. MRI-guided procedures in various regions of the body using a robotic assistance system in a closed-bore scanner: preliminary clinical experience and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, Michael; Zajonz, Dirk; Kahn, Thomas; Busse, Harald

    2010-04-01

    To present the clinical setup and workflow of a robotic assistance system for image-guided interventions in a conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment and to report our preliminary clinical experience with percutaneous biopsies in various body regions. The MR-compatible, servo-pneumatically driven, robotic device (Innomotion) fits into the 60-cm bore of a standard MR scanner. The needle placement (n = 25) accuracy was estimated by measuring the 3D deviation between needle tip and prescribed target point in a phantom. Percutaneous biopsies in six patients and different body regions were planned by graphically selecting entry and target points on intraoperatively acquired roadmap MR data. For insertion depths between 29 and 95 mm, the average 3D needle deviation was 2.2 +/- 0.7 mm (range 0.9-3.8 mm). Patients with a body mass index of up to approximately 30 kg/m(2) fitted into the bore with the device. Clinical work steps and limitations are reported for the various applications. All biopsies were diagnostic and could be completed without any major complications. Median planning and intervention times were 25 (range 20-36) and 44 (36-68) minutes, respectively. Preliminary clinical results in a standard MRI environment suggest that the presented robotic device provides accurate guidance for percutaneous procedures in various body regions. Shorter procedure times may be achievable by optimizing technical and workflow aspects. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Geologic field trip guide to Mount Mazama and Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles R.; Wright, Heather M.

    2017-08-08

    geologic research at Crater Lake have been incorporated not only in scientific investigations elsewhere, but also in the practical evaluation of local hazards (Bacon and others, 1997b) and geothermal resources (Bacon and Nathenson, 1996). The 1:24,000-scale geologic map of Mount Mazama and Crater Lake caldera (Bacon, 2008) is unusual because it portrays bedrock (outcrop), surficial, and lake floor geology. Caldera wall geology is depicted in detail on the accompanying geologic panoramas, and bedrock geology is shown in a 1:50,000-scale geologic map. This field guide supersedes earlier geology guides of Crater Lake (Bacon, 1987, 1989).

  2. Nu shifts in betatron oscillations from uniform perturbations in the presence of non-linear magnetic guide fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crebbin, K.C.

    1985-05-01

    Uniform magnetic field perturbations cause a closed orbit distortion in a circular accelerator. If the magnetic guide field is non-linear these perturbations can also cause a Nu shift in the betatron oscillations. Such a shift in radial Nu values has been observed in the Bevalac while studying the low energy resonant extraction system. In the Bevalac, the radial perturbation comes from the quadrants being magnetically about 0.8% longer than 90 0 . The normal effect of this type of perturbation is a radial closed orbit shift and orbit distortion. The Nu shift, associated with this type of perturbation in the presence of a non-linear guide field, is discussed in this paper. A method of handling the non-linear n values is discussed as well as the mechanism for the associated Nu shift. Computer calculations are compared to measurements. 2 refs., 4 figs

  3. MiDAS Field Guide – a Comprehensive Online Source of Information About the Microbes of Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; McIlroy, Simon Jon; Saunders, Aaron Marc

    activated sludge wastewater treatment systems, linking their identity with available information on their function and distribution. The guide includes the approx. 100 abundant genera that are present in most treatment plants (based on a survey of 25 full-scale Danish wastewater treatment plants...... are provided. The MiDAS Field Guide is a continuously developing resource where all working in the field are invited to contribute....... that would be otherwise excluded from analyses. The MiDAS database importantly provides a common taxonomy for the field that gives a solid foundation for the study of microbial ecology of the activated sludge process and related wastewater treatment processes, such as biofilms and granular sludge. Each genus...

  4. Preliminary study : Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) effects on the growth of plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roha Tukimin; Wan Norsuhaila Wan Aziz; Rozaimah Abd Rahim; Wan Saffiey Wan Abdulah

    2010-01-01

    A research has been done to study the effects of magnetic fields on the growth of plants.Two samples of maize seedlings and green beans have been studied. Helmholtz coil systems were used as magnetic field source at frequency 50 Hz with 440 mGauss field strength. Sample characteristics such height, leaf, colour and length of roots were observed. The results show that the magnetic field influenced the growth of the sample. The sample that were exposed to the magnetic field show faster growth compared to the controlled sample. (author)

  5. Computer code and users' guide for the preliminary analysis of dual-mode space nuclear fission solid core power and propulsion systems, NUROC3A. AMS report No. 1239b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R.A.; Smith, W.W.

    1976-06-30

    The three-volume report describes a dual-mode nuclear space power and propulsion system concept that employs an advanced solid-core nuclear fission reactor coupled via heat pipes to one of several electric power conversion systems. The second volume describes the computer code and users' guide for the preliminary analysis of the system.

  6. Prospective economical evaluation of the image guided radiotherapy (I.G.R.T.) applied to prostate cancers. Preliminary results of the study 'program to support innovative and costly techniques (S.t.i.c.)-I.G.R.T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommier, P.; Morelle, M.; Remonnay, R.; Crevoisier, R. de

    2009-01-01

    The preliminary results of the economical analysis of CT-guided radiotherapy use shows on one hand, a significant increase in the length of irradiation sessions related to the image guidance, but also on the other hand a substantial inter centrum variability yet to explore. (N.C.)

  7. On Multiple Hall-Like Electron Currents and Tripolar Guide Magnetic Field Perturbations During Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturner, Andrew P.; Eriksson, Stefan; Nakamura, Takuma; Gershman, Daniel J.; Plaschke, Ferdinand; Ergun, Robert E.; Wilder, Frederick D.; Giles, Barbara; Pollock, Craig; Paterson, William R.; Strangeway, Robert J.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Burch, James L.

    2018-02-01

    Two magnetopause current sheet crossings with tripolar guide magnetic field signatures were observed by multiple Magnetosphere Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft during Kelvin-Helmholtz wave activity. The two out-of-plane magnetic field depressions of the tripolar guide magnetic field are largely supported by the observed in-plane electron currents, which are reminiscent of two clockwise Hall current loop systems. A comparison with a three-dimensional kinetic simulation of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves and vortex-induced reconnection suggests that MMS likely encountered the two Hall magnetic field depressions on either side of a magnetic reconnection X-line. Moreover, MMS observed an out-of-plane current reversal and a corresponding in-plane magnetic field rotation at the center of one of the current sheets, suggesting the presence of two adjacent flux ropes. The region inside one of the ion-scale flux ropes was characterized by an observed decrease of the total magnetic field, a strong axial current, and significant enhancements of electron density and parallel electron temperature. The flux rope boundary was characterized by currents opposite this axial current, strong in-plane and converging electric fields, parallel electric fields, and weak electron-frame Joule dissipation. These return current region observations may reflect a need to support the axial current rather than representing local reconnection signatures in the absence of any exhausts.

  8. Energization and Transport in 3D Kinetic Simulations of MMS Magnetopause Reconnection Site Encounters with Varying Guide Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, A.; Daughton, W. S.; Ohia, O.; Chen, L. J.; Liu, Y. H.

    2017-12-01

    We present 3D fully kinetic simulations of asymmetric reconnection with plasma parameters matching MMS magnetopause diffusion region crossings with varying guide fields of 0.1 [Burch et al., Science (2016)], 0.4 [Chen et al. JGR (2017)], and 1 [Burch and Phan, GRL (2016] of the reconnecting sheath field. Strong diamagnetic drifts across the magnetopause current sheet drive lower-hybrid drift instabilities (LHDI) over a range of wavelengths [Daughton, PoP (2003); Roytershteyn et al., PRL (2012)] that develop into a turbulent state. Magnetic field tracing diagnostics are employed to characterize the turbulent magnetic geometry and to evaluate the global reconnection rate. The contributions to Ohm's law are evaluated field line by field line, including time-averaged diagnostics that allow the quantification of anomalous resistivity and viscosity. We examine how fluctuating electric fields and chaotic magnetic field lines contribute to particle mixing across the separatrix, and we characterize the accelerated electron distributions that form under varying magnetic shear or guide field. The LHDI turbulence is found to strongly enhance transport and parallel electron heating in 3D compared to 2D, particularly along the magnetospheric separatrix [Le et al., GRL (2017)]. The PIC simulation results are compared to MMS observations.

  9. Preliminary Experience Using Eye-Tracking Technology to Differentiate Novice and Expert Image Interpretation for Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Lindsay K; Harrison, T Kyle; Kou, Alex; Mariano, Edward R; Udani, Ankeet D; Kim, T Edward; Shum, Cynthia; Howard, Steven K

    2018-02-01

    Objective measures are needed to guide the novice's pathway to expertise. Within and outside medicine, eye tracking has been used for both training and assessment. We designed this study to test the hypothesis that eye tracking may differentiate novices from experts in static image interpretation for ultrasound (US)-guided regional anesthesia. We recruited novice anesthesiology residents and regional anesthesiology experts. Participants wore eye-tracking glasses, were shown 5 sonograms of US-guided regional anesthesia, and were asked a series of anatomy-based questions related to each image while their eye movements were recorded. The answer to each question was a location on the sonogram, defined as the area of interest (AOI). The primary outcome was the total gaze time in the AOI (seconds). Secondary outcomes were the total gaze time outside the AOI (seconds), total time to answer (seconds), and time to first fixation on the AOI (seconds). Five novices and 5 experts completed the study. Although the gaze time (mean ± SD) in the AOI was not different between groups (7 ± 4 seconds for novices and 7 ± 3 seconds for experts; P = .150), the gaze time outside the AOI was greater for novices (75 ± 18 versus 44 ± 4 seconds for experts; P = .005). The total time to answer and total time to first fixation in the AOI were both shorter for experts. Experts in US-guided regional anesthesia take less time to identify sonoanatomy and spend less unfocused time away from a target compared to novices. Eye tracking is a potentially useful tool to differentiate novices from experts in the domain of US image interpretation. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  10. Location of pulmonary modules prior to video thoracoscopic surgery by CT-guided hook wire placement: Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreiras, J.; Salmeron, I.; Bustos Garcia de Castro, A.; Hernando, F.; Gomez, A.; Torres, A.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the efficacy of computerized tomography (CT) or radiologically-guided percutaneous biopsy and that offluoroscopically-guided trans bronchial biopsy in characterizing pulmonary nodules, it is not always possible to determine the etiology using these techniques, making it necessary to resort to thoracotomy. Recent developments in endoscopicsurgery equipment and the availability of advance video imaging technology have extended the indications for both diagnostic and therapeutic thoracoscopy. Thus, a number of procedures that previously could only be performed bymeans of thoracotomy, such as resection of peripheral pulmonary nodules, can nowbe carried out by means of video thoracoscopic (VT) surgery. Palpation orvisual location of pulmonary nodules by thoracoscopy is essential but is not always possible when the nodules measure less than 20 mm or when their location is not subpleural. In such cases, a procedure for their prior location is useful. In eight patients with pulmonary nodules who were to undergo subsequent VT surgery, the attempt was made to locate the nodules by CT-guided placementof a hook wire, similar to that employed in breast, and methylene blue injection. The hook wire was correctly introduced without significant complications in all eight cases. The eight nodules were successfully resected during the thoracoscopic procedure, in which the hook wire and methylene blue staining were of great assistance. In certain cases, the location of pulmonary nodules by means of CT-guidehook wire placement and methylene blue injection allows the video thoracoscopic resection of lesions of difficult access. (Author)

  11. Joint deformable liver registration and bias field correction for MR-guided HDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Marko; König, Tim; Tönnies, Klaus D; Walke, Mathias; Ricke, Jens; Wybranski, Christian

    2017-12-01

    In interstitial high-dose rate brachytherapy, liver cancer is treated by internal radiation, requiring percutaneous placement of applicators within or close to the tumor. To maximize utility, the optimal applicator configuration is pre-planned on magnetic resonance images. The pre-planned configuration is then implemented via a magnetic resonance-guided intervention. Mapping the pre-planning information onto interventional data would reduce the radiologist's cognitive load during the intervention and could possibly minimize discrepancies between optimally pre-planned and actually placed applicators. We propose a fast and robust two-step registration framework suitable for interventional settings: first, we utilize a multi-resolution rigid registration to correct for differences in patient positioning (rotation and translation). Second, we employ a novel iterative approach alternating between bias field correction and Markov random field deformable registration in a multi-resolution framework to compensate for non-rigid movements of the liver, the tumors and the organs at risk. In contrast to existing pre-correction methods, our multi-resolution scheme can recover bias field artifacts of different extents at marginal computational costs. We compared our approach to deformable registration via B-splines, demons and the SyN method on 22 registration tasks from eleven patients. Results showed that our approach is more accurate than the contenders for liver as well as for tumor tissues. We yield average liver volume overlaps of 94.0 ± 2.7% and average surface-to-surface distances of 2.02 ± 0.87 mm and 3.55 ± 2.19 mm for liver and tumor tissue, respectively. The reported distances are close to (or even below) the slice spacing (2.5 - 3.0 mm) of our data. Our approach is also the fastest, taking 35.8 ± 12.8 s per task. The presented approach is sufficiently accurate to map information available from brachytherapy pre-planning onto interventional data. It

  12. CT-guided injection of botulinic toxin for percutaneous therapy of piriformis muscle syndrome with preliminary MRI results about denervative process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanucci, E.; Masala, S.; Sodani, G.; Varrucciu, V.; Romagnoli, A.; Squillaci, E.; Simonetti, G. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Rome (Italy)

    2001-12-01

    Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS) is a cause of sciatica, leg or buttock pain and disability. The pain is usually increased by muscular contraction, palpation or prolonged sitting. The aim of our paper was to evaluate the feasibility of CT-guided percutaneous botulinic toxin (BTX) injection for the purpose of PMS treatment. Thirty patients suffering from PMS, suspected with clinical and electrophysiological criteria, after imaging examinations excluding other causes of sciatic pain, resulted positive at the lidocaine test and were treated by intramuscular injection of BTX type A under CT guidance. The follow-up (12 months) was performed with clinical examination in all cases and with MR 3 months after the procedure in 9 patients to evaluate the denervative process entity of the treated muscle. In 26 cases relief of symptoms was obtained after 5-7 days. In 4 patients an insufficient relief of pain justified a second percutaneous treatment which was clinically successful. No complications or side effects were recorded after BTX injection. The MR examination showed a signal intensity change of the treated muscle in 7 patients due to the denervative process of PM, whereas in the remaining 2 cases only an atrophy of the treated muscle was detected. Larger series are necessary to confirm these MRI preliminary results. The CT-guided BTX injection in the PMS is an emergent and feasible technique that obtains an excellent local therapeutic effect without risk of imprecise inoculation. (orig.)

  13. Viking satellite program - preliminary results from the APL Magnetic Field Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potemra, T.A.; Zanetti, L.J.; Erlandson, R.E.; Gustafsson, G.; Acuna, M.H.; NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD)

    1986-01-01

    Sweden's Viking satellite, launched in February 1986, has been conducting plasma process observations in the earth magnetosphere and auroral regions; the U.S.-supplied APL Magnetic Field Experiment aboard Viking is used to determine field-aligned Birkeland current characteristics in previously unsampled regions of near-earth space. The Magnetic Field Experiment has an equivalent spatial resolution of 12 m in the auroral ionosphere when making measurements near apogee. The purposes of Viking's other instruments and their relationship to the Magnetic Field Experiment are discussed

  14. Field estimation of soil water content. A practical guide to methods, instrumentation and sensor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    During a period of five years, an international group of soil water instrumentation experts were contracted by the International Atomic Energy Agency to carry out a range of comparative assessments of soil water sensing methods under laboratory and field conditions. The detailed results of those studies are published elsewhere. Most of the devices examined worked well some of the time, but most also performed poorly in some circumstances. The group was also aware that the choice of a water measurement technology is often made for economic, convenience and other reasons, and that there was a need to be able to obtain the best results from any device used. The choice of a technology is sometimes not made by the ultimate user, or even if it is, the main constraint may be financial rather than technical. Thus, this guide is presented in a way that allows the user to obtain the best performance from any instrument, while also providing guidance as to which instruments perform best under given circumstances. That said, this expert group of the IAEA reached several important conclusions: (1) the field calibrated neutron moisture meter (NMM) remains the most accurate and precise method for soil profile water content determination in the field, and is the only indirect method capable of providing accurate soil water balance data for studies of crop water use, water use efficiency, irrigation efficiency and irrigation water use efficiency, with a minimum number of access tubes; (2) those electromagnetic sensors known as capacitance sensors exhibit much more variability in the field than either the NMM or direct soil water measurements, and they are not recommended for soil water balance studies for this reason (impractically large numbers of access tubes and sensors are required) and because they are rendered inaccurate by changes in soil bulk electrical conductivity (including temperature effects) that often occur in irrigated soils, particularly those containing

  15. ZTI: Preliminary characterization of an ignition class reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Werley, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary cost-optimized conceptual design of an intermediate-step, ignition-class RFP device (ZTI) for the study of alpha-particle physics in a DT plasma is reported. The ZTI design reflects potentially significant cost savings relative to similar ignition-class tokamaks for device parameters that reside on the path to a viable commercial RFP reactor. Reductions in both device costs and number of steps to commercialization portend a significantly reduced development cost for fusion. The methodology and result and coupling realistic physics, engineering, and cost models through a multi-dimensional optimizer are reported for ZTI, which is a device that would follow the 2--4 MA ZTH on a approx-gt 1996--98 timescale. 15 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Development of a device for real-time light-guided vocal fold injection: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Wonjae; Ro, Jung Hoon; Wang, Soo-Geun; Jang, Jeon Yeob; Cho, Jae Keun; Kim, Geun-Hyo; Lee, Yeon Woo

    2016-04-01

    Vocal fold injection is a minimally invasive technique for various vocal fold pathologies. The shortcomings of the cricothyroid (CT) membrane approach are mainly related to invisibility of the injection needle. If localization of the needle tip can be improved during vocal fold injection with the CT approach, the current problems of the technique can be overcome. We have conceptualized real-time light-guided vocal fold injection that enables simultaneous injection under precise localization. In this study, we developed a device for real-time light-guided vocal fold injection and applied it in excised canine larynx. Animal model. A single optic fiber was inserted in an unmodified 25-gauge needle. A designated connector for the device was attached to the needle, the optic fiber, and the syringe. A laser diode module was used as the light source. An ex vivo canine larynx model was used to validate the device. The location of the needle tip was accurately indicated, and the depth from the mucosa could be estimated according to the brightness and size of the red light. The needle was inserted and could be localized in the canine vocal fold by the light of the device. Precise injection at the intended location was easily performed with no manipulation of the device or the needle. Real-time light-guided vocal fold injection might be a feasible and promising technique for treatment of vocal fold pathology. It is expected that this technique can improve the precision of vocal fold injection and expand its indication in laryngology. NA. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. 1.5 T conventional MR-guided iodine-125 interstitial implants for hepatocellular carcinoma: Feasibility and preliminary clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Zhengyu; Lin Jun; Lin Cong; Li Yinguan; Chen Shaoming; Hu Jianping; Hu Rui; Chen Jin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and therapeutic efficacy of 1.5 T conventional MR-guided percutaneous interstitial implantation of I-125 radioactive seeds in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and methods: The institutional ethics committee approved this study. After imformed consent was obtained, twenty-three patients suffering from a total of 65 HCC lesions were treated with I-125 seed permanent interstitial implantation under the guidance of a 1.5 T conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. The FSE T2WI, T1 FSPGR, FIESTA 2D, 3D Dyn T1WI sequences were used to guide an 18G MR-compatible needle inserted into the lesions to introduce the I-125 seeds. The response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) were used to evaluate the curative effect. Results: The needle and I-125 seed were seen clearly on MRI images. The final dose delivered to total decay was 173.46 ± 32.44 Gy (range, 110–270 Gy) as calculated by postoperative TPS. The complete response (CR) was seen in 22 lesions (33.8%), partial response (PR) in 24 lesions (36.9%), stable disease (SD) in 9 lesions (13.8%), and progressive disease (PD) in 10 lesions (15.4%). The post-operative alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) was decreased (t = 3.117, P = 0.005 < 0.05). Two patients were observed a small area of subcapsular bleeding that did not lead to any symptoms or clinical sequelae. Conclusion: MR-guided I-125 implantation for HCC is technically feasible and effective.

  18. Preliminary experience with interactive guided brain biopsies using a vertically opened 0.5-T MR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.P.; Dietrich, J.; Lieberenz, S.; Schmidt, F.; Sorge, O.; Trantakis, C.; Seifert, V.; Kellermann, S.; Schober, R.; Franke, P.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of brain biopsies performed within a vertically opened MR system. We worked with the interventional 0.5-T MR ''SIGNA SP'' (General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wis.) with an integrated tracking device ''Flashpoint Position Encoder'' (Image Guided Technologies, USA). As a holding device for this instrument we constructed a special frame. The whole system allows an exact adjustment of an optimum biopsy direction and guidance of the biopsy in a non-stereotactic, interactive mode in near real-time. As biopsy tools we used MR-compatible aspiration and specially made side-cut needles (Daum, Germany; E-Z-EM, USA). We performed a prospective diagnostic brain biopsy study in 18 patients. Guidance of the needle was carried out using gradient-echo single-slice technique. The sample was taken after controlling the exact position of the needle tip on spin-echo images. In 12 cases an exact neuropathological diagnosis was possible. In 6 cases of negative biopsy (4 aspiration biopsies) the samples were not representative. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of interactive MR-guided minimally invasive brain biopsies in an open MR system. The best results were achieved using cut needles for biopsies of contrast-enhancing lesions visible on T1-weighted gradient-echo guidance sequence. (orig.)

  19. Preliminary Finding from a New Device for Monitoring Performance and Environmental Factors in the Field

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lieberman, Harris

    2000-01-01

    .... This paper will introduce a new device, the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine vigilance monitor, which was developed for assessment of human performance in an automated, continuous manner in the field...

  20. NOTE: Development and preliminary evaluation of a prototype audiovisual biofeedback device incorporating a patient-specific guiding waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Raghu B.; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; George, Rohini; Keall, Paul J.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of a novel audio-visual biofeedback respiratory training tool to reduce respiratory irregularity. The audiovisual biofeedback system acquires sample respiratory waveforms of a particular patient and computes a patient-specific waveform to guide the patient's subsequent breathing. Two visual feedback models with different displays and cognitive loads were investigated: a bar model and a wave model. The audio instructions were ascending/descending musical tones played at inhale and exhale respectively to assist in maintaining the breathing period. Free-breathing, bar model and wave model training was performed on ten volunteers for 5 min for three repeat sessions. A total of 90 respiratory waveforms were acquired. It was found that the bar model was superior to free breathing with overall rms displacement variations of 0.10 and 0.16 cm, respectively, and rms period variations of 0.77 and 0.33 s, respectively. The wave model was superior to the bar model and free breathing for all volunteers, with an overall rms displacement of 0.08 cm and rms periods of 0.2 s. The reduction in the displacement and period variations for the bar model compared with free breathing was statistically significant (p = 0.005 and 0.002, respectively); the wave model was significantly better than the bar model (p = 0.006 and 0.005, respectively). Audiovisual biofeedback with a patient-specific guiding waveform significantly reduces variations in breathing. The wave model approach reduces cycle-to-cycle variations in displacement by greater than 50% and variations in period by over 70% compared with free breathing. The planned application of this device is anatomic and functional imaging procedures and radiation therapy delivery.

  1. Development and preliminary evaluation of a prototype audiovisual biofeedback device incorporating a patient-specific guiding waveform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat, Raghu B; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; Keall, Paul J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5847 (United States); George, Rohini [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)], E-mail: Paul.Keall@stanford.edu

    2008-06-07

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of a novel audio-visual biofeedback respiratory training tool to reduce respiratory irregularity. The audiovisual biofeedback system acquires sample respiratory waveforms of a particular patient and computes a patient-specific waveform to guide the patient's subsequent breathing. Two visual feedback models with different displays and cognitive loads were investigated: a bar model and a wave model. The audio instructions were ascending/descending musical tones played at inhale and exhale respectively to assist in maintaining the breathing period. Free-breathing, bar model and wave model training was performed on ten volunteers for 5 min for three repeat sessions. A total of 90 respiratory waveforms were acquired. It was found that the bar model was superior to free breathing with overall rms displacement variations of 0.10 and 0.16 cm, respectively, and rms period variations of 0.77 and 0.33 s, respectively. The wave model was superior to the bar model and free breathing for all volunteers, with an overall rms displacement of 0.08 cm and rms periods of 0.2 s. The reduction in the displacement and period variations for the bar model compared with free breathing was statistically significant (p = 0.005 and 0.002, respectively); the wave model was significantly better than the bar model (p = 0.006 and 0.005, respectively). Audiovisual biofeedback with a patient-specific guiding waveform significantly reduces variations in breathing. The wave model approach reduces cycle-to-cycle variations in displacement by greater than 50% and variations in period by over 70% compared with free breathing. The planned application of this device is anatomic and functional imaging procedures and radiation therapy delivery. (note)

  2. Development and preliminary evaluation of a prototype audiovisual biofeedback device incorporating a patient-specific guiding waveform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat, Raghu B; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; Keall, Paul J; George, Rohini

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of a novel audio-visual biofeedback respiratory training tool to reduce respiratory irregularity. The audiovisual biofeedback system acquires sample respiratory waveforms of a particular patient and computes a patient-specific waveform to guide the patient's subsequent breathing. Two visual feedback models with different displays and cognitive loads were investigated: a bar model and a wave model. The audio instructions were ascending/descending musical tones played at inhale and exhale respectively to assist in maintaining the breathing period. Free-breathing, bar model and wave model training was performed on ten volunteers for 5 min for three repeat sessions. A total of 90 respiratory waveforms were acquired. It was found that the bar model was superior to free breathing with overall rms displacement variations of 0.10 and 0.16 cm, respectively, and rms period variations of 0.77 and 0.33 s, respectively. The wave model was superior to the bar model and free breathing for all volunteers, with an overall rms displacement of 0.08 cm and rms periods of 0.2 s. The reduction in the displacement and period variations for the bar model compared with free breathing was statistically significant (p = 0.005 and 0.002, respectively); the wave model was significantly better than the bar model (p = 0.006 and 0.005, respectively). Audiovisual biofeedback with a patient-specific guiding waveform significantly reduces variations in breathing. The wave model approach reduces cycle-to-cycle variations in displacement by greater than 50% and variations in period by over 70% compared with free breathing. The planned application of this device is anatomic and functional imaging procedures and radiation therapy delivery. (note)

  3. Preliminary Information on the Vertebrate Fauna (Animalia: Vertebrata of the NATURA2000 Site “Rice Fields Tsalapitsa” (Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivayla L. Klimentova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out by tree visits in different areas of the Natura 2000 site “Rice Fields Tsalapitsa” BG 0002086 (West of Plovdiv city, near village of Tsalapitsa. Our preliminary research showed that in the area vertebrates with high conservation status occurred included in the Bulgarian Bidiversity Act, Appendix II and III, Appendix II of the Bern convention, Natura 2000 species list, the Bonn convention, Appendix II, the Convention of the International Trade of Endangered Species, and the list of the International Union for Conservation of the Nature. This information will help in future preparation of the management plan of the Natura 2000 site and showed the need of studies focused on such areas which will help undertaking adequate measures for their proper way of conservation.

  4. Design and preliminary test results of the 40 MW power supply at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boenig, H.J.; Bogdan, F.; Morris, G.C.; Ferner, J.A.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.; Rumrill, R.H.; Rumrill, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    Four highly stabilized, steady-state, 10 MW power supplies have been installed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, FL. Each supply consists of a 12.5 kV vacuum circuit breaker, two three-winding, step-down transformers, a 24-pulse rectifier with interphase reactors and freewheeling diodes, and a passive and an active filter. Two different transformer tap settings allow dc supply output voltages of 400 and 500 V. The rated current of a supply is 17 kA and each supply has a one hour overload capability of 20 kA. The power supply output bus system, including a reversing switch at the input and 2 x 16 disconnect switches at the output, connects each supply to 16 different magnet cells. The design of the power supply is described and preliminary test results with a supply feeding a 10 MW resistive load are presented

  5. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Department of Energy (DOE) activities at Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Ventura County, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratories Site (DOE/SSFL), conducted May 16 through 26, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by an private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with DOE activities at SSFL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at SSFL, and interviews with site personnel. 90 refs., 17 figs., 28 tabs.

  6. Preliminary study of an integral harmonic analysis magnetic field measurement system for long SSC magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.I.

    1991-04-01

    We described the research and development required to design and build a prototype system capable of making integrated magnetic multipole measurements of warm and cryogenic 50 mm bore SSC dipole and quadrupole magnets utilizing a warm probe in a warm finger. Our experience and some preliminary studies indicate that it is highly unlikely that a 16 meter long probe can be fabricated that will have a twist below several milliradians at any temperature. Consequently we describe a segmented 16 meter long probe for which we intend to calibrate the phase of each segment to within 0.1 milliradians. The data for all segments will be acquired simultaneously, and integrated data will be generated from the vector sums of the individual segments. The calibration techniques and instrumentation required to implement this system are described. The duration of an integral measurement at one current is less than ten seconds, which is three orders of magnitude shorter than that required by the mole technique presently being used. The system is based on an extrapolation of the techniques used at LBL to measure cryogenic 1 meter models of SSC magnets with a cryogenic probe. 3 refs., 3 figs

  7. MR-guided data framing for PET motion correction in simultaneous MR–PET: A preliminary evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullisch, M.G., E-mail: m.ullisch@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH (Germany); Scheins, J.; Weirich, C.; Rota Kops, E.; Celik, A.; Tellmann, L.; Stöcker, T.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N.J. [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH (Germany)

    2013-02-21

    Head motion can significantly degrade image quality of static and dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of the human brain. One method to regain acceptable image quality in the presence of motion is to include the correction for motion in the reconstruction process. When applying motion correction, the PET data can be segmented into discrete parts of similar head position, referred to as frames. This framing of the data can reduce the computational overhead necessary for motion correction during the reconstruction process by reducing the number of discrete head positions which have to be accounted for. Here a framing algorithm is presented which minimises residual motion in the framed data, while taking full advantage of the additional information provided by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in a simultaneous MR–PET acquisition. In the work presented here information on motion is derived from EPI sequences acquired simultaneously with the PET data. A comparison to images reconstructed with regular framing show a more clearly delineated cortex due to increased contrast between grey matter and white matter. This improvement in image quality is achieved as well as a reduction in the number of frames, thereby reducing the reconstruction time. Preliminary data indicates an efficient reduction of residual intra-frame motion compared to regular framing.

  8. Preliminary results on soil-emitted gamma radiation and its relation with the local atmospheric electric field at Amieira (Portugal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, F; Barbosa, S M; Silva, H G; Bárias, S

    2015-01-01

    The atmospheric electric field near the Earth's surface is dominated by atmospheric pollutants and natural radioactivity, with the latter directly linked to radon ( 222 Rn) gas. For a better comprehension on the temporal variability of both the atmospheric electric field and the radon concentration and its relation with local atmospheric variables, simultaneous measurements of soil-emitted gamma radiation and potential gradient (defined from the vertical component of the atmospheric electric field) were taken every minute, along with local meteorological parameters (e.g., temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity and daily solar radiation). The study region is Amieira, part of the Alqueva lake in Alentejo Portugal, where an interdisciplinary meteorological campaign, ALEX2014, took place from June to August 2014. Soil gamma radiation is more sensitive to small concentrations of radon as compared with alpha particles measurements, for that reason it is more suited for sites with low radon levels, as expected in this case. Preliminary results are presented here: statistical and spectral analysis show that i) the potential gradient has a stronger daily cycle as compared with the gamma radiation, ii) most of the energy of the gamma signal is concentrated in the low frequencies (close to 0), contrary to the potential gradient that has most of the energy in frequency 1 (daily cycle) and iii) a short-term relation between gamma radiation and the potential gradient has not been found. Future work and plans are also discussed. (paper)

  9. Efficiency of preliminary discharge of stratum water in Tuymazinskoe oil field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almukhametova, E. M.; Akimov, A. V.; Kalinina, S. V.; Fatkullin, I. F.; Gizetdinov, I. A.

    2017-10-01

    The high water content of oil is a common occurrence for many Russian fields at the late stage of development. Due to the elimination of associated water in oil, the overload of field pipelines often takes place. Products are often collected by a one-pipe system, which means that the formation water is discharged using special plants PWDS. Research workers have made it clear that the complexity of production “BashNIPIneft” and OGPD “Tuymazaneft” on Tuimazy field was due to the fact that the collection of production, in most cases, uses a centralized system, which loses its advantages when there is a large content of water in the emulsions. Research has indicated that the reagents, used in the field, proved to be ineffective, as the oil of Devonian formations is heavily saturated with paraffins. But, ultimately, the most effective agents for the destruction of emulsions have been nonetheless identified. This paper describes the implementation of the system of track discharge of formation water, which is currently in use for many oil companies not only in Russia but also worldwide.

  10. Site study plan for cultural resources, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Cultural Resources Site Study Plan describes a field program to identify and evaluate the archaeological, historical, and Native American Indian resources of the site on local and regional perspectives; monitor and manage discovered cultural resources; and establish a worker education program. The archaeological field program consists of three pedestrian surveys: Survey 1 includes two EDBH seismic survey lines and the area within the exploratory shaft facility (ESF); Survey 2 includes the remainder of the site plus a 1/4 to 3/4-mi border area; and Survey 3 includes an assortment of offsite areas. The historical studies will identify and evaluate known and discovered historical sites and structures and the Native American Indian will identify and evaluate cultural and religious concerns expressed by Indian tribal groups. Prehistoric and historic sites will be evaluated to determine if they meet eligibility criteria for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. This site study plan describes the need for each study; its design and design rationale; analysis, management, and use of data; schedule of field activities; organization of field personnel and sample management; and quality assurance requirements. The cultural resource studies will provide data for satisfying the Programmatic Agreement, engineering design needs, and SRP requirements for permits and approvals, and for minimizing effects to any cultural properties discovered during site characterization. 75 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Enhancement of the guide field during the current sheet formation in the three-dimensional magnetic configuration with an X line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, Anna; Bugrov, Sergey; Markov, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Results are presented from studies of the formation of current sheets during exciting a current aligned with the X line of the 3D magnetic configuration, in the CS-3D device. Enhancement of the guide field (parallel to the X line) was directly observed for the first time, on the basis of magnetic measurements. After the current sheet formation, the guide field inside the sheet exceeds its initial value, as well as the field outside. It is convincingly demonstrated that an enhancement of the guide field is due to its transportation by plasma flows on the early stage of the sheet formation. The in-plane plasma currents, which produce the excess guide field, are comparable to the total current along the X line that initiates the sheet itself.

  12. Theoretical predictions for spatially-focused heating of magnetic nanoparticles guided by magnetic particle imaging field gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhavalikar, Rohan [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1030 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1030 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, 1275 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) transfer some of the field's energy to their surroundings in the form of heat, a property that has attracted significant attention for use in cancer treatment through hyperthermia and in developing magnetic drug carriers that can be actuated to release their cargo externally using magnetic fields. To date, most work in this field has focused on the use of AMFs that actuate heat release by nanoparticles over large regions, without the ability to select specific nanoparticle-loaded regions for heating while leaving other nanoparticle-loaded regions unaffected. In parallel, magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has emerged as a promising approach to image the distribution of magnetic nanoparticle tracers in vivo, with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The underlying principle in MPI is the application of a selection magnetic field gradient, which defines a small region of low bias field, superimposed with an AMF (of lower frequency and amplitude than those normally used to actuate heating by the nanoparticles) to obtain a signal which is proportional to the concentration of particles in the region of low bias field. Here we extend previous models for estimating the energy dissipation rates of magnetic nanoparticles in uniform AMFs to provide theoretical predictions of how the selection magnetic field gradient used in MPI can be used to selectively actuate heating by magnetic nanoparticles in the low bias field region of the selection magnetic field gradient. Theoretical predictions are given for the spatial decay in energy dissipation rate under magnetic field gradients representative of those that can be achieved with current MPI technology. These results underscore the potential of combining MPI and higher amplitude/frequency actuation AMFs to achieve selective magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) guided by MPI. - Highlights: • SAR predictions based on a field-dependent magnetization relaxation model.

  13. Site Study Plan for Aesthetics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Aesthetic Site Study Plan describes a field program consisting of identification of the visually affected area; determination of scenic quality, visual sensitivity, and visual management classes of the site and vicinity; and analysis of the level of visual contrast that would be created by the project. Field ratings of scenic quality, visual sensitivity, and visual contrast will be supplemented by a public perception survey designed to incorporate the views of the public. This plan describes the need for the study, the study design, data management and use, schedule for proposed activities, and quality assurance program. This study will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, SRPO Requirement Document (SRP-RD). 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Influence of Moderate Training on Gait and Work Capacity of Fibromyalgia Patients: A Preliminary Field Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tiidus, Peter M.; Pierrynowski, Michael; Dawson, Kimberley A.

    2002-01-01

    This field study examined the influence of moderate intensity training on gait patterns and work capacity of individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome (FS). FS is a chronic condition of unknown etiology, characterized by muscle tenderness, pain and stiffness and often accompanied by depression and fatigue which seems to occur primarily in middle aged females. There is no known cure for FS but treatment often includes a prescription of mild exercise. Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness o...

  15. Site Study Plan for Acoustics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Acoustics site study plan describes a field program which characterizes existing sound levels, determines the area's sound propagation characteristics, and monitors the project-related sound emissions. The plan describes for each study: the need for the study, study design, data management and use, schedule, and quality assurance requirements. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Requirements Document. 37 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Site Study Plan for land use, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Land Use Site Study Plan describes a field program consisting of characterization of the site; seismic survey rights-of-way and transportation and utility corridors, the vicinity, the region, future land use, and monitoring land-use change. Aerial photography will be used to characterize the site, seismic rows and transportation and utility corridors, and the vicinity. The resulting land-use maps and overlays will then be verified in the field. Interviews with farm managers and local experts will provide additional information. A Geographic Information System (GIS) and satellite imagery will be used to characterize the region, monitor land-use change, and provide information to assist with the future land use study. The site study plan describes the study design and rationale, the filed data collection procedures and equipment, the data analysis methods and application of results, the data management strategy, the schedule of field activities, the personnel requirements and management of the study, and the study's quality assurance program. The directives and requirements that drive these studies are derived from the Salt Repository Project Requirements Document. 51 refs; 6 figs; 3 tabs

  17. 18F-FDOPA PET/CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Metastases from Neuroendocrine Tumours: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juleiengarnon@gmail.com [Nouvel Hôpital Civil (Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS), Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Ramamurthy, Nitin, E-mail: nitin-ramamurthy@hotmail.com [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: georgia.tsoumakidou@chru-strasbourg.fr [Nouvel Hôpital Civil (Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS), Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Imperiale, Alessio, E-mail: alessio.imperiale@chru-strasbourg.fr; Namer, Izzie Jacques, E-mail: izzie.jacques.namer@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpital de Hautepierre (Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS), Department of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine (France); Bachellier, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.bachellier@chru-strasbourg.fr [Hôpital de Hautepierre (Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS), Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery and Liver Transplantation (France); Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: jean.caudrelier@chru-strasbourg.fr; Rao, Pramod, E-mail: pramodrao@me.com; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.koch@chru-strasbourg.fr; Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Nouvel Hôpital Civil (Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS), Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

    2016-09-15

    AimTo review our preliminary experience with 6-l-18F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-FDOPA) PET/CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumours (NETs).Materials and MethodsThree patients (mean age 51.3 years; range 43–56) with gastro-entero pancreatic NET (GEP-NET) liver metastases underwent 18F-FDOPA PET/CT-guided RFA. Patients were referred with oligometastatic hepatic-confined disease (1–6 metastases; <3 cm) on 18F-FDOPA PET/CT; poor lesion visualisation on US, CT, and MR; and ongoing symptoms. Procedures were performed in an interventional PET/CT scanner under general anaesthesia using a split-dose protocol. Lesion characteristics, procedural duration and technical success (accurate probe placement and post-procedural ablation-zone photopaenia), complications, patient and operator dose, and clinical outcomes were evaluated.ResultsThirteen liver metastases (mean size 11.4 mm, range 8–16) were treated in three patients (two presented with “carcinoid syndrome”). Technical success was 100 % with a mean procedural duration of 173.3 min (range 90–210) and no immediate complications. Mean patient dose was 2844 mGy·cm (range 2104–3686). Operator and radiographer doses were acceptable other than the operator’s right hand in the first case (149 µSv); this normalised in the second case. There was no local tumour or extra-hepatic disease progression at mid-term follow-up (mean 12.6 months; range 6–20); however, two cases progressed with new liver metastases at different sites. There was 100 % clinical success (n = 2) in resolving carcinoid syndrome symptoms.Conclusion18F-FDOPA PET/CT-guided RFA appears technically feasible, safe, and effective in patients with GEP-NETs and low-burden hepatic metastases. Further prospective studies are required to elucidate its precise role in tailored multimodality management of GEP-NET liver metastases.

  18. Field guide to common macrofungi in eastern forests and their ecosystem functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael E. Ostry; Neil A. Anderson; Joesph G. O' Brien

    2011-01-01

    Macrofungi are distinguished from other fungi by their spore-bearing fruit bodies (mushrooms, conks, brackets). These fungi are critical in forests, causing disease, and wood and litter decay, recycling nutrients, and forming symbiotic relationships with trees. This guide is intended to assist in identifying macrofungi and provide a description of the ecological...

  19. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    An instructional aid is provided for home economics teachers who wish to integrate the subject of solar energy into their classroom activities. This teacher's guide was produced along with the student activities book for home economics by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

  20. [Development of a novel absorbable nanofiber chitosan-collagen membrane by electrospinning and the preliminary study on guided bone regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, B; Li, X J; Lin, M; Li, Y Y; Dong, Y

    2018-02-09

    Objective: To evaluate the application effect of nanofiber chitosan-collagen membrane (NCM) on guided bone regeneration (GBR). Methods: The mixture of collagen, chitosan, polyethylene oxide was used to make up the NCM by electrospinning, then the NCM was crosslinked by glutaraldehyde vapor. The physical property of the NCM was measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured on NCM to characterize the biocompatibility. The effectiveness of four groups [contrast group, Bio-gide membrane (BGM), compressed chitosan-collagen menbrane (CCM), NCM/CCM] on bone regeneration were evaluated in critical-sized defects (diameter = 5 mm) in SD rats. Results: When the mixed solution consists of 4.0% collagen, 1.0% chitosan and 3.5% polyethylene oxide, the NCM could be validly fabricated by electrospinning. After cross-linking by glutaraldehyde vapor, the tensile strength and the stability of NCM in damp was enhanced. No cytotoxicity of the NCM was detected on MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. In vivo study showed that the new bone regeneration ratio of NCM/CCM group was [(43.10±1.49)%], and this was similar to that of the group of BGM [(41.36±2.60)%] ( P> 0.05), but higher than that of the CCM group [(33.10±1.41)%] and the contrast group [(7.22±2.46)%] ( P< 0.05). Conclusions: The NCM can promote new bone regeneration effectively in GBR procedure.

  1. INFX GUIDE: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BILATERAL AGREEMENTS FOR COOPERATION IN THE FIELD OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT (INFX: INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION EXCHANGE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, K. M.; Lakey, L. T.; Leigh, I. W.; Jeffs, A. G.

    1985-07-01

    As the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have increased the magnitude and scope of their cooperative activities with other nations in the nuclear fuel cycle and waste management field, a need has developed for ready sources of information concerning foreign waste management programs, DOE technology exchange policies, bilateral fuel cycle and waste management agreements and plans and activities to implement those agreements. The INFX (International InLormation E~change) Guide is one of a series of documents that have been prepared to provide that information. The INFX Guide has been compiled under the charter of PNL's International Support Office (IPSO) to maintain for DOE a center to collect, organize, evaluate and disseminate information on foreign and international radioactive waste management programs. Because the information in this document is constantly subject to change, the document is assembled in loose-leaf form to accommodate frequent updates.

  2. Analysis of the dependence of the guided mode field distribution on the silica bridges in hollow-core Bragg fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selleri, S.; Poli, F.; Foroni, M.

    2007-01-01

    The guiding properties of fabricated air-silica Bragg fibers with different geometric characteristics have been numerically investigated through a modal solver based on the finite element method. The method has been used to compute the dispersion curves, the loss spectra and the field distribution...... of the modes sustained by the Bragg fibers under investigation. In particular, the silica bridge influence on the fundamental mode has been analyzed, by considering structures with different cross sections, that is an ideal Bragg fiber, without the silica nonosupports, a squared air-hole one and, finally......, a rounded air-hole one, which better describes the real fiber transverse section. Results have shown.the presence of anti-crossing points in the effective index curves associated with the transition of the guided mode to a surface mode. Moreover, it has been verified that these surface modes are responsible...

  3. Preliminary thoughts on the relevance of the research field of cognition for Practical Theology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdi P. Kruger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research from the vantage point of Practical Theology, the author focusses on the importance and the possible value of the concept of cognition for further research. The philosophical roots of the concepts of knowledge and understanding are highlighted in a qualitative manner by means of a short selection from the insights of philosophers from the era of the Greek Philosophy to the nineteenth century. The insights of Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Descartes and Kant are utilised. The purpose was to indicate the importance of the concepts of knowing and cognition from an early stage. Research from the field of cognitive science also received attention in this research. The purpose of this discussion is to indicate that cognition is not a mere intellectual activity. Cognition is important in the processes of perspective-making and moral choices. Cognitive distortions could possibly endanger people�s ability to have the right cognition about people, events and life itself. The concept of phronesis, as the concept that comes the nearest to the essence of cognition, is also investigated from the vantage point of Philippians 2:5 and Romans 12:3. Wisdom thinking is really important in research on the acts of people from a practical theological vantage point. Cognition must be regarded as people�s attempt to make sense out what they already know and also out of what they are observing. In the final part of the article, fields for possible further investigation are highlighted in order to make the statement that practical theologians can consider the fact to reclaim the field of investigation on cognition in further research. The importance of cognition for liturgy, homiletics, pastoral care and youth ministry is indicated.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: This article is undertaken from a practical theological vantage point in order to highlight the importance of the concept of cognition for further research. In

  4. Site study plan for ecology, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Ecology Site Study Plan describes a field program consisting of studies which include surveys for endangered, threatened, and candidate species; vegetation characterization, including mapping and cover typing, plant succession, wetlands description, and preexisting stresses; and wildlife community characterization, including availability and quality of habitats and descriptions of mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, and invertebrate populations. The plan for each study describes the need for the study, study design, data management and use, schedule and personnel requirements, and quality assurance. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Project Requirements Document (SRP-RD). 83 refs., 3 tabs

  5. 3.0-T high-field magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis: preliminary experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morakkabati-Spitz, N.; Gieseke, J.; Kuhl, C.; Lutterbey, G.; Falkenhausen, M. von; Traeber, F.; Zivanovic, O.; Schild, H.H.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if 3.0 T allows for clinically useful pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, i.e. if familiar image quality and tissue contrast can be achieved at 3.0 T as compared with at 1.5 T. Adapting a 1.5-T protocol to the 3.0-T environment is subject to a variety of factors. In order to reduce the number of potential variables, we chose two cornerstones: the 3.0-T sequence should have similar spatial resolution and acquisition time; furthermore, the contrast parameters repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE) were kept identical. Based on this modified 3.0-T T2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequence (TR/TE 2,705/80 ms; 0.7 x 1.04 x 4 mm measured voxel size; field of view 360 mm; 4.03-min scan time) we performed an intraindividual study on 19 patients with the 1.5-T sequence as the standard of reference. Two radiologists analyzed the examinations in consensus with regard to tissue contrast (visualization of zonal anatomy of the uterus and/or delineation of pathologic findings) rated on a three-point scale (3 is 3.0 T better; 2 is 3.0 T equal; 1 is 3.0 T worse than 1.5 T). In addition, the signal difference between muscle and bone marrow was measured as a marker for tissue contrast. The analysis of the image quality comprised the level of the artifacts (rated on a five-point scale: 1 is no artifacts; 5 is nondiagnostic study), the visual signal-to-noise ratio (rated on a three-point scale) and detail delineation. Only minor artifacts were observed at both 1.5 and 3.0 T; the difference was not statistically significant. The visual signal-to-noise ratio and the delineation of image details were rated equal for 1.5 and 3.0 T. With regard to image contrast, both qualitative analysis as well as quantitative analysis revealed comparable image contrast for the 1.5- and 3.0-T protocols. Pathological findings were seen equally well with both field strengths. Clinically diagnostic pelvic studies of high image quality can be obtained using a 3.0-T scanner

  6. Preliminary measurements of the edge magnetic field pitch from 2-D Doppler backscattering in MAST and NSTX-U (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, R. G. L.; Brunner, K. J.; Ellis, R.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system is a novel diagnostic consisting of an array of 8 independently phased antennas. At any one time, SAMI operates at one of the 16 frequencies in the range 10-34.5 GHz. The imaging beam is steered in software post-shot to create a picture of the entire emission surface. In SAMI's active probing mode of operation, the plasma edge is illuminated with a monochromatic source and SAMI reconstructs an image of the Doppler back-scattered (DBS) signal. By assuming that density fluctuations are extended along magnetic field lines, and knowing that the strongest back-scattered signals are directed perpendicular to the density fluctuations, SAMI's 2-D DBS imaging capability can be used to measure the pitch of the edge magnetic field. In this paper, we present preliminary pitch angle measurements obtained by SAMI on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) at Culham Centre for Fusion Energy and on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The results demonstrate encouraging agreement between SAMI and other independent measurements.

  7. Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS) real-time controller preliminary architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerley, Dan; Smith, Malcolm; Dunn, Jennifer; Herriot, Glen; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Boyer, Corinne; Ellerbroek, Brent; Gilles, Luc; Wang, Lianqi

    2016-08-01

    The Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS) is the first light Adaptive Optics (AO) system for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). A critical component of NFIRAOS is the Real-Time Controller (RTC) subsystem which provides real-time wavefront correction by processing wavefront information to compute Deformable Mirror (DM) and Tip/Tilt Stage (TTS) commands. The National Research Council of Canada - Herzberg (NRC-H), in conjunction with TMT, has developed a preliminary design for the NFIRAOS RTC. The preliminary architecture for the RTC is comprised of several Linux-based servers. These servers are assigned various roles including: the High-Order Processing (HOP) servers, the Wavefront Corrector Controller (WCC) server, the Telemetry Engineering Display (TED) server, the Persistent Telemetry Storage (PTS) server, and additional testing and spare servers. There are up to six HOP servers that accept high-order wavefront pixels, and perform parallelized pixel processing and wavefront reconstruction to produce wavefront corrector error vectors. The WCC server performs low-order mode processing, and synchronizes and aggregates the high-order wavefront corrector error vectors from the HOP servers to generate wavefront corrector commands. The Telemetry Engineering Display (TED) server is the RTC interface to TMT and other subsystems. The TED server receives all external commands and dispatches them to the rest of the RTC servers and is responsible for aggregating several offloading and telemetry values that are reported to other subsystems within NFIRAOS and TMT. The TED server also provides the engineering GUIs and real-time displays. The Persistent Telemetry Storage (PTS) server contains fault tolerant data storage that receives and stores telemetry data, including data for Point-Spread Function Reconstruction (PSFR).

  8. Acceleration/heating of plasma on auroral field lines: preliminary results from the Viking satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundin, R.

    1988-01-01

    In this report, a review of the first results obtained from the particle experiment on board the Viking spacecraft will be given. During the first part of the Viking mission, the orbit was suitable for high-altitude measurements (up to ∼ 13500 km) in the dayside oval and the cusp/cleft region. Thus, some emphasis will be put on processes occurring in the dayside auroral region. On the basis of more than 100 Viking traversals of the cusp and cleft it is suggested that these regions can be identified by some regular characteristics in the particle data. The cusp has a continuous presence of solar wind plasma, affected mainly by convection and containing modest plasma energization. Conversely, the cleft is characterized by extensive plasma energization, and strong field aligned current sheets. Temporal injections of solar wind plasma are frequently observed in the cleft. A distinguishing characteristic of the Viking charged particle experiment is the energy and angular resolution. Thus, the fine-structure of narrow particle beams and conical distributions of both electrons and ions can be determined. This enables very detailed studies of the plasma acceleration processes along auroral field lines. Some examples of accelerated plasma populations and their related energy and angular distribution will be presented. The observations are compared with existing theories of auroral plasma heating and acceleration processes

  9. Immunotropic potency of microwave fields: preliminary studies on immunocompetent cells exposed in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankiewicz, W.; Dabrowski, M.P.; Sobiczewska, E.; Kubacki, R.; Szmigielski, S.

    2006-01-01

    Exposure in radiofrequency (RF) and microwave (MW) fields can influence the function of the immune system, but the data available on the immunotropic potency of RF/MW radiation are still full of uncertainties and controversies. In the available literature there exist no reports on complex assessment of function and responsiveness of the immune system. All investigations have been aimed to evaluate selected, fragmentary reaction of the system and/or functional response of immunocompetent cells in RF/MW-exposed subjects. However, at the present state of knowledge it is not possible to conclude about the possible immunotropic potencies of RF/MW radiation. The undisturbed defensive, tolerogenic, and proregenerative activities of the immune system are commonly recognised as one of the most important homeostatic functions of the organism. Thus, basic immunoregulatory activities which can be observed and precisely quantified in microcultures of immune cells separated from the human blood, represent a unique and objective model for the investigation of possible immunotropic effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs). To determine the potential immunomodulatory influences of EMFs, the immunotropic effects of pulse modulated microwave (1300 MHz) were investigated in the cultures of blood mononuclear cells from sixteen healthy donors

  10. 36Cl/Cl ratios in geothermal systems: preliminary measurements from the Coso Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimz, G.J.; Moore, J.N.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    The 36 Cl/Cl isotopic composition of chlorine in geothermal systems can be a useful diagnostic tool in characterizing hydrologic structure, in determining the origins and age of waters within the systems, and in differentiating the sources of chlorine (and other solutes) in the thermal waters. The 36 Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples from the Coso, California geothermal field have been measured for these purposes. The results indicate that most of the chlorine is not derived from the dominant granitoid that host the geothermal system. If the chlorine was originally input into the Coso subsurface through meteoric recharge, that input occurred at least 1-1.25 million years ago. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic sources. In either case, the results indicate that most of the chlorine in the thermal waters has existed within the granitoid host rocks for no more than about 100,00-200,00 years. this residence time for the chlorine is similar to residence times suggested by other researchers for chlorine in deep groundwaters of the Mono Basin north of the Coso field

  11. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field radiation: a preliminary study case in Bangi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roha Tukimin; Wan Nor Liza Mahadi; Mohd Yusof Mohd Ali; Mohd Amirul Nizam Mohd Thari; Mohd Azizi Jali; Ahmad Fadhil Ahmad Sanusi

    2008-08-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields radiation is known to be hazardous if amount received is excessive. The primary sources of ELF EMF are from the electricity supply system such as transmission line, substation, transformers and switch gears. Due to limited space, many substations were built very close to the residential area. A study was carried out in the selected houses located in Bangi, Selangor which located close to the TNB substation. The study was made in two conditions, before the area fully occupied and after the resident moved into the house. The aim of the study is for assessing the strength of ELF EMF that emitted by the substation. This study was also conducted to assess the potential exposure received by personnel living in the house. The surveys were carried out using PMM model EHP50A and EMDEX instruments based on standard measurement procedures and protocol recommended by IEEE. Results obtained were compared against the permissible exposure limits recommended by International Commission of Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP).This paper highlights some of the findings at the study site. Results obtained suggest that ELF EMF radiation varies with location and the magnetic fields strength measured near the source of ELF EMF was found to be higher than the normal environment. (Author)

  12. 36Cl/Cl ratios in geothermal systems: preliminary measurements from the Coso Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimz, G.J.; Moore, J.N.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1997-07-01

    The {sub 36}Cl/Cl isotopic composition of chlorine in geothermal systems can be a useful diagnostic tool in characterizing hydrologic structure, in determining the origins and age of waters within the systems, and in differentiating the sources of chlorine (and other solutes) in the thermal waters. The {sub 36}Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples from the Coso, California geothermal field have been measured for these purposes. The results indicate that most of the chlorine is not derived from the dominant granitoid that host the geothermal system. If the chlorine was originally input into the Coso subsurface through meteoric recharge, that input occurred at least 1-1.25 million years ago. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic sources. In either case, the results indicate that most of the chlorine in the thermal waters has existed within the granitoid host rocks for no more than about 100,00-200,00 years. this residence time for the chlorine is similar to residence times suggested by other researchers for chlorine in deep groundwaters of the Mono Basin north of the Coso field.

  13. The preliminary study of setup errors' impact on dose distribution of image guide radiation therapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Luying; Pan Jianji; Wang Xiaoliang; Bai Penggang; Li Qixin; Fei Zhaodong; Chen Chuanben; Ma Liqin; Tang Tianlan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To measure the set-up errors of patients with head and neck (H and N) cancer during the image guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment and analyze the impact of setup errors on dose distribution; then to further investigate the necessity of adjustment online for H and N cancer during IMRT treatment. Methods: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scanning of thirty patients with H and N cancer were acquired by once weekly with a total of 6 times during IMRT treatment. The CBCT images and the original planning CT images were matched by the bony structure and worked out the translational errors of the x, y, z axis, as well as rotational errors. The dose distributions were recalculated based on the data of each setup error. The dose of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk were calculated in the re-planning, and than compared with the original plan by paired t-test. Results: The mean value of x, y, z axis translational set-up errors were (1.06 ± 0.95)mm, (0.95 ± 0.77)mm and (1.31 ± 1.07)mm, respectively. The rotational error of x, y, z axis were (1.04 ±0.791), (1.06 ±0.89) and (0.81 ±0.61 ), respectively. PTV 95% volume dose (D 95 ) and PTV minimal dose of re-planning for 6 times set-up were lower than original plan (6526.6 cGy : 6630.3 cGy, t =3.98, P =0.000 and 5632.6 cGy : 5792.5 cGy, t =- 2.89, P =0.007). Brain stem received 45 Gydose volume (V 45 ) and 1% brain stem volume dose (D 01 )were higher than original plan (3.54% : 2.75%, t =3.84, P =0.001 and 5129.7 cGy : 4919.3 cGy, t =4.36, P =0.000). Conclusions: The set-up errors led to the dose of PTV D 95 obviously insufficient and significantly increased V 45 , D 01 of the brainstem. So, adjustment online is necessary for H and N cancer during IMRT treatment. (authors)

  14. Site Study Plan for soils, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Soils Site Study Plan describes a field program consisting of a soil characterization survey, impact monitoring of soils, predisturbance soil salinity survey, and a reclamation suitability study. This information will be used to plan for soil stripping, stockpiling, and replacement; reclamation of soils; determining predisturbance chemical and physical characteristics of the soils; including salinity levels; and monitoring for changes in chemical and physical characteristics of the soil. The SSP describes for each study the need for the study, the study design, data management and use, schedule of proposed activities, and the quality assurance program. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Project Requirements Document. 75 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Site Study Plan for salt, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Salt Site Study Plan (SSP) describes a program for characterizing the existing salt environment in the site vicinity. A step-by-step approach is described which proceeds from published data and planned theoretical studies, to planned laboratory studies, and finally to planned field studies, to provide the necessary data to meet program requirements contained in the Salt Repository Project - Requirements Document (SRP-RD). The plan also draws on the results of other SSP's for certain data; for example, soil salinity data are to be provided under the Soils SSP. The salt studies consist of evaluation of control and mitigation measures, salt monitoring studies, emission factors development, air models development and validation, and risk assessment. For each study, its design and design rationale; analysis, management, and use of data; schedule of activities; organization of personnel and sample management; and quality assurance requirements are described. 90 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs

  16. Field assessment of the susceptibility of onion cultivars to thrips attack – preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pobożniak Maria

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments on the susceptibility of onion to thrips infestation were carried out in 2012 and 2013. The investigation used 18 cultivars and 5 breeding lines of Allium cepa, and the species A. fistulosum and A. roylei. In 2012 A. fistulosum was one of the most infested plants, whereas in 2013 infestation was no more than average. The most infested cultivars of A. cepa were ‘Efekt’, ‘Alonso F1’, ‘Alibaba’ and ‘Wama’ and the ‘NOE5’ breeding line. In 2012 the extent of damage ranged from 12 to 55%, in 2013 from 20 to 30%. The ‘NOE2’, ‘NOE3’ and ‘Wama’ cultivars were the most seriously damaged by thrips. Leaf damage to A. fistulosum was minimal. No damage was caused to the wild species A. roylei by feeding onion thrips.

  17. 1978 Insect Pest Management Guide: Field and Forage Crops. Circular 899.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This circular lists suggested uses of insecticides for the control of field crop pests. Suggestions are given for selection, dosage and application of insecticides to control pests in field corn, alfalfa and clover, small grains, soybeans and grain sorghum. (CS)

  18. Experimental study on electrostatic guiding of supersonic D2O molecular beam with two charged wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Yaling; Xia Yong; Chen Haibo; Yin Jianping

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate the guiding of a supersonic heavy-water (D 2 O) molecular beam using a hollow electrostatic field generated by the combination of two parallel charged-wires and two grounded metal-plates, and report some new and preliminary experimental results. In the experiment, we detect the guiding signals by using the method of time-of-flight mass spectrum and study the dependence of the relative transmission of the beam guide on the guiding voltage. Our study shows that the relative transmission of the beam guide is increased linearly with increasing guiding voltage V guid , and the number of the guided D 2 O molecules is at least increased by 89.4% when the guiding voltage is +20.0 kV. Finally, some potential applications of our guiding scheme in the molecule optics are briefly discussed. (authors)

  19. Field Guide to Layered Rocks. Earth Science Curriculum Project Pamphlet Series PS-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Tom

    Presented is the study of sequences of rock layers as the basis for historical geology. Also considered is the influence of rock layers on the appearance of the landscape. Specific relevant laws of geology are presented. Preparation for a field trip is discussed. An example field trip is discussed and field techniques and projects are reviewed.…

  20. Cranial radiotherapy guided by computed tomography with or without fields conformation in pediatric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Diego; Caussa, Lucas; Murina, Patricia; Zunino, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Many malignancies in children can be cured by radiotherapy, acute toxicity and the significant effect of delayed treatment are worrying for the patient, family and society. Therefore, the end of the pediatric radiotherapy is to maintain or improve the cure rate of cancer, diminishing the aftermath of treatment. The goal of this study is to measure differences in doses to the healthy tissue of the central nervous system with two radiotherapy techniques, both guided by computed tomography [es

  1. Generalized theory of a free-electron laser in a helical wiggler and guide magnetic fields using the kinetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, K.D.; Mishra, P.K.

    2002-01-01

    A self-consistent theory of a free-electron laser is developed by the kinetic approach, using the method of characteristics in helical wiggler and guide magnetic fields. The detailed relativistic particle trajectories obtained in wiggler and guide magnetic fields are used in linearized Vlasov-Maxwell equations having variations in perpendicular and parallel momenta to obtain the perturbed distribution function in terms of perturbed electric and magnetic fields deviating from the vector potential approach. The perturbed distribution function thus obtained, having variations in perpendicular and parallel momenta for an arbitrary distribution function, is used to obtain current, conductivity and dielectric tensors. The full dispersion relation (FDR) and Compton dispersion relation (CDR) have been obtained. The dispersion diagram has been obtained and the interaction of the negative longitudinal space charge with the electromagnetic wave has been shown. The temporal growth rates obtained from the full dispersion relation and Compton dispersion relation for the tenuous cold relativistic beam in microwave region have been discussed

  2. Preliminary study about frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Mariana E.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F.; Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide

    2011-01-01

    The estimate on approximate dose in exposed individual can be made through conventional cytogenetic analysis of dicentric, this technique has been used to support physical dosimetry. It is important to estimate the absorbed dose in case of accidents with the aim of developing an appropriate treatment and biological dosimetry can be very useful in case where the dosimetry is unavailable. Exposure to gamma and neutron radiation leads to the same biological effects such as chromosomal alterations and cancer. However, neutrons cause more genetic damage, such as mutation or more structural damage, such as chromosome alterations. The aim of research is to compare frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma beam with those from neutron-gamma mixed field. Two blood samples were obtained from one healthy donor and irradiated at different sources. The first sample was exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources 241 AmBe at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL - CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil) and the second one was exposed to 137 Cs gamma rays at 137 Cs Laboratory (CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil), both exposures resulting in an absorbed dose of 0.66Gy. Mitotic metaphase cells were obtained by lymphocyte culture for chromosomal analysis and slides were stained with Giemsa 5%. These preliminary results showed a similarity in associated dicentrics frequency per cell (0.041 and 0.048) after 137 Cs and 241 AmBe sources irradiations, respectively. However, it was not observed centric rings frequency per cell (0.0 and 0.027). This study will be continue to verify the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by only gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field. (author)

  3. Preliminary study about frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Mariana E.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide [Universidade Federal de Pernanmbuco (CCB/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Biologicas. Dept. de Genetica

    2011-07-01

    The estimate on approximate dose in exposed individual can be made through conventional cytogenetic analysis of dicentric, this technique has been used to support physical dosimetry. It is important to estimate the absorbed dose in case of accidents with the aim of developing an appropriate treatment and biological dosimetry can be very useful in case where the dosimetry is unavailable. Exposure to gamma and neutron radiation leads to the same biological effects such as chromosomal alterations and cancer. However, neutrons cause more genetic damage, such as mutation or more structural damage, such as chromosome alterations. The aim of research is to compare frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by a gamma beam with those from neutron-gamma mixed field. Two blood samples were obtained from one healthy donor and irradiated at different sources. The first sample was exposed to mixed field neutron-gamma sources {sup 241}AmBe at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL - CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil) and the second one was exposed to {sup 137}Cs gamma rays at {sup 137}Cs Laboratory (CRCN/NE - PE - Brazil), both exposures resulting in an absorbed dose of 0.66Gy. Mitotic metaphase cells were obtained by lymphocyte culture for chromosomal analysis and slides were stained with Giemsa 5%. These preliminary results showed a similarity in associated dicentrics frequency per cell (0.041 and 0.048) after {sup 137}Cs and {sup 241}AmBe sources irradiations, respectively. However, it was not observed centric rings frequency per cell (0.0 and 0.027). This study will be continue to verify the frequencies of unstable chromosome alterations induced by only gamma beam and neutron-gamma mixed field. (author)

  4. Preliminary hydrocarbon analysis of crude oils from Umutu/Bomu fields, south west Niger Delta Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Onojake

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Seven different crude oil samples were collected from two oil fields in the Niger Delta Nigeria. The bulk properties of these crude oils which include API gravity, reid vapour pressure; kinematic viscosity, dynamic viscosity, moisture, gum content and cloud point were analysed. Aliphatic biomarkers were used as supporting tool to deduce the geochemical characteristics such as thermal maturity, depositional environments, source of organic matter and extent of biodegradation. Results show that API° gravity ranged from 29.00° to 85.00°, specific gravity 0.65 to 0.88, 3.00 to 9.00, reid vapour pressure 3.00 to 9.00 kPa, kinematic viscosity 0.90 to 10.10 cSt, dynamic viscosity 0.70 to 8.90 cP, moisture content 0.13% to 26.00%, gum content 6.27 to 45.84 mg/L, cloud point 3.00 to 12.00 °C, pour point −7.00 to 4.00 °C and flash point <30.00 °C. Distribution of n-alkanes (Pr/Ph, and isoprenoide/n-alkanes ratios reflects that the oil samples originated mainly from terrestrial organic sources deposited in an oxic paleoenvironment.

  5. [Variable magnetic fields in the treatment of tics disorders - preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Jarosław; Jędrzejewska, Anna; Jagodziński, Leszek; Obuchowicz, Anna; Flak, Maria; Sieroń, Aleksander

    Tics disorders is frequent pathological syndrome, particularly typical for children's age. The symptoms of this disease are differential, and their intensification individualized, which makes difficult unique recognition. Tics disorders concern the most often the muscles of face, head, upper limbs and trunk. The study group consisted of 16 patients (11 boys and 5 girls) with tics complex disorders about unknown etiology particularly relating of face and upper limbs muscles. In the treatment were the interventions with use a magnetotherapy and magnetostimulation applied. The procedures were ones daily by 3 weeks in two series executed. It author's pool was the frequency of occurrence tics disorders as well as the proportional opinion of effectiveness conducted treatment estimated. After 10 weeks in 14 patients was the decrease of occurrence frequency involuntary movements observed, in proportional scale about 75%. The results of subjective opinion of mood showed, that decrease the frequency tics disorders had in all children the direct shift on improvement their mood, and also satisfaction in their parents. The use of variable magnetic fields influenced on decrease the occurrence frequency tics disorders, and also on improvement quality of life the treated patients.

  6. Review of Stat-Spotting: A Field Guide to Identifying Dubious Data by Joel Best

    OpenAIRE

    Joe Swingle

    2009-01-01

    Best, Joel. Stat-Spotting: A Field Guide to Identifying Dubious Data. (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2008) 144 pp. $19.95. ISBN 1-978-0-520-25746-7.Stat-Spotting is a practical, do-it-yourself manual for detecting questionable claims reported in the media. Using examples drawn mostly from mass media sources, Stat-Spotting provides readers with a number of useful tips for identifying potentially problematic statistics. The author’s skillful analyses and explanations presented in cl...

  7. TH-CD-201-12: Preliminary Evaluation of Organic Field Effect Transistors as Radiation Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syme, A [Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Lin, H; Rubio-Sanchez, J; Perepichka, D [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To fabricate organic field effect transistors (OFETs) and evaluate their performance before and after exposure to ionizing radiation. To determine if OFETs have potential to function as radiation dosimeters. Methods: OFETs were fabricated on both Si/SiO{sub 2} wafers and flexible polymer substrates using standard processing techniques. Pentacene was used as the organic semiconductor material and the devices were fabricated in a bottom gate configuration. Devices were irradiated using an orthovoltage treatment unit (120 kVp x-rays). Threshold voltage values were measured with the devices in saturation mode and quantified as a function of cumulative dose. Current-voltage characteristics of the devices were measured using a Keithley 2614 SourceMeter SMU Instrument. The devices were connected to the reader but unpowered during irradiations. Results: Devices fabricated on Si/SiO2 wafers demonstrated excellent linearity (R{sup 2} > 0.997) with threshold voltages that ranged between 15 and 36 V. Devices fabricated on a flexible polymer substrate had substantially smaller threshold voltages (∼ 4 – 8 V) and slightly worse linearity (R{sup 2} > 0.98). The devices demonstrated excellent stability in I–V characteristics over a large number (>2000) cycles. Conclusion: OFETs have demonstrated excellent potential in radiation dosimetry applications. A key advantage of these devices is their composition, which can be substantially more tissue-equivalent at low photon energies relative to many other types of radiation detector. In addition, fabrication of organic electronics can employ techniques that are faster, simpler and cheaper than conventional silicon-based devices. These results support further development of organic electronic devices for radiation detection purposes. Funding Support, Disclosures, and Conflict of Interest: This work was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  8. Influence of moderate training on gait and work capacity of fibromyalgia patients: a preliminary field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiidus, Peter M; Pierrynowski, Michael; Dawson, Kimberley A

    2002-12-01

    This field study examined the influence of moderate intensity training on gait patterns and work capacity of individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome (FS). FS is a chronic condition of unknown etiology, characterized by muscle tenderness, pain and stiffness and often accompanied by depression and fatigue which seems to occur primarily in middle aged females. There is no known cure for FS but treatment often includes a prescription of mild exercise. Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of mild exercise on work capacity and gait patterns in FS patients. Participants were 14 females (age 47.0 ± 7.6 y) who participated in a 10 wk community based aerobic, strength and stretching program designed for FS individuals. Subjects were evaluated pre- and post-program and at a 2 month follow up. Work capacity was estimated by a sub-maximal PWC 170 cycle ergometer test and a Borg perceived exertion scale. Gait was assessed using OptoTrack three dimensional kinematics with 16 channel analogue data acquisition system. Trunk flexibility was also assessed. No significant change in estimated work capacity or flexibility was seen between pre- post- and follow up times. Nevertheless, a significant increase in self selected walking speed (p gait pattern that was sustained in the follow up testing was noted. We had previously also reported a significant improvement in muscle pain and other fibromyalgia symptoms in this population consequent to the training program. It was concluded that mild exercise training that does not influence work capacity or trunk flexibility can nevertheless positively influence gait mechanics and fibromyalgia symptoms in female FS patients.

  9. Engineering, Manufacture and Preliminary Testing of the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rista, P. E. C.; Shull, J.; Sargent, S.

    2015-12-01

    The ITER cryodistribution system provides the supercritical Helium (SHe) forced flow cooling to the magnet system using cold circulators. The cold circulators are located in each of five separate auxiliary cold boxes planned for use in the facility. Barber-Nichols Inc. has been awarded a contract from ITER-India for engineering, manufacture and testing of the Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator. The cold circulator will be extensively tested at Barber-Nichols’ facility prior to delivery for qualification testing at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's (JAEA) test facility at Naka, Japan. The TF Cold Circulator integrates features and technical requirements which Barber-Nichols has utilized when supplying helium cold circulators worldwide over a period of 35 years. Features include a vacuum-jacketed hermetically sealed design with a very low helium leak rate, a heat shield for use with both nitrogen & helium cold sources, a broad operating range with a guaranteed isentropic efficiency over 70%, and impeller design features for high efficiency. The cold circulator will be designed to meet MTBM of 17,500 hours and MTBF of 36,000 hours. Vibration and speed monitoring are integrated into a compact package on the rotating assembly with operation and health monitoring in a multi-drop PROFIBUS communication environment using an electrical cabinet with critical features and full local and network PLC interface and control. For the testing in Japan and eventual installation in Europe, the cold circulator must be certified to the Japanese High Pressure Gas Safety Act (JHPGSA) and CE marked in compliance with the European Pressure Equipment Directive (PED) including Essential Safety Requirements (ESR). The test methodology utilized at Barber-Nichols’ facility and the resulting test data, validating the high efficiency of the TF Cold Circulator across a broad operating range, are important features of this paper.

  10. Engineering, Manufacture and Preliminary Testing of the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C Rista, P E; Shull, J; Sargent, S

    2015-01-01

    The ITER cryodistribution system provides the supercritical Helium (SHe) forced flow cooling to the magnet system using cold circulators. The cold circulators are located in each of five separate auxiliary cold boxes planned for use in the facility. Barber-Nichols Inc. has been awarded a contract from ITER-India for engineering, manufacture and testing of the Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator. The cold circulator will be extensively tested at Barber-Nichols’ facility prior to delivery for qualification testing at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's (JAEA) test facility at Naka, Japan. The TF Cold Circulator integrates features and technical requirements which Barber-Nichols has utilized when supplying helium cold circulators worldwide over a period of 35 years. Features include a vacuum-jacketed hermetically sealed design with a very low helium leak rate, a heat shield for use with both nitrogen and helium cold sources, a broad operating range with a guaranteed isentropic efficiency over 70%, and impeller design features for high efficiency. The cold circulator will be designed to meet MTBM of 17,500 hours and MTBF of 36,000 hours. Vibration and speed monitoring are integrated into a compact package on the rotating assembly with operation and health monitoring in a multi-drop PROFIBUS communication environment using an electrical cabinet with critical features and full local and network PLC interface and control. For the testing in Japan and eventual installation in Europe, the cold circulator must be certified to the Japanese High Pressure Gas Safety Act (JHPGSA) and CE marked in compliance with the European Pressure Equipment Directive (PED) including Essential Safety Requirements (ESR). The test methodology utilized at Barber-Nichols’ facility and the resulting test data, validating the high efficiency of the TF Cold Circulator across a broad operating range, are important features of this paper. (paper)

  11. INFLUENCE OF MODERATE TRAINING ON GAIT AND WORK CAPACITY OF FIBROMYALGIA PATIENTS: A PRELIMINARY FIELD STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pierrynowski

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This field study examined the influence of moderate intensity training on gait patterns and work capacity of individuals with fibromyalgia syndrome (FS. FS is a chronic condition of unknown etiology, characterized by muscle tenderness, pain and stiffness and often accompanied by depression and fatigue which seems to occur primarily in middle aged females. There is no known cure for FS but treatment often includes a prescription of mild exercise. Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of mild exercise on work capacity and gait patterns in FS patients. Participants were 14 females (age 47.0± 7.6 y who participated in a 10 wk community based aerobic, strength and stretching program designed for FS individuals. Subjects were evaluated pre- and post-program and at a 2 month follow up. Work capacity was estimated by a sub-maximal PWC 170 cycle ergometer test and a Borg perceived exertion scale. Gait was assessed using OptoTrack three dimensional kinematics with 16 channel analogue data acquisition system. Trunk flexibility was also assessed. No significant change in estimated work capacity or flexibility was seen between pre- post- and follow up times. Nevertheless, a significant increase in self selected walking speed (p < 0.05 and a trend toward a more normal gait pattern that was sustained in the follow up testing was noted. We had previously also reported a significant improvement in muscle pain and other fibromyalgia symptoms in this population consequent to the training program. It was concluded that mild exercise training that does not influence work capacity or trunk flexibility can nevertheless positively influence gait mechanics and fibromyalgia symptoms in female FS patients

  12. A preliminary study to conceptualize professionalism in the field of veterinary medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytaç Ünsal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION[|]Although the concept of professionalism is widely used in all over the world, there is no clear definition that describes exactly what it is. This is thought to result from different meanings which are attributed to the concept of profession. The number of researches and publications on medical professionalism has increased rapidly in recent years. In this sources some definitions reveal a detailed list of keywords. Compared with medicine, veterinary medicine has still got limited studies on this subject. This research was carried out to determine how veterinarians conceptualize professionalism in the field of veterinary medicine.[¤]METHODS[|]This qualitative study was designed as an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA. The sample was consisted of veterinarians who have carried out their duties at the Veterinary School of Ankara University. The sampling strategy was purposive sampling. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews then content analysis was applied. During this process, internal and external consistencies were checked with an expert's help. As a result of the analysis the meaning units were created and classified. Results were shown in the tables, interpreted and then discussed.[¤]RESULTS[|]In this study it is found that veterinary and human medicines have many common terms for conceptualization of professionalism. Veterinary professionalism were conceptualized with similar approaches by experienced and inexperienced veterinarians. Ethics and moral values were expressed primarily and together in participant's approaches to this concept. The definition of good veterinarians is generally consistent with the definition of veterinary professionalism.[¤]DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION[|]Compared with medicine, veterinary medicine has still got limited studies about professionalizm. This research shows that veterinarians conceptialize professionalism by using some terms and explanations related to some values

  13. GPS water vapour tomography: preliminary results from the ESCOMPTE field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champollion, C.; Masson, F.; Bouin, M.-N.; Walpersdorf, A.; Doerflinger, E.; Bock, O.; Van Baelen, J.

    2005-03-01

    Water vapour plays a major role in atmospheric processes but remains difficult to quantify due to its high variability in time and space and the sparse set of available measurements. The GPS has proved its capacity to measure the integrated water vapour at zenith with the same accuracy as other methods. Recent studies show that it is possible to quantify the integrated water vapour in the line of sight of the GPS satellite. These observations can be used to study the 3D heterogeneity of the troposphere using tomographic techniques. We develop three-dimensional tomographic software to model the three-dimensional distribution of the tropospheric water vapour from GPS data. First, the tomographic software is validated by simulations based on the realistic ESCOMPTE GPS network configuration. Without a priori information, the absolute value of water vapour is less resolved as opposed to relative horizontal variations. During the ESCOMPTE field experiment, a dense network of 17 dual frequency GPS receivers was operated for 2 weeks within a 20×20-km area around Marseille (southern France). The network extends from sea level to the top of the Etoile chain (˜700 m high). Optimal results have been obtained with time windows of 30-min intervals and input data evaluation every 15 min. The optimal grid for the ESCOMTE geometrical configuration has a horizontal step size of 0.05°×0.05° and 500 m vertical step size. Second, we have compared the results of real data inversions with independent observations. Three inversions have been compared to three successive radiosonde launches and shown to be consistent. A good resolution compared to the a priori information is obtained up to heights of 3000 m. A humidity spike at 4000-m altitude remains unresolved. The reason is probably that the signal is spread homogeneously over the whole network and that such a feature is not resolvable by tomographic techniques. The results of our pure GPS inversion show a correlation with

  14. Astrovirus-induced "white chicks" condition - field observation, virus detection and preliminary characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajewicz-Krukowska, Joanna; Pać, Krzysztof; Lisowska, Anna; Pikuła, Anna; Minta, Zenon; Króliczewska, Bożena; Domańska-Blicharz, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Chicken astrovirus (CAstV) was recently indicated as the factor of the "white chicks" condition associated not only with increased embryo/chick mortality but also with weakness and white plumage of hatched chicks. In February 2014, organ samples (livers and kidneys) from dead-in-shell embryos, as well as 1-day-old whitish and normal chicks, were delivered from one hatchery in Poland for disease diagnosis. The samples originated from the same 30-week-old breeder flock in which the only observed abnormal signs were 4-5% decrease in the number of hatched chickens and the presence (about 1%) of weaker chicks with characteristic whitish plumage among normal ones. CAstV was detected in submitted samples and was then isolated in 10-day-old embryonated specific pathogen free (SPF) chicken eggs. We also reproduced an infection model for the "white chicks" condition in SPF layer chickens using the isolated PL/G059/2014 strain as the infectious agent. Results of experimental reproduction of the "white chicks" condition were somewhat more serious than field observation. The administration of the CAstV material into the yolk sac of 8-day-old SPF chicken eggs caused delay and prolongation of hatching, as well as death of embryos/chicks, and also a change of plumage pigmentation. Only two chicks of a total of 10 inoculated SPF eggs survived and were observed for 2 months. A gradual elimination of the CAstV genome was noted in this period. Moreover, a few contact-naive SPF chicks, which had been placed in the same cage, were infected with CAstV. Molecular characterization of detected CAstV was performed by nucleotide sequencing of the full ORF2 region encoding the capsid precursor protein gene. Phylogenetic studies showed that the PL/G059/2014 isolate clustered in the subgroup Aiii of CAstV. In the light of the new classification rules, the Polish PL/G059/2014 CAstV isolate could be assigned to a new species of the Avastrovirus genus.

  15. A joint Russian-American field test at the Chelyabinsk-65 (Mayak) Site: Test description and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberg, H.; Tsang, C.F.; Frangos, W.

    1995-05-01

    In September 1994, a Russian-American team conducted hydrogeological, geochemical, geophysical, and radiometric measurements in the territory of the Mayak Production Association. The primary purpose of these operations was to examine the groundwater plume moving from Lake Karachai toward the river. Activities encompassed isolation of hydrologic intervals in two wells and production of water from these intervals, to compare isolated versus open-well sampling methods; surface and soil-water sampling, accompanying radiometric measurements and subsequent chemical analyses; and electrical resistivity profiling in areas of expected contrasting resistivity. Preliminary results indicate that (1) 60 Co and 137 Cs are present in small concentrations in water of the Mishelyak River, (2) analyses of water samples collected by a downhole sampler and of water produced from packed-off intervals agree within limits of laboratory accuracy, attesting to the efficacy of the sampling methods presently used by the Russian workers; and (3) strong contrasts occur between the electrical resistivities of soil and bedrock. Further collaborative work is strongly recommended, and should include more detailed isolation of intervals in wells by multi-packer installations, to better determine the geochemical and hydrological characteristics of the Karachai-Mishelyak system; deployment of a broader soil-water and soil sampling array; a more detailed examination of the distribution and concentration of radionuclides by high-resolution field gamma spectrometry; and a detailing of the area's electrical resistivity setting, using a mobile electromagnetic measurement system

  16. DOE/NETL's phase II mercury control technology field testing program: preliminary economic analysis of activated carbon injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew P; Hoffmann, Jeffrey W; Smith, Dennis N; Feeley, Thomas J; Murphy, James T

    2007-02-15

    Based on results of field testing conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), this article provides preliminary costs for mercury control via conventional activated carbon injection (ACI), brominated ACI, and conventional ACI coupled with the application of a sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) to coal prior to combustion. The economic analyses are reported on a plant-specific basis in terms of the cost required to achieve low (50%), mid (70%), and high (90%) levels of mercury removal "above and beyond" the baseline mercury removal achieved by existing emission control equipment. In other words, the levels of mercury control are directly attributable to ACI. Mercury control costs via ACI have been amortized on a current dollar basis. Using a 20-year book life, levelized costs for the incremental increase in cost of electricity (COE), expressed in mills per kilowatt-hour (mills/kWh), and the incremental cost of mercury control, expressed in dollars per pound of mercury removed ($/lb Hg removed), have been calculated for each level of ACI mercury control. For this analysis, the increase in COE varied from 0.14 mills/kWh to 3.92 mills/kWh. Meanwhile, the incremental cost of mercury control ranged from $3810/lb Hg removed to $166000/lb Hg removed.

  17. Charge transfer to a dielectric target by guided ionization waves using electric field measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slikboer, E.T.; Garcia-Caurel, E.; Guaitella, O.; Sobota, A.

    2017-01-01

    A kHz-operated atmospheric pressure plasma jet is investigated by measuring charge transferred to a dielectric electro-optic surface (BSO crystal) allowing for the measurement of electric field by exploiting the Pockels effect. The electric field values, distribution of the surface discharge and

  18. Self-fields in free-electron lasers with planar wiggler and ion-channel guiding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farokhi, B; Jafary, F B; Maraghechi, B

    2006-01-01

    A theory of self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a relativistic electron beam passing through a one-dimensional planar wiggler and an ion-channel is presented. The equilibrium orbits and their stability, under the influence of self-electric and self-magnetic fields, are analysed. New unstable orbits, in the first part of the group I orbits, are found. It is shown that for a low energy and high density beam the self-fields can produce very large effects. Stabilities of quasi-steady-state orbits are investigated by analytical and numerical methods and perfect agreement was found. The theory of small signal gain is used to derive a formula for the gain with the self-field effects included. A numerical analysis is conducted to study the self-field effects on the quasi-steady-state orbits and the gain

  19. Improved foilless Ku-band transit-time oscillator for generating gigawatt level microwave with low guiding magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Junpu; He, Juntao, E-mail: hejuntao12@163.com; Zhang, Jiande; Jiang, Tao; Hu, Yi [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2014-09-15

    An improved foilless Ku-band transit-time oscillator with low guiding magnetic field is proposed and investigated in this paper. With a non-uniform buncher and a coaxial TM{sub 02} mode dual-resonant reflector, this improved device can output gigawatt level Ku-band microwave with relatively compact radial dimensions. Besides the above virtue, this novel reflector also has the merits of high TEM reflectance, being more suitable for pre-modulating the electron beam and enhancing the conversion efficiency. Moreover, in order to further increase the conversion efficiency and lower the power saturation time, a depth-tunable coaxial collector and a resonant cavity located before the extractor are employed in our device. Main structure parameters of the device are optimized by particle in cell simulations. The typical simulation result is that, with a 380 kV, 8.2 kA beam guided by a magnetic field of about 0.6 T, 1.15 GW microwave pulse at 14.25 GHz is generated, yielding a conversion efficiency of about 37%.

  20. Field and laboratory guide to freshwater cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms for Native American and Alaska Native communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Barry H.; St. Amand, Ann

    2015-09-14

    Cyanobacteria can produce toxins and form harmful algal blooms. The Native American and Alaska Native communities that are dependent on subsistence fishing have an increased risk of exposure to these cyanotoxins. It is important to recognize the presence of an algal bloom in a waterbody and to distinguish a potentially toxic harmful algal bloom from a non-toxic bloom. This guide provides field images that show cyanobacteria blooms, some of which can be toxin producers, as well as other non-toxic algae blooms and floating plants that might be confused with algae. After recognition of a potential toxin-producing cyanobacterial bloom in the field, the type(s) of cyanobacteria present needs to be identified. Species identification, which requires microscopic examination, may help distinguish a toxin-producer from a non-toxin producer. This guide also provides microscopic images of the common cyanobacteria that are known to produce toxins, as well as images of algae that form blooms but do not produce toxins.

  1. Field inoculation of arbuscular mycorrhiza on maize (Zea mays L. under low inputs: preliminary study on quantitative and qualitative aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Sabia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis contributes to the sustainability of soil-plant system. A field experiment was conducted to examine the effect of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM on quantitative and qualitative performance in forage maize (Zea mays L.. Within the project Sviluppo di modelli zootecnici ai fini della sostenibilità (SOS-ZOOT a trial was conducted at the experimental farm of the Agricultural Research Council in Bella (PZ, located in Basilicata region (Southern Italy at 360 m asl, characterised by an annual rainfall of approximately 650 mm. For spring sowing, two plots of 2500 m2 were used, one sown with seeds inoculated with AM (M, 1.0 kg/ha, and the other one with non-inoculated seeds (NM. After 120 days after sowing, when plants showed 30% dry matter, five replicates of 1 m2 per plot were used to estimate dry matter yield (DMY, while half plot was dedicated to the assessment of grain production. For each replicate, three representative plants were considered; each plant was measured for height and was divided into leaves, stem and ear. For each plot, the following constituents were determined: crude protein, ash, ether extract, crude fibre (CF, fractions of fibre [neutral detergent (NDF, acid detergent fibre (ADF and sulphuric acid lignin] and phosphorus (P. Throughout the period of plants’ growth, no herbicides, organic or inorganic fertilisation, and irrigation water were distributed. The preliminary results revealed a significant effect of AM inoculation on forage maize DMY, P content in the whole plant, into the leaves and on the quality of steam. The M thesis showed a significant increase in terms of DMY in comparison with the NM thesis: 21.2 vs 17.9 t/ha (P<0.05. The mycorrhized whole plants [0.22 vs 0.17% dry matter (DM, P<0.05] and leaves (0.14 vs 0.09% DM, P<0.05 showed an increased P content. The stems of M plants showed a content of CF, NDF, ADF and Ash significantly lower compared with NM plants. No significant

  2. Preliminary experience of a three-dimensional, large-field-of-view PET scanner for the localization of partial epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binns, D.S.; O'Brien, T.J.; Murphy, M.; Cook, M.J.; Hicks, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: PET scanning is a useful ancillary technique in the localization of intractable partial epilepsy, but its widespread use has been limited by the high cost of traditional PET equipment and radioisotopes. The use of 3D-scanning mode with a large-field of-view PET scanner involves lower equipment costs and requires significantly lower doses of radioisotope. Our aim was to report our preliminary experience of the use of a 3-D, large-field-of-view scanner for FDG-PET studies in the localization of partial epilepsy. 31 patients (pts) with partial epilepsy were studied. The FDG-PET scans were reviewed blindly by a single reviewer without knowledge of seizure localization on structural imaging or ictal electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring. The PET results were correlated with the localization by more traditional techniques and the results on surgery when available. A localized region of hypometabolism on FDG-PET scanning was reported in 26/31 (84%) patients (21 temporal, 5 extratemporal). This compared favourably with volumetric MRI on which 19/31 (61%) had a focal potentially epileptogenic abnormality, all of which were concordant with the PET localization. PET was concordant with ictal EEG onset in all 22 patients with localizing studies, including 5 pts with normal MRI. PET demonstrated localized hypometabolism in 4/5 pts with non-localizing ictal EEG and was concordant in both pts with abnormal MRI in this group. PET was considered normal in 4 pts, including 3 pts with normal MRI but localizing EEG and 1 pt without EEG or MRI abnormality. One pt with a localizing EEG and normal MRI was felt to have bitemporal hypometabolism. Five patients have subsequently had resective epilepsy surgery with 4 currently seizure-free and 1 significantly improved. Four patients are planned for surgery in the near future. In conclusion, FDG-PET using a 3-D, large-field-of view PET scanner provides sensitive and specific localization in partial epilepsy, and may provide a

  3. 3-D near-field imaging of guided modes in nanophotonic waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziegler Jed I.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Highly evanescent waveguides with a subwavelength core thickness present a promising lab-on-chip solution for generating nanovolume trapping sites using overlapping evanescent fields. In this work, we experimentally studied Si3N4 waveguides whose sub-wavelength cross-sections and high aspect ratios support fundamental and higher order modes at a single excitation wavelength. Due to differing modal effective indices, these co-propagating modes interfere and generate beating patterns with significant evanescent field intensity. Using near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM, we map the structure of these beating modes in three dimensions. Our results demonstrate the potential of NSOM to optimize waveguide design for complex field trapping devices. By reducing the in-plane width, the population of competing modes decreases, resulting in a simplified spectrum of beating modes, such that waveguides with a width of 650 nm support three modes with two observed beats. Our results demonstrate the potential of NSOM to optimize waveguide design for complex field trapping devices.

  4. Electric Field Guided Assembly of One-Dimensional Nanostructures for High Performance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing Kam Liu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Various nanowire or nanotube-based devices have been demonstrated to fulfill the anticipated future demands on sensors. To fabricate such devices, electric field-based methods have demonstrated a great potential to integrate one-dimensional nanostructures into various forms. This review paper discusses theoretical and experimental aspects of the working principles, the assembled structures, and the unique functions associated with electric field-based assembly. The challenges and opportunities of the assembly methods are addressed in conjunction with future directions toward high performance sensors.

  5. From Field Notes to Data Portal - A Scalable Data QA/QC Framework for Tower Networks: Progress and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturtevant, C.; Hackley, S.; Lee, R.; Holling, G.; Bonarrigo, S.

    2017-12-01

    Quality assurance and control (QA/QC) is one of the most important yet challenging aspects of producing research-quality data. Data quality issues are multi-faceted, including sensor malfunctions, unmet theoretical assumptions, and measurement interference from humans or the natural environment. Tower networks such as Ameriflux, ICOS, and NEON continue to grow in size and sophistication, yet tools for robust, efficient, scalable QA/QC have lagged. Quality control remains a largely manual process heavily relying on visual inspection of data. In addition, notes of measurement interference are often recorded on paper without an explicit pathway to data flagging. As such, an increase in network size requires a near-proportional increase in personnel devoted to QA/QC, quickly stressing the human resources available. We present a scalable QA/QC framework in development for NEON that combines the efficiency and standardization of automated checks with the power and flexibility of human review. This framework includes fast-response monitoring of sensor health, a mobile application for electronically recording maintenance activities, traditional point-based automated quality flagging, and continuous monitoring of quality outcomes and longer-term holistic evaluations. This framework maintains the traceability of quality information along the entirety of the data generation pipeline, and explicitly links field reports of measurement interference to quality flagging. Preliminary results show that data quality can be effectively monitored and managed for a multitude of sites with a small group of QA/QC staff. Several components of this framework are open-source, including a R-Shiny application for efficiently monitoring, synthesizing, and investigating data quality issues.

  6. Religious Studies: The Shaping of a Field and a Guide to Reference Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippy, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the development of religious studies as an academic discipline. Examines the work of leading thinkers in the field, including anthropologists Sir James Fraser and Edward Burnett Taylor, sociologist Max Weber, and psychologist Erik Erikson. Identifies some of the many reference works that deal with religious studies. (SG)

  7. Acid Rain: A Resource Guide for Classroom, Laboratory, Field, and Debate Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoss, Frederick W.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a partially annotated bibliography of journals and book chapters which deal with acid rain. Includes selections which provide background information, ideas for introducing acid rain into science or social studies curricula, inventories of audio-visual aids, and non-print media to supplement classroom, laboratory, and field instruction.…

  8. Field Guide to Soils. Earth Science Curriculum Project Pamphlet Series PS-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foth, Henry; Jacobs, Hyde S.

    Discussed are the importance of soil to plant and animal life, the evolution of a soil profile, and the major kinds of soil in the United States. On a suggested field trip, students examine different kinds of soil profiles; they also measure soil acidity and water-holding capacity. Suggestions for further study are provided along with references…

  9. Variational Symplectic Integrator for Long-Time Simulations of the Guiding-Center Motion of Charged Particles in General Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Hong; Guan Xiaoyin

    2008-01-01

    A variational symplectic integrator for the guiding-center motion of charged particles in general magnetic fields is developed for long-time simulation studies of magnetized plasmas. Instead of discretizing the differential equations of the guiding-center motion, the action of the guiding-center motion is discretized and minimized to obtain the iteration rules for advancing the dynamics. The variational symplectic integrator conserves exactly a discrete Lagrangian symplectic structure, and has better numerical properties over long integration time, compared with standard integrators, such as the standard and variable time-step fourth order Runge-Kutta methods

  10. Variational Symplectic Integrator for Long-Time Simulations of the Guiding-Center Motion of Charged Particles in General Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, H.; Guan, X.

    2008-01-01

    A variational symplectic integrator for the guiding-center motion of charged particles in general magnetic fields is developed for long-time simulation studies of magnetized plasmas. Instead of discretizing the differential equations of the guiding-center motion, the action of the guiding-center motion is discretized and minimized to obtain the iteration rules for advancing the dynamics. The variational symplectic integrator conserves exactly a discrete Lagrangian symplectic structure, and has better numerical properties over long integration time, compared with standard integrators, such as the standard and variable time-step fourth order Runge-Kutta methods.

  11. A preliminary study on the feedback of heat transfer on groundwater flow in a Karst geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Y.; Pang, Z.; Hu, S.; Pang, J.; Shao, H.; Kolditz, O.

    2014-12-01

    In deep sedimentary basins, groundwater movement can significantly alter the heat flow pattern. At the same time, heat flux induced temperature change can reversely determine the flow regime through density dependent convection process. In Karst aquifers, the heterogeneity in the carbonate rocks makes the identification of this feedback much more complex. In this work, a preliminary study has been made on this feedback in Xiongxian geothermal field. The Karst aquifer in our site has an average thickness of about 1000 m, and is overlaid by over 400 m of quaternary clay, and subsequently 600 m of Neogene sandstone. Geothermal energy has been exploited in the site for space heating. During the heating period from Nov 15th to Mar 15th every year, hot water was extracted from the aquifer and re-injected after the heat extraction. A detailed temperature logging has been carried out in the field, both before and after the heating period, with the consideration that temperature distribution will be affected by the re-injection of cold water. The vertical distribution of temperature in the cap rock shows a constant positive gradient over depth. The heat flux at different locations has been calculated respectively. It is found to decline from southwest to northeast, with the highest value of 113.9 mW/m2 to the lowest of 80.6 mW/m2. This pattern can be well explained by the tectonic features. More interestingly, two inflection points appear on the temperature profile of the Karst layer, revealing strong influence from the cold re-injection water. Also, a 3℃ temperature difference was observed in the June and October measurement, which is related to the reservoir recovery. Currently, a 3D numerical model is being constructed, using the open-source software OpenGeoSys. Heat transport process is coupled with density dependent flow in a monolithic approach, to simulate both heat conduction and groundwater convection. This model will help to quantify the feedback from heat

  12. Imaged-guided liver stereotactic body radiotherapy using VMAT and real-time adaptive tumor gating. Concerns about technique and preliminary clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llacer-Moscardo, Carmen; Riou, Olivier; Azria, David; Bedos, Ludovic; Ailleres, Norbert; Quenet, Francois; Rouanet, Philippe; Ychou, Marc; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Motion management is a major challenge in abdominal SBRT. We present our study of SBRT for liver tumors using intrafraction motion review (IMR) allowing simultaneous KV information and MV delivery to synchronize the beam during gated RapidArc treatment. Between May 2012 and March 2015, 41 patients were treated by liver SBRT using gated RapidArc technique in a Varian Novalis Truebeam STx linear accelerator. PTV was created by expanding 5 mm from the ITV. Dose prescription ranged from 40 to 50 Gy in 5-10 fractions. The prescribed dose and fractionation were chosen depending on hepatic function and dosimetric results. Thirty-four patients with a minimal follow-up of six months were analyzed for local control and toxicity. Accuracy for tumor repositioning was evaluated for the first ten patients. With a median follow-up of 13 months, the treatment was well tolerated and no patient presented RILD, perforation or gastrointestinal bleeding. Acute toxicity was found in 3 patients with G1 abdominal pain, 2 with G1 nausea, 10 with G1 asthenia and 1 with G2 asthenia. 6 patients presented asymptomatic transitory perturbation of liver enzymes. In-field local control was 90.3% with 7 complete responses, 14 partial responses and 7 stabilisations. 3 patients evolved "in field". 12 patients had an intrahepatic progression "out of field". Mean intrafraction deviation of fiducials in the craneo-caudal direction was 0.91 mm (0-6 mm). The clinical tolerance and oncological outcomes were favorable when using image-guided liver SBRT with real-time adaptive tumor gating.

  13. Intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring-guided surgery for treating supratentorial cavernomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang-Ye; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Xu, Bai-Nan

    2016-09-01

    To determine the beneficial effects of intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring-guided surgery for treating supratentorial cavernomas. Twelve patients with 13 supratentorial cavernomas were prospectively enrolled and operated while using a 1.5 T intraoperative MRI, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring. All cavernomas were deeply located in subcortical areas or involved critical areas. Intraoperative high-field MRIs were obtained for the intraoperative "visualization" of surrounding eloquent structures, "brain shift" corrections, and navigational plan updates. All cavernomas were successfully resected with guidance from intraoperative MRI, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring. In 5 cases with supratentorial cavernomas, intraoperative "brain shift" severely deterred locating of the lesions; however, intraoperative MRI facilitated precise locating of these lesions. During long-term (>3 months) follow-up, some or all presenting signs and symptoms improved or resolved in 4 cases, but were unchanged in 7 patients. Intraoperative high-field MRI, multimodal neuronavigation, and intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring are helpful in surgeries for the treatment of small deeply seated subcortical cavernomas.

  14. Energy Conversion Mechanism for Electron Perpendicular Energy in High Guide-Field Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuehan; Horiuchi, Ritoku; Kaminou, Yasuhiro; Cheng, Frank; Ono, Yasushi

    2016-10-01

    The energy conversion mechanism for electron perpendicular energy, both the thermal and the kinetic energy, is investigated by means of two-dimensional, full-particle simulations in an open system. It is shown that electron perpendicular heating is mainly due to the breaking of magnetic moment conservation in separatrix region because the charge separation generates intense variation of electric field within the electron Larmor radius. Meanwhile, electron perpendicular acceleration takes place manly due to the polarization drift term as well as the curvature drift term of E . u⊥ in the downstream near the X-point. The enhanced electric field due to the charge separation there results in a significant effect of the polarization drift term on the dissipation of magnetic energy within the ion inertia length in the downstream. Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  15. A practical guide to manuscript writing with particular relevance to the field of pediatric hospital medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Ronald J; Andrews, Anne L; Williams, Derek J

    2014-11-01

    Publishing manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals, such as Hospital Pediatrics, is critical for both the academic development of practitioners in pediatric hospital medicine and the scientific advancement of our field. Understanding the purpose of scientific writing and developing a structured approach to the writing process is essential. Doing so will improve the clarity of your work and likely the ease at which your research is published and disseminated throughout the scientific community. The purposes of this article are to detail the structure of a scientific manuscript, to highlight specific writing strategies, and to provide writing tips that may help or hinder publication. Our ultimate goal is to advance the field of pediatric hospital medicine and its growing membership by promoting the dissemination of high-quality research. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Archaeological Geophysics for DoD Field Use: A Guide for New and Novice Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    magnetometers are commonly used in archaeology: proton precession, optically pumped, and fluxgate . Proton precession magnetometers were the first to... Fluxgate magnetometers use a metal rod around which a coil of copper wire is wound (Clark 1996). An external magnetic field, such as the Earth’s...means that fluxgate sensors are direction sensitive, and much more so than precession magnetometers . They are usually configured to measure the

  17. Ultrasonic Guided Waves-Based Monitoring of Rail Head: Laboratory and Field Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piervincenzo Rizzo

    2010-01-01

    The first part of the paper shows the prototype in action on a railroad track mock-up built at the University of California, San Diego. The mock-up contained surface and internal defects. The results from three experiments are presented. The importance of feature selection to maximize the sensitivity of the inspection system is demonstrated here. The second part of the paper shows the results of field testing conducted in south east Pennsylvania under the auspices of the U.S. Federal Railroad Administration.

  18. Distortion-free diffusion MRI using an MRI-guided Tri-Cobalt 60 radiotherapy system: Sequence verification and preliminary clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Han, Fei; Zhou, Ziwu; Cao, Minsong; Kaprealian, Tania; Kamrava, Mitchell; Wang, Chenyang; Neylon, John; Low, Daniel A; Yang, Yingli; Hu, Peng

    2017-10-01

    Monitoring tumor response during the course of treatment and adaptively modifying treatment plan based on tumor biological feedback may represent a new paradigm for radiotherapy. Diffusion MRI has shown great promises in assessing and predicting tumor response to radiotherapy. However, the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging (DW-ssEPI) technique suffers from limited resolution, severe distortion, and possibly inaccurate ADC at low field strength. The purpose of this work was to develop a reliable, accurate and distortion-free diffusion MRI technique that is practicable for longitudinal tumor response evaluation and adaptive radiotherapy on a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy system. A diffusion-prepared turbo spin echo readout (DP-TSE) sequence was developed and compared with the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging sequence on a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy system (ViewRay). A spatial integrity phantom was used to quantitate and compare the geometric accuracy of the two diffusion sequences for three orthogonal orientations. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) accuracy was evaluated on a diffusion phantom under both 0 °C and room temperature to cover a diffusivity range between 0.40 × 10 -3 and 2.10 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s. Ten room temperature measurements repeated on five different days were conducted to assess the ADC reproducibility of DP-TSE. Two glioblastoma (GBM) and six sarcoma patients were included to examine the in vivo feasibility. The target registration error (TRE) was calculated to quantitate the geometric accuracy where structural CT or MR images were co-registered to the diffusion images as references. ADC maps from DP-TSE and DW-ssEPI were calculated and compared. A tube phantom was placed next to patients not treated on ViewRay, and ADCs of this reference tube were also compared. The proposed DP-TSE passed the spatial integrity test (< 1 mm within 100 mm radius and < 2 mm within 175 mm radius

  19. Geologic field-trip guide to the volcanic and hydrothermal landscape of the Yellowstone Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan Morzel, Lisa Ann; Shanks, W. C. Pat; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Farrell, Jamie M.; Robinson, Joel E.

    2017-11-20

    Yellowstone National Park, a nearly 9,000 km2 (~3,468 mi2) area, was preserved in 1872 as the world’s first national park for its unique, extraordinary, and magnificent natural features. Rimmed by a crescent of older mountainous terrain, Yellowstone National Park has at its core the Quaternary Yellowstone Plateau, an undulating landscape shaped by forces of late Cenozoic explosive and effusive volcanism, on-going tectonism, glaciation, and hydrothermal activity. The Yellowstone Caldera is the centerpiece of the Yellowstone Plateau. The Yellowstone Plateau lies at the most northeastern front of the 17-Ma Yellowstone hot spot track, one of the few places on Earth where time-transgressive processes on continental crust can be observed in the volcanic and tectonic (faulting and uplift) record at the rate and direction predicted by plate motion. Over six days, this field trip presents an intensive overview into volcanism, tectonism, and hydrothermal activity on the Yellowstone Plateau (fig. 1). Field stops are linked directly to conceptual models related to monitoring of the various volcanic, geochemical, hydrothermal, and tectonic aspects of the greater Yellowstone system. Recent interest in young and possible future volcanism at Yellowstone as well as new discoveries and synthesis of previous studies, (for example, tomographic, deformation, gas, aeromagnetic, bathymetric, and seismic surveys), provide a framework in which to discuss volcanic, hydrothermal, and seismic activity in this dynamic region.

  20. Localization of a sound source in in a guided medium and reverberating field. Contribution to a study on leak localization in the internal wall of containment of a nuclear reactor in the case of a severe reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomann, F.

    1996-01-01

    Basic data necessary for the localization of a leak in the internal wall of the containment are presented by studying the sound generated by gas jets coming out of (leaking fissures) as well as propagation in a guided medium. The results acquired have led us to choose the simple intercorrelation method and the matched filed processing method, both of which are likely to adequately handle our problems. Whereas the intercorrelation method appears to be limited in scope when dealing in the guided medium, the matched field processing is suited to leak localization over a surface of approximately 1000 m 2 (for a total surface of 10 000 m 2 ). Preliminary studies on the leak signal and on replicated signals have led us to limit the frequency band to 2600 - 3000 Hz. We have succeeded in locating a leak situated in an ordinary position with a minimum amount of replicated signals and basic data. We have improved on the estimation of Bartlett and MVDE (minimum variance distortion less filter) rendering them even more effective. Afterwards, we considered the severe accident situation and showed that the system can be installed in situ. (author)

  1. Numerical calculation for flow field of servo-tube guided hydraulic control rod driving system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Keyu; Han Weishi

    2010-01-01

    A new-style hydraulic control rod driving mechanism was put forward by using servo-tube control elements for the design of control rod driving mechanism. The results of numerical simulation by CFD program Fluent for flow field of hydraulic driving cylinder indicate that the bigger the outer diameter of servo-tube, the smaller the resistance coefficient of variable throttle orifice. The zero position gap of variable throttle orifice could be determined on 0.2 mm in the design. The pressure difference between the upper and nether surfaces of piston was mainly created by the throttle function of fixed throttle orifice. It can be effectively controlled by changing the gap of variable throttle orifice. And the lift force of driving cylinder is able to meet the requirement on the design load. (authors)

  2. Field guide to malformations of frogs and toads: with radiographic interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteyer, Carol U.

    2000-01-01

    In 1995, students found numerous malformed frogs on a field trip to a Minnesota pond. Since that time, reports of malformed frogs have increased dramatically. Malformed frogs have now been reported in 44 states in 38 species of frogs, and 19 species of toads. Estimates as high as 60% of the newly metamorphosed frog populations have had malformations at some ponds (NARCAM, ’99). The wide geographic distribution of malformed frogs and the variety of malformations are a concern to resource managers, research scientists and public health officials. The potential for malformations to serve as a signal of ecosystem disruption, and the affect this potential disruption might have on other organisms that share those ecosystems, has not been resolved. Malformations represent an error that occurred early in development. The event that caused the developmental error is temporally distant from the malformation we see in the fully developed animal. Knowledge of normal developmental principles is necessary to design thoughtful investigations that will define the events involved in abnormal development in wild frog populations.Development begins at the time an egg is fertilized and progresses by chemical communication between cells and cell layers. This communication is programmed through gene expression. Malformations represent primary errors in development, errors in chemical communication or translation of genetic information. Deformations arise later in development and usually result from the influence of mechanical factors (such as amputation) that alter shape or anatomy of a structure that has developed normally. The occurrence and the type of malformations are influenced by the type of error or insult as well as the timing of the error (the developmental stage at which the error occurred). The appearance of the malformation can therefore provide clues that suggest when the error may have occurred. If the malformation is an incomplete organ, such as an incomplete limb, the

  3. Subsampled Numerical Experiments as a Guide for Field Deployment of Thermistor Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Justin; Stastna, Marek

    2017-11-01

    Thermistor chains are a standard tool for recording temperature profiles in geophysical flows. Density values can be inferred from readings and the resulting density field analyzed for the passage of internal waves, Kelvin-Helmholtz billows, and other dynamic events. The number and spacing of the thermistors, both on and between chains, determines which events can be identified in the dataset. We examine the effect of changing these variables by subsampling a set of numerical experiments to simulate thermistor chain locations. A pseudo spectral method was used to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation. The resulting flows are a set of high resolution seiches where the depth was held constant across experiments, and the length was varied. Sampling a known, commonly occurring flow with relatively simple geometry allows for a clear analysis of the effects of thermistor placement in the capture of dynamic events. We will discuss three dimensional deployment strategies, as well as EOF and DMD analyses if there is time. Funded by a Grant from the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  4. Virtual cathode microwave generation using inhomogeneous magnetic field and wave guide wall configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.; Kwan, T.J.T.

    1984-01-01

    Microwave generation from a virtual cathode system is investigated using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. In the typical virtual cathode geometry, the electron beam diode is separated from the output waveguide by a ground plane which is a thin foil or screen. By lowering the diode impedance sufficiently, it is possible to form a virtual cathode in the waveguide region a short distance from the ground plane. In this configuration two mechanisms can lead to microwave generation: 1) electron bunching due to reflection between the real and virtual cathode and 2) electron bunching due to virtual cathode oscillation. Both mechanisms are typically present, but it appears possible to make one mechanism dominant by adjusting the output waveguide radius. Although such a configuration might generate 1-10 GW output, electron deposition into the ground plane, waveguide wall, and output window causes breakdown. To overcome these disadvantages, the authors have investigated a configuration with no ground plane coupled with the use of an inhomogeneous external magnetic field and waveguide wall

  5. Driving magnetic turbulence using flux ropes in a moderate guide field linear system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookhart, Matthew I.; Stemo, Aaron; Waleffe, Roger; Forest, Cary B.

    2017-12-01

    We present a series of experiments on novel, line-tied plasma geometries as a study of the generation of chaos and turbulence in line-tied systems. Plasma production and the injection scale for magnetic energy is provided by spatially discrete plasma guns that inject both plasma and current. The guns represent a technique for controlling the injection scale of magnetic energy. A two-dimensional (2-D) array of magnetic probes provides spatially resolved time histories of the magnetic fluctuations at a single cross-section of the experimental cylinder, allowing simultaneous spatial measurements of chaotic and turbulent behaviour. The first experiment shows chaotic fluctuations and self-organization in a hollow-current line-tied screw pinch. These dynamics is modulated primarily by the applied magnetic field and weakly by the plasma current and safety factor. The second experiment analyses the interactions of multiple line-tied flux ropes. The flux ropes all exhibit chaotic behaviour, and under certain conditions develop an inverse cascade to larger scales and a turbulent inertial range with magnetic energy ( ) related to perpendicular wave number ( \\bot $ ) as \\bot -2.5\\pm 0.5$ .

  6. Guide to precision calculations in Dyson close-quote s hierarchical scalar field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godina, J.J.; Meurice, Y.; Oktay, M.B.; Niermann, S.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this article is to provide a practical method to calculate, in a scalar theory, accurate numerical values of the renormalized quantities which could be used to test any kind of approximate calculation. We use finite truncations of the Fourier transform of the recursion formula for Dyson close-quote s hierarchical model in the symmetric phase to perform high-precision calculations of the unsubtracted Green close-quote s functions at zero momentum in dimension 3, 4, and 5. We use the well-known correspondence between statistical mechanics and field theory in which the large cutoff limit is obtained by letting β reach a critical value β c (with up to 16 significant digits in our actual calculations). We show that the round-off errors on the magnetic susceptibility grow like (β c -β) -1 near criticality. We show that the systematic errors (finite truncations and volume) can be controlled with an exponential precision and reduced to a level lower than the numerical errors. We justify the use of the truncation for calculations of the high-temperature expansion. We calculate the dimensionless renormalized coupling constant corresponding to the 4-point function and show that when β→β c , this quantity tends to a fixed value which can be determined accurately when D=3 (hyperscaling holds), and goes to zero like [Ln(β c -β)] -1 when D=4. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  7. Investigating microbial transformations of soil organic matter: synthesizing knowledge from disparate fields to guide new experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, S. A.; Tiemann, L. K.; Ballantyne, F., IV; Lehmeier, C. A.; Min, K.

    2015-04-01

    Discerning why some soil organic matter (SOM) leaves soil profiles relatively quickly while other compounds, especially at depth, can be retained for decades to millennia is challenging for a multitude of reasons. Simultaneous with soil-specific advances, multiple other disciplines have enhanced their knowledge bases in ways potentially useful for future investigations of SOM decay. In this article, we highlight observations highly relevant for those investigating SOM decay and retention but often emanating from disparate fields and residing in literature seldom cited in SOM research. We focus on recent work in two key areas. First, we turn to experimental approaches using natural and artificial aquatic environments to investigate patterns of microbially mediated OM transformations as environmental conditions change, and highlight how aquatic microbial responses to environmental change can reveal processes likely important to OM decay and retention in soils. Second, we emphasize the importance of establishing intrinsic patterns of decay kinetics for purified substrates commonly found in soils to develop baseline rates. These decay kinetics - which represent the upper limit of the reaction rates - can then be compared to substrate decay kinetics observed in natural samples, which integrate intrinsic decay reaction rates and edaphic factors essential to the site under study but absent in purified systems. That comparison permits the site-specific factors to be parsed from the fundamental decay kinetics, an important advance in our understanding of SOM decay (and thus persistence) in natural systems. We then suggest ways in which empirical observations from aquatic systems and purified substrate-enzyme reaction kinetics can be used to advance recent theoretical efforts in SOM-focused research. Finally, we suggest how the observations in aquatic and purified substrate-enzyme systems could be used to help unravel the puzzles presented by oft-observed patterns of SOM

  8. The Kepler Data Processing Handbook: A Field Guide to Prospecting for Habitable Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jon M.

    2017-01-01

    The Kepler telescope hurtled into orbit in March 2009, initiating NASA's first mission to discover Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars. Kepler simultaneously collected data for approximately 165,000 target stars at a time over its four-year mission, identifying over 4700 planet candidates, over 2300 confirmed or validated planets, and over 2100 eclipsing binaries. While Kepler was designed to discover exoplanets, the long-term, ultrahigh photometric precision measurements it achieved made it a premier observational facility for stellar astrophysics, especially in the field of asteroseismology, and for variable stars, such as RR Lyrae. The Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) was developed at NASA Ames Research Center to process the data acquired by Kepler from pixel-level calibrations all the way to identifying transiting planet signatures and subjecting them to a suite of diagnostic tests to establish or break confidence in their planetary nature. Detecting small, rocky planets transiting Sun-like stars presents a variety of daunting challenges, including achieving an unprecedented photometric precision of 20 ppm on 6.5-hour timescales, and supporting the science operations, management, processing, and repeated reprocessing of the accumulating data stream. A newly revised and expanded version of the Kepler Data Processing Handbook (KDPH) has been released to support the legacy archival products. The KDPH details the theory, design and performance of the algorithms supporting each data processing step. This paper presents an overview of the KDPH and features illustrations of several key algorithms in the Kepler Science Data Processing Pipeline. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA, Science Mission Directorate.

  9. The Field Guide to ADHD: What They Don't Want You to Know. Psychiatry--Theory, Applications and Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Blake

    2017-01-01

    In "The Field Guide to ADHD: What They Don't Want You to Know," Harding confronts with unusual candor and painstaking effort one of the most alarming and perilous crises of our time: ADHD. In confronting this crisis, Harding forces us to reconsider the assumptions underlying ADHD and how we think about medical diagnoses, disability,…

  10. Focusing electrode and coaxial reflector used for reducing the guiding magnetic field of the Ku-band foilless transit-time oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Junpu; Zhang, Jiande; He, Juntao, E-mail: hejuntao12@163.com; Wang, Lei; Deng, Bingfang [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2014-08-15

    Based on the theoretical analysis of the intense relativistic electron beam propagation in the coaxial drift-tube, a focusing electrode and a coaxial reflector is proposed to lessen the demand of the coaxial Ku-band foilless transit-time oscillator (TTO) for the guiding magnetic field. Moreover, a Ku-band TTO with the focusing electrode and the coaxial reflector is designed and studied by particle in cell simulation. When the diode voltage is 390 kV, the beam current 7.8 kA, and the guiding magnetic field is only 0.3 T, the device can output 820 MW microwave pulse at 14.25 GHz by means of the simulation. However, for the device without them, the output power is only 320 MW. The primary experiments are also carried out. When the guiding magnetic field is 0.3 T, the output power of the device with the focusing electrode and the coaxial reflector is double that of the one without them. The simulation and experimental results prove that the focusing electrode and the coaxial reflector are effective on reducing the guiding magnetic field of the device.

  11. Preliminary study of the application of transthoracic echocardiography-guided three-dimensional printing for the assessment of structural heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanbo; Liu, Jianshi; Wang, Lianqun; Guan, Xin; Luo, Yongjuan; Geng, Jie; Geng, Qingguo; Lin, Yunjia; Zhang, Lixia; Li, Xixue; Lu, Yaping

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility and diagnostic value of a preoperative transthoracic echocardiography-guided three-dimensional printed model (TTE-guided 3DPM) for the assessment of structural heart disease (SHD). Fourty-four patients underwent cardiac surgery at Tianjin Chest Hospital. The patients were preoperatively assessed using TTE-guided 3DPM, which was compared to conventional three-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (3DTTE) along with direct intraoperative findings, which were considered the "gold standard." Twelve patients had SHD, including four with mitral prolapse, two with partial endocardial cushion defects, two with secondary atrial septal defects, two with rheumatic mitral stenosis, one with tetralogy of Fallot, and one with a ventricular septal defect (VSD). Thirty-two patients who did not have SHDs were designated as the negative control group. The sensitivity and specificity of the TTE-guided 3DPM were greater than or equal to those of the 3DTTE. The P-value of the McNemar test of 3DTTE was >.05, which indicates that the difference was not statistically significant (Kappa = 0.745, P guided 3DPM was >.05, which indicates that the difference was not statistically significant (Kappa = 0.955, P guided 3DPM resulted in a P-value >.05, which indicates that the difference was not statistically significant (Kappa = 0.879, P guided 3DPM displayed the 3D structure of SHDs and cardiac lesions clearly and was consistent with the intra-operative findings. Transthoracic echocardiography-guided three-dimensional printed model (TTE-guided 3DPM) provides essential information for preoperative evaluation and decision making for patients with SHDs. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Preliminary Sensorimotor and Cardiovascular Results from the Joint Russian/U.S. Pilot Field Test in Preparation for the Full Field Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Platts, S. H.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Fomina, E. V.; Stenger, M. B.; Lee, S. M. C.; Wood, S. J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing collaborative research efforts between NASA's Neuroscience and Cardiovascular Laboratories, and the Institute of Biomedical Problems' (IBMP) Sensory-Motor and Countermeasures Laboratories have been measuring functional sensorimotor, cardiovascular and strength responses following bed rest, dry immersion, short-duration (Space Shuttle) and long-duration (Mir and International Space Station [ISS]) space flights. While the unloading paradigms associated with dry immersion and bed rest does serve as acceptable flight analogs, testing of crew responses following the long-duration flights previously has not been possible until a minimum of 24 hours after landing. As a result, it is not possible to estimate the nonlinear trend of the early (testing at the landing site. By joint agreement, this research effort has been identified as the functional Field Test (FT). For practical reasons the FT has been divided into two phases: the full FT and a preliminary pilot version (PFT) of the FT that is reduced in both length and scope. The primary goal of this research is to determine functional abilities in long-duration space-flight crews beginning as soon after landing as possible (test in conjunction with postural ataxia testing (quiet stance sway) as well as cardiovascular responses during the other functional tasks. In addition to the immediate post-landing collection of data for the full FT, postflight data will be acquired between one and three more other times within the 24 hours after landing and will continue over the subsequent weeks until functional sensorimotor and cardiovascular responses have returned to preflight normative values. The PFT represents a single trial run comprised of a jointly agreed upon subset of tests from the full FT and relies heavily on IBMP's Sensory-Motor and Countermeasures Laboratories for content and implementation. The PFT has been collected on several ISS missions. Testing included: (1) a sit-to-stand test, (2) recovery from a fall

  13. Strong guided mode resonant local field enhanced visible harmonic generation in an azo-polymer resonant waveguide grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian Hung; Tseng, Chun-Yen; Lee, Ching-Ting; Young, Jeff F; Kan, Hung-Chih; Hsu, Chia Chen

    2014-02-10

    Guided mode resonance (GMR) enhanced second- and third-harmonic generation (SHG and THG) is demonstrated in an azo-polymer resonant waveguide grating (RWG), comprised of a poled azo-polymer layer on top of a textured SU8 substrate with a thin intervening layer of TiO2. Strong SHG and THG outputs are observed by matching either in-coming fundamental- or out-going harmonic-wavelength to the GMR wavelengths of the azo-polymer RWG. Without the azo-polymer coating, pure TiO2 RWGs, do not generate any detectable SHG using a fundamental beam peak intensity of 2 MW/cm(2). Without the textured TiO2 layer, a planar poled azo-polymer layer results in 3650 times less SHG than the full nonlinear RWG structure under identical excitation conditions. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis calculations confirm that this enhancement of the nonlinear conversion is due to strong local electric fields that are generated at the interfaces of the TiO2 and azo-polymer layers when the RWG is excited at resonant wavelengths associated with both SHG and THG conversion processes.

  14. Electron acceleration in the Solar corona - 3D PiC code simulations of guide field reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio

    2017-04-01

    The efficient electron acceleration in the solar corona detected by means of hard X-ray emission is still not well understood. Magnetic reconnection through current sheets is one of the proposed production mechanisms of non-thermal electrons in solar flares. Previous works in this direction were based mostly on test particle calculations or 2D fully-kinetic PiC simulations. We have now studied the consequences of self-generated current-aligned instabilities on the electron acceleration mechanisms by 3D magnetic reconnection. For this sake, we carried out 3D Particle-in-Cell (PiC) code numerical simulations of force free reconnecting current sheets, appropriate for the description of the solar coronal plasmas. We find an efficient electron energization, evidenced by the formation of a non-thermal power-law tail with a hard spectral index smaller than -2 in the electron energy distribution function. We discuss and compare the influence of the parallel electric field versus the curvature and gradient drifts in the guiding-center approximation on the overall acceleration, and their dependence on different plasma parameters.

  15. 3D computations of flow field in a guide vane blading designed by means of 2D model for a low head hydraulic turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzemianowski, Z; Puzyrewski, R

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the main parameters of the flow field behind the guide vane cascade designed by means of 2D inverse problem and following check by means of 3D commercial program ANSYS/Fluent applied for a direct problem. This approach of using different models reflects the contemporary design procedure for non-standardized turbomachinery stage. Depending on the model, the set of conservation equation to be solved differs, although the physical background remains the same. The example of computations for guide vane cascade for a low head hydraulic turbine is presented.

  16. Preliminary research on finite difference method to solve radon field distribution over sandstone-type uranium ore body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Bihong; Shuang Na; Liu Qingcheng

    2006-01-01

    The principle of finite difference method is introduced, and the radon field distribution over sandstone-type uranium deposit is narrated. The radon field distribution theory equation is established. To solve radon field distribution equation using finite difference algorithm is to provide the value computational method for forward calculation about radon field over sandstone-type uranium mine. Study on 2-D finite difference method on the center of either high anomaly radon fields in view of the character of radon field over sandstone-type uranium provide an algorithm for further research. (authors)

  17. Characterizing the Utility and Limitations of Repurposing an Open-Field Optical Imaging Device for Fluorescence-Guided Surgery in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lindsay S; Rosenthal, Eben L; Chung, Thomas K; de Boer, Esther; Patel, Neel; Prince, Andrew C; Korb, Melissa L; Walsh, Erika M; Young, E Scott; Stevens, Todd M; Withrow, Kirk P; Morlandt, Anthony B; Richman, Joshua S; Carroll, William R; Zinn, Kurt R; Warram, Jason M

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-cleared devices designed for indocyanine green-based perfusion imaging to identify cancer-specific bioconjugates with overlapping excitation and emission wavelengths. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated potential for fluorescence-guided surgery, but the time and cost of the approval process may impede clinical translation. To expedite this translation, we explored the feasibility of repurposing existing optical imaging devices for fluorescence-guided surgery. Consenting patients (n = 15) scheduled for curative resection were enrolled in a clinical trial evaluating the safety and specificity of cetuximab-IRDye800 (NCT01987375). Open-field fluorescence imaging was performed preoperatively and during the surgical resection. Fluorescence intensity was quantified using integrated instrument software, and the tumor-to-background ratio characterized fluorescence contrast. In the preoperative clinic, the open-field device demonstrated potential to guide preoperative mapping of tumor borders, optimize the day of surgery, and identify occult lesions. Intraoperatively, the device demonstrated robust potential to guide surgical resections, as all peak tumor-to-background ratios were greater than 2 (range, 2.2-14.1). Postresection wound bed fluorescence was significantly less than preresection tumor fluorescence (P open-field imaging device was successfully repurposed to distinguish cancer from normal tissue in the preoperative clinic and throughout surgical resection. This study illuminated the potential for existing open-field optical imaging devices with overlapping excitation and emission spectra to be used for fluorescence-guided surgery. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  18. TU-H-BRA-02: The Physics of Magnetic Field Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, D; Mutic, S; Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the MRI magnetic field from field-sensitive linear accelerator components at distances close to isocenter. Methods: A MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. In order to accomplish this, the magnetron, port circulator, radiofrequency waveguide, gun driver, and linear accelerator needed to be placed in locations with low magnetic fields. The system was also required to be compact, so moving these components far from the main magnetic field and isocenter was not an option. The magnetic field sensitive components (exclusive of the waveguide) were placed in coaxial steel sleeves that were electrically and mechanically isolated and whose thickness and placement were optimized using E&M modeling software. Six sets of sleeves were placed 60° apart, 85 cm from isocenter. The Faraday effect occurs when the direction of propagation is parallel to the magnetic RF field component, rotating the RF polarization, subsequently diminishing RF power. The Faraday effect was avoided by orienting the waveguides such that the magnetic field RF component was parallel to the magnetic field. Results: The magnetic field within the shields was measured to be less than 40 Gauss, significantly below the amount needed for the magnetron and port circulator. Additional mu-metal was employed to reduce the magnetic field at the linear accelerator to less than 1 Gauss. The orientation of the RF waveguides allowed the RT transport with minimal loss and reflection. Conclusion: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of creating low magnetic field environments for the magnetic-field sensitive components, has been solved. The measured magnetic fields are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This work supported by ViewRay, Inc.

  19. TU-H-BRA-02: The Physics of Magnetic Field Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the MRI magnetic field from field-sensitive linear accelerator components at distances close to isocenter. Methods: A MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. In order to accomplish this, the magnetron, port circulator, radiofrequency waveguide, gun driver, and linear accelerator needed to be placed in locations with low magnetic fields. The system was also required to be compact, so moving these components far from the main magnetic field and isocenter was not an option. The magnetic field sensitive components (exclusive of the waveguide) were placed in coaxial steel sleeves that were electrically and mechanically isolated and whose thickness and placement were optimized using E&M modeling software. Six sets of sleeves were placed 60° apart, 85 cm from isocenter. The Faraday effect occurs when the direction of propagation is parallel to the magnetic RF field component, rotating the RF polarization, subsequently diminishing RF power. The Faraday effect was avoided by orienting the waveguides such that the magnetic field RF component was parallel to the magnetic field. Results: The magnetic field within the shields was measured to be less than 40 Gauss, significantly below the amount needed for the magnetron and port circulator. Additional mu-metal was employed to reduce the magnetic field at the linear accelerator to less than 1 Gauss. The orientation of the RF waveguides allowed the RT transport with minimal loss and reflection. Conclusion: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of creating low magnetic field environments for the magnetic-field sensitive components, has been solved. The measured magnetic fields are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This work supported by ViewRay, Inc.

  20. A model of preliminary breakdown pulse peak currents and their relation to the observed electric-field pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašpar, Petr; Santolík, Ondřej; Kolmašová, Ivana; Farges, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2017), s. 596-603 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31899S Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1401 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : lightning initiation * electromagnetic radiation * preliminary breakdown pulses Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 4.253, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL071483/pdf

  1. Technical Note: Dose effects of 1.5 T transverse magnetic field on tissue interfaces in MRI-guided radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xinfeng; Prior, Phil; Chen, Guang-Pei; Schultz, Christopher J.; Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    dose effects of the TMF at tissue interfaces (e.g., air-cavity wall, lung-tissue interfaces, skin) are significantly reduced in most cases. Conclusions: The doses on tissue interfaces can be significantly changed by the presence of a TMF during MR-guided RT when the magnetic field is not included in plan optimization. These changes can be substantially reduced or even eliminated during VMAT/IMRT optimization that specifically considers the TMF, without deteriorating overall plan quality.

  2. DECOVALEX-THMC Project. Task A. Influence of near field coupled THM phenomena on the performance of a spent fuel repository. Report of Task A1: Preliminary scoping calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Son (ed.) [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (Canada); Lanru Jing (ed.) [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Boergesson, Lennart [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Chijimatzu, Masakazu [Hazama Corporation (Japan); Jussila, Petri [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Helsinki (Finland); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory CA (United States)

    2007-02-15

    The DECOVALEX-THMC project is an ongoing international co-operative project that was stared in 2004 to support the development of mathematical models of coupled Thermal (T), Hydrological (H), Mechanical (M) and Chemical (C) processes in geological media for siting potential nuclear fuel waste repositories. The general objective is to characterise and evaluate the coupled THMC processes in the near field and far field of a geological repository and to assess their impact on performance assessment: - during the three phases of repository development: excavation phase, operation phase and post-closure phase; - for three different rocks types: crystalline, argillaceous and tuff; - with specific focus on the issues of: Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ), permanent property changes of rock masses, and glaciation and permafrost phenomena. The project involves a large number of research teams supported by radioactive waste management agencies or governmental regulatory bodies in Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden and USA, who conducted advanced studies and numerical modelling of coupled THMC processes under five tasks. This report presents the definition of the first phase, Task A-1, of the Task A of the project. The task is a working example of how interaction between THMC modelling and SA analysis could be performed. Starting with the technical definition of the Task A, the report presents the results of preliminary THM calculations with a purpose of an initial appreciation of the phenomena and material properties that must be better understood in subsequent phases. Many simplifications and assumptions were introduced and the results should be considered under these assumptions. Based on the evaluation of the multiple teams' results, a few points of concern were identified that may guide the successive phases of Task A studies: 1. The predicted maximum total stress in the MX-80 bentonite could slightly exceed the 15 MPa design pressure for the

  3. DECOVALEX-THMC Project. Task A. Influence of near field coupled THM phenomena on the performance of a spent fuel repository. Report of Task A1: Preliminary scoping calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Son; Lanru Jing; Boergesson, Lennart; Chijimatzu, Masakazu; Jussila, Petri; Rutqvist, Jonny

    2007-02-01

    The DECOVALEX-THMC project is an ongoing international co-operative project that was stared in 2004 to support the development of mathematical models of coupled Thermal (T), Hydrological (H), Mechanical (M) and Chemical (C) processes in geological media for siting potential nuclear fuel waste repositories. The general objective is to characterise and evaluate the coupled THMC processes in the near field and far field of a geological repository and to assess their impact on performance assessment: - during the three phases of repository development: excavation phase, operation phase and post-closure phase; - for three different rocks types: crystalline, argillaceous and tuff; - with specific focus on the issues of: Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ), permanent property changes of rock masses, and glaciation and permafrost phenomena. The project involves a large number of research teams supported by radioactive waste management agencies or governmental regulatory bodies in Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden and USA, who conducted advanced studies and numerical modelling of coupled THMC processes under five tasks. This report presents the definition of the first phase, Task A-1, of the Task A of the project. The task is a working example of how interaction between THMC modelling and SA analysis could be performed. Starting with the technical definition of the Task A, the report presents the results of preliminary THM calculations with a purpose of an initial appreciation of the phenomena and material properties that must be better understood in subsequent phases. Many simplifications and assumptions were introduced and the results should be considered under these assumptions. Based on the evaluation of the multiple teams' results, a few points of concern were identified that may guide the successive phases of Task A studies: 1. The predicted maximum total stress in the MX-80 bentonite could slightly exceed the 15 MPa design pressure for the container

  4. Ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane vs surgeon administered intraoperative regional field infiltration with bupivacaine for early postoperative pain control in children undergoing open pyeloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Armando J; Lynch, Johanne; Matava, Clyde; El-Beheiry, Hossam; Hayes, Jason

    2014-07-01

    Regional analgesic techniques are commonly used in pediatric urology. Ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block has recently gained popularity. However, there is a paucity of information supporting a benefit over regional field infiltration. We present a parallel group, randomized, controlled trial evaluating ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block superiority over surgeon delivered regional field infiltration for children undergoing open pyeloplasty at a tertiary referral center. Following ethics board approval and registration, children 0 to 6 years old were recruited and randomized to undergo perioperative transversus abdominis plane block or regional field infiltration for early post-pyeloplasty pain control. General anesthetic delivery, surgical technique and postoperative analgesics were standardized. A blinded assessor regularly captured pain scores in the recovery room using the FLACC (Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability) scale. The primary outcome was the need for rescue morphine administration based on a FLACC score of 3 or higher. Two pediatric urologists performed 57 pyeloplasties during a 2.5-year period, enrolling 32 children (16 in each group, balanced for age and weight). There were statistically significant differences in the number of children requiring rescue morphine administration (13 of 16 receiving transversus abdominis plane block and 6 of 16 receiving regional field infiltration, p = 0.011), mean ± SD total morphine consumption (0.066 ± 0.051 vs 0.028 ± 0.040 mg/kg, p = 0.021) and mean ± SD pain scores (5 ± 5 vs 2 ± 3, p = 0.043) in the recovery room, in favor of surgeon administered regional field infiltration. No local anesthetic specific adverse events were noted. Ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block is not superior to regional field infiltration with bupivacaine as a strategy to minimize early opioid requirements following open pyeloplasty in children. Instead, our data suggest that

  5. Clinical and radiological studies upon a combined method for guided bone regeneration in experimental mandibular defects in dogs - a preliminary communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borissov, I.; Uzunov, N.; Paskalev, M.

    2004-01-01

    The treated bone defects were compared clinically and radiologically. After a 3-month period of survey, the best results were obtained in the group treated with partially demineralized bone matrix, enzymatically processed and lyophilized dura mater and mucoperiosteal flap. The placement of titanium screw dental implants did not impair the guided bone regeneration, that was confirmed by their good osteointegration

  6. Field-trip guide to Columbia River flood basalts, associated rhyolites, and diverse post-plume volcanism in eastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferns, Mark L.; Streck, Martin J.; McClaughry, Jason D.

    2017-08-09

    The Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) is the youngest and best preserved continental flood basalt province on Earth, linked in space and time with a compositionally diverse succession of volcanic rocks that partially record the apparent emergence and passage of the Yellowstone plume head through eastern Oregon during the late Cenozoic. This compositionally diverse suite of volcanic rocks are considered part of the La Grande-Owyhee eruptive axis (LOEA), an approximately 300-kilometer-long (185 mile), north-northwest-trending, middle Miocene to Pliocene volcanic belt located along the eastern margin of the Columbia River flood basalt province. Volcanic rocks erupted from and preserved within the LOEA form an important regional stratigraphic link between the (1) flood basalt-dominated Columbia Plateau on the north, (2) bimodal basalt-rhyolite vent complexes of the Owyhee Plateau on the south, (3) bimodal basalt-rhyolite and time-transgressive rhyolitic volcanic fields of the Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Plateau, and (4) the High Lava Plains of central Oregon.This field-trip guide describes a 4-day geologic excursion that will explore the stratigraphic and geochemical relationships among mafic rocks of the Columbia River Basalt Group and coeval and compositionally diverse volcanic rocks associated with the early “Yellowstone track” and High Lava Plains in eastern Oregon. Beginning in Portland, the Day 1 log traverses the Columbia River gorge eastward to Baker City, focusing on prominent outcrops that reveal a distal succession of laterally extensive, large-volume tholeiitic flood lavas of the Grande Ronde, Wanapum, and Saddle Mountains Basalt formations of the CRBG. These “great flows” are typical of the well-studied flood basalt-dominated Columbia Plateau, where interbedded silicic and calc-alkaline lavas are conspicuously absent. The latter part of Day 1 will highlight exposures of middle to late Miocene silicic ash-flow tuffs, rhyolite domes, and

  7. Preliminary design of high-power wave-guide/transmission system for multimegawatt CW requirements of 100 MeV proton Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Purushottam; Wanmode, Y.D.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Development of a 100 MeV CW proton Linac has been planned at CAT. This Linac will be needing CW rf power in the frequency ranges of 350 MHz and 700 MHz for its RFQ and DTL/CCDTL/SFDTL structures respectively. The power to the accelerating structures will be produced by either 1 MW CW or 250 kW CW klystron/inductive output tubes (HOM IOTs). The power needed by respective feed points in the structure is max. 250 kW which will be powered by splitting the power from 1 MW klystron/klystrode into four channels by using a wave-guide system. In case of using 250 kW tubes the power to the structures will be provided directly from each tube. Two types of wave-guide transmission system have been considered, viz WR 2300 for 350 MHz rf needs and WR 1500 for 700 MHz rf needs. The typical wave-guide system has been designed using the 1 MW CW klystron followed by wave-guide filter, dual directional coupler, high-power circulator, three 3 dB magic TEE power dividers to split the main channel into four equal channels of 250 kW each. Each individual channel has dual directional couplers, flexible wave-guide sections and high power ceramic vacuum window. The circulator and each power divider is terminated into the isolated ports by high power CW loads. Out of the four channels three channels have phase shifters. Present paper describes the technological aspects and design specifications-considerations for these stringent requirements. (author)

  8. Regulatory Guide 1.131: Qualification tests of electric cables, field splices, and connections for light-water-cooled nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Criterion III, ''Design Control,'' of Appendix B, ''Quality Assurance Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants and Fuel Reprocessing Plant,'' to 10 CFR Part 50, ''Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities,'' requires that, where a test program is used to verify the adequacy of a specific design feature, it include suitable qualification testing of a prototype unit under the most adverse design conditions. This regulatory guide describes a method acceptable to the NRC staff for complying with the Commission's regulations with regard to qualification testing of electric cables, field splices, and connections for service in light-water-cooled nuclear power plants to ensure that the cables, field splices, and connections can perform their safety-related functions. The fire test provisions of this guide do not apply to qualification for an installed configuration

  9. Technical procedures for implementation of background environmental radioactivity site studies, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this technical procedure is to describe the method for performing field maintenance on low-volume air samplers and the associated topics of personnel and organization, procedure preparation, documentation, and quality assurance. The scope of this procedure includes the maintenance of low-volume air samplers in the field and does not encompass maintenance performed by the manufacturer

  10. MR-guided breast biopsy and hook wire marking using a low-field (0.23 T) scanner with optical instrument tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Reinikainen, Heli; Blanco Sequeiros, Andreas M.; Ojala, Risto; Paeaekkoe, Eija; Tervonen, Osmo; Vaara, Teuvo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of MR-guided percutaneous breast biopsy (LCNB) and breast hook wire marking in a low-field (0.23 T) MRI system with optical instrument tracking. MR-guided core biopsy and/or hook wire marking was performed on 13 lesions observable at MR imaging only. Seven breast LCNBs and 10 hook wire markings were performed under MR guidance on 11 patients. The diagnosis was confirmed by excision biopsy or mastectomy in 12 lesions and with histopathological and cytological diagnosis and 12-month clinical follow-up in one lesion. All lesions seen in the high-field scanner were also successfully identified and targeted in the low-field scanner. The following procedures were typically technically successful. There were difficulties due to unsatisfactory functioning of some core biopsy guns. Detailed description of low-field MR guidance and optical tracking in breast biopsies is provided. The procedure seems accurate and safe and provides means to obtain a histological diagnosis of a breast lesion only seen with MRI. The low-field biopsy system is comparable to the high-field MRI system. MR-compatible biopsy guns need to be improved. (orig.)

  11. Heavy Metals Uptake by Asian Swamp Eel, Monopterus albus from Paddy Fields of Kelantan, Peninsular Malaysia: Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Sow Ai; Ismail, Ahmad; Zulkifli, Syaizwan Zahmir

    2012-01-01

    Swamp eel, Monopterus albus is one of the common fish in paddy fields, thus it is suitable to be a bio-monitor for heavy metals pollution studies in paddy fields. This study was conducted to assess heavy metals levels in swamp eels collected from paddy fields in Kelantan, Malaysia. The results showed zinc [Zn (86.40 μg/g dry weight)] was the highest accumulated metal in the kidney, liver, bone, gill, muscle and skin. Among the selected organs, gill had the highest concentrations of lead (Pb),...

  12. The effect of guide-field and boundary conditions on the features and signatures of collisionless magnetic reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic X-point collapse is investigated using a 2.5D fully relativistic particle-in-cell simulation, with varying strengths of guide-field as well as open and closed boundary conditions. In the zero guide-field case we discover a new signature of Hall-reconnection in the out-of-plane magnetic field, namely an octupolar pattern, as opposed to the well-studied quadrupolar out-of-plane field of reconnection. The emergence of the octupolar components was found to be caused by ion currents and is a general feature of X-point collapse. In a comparative study of tearing-mode reconnection, signatures of octupolar components are found only in the out-flow region. It is argued that space-craft observations of magnetic fields at reconnection sites may be used accordingly to identify the type of reconnection [1][2]. Further, initial oscillatory reconnection is observed, prior to reconnection onset, generating electro-magnetic waves at the upper-hybrid frequency, matching solar flare progenitor emission. When applying a guide-field, in both open and closed boundary conditions, thinner dissipation regions are obtained and the onset of reconnection is increasingly delayed. Investigations with open boundary conditions show that, for guide-fields close to the strength of the in-plane field, shear flows emerge, leading to the formation of electron flow vortices and magnetic islands [3]. Asymmetries in the components of the generalised Ohm's law across the dissipation region are observed. Extended in 3D geometry, it is shown that locations of magnetic islands and vortices are not constant along the height of the current-sheet. Vortices formed on opposite sites of the current-sheet travel in opposite directions along it, leading to a criss-cross vortex pattern. Possible instabilities resulting from this specific structure formation are to be investigated [4].[1] J. Graf von der Pahlen and D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 21, 060705 (2014), [2] J. Graf von der Pahlen and D. Tsiklauri

  13. Preliminary clinical experience with a dedicated interventional robotic system for CT-guided biopsies of lung lesions: a comparison with the conventional manual technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzidei, Michele; Argiro, Renato; Porfiri, Andrea; Boni, Fabrizio; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Napoli, Alessandro; Leonardi, Andrea; Bezzi, Mario; Catalano, Carlo; Anile, Marco; Venuta, Federico; Vitolo, Domenico; Saba, Luca; Longo, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Evaluate the performance of a robotic system for CT-guided lung biopsy in comparison to the conventional manual technique. One hundred patients referred for CT-guided lung biopsy were randomly assigned to group A (robot-assisted procedure) or group B (conventional procedure). Size, distance from entry point and position in lung of target lesions were evaluated to assess homogeneity differences between the two groups. Procedure duration, dose length product (DLP), precision of needle positioning, diagnostic performance of the biopsy and rate of complications were evaluated to assess the clinical performance of the robotic system as compared to the conventional technique. All biopsies were successfully performed. The size (p = 0.41), distance from entry point (p = 0.86) and position in lung (p = 0.32) of target lesions were similar in both groups (p = 0.05). Procedure duration and radiation dose were significantly reduced in group A as compared to group B (p = 0.001). Precision of needle positioning, diagnostic performance of the biopsy and rate of complications were similar in both groups (p = 0.05). Robot-assisted CT-guided lung biopsy can be performed safely and with high diagnostic accuracy, reducing procedure duration and radiation dose in comparison to the conventional manual technique. (orig.)

  14. Preliminary clinical experience with a dedicated interventional robotic system for CT-guided biopsies of lung lesions: a comparison with the conventional manual technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzidei, Michele; Argiro, Renato; Porfiri, Andrea; Boni, Fabrizio; Zaccagna, Fulvio; Napoli, Alessandro; Leonardi, Andrea; Bezzi, Mario; Catalano, Carlo [University of Rome, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomopathological Sciences - Radiology - Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Anile, Marco; Venuta, Federico [University of Rome, Department of Thoracic Surgery - Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Vitolo, Domenico [University of Rome, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomopathological Sciences - Pathology - Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Saba, Luca [Department of Radiology, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria (A.O.U.), di Cagliari-Polo di Monserrato, Monserrato (Italy); Longo, Flavia [University of Rome, Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomopathological Sciences - Oncology - Sapienza, Rome (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Evaluate the performance of a robotic system for CT-guided lung biopsy in comparison to the conventional manual technique. One hundred patients referred for CT-guided lung biopsy were randomly assigned to group A (robot-assisted procedure) or group B (conventional procedure). Size, distance from entry point and position in lung of target lesions were evaluated to assess homogeneity differences between the two groups. Procedure duration, dose length product (DLP), precision of needle positioning, diagnostic performance of the biopsy and rate of complications were evaluated to assess the clinical performance of the robotic system as compared to the conventional technique. All biopsies were successfully performed. The size (p = 0.41), distance from entry point (p = 0.86) and position in lung (p = 0.32) of target lesions were similar in both groups (p = 0.05). Procedure duration and radiation dose were significantly reduced in group A as compared to group B (p = 0.001). Precision of needle positioning, diagnostic performance of the biopsy and rate of complications were similar in both groups (p = 0.05). Robot-assisted CT-guided lung biopsy can be performed safely and with high diagnostic accuracy, reducing procedure duration and radiation dose in comparison to the conventional manual technique. (orig.)

  15. Preliminary Field Tests and Long-Term Monitoring as a Method of Design Risk Mitigation: A Case Study of Gdańsk Deepwater Container Terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miśkiewicz Mikołaj

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate risk assessment plays a fundamental role in the design. . The authors propose a possible method of design risk mitigation, which follows recommendations included in Eurocode 7. The so-called “Observational Method” (OM can produce savings in costs and programmes on engineering projects without compromising safety. The case study presented is a complex design solution that deals with the heavy foundations of a gantry crane beam as one of the elements of a Deepwater Container Terminal extension. The paper presents a detailed process of the design of the rear crane beam being a part of the brand new berth, together with its static analysis, as well as the long-term results of observations, which have revealed the real performance of the marine structure. The case presented is based on excessive preliminary field tests and technical monitoring of the structure, and is an example of a successful OM implementation and design risk mitigation.

  16. Site Study Plan for background environmental radioactivity, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Background Environmental Radioactivity Site Study Plan describes a field program consisting of an initial radiological survey and a radiological sampling program. The field program includes measurement of direct radiation and collection and analysis of background radioactivity samples of air, precipitation, soil, water, milk, pasture grass, food crops, meat, poultry, game, and eggs. The plan describes for each study: the need for the study, the study design, data management and use, schedule of proposed activities, and quality assurance requirements. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Project (SRP) Requirements Document. 50 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  17. The ArTéMiS wide-field sub-millimeter camera: preliminary on-sky performance at 350 microns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revéret, Vincent; André, Philippe; Le Pennec, Jean; Talvard, Michel; Agnèse, Patrick; Arnaud, Agnès.; Clerc, Laurent; de Breuck, Carlos; Cigna, Jean-Charles; Delisle, Cyrille; Doumayrou, Eric; Duband, Lionel; Dubreuil, Didier; Dumaye, Luc; Ercolani, Eric; Gallais, Pascal; Groult, Elodie; Jourdan, Thierry; Leriche, Bernadette; Maffei, Bruno; Lortholary, Michel; Martignac, Jérôme; Rabaud, Wilfried; Relland, Johan; Rodriguez, Louis; Vandeneynde, Aurélie; Visticot, François

    2014-07-01

    ArTeMiS is a wide-field submillimeter camera operating at three wavelengths simultaneously (200, 350 and 450 μm). A preliminary version of the instrument equipped with the 350 μm focal plane, has been successfully installed and tested on APEX telescope in Chile during the 2013 and 2014 austral winters. This instrument is developed by CEA (Saclay and Grenoble, France), IAS (France) and University of Manchester (UK) in collaboration with ESO. We introduce the mechanical and optical design, as well as the cryogenics and electronics of the ArTéMiS camera. ArTeMiS detectors consist in Si:P:B bolometers arranged in 16×18 sub-arrays operating at 300 mK. These detectors are similar to the ones developed for the Herschel PACS photometer but they are adapted to the high optical load encountered at APEX site. Ultimately, ArTeMiS will contain 4 sub-arrays at 200 μm and 2×8 sub-arrays at 350 and 450 μm. We show preliminary lab measurements like the responsivity of the instrument to hot and cold loads illumination and NEP calculation. Details on the on-sky commissioning runs made in 2013 and 2014 at APEX are shown. We used planets (Mars, Saturn, Uranus) to determine the flat-field and to get the flux calibration. A pointing model was established in the first days of the runs. The average relative pointing accuracy is 3 arcsec. The beam at 350 μm has been estimated to be 8.5 arcsec, which is in good agreement with the beam of the 12 m APEX dish. Several observing modes have been tested, like "On- The-Fly" for beam-maps or large maps, spirals or raster of spirals for compact sources. With this preliminary version of ArTeMiS, we concluded that the mapping speed is already more than 5 times better than the previous 350 μm instrument at APEX. The median NEFD at 350 μm is 600 mJy.s1/2, with best values at 300 mJy.s1/2. The complete instrument with 5760 pixels and optimized settings will be installed during the first half of 2015.

  18. Preliminary designs: passive solar manufactured housing. Technical status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-12

    The criteria established to guide the development of the preliminary designs are listed. Three preliminary designs incorporating direct gain and/or sunspace are presented. Costs, drawings, and supporting calculations are included. (MHR)

  19. Effect of the application of an electric field on the performance of a two-phase loop device: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creatini, F; Di Marco, P; Filippeschi, S; Fioriti, D; Mameli, M

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the continuous development of electronics has pointed out the need for a change in mind with regard to thermal management. In the present scenario, Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHPs) are novel promising two-phase passive heat transport devices that seem to meet all present and future thermal requirements. Nevertheless, PHPs governing phenomena are quite unique and not completely understood. In particular, single closed loop PHPs manifest several drawbacks, mostly related to the reduction of device thermal performance and reliability, i.e. the occurrence of multiple operational quasi-steady states. The present research work proposes the application of an electric field as a technique to promote the circulation of the working fluid in a preferential direction and stabilize the device operation. The tested single closed loop PHP is made of a copper tube with an inner tube diameter equal to 2.00 mm and filled with pure ethanol (60% filling ratio). The electric field is generated by a couple of wire-shaped electrodes powered with DC voltage up to 20 kV and laid parallel to the longitudinal axis of the glass tube constituting the adiabatic section. Although the electric field intensity in the working fluid region is weakened both by the polarization phenomenon of the working fluid and by the interposition of the glass tube, the experimental results highlight the influence of the electric field on the device thermal performance and encourage the continuation of the research in this direction. (paper)

  20. Site study plan for utilities and solid waste, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This site plan describes utilities and solid waste studies to be conducted during the characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site for the US Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project. After utilities and solid waste information needs derived from Federal, State, and local statutes and regulations and the project specifications are briefly described, the site study plan describes the study design and rationale, the field data collection procedures and equipment, and data analysis methods and application of results, the data management strategy, the schedule of field activities, the management of the study, and the study's quality assurance program. The field data collection activities are organized into programs to characterize electrical power, natural gas, communication, water, wastewater sludge, nonradiological solid waste, nonradiological hazardous waste, and low-level radiological waste. These programs include details for the collection of project needs, identification of utilities and solid waste disposal contractor capabilities, and verification of the obtained data. Utilities and solid waste field activities will begin approximately at the time of site access. Utilities and solid waste characterization will be completed within the first year of activity. 29 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Heavy Metals Uptake by Asian Swamp Eel, Monopterus albus from Paddy Fields of Kelantan, Peninsular Malaysia: Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Sow Ai; Ismail, Ahmad; Zulkifli, Syaizwan Zahmir

    2012-12-01

    Swamp eel, Monopterus albus is one of the common fish in paddy fields, thus it is suitable to be a bio-monitor for heavy metals pollution studies in paddy fields. This study was conducted to assess heavy metals levels in swamp eels collected from paddy fields in Kelantan, Malaysia. The results showed zinc [Zn (86.40 μg/g dry weight)] was the highest accumulated metal in the kidney, liver, bone, gill, muscle and skin. Among the selected organs, gill had the highest concentrations of lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and nickel (Ni) whereas muscle showed the lowest total metal accumulation of Zn, Pb, copper (Cu), Cd and Ni. Based on the Malaysian Food Regulation, the levels of Zn and Cu in edible parts (muscle and skin) were within the safety limits. However, Cd, Pb and Ni exceeded the permissible limits. By comparing with the maximum level intake (MLI), Pb, Ni and Cd in edible parts can still be consumed. This investigation indicated that M. albus from paddy fields of Kelantan are safe for human consumption with little precaution.

  2. Incorporating field wind data into FIRETEC simulations of the International Crown Fire Modeling Experiment (ICFME): preliminary lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman Linn; Kerry Anderson; Judith Winterkamp; Alyssa Broos; Michael Wotton; Jean-Luc Dupuy; Francois Pimont; Carleton Edminster

    2012-01-01

    Field experiments are one way to develop or validate wildland fire-behavior models. It is important to consider the implications of assumptions relating to the locality of measurements with respect to the fire, the temporal frequency of the measured data, and the changes to local winds that might be caused by the experimental configuration. Twenty FIRETEC simulations...

  3. MMS Observations of Large Guide Field Symmetric Reconnection Between Colliding Reconnection Jets at the Center of a Magnetic Flux Rope at the Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oieroset, M.; Phan, T. D.; Haggerty, C.; Shay, M. A.; Eastwood, J. P.; Gershman, D. J.; Drake, J. F.; Fujimoto, M.; Ergun, R. E.; Mozer, F. S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report evidence for reconnection between colliding reconnection jets in a compressed current sheet at the center of a magnetic flux rope at Earth's magnetopause. The reconnection involved nearly symmetric Inflow boundary conditions with a strong guide field of two. The thin (2.5 ion-skin depth (d(sub i) width) current sheet (at approximately 12 d(sub i) downstream of the X line) was well resolved by MMS, which revealed large asymmetries in plasma and field structures in the exhaust. Ion perpendicular heating, electron parallel heating, and density compression occurred on one side of the exhaust, while ion parallel heating and density depression were shifted to the other side. The normal electric field and double out-of-plane (bifurcated) currents spanned almost the entire exhaust. These observations are in good agreement with a kinetic simulation for similar boundary conditions, demonstrating in new detail that the structure of large guide field symmetric reconnection is distinctly different from antiparallel reconnection.

  4. Phospholipid micelle-based magneto-plasmonic nanoformulation for magnetic field-directed, imaging-guided photo-induced cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Kopwitthaya, Atcha; Jeon, Mansik; Guo, Moran; Law, Wing-Cheung; Furlani, Edward P; Kim, Chulhong; Prasad, Paras N

    2013-11-01

    We present a magnetoplasmonic nanoplatform combining gold nanorods (GNR) and iron-oxide nanoparticles within phospholipid-based polymeric nanomicelles (PGRFe). The gold nanorods exhibit plasmon resonance absorbance at near infrared wavelengths to enable photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy, while the Fe3O4 nanoparticles enable magnetophoretic control of the nanoformulation. The fabricated nanoformulation can be directed and concentrated by an external magnetic field, which provides enhancement of a photoacoustic signal. Application of an external field also leads to enhanced uptake of the magnetoplasmonic formulation by cancer cells in vitro. Under laser irradiation at the wavelength of the GNR absorption peak, the PGRFe formulation efficiently generates plasmonic nanobubbles within cancer cells, as visualized by confocal microscopy, causing cell destruction. The combined magnetic and plasmonic functionalities of the nanoplatform enable magnetic field-directed, imaging-guided, enhanced photo-induced cancer therapy. In this study, a nano-formulation of gold nanorods and iron oxide nanoparticles is presented using a phospholipid micelle-based delivery system for magnetic field-directed and imaging-guided photo-induced cancer therapy. The gold nanorods enable photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy, while the Fe3O4 nanoparticles enable magnetophoretic control of the formulation. This and similar systems could enable more precise and efficient cancer therapy, hopefully in the near future, after additional testing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigating Streams and Rivers. An Interdisciplinary Curriculum Guide for Use with Mitchell and Stapp's "Field Manual for Water Quality Monitoring."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Mare; And Others

    This guide contains 12 activities designed to encourage secondary school student inquiry, investigation, and action regarding local streams and rivers. The activities are sequential and organized into three topic areas. The first section consists of three activities that help orient students to their local watercourse. Students map a local…

  6. SU-E-J-198: Out-Of-Field Dose and Surface Dose Measurements of MRI-Guided Cobalt-60 Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, J; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Thomas, D; Yang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure quantities of dosimetric interest in an MRI-guided cobalt radiotherapy machine that was recently introduced to clinical use. Methods: Out-of-field dose due to photon scatter and leakage was measured using an ion chamber and solid water slabs mimicking a human body. Surface dose was measured by irradiating stacks of radiochromic film and extrapolating to zero thickness. Electron out-of-field dose was characterized using solid water slabs and radiochromic film. Results: For some phantom geometries, up to 50% of Dmax was observed up to 10 cm laterally from the edge of the beam. The maximum penetration was between 1 and 2 mm in solid water, indicating an electron energy not greater than approximately 0.4 MeV. Out-of-field dose from photon scatter measured at 1 cm depth in solid water was found to fall to less than 10% of Dmax at a distance of 1.2 cm from the edge of a 10.5 × 10.5 cm field, and less that 1% of Dmax at a distance of 10 cm from field edge. Surface dose was measured to be 8% of Dmax. Conclusion: Surface dose and out-of-field dose from the MRIguided cobalt radiotherapy machine was measured and found to be within acceptable limits. Electron out-of-field dose, an effect unique to MRI-guided radiotherapy and presumed to arise from low-energy electrons trapped by the Lorentz force, was quantified. Dr. Low is a member of the scientific advisory board of ViewRay, Inc

  7. The Field Shower Wastewater Recycling System: Development of a Program of Instruction and Preliminary Analysis of Its Potential Health Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    U.S. Army forces in the European, Korean, and Viet Nam Theaters. Recycling shower water in areas such as those described above is not necessary and...project. Signature Figure 3. Bather affidavit. 0. Contaminants Army field conditions do not restrict the types of cosmetic and health care products a...other toiletries used in the showering process * Topically applied cosmetic and health care products, such as antiperspirants, aftershave lotions

  8. Field test facility for monitoring water/radionuclide transport through partially saturated geologic media: design, construction, and preliminary description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Campbell, A.C.; Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Hoober, H.H.; Schwarzmiller, K.O.

    1979-11-01

    Shallow land burial has been a common practice for disposing radioactive waste materials since the beginning of plutonium production operations. Accurate monitoring of radionuclide transport and factors causing transport within the burial sites is essential to minimizing risks associated with disposal. However, monitoring has not always been adequate. Consequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) has begun a program aimed at better assuring and evaluating containment of radioactive wastes at shallow land burial sites. This program includes a technological base for monitoring transport. As part of the DOE program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing geohydrologic monitoring systems to evaluate burial sites located in arid regions. For this project, a field test facility was designed and constructed to assess monitoring systems for near-surface disposal of radioactive waste and to provide information for evaluating site containment performance. The facility is an integrated network of monitoring devices and data collection instruments. This facility is used to measure water and radionuclide migration under field conditions typical of arid regions. Monitoring systems were developed to allow for measurement of both mass and energy balance. Work on the facility is ongoing. Continuing work includes emplacement of prototype monitoring instruments, data collection, and data synthesis. At least 2 years of field data are needed to fully evaluate monitoring information

  9. Site Study Plan for meteorology/air quality, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Meteorological/Air Quality Site Study Plan describes a field program consisting of continuous measurements of surface (10-meter) wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity, dew point, pressure, and sensible heat flux (vertical). Air quality measurements will be limited to suspended particulate matter. After the first year of measurements, a 60-meter tower will be added to incorporate measurements needed for later modeling and dose calculations; these will include upper level winds, vertical temperature structure, and vertical wind speed. All of these measurements will be made at a site located within the 9-mi 2 site area but remote from the ESF. A second site, located near and downwind from the ESF, will monitor only particulate matter. The SSP describes the need for each study; its design and design rationale; analysis, management, and use of data, schedule of field activities, organization of field personnel and sample management, and quality assurance requirements. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from the Salt Repository Project Requirements Document. 38 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Giving Students Control over Their Learning; from Self-guided Museum Visits and Field Trips to Using Scanning Technology to Link Content to Earth Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, K. C.; Phipps, M.

    2011-12-01

    While it may seem counterintuitive, sometimes stepping back is one of the more effective pedagogical approaches instructors can make. On museum visits, an instructor's presence fundamentally alters students' experiences and can curtail student learning by limiting questions or discouraging students from exploring their own interests. Students often rely on the instructor and become passive observers, rather than engaged learners. As an alternative to instructor-led visits, self-guided student explorations of museum exhibits proved to be both popular and pedagogically effective. On pre-instruction and post-instruction surveys, these ungraded, self-guided explorations match or exceed the efficacy of traditional graded lab instruction and completely eclipse gains normally achieved by traditional lecture instruction. In addition, these explorations achieve the remarkable goal of integrating undergraduate earth science instruction into students' social lives. Based on the success of the self-guided museum explorations, this fall saw the debut of an attempt to expand this concept to field experiences. A self-guided student field exploration of Saint Anthony Falls focuses on the intersections of geological processes with human history. Students explore the waterfalls' evolution, its early interpretation by 18th and 19th century Dakota and Euro-America societies, and its subsequent social and economic impacts on Upper Midwest societies. Self-guided explorations allow students to explore field settings on their own or with friends and family in a more relaxed manner. At the same time, these explorations give students control over, and responsibility for, their own learning - a powerful pedagogical approach. Student control over their learning is also the goal of an initiative to use scanning technologies, such as linear bar codes, 2D barcodes and radio-frequency identification (RFID), to revolutionize sample identification and study. Scanning technology allows students to

  11. Enhancement of a Virtual Geology Field Guide of Georgia Initiative Using Gigapan© and ArcGIS Online's Story Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobasher, K.; Turk, H. J.; Witherspoon, W.; Tate, L.; Hoynes, J.

    2015-12-01

    A GIS geology geodatabase of Georgia was developed using ArcGIS 10.2. The geodatabase for each physiographic provinces of Georgia contains fields designed to store information regarding geologic features. Using ArcGIS online, the virtual field guide is created which provides an interactive learning experience for students to allow in real time photography, description, mapping and sharing their observations with the instructor and peers. Gigapan© facilitates visualizing geologic features at different scales with high resolutions and in their larger surrounding context. The classroom applications of the Gigapan© are limitless when teaching students the entire range of geologic structures from showcasing crystalline structures of minerals to understanding the geological processes responsible for formation of an entire mountain range. The addition of the Story Map enhances the virtual experience when you want to present a geo-located story point narrative featuring images or videos. The virtual field component and supplementary Gigapan© imagery coupled with Story Map added significantly to the detailed realism of virtual field guide further allowing students to more fully understand geological concepts at various scales. These technologies peaked students interest and facilitated their learning and preparation to function more effectively in the geosciences by developing better observations and new skills. These technologies facilitated increased student engagement in the geosciences by sharing, enhancing and transferring lecture information to actual field knowledge and experiences. This enhanced interactive learning experience not only begins to allow students to understand and recognize geologic features in the field but also increased their collaboration, enthusiasm and interest in the discipline. The increased interest and collaboration occurred as students assisted in populating a geologic geodatabase of Georgia.

  12. Preliminary study of the effect of the turbulent flow field around complex surfaces on their acoustic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, W. A.; Boldman, D.

    1978-01-01

    Fairly extensive measurements have been conducted of the turbulent flow around various surfaces as a basis for a study of the acoustic characteristics involved. In the experiments the flow from a nozzle was directed upon various two-dimensional surface configurations such as the three-flap model. A turbulent flow field description is given and an estimate of the acoustic characteristics is provided. The developed equations are based upon fundamental theories for simple configurations having simple flows. Qualitative estimates are obtained regarding the radiation pattern and the velocity power law. The effect of geometry and turbulent flow distribution on the acoustic emission from simple configurations are discussed.

  13. Technical procedures for implementation of acoustics site studies, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The purpose and scope of the technical procedure for processing data from the tethered meteorological system are covered. Definitions, interfaces, and concurrent data needs are also addressed. This technical procedure describes how to control, organize, verify, and archive tethered meteorological system data. These data will be received at the processing location from the field measurement location and are part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas for the salt repository program. These measurements will be made in support of the sound propagation study and are a result of environmental data requirements for acoustics. 6 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs

  14. A Workplace Mindfulness Intervention May Be Associated With Improved Psychological Well-Being and Productivity. A Preliminary Field Study in a Company Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersemaekers, Wendy; Rupprecht, Silke; Wittmann, Marc; Tamdjidi, Chris; Falke, Pia; Donders, Rogier; Speckens, Anne; Kohls, Niko

    2018-01-01

    Background: Mindfulness trainings are increasingly offered in workplace environments in order to improve health and productivity. Whilst promising, there is limited research on the effectiveness of mindfulness interventions in workplace settings. Objective: To examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a Workplace Mindfulness Training (WMT) in terms of burnout, psychological well-being, organizational and team climate, and performance. Methods: This is a preliminary field study in four companies. Self-report questionnaires were administered up to a month before, at start of, and right at the end of the WMT, resulting in a pre-intervention and an intervention period. There was no separate control group. A total of 425 participants completed the surveys on the different time points. Linear mixed model analyses were used to analyze the data. Results: When comparing the intervention period with the pre-intervention period, significantly greater improvements were found in measures of burnout (mean difference = 0.3, p mindfulness [mean difference = 1.0 for the Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory (FMI) and 0.8 for the Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), both p mindfulness (d > 0.8), moderate for well-being, burnout and perceived stress (d = 0.5–0.8), and ranged from low to moderate for organizational and team climate and personal performance (d = 0.2–0.8). Conclusion: These preliminary data suggest that compared to the pre-intervention period, the intervention period was associated with greater reductions in burnout and perceived stress, improvements in mindfulness, well-being, and increases in team and organizational climate and personal performance. Due to design limitations, no conclusions can be drawn on the extent to which the WMT or non-specific factors such as time have contributed to the findings. Further studies, preferably using randomized controlled designs with longer follow up periods are needed to evaluate whether the associations found can be

  15. Preliminary Results of a New Auxiliary Mechatronic Near-Field Radar System to 3D Mammography for Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Ghanbarzadeh Dagheyan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and early detection of breast cancer is of high importance, as it is directly associated with the patients’ overall well-being during treatment and their chances of survival. Uncertainties in current breast imaging methods can potentially cause two main problems: (1 missing newly formed or small tumors; and (2 false alarms, which could be a source of stress for patients. A recent study at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH indicates that using Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT can reduce the number of false alarms, when compared to conventional mammography. Despite the image quality enhancement DBT provides, the accurate detection of cancerous masses is still limited by low radiological contrast (about 1% between the fibro-glandular tissue and affected tissue at X-ray frequencies. In a lower frequency region, at microwave frequencies, the contrast is comparatively higher (about 10% between the aforementioned tissues; yet, microwave imaging suffers from low spatial resolution. This work reviews conventional X-ray breast imaging and describes the preliminary results of a novel near-field radar imaging mechatronic system (NRIMS that can be fused with the DBT, in a co-registered fashion, to combine the advantages of both modalities. The NRIMS consists of two antipodal Vivaldi antennas, an XY positioner, and an ethanol container, all of which are particularly designed based on the DBT physical specifications. In this paper, the independent performance of the NRIMS is assessed by (1 imaging a bearing ball immersed in sunflower oil and (2 computing the heat Specific Absorption Rate (SAR due to the electromagnetic power transmitted into the breast. The preliminary results demonstrate that the system is capable of generating images of the ball. Furthermore, the SAR results show that the system complies with the standards set for human trials. As a result, a configuration based on this design might be suitable for use in realistic clinical

  16. Radiation damage of light guide fibers in gamma radiation field - on-line monitoring of absorption centers formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaha, J.; Simane, C.; Finger, M.; Slunecka, M.; Finger, M. Jr.; Sluneckova, V.; Janata, A.; Vognar, M.; Sulc, M.

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics of radiation-induced changes of absorption coefficient was studied by online transmission spectra measurement for two different Kuraray light guide fibers. The samples were irradiated by bremsstrahlung gamma radiation, dose rates were from 2 Gy/s to 25 Gy/s. The kinetic coefficients both for absorption centers formation and for recovery processes were calculated. Good agreement of experimental data and simple one-short-lived absorption center model were received for radiation-hard light guide Kuraray (KFC). The more complicated process was observed on Kuraray (PSM) clear fiber. It was caused by the reaction of the oxygen dissolved in fiber and created radicals. The results are very useful for prediction of an optical fibers response in conditions of new nuclear and particle physics experiments. (author)

  17. Flora and Field Guide References Supporting All U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Wetland Regional Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Guide. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. Jones, A. 1992. Aster and Brachyactis (Asteraceae) in Oklahoma. Sida Bot. Miscellany No. 8. Fort...author. Jones, A. 1992. Aster and Brachyactis (Asteraceae) in Oklahoma. Sida Bot. Miscellany No. 8. Fort Worth, TX: Research Institute of Texas...Agricultural Experiment Station. Jones, A. 1992. Aster and Brachyactis (Asteraceae) in Oklahoma. Sida Bot. Miscellany No. 8. Fort Worth, TX: Research

  18. Preliminary field tests of near-real-time materials accountancy system at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TASK F)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Masayori; Sawahata, Toshio; Sugiyama, Toshihide; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Suyama, Naohiro

    1982-01-01

    A study of applying the proposed near-real-time material accountancy model to the Tokai Reprocessing Plant, PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp.), showed that the model was feasible and effective to meet the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards criteria in terms of detection timeliness and sensitivity. This study using the computer simulation technique is shown in this paper. In order to investigate the applicability of the model to the actual plant, the field test was carried out on the process in the material balance area (MBA) which covers the area from the input accountability vessel (IAV) to the product accountability vessel (PAV), in cooperation with JAERI. The key measuring points for dynamic physical inventory counts (D-PIT) are shown. The results of test evaluation are as follows: For timely detection, it will be able to evaluate an abnoumal accountancy in process by using the MUFd (material unaccounted for) obtained by the D-PIT about once every week. Therefore, this seems to satisfy the timely detection of IAEA safeguards criteria. As for detection, sensitivity and verification procedures, in order to clarify these criteria for a large scale reprocessing plant, further research and development will be required. In addition, since the field test was carried out along with normal plant operation, additional man-power problem was also considered. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  19. Natural Babesia bovis Infection in Water Buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis and Crossbred Cattle under Field Conditions in Egypt: a Preliminary Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Mahmmod

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a little or no data available on the natural Babesia bovis (B. bovis infection in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis comparing to the available one for cattle. This study was conducted to investigate the natural B. bovis infection in water buffaloes in comparison to crossbred cattle under field conditions in Egypt.A total of 35 buffaloes and cattle were clinically and laboratory investigated from March to June 2008. Twenty-nine buffaloes and cattle out of 35 were naturally infected with B. bovis and showed signs of bovine babesiosis. Three cows and three buffaloes showed no clinical signs and were free from external, internal, and blood parasites served as control group.Babesia bovis-infected cattle showed typical signs of bovine babesiosis while B. bovis-infected buffaloes showed a milder form (less severe of the clinical signs. Advanced cases of cattle showed dark brown to dark red (coffee-color urine, hemoglobinuria and nervous manifestations while these manifestations were not detected in the infected buffaloes. Hematological changes in both species however, these changes were less significant in buffaloes than those reported in cattle.This paper documents the first description of natural B. bovis infection in water buffaloes which were found to be more likely to be tolerant than cattle to the natural clinical infection with B. bovis and its subsequent haematological changes. Our finding may lead to a better understanding of the disease pattern of B. bovis infection under field conditions in buffaloes.

  20. Preoperative staging of endometrial cancer using reduced field-of-view diffusion-weighted imaging: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, Takashi; Hori, Masatoshi; Onishi, Hiromitsu; Sakane, Makoto; Tsuboyama, Takahiro; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Nakamoto, Atsushi; Narumi, Yoshifumi [Osaka Medical College, Department of Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Kimura, Tadashi [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Osaka (Japan)

    2017-12-15

    To compare the image quality and diagnostic performance of reduced field-of-view (rFOV) versus conventional full field-of-view (fFOV) diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging of endometrial cancer. Fifty women with endometrial cancer underwent preoperative rFOV and fFOV DW imaging. Two radiologists compared the image qualities of both techniques, and five radiologists assessed superficial and deep myometrial invasion using both techniques. The statistical analysis included the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and paired t-test for comparisons of image quality and mean diagnostic values. Distortion, tumour delineation, and overall image quality were significantly better with rFOV DW imaging, compared to fFOV DW imaging (P < 0.05); however, the former was inferior in noise (P < 0.05). Regarding superficial invasion, the mean accuracies of the techniques did not differ statistically (rFOV, 58.0% versus fFOV, 56.0%; P = 0.30). Regarding deep myometrial invasion, rFOV DW imaging yielded significantly better mean accuracy, specificity, and positive predictive values (88.4%, 97.8%, and 91.7%, respectively), compared with fFOV DW imaging (84.8%, 94.1%, and 77.4%, respectively; P = 0.009, 0.005, and 0.011, respectively). Compared with fFOV DW imaging, rFOV DW imaging yielded less distortion, improved image quality and, consequently, better diagnostic performance for deep myometrial invasion of endometrial cancer. (orig.)

  1. 7 CFR 1942.20 - Community Facility Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Commitment. (2) Guide 2—Water Users Agreement. (3) Guide 3—Service Declination Statement. (4) Guide 4—Bylaws. (5) Guide 5—Financial Feasibility Report. (6) Guide 6—Preliminary Architectural Feasibility Report... 12—Memorandum of Understanding Between the Economic Development Administration—Department of Commerce...

  2. Evaluation of MR cisternography of the cerebellopontine angle using a balanced fast-field-echo sequence: preliminary findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Aoki, Chinatsu; Hachiya, Junichi [Department of Radiology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2 Shinkawa, Mitaka, 181-8611, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-02-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of MR cisternography by the balanced fast-field-echo (bFFE) sequence, comparing with that by a turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequence, for cerebellopontine angle lesions on a 1.5-T imager (Gyroscan Intera, Philips, Best, The Netherlands). The bFFE MR cisternograms depicted target cranial nerves with less cerebrospinal fluid pulsation artifacts than TSE cisternograms and visualized an acoustic schwannoma in 6 of 44 patients with suspicion and a causative vessel of hemifacial spasm in all of 3 patients in a short scanning time (1 min 53 s). The bFFE sequence can be promising for MR cisternography in the diagnosis of cerebellopontine angle lesions. (orig.)

  3. Preliminary study on the characteristics of carbon and oxygen isotopes in the Shiziping geothermal field groundwater in Emei Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xiujing; Jia Shuyuan

    2000-01-01

    Emei Mountain is a well-known scenic tourism spot in China. In order to promote the development of tourist trade, the authors have explored the hydrothermal water in Emei Mountain. At the beginning of 1998, the hydrothermal water was successfully drilled from the Shiziping geothermal field. In the process of prospecting the hydrothermal water, the authors adopted the geochemical method such as carbon and oxygen isotopes. The result indicates that the groundwater of different genetic types has different constitution characteristics of carbon and oxygen isotopes. This provides the important basis for finding out the forming conditions of underground hydrothermal water. So, it is prospective to study the growth characteristics of hydrothermal water with the carbon and oxygen isotopes of HCO 3 in groundwater

  4. Evaluating strategies to improve glucosinolate concentration and root yield of field-grown horseradish in a Mediterranean environment: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rita Rivelli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Horseradish is grown for its enlarged taproot that is widely used as a dish condiment and as a source of horseradish peroxidase. Nowadays, the species is gaining great interest due to the richness in bioactive compounds that besides providing a high nutritional value are tested for innovative applications in different fields. Nevertheless, the effect of crop management on root yield and glucosinolates (GLS biosynthesis is poorly documented. Aim of this study was to evaluate the root yield and GLS concentration of two field-grown horseradish accessions (Cor and Mon grown with nitrogen (N alone and both N and sulphur (S (-N-S, +N-S and +N+S treatments and harvested at different times [late autumn (LA, 2011 and 2012, early spring (ES, 2012]. Yield increased throughout the harvests up to 48% on average of the fertilised treatments and 25% in the unfertilised control. Conversely, root GLS concentration significantly declined in the unfertilised control throughout the harvests [from 7.6 in LA_2011 to 1.43 μmol/g dry matter (DM in LA_2012] while it highly increased in plants grown with N alone and with both N and S by 46 and 98%, respectively, from LA_2011 to ES_2012 (up to 11.9 and 21.1 μmol/g DM, respectively; then it drastically decreased by 80% on average, in the next harvest. Among individual GLS, the concentration of sinigrin and nasturtin similarly varied as effect of the analysed factors, showing the highest values in Cor accession. The data show that although the level of GLS is highly dependent on genotype, fertilisation and harvesting date may play a primary role in determining the yield and GLS concentration in horseradish root.

  5. Endoluminal ultrasound applicators for MR-guided thermal ablation of pancreatic tumors: Preliminary design and evaluation in a porcine pancreas model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Matthew S., E-mail: matt.adams@ucsf.edu; Diederich, Chris J. [Thermal Therapy Research Group, University of California, San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, S341, San Francisco, California 94115 and The UC Berkeley - UCSF Graduate Program in Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, and University of California, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States); Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Jones, Peter D. [Thermal Therapy Research Group, University of California, San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, S341, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States); Plata-Camargo, Juan; Sommer, Graham; Pauly, Kim Butts [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Pascal-Tenorio, Aurea; Bouley, Donna M. [Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Chen, Hsin-Yu [The UC Berkeley - UCSF Graduate Program in Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, and University of California, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: Endoluminal ultrasound may serve as a minimally invasive option for delivering thermal ablation to pancreatic tumors adjacent to the stomach or duodenum. The objective of this study was to explore the basic feasibility of this treatment strategy through the design, characterization, and evaluation of proof-of-concept endoluminal ultrasound applicators capable of placement in the gastrointestinal (GI) lumen for volumetric pancreas ablation under MR guidance. Methods: Two variants of the endoluminal applicator, each containing a distinct array of two independently powered transducers (10 × 10 mm 3.2 MHz planar; or 8 × 10 × 20 mm radius of curvature 3.3 MHz curvilinear geometries) at the distal end of a meter long flexible catheter assembly, were designed and fabricated. Transducers and circulatory water flow for acoustic coupling and luminal cooling were contained by a low-profile polyester balloon covering the transducer assembly fixture. Each applicator incorporated miniature spiral MR coils and mechanical features (guiding tips and hinges) to facilitate tracking and insertion through the GI tract under MRI guidance. Acoustic characterization of each device was performed using radiation force balance and hydrophone measurements. Device delivery into the upper GI tract, adjacent to the pancreas, and heating characteristics for treatment of pancreatic tissue were evaluated in MR-guided ex vivo and in vivo porcine experiments. MR guidance was utilized for anatomical target identification, tracking/positioning of the applicator, and MR temperature imaging (MRTI) for PRF-based multislice thermometry, implemented in the real-time RTHawk software environment. Results: Force balance and hydrophone measurements indicated efficiencies of 48.8% and 47.8% and −3 dB intensity beam-widths of 3.2 and 1.2 mm for the planar and curvilinear transducers, respectively. Ex vivo studies on whole-porcine carcasses revealed capabilities of producing ablative temperature rise

  6. Endoluminal ultrasound applicators for MR-guided thermal ablation of pancreatic tumors: Preliminary design and evaluation in a porcine pancreas model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Matthew S.; Diederich, Chris J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Jones, Peter D.; Plata-Camargo, Juan; Sommer, Graham; Pauly, Kim Butts; Pascal-Tenorio, Aurea; Bouley, Donna M.; Chen, Hsin-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Endoluminal ultrasound may serve as a minimally invasive option for delivering thermal ablation to pancreatic tumors adjacent to the stomach or duodenum. The objective of this study was to explore the basic feasibility of this treatment strategy through the design, characterization, and evaluation of proof-of-concept endoluminal ultrasound applicators capable of placement in the gastrointestinal (GI) lumen for volumetric pancreas ablation under MR guidance. Methods: Two variants of the endoluminal applicator, each containing a distinct array of two independently powered transducers (10 × 10 mm 3.2 MHz planar; or 8 × 10 × 20 mm radius of curvature 3.3 MHz curvilinear geometries) at the distal end of a meter long flexible catheter assembly, were designed and fabricated. Transducers and circulatory water flow for acoustic coupling and luminal cooling were contained by a low-profile polyester balloon covering the transducer assembly fixture. Each applicator incorporated miniature spiral MR coils and mechanical features (guiding tips and hinges) to facilitate tracking and insertion through the GI tract under MRI guidance. Acoustic characterization of each device was performed using radiation force balance and hydrophone measurements. Device delivery into the upper GI tract, adjacent to the pancreas, and heating characteristics for treatment of pancreatic tissue were evaluated in MR-guided ex vivo and in vivo porcine experiments. MR guidance was utilized for anatomical target identification, tracking/positioning of the applicator, and MR temperature imaging (MRTI) for PRF-based multislice thermometry, implemented in the real-time RTHawk software environment. Results: Force balance and hydrophone measurements indicated efficiencies of 48.8% and 47.8% and −3 dB intensity beam-widths of 3.2 and 1.2 mm for the planar and curvilinear transducers, respectively. Ex vivo studies on whole-porcine carcasses revealed capabilities of producing ablative temperature rise

  7. Localization of a sound source in in a guided medium and reverberating field. Contribution to a study on leak localization in the internal wall of containment of a nuclear reactor in the case of a severe reactor accident; Localisation d`une source acoustique en milieu guide et champ reverberant. Contribution a l`etude sur la localisation de fuite de l`enceinte de confinement d`une centrale nucleaire en situation accidentelle grave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomann, F

    1996-11-28

    Basic data necessary for the localization of a leak in the internal wall of the containment are presented by studying the sound generated by gas jets coming out of (leaking fissures) as well as propagation in a guided medium. The results acquired have led us to choose the simple intercorrelation method and the matched filed processing method, both of which are likely to adequately handle our problems. Whereas the intercorrelation method appears to be limited in scope when dealing in the guided medium, the matched field processing is suited to leak localization over a surface of approximately 1000 m{sup 2} (for a total surface of 10 000 m{sup 2}). Preliminary studies on the leak signal and on replicated signals have led us to limit the frequency band to 2600 - 3000 Hz. We have succeeded in locating a leak situated in an ordinary position with a minimum amount of replicated signals and basic data. We have improved on the estimation of Bartlett and MVDE (minimum variance distortion less filter) rendering them even more effective. Afterwards, we considered the severe accident situation and showed that the system can be installed in situ. (author) 88 refs.

  8. Comparison between high-field magnetic resonance imaging of the liver and computed tomography. A preliminary study on 39 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaerel, P.; Marchal, G.; Aerts, P.; Van Fraeyenhoven, L.; Baert, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Thirty nine patients with one or more focal hepatic lesions were examined by contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A variety of pulse sequences - spin echo (SE), gradient echo (GE) and inversion recovery (IR) - have been reported in the literature on MRI concerning the detection and characterization of liver tumors. Multiple studies have compared MRI at different field strenghts to CT. As controversy still exists concerning the optimal pulse sequence on MRI, CE-CT has been compared to T2 weighted SE sequence in this study. CT, as well as MRI, identified abnormalities in liver parenchyma in all patients. As far as detection of hepatic lesions is concerned, MRI and CE-CT were equal in 35 cases and MRI was superior in the other four cases. However, CT remains the examination of choice for detection of focal lesions, due to the short examination time, the low cost and the superiority in detection of extrahepatic pathology [fr

  9. Optimal usage of cone beam computed tomography system with different field of views in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Venkata Naga Madhusudhana Sresty

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To find methods for optimal usage of XVI (X-ray volume imaging system in Elekta synergy linear accelerator with different field of views for same lesion in order to minimize patient dose due to imaging.Methods: 20 scans of 2 individual patients with ca sigmoid colon and ca lung were used in this study. Kilo voltage collimators with medium field of view were used as per the preset information. Images were reconstructed for another collimator with small field of view. The set up errors were evaluated with XVI software. Shift results of both methods were compared. Results: Variation in treatment set up errors with M20 and S20 collimators were ≤ 0.2 mm in translational and 0.30 in rotational shifts. Results showed almost equal translational and rotational shifts in both medium and small field of views with different collimators in all the scans. Visualization of target and surrounding structures were good enough and sufficient for XVI auto matching.Conclusion: Imaging with small field of view results less patient dose compared with medium or large field of views. It is Suggestible to use collimators with small field of view wherever possible. In this study, collimators with small field of view were sufficient for both patients though the preset information indicated medium field of view. But, it always depends on the area required for matching purpose. So, individual selection is important than preset information in the XVI system.

  10. A CT-ultrasound-coregistered augmented reality enhanced image-guided surgery system and its preliminary study on brain-shift estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C H; Hsieh, C H; Lee, J D; Huang, W C; Lee, S T; Wu, C T; Sun, Y N; Wu, Y T

    2012-01-01

    With the combined view on the physical space and the medical imaging data, augmented reality (AR) visualization can provide perceptive advantages during image-guided surgery (IGS). However, the imaging data are usually captured before surgery and might be different from the up-to-date one due to natural shift of soft tissues. This study presents an AR-enhanced IGS system which is capable to correct the movement of soft tissues from the pre-operative CT images by using intra-operative ultrasound images. First, with reconstructing 2-D free-hand ultrasound images to 3-D volume data, the system applies a Mutual-Information based registration algorithm to estimate the deformation between pre-operative and intra-operative ultrasound images. The estimated deformation transform describes the movement of soft tissues and is then applied to the pre-operative CT images which provide high-resolution anatomical information. As a result, the system thus displays the fusion of the corrected CT images or the real-time 2-D ultrasound images with the patient in the physical space through a head mounted display device, providing an immersive augmented-reality environment. For the performance validation of the proposed system, a brain phantom was utilized to simulate brain-shift scenario. Experimental results reveal that when the shift of an artificial tumor is from 5mm ∼ 12mm, the correction rates can be improved from 32% ∼ 45% to 87% ∼ 95% by using the proposed system.

  11. Cranial nerve threshold for thermal injury induced by MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU): preliminary results on an optic nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnof, Sagi; Zibly, Zion; Cohen, Zvi; Shaw, Andrew; Schlaff, Cody; Kassel, Neal F

    2013-04-01

    Future clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) are moving toward the management of different intracranial pathologies. We sought to validate the production, safety, and efficacy of thermal injury to cranial nerves generated by MRgHIFU. In this study, five female domestic pigs underwent a standard bifrontal craniectomy under general anesthesia. Treatment was then given using an MRgHIFU system to induce hyperthermic ablative sonication (6 to 10 s; 50 to 2000 J.) Histological analyses were done to confirm nerve damage; temperature measured on the optic nerve was approximately 53.4°C (range: 39°C to 70°C.) Histology demonstrated a clear definition between a necrotic, transitional zone, and normal tissue. MRgHIFU induces targeted thermal injury to nervous tissue within a specific threshold of 50°C to 60°C with the tissue near the sonication center yielding the greatest effect; adjacent tissue showed minimal changes. Additional studies utilizing this technology are required to further establish accurate threshold parameters for optic nerve thermo-ablation.

  12. Randomized trial for superiority of high field strength intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging guided resection in pituitary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Vivek; Raheja, Amol; Suri, Ashish; Chandra, P Sarat; Kale, Shashank S; Kumar, Rajinder; Garg, Ajay; Kalaivani, Mani; Pandey, Ravindra M; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2017-03-01

    Till date there are no randomized trials to suggest the superiority of intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (IOMRI) guided trans-sphenoidal pituitary resection over two dimensional fluoroscopic (2D-F) guided resections. We conducted this trial to establish the superiority of IOMRI in pituitary surgery. Primary objective was to compare extent of tumor resection between the two study arms. It was a prospective, randomized, outcome assessor and statistician blinded, two arm (A: IOMRI, n=25 and B: 2D-F, n=25), parallel group clinical trial. 4 patients from IOMRI group cross-over to 2D-F group and were consequently analyzed in latter group, based on modified intent to treat method. A total of 50 patients were enrolled till completion of trial (n=25 in each study arm). Demographic profile and baseline parameters were comparable among the two arms (p>0.05) except for higher number of endoscopic procedures and experienced neurosurgeons (>10years) in arm B (p=0.02, 0.002 respectively). Extent of resection was similar in both study arms (A, 94.9% vs B, 93.6%; p=0.78), despite adjusting for experience of operating surgeon and use of microscope/endoscope for surgical resection. We observed that use of IOMRI helped optimize the extent of resection in 5/20 patients (25%) for pituitary tumor resection in-group A. Present study failed to observe superiorty of IOMRI over conventional 2D-F guided resection in pituitary macroadenoma surgery. By use of this technology, younger surgeons could validate their results intra-operatively and hence could increase EOR without causing any increase in complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Field Trip Guide to Serpentinite, Silica-Carbonate Alteration, and Related Hydrothermal Activity in the Clear Lake Region, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser Goff; George Guthrie

    1999-06-01

    This guide is designed to familiarize scientists with the geology, structure, alteration, and fluids typical of California serpentinites for purposes of carbon dioxide sequestration (Lackner et al., 1995). Goff et al. (1997) and Goff and Lackner (1998) describe the geology and geochemistry of some of the serpentinites from this area. Mechanisms of silica-carbonate alteration were outlined by Barnes et al. (1973). Donnelly-Nolan et al. (1993) most recently reviewed relations between regional hydrothermal alteration and Quarternary volcanic activity. Stanley et al. (1998) summarized geophysical characteristics of the region.

  14. THE PROPERTIES OF GUIDED ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD MODES ON THE GaAs-BASED FIBER GLASS AND LASERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa TEMİZ

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available On the lasers or fiber optic communication electromagnetic waves are transmitted by confining and guiding between special layer's or fiber glass respectively. It is desired that electric and magnetic waves are in the active region of the lasers and in the core of the fiber glass. It is obtained by making more larger the of refractive index of the regions. On this work, the behavior and varying of the electric and magnetic waves and the effects on the electromagnetic waves in the fiber glass and lasers are investigated.

  15. Preliminary analysis of columnar aerosol properties in relation to surface PM measurements in the DAMOCLES 2006 field campaign (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelles, V.; Esteve, A.; Pey, J.; Martinez-Lozano, J. A.; Utrillas, M. P.; Querol, X.; de La Rosa, J.; Gonzalez-Castanedo, Y.; Alastuey, A.; Gangoiti, G.

    2009-04-01

    The DAMOCLES network is a Spanish thematic network, started in 2004, whose main objective is the establishment of a link among the different groups that perform research on atmospheric aerosols in Spain. Under the DAMOCLES coordination, a field campaign was held in summer 2006 at the INTA installations (El Arenosillo, Huelva) for the intercomparison of different kind of instruments devoted to in - situ and columnar aerosol measurement. During this field campaign, two daily meteorological soundings were carried out at noon and midnight for characterization of the atmospheric condition. A plane was also flown by the National Institute of Aerospace Technology (INTA) to carry airborne sensors for measuring different atmospheric factors: meteorological parameters, ozone with a 2BTech analyzer, and aerosol particle size distributions in the range (0.01-2) microns, by using a PCASP probe. The columnar aerosol properties were measured by seven CIMEL CE318 sun photometers. For in situ aerosol characterization, high volume collectors (DIGITEL and MCV) with DIGITEL for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 measurement were used, with two cascade impactors for particulate matter measurement in 7 -8 granulometric fractions. For the PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 measurement, quartz fibre filters of 150 mm diameter were adapted. Other in situ deployed instruments were a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS, Model 3936), two Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS Model 3321) and one Grimm Spectrometer (Model #190). For characterization of the aerosol scattering at ground level, three integrating nephelometers TSI-3563 were used. For the columnar profiling we deployed five LIDAR instruments. In this study we have related the columnar aerosol measurements retrieved with one CE318 sun photometer to the surface PM measurements, mainly in some interesting situations where nearby pollution sources were influencing the local atmosphere. For the sun photometric analysis, we have applied the EuroSkyRad package (ESR

  16. Understanding the fate of black (pyrogenic) carbon in soil: Preliminary results from a long term field trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Will; Ascough, Philippa; Bird, Michael; Large, David; Shen, Licheng; Snape, Colin

    2014-05-01

    Black carbon (BC, also known as pyrogenic carbon) is an 'inert' form of carbon and has been proposed as a means of long-term carbon sequestration, particularly by amending soils and sediments with BC known as biochar. While there is abundant anecdotal evidence of biochar stability over extended timescales it is essential to gain a greater understanding of the degree and mechanisms of biochar degradation in the environment. This study aims to quantitatively assess the stability of biochar by investigating samples from field degradation trials first buried during 2009 in a tropical soil, and recovered after 12 and 36 month intervals. Catalytic hydropyrolysis (HyPy) is a novel analytical tool for the isolation of BC [1] in which high hydrogen pressure (150 bar) and a sulphided Mo catalyst reductively remove the non-BC fraction of the chars, and so isolate the most stable portion of the biochar, defined as BC(HyPy). This method also allows for the non-BC(HyPy) fraction of a sample, which from charcoal is known to include small ring PAHs (soil depth and pH to be investigated. Char stability (as measured by BC(HyPy) content) is dependent on both the feedstock and temperature of formation. HyPy is known to discriminate (in terms of BC isolation) against low temperature chars, composed of relatively small aromatic clusters [1], resulting in the low BC(HyPy) contents reported for the 305°C chars. Fresh charcoals, and those not subject to environmental degradation have display a similar distribution of aromatic clusters in the non-BC(HyPy) fraction, with 2 to 7 ring PAHs abundant [2]. However, environmentally degraded charcoals such as that from a Chinese river sediment, and an Australian river estuary [3] show a more restricted distribution with markedly fewer 2- and 3- ring PAH structures apparent. This may be evidence for the partial solubilisation of the charcoal as observed for a forest soil [4] and suggested as a mechanism for the transport of BC to the oceans [5

  17. Validation of dose-response calibration curve for X-Ray field of CRCN-NE/CNEN: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Laís Melo; Mendonç, Julyanne Conceição de Goes; Andrade, Aida Mayra Guedes de; Hwang, Suy F.; Mendes, Mariana Esposito; Lima, Fabiana F.; Melo, Ana Maria M.A.

    2017-01-01

    It is very important in accident investigations that accurate estimating of absorbed dose takes place, so that it contributes to medical decisions and overall assessment of long-term health consequences. Analysis of chromosome aberrations is the most developed method for biological monitoring, and frequencies of dicentric chromosomes are related to absorbed dose of human peripheral blood lymphocytes using calibration curves. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommends that each biodosimetry laboratory sets its own calibration curves, given that there are intrinsic differences in protocols and dose interpretations when using calibration curves produced in other laboratories, which could add further uncertainties to dose estimations. The Laboratory for Biological Dosimetry CRCN-NE recently completed dose-response calibration curves for X ray field. Curves of chromosomes dicentrics and dicentrics plus rings were made using Dose Estimate. This study aimed to validate the calibration curves dose-response for X ray with three irradiated samples. Blood was obtained by venipuncture from healthy volunteer and three samples were irradiated by x-rays of 250 kVp with different absorbed doses (0,5Gy, 1Gy and 2Gy). The irradiation was performed at the CRCN-NE/CNEN Metrology Service with PANTAK X-ray equipment, model HF 320. The frequency of dicentric and centric rings chromosomes were determined in 500 metaphases per sample after cultivation of lymphocytes, and staining with Giemsa 5%. Results showed that the estimated absorbed doses are included in the confidence interval of 95% of real absorbed dose. These Dose-response calibration curves (dicentrics and dicentrics plus rings) seems valid, therefore other tests will be done with different volunteers. (author)

  18. Reproductive isolation revealed in preliminary crossbreeding experiments using field collected Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) from three ITS-2 defined groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Mauricio; Menes, Marianela; Dorn, Patricia L; Monroy, Carlota; Richards, Bethany; Panzera, Francisco; Bustamante, Dulce María

    2013-12-01

    Triatoma dimidiata, a Chagas disease vector distributed in Mexico, Central America, Colombia, Venezuela, Peru and Ecuador, has been studied using genetic markers and four groups have been defined by ITS-2 sequences: 1A, 1B, 2 and 3. To gather evidence on the divergence and reproductive isolation among T. dimidiata ITS-2 groups, we carried out 15 crossbreeding experiments with field-collected sylvan and domestic T. dimidiata from Guatemala where three groups are found: 1A, 2 and 3. Reciprocal crosses between individuals from groups 1A and 2, and a cross between group 2 individuals from different habitats, produced an average 129.78±42.29 eggs with hatching success ranging from 31.6 to 90.1%. The offspring of these crosses reached the adult stage, and crosses between F1 insects produced eggs. These results suggest that there are no pre- or post-zygotic reproductive barriers between groups 1A and 2, or within group 2. Crosses between group 3 females and males from groups 1A or 2 produced on average 85.67±30.26 eggs and none of them hatched. These results support the existence of pre-zygotic barriers between T. dimidiata group 3 and groups 1A and 2. The group 3 individuals were collected in sylvatic environments in Yaxha, Peten, Guatemala. Previously, distinct chromosomal characteristics (cytotype 3) were described in individuals from this population. Based on this evidence we suggest that this population is divergent at the species level from other T. dimidiata populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Validation of dose-response calibration curve for X-Ray field of CRCN-NE/CNEN: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Laís Melo; Mendonç, Julyanne Conceição de Goes; Andrade, Aida Mayra Guedes de; Hwang, Suy F.; Mendes, Mariana Esposito; Lima, Fabiana F., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: mendes_sb@hotmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares, (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Melo, Ana Maria M.A., E-mail: july_cgm@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Vitória de Santo Antão, PE (Brazil). Centro Acadêmico de Vitória

    2017-07-01

    It is very important in accident investigations that accurate estimating of absorbed dose takes place, so that it contributes to medical decisions and overall assessment of long-term health consequences. Analysis of chromosome aberrations is the most developed method for biological monitoring, and frequencies of dicentric chromosomes are related to absorbed dose of human peripheral blood lymphocytes using calibration curves. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommends that each biodosimetry laboratory sets its own calibration curves, given that there are intrinsic differences in protocols and dose interpretations when using calibration curves produced in other laboratories, which could add further uncertainties to dose estimations. The Laboratory for Biological Dosimetry CRCN-NE recently completed dose-response calibration curves for X ray field. Curves of chromosomes dicentrics and dicentrics plus rings were made using Dose Estimate. This study aimed to validate the calibration curves dose-response for X ray with three irradiated samples. Blood was obtained by venipuncture from healthy volunteer and three samples were irradiated by x-rays of 250 kVp with different absorbed doses (0,5Gy, 1Gy and 2Gy). The irradiation was performed at the CRCN-NE/CNEN Metrology Service with PANTAK X-ray equipment, model HF 320. The frequency of dicentric and centric rings chromosomes were determined in 500 metaphases per sample after cultivation of lymphocytes, and staining with Giemsa 5%. Results showed that the estimated absorbed doses are included in the confidence interval of 95% of real absorbed dose. These Dose-response calibration curves (dicentrics and dicentrics plus rings) seems valid, therefore other tests will be done with different volunteers. (author)

  20. Assessment of multifocal contact lens over-refraction using an infrared, open-field autorefractor: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner, Anna; Aldaba, Mikel; Arjona, Montserrat; Vilaseca, Meritxell; Pujol, Jaume

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of an infrared open-field autorefractor as a predictor of the refractive error when fitting multifocal contact lenses (MCL). Objective and subjective measurements of the non-cycloplegic distance refractive error were compared in patients wearing MCL. We used the Grand Seiko WAM-5500 autorefractor for the objective measurements. Three commercially available MCL were tested. Twenty-one eyes of sixteen healthy adults were included in the study. Over-refraction was evaluated in terms of spherical equivalent (SE) and astigmatic vectors (J0 and J45). The mean difference±SD of each parameter was calculated. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to verify the normal distribution. Pearson's correlation, Bland and Altman plot and paired sample t test were used to compare the results obtained with both methods. The mean difference between objective and subjective results of the SE over-refraction was 0.13±0.42D; for astigmatic vectors J0 and J45 were 0.03±0.32D and -0.00±0.17D, respectively. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test showed a normal distribution for all parameters. The highest Pearson's correlation coefficients were obtained for the SE with values of 0.98 without MCL and 0.97 with MCL. The lowest were obtained for J45 with values of 0.65 without MCL and 0.75 with MCL. Significant correlations were obtained for each parameter. The paired sample t test failed to show significant differences in analyzed parameters except for J0 without MCL. The Grand Seiko WAM-5500 can be used as a screening method of over-refraction in the clinical fitting of MCL. Copyright © 2015 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A preliminary interpretation of gas composition in the CP IV sector wells, Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan Reyes, Rosa Maria; Arellano Gomez, Victor M; Portugal Marin, Enrique [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Geotermia, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: rmb@iie.org.mx; Perez Hernandez, Alfredo; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Marco Helio; Leon Vivar, Jesus de [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Residencia General Cerro Prieto, B.C. (Mexico)

    2007-07-15

    To increase the electrical generation capacity of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field from 620 MW to 720 MW, the Cerro Prieto IV (CP IV) sector of the field was developed in the NE portion of the exploited field. Fourteen new wells have been drilled there since 2000. The wells in CP IV zone produce two-phase fluids at wellhead with heterogeneous steam fraction characteristics: at the central zone and towards the NW, the wells are liquid-dominated while those towards the E and S produce a relatively high steam fraction. This work studies the gas compositions of produced fluids to obtain reservoir parameters such as temperature and steam fraction and identify different sources of fluids in the wells. A method was used based on the Fischer Tropsch reaction and H{sub 2}S equilibria with pyrite-pyrrhotite as a mineral buffer (FT-HSH3). The results for the natural state showed the presence of fluids with reservoir temperatures from 275 to 310 degrees Celsius and excess steam values from -1 to 50%. Data are aligned in a FT-HSH3 trend, suggesting that the well discharges consist of a mixture in different proportions of the two end members. One seems to be a liquid with a temperature of over 300 degrees Celsius with negative or negligible excess steam. The other seems to be a two-phase fluid with a temperature of about 275 degrees Celsius and an excess steam fraction of about 0.5. According to the data for single wells and depending on the production conditions of the wells, reservoir fluid mixtures could occur in different proportions of liquid and steam. Data for 2005 that included wells drilled after 2000 suggest the presence of a steam phase in the reservoir. The steam could be generated with the boiling of deep reservoir fluid from a pressure drop. The mixing trend obtained for the natural state was also seen for 2005 data but lower temperatures (from 265 to 295 degrees Celsius) were obtained compared with those for natural conditions. The entry of lower

  2. Field-trip guide to the vents, dikes, stratigraphy, and structure of the Columbia River Basalt Group, eastern Oregon and southeastern Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Victor E; Reidel, Stephen P.; Ross, Martin E.; Brown, Richard J.; Self, Stephen

    2017-06-22

    The Columbia River Basalt Group covers an area of more than 210,000 km2 with an estimated volume of 210,000 km3. As the youngest continental flood-basalt province on Earth (16.7–5.5 Ma), it is well preserved, with a coherent and detailed stratigraphy exposed in the deep canyonlands of eastern Oregon and southeastern Washington. The Columbia River flood-basalt province is often cited as a model for the study of similar provinces worldwide.This field-trip guide explores the main source region of the Columbia River Basalt Group and is written for trip participants attending the 2017 International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) Scientific Assembly in Portland, Oregon, USA. The first part of the guide provides an overview of the geologic features common in the Columbia River flood-basalt province and the stratigraphic terminology used in the Columbia River Basalt Group. The accompanying road log examines the stratigraphic evolution, eruption history, and structure of the province through a field examination of the lavas, dikes, and pyroclastic rocks of the Columbia River Basalt Group.

  3. Efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of symptomatic uterine fibroids in Black women: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Jacobson, H; Ngobese, Z E; Setzen, R

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effect and safety of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) treatment on symptomatic uterine fibroids in Black women. A feasibility study. Gynaecological department in a teaching hospital in South Africa. Premenopausal women with uterus fibroids. Twenty-six patients with 53 fibroids who underwent USgHIFU treatment were enrolled. The USgHIFU treatment information was recorded, including treatment time, sonication time and total energy. Adverse events were also observed and recorded during and after treatment. Safety and efficacy of USgHIFU for the treatment of uterine fibroids in Black women. The median volume of fibroids was 52.7 (interquartile range, 18.6-177.4) cm 3 . According to USgHIFU treatment plan, total energy of 298.6 ± 169.3 kJ (range, 76.0-889.2) within treatment time of 90.3 ± 43.3 minutes (range, 14.0-208.0), in which sonication time of 774.0 ± 432.9 seconds (range, 190.0-2224.0) was used to ablate fibroids. The average ablation rate was 80.6 ± 9.7% (range, 46.5-94.5%). During the procedure, 69.2% of the patients reported lower abdominal pain, 57.7% sciatic/buttock pain, 38.5% burning skin, and 34.6% transient leg pain. No severe complications were observed. USgHIFU is feasible and safe to use to treat symptomatic uterine fibroids in Black women. Multiple uterine fibroids are more frequently detected in Black women. USgHIFU is feasible and safe for the treatment of uterine fibroids in Black women. © 2017 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  4. Feasibility Study on MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Sciatic Nerve in a Swine Model: Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, Elena A., E-mail: kayee@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Gutta, Narendra Babu, E-mail: gnbabu.aiims@gmail.com [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Monette, Sebastien, E-mail: monettes@mskcc.org [The Rockefeller University, Tri-Institutional Laboratory of Comparative Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College (United States); Gulati, Amitabh, E-mail: gulatia@mskcc.org; Loh, Jeffrey, E-mail: jeffreyloh@gmail.com [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Anesthesiology-Critical Care (United States); Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan, E-mail: srimaths@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Ezell, Paula C., E-mail: paula.ezell@intusurg.com [The Rockefeller University, Tri-Institutional Laboratory of Comparative Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College (United States); Erinjeri, Joseph P., E-mail: erinjerj@mskcc.org; Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org; Maybody, Majid, E-mail: maybodym@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2015-08-15

    IntroductionSpastic patients often seek neurolysis, the permanent destruction of the sciatic nerve, for better pain management. MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) may serve as a noninvasive alternative to the prevailing, more intrusive techniques. This in vivo acute study is aimed at performing sciatic nerve neurolysis using a clinical MRgHIFU system.MethodsThe HIFU ablation of sciatic nerves was performed in swine (n = 5) using a HIFU system integrated with a 3 T MRI scanner. Acute lesions were confirmed using T1-weighted contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI and histopathology using hematoxylin and eosin staining. The animals were euthanized immediately following post-ablation imaging.ResultsReddening and mild thickening of the nerve and pallor of the adjacent muscle were seen in all animals. The HIFU-treated sections of the nerves displayed nuclear pyknosis of Schwann cells, vascular hyperemia, perineural edema, hyalinization of the collagenous stroma of the nerve, myelin sheet swelling, and loss of axons. Ablations were visible on CE MRI. Non-perfused volume of the lesions (5.8–64.6 cc) linearly correlated with estimated lethal thermal dose volume (4.7–34.2 cc). Skin burn adjacent to the largest ablated zone was observed in the first animal. Bilateral treatment time ranged from 55 to 138 min, and preparation time required 2 h on average.ConclusionThe acute pilot study in swine demonstrated the feasibility of a noninvasive neurolysis of the sciatic nerve using a clinical MRgHIFU system. Results revealed that acute HIFU nerve lesions were detectable on CE MRI, gross pathology, and histology.

  5. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma by radiofrequency hyperthermia with a 'cooled-tip needle'. A preliminary clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francica, G; Marone, G

    1999-05-01

    Radiofrequency hyperthermia using the newly-developed 'cooled-tip' needle has recently been proposed as a therapeutic modality for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Herein we report our preliminary results on feasibility and effectiveness of the thermal ablation of mono- or pauci-focal hepatocellular carcinoma with the cooled-tip needle. We treated 15 cirrhotic patients (mean age 68.8 years; 12 males; 14 HCV-positive; 13 in Child's Class A and 2 in Class B) with 20 hepatocellular carcinoma nodules (mean diameter 28.1 mm; range 10-43 mm; nine lesions with diameter greater than 3 cm). None of the patients had portal thrombosis and/or extrahepatic spread. We used a radiofrequency generator (100 W of power) connected to a 18 g perfusion electrode needle with an exposed tip of 2-3 cm. The circuit was closed through a dispersive electrode positioned under the patient's thighs. A peristaltic pump infused a chilled (2-5 degrees C) saline solution to guarantee the continuous cooling of the needle tip. The needle was placed into target lesions under US guidance. The interventional procedure was carried out in general anesthesia without intubation. Dynamic helical CT was carried out 15-20 days after thermal ablation to assess therapeutic efficacy. In all, 38 areas of coagulation necrosis (at 1000-1200 mA for 10-15 min) were generated in 24 sessions in the 20 hepatocellular carcinoma nodules (mean 1.9 lesions per nodule and 1.2 sessions per nodule). Complete necrosis as assessed at dynamic CT (lack of enhancement during the arteriographic phase) was achieved in 75% of cases in a single session; after a second RF session success rate was 90% (18 out of 20 nodules). A self-limited pleurisy along with a 5-fold increase in transaminases occurred in one patient; a 3-fold elevation of transaminases was encountered in three other patients. During the follow-up (median 15 months) five patients had recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma with a 1-year disease free interval of 64%. Of the

  6. Linking blast physics to biological outcomes in mild traumatic brain injury: Narrative review and preliminary report of an open-field blast model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hailong; Cui, Jiankun; Simonyi, Agnes; Johnson, Catherine E; Hubler, Graham K; DePalma, Ralph G; Gu, Zezong

    2018-03-15

    Blast exposures are associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and blast-induced TBIs are common injuries affecting military personnel. Department of Defense and Veterans Administration (DoD/VA) reports for TBI indicated that the vast majority (82.3%) has been mild TBI (mTBI)/concussion. mTBI and associated posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD) have been called "the invisible injury" of the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. These injuries induce varying degrees of neuropathological alterations and, in some cases, chronic cognitive, behavioral and neurological disorders. Appropriate animal models of blast-induced TBI will not only assist the understanding of physical characteristics of the blast, but also help to address the potential mechanisms. This report provides a brief overview of physical principles of blast, injury mechanisms related to blast exposure, current blast animal models, and the neurological behavioral and neuropathological findings related to blast injury in experimental settings. We describe relationships between blast peak pressures and the observed injuries. We also report preliminary use of a highly reproducible and intensity-graded blast murine model carried out in open-field with explosives, and describe physical and pathological findings in this experimental model. Our results indicate close relationships between blast intensities and neuropathology and behavioral deficits, particularly at low level blast intensities relevant to mTBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Preliminary petrological and geochemical results from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California: A near-field natural analog of a radioactive waste repository in salt: Topical report No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elders, W.A.; Cohen, L.H.; Williams, A.E.; Neville, S.; Collier, P.; Oakes, C.

    1986-03-01

    High concentrations of radionuclides and high temperatures are not naturally encountered in salt beds. For this reason, the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) may be the best available geologic analog of some of the processes expected to occur in high level nuclear waste repositories in salt. Subsurface temperatures and brine concentrations in the SSGF span most of the temperature range and fluid inclusion brine range expected in a salt repository, and the clay-rich sedimentary rocks are similar to those which host bedded or domal salts. As many of the chemical processes observed in the SSGF are similar to those expected to occur in or near a salt repository, data derived from it can be used in the validation of geochemical models of the near-field of a repository in salt. This report describes preliminary data on petrology and geochemistry, emphasizing the distribution of rare earth elements and U and Th, of cores and cuttings from several deep wells chosen to span a range of temperature gradients and salinities. Subsurface temperature logs have been augmented by fluid inclusion studies, to reveal the effects of brines of varying temperature and salinity. The presence of brines with different oxygen isotopic signatures also indicate lack of mixing. Whole rock major, minor and trace element analyses and data on brine compositions are being used to study chemical migration in these sediments. 65 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Test of Shi et al. Method to Infer the Magnetic Reconnection Geometry from Spacecraft Data: MHD Simulation with Guide Field and Antiparallel Kinetic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, R.; Sonnerup, B. U. O.; Swisdak, M.; Birn, J.; Drake, J. F.; Heese, M.

    2012-01-01

    When analyzing data from an array of spacecraft (such as Cluster or MMS) crossing a site of magnetic reconnection, it is desirable to be able to accurately determine the orientation of the reconnection site. If the reconnection is quasi-two dimensional, there are three key directions, the direction of maximum inhomogeneity (the direction across the reconnection site), the direction of the reconnecting component of the magnetic field, and the direction of rough invariance (the "out of plane" direction). Using simulated spacecraft observations of magnetic reconnection in the geomagnetic tail, we extend our previous tests of the direction-finding method developed by Shi et al. (2005) and the method to determine the structure velocity relative to the spacecraft Vstr. These methods require data from four proximate spacecraft. We add artificial noise and calibration errors to the simulation fields, and then use the perturbed gradient of the magnetic field B and perturbed time derivative dB/dt, as described by Denton et al. (2010). Three new simulations are examined: a weakly three-dimensional, i.e., quasi-two-dimensional, MHD simulation without a guide field, a quasi-two-dimensional MHD simulation with a guide field, and a two-dimensional full dynamics kinetic simulation with inherent noise so that the apparent minimum gradient was not exactly zero, even without added artificial errors. We also examined variations of the spacecraft trajectory for the kinetic simulation. The accuracy of the directions found varied depending on the simulation and spacecraft trajectory, but all the directions could be found within about 10 for all cases. Various aspects of the method were examined, including how to choose averaging intervals and the best intervals for determining the directions and velocity. For the kinetic simulation, we also investigated in detail how the errors in the inferred gradient directions from the unmodified Shi et al. method (using the unperturbed gradient

  9. A one-and-a-quarter-dimensional transport code for field-reversed configuration studies: A user's guide for CFRX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Ming-Yuan; Werley, K.A.; Ling, Kuok-Mee.

    1988-05-01

    A one-and-a-quarter-dimensional transport code, which includes radial as well as some two-dimensional effects for field-reversed configurations, is described. The set of transport equations is transformed to a set of new independent and dependent variables and is solved as a coupled initial-boundary value problem. The code simulation includes both the closed and open field regions. The axial effects incorporated include global axial force balance, axial losses in the open field region, and flux surface averaging over the closed field region. Input, output, and structure of the code are described in detail. A typical example of the code results is also given. 20 refs., 21 figs., 7 tabs

  10. Investigation of the 4D composite MR image distortion field associated with tumor motion for MR-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu, T; Jaffray, D

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images are affected by geometric distortions due to the specifics of the MR scanner and patient anatomy. Quantifying the distortions associated with mobile tumors is particularly challenging due to real anatomical changes in the tumor's volume, shape, and relative location within the MR imaging volume. In this study, the authors investigate the 4D composite distortion field, which combines the effects of the susceptibility-induced and system-related distortion fields, experienced by mobile lung tumors. The susceptibility (χ) effects were numerically simulated for two specific scenarios: (a) a full motion cycle of a lung tumor due to breathing as depicted on ten phases of a 4D CBCT data set and (b) varying the tumor size and location in lung tissue via a synthetically generated sphere with variable diameter (4-80 mm). The χ simulation procedure relied on the segmentation and generation of 3D susceptibility (χ) masks and computation of the magnetic field by means of finite difference methods. A system-related distortion field, determined with a phantom and image processing algorithm, was used as a reference. The 4D composite distortion field was generated as the vector summation of the χ-induced and system-related fields. The analysis was performed for two orientations of the main magnetic field (B0), which correspond to several MRIgRT system configurations. Specifically, B0 was set along the z-axis as in the case of a cylindrical-bore scanner and in the (x,y)-plane as for a biplanar MR. Computations were also performed for a full revolution at 15° increments in the case of a rotating biplanar magnet. Histograms and metrics such as maximum, mean, and range were used to evaluate the characteristics of the 4D distortion field. The χ-induced field depends on the change in volume and shape of the moving tumor as well as the local surrounding anatomy. In the case of system-related distortions, the tumor experiences increased field

  11. Utilization of Field Enhancement in Plasmonic Waveguides for Subwavelength Light-Guiding, Polarization Handling, Heating, and Optical Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Daoxin; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Wei

    2015-10-09

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted intensive attention for many applications in recent years because of the field enhancement at the metal/dielectric interface. First, this strong field enhancement makes it possible to break the diffraction limit and enable subwavelength optical waveguiding, which is desired for nanophotonic integrated circuits with ultra-high integration density. Second, the field enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures occurs only for the polarization mode whose electric field is perpendicular to the metal/dielectric interface, and thus the strong birefringence is beneficial for realizing ultra-small polarization-sensitive/selective devices, including polarization beam splitters, and polarizers. Third, plasmonic nanostructures provide an excellent platform of merging electronics and photonics for some applications, e.g., thermal tuning, photo-thermal detection, etc. Finally, the field enhancement at the metal/dielectric interface helps a lot to realize optical sensors with high sensitivity when introducing plasmonic nanostrutures. In this paper, we give a review for recent progresses on the utilization of field enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures for these applications, e.g., waveguiding, polarization handling, heating, as well as optical sensing.

  12. Utilization of Field Enhancement in Plasmonic Waveguides for Subwavelength Light-Guiding, Polarization Handling, Heating, and Optical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoxin Dai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted intensive attention for many applications in recent years because of the field enhancement at the metal/dielectric interface. First, this strong field enhancement makes it possible to break the diffraction limit and enable subwavelength optical waveguiding, which is desired for nanophotonic integrated circuits with ultra-high integration density. Second, the field enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures occurs only for the polarization mode whose electric field is perpendicular to the metal/dielectric interface, and thus the strong birefringence is beneficial for realizing ultra-small polarization-sensitive/selective devices, including polarization beam splitters, and polarizers. Third, plasmonic nanostructures provide an excellent platform of merging electronics and photonics for some applications, e.g., thermal tuning, photo-thermal detection, etc. Finally, the field enhancement at the metal/dielectric interface helps a lot to realize optical sensors with high sensitivity when introducing plasmonic nanostrutures. In this paper, we give a review for recent progresses on the utilization of field enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures for these applications, e.g., waveguiding, polarization handling, heating, as well as optical sensing.

  13. A Workplace Mindfulness Intervention May Be Associated With Improved Psychological Well-Being and Productivity. A Preliminary Field Study in a Company Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersemaekers, Wendy; Rupprecht, Silke; Wittmann, Marc; Tamdjidi, Chris; Falke, Pia; Donders, Rogier; Speckens, Anne; Kohls, Niko

    2018-01-01

    Background: Mindfulness trainings are increasingly offered in workplace environments in order to improve health and productivity. Whilst promising, there is limited research on the effectiveness of mindfulness interventions in workplace settings. Objective: To examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a Workplace Mindfulness Training (WMT) in terms of burnout, psychological well-being, organizational and team climate, and performance. Methods: This is a preliminary field study in four companies. Self-report questionnaires were administered up to a month before, at start of, and right at the end of the WMT, resulting in a pre-intervention and an intervention period. There was no separate control group. A total of 425 participants completed the surveys on the different time points. Linear mixed model analyses were used to analyze the data. Results: When comparing the intervention period with the pre-intervention period, significantly greater improvements were found in measures of burnout (mean difference = 0.3, p Inventory (FMI) and 0.8 for the Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), both p team climate, organizational climate and personal performance were reported during the intervention compared to the pre-intervention period with largest improvements in team cooperation (mean difference = 0.3, p 0.8), moderate for well-being, burnout and perceived stress ( d = 0.5-0.8), and ranged from low to moderate for organizational and team climate and personal performance ( d = 0.2-0.8). Conclusion: These preliminary data suggest that compared to the pre-intervention period, the intervention period was associated with greater reductions in burnout and perceived stress, improvements in mindfulness, well-being, and increases in team and organizational climate and personal performance. Due to design limitations, no conclusions can be drawn on the extent to which the WMT or non-specific factors such as time have contributed to the findings. Further studies, preferably

  14. A Workplace Mindfulness Intervention May Be Associated With Improved Psychological Well-Being and Productivity. A Preliminary Field Study in a Company Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Kersemaekers

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mindfulness trainings are increasingly offered in workplace environments in order to improve health and productivity. Whilst promising, there is limited research on the effectiveness of mindfulness interventions in workplace settings.Objective: To examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a Workplace Mindfulness Training (WMT in terms of burnout, psychological well-being, organizational and team climate, and performance.Methods: This is a preliminary field study in four companies. Self-report questionnaires were administered up to a month before, at start of, and right at the end of the WMT, resulting in a pre-intervention and an intervention period. There was no separate control group. A total of 425 participants completed the surveys on the different time points. Linear mixed model analyses were used to analyze the data.Results: When comparing the intervention period with the pre-intervention period, significantly greater improvements were found in measures of burnout (mean difference = 0.3, p < 0.001, perceived stress (mean difference = -0.2, p < 0.001, mindfulness [mean difference = 1.0 for the Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory (FMI and 0.8 for the Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS, both p < 0.001], and well-being (mean difference = 0.4, p < 0.001. Additionally, greater increases in team climate, organizational climate and personal performance were reported during the intervention compared to the pre-intervention period with largest improvements in team cooperation (mean difference = 0.3, p < 0.001, productivity (mean difference = 0.5, p < 0.001, and stress (mean difference = -0.4, p < 0.001. Effect sizes were large for mindfulness (d > 0.8, moderate for well-being, burnout and perceived stress (d = 0.5–0.8, and ranged from low to moderate for organizational and team climate and personal performance (d = 0.2–0.8.Conclusion: These preliminary data suggest that compared to the pre-intervention period, the intervention

  15. Effects of self-fields on electron trajectory and gain in two-stream electromagnetically pumped free-electron laser with ion channel guiding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saviz, S.; Ghorannevis, M.; Aghamir, Farzin M.; Mehdian, H.

    2011-01-01

    A theory for the two-stream free-electron laser with an electromagnetic wiggler (EMW) and an ion channel guiding is developed. In the analysis, the effects of self-fields have been taken into account. The electron trajectories and the small signal gain are derived. The stability of the trajectories, the characteristics of the linear gain and the normalized maximum gain are studied numerically. The dependence of the normalized frequency ω-circumflex corresponding to the maximum gain on the ion-channel frequency is presented. The results show that there are seven groups of orbits in the presence of the self-fields, which are similar to those reported in the absence of the self-fields. It is also shown that the normalized gains of 2 groups decrease while the rest increase with the increasing normalized ion-channel frequency. Furthermore, it is found that the two-stream instability and the self-field lead to a decrease in the maximum gain except for group 4. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  16. A Hiker's guide to K3. Aspects of N=(4,4) superconformal field theory with central charge c=6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahm, W.; Wendland, K.

    2001-01-01

    We study the moduli space M of N=(4,4) superconformal field theories with central charge c=6. After a slight emendation of its global description we find the locations of various known models in the component of M associated to K3 surfaces. Among them are the Z 2 and Z 4 orbifold theories obtained from the torus component of M. Here, SO(4,4) triality is found to play a dominant role. We obtain the B-field values in direction of the exceptional divisors which arise from orbifolding. We prove T-duality for the Z 2 orbifolds and use it to derive the form of M purely within conformal field theory. For the Gepner model (2) 4 and some of its orbifolds we find the locations in M and prove isomorphisms to nonlinear σ models. In particular we prove that the Gepner model (2) 4 has a geometric interpretation with Fermat quartic target space. (orig.)

  17. Noble Gas geochemistry of the newly discovered hydrothermal fields in the Gulf of California: preliminary He-isotope ratios from the Alarcon Rise and Pescadero basin vent sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelz, R. M.; Lupton, J. E.; Evans, L. J.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Neumann, F.; Paduan, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Numerous submarine deep-sea hydrothermal vents related to volcanic activity of the East Pacific Rise (EPR) are situated along the Pacific margins of Mexico. Until recently, active hydrothermal venting was unknown between the Guaymas Basin and 21°N on the EPR. MBARI's recent oceanographic surveys have added 7 new active vent sites. In this study, we aimed to sample the high-temperature hydrothermal fluids emanating from two distinct vent sites, named Meyibo and Auka, located in the Alarcon Rise and Pescadero Basin, respectively. Mantle-derived He have long been identified in hydrothermal fluid releases. The presence of He in aqueous fluids with 3He/4He ratios greater than in-situ production values (~0.05 RA, where RA = air He or 1.4 x 10-6) indicates the presence of mantle-derived melts. Preliminary analyses of He-isotope ratios derived from the newly discovered Meyibo and Auka hydrothermal fields show high 3He/4He ratios (~8RA), typical of MORB's. Auka vent field, characterized by chimneys composed of light carbonate minerals and oil-like hydrocarbons, and temperatures between 250-290oC, show average values of ~7.87RA. In contrast, the black-smokers at the Meyibo field, composed of dark sulfide minerals and temperatures over 350oC, yielded a higher He ratio of ~8.24RA. Recently, it has become clear that regional maximum mantle He values correlate with the velocity structure in the mantle, therefore, He has the potential to map regions of the underlying mantle that are undergoing partial melting. Seismic records could then be compared with the geochemical He ratio signal and supply information regarding tectonics and other processes involved in the generation of these gases. The data presented here will be completing a totally new inventory of He results from hydrothermal vents in the EPR and fault-termination basins distributed along the P-NA plate boundary in the Gulf of California. The results will be further coupled with the analysis of other geochemical

  18. The Federal Cylinder Project: A Guide to Field Cylinder Collections in Federal Agencies. Volume 1, Introduction and Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Erika; And Others

    Volume one of a multivolume catalog inventories 247 federal agency collections of wax cylinder recordings made by early ethnographers during 5 decades (1890-1941) of field work with Native American, traditional American, and world cultures. Native American music, chants, and linguistic samples comprise the majority of the collection. In addition…

  19. Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, William [Brooks Engineering, Vacaville, CA (United States); Basso, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Coddington, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

  20. Synthesis of regional wildlife and vegetation field studies to guide management of standing and down dead trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce G. Marcot; Janet L. Ohmann; Kim L. Mellen-McLean; Karen L. Waddell

    2010-01-01

    We used novel methods for combining information from wildlife and vegetation field studies to develop guidelines for managing dead wood for wildlife and biodiversity. The DecAID Decayed Wood Adviser presents data on wildlife use of standing and down dead trees (snags and down wood) and summaries of regional vegetation plot data depicting dead wood conditions, for...

  1. The Playing Field. A Curriculum Guide to Pesticide Education for Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Grades. First Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellissemo, Diane; Garcia, Deliana

    A pesticide safety video for children 9-12 years old, "The Playing Field," draws children into the lives of a migrant farmworker family while teaching them about the dangers of pesticides. The video and the lessons are not limited to migrant education, but open a multicultural window for all children, migrant or nonmigrant. Teaching elements for…

  2. Field guide to the Mesozoic arc and accretionary complex of South-Central Alaska, Indian to Hatcher Pass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Susan M.; Oswald, P.J.; Hults, Chad P.

    2015-01-01

    This field trip traverses exposures of a multi-generation Mesozoic magmatic arc and subduction-accretion complex that had a complicated history of magmatic activity and experienced variations in composition and deformational style in response to changes in the tectonic environment. This Mesozoic arc formed at an unknown latitude to the south, was accreted to North America, and was subsequently transported along faults to its present location (Plafker and others, 1989; Hillhouse and Coe, 1994). Some of these faults are still active. Similar tectonic, igneous, and sedimentary processes to those that formed the Mesozoic arc complex persist today in southern Alaska, building on, and deforming the Mesozoic arc. The rocks we will see on this field trip provide insights on the three-dimensional composition of the modern arc, and the processes involved in the evolution of an arc and its companion accretionary complex.

  3. The North Sea field development guide. V.1: Northern North Sea. V.2: Southern North Sea. 6. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-08-01

    The 1997/8, sixth edition is the first to be divided into two volumes. Volume 1 covers the central and northern North Sea areas; volume 2 contains the southern North Sea as well as the Irish and German sectors. The pages are numbered consecutively over the two volumes, with page numbers greater than 702 contained in the second volume. There are three index sections. Main index. Arranged by national sector (UK, Norway etc.) Within each sector the entries are alphabetical by operator name. This index contains page numbers for the book entries: the other two index sections should be used with the main index to find the exact location of an entry; Index by field. If the reader knows a field name (e.g. Kittiwake) but not the operator or the national sector, this index will reference them; Index by installation. Each installation (''Fulmar SALM'', ''Togi'') is named, giving the operator, field and national sector where it is located. This index is also useful for locating particular kinds of installations, such as subsea completions; The book is intended to provide a factual overview of field development activity in the North Sea (a term loosely used to include the Irish Sea and the Baltic Sea). The aim is therefore to provide some background, specifications and history on every offshore installation in that area. Speculative or evaluative commentary is avoided where possible. No attempt has been made to forecast the form or probability of future developments, except in those few instances where announcements have been made by the oil company itself, and these are, clearly indicated. (UK)

  4. Target volume delineation and field setup. A practical guide for conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nancy Y. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Radiation Oncology; Lu, Jiade J. (eds.) [National Univ. Health System, Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Medicine

    2013-03-01

    Practical handbook on selection and delineation of tumor volumes and fields for conformal radiation therapy, including IMRT. Helpful format facilitating use on a step-by-step basis in daily practice. Designed to ensure accurate coverage of commonly encountered tumors along their routes of spread. This handbook is designed to enable radiation oncologists to appropriately and confidently delineate tumor volumes/fields for conformal radiation therapy, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), in patients with commonly encountered cancers. The orientation of this handbook is entirely practical, in that the focus is on the illustration of clinical target volume (CTV) delineation for each major malignancy. Each chapter provides guidelines and concise knowledge on CTV selection for a particular disease, explains how the anatomy of lymphatic drainage shapes the selection of the target volume, and presents detailed illustrations of volumes, slice by slice, on planning CT images. While the emphasis is on target volume delineation for three-dimensional conformal therapy and IMRT, information is also provided on conventional radiation therapy field setup and planning for certain malignancies for which IMRT is not currently suitable.

  5. Arsenic associated with historical gold mining in the Sierra Nevada foothills: Case study and field trip guide for Empire Mine State Historic Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, Charles N.; Myers, Perry A; Millsap, Daniel; Regnier, Tamsen B; Bowell, Robert J.; Alpers, Charles N.; Jamieson, Heather E.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Majzlan, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    The Empire Mine, together with other mines in the Grass Valley mining district, produced at least 21.3 million troy ounces (663 tonnes) of gold (Au) during the 1850s through the 1950s, making it the most productive hardrock Au mining district in California history (Clark 1970). The Empire Mine State Historic Park (Empire Mine SHP or EMSHP), established in 1975, provides the public with an opportunity to see many well-preserved features of the historic mining and mineral processing operations (CDPR 2014a).A legacy of Au mining at Empire Mine and elsewhere is contamination of mine wastes and associated soils, surface waters, and groundwaters with arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and other metals. At EMSHP, As has been the principal contaminant of concern and the focus of extensive remediation efforts over the past several years by the State of California, Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) and Newmont USA, Ltd. In addition, the site is the main focus of a multidisciplinary research project on As bioavailability and bioaccessibility led by the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA’s) Brownfields Program.This chapter was prepared as a guide for a field trip to EMSHP held on June 14, 2014, in conjunction with a short course on “Environmental Geochemistry, Mineralogy, and Microbiology of Arsenic” held in Nevada City, California on June 15–16, 2014. This guide contains background information on geological setting, mining history, and environmental history at EMSHP and other historical Au mining districts in the Sierra Nevada, followed by descriptions of the field trip stops.

  6. Field Demonstration of Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump Part I. Technology and Field Demo System/Site Descriptions, and Preliminary Summer/Fall Performance Analysis for One Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Van D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Munk, Jeffrey D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gehl, Anthony C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The field study is planned to continue through the 2016 cooling season with the draft final project report due by September 30, 2016. This report provides a description of both installations and preliminary 2015 cooling and fall season performance results for the Knoxville site. For the August 18 through December 14 period, the Knoxville site GS-IHP provided 53.6% total source energy savings compared to a baseline electric RTU/heat pump and electric WH. Peak demand savings ranged from 33% to 59% per month. Energy cost savings of 53.1% have been achieved to date with more than half of that coming from reduced demand charges. Data on installation and maintenance costs are being collected and will be combined with total test period energy savings data for a payback analysis to be included in the project final report. The GS-IHP also saved a significant amount of carbon emissions. The total emission savings for the Knoxville site for the August-December 2015 period were ~0.8 metric tons. If trading for carbon credits ever becomes a reality, additional cost savings would be realized.

  7. Resonant alteration of propagation in guiding structures with complex Robin parameter and its magnetic-field-induced restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olendski, O.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Solutions of the wave equation are analyzed for the confined circular geometry with complex Robin boundary conditions. → Sharp extremum is found in the energy dependence on the imaginary part of the extrapolation length. → Nonzero real part of the Robin length or/and magnetic field wipe out the resonance. - Abstract: Solutions of the scalar Helmholtz wave equation are derived for the analysis of the transport and thermodynamic properties of the two-dimensional disk and three-dimensional infinitely long straight wire in the external uniform longitudinal magnetic field B under the assumption that the Robin boundary condition contains extrapolation length Λ with nonzero imaginary part Λ i . As a result of this complexity, the self-adjointness of the Hamiltonian is lost, its eigenvalues E become complex too and the discrete bound states of the disk characteristic for the real Λ turn into the corresponding quasibound states with their lifetime defined by the eigenenergies imaginary parts E i . Accordingly, the longitudinal flux undergoes an alteration as it flows along the wire with its attenuation/amplification being E i -dependent too. It is shown that, for zero magnetic field, the component E i as a function of the Robin imaginary part exhibits a pronounced sharp extremum with its magnitude being the largest for the zero real part Λ r of the extrapolation length. Increasing magnitude of Λ r quenches the E i - Λ i resonance and at very large Λ r the eigenenergies E approach the asymptotic real values independent of Λ i . The extremum is also wiped out by the magnetic field when, for the large B, the energies tend to the Landau levels. Mathematical and physical interpretations of the obtained results are provided; in particular, it is shown that the finite lifetime of the disk quasibound states stems from the Λ i -induced currents flowing through the sample boundary. Possible experimental tests of the calculated effect are discussed; namely

  8. Preliminary study on field buses for the control system of the high voltage of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter; Etude preliminaire d`un reseau de terrain pour le systeme de controle des hautes tensions du calorimetre hadronique d`Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevet, F.; Chadelas, R.; Montarou, G.

    1996-12-31

    We present here after a preliminary study on field buses for the control system of the high voltage of the photomultipliers of the TILECAL calorimeter. After some generalities, different commercial buses are reviewed (CAN, ARCET, WorldFIP, Profibus and LonWorks). The Profibus and LonWorks solution are more extensively studies as a possible solution for the high voltage system of the TILE hadronic calorimeter. (authors).

  9. fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Arnold

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface irrigation, such as flood or furrow, is the predominant form of irrigation in California for agronomic crops. Compared to other irrigation methods, however, it is inefficient in terms of water use; large quantities of water, instead of being used for crop production, are lost to excess deep percolation and tail runoff. In surface-irrigated fields, irrigators commonly cut off the inflow of water when the water advance reaches a familiar or convenient location downfield, but this experience-based strategy has not been very successful in reducing the tail runoff water. Our study compared conventional cutoff practices to a retroactively applied model-based cutoff method in four commercially producing alfalfa fields in Northern California, and evaluated the model using a simple sensor system for practical application in typical alfalfa fields. These field tests illustrated that the model can be used to reduce tail runoff in typical surface-irrigated fields, and using it with a wireless sensor system saves time and labor as well as water.

  10. MR-Guided Laser Ablation of Osteoid Osteoma in an Open High-Field System (1.0 T)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streitparth, F.; Gebauer, B.; Melcher, I.; Schaser, K.; Philipp, C.; Rump, J.; Hamm, B.; Teichgraeber, U.

    2009-01-01

    Computed tomography is the standard imaging modality to minimize the extent of surgical or ablative treatment in osteoid osteomas. In the last 15 years, since a description of thermal ablation of osteoid osteomas was first published, this technique has become a treatment of choice for this tumor. We report the case of a 20-year-old man with an osteoid osteoma treated with laser ablation in an open high-field magnetic resonance imaging scanner (1.0 T). The tumor, located in the right fibula, was safely and effectively ablated under online monitoring. We describe the steps of this interventional procedure and discuss related innovative guidance and monitoring features and potential benefits compared with computed tomographic guidance.

  11. An ultra-high field strength MR image-guided robotic needle delivery system for in-bore small animal interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravett, Matthew; Cepek, Jeremy; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an image-guided robotic needle delivery system for accurate and repeatable needle targeting procedures in mouse brains inside the 12 cm inner diameter gradient coil insert of a 9.4 T MR scanner. Many preclinical research techniques require the use of accurate needle deliveries to soft tissues, including brain tissue. Soft tissues are optimally visualized in MR images, which offer high-soft tissue contrast, as well as a range of unique imaging techniques, including functional, spectroscopy and thermal imaging, however, there are currently no solutions for delivering needles to small animal brains inside the bore of an ultra-high field MR scanner. This paper describes the mechatronic design, evaluation of MR compatibility, registration technique, mechanical calibration, the quantitative validation of the in-bore image-guided needle targeting accuracy and repeatability, and demonstrated the system's ability to deliver needles in situ. Our six degree-of-freedom, MR compatible, mechatronic system was designed to fit inside the bore of a 9.4 T MR scanner and is actuated using a combination of piezoelectric and hydraulic mechanisms. The MR compatibility and targeting accuracy of the needle delivery system are evaluated to ensure that the system is precisely calibrated to perform the needle targeting procedures. A semi-automated image registration is performed to link the robot coordinates to the MR coordinate system. Soft tissue targets can be accurately localized in MR images, followed by automatic alignment of the needle trajectory to the target. Intra-procedure visualization of the needle target location and the needle were confirmed through MR images after needle insertion. The effects of geometric distortions and signal noise were found to be below threshold that would have an impact on the accuracy of the system. The system was found to have negligible effect on the MR image signal noise and geometric distortion

  12. Preliminary Design Guide for Arctic Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    Mazda (1983, p. 20/19). Zinc-air Energy output Falls to 20% or les. of nominal. Capacitors Capacitance 10 ppm/C to 2000 ppm/C. Maintain at constant...Temperature coefficient Use compensation, calibrate at temperature, provide artificial environment. Motors Rotation May fail to start turning. Heat...JP-5 and Type II distillate range of common motor oils. In addition, they fuels should be considered. DF-A fuel (Diesel Fuel- Table 4

  13. Analyze of waves dynamic over an intertidal mudflat of a sandy-gravely estuarine beach - Field survey and preliminary modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morio, Olivier; Sedrati, Mouncef; Goubert, Evelyne

    2014-05-01

    As well as marine submersion or erosive phenomena, clay-silted sediment in-filling on estuarial and bay beaches are a main issue in these human-attractive areas. Coupled sandy/gravely and clay/silty intertidal areas can be observed in these particular coastal areas, depending of rivers characteristic (discharge of particle, water flow), ocean dynamics (wave exposure, current) and sediments sources. All around the world, sandy/gravely beaches are exposed to punctual or continuous input clay sediments. Vilaine estuary, Bay of Arcachon and Bay of Seine in France, Plymouth Bay in UK and also Wadden Sea in Deutschland are few examples of muddy/sandy coupled or mixed system. The beach of Bétahon (Ambon town, Brittany - France) is located on the external Vilaine estuary and is an example of this issue. This meso-macrotidal intermediate (low tide terrace) beach presents heterogeneous sediments. The upper intertidal zone is composed by sand and gravel and characterized by a steep slope. A very gentle slope characterized the lower part of the beach and is constituted by silt and clay. Clay/sand limit is characterized by a decimetric erosion cliff of mudflat along the beach. In order to understand bed variations and sediment transport of this complex heterogeneous beach, a well understanding of wave dynamic across the beach is necessary. This study focus on wave dynamics over the beach, using field observations and MIKE 21 3D wave numerical model. This paper is a preliminary approach of an upcoming global understanding of this estuarial beach behavior. Swell from deep-sea to near-shore area is modeled over a 100 km² area and real wind, deep sea wave characteristic, river water flow and tidal level are defined as open boundary conditions for the regional model. This last one is based on multiple bathymetric surveys over the last 50 years. Local model, triangular mesh gridded to 5 meters, covering Bétahon beach , is based on topographic and photographic survey of the mudflat

  14. Prefrontal Neurons Represent Motion Signals from Across the Visual Field But for Memory-Guided Comparisons Depend on Neurons Providing These Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Klaus; Spinelli, Philip; Pasternak, Tatiana

    2016-09-07

    Visual decisions often involve comparisons of sequential stimuli that can appear at any location in the visual field. The lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) in nonhuman primates, shown to play an important role in such comparisons, receives information about contralateral stimuli directly from sensory neurons in the same hemisphere, and about ipsilateral stimuli indirectly from neurons in the opposite hemisphere. This asymmetry of sensory inputs into the LPFC poses the question of whether and how its neurons incorporate sensory information arriving from the two hemispheres during memory-guided comparisons of visual motion. We found that, although responses of individual LPFC neurons to contralateral stimuli were stronger and emerged 40 ms earlier, they carried remarkably similar signals about motion direction in the two hemifields, with comparable direction selectivity and similar direction preferences. This similarity was also apparent around the time of the comparison between the current and remembered stimulus because both ipsilateral and contralateral responses showed similar signals reflecting the remembered direction. However, despite availability in the LPFC of motion information from across the visual field, these "comparison effects" required for the comparison stimuli to appear at the same retinal location. This strict dependence on spatial overlap of the comparison stimuli suggests participation of neurons with localized receptive fields in the comparison process. These results suggest that while LPFC incorporates many key aspects of the information arriving from sensory neurons residing in opposite hemispheres, it continues relying on the interactions with these neurons at the time of generating signals leading to successful perceptual decisions. Visual decisions often involve comparisons of sequential visual motion that can appear at any location in the visual field. We show that during such comparisons, the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) contains

  15. Description of relevant scenarios in the field of agricultural, environmental and climate policy and energy prices for the preliminary study on a Roadmap for the 'SuikerUnie'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plomp, A.J.

    2011-11-01

    In the Dutch Long Term Agreements on energy efficiency (MJA3 and MEE)the Dutch government and industry agreed to strive for a 30% energy efficiency improvement in 2020 compared to 2005. To reach more than 30%, it is not enough to optimize; instead larger process changes will be needed. An important instrument is the realization of preliminary studies and roadmaps, which are supported by the government. This memo offers an overview of relevant developments and scenarios from Agricultural, climate and environmental policy and energy prices for the Dutch sugar industry. This memo serves as input for the Preliminary study Roadmap SuikerUnie. [nl

  16. Field guide to the Mesozoic accretionary complex along Turnagain Arm and Kachemak Bay, south-central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight C.; Kusky, Timothy M.; Karl, Susan M.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    1997-01-01

    Turnagain Arm, just east of Anchorage, provides a readily accessible, world-class cross section through a Mesozoic accretionary wedge. Nearly continuous exposures along the Seward Highway, the Alaska Railroad, and the shoreline of Turnagain Arm display the two main constituent units of the Chugach terrane: the McHugh Complex and Valdez Group. In this paper we describe seven bedrock geology stops along Turnagain Arm, and two others in the Chugach Mountains just to the north (Stops 1-7 and 9), which will be visited as part of the May, 1997 field trip of the Alaska Geological Society. Outcrops along Turnagain Arm have already been described in two excellent guidebook articles (Clark, 1981; Winkler and others 1984), both of which remain as useful and valid today as when first published. Since the early 1980's, studies along Turnagain Arm have addressed radiolarian ages of chert and conodont ages of limestone in the McHugh Complex (Nelson and others, 1986, 1987); geochemistry of basalt in the McHugh Complex (Nelson and Blome, 1991); post-accretion brittle faulting (Bradley and Kusky, 1990; Kusky and others, 1997); and the age and tectonic setting of gold mineralization (Haeussler and others, 1995). Highlights of these newer findings will described both in the text below, and in the stop descriptions.Superb exposures along the southeastern shore of Kachemak Bay show several other features of the McHugh Complex that are either absent or less convincing along Turnagain Arm. While none of these outcrops can be reached via the main road network, they are still reasonably accessible - all are within an hour by motorboat from Homer, seas permitting. Here, we describe seven outcrops along the shore of Kachemak Bay that we studied between 1989 and 1993 during geologic mapping of the Seldovia 1:250,000- scale quadrangle. These outcrops (Stops 61-67) will not be part of the 1997 itinerary, but are included here tor the benefit of those who may wish to visit them later.

  17. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellens, N; Farahani, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  18. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellens, N [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Farahani, K [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  19. SU-G-JeP2-13: Spatial Accuracy Evaluation for Real-Time MR Guided Radiation Therapy Using a Novel Large-Field MRI Distortion Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antolak, A; Bayouth, J; Bosca, R; Jackson, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate a large-field MRI phantom for assessment of geometric distortion in whole-body MRI for real-time MR guided radiation therapy. Methods: A prototype CIRS large-field MRI distortion phantom consisting of a PMMA cylinder (33 cm diameter, 30 cm length) containing a 3D-printed orthogonal grid (3 mm diameter rods, 20 mm apart), was filled with 6 mM NiCl_2 and 30 mM NaCl solution. The phantom was scanned at 1.5T and 3.0T on a GE HDxt and Discovery MR750, respectively, and at 0.35T on a ViewRay system. Scans were obtained with and without 3D distortion correction to demonstrate the impact of such corrections. CT images were used as a reference standard for analysis of geometric distortion, as determined by a fully automated gradient-search method developed in Matlab. Results: 1,116 grid points distributed throughout a cylindrical volume 28 cm in diameter and 16 cm in length were identified and analyzed. With 3D distortion correction, average/maximum displacements for the 1.5, 3.0, and 0.35T systems were 0.84/2.91, 1.00/2.97, and 0.95/2.37 mm, respectively. The percentage of points with less than (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 mm) total displacement were (73%, 92%, 97%), (54%, 85%, 97%), and (55%, 90%, 99%), respectively. A reduced scan volume of 20 × 20 × 10 cm"3 (representative of a head and neck scan volume) consisting of 420 points was also analyzed. In this volume, the percentage of points with less than (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 mm) total displacement were (90%, 99%, 100%), (63%, 95%, 100%), and (75%, 96%, 100%), respectively. Without 3D distortion correction, average/maximum displacements were 1.35/3.67, 1.67/4.46, and 1.51/3.89 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The prototype large-field MRI distortion phantom and developed software provide a thorough assessment of 3D spatial distortions in MRI. The distortions measured were acceptable for RT applications, both for the high field strengths and the system configuration developed by ViewRay.

  20. Field-trip guide to the geology of the Lexington Reservoir and Loma Prieta areas in the Santa Cruz Mountains, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffer, Philip W.; Messina, Paula

    2002-01-01

    This guide contains a road log and five stop descriptions for a field trip in the southern Santa Cruz Mountains. The trip officially begins at the boat dock parking area on Alma Bridge Road near the dam of Lexington Reservoir. Stop 1 involves a walk up the Limekiln Trail to examine a large landslide in serpentinite that frequently takes out the trail. Stop 2 is at Miller Point picnic area along the shore of the reservoir where exposures of massive, fractured graywacke sandstone are capped with terrace gravel deposits. Stop 3 is along Highland Way in the Santa Cruz Mountains where large landslides have occasionally force the closure of the road. Stop 4A-C are several closely spaced outcrop areas along Loma Prieta Avenue and Summit-Mt. Madonna Road in the Loma Prieta summit area. A walk to scenic vista points provide opportunity to discuss the evolution of regional landscape along the crest of the Sierra Azul. In addition, a variety of rock types are exposed in the Stop 4 area along a series of road cuts, including Cretaceous age conglomerate, turbidites (consisting of interbedded sandstone and shale), and fossiliferous mudstone. Stop 5 involves returning to the boat dock parking area to examine geology and the placement of the Lexington Dam in the Los Gatos Creek canyon.

  1. First patients treated with a 1.5 T MRI-Linac: clinical proof of concept of a high-precision, high-field MRI guided radiotherapy treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaymakers, B. W.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, I. M.; Bol, G. H.; Glitzner, M.; Kotte, A. N. T. J.; van Asselen, B.; de Boer, J. C. J.; Bluemink, J. J.; Hackett, S. L.; Moerland, M. A.; Woodings, S. J.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; van Zijp, H. M.; Philippens, M. E. P.; Tijssen, R.; Kok, J. G. M.; de Groot-van Breugel, E. N.; Kiekebosch, I.; Meijers, L. T. C.; Nomden, C. N.; Sikkes, G. G.; Doornaert, P. A. H.; Eppinga, W. S. C.; Kasperts, N.; Kerkmeijer, L. G. W.; Tersteeg, J. H. A.; Brown, K. J.; Pais, B.; Woodhead, P.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2017-12-01

    The integration of 1.5 T MRI functionality with a radiotherapy linear accelerator (linac) has been pursued since 1999 by the UMC Utrecht in close collaboration with Elekta and Philips. The idea behind this integrated device is to offer unrivalled, online and real-time, soft-tissue visualization of the tumour and the surroundings for more precise radiation delivery. The proof of concept of this device was given in 2009 by demonstrating simultaneous irradiation and MR imaging on phantoms, since then the device has been further developed and commercialized by Elekta. The aim of this work is to demonstrate the clinical feasibility of online, high-precision, high-field MRI guidance of radiotherapy using the first clinical prototype MRI-Linac. Four patients with lumbar spine bone metastases were treated with a 3 or 5 beam step-and-shoot IMRT plan. The IMRT plan was created while the patient was on the treatment table and based on the online 1.5 T MR images; pre-treatment CT was deformably registered to the online MRI to obtain Hounsfield values. Bone metastases were chosen as the first site as these tumors can be clearly visualized on MRI and the surrounding spine bone can be detected on the integrated portal imager. This way the portal images served as an independent verification of the MRI based guidance to quantify the geometric precision of radiation delivery. Dosimetric accuracy was assessed post-treatment from phantom measurements with an ionization chamber and film. Absolute doses were found to be highly accurate, with deviations ranging from 0.0% to 1.7% in the isocenter. The geometrical, MRI based targeting as confirmed using portal images was better than 0.5 mm, ranging from 0.2 mm to 0.4 mm. In conclusion, high precision, high-field, 1.5 T MRI guided radiotherapy is clinically feasible.

  2. Preliminary Results from the Joint Russian and US Field Test: Measurement of Sensorimotor and Cardiovascular Responses Immediately Following Landing of the Soyuz Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Platts, S. H.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Fomina, E. V.; Stenger, M. B.; Lee, S. M. C.; Wood, S. J.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing collaborative research efforts between NASA's Neuroscience and Cardiovascular Laboratories, and the Institute of Biomedical Problems' (IBMP) Sensory-Motor and Countermeasures Laboratories have been measuring functional sensorimotor, cardiovascular and strength responses following bed rest, dry immersion, short duration (Space Shuttle) and long duration (Mir and International Space Station) space flights. While the unloading paradigms associated with dry immersion and bed rest have do serve as acceptable flight analogs, testing of crew responses following the long duration flights does not begin until a minimum of 24 hours after landing. As a result it is not possible to estimate the nonlinear trend of the early (testing at the time of landing and before the flight crews have left the landing site. By joint agreement this research effort has been identified as the functional Field Test (FT). For practical reasons the FT has been divided into two phases: the full FT and a preliminary pilot version (PFT) of the FT that is reduced in both length and scope. The primary goal of this research is to determine functional abilities in long duration space flight crews beginning as soon after landing as possible (test in conjunction with postural ataxia testing. In addition to the immediate post-landing collection of data for the full FT, postflight data will be acquired at a minimum of one to three more other times within the 24 hr following landing and continue until functional sensorimotor and cardiovascular responses have returned to preflight normative values. The PFT represents a single trial run comprised of jointly agreed tests from the full FT and relies heavily on IBMP's Sensory-Motor and Countermeasures Laboratories for content, and implementation. The PFT is currently scheduled for the September 2013 landing of the Soyuz spacecraft (34S). Testing will include: (1) a sit-to-stand test, (2) recovery from a fall where the crewmember begins in the prone

  3. Remote Sensing Field Guide - Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    experienced boatmen. Most river water, even in deserts, contains Giardia micro -organisms that can cause serious diarrhea. Sich water should be boiled...water. The solutes and suspended micro -matter can be moved up and down by an oscillating water table and redeposited or precipitated at differ- ent...McCauley, U.S. Geological Survey, Desert Studies Group, Flagstaff, AZ, Nov 1973. B. Servicio Aerofotografia Nacional del Peru (on back). / ...... CONN:MFI

  4. Walkthrough screening evaluation field guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eder, S.J.; Eli, M.W.; Salmon, M.W.

    1993-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has a large inventory of existing facilities. Many of these facilities were not designed and constructed to current natural phenomena hazard (NPH) criteria. The NPH events include earthquakes, extreme winds and tornadoes, and floods. DOE Order 5480.28 establishes policy and requirements for NPH mitigation for DOE facilities. DOE is conducting a multiyear project to develop evaluation guidelines for assessing the condition and determining the need for upgrades at DOE facilities. One element of the NPH evaluation guidelines' development involves the existing systems and components at DOE facilities. This effort is described in detail in a cited reference. In the interim period prior to availability of the final guidelines, DOE facilities are encouraged to implement an NPH walk through screening evaluation process by which systems and components that need attention can be rapidly identified. Guidelines for conducting the walk through screening evaluations are contained herein. The result of the NPH walk through screening evaluation should be a prioritized list of systems and components that need further action. Simple and inexpensive fixes for items identified in the walk through as marginal or inadequate should be implemented without further study. By implementing an NPH walk through screening evaluation, DOE facilities may realize significant reduction in risk from NPH in the short term

  5. Mathematics Curriculum Guide for Spanish-Speaking Students, Levels E, F. Field Test. Working Draft = Guia didactica de matematicas, Niveles E, F. Edicion Experimental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicago Board of Education, IL. Dept. of Curriculum.

    The curriculum guide for mathematics instruction in the bilingual education program of the Chicago public schools is designed to assist teachers in the instruction of limited-English-speaking students in their native language. The guide outlines, for each of two levels, lessons on absolute and relative values of numbers, whole number operations,…

  6. WE-G-BRB-08: TG-51 Calibration of First Commercial MRI-Guided IMRT System in the Presence of 0.35 Tesla Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddu, S; Green, O Pechenaya; Mutic, S

    2012-06-01

    The first real-time-MRI-guided radiotherapy system has been installed in a clinic and it is being evaluated. Presence of magnetic field (MF) during radiation output calibration may have implications on ionization measurements and there is a possibility that standard calibration protocols may not be suitable for dose measurements for such devices. In this study, we evaluated whether a standard calibration protocol (AAPM- TG-51) is appropriate for absolute dose measurement in presence of MF. Treatment delivery of the ViewRay (VR) system is via three 15,000Ci Cobalt-60 heads positioned 120-degrees apart and all calibration measurements were done in the presence of 0.35T MF. Two ADCL- calibrated ionization-chambers (Exradin A12, A16) were used for TG-51 calibration. Chambers were positioned at 5-cm depth, (SSD=105cm: VR's isocenter), and the MLC leaves were shaped to a 10.5cm × 10.5 cm field size. Percent-depth-dose (PDD) measurements were performed for 5 and 10 cm depths. Individual output of each head was measured using the AAPM- TG51 protocol. Calibration accuracy for each head was subsequently verified by Radiological Physics Center (RPC) TLD measurements. Measured ion-recombination (Pion) and polarity (Ppol) correction factors were less-than 1.002 and 1.006, respectively. Measured PDDs agreed with BJR-25 within ±0.2%. Maximum dose rates for the reference field size at VR's isocenter for heads 1, 2 and 3 were 1.445±0.005, 1.446±0.107, 1.431±0.006 Gy/minute, respectively. Our calibrations agreed with RPC- TLD measurements within ±1.3%, ±2.6% and ±2.0% for treatment-heads 1, 2 and 3, respectively. At the time of calibration, mean activity of the Co-60 sources was 10,800Ci±0.1%. This study shows that the TG- 51 calibration is feasible in the presence of 0.35T MF and the measurement agreement is within the range of results obtainable for conventional treatment machines. Drs. Green, Goddu, and Mutic served as scientific consultants for ViewRay, Inc. Dr. Mutic

  7. International Buyers' guide 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    A guide is presented of manufactures, consultants, architect engineers and specialist service companies in the nuclear industry. The guide which is in three sections, supplies the following information: addresses of principal national and international agencies and nuclear organisations; addresses etc of companies in all major countries serving the nuclear industry; a list classified in terms of products and services and grouped according to country showing in which fields the companies operate. (author)

  8. CCNA Wireless Study Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lammle, Todd

    2010-01-01

    A complete guide to the CCNA Wireless exam by leading networking authority Todd Lammle. The CCNA Wireless certification is the most respected entry-level certification in this rapidly growing field. Todd Lammle is the undisputed authority on networking, and this book focuses exclusively on the skills covered in this Cisco certification exam. The CCNA Wireless Study Guide joins the popular Sybex study guide family and helps network administrators advance their careers with a highly desirable certification.: The CCNA Wireless certification is the most respected entry-level wireless certification

  9. Toward a Rapid Synthesis of Field and Desktop Data for Classifying Streams in the Pacific Northwest: Guiding the Sampling and Management of Salmonid Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprak, A.; Wheaton, J. M.; Bouwes, N.; Weber, N. P.; Trahan, N. C.; Jordan, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    River managers often seek to understand habitat availability and quality for riverine organisms within the physical template provided by their landscape. Yet the large amount of natural heterogeneity in landscapes gives rise to stream systems which are highly variable over small spatial scales, potentially complicating site selection for surveying aquatic habitat while simultaneously making a simple, wide-reaching management strategy elusive. This is particularly true in the rugged John Day River Basin of northern Oregon, where efforts as part of the Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program to conduct site-based surveys of physical habitat for endangered steelhead salmon (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are underway. As a complete understanding of the type and distribution of habitat available to these fish would require visits to all streams in the basin (impractical due to its large size), here we develop an approach for classifying channel types which combines remote desktop GIS analyses with rapid field-based stream and landscape surveys. At the core of this method, we build off of the River Styles Framework, an open-ended and process-based approach for classifying streams and informing management decisions. This framework is combined with on-the-ground fluvial audits, which aim to quickly and continuously map sediment dynamics and channel behavior along selected channels. Validation of this classification method is completed by on-the-ground stream surveys using a digital iPad platform and by rapid small aircraft overflights to confirm or refine predictions. We further compare this method with existing channel classification approaches for the region (e.g. Beechie, Montgomery and Buffington). The results of this study will help guide both the refinement of site stratification and selection for salmonid habitat monitoring within the basin, and will be vital in designing and prioritizing restoration and management strategies tailored to the distribution of river styles found

  10. Preliminary Sensorimotor and Cardiovascular Results from the Joint Russian and U.S. Pilot Field Test with Planning for the Full Field Test Beginning with the Year Long Intenational Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Platts, S. H.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Fomina, E. V.; Stenger, M. B.; Lee, S. M. C.; Wood, S. J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing collaborative research efforts between NASA's Neuroscience and Cardiovascular Laboratories, and the Institute of Biomedical Problems' (IBMP) Sensory-Motor and Countermeasures Laboratories have been measuring functional sensorimotor, cardiovascular and strength responses following bed rest, dry immersion, short duration (Space Shuttle) and long duration (Mir and International Space Station) space flights. While the unloading paradigms associated with dry immersion and bed rest does serve as acceptable flight analogs, testing of crew responses following the long duration flights previously has not been possible until a minimum of 24 hours after landing. As a result, it is not possible to estimate the nonlinear trend of the early (testing at landing site. By joint agreement, this research effort has been identified as the functional Field Test (FT). For practical reasons the FT has been divided into two phases: the full FT and a preliminary pilot version (PFT) of the FT that is reduced in both length and scope. The primary goal of this research is to determine functional abilities in long duration space flight crews beginning as soon after landing as possible (test in conjunction with postural ataxia testing (quiet stance sway) as well as cardiovascular responses during other functional tasks. In addition to the immediate post-landing collection of data for the full FT, postflight data will be acquired at a minimum of one to three more other times within the 24 hr following landing and continue until functional sensorimotor and cardiovascular responses have returned to preflight normative values. The PFT represents a single trial run comprised of jointly agreed upon subset of tests from the full FT and relies heavily on IBMP's Sensory-Motor and Countermeasures Laboratories for content and implementation. The PFT was first conducted following the September 2013 landing of the Soyuz spacecraft (34S) and again following the landing of Soyuz 35S in November

  11. TH-AB-BRA-06: MOSFET-Based Dosimetry in An MR Image-Guided Radiation Therapy System: Comparison with and Without a Static 0.3T Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammin, J; Curcuru, A; Li, H; Mutic, S; Green, O [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare depth-dose and surface-dose measurements without and with the magnetic field in a 0.3T MR image-guided Co-60 treatment unit using MOSFET dosimeters. Methods: MOSFET dosimeters (Best Medical Canada, model TN-502RDH-10) were placed in a solid water phantom at 5cm depth with 8cm backscatter (with the MOSFET wires in different orientations to the couch long axis) and also on the surface of an 8cm solid water phantom. The phantoms were placed in an MR image-guided Co-60 treatment machine at an SAD of 105cm to the MOSFETs. Dose measurements were performed between 50 and 200cGy at 5cm depth in a 10.5cm × 10.5cm radiation field without the magnetic field (during a machine maintenance period) and with the nominal magnetic field of 0.3T. The dose linearity was measured at 5cm depth with an orthogonal field and the angular dose dependence was measured on the surface with an orthogonal field and oblique fields at +60 degrees and −60 degrees. Results: The measured MOSFET readings at 5cm depth were linear with dose with slopes of (2.97 +/− 0.01) mV/cGy and (3.01 +/− 0.02) mV/cGy without and with the magnetic field, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found. The surface dose measurements, however, were lower by 6.4% for the AP field (2.3 σ) with magnetic field, 4.9% for the −60 degree field (1.4 σ), and 0.4% different for the +60 degree field (0.2 σ). Conclusion: There is no statistically significant difference in the dose at depth without and with the magnetic field and different orientations of the MOSFET wires. There is a statistically significant difference for the surface dose due to the influence of the magnetic field on secondary electrons from head-scatter and the build-up region in certain field orientations. Clinical surface-dose dosimetry in a magnetic field should apply asymmetric angle-dependent corrections.

  12. Manual on brachytherapy. Incorporating: Applications guide, procedures guide, basics guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This publication is part of practical radiation safety manual series for different fields of application aimed primarily at persons handling radiation sources on a daily routine basis, which could at same time be used by the competent authorities, supporting their efforts in the radiation protection training of workers or medical assistance personnel or helping on-site management to set up local radiation protection rules. It is dedicated to brachytherapy: its application and procedures guides

  13. Usefulness of a Small-Field Digital Mammographic Imaging System Using Parabolic Polycapillary Optics as a Diagnostic Imaging Tool: a Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chon, Kwon Su; Park, Jeong Gon; Son, Hyun Hwa; Kang, Sung Hoon; Park, Seong Hoon; Kim, Hye Won; Kim, Hun Soo; Yoon, Kwon Ha

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy for spatial resolution and radiation dose of a small-field digital mammographic imaging system using parabolic polycapillary optics. We developed a small-field digital mammographic imaging system composed of a CCD (charge coupled device) detector and an Xray source coupled with parabolic polycapillary optics. The spatial resolution and radiation dose according to various filters were evaluated for a small-field digital mammographic imaging system. The images of a test standard phantom and breast cancer tissue sample were obtained. The small-field digital mammographic imaging system had spatial resolutions of 12 lp/mm with molybdenum and rhodium filters with a 25-μm thickness. With a thicker molybdenum filter (100 μm thick), the system had a higher spatial resolution of 11 lp/mm and contrast of 0.48. The radiation dose for a rhodium filter with a 25-μm thickness was 0.13 mGy within a 10-mm-diameter local field. A larger field image greater than 10 mm in diameter could be obtained by scanning an object. On the small-field mammographic imaging system, microcalcifications of breast cancer tissue were clearly observed. A small-field digital mammographic imaging system with parabolic polycapillary optics may be a useful diagnostic tool for providing high-resolution imaging with a low radiation dose for examination of local volumes of breast tissue

  14. Usefulness of a Small-Field Digital Mammographic Imaging System Using Parabolic Polycapillary Optics as a Diagnostic Imaging Tool: a Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chon, Kwon Su [Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong Gon; Son, Hyun Hwa; Kang, Sung Hoon; Park, Seong Hoon; Kim, Hye Won; Kim, Hun Soo; Yoon, Kwon Ha [Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate the efficacy for spatial resolution and radiation dose of a small-field digital mammographic imaging system using parabolic polycapillary optics. We developed a small-field digital mammographic imaging system composed of a CCD (charge coupled device) detector and an Xray source coupled with parabolic polycapillary optics. The spatial resolution and radiation dose according to various filters were evaluated for a small-field digital mammographic imaging system. The images of a test standard phantom and breast cancer tissue sample were obtained. The small-field digital mammographic imaging system had spatial resolutions of 12 lp/mm with molybdenum and rhodium filters with a 25-{mu}m thickness. With a thicker molybdenum filter (100 {mu}m thick), the system had a higher spatial resolution of 11 lp/mm and contrast of 0.48. The radiation dose for a rhodium filter with a 25-{mu}m thickness was 0.13 mGy within a 10-mm-diameter local field. A larger field image greater than 10 mm in diameter could be obtained by scanning an object. On the small-field mammographic imaging system, microcalcifications of breast cancer tissue were clearly observed. A small-field digital mammographic imaging system with parabolic polycapillary optics may be a useful diagnostic tool for providing high-resolution imaging with a low radiation dose for examination of local volumes of breast tissue.

  15. Results of the 1998 Field Demonstration and Preliminary Implementation Guidance for Phytoremediation of Lead-Contaminated Soil at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant, Arden Hills, Minnesota

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behel, A

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the first-year (1998) results of a two-year field demonstration conducted to determine if phytoextraction is a viable and feasible technology for remediation of metals (specifically lead) in soil...

  16. Guided labworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lærke Bang

    For the last 40 years physics education research has shown poor learning outcomes of guided labs. Still this is found to be a very used teaching method in the upper secodary schools. This study explains the teacher's choice of guided labs throught the concept of redesign as obstacle dislodgement...

  17. Mathematics Curriculum Guide for Spanish-Speaking Students, Levels A, B, C, D, Field Test. Working Draft = Guia didactica de Matematicas, Niveles A, B, C, D. Edicion Experimental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicago Board of Education, IL. Dept. of Curriculum.

    The introductory level curriculum guide for bilingual education for Spanish-speaking children in the Chicago public schools is divided into four difficulty levels and is designed to facilitate acquisition of mathematical concepts by presenting them in the children's native language. At each level, the concepts covered include the meaning of…

  18. Traditional Birth Attendants: A Field Guide to Their Training, Evaluation, and Articulation with Health Services. World Health Organization Offset Publication No. 44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    Guidelines for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of nationwide programs for the training and utilization of traditional birth attendants (TBAs) are presented. The guide begins with a chart outlining the steps in the development and evaluation of TBA programs. The next section discusses the formulation of basic policies regarding the…

  19. Curriculum Guide for Spanish Language Arts, Elementary Level F. Field Test = Guia para la ensenanza de las artes del lenguaje espanol, nivel elemental primario F. Edicion experimental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicago Board of Education, IL. Dept. of Curriculum.

    The curriculum guide for teachers of Spanish language arts for native Spanish-speaking primary students in the Chicago public schools' bilingual education program is introduced by a section outlining the program and defining the areas to be emphasized in the program: word attack, comprehension skills, study skills, and literature appreciation.…

  20. MR-guided percutaneous biopsy of solitary pulmonary lesions using a 1.0-T open high-field MRI scanner with respiratory gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Huang, Jie; Xu, Yujun; He, Xiangmeng; Lue, Yubo; Liu, Qiang; Li, Chengli [Department of Interventional MRI, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong Key Laboratory of Advanced Medical Imaging Technologies and Applications, Jinan, Shandong (China); Li, Lei [Qingdao Central Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto [Turku University Hospital, The South Western Finland Imaging Centre, Turku (Finland)

    2017-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility, safety and accuracy of MR-guided percutaneous biopsy of solitary pulmonary lesions using a 1.0-T open MR scanner with respiratory gating. Sixty-five patients with 65 solitary pulmonary lesions underwent MR-guided percutaneous coaxial cutting needle biopsy using a 1.0-T open MR scanner with respiratory gating. Lesions were divided into two groups according to maximum lesion diameters: ≤2.0 cm (n = 31) and >2.0 cm (n = 34). The final diagnosis was established in surgery and subsequent histology. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were compared between the groups using Fisher's exact test. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of MRI-guided percutaneous pulmonary biopsy in diagnosing malignancy were 96.9 %, 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were 96.8 %, 96.3 % and 100 % for lesions 2.0 cm or smaller and 97.1 %, 96.4 % and 100 %, respectively, for lesions larger than 2.0 cm. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). Biopsy-induced complications encountered were pneumothorax in 12.3 % (8/65) and haemoptysis in 4.6 % (3/65). There were no serious complications. MRI-guided percutaneous biopsy using a 1.0-T open MR scanner with respiratory gating is an accurate and safe diagnostic technique in evaluation of pulmonary lesions. (orig.)

  1. Architectural Guide of Jordan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Architectural and cultural guidebook for Jordan that also includes a view on the Syrian refugee situation, especially in the large UNHCR camp of Zaatari. The guide book is a preparatory study for a field trip our master studio undertook to the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan in Fall 2016....

  2. Track Starter's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Charles H.; Rankin, Kelly D.

    This guide was developed to serve both the novice and experienced starter in track and field events. Each year in the United States, runners encounter dozens of different starters' mannerisms as they travel to track meets in various towns and states. The goal of any competent and conscientious starter is to insure that all runners receive a fair…

  3. Rust scoring guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anonymous,

    1986-01-01

    This brief guide for identifying rust diseases of smaill grain cereals contains color photos depicting the growth stages of small grain cereal crops and provides instructions for recording rust severity and field response for stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis), stem rust (P. graminis), and leaf rust

  4. Rust scoring guide

    OpenAIRE

    Anonymous

    1986-01-01

    This brief guide for identifying rust diseases of smaill grain cereals contains color photos depicting the growth stages of small grain cereal crops and provides instructions for recording rust severity and field response for stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis), stem rust (P. graminis), and leaf rust (P. recondita).

  5. Guiding center drift equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1979-03-01

    The quations for particle guiding center drift orbits are given in a new magnetic coordinate system. This form of the equations not only separates the fast motion along the lines from the slow motion across, but also requires less information about the magnetic field than many other formulations of the problem

  6. Teacher's Guide for Earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Merle S.; And Others

    This teacher's guide on earthworms includes four major sections: (1) introduction, (2) caring for earthworms in the classroom, (3) classroom activities, and (4) the appendix. The introduction includes information concerning grade level, scheduling, materials, obtaining earthworms, field study, classroom clean-up, and records. Caring for earthworms…

  7. Preliminary investigation of the structural influence of entry-entry intersections and inhomogeneous initial-stress fields on repository disposal rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loken, M.C.

    1983-07-01

    The structural influence of entry-entry intersections and inhomogeneous initial stress fields on a repository configuration has been investigated. The out-of-plane stress increases rapidly into the pillar from the rib of the connecting corridor to the plane strain value within one pillar width of the intersection, indicating that a two-dimensional analysis is valid over a major portion of the disposal room and pillar. Inhomogeneous initial stress fields do not significantly alter the trends of the resulting post-excavation stress fields. However, the magnitude of the vertical stress and the effective stress is slightly greater near the corner at the intersection. Further nonlinear analyses are required to assess the stability of the pillar at the intersection because of the high deviatoric stresses occurring in that region. 6 references

  8. Field-cage methodology for evaluating climatic suitability for introduced wood-borer parasitoids: preliminary results from the emerald ash borer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Jian J. Duan; Leah S. Bauer; Juli Gould; Phil Taylor; Dick Bean; Carol Holko; Roy Van. Driesche

    2011-01-01

    Field-cage methods were developed to evaluate the abilities of Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), biocontrol agents of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), to parasitize, develop and overwinter following three late-season releases at both a northern (Michigan) and a southern (...

  9. Preliminary results from a field experiment on e-bike safety : Speed choice and mental workload for middle-aged and elderly cyclists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twisk, D.A.M.; Boele, M.J.; Vlakveld, W.P.; Christoph, M.; Sikkema, R.; Remij, R.; Schwab, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    To study the safety of e-bikes for the elderly, an experimental field study was conducted, using instrumented bicycles and comparing two age groups: older cyclists, n= 29, mean age = 70, SD = 4.2 and middle-aged cyclists, n = 29, mean age = 38, SD = 4.3. All were regular cyclists. They rode a fixed

  10. Transitioning from Faculty-Led Lecture to Student-Centered Field Learning Facilitated by Near-Peer Mentors: Preliminary Findings from the GeoFORCE/ STEMFORCE Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M.; Wright, V. D.; Ellins, K. K.; Browder, M. G. J.; Castillo, R.; Kotowski, A. J.; Libarkin, J. C.; Lu, J.; Maredia, N.; Butler, N.

    2017-12-01

    GeoFORCE Texas, a geology-based outreach program in the Jackson School of Geosciences, offers weeklong summer geology field based courses to secondary students from minority-serving high schools in Texas and the Bahamas. Students transitioning from eighth to ninth grade are recruited into the program and ideally remain in GeoFORCE for four years. The program aims to empower underrepresented students by exposing them to experiences intended to inspire them to pursue geoscience or other STEM careers. Since the program's inception in 2005, GeoFORCE Texas has relied on a mix of classroom lectures delivered by a geoscience faculty member and time in the field. Early research findings from a National Science Foundation-sponsored GeoPaths-IMPACT project are influencing the evolution of field instruction away from the faculty-led lecture model to student-centered learning that may improve students' grasp of key geological concepts. The eleventh and twelfth grade programs are shifting towards this strategy. Each trip is facilitated by a seven-person team comprised of a geoscience graduate student, master teachers, four undergraduate geology students, and preservice teachers. Members of the instructional team reflected the racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity that the geoscience strives to achieve; all are excellent role models for GeoFORCE students. The outcome of the most recent Central Texas twelfth grade trip, which used a student-centered, project-based approach, was especially noteworthy. Each group was given a topic to apply to what they saw in the field, such as fluvial systems, cultural significance, or geohazards, etc., and present in any manner in front of peers and a panel of geoscience experts. Students used the latest presentation technology available to them (e.g. Prezi, iMovies) and sketches and site notes from field stops. The final presentations were clear, informative, and entertaining. It can be concluded that the students were more engaged with the

  11. Preliminary results of chronostratigraphic field work, OSL-dating and morphogenetic reconstruction of an alluvial apron at Alborz southern foothill, Damghan basin, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büdel, Christian; Fuchs, Markus; Majid Padashi, Seyed; Baumhauer, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Here we present preliminary results of a chronostratigraphic study of an alluvial fan in the Damghan Basin, northern Iran. The basin sediments date back to the Mio- and Pliocene and therefore represent the starting point of alluvial fan aggradation. Today, the still active alluvial fans prograde from the Albors Mountain ranges and sit on the older sediment bodies. In this study, our focus is on the late Pleistocene to Holocene alluvial fan sedimentation history. The upper stratigraphy of the alluvial fans and intercalated lake deposits is characterized by six individual layers of gravels and fines, representing six different stratigraphic units. These units are described and classified by detailed geomorphological and stratigraphic mapping. To establish an alluvial fan chronology, six profiles were sampled for OSL dating. As expected, due to the high-energy transport system of alluvial fan aggradation in semi-desert environments, OSL dating of these sediments is challenging due to the problem of insufficient bleaching. Consequently, most of the samples are interpreted as maximum ages. However, the measurements show a consistent internal age structure and the overall OSL-based chronology is in agreement with the age model derived from our geomorphological analysis. As a first interpretation, based on surveyed geomorphological features and chronological analysis, we could identify seven morphodynamic phases, leading to a genetic model of alluvial fan aggradation. The oldest Pleistocene age estimate is derived from a former lake terrace. The following ages represent ongoing lake sediment deposition and the development of a proximal and mid-fan gravel cover. After the youngest lake deposits were accumulated within the Holocene, the lake starts to retreat and small alluvial fans are filling up the former lake bottom. This last sedimentation phase can be divided in at least two sub-phases, probably coupled to a lateral shifting of the active depositional lobe and to the

  12. HBR guides

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Nancy; Dillon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Master your most pressing professional challenges with this seven-volume set that collects the smartest best practices from leading experts all in one place. "HBR Guide to Better Business Writing" and "HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations" help you perfect your communication skills; "HBR Guide to Managing Up and Across" and "HBR Guide to Office Politics" show you how to build the best professional relationships; "HBR Guide to Finance Basics for Managers" is the one book you'll ever need to teach you about the numbers; "HBR Guide to Project Management" addresses tough questions such as how to manage stakeholder expectations and how to manage uncertainty in a complex project; and "HBR Guide to Getting the Right Work Done" goes beyond basic productivity tips to teach you how to prioritize and focus on your work. This specially priced set of the most popular books in the series makes a perfect gift for aspiring leaders looking for trusted advice. Arm yourself with the advice you need to succeed on the job, from ...

  13. Site study plan for Exploratory shaft facilities design foundation boreholes (shaft surface facility foundation borings), Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Surface-based geotechnical field program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This site study plan describes the Exploratory Shaft Facilities (ESF) Design Foundation Boreholes field activities to be conducted during early stages of Site Characterization at the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site. The field program has been designed to provide data useful in addressing information/data needs resulting from federal/state/local regulations, and repository program requirements. Approximately 50 foundation boreholes will be drilled within the ESP location to provide data necessary for design of the ESF and to satisfy applicable shaft permitting requirements. Soils and subsurface rock will be sampled as the foundation boreholes are advanced. Soil samples or rock core will be taken through the Blackwater Draw and Ogallala Formations and the Dockum Group. Hydrologic testing will be performed in boreholes that penetrates the water table. In-situ elastic properties will be determined from both the soil strata and rock units along the length of the boreholes. Field methods/tests are chosen that provide the best or only means of obtaining the required data. The Salt Repository Project (SRP) Networks specify the schedule under which the program will operate. Drilling will not begin until after site ground water baseline conditions have been established. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program of drilling and testing. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established SRP procedures. A quality assurance program will be utilized to assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 25 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Ground Field-Based Hyperspectral Imaging: A Preliminary Study to Assess the Potential of Established Vegetation Indices to Infer Variation in Water-Use Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelech, E. A.; McGrath, J.; Pederson, T.; Bernacchi, C.

    2017-12-01

    Increases in the global average temperature will consequently induce a higher occurrence of severe environmental conditions such as drought on arable land. To mitigate these threats, crops for fuel and food must be bred for higher water-use efficiencies (WUE). Defining genomic variation through high-throughput phenotypic analysis in field conditions has the potential to relieve the major bottleneck in linking desirable genetic traits to the associated phenotypic response. This can subsequently enable breeders to create new agricultural germplasm that supports the need for higher water-use efficient crops. From satellites to field-based aerial and ground sensors, the reflectance properties of vegetation measured by hyperspectral imaging is becoming a rapid high-throughput phenotyping technique. A variety of physiological traits can be inferred by regression analysis with leaf reflectance which is controlled by the properties and abundance of water, carbon, nitrogen and pigments. Although, given that the current established vegetation indices are designed to accentuate these properties from spectral reflectance, it becomes a challenge to infer relative measurements of WUE at a crop canopy scale without ground-truth data collection. This study aims to correlate established biomass and canopy-water-content indices with ground-truth data. Five bioenergy sorghum genotypes (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) that have differences in WUE and wild-type Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. Samsun) under irrigated and rainfed field conditions were examined. A linear regression analysis was conducted to determine if variation in canopy water content and biomass, driven by natural genotypic and artificial treatment influences, can be inferred using established vegetation indices. The results from this study will elucidate the ability of ground field-based hyperspectral imaging to assess variation in water content, biomass and water-use efficiency. This can lead to improved opportunities to

  15. Medication Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Small Text Medium Text Large Text Contrast Dark on Light Light on Dark Donate Search Menu Donate What is Glaucoma? Care ... Low Vision Resources Medication Guide Resources on the Web » See All Articles Where the Money Goes Have ...

  16. Site study plan for Upper Aquifer Hydrology Clusters, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Surface-based geotechnical field program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    As part of site characterization studies, at the Deaf Smith County site, Texas, 15 wells at 5 locations will be completed in the Ogallala Formation and Dockum Group. The purposes of the wells, which are called Upper Aquifer (2) establish background hydrologic and water quality conditions, (3) provide analysis, (4) monitor responses of the shallow hydrologic system to site activities and nearby pumpage for irrigation, (5) collect water samples from both saturated and unsaturated materials to help define recharge rates and ground-water flow patterns, (6) monitor variations on water quality, and (7) define ground-water resources near the site. The test wells will be installed during a 14-month period starting about 1-1/2 years after site characterization activities begin. The Technical Field Services Contractor is responsible for conducting the field program of drilling and testing. Samples and data will be handled and reported in accordance with established Salt Repository Project procedures. A quality assurance program will assure that activities affecting quality are performed correctly and that the appropriate documentation is maintained. 44 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs

  17. Field test of short-notice random inspections for inventory-change verification at a low-enriched-uranium fuel-fabrication plant: Preliminary summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Moussalli, G.; Naegele, G.; Ikonomou, P.; Hosoya, M.; Scott, P.; Fager, J.; Sanders, C.; Colwell, D.; Joyner, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    An approach of short-notice random inspections (SNRIs) for inventory-change verification can enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of international safeguards at natural or low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel fabrication plants. According to this approach, the plant operator declares the contents of nuclear material items before knowing if an inspection will occur to verify them. Additionally, items about which declarations are newly made should remain available for verification for an agreed time. This report details a six-month field test of the feasibility of such SNRIs which took place at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division. Westinghouse personnel made daily declarations about both feed and product items, uranium hexafluoride cylinders and finished fuel assemblies, using a custom-designed computer ''mailbox''. Safeguards inspectors from the IAEA conducted eight SNRIs to verify these declarations. Items from both strata were verified during the SNRIs by means of nondestructive assay equipment. The field test demonstrated the feasibility and practicality of key elements of the SNRI approach for a large LEU fuel fabrication plant

  18. International nuclear energy guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning current technical and economical events in the nuclear field. Twelve papers have been abstracted and input to the data base. The ''international nuclear energy guide'' gives a general directory of the name, the address and the telephone number of the companies and bodies quoted in this guide; a chronology of the main events 1982. The administrative and professional organization, the nuclear courses and research centers in France are presented, as also the organization of protection and safety, and of nuclear fuel cycle. The firms concerned by the design and the construction of NSSS and the allied nuclear firms are also presented. The last part of this guide deals with the nuclear energy in the world: descriptive list of international organizations, and, the nuclear activities throughout the world (alphabetical order by countries) [fr

  19. X-ray and visible light transmission as two-dimensional, full-field moisture-sensing techniques: A preliminary comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidwell, V.C.; Glass, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Two independent high-resolution moisture-sensing techniques, x-ray absorption and light transmission, have been developed for use in two-dimensional, thin-slab experimental systems. The techniques yield full-field measurement capabilities with exceptional resolution of moisture content i