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Sample records for prehospitalization aspirin therapy

  1. Daily Aspirin Therapy: Understand the Benefits and Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily aspirin therapy: Understand the benefits and risks Daily aspirin therapy can be a lifesaving option, but it's not ... everyone. Get the facts before considering a daily aspirin. By Mayo Clinic Staff Daily aspirin therapy may ...

  2. Duration of increased bleeding tendency after cessation of aspirin therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Ronan A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Aspirin has a significant effect on hemostasis, so it is often recommended that patients taking aspirin discontinue treatment before elective surgery. While off aspirin, these patients may be at risk of thrombosis. The optimum period of time that aspirin should be withheld is controversial. The aim of this study was to establish the duration of the antihemostatic effect of prolonged aspirin therapy. STUDY DESIGN: In a prospective study, 51 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned into 3 groups, each receiving an identical tablet for 14 days. One group received a placebo tablet; individuals in the other two groups received either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin once a day. Template bleeding times and specific platelet function testing (using the PFA-100; Dade Behring) were carried out on subjects before therapy and again after its completion until they returned to baseline. RESULTS: Thirty-eight volunteers complied sufficiently with the protocol to provide useful results. All bleeding times normalized within 96 hours and all platelet function tests within 144 hours after stopping aspirin. There was no demonstrable hemostatic defect in any volunteer persisting by or beyond the sixth day after treatment cessation. There was no apparent difference in duration of effect between those taking either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin. CONCLUSIONS: This study uses sensitive measures of platelet function to demonstrate the duration of increased bleeding tendency after withdrawal of aspirin therapy. It supports discontinuation of aspirin therapy 5 days before elective surgery (with the operation being performed on the sixth day).

  3. Safety and feasibility of liver resection with continued antiplatelet therapy using aspirin.

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    Monden, Kazuteru; Sadamori, Hiroshi; Hioki, Masayoshi; Ohno, Satoshi; Saneto, Hiromi; Ueki, Toru; Yabushita, Kazuhisa; Ono, Kazumi; Sakaguchi, Kousaku; Takakura, Norihisa

    2017-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used for the secondary prevention of ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disease. Perioperative aspirin may decrease thrombotic morbidity, but may also increase hemorrhagic morbidity. In particular, liver resection carries risks of bleeding, leading to higher risks of hemorrhagic morbidity. Our institution has continued aspirin therapy perioperatively in patients undergoing liver resection. This study examined the safety and feasibility of liver resection while continuing aspirin. We retrospectively evaluated 378 patients who underwent liver resection between January 2010 and January 2016. Patients were grouped according to preoperative aspirin prescription: patients with aspirin therapy (aspirin users, n = 31); and patients without use of aspirin (aspirin non-users, n = 347). Aspirin users were significantly older (P aspirin users than among aspirin non-users, no significant difference was identified. No postoperative hemorrhage was seen among aspirin users. Liver resection can be safely performed while continuing aspirin therapy without increasing hemorrhagic morbidity. Our results suggest that interruption of aspirin therapy is unnecessary for patients undergoing liver resection. © 2017 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  4. Weighing the Anti-Ischemic Benefits and Bleeding Risks from Aspirin Therapy: a Rational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugani, Sagar; Ames, Jeffrey M; Manson, JoAnn E; Mora, Samia

    2018-02-21

    The role of aspirin in secondary cardiovascular prevention is well understood; however, the role in primary prevention is less clear, and requires careful balancing of potential benefits with risks. Here, we summarize the evidence base on the benefits and risks of aspirin therapy, discuss clinical practice guidelines and decision support tools to assist in initiating aspirin therapy, and highlight ongoing trials that may clarify the role of aspirin in cardiovascular disease prevention. In 2016, the USPSTF released guidelines on the use of aspirin for primary prevention. Based on 11 trials (n = 118,445), aspirin significantly reduced all-cause mortality and nonfatal myocardial infarction, and in 7 trials that evaluated aspirin ≤ 100 mg/day, there was significant reduction in nonfatal stroke. The USPSTF recommends individualized use of aspirin based on factors including age, 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk score, and bleeding risk. Several ongoing trials are evaluating the role of aspirin in primary prevention, secondary prevention, and in combination therapy for atrial fibrillation. Evidence-based approaches to aspirin use should consider the anti-ischemic benefits and bleeding risks from aspirin. In this era of precision medicine, tools that provide the personalized benefit to risk assessment, such as the freely available clinical decision support tool (Aspirin-Guide), can be easily incorporated into the electronic health record and facilitate more informed decisions about initiating aspirin therapy for primary prevention. Aspirin has a complex matrix of benefits and risks, and its use in primary prevention requires individualized decision-making. Results from ongoing trials may guide healthcare providers in identifying appropriate candidates for aspirin therapy.

  5. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. II. Aspirin

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    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of aspirin, an antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug, undoubtedly represents a milestone in the history of medical therapy. Since ancient times the derivatives of willow (Salix alba were used to treat a variety of fevers and pain syndromes, although the first report dates back to 1763 when the English Reverend Edward Stone described the effect of an extract of the bark willow in treating malaria. In the XIX century many apothecaries and chemists, including the Italian Raffaele Piria and Cesare Bertagnini, developed the biological processes of extraction and chemical synthesis of salicylates, and then analyzed their therapeutic properties and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. In 1899 the Bayer Company, where Felix Hoffmann, Heinrich Dreser and Arthur Eichengrün worked, recorded acetyl-salicylic acid under the name “Aspirin”. In the XX century, besides the definition of the correct applications of aspirin in the anti-rheumatic therapy being defined, Lawrence L. Crawen identified the property of this drug as an anti-platelet agent, thus opening the way for more widespread uses in cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Cytokine expression before and after aspirin desensitization therapy in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Ayse; Kurt, Emel; Gulbas, Zafer

    2013-12-01

    Aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is induced by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and/or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Effects of desensitization on many mediators have been examined previously, but few studies addressed the influence of desensitization on T lymphocytes and T lymphocyte-derived cytokines. This study was performed to examine peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) cytokine expression in aspirin-sensitive patients who have asthma before and after aspirin desensitization. In this study, the release of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-4 (IL-4), and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4+ T lymphocytes prior to aspirin desensitization were also measured at intracellular levels, and expression of these cytokines after 1 month aspirin desensitization was evaluated. Twelve patients with AERD were included in the study. Two different control groups were formed, one consisted of 15 healthy people and second 12 aspirin tolerant asthmatic (ATA) patients using aspirin. A blood sample was collected prior to desensitization, and the tests were repeated by taking a second blood sample 1 month after the 4-day desensitization treatment. The proportion of lymphocytes secreting IFN-γ in the study group was 15.61 ± 4.40 % before desensitization and 15.08 ± 5.89 % after desensitization. The rate of IFN-γ secreting CD4+ T lymphocytes was 20.51 ± 4.41 % in the normal control group and 16.07 ± 5.7 % in the ATA group (p = 0.021). The ratio of CD4+ T lymphocyte secreting IFN-γ was reduced in patients with AERD before desensitization compared to normal control group (p = 0.040). The levels of IL-2, IL-4, and the subsets of lymphocyte were not different before and after desensitization compared to control groups.

  7. Antiplatelet therapy: aspirin resistance and all that jazz!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divani, Afshin A; Zantek, Nicole D; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Rao, Gundu H R

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and stroke. Aspirin used alone or in combination with other antiplatelet drugs has been shown to offer significant benefit to patients at high risk of vascular events. Resistance to the action of aspirin may decrease this benefit. Aspirin resistance has been defined by clinical and/or laboratory criteria; however, detection by laboratory methods prior to experiencing a clinical event will likely provide the greatest opportunity for intervention. Numerous laboratory methods with different cutoff points have been used to evaluate the resistance. Noncompliance with aspirin treatment has also confounded studies. A single assay is currently insufficient to establish resistance. Combinations of results to confirm compliance and platelet inhibition may identify "at-risk" individuals who truly have aspirin resistance. The most effective strategy for managing patients with aspirin resistance is unknown; however, studies are currently underway to address this issue.

  8. Monitoring aspirin therapy with the Platelet Function Analyzer-100

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jette; Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Low platelet response to aspirin has been reported to be associated with a high incidence of vascular events. The reported prevalence of aspirin low-responsiveness varies, which may be explained by poor reproducibility of the methods used to evaluate aspirin response and low compliance....... The Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PFA-100) is a commonly used platelet function test. We aimed to assess the reproducibility of the PFA-100 and the agreement with optical platelet aggregometry (OPA) in healthy volunteers and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) treated with low-dose aspirin....... MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 43 patients with CAD took part in the study. During treatment with aspirin 75 mg daily, all participants had platelet function assessed in duplicate with the PFA-100 and OPA on 4 consecutive days. Additionally, platelet function was assessed before...

  9. Aspirin mono-therapy continuation does not result in more bleeding after knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Pierre-Emmanuel; Lavand'homme, Patricia; Yombi, JeanCyr; Thienpont, Emmanuel

    2017-08-01

    Current clinical practice guidelines sometimes still recommend stopping aspirin five to seven days before knee arthroplasty surgery. Literature regarding multimodal blood management and continuation of anti-platelet therapy in this type of surgery is scant. The study hypothesis was that knee arthroplasty under low-dose aspirin mono-therapy continuation does not cause more total blood loss than knee arthroplasty performed without aspirin. Blood loss would be measured by haemoglobin (Hb) and haematocrit (HTC) levels drop at day 2 or day 4 for patients who benefit from multimodal bleeding control measures. A database of all patients undergoing knee arthroplasty between 2006 and 2014 was analysed. Demographic, surgical and complete blood workup data were collected. A retrospective comparison study analysed both groups in terms of blood loss, by mean calculated blood loss as haemoglobin or haematocrit drop between the preoperative Nadir value and the postoperative day 2 and 4 value. A group of 198 (44 UKA and 154 TKA) patients underwent surgery without interrupting their aspirin therapy for cardiovascular prevention. Mean (SD) age was 71 (8) and the mean (SD) BMI was 29 (5.5) kg/m 2 . The control group consisted of 403 (102 UKA and 301 TKA) patients who were not under aspirin, or any other anti-platelet agent. Mean (SD) age was 65 (10) (p aspirin mono-therapy for cardiovascular prevention. III.

  10. Mortality in primary angioplasty patients starting antiplatelet therapy with prehospital prasugrel or clopidogrel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, Patrick; Grieco, Niccolò; Ince, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    hospitalization, we report here the 1-year follow-up data, including cardiovascular (CV) mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: MULTIPRAC is a multinational, prospective registry of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) from 25 hospitals in nine countries, all of which had an established practice...... of prehospital start of dual antiplatelet therapy in place. The key outcome was CV death at 1 year. Among 2,036 patients followed-up through 1 year, 49 died (2.4%), 10 during the initial hospitalization and 39 within 1 year after hospital discharge. The primary analysis was based on the P2Y12-inhibitor, used...... from prehospital loading dose through hospital discharge. Prasugrel (n=824) was more commonly used than clopidogrel (n=425). The observed 1-year rates for CV death were 0.5% with prasugrel and 2.6% with clopidogrel. After adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics, treatment with prasugrel...

  11. Using the Platelet Function Analyzer-100 for monitoring aspirin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Mickley, Hans; Korsholm, Lars

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to evaluate the test characteristics of the Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PFA-100) in patients treated with aspirin. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study consisted of two sub-studies. In study 1, 10 patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 10 controls had...... platelet function assessed by optical platelet aggregation and the PFA-100 method in two 5-week periods. Patients with IHD were treated with aspirin 150 mg/day (first 5-week period), and 300 mg/day (second 5-week period), whereas the controls only received aspirin (150 mg/day) during the second 5-week...... period. From the results of study 1, we found that a cut-off value for the PFA-100 collagen/epinephrine cartridge PFA-100 method and optical platelet aggregation was found. Within...

  12. Pre-hospital Obstacles in Thrombolytic Therapy and Suggested Solutions

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    Betül Tekin Güveli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Acute ischemic stroke is frequently encountered in emergency neurology clinics. Especially when administered within 3 hours of symptom onset, thrombolytic therapy is important in reducing ischemic injury and neurological disability. In this study, we aimed to investigate the demographic and clinical characteristics according to application time, to identify situations which pose an obstacle to thrombolytic therapy and to review the thrombolytic therapy results in patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: The patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke were evaluated and their age, gender, complaints, risk factors, previous history of stroke, with whom they live, how they arrived at the hospital and their application time information were recorded. Those who were admitted within 3 hours of symptom onset were assessed as early, those admitted after 3 hours were assessed as late admission. Then the rate of thrombolytic therapy, final results and the clinical status in early admission patients and the reasons for delay in late admission patients were discussed. RESULTS: Among 361 acute ischemic stroke patients, the mean age was 66±14,1. 111 patients were admitted within 3 hours of symptom onset, 246 patients were admitted after three hours. Patients arriving to emergency room with 112 Ambulance Service were admitted earlier than those brought in by family, and this difference was statistically significant. The most common causes of time loss in late admissions were the patients being referred from other centers and the unawareness of family about the importance of the disease. There were 13 patients treated with thrombolytic therapy, and complications occurred in one patient. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Thrombolytic therapy is important in acute ischemic stroke for suitable patients.Our study suggested that the most important factors in spreading of performing the thrombolytic therapy are informing the public about

  13. Aspirin and low-molecular weight heparin combination therapy effectively prevents recurrent miscarriage in hyperhomocysteinemic women.

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    Pratip Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The management of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL still remains a great challenge, and women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS are at a greater risk for spontaneous abortion. Treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH has become an accepted treatment option for women with RPL; however, the subgroup of women, who are likely to respond to LMWH, has not been precisely identified. The present study evaluated the efficacy of LMWH with reference to PCOS and associated metabolic phenotypes including hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy, insulin resistance (IR and obesity. This prospective observational study was conducted at Institute of Reproductive Medicine, Kolkata, India. A total of 967 women with history of 2 or more consecutive first trimester abortions were screened and 336 were selected for the study. The selected patients were initially divided on the basis of presence or absence of PCOS, while subsequent stratification was based on HHcy, IR and/or obesity. The subjects had treatment with aspirin during one conception cycle and aspirin-LMWH combined anticoagulant therapy for the immediate next conception cycle, if the first treated cycle was unsuccessful. Pregnancy salvage was the sole outcome measure. The overall rate of pregnancy salvage following aspirin therapy was 43.15%, which was mostly represented by normohomocysteinemic women, while the salvage rate was lower in the HHcy populations irrespective of the presence or absence of PCOS, IR, or obesity. By contrast, aspirin-LMWH combined therapy could rescue 66.84% pregnancies in the aspirin-failed cases. Logistic regression analyses showed that HHcy remained a significant factor in predicting salvage rates in the PCOS, IR, and obese subpopulations controlled for other confounding factors. With regard to pregnancy salvage, combined anticoagulant therapy with aspirin and LMWH conferred added benefit to those with HHcy phenotype.

  14. Prehospital factors determining regional variation in thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahr, Maarten M H; Vroomen, Patrick C A J; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; van der Zee, Durk-Jouke; de Vos, Ronald; Buskens, Erik

    2014-10-01

    Treatment rates with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator vary by region, which can be partially explained by organizational models of stroke care. A recent study demonstrated that prehospital factors determine a higher thrombolysis rate in a centralized vs. decentralized model in the north of the Netherlands. To investigate prehospital factors that may explain variation in thrombolytic therapy between a centralized and a decentralized model. A consecutive case observational study was conducted in the north of the Netherlands comparing patients arriving within 4·5 h in a centralized vs. decentralized stroke care model. Factors investigated were transportation mode, prehospital diagnostic accuracy, and preferential referral of thrombolysis candidates. Potential confounders were adjusted using logistic regression analysis. A total of 172 and 299 arriving within 4·5 h were enrolled in centralized and decentralized settings, respectively. The rate of transportation by emergency medical services was greater in the centralized model (adjusted odds ratio 3·11; 95% confidence interval, 1·59-6·06). Also, more misdiagnoses of stroke occurred in the central model (P = 0·05). In postal code areas with and without potential preferential referral of thrombolysis candidates due to overlapping catchment areas, the odds of hospital arrival within 4·5 h in the central vs. decentral model were 2·15 (95% confidence interval, 1·39-3·32) and 1·44 (95% confidence interval, 1·04-2·00), respectively. These results suggest that the larger proportion of patients arriving within 4·5 h in the centralized model might be related to a lower threshold to use emergency services to transport stroke patients and partly to preferential referral of thrombolysis candidates. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  15. Aspirin desensitization in aspirin-sensitive asthma: failure to maintain a desensitized state during prolonged therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankner, R E; Wedner, H J

    1983-11-01

    A patient with a history of asthma induced by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) was found to be ASA sensitive when orally challenged with ASA. She was successfully desensitized using incremental doses of ASA given orally and maintained on ASA or other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory (NSAI) agents for the treatment of arthritis. After 6 months of uninterrupted therapy the patient developed asthmatic symptoms that were related to ASA and NSAI drug therapy. Although desensitization may be achieved in patients with ASA-sensitive asthma, sensitivity may recur despite continuous therapy.

  16. Aspirin and Statin Nonuse Associated With Early Biochemical Failure After Prostate Radiation Therapy

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    Zaorsky, Nicholas G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K., E-mail: mark.buyyounouski@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Li, Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To present the largest retrospective series investigating the effect of aspirin and statins, which are hypothesized to have antineoplastic properties, on biochemical failure (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) after prostate radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2006, 2051 men with clinically localized prostate cancer received definitive RT alone (median dose, 76 Gy). The rates of aspirin use and statin use (defined as any use at the time of RT or during follow-up) were 36% and 34%, respectively. The primary endpoint of the study was an interval to biochemical failure (IBF) of less than 18 months, which has been shown to be the single strongest predictor of distant metastasis, prostate cancer survival, and overall survival after RT. Patient demographic characteristics and tumor staging factors were assessed with regard to associations with the endpoint. Univariate analysis was performed with the {chi}{sup 2} test for categorical variables and the Wilcoxon test for continuous variables. Multivariable analysis was performed with a multiple logistic regression. Results: The median follow-up was 75 months. Univariate analysis showed that an IBF of less than 18 months was associated with aspirin nonuse (P<.0001), statin nonuse (P<.0001), anticoagulant nonuse (P=.0006), cardiovascular disease (P=.0008), and prostate-specific antigen (continuous) (P=.008) but not with Gleason score, age, RT dose, or T stage. On multivariate analysis, only aspirin nonuse (P=.0012; odds ratio, 2.052 [95% confidence interval, 1.328-3.172]) and statin nonuse (P=.0002; odds ratio, 2.465 [95% confidence interval, 1.529-3.974]) were associated with an IBF of less than 18 months. Conclusions: In patients who received RT for prostate cancer, aspirin or statin nonuse was associated with early biochemical failure, a harbinger of distant metastasis and death. Further study is needed to confirm these findings and to determine the optimal dosing and schedule, as well as the relative

  17. Aspirin and Statin Nonuse Associated With Early Biochemical Failure After Prostate Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Li, Tianyu; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To present the largest retrospective series investigating the effect of aspirin and statins, which are hypothesized to have antineoplastic properties, on biochemical failure (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) after prostate radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2006, 2051 men with clinically localized prostate cancer received definitive RT alone (median dose, 76 Gy). The rates of aspirin use and statin use (defined as any use at the time of RT or during follow-up) were 36% and 34%, respectively. The primary endpoint of the study was an interval to biochemical failure (IBF) of less than 18 months, which has been shown to be the single strongest predictor of distant metastasis, prostate cancer survival, and overall survival after RT. Patient demographic characteristics and tumor staging factors were assessed with regard to associations with the endpoint. Univariate analysis was performed with the χ 2 test for categorical variables and the Wilcoxon test for continuous variables. Multivariable analysis was performed with a multiple logistic regression. Results: The median follow-up was 75 months. Univariate analysis showed that an IBF of less than 18 months was associated with aspirin nonuse (P<.0001), statin nonuse (P<.0001), anticoagulant nonuse (P=.0006), cardiovascular disease (P=.0008), and prostate-specific antigen (continuous) (P=.008) but not with Gleason score, age, RT dose, or T stage. On multivariate analysis, only aspirin nonuse (P=.0012; odds ratio, 2.052 [95% confidence interval, 1.328-3.172]) and statin nonuse (P=.0002; odds ratio, 2.465 [95% confidence interval, 1.529-3.974]) were associated with an IBF of less than 18 months. Conclusions: In patients who received RT for prostate cancer, aspirin or statin nonuse was associated with early biochemical failure, a harbinger of distant metastasis and death. Further study is needed to confirm these findings and to determine the optimal dosing and schedule, as well as the relative

  18. Identifying an evidence-based model of therapy for the pre-hospital emergency management of supraventricular tachycardia

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    This thesis provides a comprehensive reporting of the work undertaken to identify evidence supporting pre-hospital management of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), delivering an evidence base for paramedic treatment of these patients. The literature search identified absences in evidence supporting therapies used within existing clinical guidelines. The vagal manoeuvres, the simplest and least invasive therapy to employ in the stable patient, were insufficiently evidenced regarding technique...

  19. Influence of aspirin therapy in the ulcer associated with chronic venous insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río Solá, Ma Lourdes; Antonio, Jose; Fajardo, González; Vaquero Puerta, Carlos

    2012-07-01

    To determine the effect of aspirin on ulcer healing rate in patients with chronic venous insufficiency, and to establish prognostic factors that influence ulcer evolution. Between 2001 and 2005, 78 patients with ulcerated lesions of diameter >2 cm and associated with chronic venous insufficiency were evaluated in our hospital. Of these, 51 patients (22 men, 29 women) with mean age of 60 years (range: 36-86) were included in a prospective randomized trial with a parallel control group. The treatment group received 300 mg of aspirin and the control group received no drug treatment; in both groups, healing was associated with standard compression therapy. During follow-up, held weekly in a blinded fashion, there was ulcer healing as well as cases of recurrence. Results were analyzed by intention-to-treat approach. Cure rate was estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and the influence of prognostic factors was analyzed by applying the Cox proportional hazards model. In the presence of gradual compression therapy, healing occurred more rapidly in patients receiving aspirin versus the control subjects (12 weeks in the treated group vs. 22 weeks in the control group), with a 46% reduction in healing time. The main prognostic factor was estimated initial area of injury (P = 0.032). Age, sex, systemic therapy, and infection showed little relevance to evolution. The administration of aspirin daily dose of 300 mg shortens the healing time of ulcerated lesions in the chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). The main prognostic factor for healing of venous ulcerated lesions is the initial surface area of the ulcer. Copyright © 2012 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Obesity in prehospital emergency care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruska, Patricia; Kappus, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased steadily in recent years. Obese people often suffer from diseases which acute decompensation requires a prompt prehospital therapy. The Emergency Medical Service will be confronted with difficulties in clinical diagnostic, therapy and especially with a delayed management of rescue and transport. It is most important to avoid prehospital depreciation in quality and time management. This article reviews the specific requirements of prehospital care of obese persons and discusses possible solutions to optimize the prehospital therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Tailored antiplatelet therapy can overcome clopidogrel and aspirin resistance - The BOchum CLopidogrel and Aspirin Plan (BOCLA-Plan to improve antiplatelet therapy

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    Pepinghege Fenena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dual antiplatelet therapy using acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin and clopidogrel is of great importance following coronary stenting. However, the variable platelet inhibitory effectiveness compromises the antithrombotic advantages provided by dual antiplatelet therapy. The aim of this single-center prospective study was to reduce the low response incidence of dual antiplatelet therapy with ASA and clopidogrel according to a prespecified therapy algorithm. Methods Platelet function testing using whole blood aggregometry (Chronolog 590 was performed 48 hours following coronary stenting (for either acute coronary syndromes or stable coronary artery disease on 504 patients. The antiplatelet therapy included a loading dose of 600 mg clopidogrel and 500 mg ASA, followed by 75 mg clopidogrel and 100 mg ASA once daily. Clopidogrel low responders (CLR: >5 ohm; adenosine diphosphate (ADP 5 μM and/or ASA low responders (ALR: >0 ohm; arachidonic acid 10 μM were treated according to a structured therapy plan: in the case of CLR, the maintenance + dose was doubled (repeated loading dose followed by 150 mg daily, and when still ineffective ticlopidine or prasugrel, if available and not contraindicated, were used. ALR was treated by increasing the dose to 300 mg in a first step or to 500 mg ASA when the first modification did not take effect sufficiently. In addition, ADP receptor antagonist 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate triethylammonium salt (MeSAMP testing and ASA incubation were performed to rule out either a platelet ADP-receptor defect or an ASA pharmacokinetic resistance. Results Of the total cohort of 504 patients, we detected 30.8% clopidogrel low-responders and 19.4% aspirin low-responders. For ALR, with a dose adjustment of 300 mg ASA daily, 94.6% of ALR were effectively treated and the residual 5.4% by administration of daily dosages of 500 mg ASA. This means that after modification of the ASA maintenance dose, all

  2. Prehospital Ultrasound

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    Jen-Tang Sun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is a commonly used diagnostic tool in clinical conditions. With recent developments in technology, use of portable ultrasound devices has become feasible in prehospital settings. Many studies also proved the feasibility and accuracy of prehospital ultrasound. In this article, we focus on the use of prehospital ultrasound, with emphasis on trauma and chest ultrasound.

  3. Prehospital factors determining regional variation in thrombolytic therapy in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahr, Maarten M.H.; Vroomen, P.C.A.J.; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; van der Zee, Durk-Jouke; de Vos, Ronald; Buskens, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment rates with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator vary by region, which can be partially explained by organizational models of stroke care. A recent study demonstrated that prehospital factors determine a higher thrombolysis rate in a centralized vs. decentralized model in the

  4. Aspirin Desensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nerve Decompression Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Aspirin Desensitization Kevin C. Welch, MD Zara Patel, MD Introduction The term "aspirin-sensitive asthma" (also known as "aspirin triad" or " ...

  5. Aspirin overdose

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    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002542.htm Aspirin overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An overdose of aspirin means you have too much aspirin in your ...

  6. Protocol Adherence in Prehospital Medical Care Provided for Patients with Chest Pain and Loss of Consciousness; a Brief Report

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    Mostafa Mehrara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although many protocols are available in the field of the prehospital medical care (PMC, there is still a notable gap between protocol based directions and applied clinical practice. This study measures the rate of protocol adherence in PMC provided for patients with chest pain and loss of consciousness (LOC.Method: In this cross-sectional study, 10 educated research assistants audited the situation of provided PMC for non-traumatic chest pain and LOC patients, presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary level teaching hospital, compare to national recommendations in these regards.Results: 101 cases with the mean age of 56.7 ± 12.3 years (30-78 were audited (55.4% male. 61 (60.3% patients had chest pain and 40 (39.7% cases had LOC. Protocol adherence rates for cardiac monitoring (62.3%, O2 therapy (32.8%, nitroglycerin administration (60.7%, and aspirin administration (52.5% in prehospital care of patients with chest pain were fair to poor. Protocol adherence rates for correct patient positioning (25%, O2 therapy (75%, cardiac monitoring (25%, pupils examination (25%, bedside glucometery (50%, and assessing for naloxone administration (55% in prehospital care of patients with LOC were fair to poor.Conclusion: There were more than 20% protocol violation regarding prehospital care of chest pain patients regarding cardiac monitoring, O2 therapy, and nitroglycerin and aspirin administration. There were same situation regarding O2 therapy, positioning, cardiac monitoring, pupils examination, bedside glucometery, and assessing for naloxone administration of LOC patients in prehospital setting.

  7. Safety of continuing aspirin therapy during spinal surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenggui; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Yang; Sun, Jianmin

    2017-11-01

    Questions whether to continue or discontinue aspirin administration in the perioperative period of spinal surgery has not been systematically evaluated. The present systematic review is carried out to assess the impact of continuing aspirin administration on the bleeding and cardiovascular events in perispinal surgery period. Studies were retrieved through MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Springer Link Databases (search terms, aspirin, continue or discontinue, and spinal fusion), bibliographies of the articles retrieved, and the authors' reference files. We included studies that enrolled patients who underwent spinal surgery who were anticoagulated with aspirin alone and that reported bleeding or cardiovascular events as an outcome. Study quality was assessed using a validated form. 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was pooled to give summary estimates of bleeding and cardiovascular risk. We identified 4 studies assessing bleeding risk associated with aspirin continuation or cardiovascular risk with aspirin discontinuation during spinal surgery. The continuation of aspirin will not increase the risk of blood loss during the spinal surgery (95% CI, -111.72 to -0.59; P = .05). Also, there was no observed increase in the operative time (95% CI, -33.29 to -3.89; P = .01) and postoperative blood transfusion (95% CI, 0.00-0.27; P = .05). But as for the cardiovascular risk without aspirin continuation and mean hospital length of stay with aspirin continuation, we did not get enough samples to make an accurate decision about their relations with aspirin. Patients undergoing spinal surgery with continued aspirin administration do not have an increased risk for bleeding. In addition, there is no observed increase in the operation time and postoperative blood transfusion.

  8. Association between PTGS1 polymorphisms and functional outcomes in Chinese patients with stroke during aspirin therapy: Interaction with smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huan; Cai, Biyang; Sun, Lingli; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Shuyu; Cao, Liping; Guo, Hongquan; Sun, Wen; Yan, Bernard; Davis, Stephen M; Zhang, Zhizhong; Liu, Xinfeng

    2017-05-15

    Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthase 1 (PTGS1) and smoking may play important roles in aspirin nonresponsiveness, but the effect of their interaction on stroke outcomes remains largely unknown. We examined the effects of PTGS1 polymorphisms, smoking status, and their interaction on functional outcomes in a cohort of Chinese Han patients with stroke during aspirin therapy. A total of 617 ischemic stroke patients taking aspirin were enrolled. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs1330344, rs3842788, and rs5788 in PTGS1 were determined for genotyping. Poor functional outcomes were defined as a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) of 3-6 at 90-day follow-up. The influence of PTGS1 gene-smoking interaction on functional outcomes was examined. Poor functional outcomes occurred in 145 (23.5%) patients. When adjusting multiple factors by logistic regression, CC genotype of rs1330344 was associated with poor functional outcomes (risk ratio [RR]=1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-2.37). A similar connection was found in the CGC haplotype (RR=1.40; 95% CI: 1.08-1.77). Furthermore, we found a significant interaction between rs1330344 and smoking status (P interaction =0.018); the interaction effect between the PTGS1 haplotype and smoking also showed statistical significance (P interaction =0.040). In Chinese Han stroke patients with aspirin therapy, the adverse effect of PTGS1 polymorphisms on functional outcomes may be modulated by the smoking status. PTGS1 gene-smoking interaction might in part reflect the heterogeneity in the prognosis of patients treated with aspirin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Performing Aspirin Desensitization in Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldram, Jeremy D; Simon, Ronald A

    2016-11-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is characterized by chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps, asthma, and reactions to cyclooxygenase-1-inhibiting drugs. This condition is often refractory to standard medical treatments and results in aggressive nasal polyposis that often requires multiple sinus surgeries. Aspirin desensitization followed by daily aspirin therapy is an important treatment option, and its efficacy has been validated in multiple research studies. Aspirin desensitization is not without risk, but specific protocols and recommendations exist to mitigate the risk. Most patients with AERD can undergo aspirin desensitization in an outpatient setting under the supervision of an allergist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Aspirin plus dipyridamole has the highest surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) values in terms of mortality, intracranial hemorrhage, and adverse event rate among 7 drug therapies in the treatment of cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Jun; Liu, Xin

    2018-03-01

    The standardization for the clinical use of drug therapy for cerebral infarction (CI) has not yet determined in some aspects. In this paper, we discussed the efficacies of different drug therapies (aspirin, aspirin plus dipyridamole, aspirin plus clopidogrel, aspirin plus warfarin, cilostazol, warfarin, and ticlopidine) for CI. We searched databases of PubMed and Cochrane Library from the inception to April, 2017, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled in this study. The network meta-analysis integrated evidences of direct and indirect comparisons to assess odd ratios (OR) and surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) value. Thirteen eligible RCTs including 7 drug therapies were included into this network meta-analysis. The network meta-analysis results showed that CI patients who received aspirin plus dipyridamole presented lower mortality when compared with those received aspirin plus clopidogrel (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.18-0.99), indicating aspirin plus dipyridamole therapy had better efficacy for CI. As for intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), stroke recurrence, and adverse event (AE) rate, there were no significant differences of efficacy among 7 drug therapies. Besides, SUCRA values demonstrated that in the 7 drug therapies, aspirin plus dipyridamole therapy was more effective than others (mortality: 80.67%; ICH: 76.6%; AE rate: 90.2%). Our findings revealed that aspirin plus dipyridamole therapy might be the optimum one for patients with CI, which could help to improve the survival of CI patients.

  11. Evaluation of aspirin therapy on intracardiac thrombi using indium-111-oxine platelet scintigraphy, two-dimentional echocardiography and left ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Masanori; Irino, Tadayoshi; Yoshioka, Toshiharu; Sugimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tsuji, Kazuo; Naka, Masashi; Arai, Hidekazu.

    1984-01-01

    Left ventriculography (LVG), two-dimensional echocardiography (2-DE) and indium-111-oxine platelet scintigraphy were performed in five patients with intracardiac thrombi. Thrombi were visible in 7 sites (5 in the ventricle and 2 in the atrium) by platelet scintigraphy, in 4 sites (3 in the ventricle and 1 in the atrium) by 2-DE, and in 4 sites (4 in the ventricle) by LVG. When aspirin was administered to the patients, platelet scintigraphy had become negative for thrombi in 5 sites and false-negative for them in 2 sites. However, thrombi were detected in 6 sites after the withdrawal of aspirin. On the other hand, thrombi were detected in 4 sites by 2-DE, irrespective of the administration of aspirin. Indium-111-oxine platelet scintigraphy has proved to not only have higher sensitivity for detecting thrombi but also to be capable of observing the coagulation status of platelets on the thrombi. It is therefore considered very helpful in assessing anticoagulation therapy. (Namekawa, K)

  12. Efficacy in Deep Vein Thrombosis Prevention With Extended Mechanical Compression Device Therapy and Prophylactic Aspirin Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Mark A; Sympson, Alexandra N; Scheuerman, Christina M; Gregg, Justin L; Hussain, Lala R

    2017-05-01

    Aspirin at 325 mg twice daily is now included as a nationally approved venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis protocol for low-risk total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients. The purpose of this study is to examine whether there is a difference in deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurrence after a limited tourniquet TKA using aspirin-based prophylaxis with or without extended use of mechanical compression device (MCD) therapy. One hundred limited tourniquet TKA patients, whose DVT risk was managed with aspirin 325 mg twice daily for 3 weeks, were randomized to either using an MCD during hospitalization only or extended use at home up to 6 weeks postoperatively. Lower extremity duplex venous ultrasonography (LEDVU) was completed on the second postoperative day, 14 days postoperatively, and at 3 months postoperatively to confirm the absence of DVT after treatment. The DVT rate for the postdischarge MCD therapy group was 0% and 23.1% for the inpatient MCD group (P aspirin for 3 weeks postoperatively, and on MCD therapy for up to 6 weeks postoperatively experienced superior DVT prophylaxis than patients receiving MCD therapy only as an inpatient (P aspirin and extended-use MCD further validates this type of prophylaxis in low DVT risk TKA patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of clopidogrel with or without aspirin in patients taking oral anticoagulant therapy and undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: an open-label, randomised, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewilde, Willem J. M.; Oirbans, Tom; Verheugt, Freek W. A.; Kelder, Johannes C.; de Smet, Bart J. G. L.; Herrman, Jean-Paul; Adriaenssens, Tom; Vrolix, Mathias; Heestermans, Antonius A. C. M.; Vis, Marije M.; Tijsen, Jan G. P.; van 't Hof, Arnoud W.; ten Berg, Jurriën M.; Schölzel, B. E.; van den Branden, B. J.; Plokker, H. W. M.; Bosschaert, M. A.; Slagboom, T.; Vos, J.; Brueren, B. R. G.; Breet, N. J.; Sheikjoesoef, K.; Aarnoudse, W.; Rasoul, S.; van Mieghem, C.; Vandendriessche, T.; Cornelis, K.

    2013-01-01

    If percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is required in patients taking oral anticoagulants, antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel is indicated, but such triple therapy increases the risk of serious bleeding. We investigated the safety and efficacy of clopidogrel alone compared with

  14. Prophylactic low-dose aspirin is effective antithrombotic therapy for combination treatments of thalidomide or lenalidomide in myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesvizky, Ruben; Martínez-Baños, Déborah; Jalbrzikowski, Jessica; Christos, Paul; Furst, Jessica; De Sancho, Maria; Mark, Tomer; Pearse, Roger; Mazumdar, Madhu; Zafar, Faiza; Pekle, Karen; Leonard, John; Jayabalan, David; Coleman, Morton

    2007-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) patients have a propensity for thromboembolic events (TE), and treatment with thalidomide/dexamethasone or lenalidomide/dexamethasone increases this risk. This report describes the use of low-dose aspirin (81 mg) as primary thromboprophylaxis in three series of MM patients receiving thalidomide or lenalidomide with other drugs. In the first regimen (clarithromycin, thalidomide, dexamethasone), initiation of low-dose aspirin negated the occurrence of any further TE. In a second study, prophylactic aspirin given with thalidomide/dexamethasone resulted in a rate of TE similar to that seen with dexamethasone alone (without aspirin). A third study (n = 72) evaluated thrombosis rates with aspirin and a lenalidomide-containing regimen (clarithromycin, lenalidomide, dexamethasone). Of nine occurrences of thromboembolism, five were associated with aspirin interruption or poor compliance. Low-dose aspirin appears to reduce the incidence of thrombosis with these regimens. Routine use of aspirin as antithrombotic prophylaxis in MM patients receiving immunomodulatory drugs with corticosteroids is warranted.

  15. Long-term clinical effects of aspirin-desensitization therapy among patients with poorly controlled asthma and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Förster-Ruhrmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA, the levels of asthma symptom control can be divided into controlled, partially controlled and uncontrolled asthma. Optional therapy for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs-hypersensitive asthmatics uses aspirin desensitization, but until now, this therapy is not established in difficult to treat cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of aspirin desensitization in patients with poorly controlled asthma. Methods: Patients with poorly controlled asthma, NDAIDs hypersensitivity and aspirin desensitization were included in the retrospective study. The data were compared to those obtained from patients with controlled asthma and aspirin therapy. Lung function, levels of asthma symptom control, asthma medication, the size of nasal polyps (NP and smell function were evaluated over 18 months. Results: Thirty-two patients were included in the study (uncontrolled/partially controlled asthma n = 12; controlled asthma n = 20. After 18 months of follow-up, the patients with poorly controlled asthma had significantly increased forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 values, as compared to the baseline (66–82%; p = 0.02, the levels of asthma control improved significantly (p  0.05 and the asthma medication was constant. In relation to nasal parameters the sense of smell improved significantly in both groups, NP-scores did not differ significantly. Conclusions: Patients with a poorly controlled asthma and NSAIDs hypersensitivity profit from an add-on aspirin therapy. Keywords: Asthma, Levels of asthma symptom control, GINA, Uncontrolled asthma, Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD, NSAIDs hypersensitivity, NSAIDs sensitive asthma, Nasal polyps

  16. Final Results of Cilostazol-Aspirin Therapy against Recurrent Stroke with Intracranial Artery Stenosis (CATHARSIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Toi, Sono; Ezura, Masayuki; Okada, Yasushi; Takagi, Makoto; Nagai, Yoji; Matsubara, Yoshihiro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Suzuki, Norihiro; Tanahashi, Norio; Taki, Waro; Nagata, Izumi; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effect of cilostazol plus aspirin versus aspirin alone on the progression of intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS), and to compare ischemic and hemorrhagic events in patients with symptomatic IAS, an investigator-driven, nationwide multicenter cooperative randomized controlled trial (CATHARSIS; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier 00333164) was conducted. 165 noncardioembolic ischemic stroke patients with >50% stenosis in the responsible intracranial artery after 2 weeks to 6 months from the onset were randomly allocated to receive either cilostazol 200 mg/day plus aspirin 100 mg/day (n = 83, CA group) or aspirin 100 mg/day alone (n = 82, A group). The primary endpoint was the progression of IAS on magnetic resonance angiography at 2 years after randomization. Secondary endpoints were any vascular events, any cause of death, serious adverse events, new silent brain infarcts, and worsening of the modified Rankin Scale score. Progression of IAS was observed in 9.6% of the CA group patients and in 5.6% of the A group patients, with no significant intergroup difference (p = 0.53). The incidence of the secondary endpoints tended to be lower in the CA group compared with the A group, although the differences were not significant. By using exploratory logistic regression analysis adjusted for patient background characteristics, it was shown that the risk for certain combinations of secondary endpoints was lower in the CA group than in the A group [all vascular events and silent brain infarcts: odds ratio (OR) = 0.37, p = 0.04; stroke and silent brain infarcts: OR = 0.34, p = 0.04; all vascular events, worsening of modified Rankin Scale scores and silent brain infracts: OR = 0.41, p = 0.03]. Major hemorrhage was observed in 4 patients of the CA group and in 3 of the A group. Progression of IAS during the 2-year observation period appears to be less frequent than previously reported in stroke patients on antiplatelet agents after the acute phase, which could be due

  17. Dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with aspirin resistance following coronary artery bypass grafting: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial [NCT01159639

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasparovic Hrvoje

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery disease remains the dominant cause of mortality in developed countries. While platelets have been recognized to play a pivotal role in atherothrombosis, the ideal antiplatelet regime after coronary artery surgery remains elusive. The evolution of CABG has presently moved beyond technical improvements to involve modulation of pharmacologic management designed to improve patient outcomes. The aim of this trial will be to test the hypothesis that the addition of clopidogrel to patients with documented postoperative aspirin resistance will reduce the incidence of major cardiovascular events. Methods Patients scheduled for isolated coronary artery surgery will be eligible for the study. Patients in whom postoperative multiple electrode aggregometry documents aspirin resistance will be randomized into two groups. The control group will receive 300 mg of aspirin. The dual antiplatelet group will receive 75 mg of clopidogrel in addition to 300 mg of aspirin. Patients will be followed for 6 months. Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (death from any cause, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization due to cardiovascular pathology as well as bleeding events will be recorded. Discussion This will be the first trial that will specifically address the issue of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients undergoing coronary artery surgery who have been found to be aspirin resistant. In the event that the addition of clopidogrel proves to be beneficial in this subset of surgical patients, this study could significantly impact their future antiplatelet management. This randomized controlled trial has been registered at the ClinicalTrials.gov website (Identifier NCT01159639.

  18. Effects of preoperative aspirin and clopidogrel therapy on perioperative blood loss and blood transfusion requirements in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae Kwang; Choi, Yong Seon; Oh, Young Jun; Bang, Sou Ouk; Yoo, Kyung Jong; Kwak, Young Lan

    2007-07-01

    Preoperative exposure to clopidogrel and aspirin significantly increases postoperative bleeding in patients undergoing on-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Off-pump coronary bypass grafting has been proposed as an alternative technique to attenuate postoperative bleeding associated with clopidogrel. This study aimed to determine the effects of aspirin and clopidogrel therapy on perioperative blood loss and blood transfusion requirements in off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. One hundred six patients scheduled for off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting were divided into three groups: aspirin and clopidogrel discontinued more than 6 days before surgery (group 1, n = 35), aspirin and clopidogrel continued until 3 to 5 days before surgery (group 2, n = 51), and both medications continued within 2 days of surgery (group 3, n = 20). Thromboelastographic tracings were analyzed before induction of anesthesia. Routine coagulation profiles were measured before and after surgery. A cell salvage device was used during surgery and salvaged blood was reinfused. Chest tube drainage and blood transfusion requirement were recorded postoperatively. Patient characteristics, operative data, and thromboelastographic tracings were similar among the groups. There were significant decreases in hematocrit level and platelet count and prolongation in prothrombin time postoperatively in all groups without any intergroup differences. The amounts of perioperative blood loss and blood transfusion required were all similar among the groups. Preoperative clopidogrel and aspirin exposure even within 2 days of surgery does not increase perioperative blood loss and blood transfusion requirements in patients undergoing elective off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

  19. Parental Decisions regarding pre-hospital therapy and costing of the Emergency Department Visit

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, M

    2017-02-01

    Paediatric patients represent a large percentage of Emergency Department (ED) visits and there is often a perception that the acuity of these presentations is low. The decision-making process that results in parents attending the ED is poorly understood. We designed a cross-sectional cohort study to explore the reasons for attendance, the treatment initiated at home and to assess parental perception of the economic cost of attendance. Data was collected on 200 patients using a survey administered to parents in ED with a follow-up phone call 4-6 weeks later. Our results suggest that attendances are often prompted by parental anxiety rather than clinical deterioration and that prior ED usage is common among those presenting for assessment. Many parents had attempted community therapy with 128\\/200 patients (64%) having been referred by a healthcare professional and medical therapy at home having been employed by 114\\/200 (57%) parents before attendance. Parental knowledge of the safety of over-the-counter medications was variable the economic cost of an ED visit was poorly understood by participants. The results of our study suggest that parental desire for control over worrisome symptoms drives much of their management strategy prior to hospital attendance. Strategies in the ED may need to focus more on managing parental expectations than on managing the illness itself and management strategies employed should focus not only on medical therapy of the child’s illness but on educating and empowering the parent.

  20. Transdermal estrogen gel and oral aspirin combination therapy improves fertility prognosis via the promotion of endometrial receptivity in moderate to severe intrauterine adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yugang; He, Ping; Lei, Li; Lan, Yi; Hu, Jianguo; Meng, Ying; Hu, Lina

    2018-01-01

    Intrauterine adhesion (IUA) is one of the most common gynecological diseases in women of reproductive age. IUA, particularlyin moderate to severe forms, accounts for a large percentage of infertility cases. Clinically, the first-line treatment strategy for IUA is transcervical resection of adhesion (TCRA), followed by adjuvant postoperative treatment. Estrogen is one of the classic chemotherapies used following TCRA and contributes to preventing re-adhesion following surgery. However, estrogen has limited effects in promoting pregnancy, which is the ultimate goal for IUA management. In the present study, a transdermal estrogen gel and oral aspirin combination therapy was used in patients with IUA following TCRA. Compared with in the control group (transdermal estrogen only therapy), the combination therapy significantly increased endometrial receptivity marker (αvβ٣ and laminin) expression in endometrium tissues. Additionally, ultrasonic examination revealed the pulsatility index and resistant index of the uterine artery were lower in the combination therapy group. Combination therapy promoted angiogenesis and prevented fibrosis following TCRA more effectively than estrogen-only therapy. Collectively, the evaluation indices, including American Fertility Society score, endometrial parameters and pregnancy rate, indicated that patients with combination therapy had better prognoses in endometrial repair and pregnancy. In conclusion, postoperative combination therapy with transdermal estrogen gel and oral aspirin may be more efficacious in enhancing endometrial receptivity by increasing uterine blood and angiogenesis, contributing to improved fertility prognosis. The findings of the present study may provide novel guidance to the clinical treatment of IUA. PMID:29512784

  1. Aspirin resistance following pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholette, Jill M; Mamikonian, Lara; Alfieris, George M; Blumberg, Neil; Lerner, Norma B

    2010-09-01

    Aspirin is often used to prevent thrombosis in pediatric cardiac surgery. The primary study aim was to assess aspirin resistance in this context. Secondary aims were to evaluate (1) the relationship between elevated inflammatory markers and thrombosis and (2) aspirin's effect on these levels. This was a prospective observational study of children undergoing cardiac surgery managed with and without aspirin. Aspirin response was assessed using the VerifyNow system and urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 (uTxB2) measurements. Laboratory studies of inflammation were also obtained. 101 subjects were studied; 50 received aspirin. Six subjects (5.9%), 5 aspirin-treated, experienced symptomatic thrombosis. When measured by VerifyNow resistance was 43% after aspirin suppositories and 14% after additional days of oral aspirin. There was no correlation with thrombosis. Upper quartile post-operative day (POD) #5 uTxB2 was correlated with thrombosis in aspirin treated subjects (pchildren with high levels of uTxB2 despite aspirin therapy and/or those with elevated preoperative CRP are at increased risk for thrombosis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bleeding tendency in dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin/clopidogrel: rescue of the template bleeding time in a single-center prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altman Raul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with heightened platelet reactivity in response to antiplatelet agents are at an increased risk of recurrent ischemic events. However, there is a lack of diagnostic criteria for increased response to combined aspirin/clopidogrel therapy. The challenge is to identify patients at risk of bleeding. This study sought to characterize bleeding tendency in patients treated with aspirin and clopidogrel. Patients/methods In a single-center prospective study, 100 patients under long-term aspirin/clopidogrel treatment, the effect of therapy was assayed by template bleeding time (BT and the inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA by light transmission aggregometry (LTA. Arachidonic acid (0.625 mmol/L and adenosine diphosphate (ADP; 2, 4, and 8 μmol/L were used as platelet agonists. Results Bleeding episodes (28 nuisance, 2 hematuria [1 severe], 1 severe proctorrhagia, 1 severe epistaxis were significantly more frequent in patients with longer BT. Template BT ≥ 24 min was associated with bleeding episodes (28 of 32. Risk of bleeding increased 17.4% for each 1 min increase in BT. Correlation was found between BT and IPAmax in response to ADP 2 μmol/L but not to ADP 4 or 8 μmol/L. Conclusion In patients treated with dual aspirin/clopidogrel therapy, nuisance and internal bleeding were significantly associated with template BT and with IPAmax in response to ADP 2 μmol/L but not in response to ADP 4 μmol/L or 8 μmol/L.

  3. A prospective randomized trial of aspirin-clopidogrel combination therapy and dose-adjusted warfarin on indices of thrombogenesis and platelet activation in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Sridhar; Blann, Andrew D; Chin, Bernard S P; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2002-08-07

    This study was designed to investigate whether or not combination aspirin-clopidogrel therapy would reduce markers of thrombogenesis and platelet activation in atrial fibrillation (AF), in a manner similar to warfarin. Dose-adjusted warfarin is beneficial as thromboprophylaxis in AF, but potentially serious side effects and regular monitoring leave room for alternative therapies. METHODS; We randomized 70 patients with nonvalvular AF who were not on any antithrombotic therapy to either dose-adjusted warfarin (international normalized ratio 2 to 3) (Group I) or combination therapy with aspirin 75 mg and clopidogrel 75 mg (Group II). Plasma indices of thrombogenesis (fibrin D-dimer, prothrombin fragment 1+2) and platelet activation (beta-thromboglobulin [TG] and soluble P-selectin) were quantified, along with platelet aggregation responses to standard agonists, at baseline (pretreatment) and at six weeks posttreatment. RESULTS; Pretreatment levels of fibrin D-dimer (p = 0.001), beta-TG (p = 0.01) and soluble P-selectin (p = 0.03) were raised in patients with AF, whereas plasma prothrombin fragment 1+2 levels and platelet aggregation were not significantly different compared with controls. Dose-adjusted warfarin reduced plasma levels of fibrin D-dimer, prothrombin fragment 1+2 and beta-thromboglobulin levels at six weeks (all p failed to reduce plasma indices of thrombogenesis and platelet activation in AF, although some aspects of ex vivo platelet aggregation were altered. Anticoagulation with warfarin may be superior to combination aspirin-clopidogrel therapy as thromboprophylaxis in AF.

  4. Aspirin and Omeprazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of aspirin and omeprazole is used to reduce the risk of stroke or heart attack in patients who have had or ... risk of developing a stomach ulcer when taking aspirin. Aspirin is in a class of medications called ...

  5. Antiplatelet therapy with aspirin, clopidogrel, and dipyridamole versus clopidogrel alone or aspirin and dipyridamole in patients with acute cerebral ischaemia (TARDIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bath, Philip M; Woodhouse, Lisa J; Appleton, Jason P

    2018-01-01

    , and dipyridamole) with that of guideline-based antiplatelet therapy. METHODS: We did an international, prospective, randomised, open-label, blinded-endpoint trial in adult participants with ischaemic stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) within 48 h of onset. Participants were assigned in a 1:1 ratio using...... was stratified by country and index event, and minimised with prognostic baseline factors, medication use, time to randomisation, stroke-related factors, and thrombolysis. The ordinal primary outcome was the combined incidence and severity of any recurrent stroke (ischaemic or haemorrhagic; assessed using...... therapy group, 1540 in the guideline antiplatelet therapy group) were recruited from 106 hospitals in four countries between April 7, 2009, and March 18, 2016. The trial was stopped early on the recommendation of the data monitoring committee. The incidence and severity of recurrent stroke or TIA did...

  6. Gastric and renal effects of COX-2 selective and non-selective NSAIDs in rats receiving low-dose aspirin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Goetz MORO

    Full Text Available Abstract The consumption of low-dose aspirin (LDA to prevent cardiovascular disease continues to increase worldwide. Consequently, the number of chronic LDA users seeking dental procedures that require complementary acute anti-inflammatory medication has also grown. Considering the lack of literature evaluating this interaction, we analyzed the gastric and renal effects caused by a selective COX-2 inhibitor (etoricoxib and a non-selective COX-2 inhibitor (ibuprofen nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID in rats receiving chronic LDA therapy. Male Wistar rats were divided into six experimental groups (carboxymethylcellulose (CMC - vehicle; LDA; LDA + ibuprofen; ibuprofen; LDA + etoricoxib; and etoricoxib and submitted to long-term LDA therapy with a subsequent NSAID administration for three days by gavage. After the experimental period, we analyzed gastric and renal tissues and quantified serum creatinine levels. The concomitant use of LDA with either NSAID induced the highest levels of gastric damage when compared to the CMC group (F = 20.26, p 0.05. These results suggest that even the acute use of an NSAID (regardless of COX-2 selectivity can induce gastric damage when combined with the long-term use of low-dose aspirin in an animal model. Additional studies, including clinical assessments, are thus needed to clarify this interaction, and clinicians should be careful of prescribing NSAIDs to patients using LDA.

  7. Role of Aspirin in Breast Cancer Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wendy Y; Holmes, Michelle D

    2017-07-01

    Chemotherapy and hormonal therapy have significantly decreased breast cancer mortality, although with considerable side effects and financial costs. In the USA, over three million women are living after a breast cancer diagnosis and are eager for new treatments that are low in toxicity and cost. Multiple observational studies have reported improved breast cancer survival with regular aspirin use. Furthermore, pooled data from five large randomized trials of aspirin for cardiovascular disease showed that subjects on aspirin had decreased risk of cancer mortality and decreased risk of metastatic cancer. Although the potential mechanism for aspirin preventing breast cancer is not known, possible pathways may involve platelets, inflammation, cyclooxygenase (COX) 2, hormones, or PI3 kinase. This review article summarizes the current epidemiologic and clinical trial evidence as well as possible underlying mechanisms that justify current phase III randomized trials of aspirin to improve breast cancer survival.

  8. [Prehospital thrombolysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spöhr, F; Böttiger, B W

    2005-02-01

    Although prehospital cardiac arrest has an incidence of 40-90/100,000 inhabitants per year, there has been a lack of therapeutic options to improve the outcome of these patients. Of all cardiac arrests, 50-70% are caused by acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or massive pulmonary embolism (PE). Thrombolysis has been shown to be a causal and effective therapy in patients with AMI or PE who do not suffer cardiac arrest. In contrast, experience with the use of thrombolysis during cardiac arrest has been limited. Thrombolysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) acts directly on thrombi or emboli causing AMI or PE. In addition, experimental studies suggest that thrombolysis causes an improvement in microcirculatory reperfusion after cardiac arrest. In-hospital and prehospital case series and clinical studies suggest that thrombolysis during CPR may cause a restoration of spontaneous circulation and survival even in patients that have been resuscitated conventionally without success. In addition, there is evidence for an improved neurological outcome in patients receiving a thrombolytic therapy during during CPR. A large randomized, double-blind multicenter trial that has started recently is expected to show if this new therapeutic option can generally improve the prognosis of patients with cardiac arrest.

  9. Aspirin challenge and desensitization: how, when and why.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortellini, Gabriele; Caruso, Cristiano; Romano, Antonino

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the current approach to aspirin challenge (drug provocation) and/or desensitization in patients with histories of hypersensitivity reactions to it, particularly in those with cardiovascular diseases. The literature indicates that patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), including those with an acute coronary syndrome, may safely undergo low-dose aspirin challenge and/or desensitization. Recently, flowcharts regarding challenge/desensitization procedures with aspirin in patients with CAD and histories of aspirin hypersensitivity reactions have become available. Aspirin desensitization and continuous aspirin therapy constitute an effective option in patients with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-exacerbated respiratory diseases (NERD) who have suboptimally controlled asthma or rhinosinusitis, or require multiple revision polypectomies. The use of aspirin has proven to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with CAD. There is a general consensus on aspirin's effectiveness in secondary prevention of CAD. Therefore, aspirin desensitization is necessary in patients with CAD and histories of hypersensitivity reactions to it. The effectiveness of aspirin desensitization and continuous therapy in patients with NERD has been shown in numerous studies. However, shared selection criteria of candidates for aspirin challenge/desensitization procedures, and simple and homogeneous protocols are necessary. Moreover, preventive safety measures are still needed in order to reduce the potential risks of these procedures.

  10. Aspirin, Butalbital, and Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of aspirin, butalbital, and caffeine comes as a capsule and tablet to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 4 ... explain any part you do not understand. Take aspirin, butalbital, and caffeine exactly as directed. Do not ...

  11. Pre-hospital thrombolytic therapy with either alteplase or streptokinase. : Practical applications, complications and long-term results in 529 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W.M. Grijseels (Els); M.J.M. Bouten; J.W. Deckers (Jaap); A.W. Hoes (Arno); J.A.M. Hartman; E. van der Does (Emiel); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); T. Lenderink (Timo)

    1995-01-01

    markdownabstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the practical application, safety and long-term outcome of pre-hospital thrombolytic intervention with either alteplase or streptokinase in patients with extensive myocardial infarction. DESIGN: Prospective study. SUBJECTS: Patients with chest pain of more

  12. The Role of Aspirin in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittaman, Sunitha V.; VanWormer, Jeffrey J.; Rezkalla, Shereif H.

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin therapy is well-accepted as an agent for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events and current guidelines also define a role for aspirin in primary prevention. In this review, we describe the seminal trials of aspirin use in the context of current guidelines, discuss factors that may influence the effectiveness of aspirin therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, and briefly examine patterns of use. The body of evidence supports a role for aspirin in both secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events in selected population groups, but practice patterns may be suboptimal. As a simple and inexpensive prophylactic measure for cardiovascular disease, aspirin use should be carefully considered in all at-risk adult patients, and further measures, including patient education, are necessary to ensure its proper use. PMID:24573704

  13. Comparative effect of clopidogrel plus aspirin and aspirin monotherapy on hematological parameters using propensity score matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayasaka M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Masatoshi Hayasaka,1 Yasuo Takahashi,2 Yayoi Nishida,2 Yoshikazu Yoshida,1 Shinji Hidaka,3 Satoshi Asai41Department of Pharmacy, Nihon University Itabashi Hospital, Tokyo, 2Division of Genomic Epidemiology and Clinical Trials, Clinical Trials Research Center, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 3Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Regulatory Science, Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Nihon University, Chiba, 4Division of Pharmacology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanBackground: Clopidogrel and aspirin are antiplatelet agents that are recommended to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other cardiovascular events. Dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin has been shown to increase the risk of hemorrhage, but the effects of the drugs on laboratory parameters have not been well studied in real-world clinical settings. Therefore, we evaluated and compared the effects of combination therapy with clopidogrel plus aspirin and aspirin monotherapy on laboratory parameters.Methods: We used data from the Nihon University School of Medicine Clinical Data Warehouse obtained between November 2004 and May 2011 to identify cohorts of new users (n = 130 of clopidogrel (75 mg/day plus aspirin (100 mg/day and a propensity score matched sample of new users (n = 130 of aspirin alone (100 mg/day. We used a multivariate regression model to compare serum levels of creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase, as well as hematological parameters including hemoglobin level, hematocrit, and white blood cell, red blood cell, and platelet counts up to 2 months after the start of administration of the study drugs.Results: There were no significant differences for any characteristics and baseline laboratory parameters between users of clopidogrel plus aspirin and users of aspirin alone. Reductions in white blood cell and red blood cell counts, hemoglobin levels, and

  14. Long-term sinonasal outcomes of aspirin desensitization in aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu-Sup; Soudry, Ethan; Psaltis, Alkis J; Nadeau, Kari C; McGhee, Sean A; Nayak, Jayakar V; Hwang, Peter H

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to assess sinonasal outcomes in patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) undergoing aspirin desensitization following endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). Case series with chart review. University hospital. A retrospective review of sinonasal outcomes was conducted for 30 AERD patients undergoing aspirin desensitization and maintenance therapy following ESS. Sinonasal outcomes were prospectively assessed by the Sinonasal Outcomes Test-22 (SNOT-22) and endoscopic polyp grading system. Data were collected preoperatively, 1 and 4 weeks postsurgery (before desensitization), and 1, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 30 months after aspirin desensitization. Twenty-eight of 30 patients (93.3%) successfully completed aspirin desensitization, whereas 2 of 30 (6.7%) were unable to complete desensitization due to respiratory intolerance. Of the 21 patients who successfully completed a minimum of 24 weeks of follow-up, 20 (95.2%) patients demonstrated sustained endoscopic and symptomatic improvement for a median follow-up period of 33 months. After surgical treatment but before desensitization, patients experienced significant reductions in SNOT-22 and polyp grade scores. In the first 6 months after aspirin desensitization, patients experienced further significant reductions in SNOT-22 scores, whereas polyp grade remained stable. The improvements in symptom endoscopic scores were preserved throughout the follow-up period after desensitization. No patients required additional sinus surgery. One patient had to discontinue aspirin therapy due to gastrointestinal side effects. No other adverse reactions to aspirin were noted. Aspirin desensitization following ESS appears to be a well-tolerated and effective adjunctive therapy for long-term control of nasal polyposis in patients with AERD. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  15. Aspirin plus dipyridamole versus aspirin alone after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin (ESPRIT): randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkes, P H A; van Gijn, J; Kappelle, L J; Koudstaal, P J; Algra, A

    2006-05-20

    Results of trials of aspirin and dipyridamole combined versus aspirin alone for the secondary prevention of vascular events after ischaemic stroke of presumed arterial origin are inconsistent. Our aim was to resolve this uncertainty. We did a randomised controlled trial in which we assigned patients to aspirin (30-325 mg daily) with (n=1363) or without (n=1376) dipyridamole (200 mg twice daily) within 6 months of a transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke of presumed arterial origin. Our primary outcome event was the composite of death from all vascular causes, non-fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or major bleeding complication, whichever happened first. Treatment was open, but auditing of outcome events was blinded. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial (number ISRCTN73824458) and with (NCT00161070). Mean follow-up was 3.5 years (SD 2.0). Median aspirin dose was 75 mg in both treatment groups (range 30-325); extended-release dipyridamole was used by 83% (n=1131) of patients on the combination regimen. Primary outcome events arose in 173 (13%) patients on aspirin and dipyridamole and in 216 (16%) on aspirin alone (hazard ratio 0.80, 95% CI 0.66-0.98; absolute risk reduction 1.0% per year, 95% CI 0.1-1.8). Addition of the ESPRIT data to the meta-analysis of previous trials resulted in an overall risk ratio for the composite of vascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction of 0.82 (95% CI 0.74-0.91). Patients on aspirin and dipyridamole discontinued trial medication more often than those on aspirin alone (470 vs 184), mainly because of headache. The ESPRIT results, combined with the results of previous trials, provide sufficient evidence to prefer the combination regimen of aspirin plus dipyridamole over aspirin alone as antithrombotic therapy after cerebral ischaemia of arterial origin.

  16. [Aspirin and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grancher, Adrien; Michel, Pierre; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Sefrioui, David

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a worldwide public health problem. Aspirin has been identified as a protective factor against the apparition of colorectal cancer. There are several mechanisms about the actions by aspirin on colorectal tumorogenesis. These are not perfectly known nowadays. On one hand, there are direct mechanisms on colorectal mucosa, on the other hand there are indirect mechanisms through platelet functions. Aspirin also plays a role by its anti-inflammatory action and the stimulation of antitumor immunity. Several studies show that long-term treatment with low-doses of aspirin decreases the incidence of adenomas and colorectal cancers. In the United States, aspirin is currently recommended for primary prevention of the risk of colorectal cancer in all patients aged 50 to 59, with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular event greater than 10 %. However, primary prevention with aspirin should not be a substitute for screening in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, aspirin seems to be beneficial when used in post-diagnosis of colorectal cancer. It could actually decrease the risk of metastasis in case of a localized colorectal cancer, and increase the survival in particular, concerning PIK3CA mutated tumors. The association of aspirin with neoadjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer by radiochimiotherapy seems to have beneficial effects. French prospective randomized study is currently being conducted to investigate postoperative aspirin in colorectal cancers with a PIK3CA mutation. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Aspirin for Primary Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Ilana B; Owens, Douglas K

    2017-07-01

    Aspirin reduces the risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke, and the risk of colorectal cancer. Aspirin increases the risk of gastrointestinal and intracranial bleeding. The best available evidence supports initiating aspirin in select populations. In 2016, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended initiating aspirin for the primary prevention of both cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer among adults ages 50 to 59 who are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Adults 60 to 69 who are at increased cardiovascular disease risk may also benefit. There remains considerable uncertainty about whether younger and older patients may benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone for preventing cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Bellesini, Marta; Takeda, Andrea; Middeldorp, Saskia; Donadini, Marco Paolo

    2017-12-14

    Aspirin is the prophylactic antiplatelet drug of choice for people with cardiovascular disease. Adding a second antiplatelet drug to aspirin may produce additional benefit for people at high risk and people with established cardiovascular disease. This is an update to a previously published review from 2011. To review the benefit and harm of adding clopidogrel to aspirin therapy for preventing cardiovascular events in people who have coronary disease, ischaemic cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, or were at high risk of atherothrombotic disease, but did not have a coronary stent. We updated the searches of CENTRAL (2017, Issue 6), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 4 July 2017) and Embase (Ovid, 1947 to 3 July 2017) on 4 July 2017. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP portal, and handsearched reference lists. We applied no language restrictions. We included all randomised controlled trials comparing over 30 days use of aspirin plus clopidogrel with aspirin plus placebo or aspirin alone in people with coronary disease, ischaemic cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease, or at high risk of atherothrombotic disease. We excluded studies including only people with coronary drug-eluting stent (DES) or non-DES, or both. We collected data on mortality from cardiovascular causes, all-cause mortality, fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction, fatal and non-fatal ischaemic stroke, major and minor bleeding. The overall treatment effect was estimated by the pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI), using a fixed-effect model (Mantel-Haenszel); we used a random-effects model in cases of moderate or severe heterogeneity (I 2 ≥ 30%). We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We used GRADE profiler (GRADE Pro) to import data from Review Manager to create a 'Summary of findings' table. The search identified 13 studies in addition to the two studies in the previous version of our systematic review. Overall

  19. Prehospital neurological deterioration in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Sabreena J; Sucharew, Heidi; Alwell, Kathleen; Moomaw, Charles J; Woo, Daniel; Adeoye, Opeolu; Flaherty, Matthew L; Ferioli, Simona; McMullan, Jason; Mackey, Jason; De Los Rios La Rosa, Felipe; Martini, Sharyl; Kissela, Brett M; Kleindorfer, Dawn O

    2018-04-27

    Patients with stroke can experience neurological deterioration in the prehospital setting. We evaluated patients with stroke to determine factors associated with prehospital neurological deterioration (PND). Among the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky region (population ~1.3 million), we screened all 15 local hospitals' admissions from 2010 for acute stroke and included patients aged ≥20. The GCS was compared between emergency medical services (EMS) arrival and hospital arrival, with decrease ≥2 points considered PND. Data obtained retrospectively included demographics, medical history and medication use, stroke subtype (eg, ischaemic stroke (IS), intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH)) and IS subtype (eg, small vessel, large vessel, cardioembolic), seizure at onset, time intervals between symptom onset, EMS arrival and hospital arrival, EMS level of training, and blood pressure and serum glucose on EMS arrival. Of 2708 total patients who had a stroke, 1092 patients (median (IQR) age 74 (61-83) years; 56% women; 21% black) were analysed. PND occurred in 129 cases (12%), including 9% of IS, 24% of ICH and 16% of SAH. In multivariable analysis, black race, atrial fibrillation, haemorrhagic subtype and ALS level of transport were associated with PND. Haemorrhage and atrial fibrillation is associated with PND in stroke, and further investigation is needed to establish whether PND can be predicted. Further studies are also needed to assess whether preferential transport of patients with deterioration to hospitals equipped with higher levels of care is beneficial, identify why race is associated with deterioration and to test therapies targeting PND. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Duration of high-dose aspirin therapy does not affect long-term coronary artery outcomes in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migally, Karl; Braunlin, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Lei; Binstadt, Bryce A

    2018-05-02

    BackgroundHigh-dose aspirin (HDA) is used with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in Kawasaki disease (KD). Practice regarding HDA varies, and it is unclear whether HDA duration affects the long-term course.MethodsWe retrospectively studied KD patients at our hospital for over 10 years. Patients were categorized as having received HDA for 0, 1-7, or >7 days. Primary outcome was the maximum coronary Z-score at diagnosis and follow-up; secondary outcomes included inflammatory markers.ResultsOne hundred and three patients had HDA duration documented, of which 35 patients had coronary artery abnormalities (CAAs) at diagnosis. There was no difference in demographics or inflammatory markers between the HDA groups, and no difference in HDA duration between patients with or without CAAs. Seventeen patients received no HDA; they had longer illness and defervescence duration before diagnosis, and were less likely to receive IVIg. For CAAs, multivariate regression revealed that HDA duration did not predict the coronary Z-score at 9-15 months. Higher Z-score at diagnosis was associated with higher Z-score at 9-15 months.ConclusionThe only factor associated with coronary Z-score at 9-15 months was the Z-score at diagnosis. At our institution, longer illness and defervescence duration and the lack of IVIg administration were associated with not administering HDA. HDA duration did not affect the clinically relevant outcomes, particularly CAA persistence.Pediatric Research advance online publication, 2 May 2018; doi:10.1038/pr.2018.44.

  1. Prehospital Trauma Care in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Chew, David; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Pek, Pin Pin; Lim, Swee Han; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng

    2015-01-01

    Prehospital emergency care in Singapore has taken shape over almost a century. What began as a hospital-based ambulance service intended to ferry medical cases was later complemented by an ambulance service under the Singapore Fire Brigade to transport trauma cases. The two ambulance services would later combine and come under the Singapore Civil Defence Force. The development of prehospital care systems in island city-state Singapore faces unique challenges as a result of its land area and population density. This article defines aspects of prehospital trauma care in Singapore. It outlines key historical milestones and current initiatives in service, training, and research. It makes propositions for the future direction of trauma care in Singapore. The progress Singapore has made given her circumstances may serve as lessons for the future development of prehospital trauma systems in similar environments. Key words: Singapore; trauma; prehospital emergency care; emergency medical services.

  2. Aspirin overutilization for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VanWormer JJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey J VanWormer,1 Aaron W Miller,2 Shereif H Rezkalla3 1Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health, 2Biomedical Informatics Research Center, Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation, Marshfield, WI, USA; 3Department of Cardiology, Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, WI, USA Background: Aspirin is commonly used for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD in the US. Previous research has observed significant levels of inappropriate aspirin use for primary CVD prevention in some European populations, but the degree to which aspirin is overutilized in the US remains unknown. This study examined the association between regular aspirin use and demographic/clinical factors in a population-based sample of adults without a clinical indication for aspirin for primary prevention.Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed using 2010–2012 data from individuals aged 30–79 years in the Marshfield Epidemiologic Study Area (WI, USA. Regular aspirin users included those who took aspirin at least every other day.Results: There were 16,922 individuals who were not clinically indicated for aspirin therapy for primary CVD prevention. Of these, 19% were regular aspirin users. In the final adjusted model, participants who were older, male, lived in northern Wisconsin, had more frequent medical visits, and had greater body mass index had significantly higher odds of regular aspirin use (P<0.001 for all. Race/ethnicity, health insurance, smoking, blood pressure, and lipid levels had negligible influence on aspirin use. A sensitivity analysis found a significant interaction between age and number of medical visits, indicating progressively more aspirin use in older age groups who visited their provider frequently.Conclusion: There was evidence of aspirin overutilization in this US population without CVD. Older age and more frequent provider visits were the strongest predictors of inappropriate aspirin use. Obesity was the only significant

  3. Aspirin therapy reduces the ability of platelets to promote colon and pancreatic cancer cell proliferation: Implications for the oncoprotein c-MYC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylman, Joanna L.; Ngo, Anh T. P.; Pang, Jiaqing; Sears, Rosalie C.; Williams, Craig D.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin, an anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic drug, has become the focus of intense research as a potential anticancer agent owing to its ability to reduce tumor proliferation in vitro and to prevent tumorigenesis in patients. Studies have found an anticancer effect of aspirin when used in low, antiplatelet doses. However, the mechanisms through which low-dose aspirin works are poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of aspirin on the cross talk between platelets and cancer cells. For our study, we used two colon cancer cell lines isolated from the same donor but characterized by different metastatic potential, SW480 (nonmetastatic) and SW620 (metastatic) cancer cells, and a pancreatic cancer cell line, PANC-1 (nonmetastatic). We found that SW480 and PANC-1 cancer cell proliferation was potentiated by human platelets in a manner dependent on the upregulation and activation of the oncoprotein c-MYC. The ability of platelets to upregulate c-MYC and cancer cell proliferation was reversed by an antiplatelet concentration of aspirin. In conclusion, we show for the first time that inhibition of platelets by aspirin can affect their ability to induce cancer cell proliferation through the modulation of the c-MYC oncoprotein. PMID:27903583

  4. Early aspirin use and the development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miae; Bergmark, Brian A; Zelniker, Thomas A; Mehra, Mandeep R; Stewart, Garrick C; Page, Deborah S; Woodcome, Erica L; Smallwood, Jennifer A; Gabardi, Steven; Givertz, Michael M

    2017-12-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). Little is known about the influence of aspirin on clinical expression of CAV. We followed 120 patients with OHT at a single center for a median of 7 years and categorized them by the presence or absence of early aspirin therapy post-transplant (aspirin treatment ≥6 months in the first year). The association between aspirin use and time to the primary end-point of angiographic moderate or severe CAV (International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation grade ≥2) was investigated. Propensity scores for aspirin treatment were estimated using boosting models and applied by inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW). Despite a preponderance of risk factors for CAV among patients receiving aspirin (male sex, ischemic heart disease as the etiology of heart failure, and smoking), aspirin therapy was associated with a lower rate of moderate or severe CAV at 5 years. Event-free survival was 95.9% for patients exposed to aspirin compared with 79.6% for patients without aspirin exposure (log-rank p = 0.005). IPTW-weighted Cox regression revealed a powerful inverse association between aspirin use and moderate to severe CAV (adjusted hazard ratio 0.13; 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.59), which was directionally consistent for CAV of any severity (adjusted hazard ratio 0.50; 95% confidence interval 0.23-1.08). This propensity score-based comparative observational analysis suggests that early aspirin exposure may be associated with a reduced risk of development of moderate to severe CAV. These findings warrant prospective validation in controlled investigations. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000092.htm Aspirin and heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... healthy people who are at low risk for heart disease. You provider will consider your overall medical condition ...

  6. Termination of prehospital resuscitative efforts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Caroline; Binderup, Lars Grassmé

    2017-01-01

    -and-death decision-making in the patient's medical records is required. We suggest that a template be implemented in the prehospital medical records describing the basis for any ethical decisions. This template should contain information regarding the persons involved in the deliberations and notes on ethical......BACKGROUND: Discussions on ethical aspects of life-and-death decisions within the hospital are often made in plenary. The prehospital physician, however, may be faced with ethical dilemmas in life-and-death decisions when time-critical decisions to initiate or refrain from resuscitative efforts...... need to be taken without the possibility to discuss matters with colleagues. Little is known whether these considerations regarding ethical issues in crucial life-and-death decisions are documented prehospitally. This is a review of the ethical considerations documented in the prehospital medical...

  7. Aspirin desensitization in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: a survey of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Andrew R; Rushworth, Gordon F; Leslie, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Aspirin remains the mainstay of anti-platelet therapy in cardiac patients. However, if a patient is allergic to aspirin and dual anti-platelet therapy is indicated - such as with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), then there is no clear guidance. One possibility is aspirin desensitization. A variety of protocols exist for the rapid desensitization of patients with aspirin allergy. The aim of this survey was to assess current knowledge and practice regarding aspirin desensitization in the UK. We conducted a UK wide survey of all UK 116 PCI centers and obtained complete responses from 40 (35.4%) centers. Of these, just 7 (17.5%) centers had previously desensitised patients; 29 (87.9%) centers suggested a lack of a local protocol prevented them from desensitizing, with 10 (30.3%) unsure of how to conduct desensitization. Only 5 (12.5%) centers had a local policy for aspirin desensitization although 25 (64.1%) units had a clinical strategy for dealing with aspirin allergy; the majority (72%) giving higher doses of thienopyridine class drugs. In the UK, there appears to be no consistent approach to patients with aspirin allergy. Patients undergoing PCI benefit from dual anti-platelet therapy (including aspirin), and aspirin desensitization in those with known allergy may facilitate this. Sustained effort should be placed on encouraging UK centers to use desensitization as a treatment modality prior to PCI rather than avoiding aspirin altogether.

  8. Aspirin as a Chemopreventive Agent for Cancer: a New Hope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isnatin Miladiyah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: inflammation has been shown to play a major role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Inflammatory process activates the immune system through pro-inflammatory mediators and subsequent triggers transformation into malignant cells. Some tumors or cancers has been associated with chronic infections, such as hepatitis B and C viruses (hepatocellular carcinoma, human papilloma virus (cervical cancer, Helicobacter pylori (gastric cancer and lymphoma, and prostatitis (prostate cancer. A considerable study have investigated the benefits of aspirin for the prevention and treatment of cancer or tumors. Objectives: This paper aims to describe the relationship between inflammation and cancer incidence, so that use of aspirin as an anti-inflammatory agent is a rational choice in the treatment and prevention of cancer. Conclusion: Aspirin potential for chemoprevention of various types of cancer. Considering the high risk of side effects of aspirin, aspirin is not intended as a routine therapy to prevent the occurrence of cancer.

  9. Medications Containing Aspirin (Acetylsalicylate) and Aspirin-Like Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    updated 3/10/08 Medications Containing Aspirin (Acetylsalicylate) and Aspirin-Like Products © National Reye's Syndrome Foundation Inc. 2008 Epidemiologic research has shown an association between the development of Reye's ...

  10. "DETERMINANTS OF PREHOSPITAL DELAY IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alidoosti

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Determination of pre-hospital delay time of patients with acute myocardial infarction and seeking ways of speeding up the time for reperfusion is an important factor to lower mortality in these patients. This is a cross-sectional study to determine pre-hospital delay time, its components, and related causes and conditions, obtained in 375 patients with prolonged chest pain referred to four hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Means of transport to hospital, reasons of ambulance disuse, decision time by the patient and finally the entire time of pre-hospital delay were specified. Suspected factors related to delays of more than 2 and 6 h were scrutinized with chi-square test. Rate of ambulance utility (18.9% directly correlated with age of patients (P<0.05. Principal motives to disuse ambulance insuccession were unrememberance (33.7%, access to private vehicle (32.8% and supposition of sufficient speed of personal reference (18.9%. Pre-hospital delay time was 8.1 ± 9.1 h (mean ± SD in whole patients and 7.6 ± 9.1 h in those with acute myocardial infarction. Delays of more than 2 and 6 hoccurred in 67.5% and 33.6% of patients, respectively. Decision time constitute three fourth of whole pre-hospital delay and was correlated with female gender, older age, history of diabetes, lower level of literacy and nocturnal onset of symptoms. In conclusion, a significant number of patients with acute myocardial infarction have pre-hospital delay of more than 2 and even 6 h, when golden time for thrombolytic therapy has already been elapsed.

  11. PFA-100-measured aspirin resistance is the predominant risk factor for hospitalized cardiovascular events in aspirin-treated patients: A 5-year cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H Y; Chou, P

    2018-04-01

    Aspirin therapy is the clinical gold standard for the prevention of cardiovascular events. However, cardiovascular events still develop in some patients undergoing aspirin therapy. Many laboratory methods exist for measuring aspirin resistance. Using the platelet Function Analyzer (PFA)-100 system, we aimed to determine the effect of aspirin resistance on hospitalized cardiovascular events (hCVE) in a 5-year follow-up cohort. We also sought to determine the impact of aspirin resistance on the relationship between common cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular hospitalization. Aspirin resistance was evaluated in aspirin-treated patients from the outpatient department. A total of 465 patients during a 5-year follow-up period were included in this study. The primary endpoint of the study was hospitalization for any acute cardiovascular event. The prevalence and associated risk factors of acute cardiovascular events were evaluated. Aspirin resistance was prevalent in 91 (20.0%) of 465 patients. Prior hospitalization history of cardiovascular events was highly associated with aspirin resistance (P = .001). At the 5-year follow-up, cardiovascular events were found to have developed in 11 patients (8 stroke and 3 myocardial infarction) who exhibited aspirin resistance (12.1%) and in 9 (4 stroke and 5 myocardial infarction) patients who did not exhibit aspirin resistance (2.4%) (P resistance and cardiovascular events (adjusted odds ratio 4.28; 95% CI: 1.64-11.20; P = .03). PFA-100 measurements of aspirin resistance correlate with hCVE, as evidenced by both the past medical history and the 5-year follow-up. The logistic regression analysis results showed that aspirin resistance plays a larger role in hospitalized cardiovascular disease than do other cardiovascular risk factors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Rivaroxaban or Aspirin for Extended Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitz, Jeffrey I; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Prins, Martin H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although many patients with venous thromboembolism require extended treatment, it is uncertain whether it is better to use full- or lower-intensity anticoagulation therapy or aspirin. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 study, we assigned 3396 patients with venous...... thromboembolism to receive either once-daily rivaroxaban (at doses of 20 mg or 10 mg) or 100 mg of aspirin. All the study patients had completed 6 to 12 months of anticoagulation therapy and were in equipoise regarding the need for continued anticoagulation. Study drugs were administered for up to 12 months...... in 17 of 1107 patients (1.5%) receiving 20 mg of rivaroxaban and in 13 of 1127 patients (1.2%) receiving 10 mg of rivaroxaban, as compared with 50 of 1131 patients (4.4%) receiving aspirin (hazard ratio for 20 mg of rivaroxaban vs. aspirin, 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20 to 0.59; hazard ratio...

  13. ESPRIT: is aspirin plus dipyridamole superior to aspirin alone in TIA or minor stroke patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhl, R P W; Lodder, J

    2008-11-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) or a (minor) ischemic stroke increases the risk of a recurrent stroke or death. Antiplatelet therapy with aspirin or clopidogrel is, in the absence of a potential cardiac embolic source, common practice to lower this risk. Until recently, adjuvant dipyridamole or low intensity oral anticoagulation were not generally prescribed in secondary prevention. In this article, we will summarize and discuss the published results of the European/Australasian Stroke Prevention in Reversible Ischemia Trial (ESPRIT). In this trial, treatments with anticoagulants, aspirin alone and the combination of aspirin plus dipyridamole were compared, in a multicenter, three-armed, randomized, open-label study in patients with TIA or minor stroke.

  14. Dipyridamole plus aspirin versus aspirin alone in the secondary prevention after TIA or stroke: a meta-analysis by risk

    OpenAIRE

    Halkes, P.H.A.; Gray, Laura J.; Bath, Philip M.W.; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Guiraud-Chaumeil, B.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Our aim was to study the effect of combination therapy with aspirin and dipyridamole (A+D) over aspirin alone (ASA) in secondary prevention after transient \\ud ischemic attack or minor stroke of presumed arterial origin and to perform subgroup analyses to identify patients that might benefit most from secondary prevention with A+D.\\ud Data sources: The previously published meta-analysis of individual patient data was updated with data from ESPRIT (N=2,739); trials without data on ...

  15. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yanshuang [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); He, Huabin [Department of Orthopedics, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); Lou, Lianqing; Ye, Weiwei; Chen, Yongxin [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China); Wang, Jinghe, E-mail: Xiaofeili2000@163.com [Department of Infectious Diseases, Yiwu Central Hospita, 519 Nan men Street, Yiwu, Jinhua, Zhejing 322000 (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis.

  16. Synergistically killing activity of aspirin and histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) on hepatocellular cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhu, Yanshuang; He, Huabin; Lou, Lianqing; Ye, Weiwei; Chen, Yongxin; Wang, Jinghe

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Novel combination therapy using aspirin and valproic acid (VPA). •Combination of aspirin and VPA elicits synergistic cytotoxic effects. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly reduces the drug dosage required alone. •Combination of aspirin and VPA significantly inhibit tumor growth. •Lower dose of aspirin in combination therapy will minimize side effects of aspirin. -- Abstract: Aspirin and valproic acid (VPA) have been extensively studied for inducing various malignancies growth inhibition respectively, despite their severe side effects. Here, we developed a novel combination by aspirin and VPA on hepatocellular cancer cells (HCCs). The viability of HCC lines were analyzed by MTT assay, apoptotic analysis of HepG2 and SMMC-7721 cell was performed. Real time-PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of apoptosis related genes and proteins such as Survivin, Bcl-2/Bax, Cyclin D1 and p15. Moreover, orthotopic xenograft tumors were challenged in nude mice to establish murine model, and then therapeutic effect was analyzed after drug combination therapy. The viability of HCC lines’ significantly decreased after drug combination treatment, and cancer cell apoptosis in combination group increasingly induced compared with single drug use. Therapeutic effect was significantly enhanced by combination therapy in tumor volume and tumor weight decrease. From the data shown here, aspirin and VPA combination have a synergistic killing effect on hepatocellular cancers cells proliferation and apoptosis

  17. Edoxaban Plus Aspirin vs Dual Antiplatelet Therapy in Endovascular Treatment of Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease: Results of the ePAD Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Frans; Baumgartner, Iris; Jaff, Michael; Nwachuku, Chuke; Tangelder, Marco; Ansel, Gary; Adams, George; Zeller, Thomas; Rundback, John; Grosso, Michael; Lin, Min; Mercur, Michele F; Minar, Erich

    2018-04-01

    To report a randomized study that investigated the safety (risk of major bleeds) and potential efficacy of edoxaban, an oral anticoagulant that targets the major components of arterial thrombi, to prevent loss of patency following endovascular treatment (EVT). Between February 2012 and June 2014, 203 patients who underwent femoropopliteal EVT were randomized to receive aspirin plus edoxaban or aspirin plus clopidogrel for 3 months in the Edoxaban in Peripheral Arterial Disease (ePAD) study ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01802775). Randomization assigned 101 patients (mean age 68.0±10.4 years; 67 men) to the edoxaban group and 102 patients (mean age 66.7±8.6 years; 78 men) to the clopidogrel group. The primary safety endpoint was bleeding as classified by the TIMI (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction) criteria and ISTH (International Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis) criteria; the efficacy endpoint was the rate of restenosis/reocclusion. There were no major or life-threatening bleeding events in the edoxaban group, while there were 2 major and 2 life-threatening bleeding events in the clopidogrel group by the TIMI criteria. By the ISTH classification, there was 1 major and 1 life-threatening bleeding event vs 5 major and 2 life-threatening bleeding events, respectively [relative risk (RR) 0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02 to 1.70]. The bleeding risk was not statistically different with either treatment when assessed by TIMI or ISTH. Following 6 months of observation, there was a lower incidence of restenosis/reocclusion with edoxaban compared with clopidogrel (30.9% vs 34.7%; RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.34, p=0.643). These results suggest that patients who have undergone EVT have similar risks for major and life-threatening bleeding events with edoxaban and aspirin compared with clopidogrel and aspirin. The incidence of restenosis/reocclusion events, while not statistically different, was lower with edoxaban and aspirin, but an adequately sized trial

  18. Preventive Aspirin and Other Antiplatelet Medication Use Among U.S. Adults Aged ≥40 Years: Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Charles F.; Eberhardt, Mark S.; Wright, Jacqueline D.; Burt, Vicki L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We estimated the prevalence of preventive aspirin and/or other antiplatelet medication use and the dosage of aspirin use in the U.S. adult population. Methods We conducted cross-sectional analyses of a representative sample (n=3,599) of U.S. adults aged ≥40 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011–2012. Results In 2011–2012, one-third of U.S. adults aged ≥40 years reported taking preventive aspirin and/or other antiplatelet medications, 97% of whom indicated preventive aspirin use. Preventive aspirin use increased with age (from 11% of those aged 40–49 years to 54% of those ≥80 years of age, paspirin than non-Hispanic Asian (20%, paspirin. Among those with cardiovascular disease, 76% reported taking preventive aspirin and/or other antiplatelet medications, of whom 91% were taking preventive aspirin. Among adults without cardiovascular disease, 28% reported taking preventive aspirin. Adherence rates to medically recommended aspirin use were 82% overall, 91% for secondary prevention, and 79% for primary prevention. Among current preventive aspirin users, 70% were taking 81 milligrams (mg) of aspirin daily and 13% were taking 325 mg of aspirin daily. Conclusion The vast majority of antiplatelet therapy is preventive aspirin use. A health-care provider's recommendation to take preventive aspirin is an important determinant of current preventive aspirin use. PMID:26556936

  19. Aspirin and clopidogrel resistance: methodological challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Yuri Gasparyan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Armen Yuri GasparyanClinical Research Unit, Russell’s Hall Hospital, Dudley Group of Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, West Midlands, UKAbstract: Antiplatelet drug resistance is one of the urgent issues in current cardiovascular medicine. Many platelet function tests have been used to define responsiveness of patients with cardiovascular disease to aspirin and clopidogrel. In most studies, cut-off values of platelet function tests for defining responsiveness to antiplatelets were chosen arbitrarily. Different tests provided wide-ranging figures of the prevalence of aspirin and clopidogrel resistance, suggesting poor correlation between currently available platelet function tests. Measurement of platelet size seems to be a promising approach for monitoring antiplatelet drug therapy. This commentary highlights some limitations of studies on aspirin and clopidogrel resistance in patients undergoing coronary interventions.Keywords: aspirin, clopidogrel, resistance, cardiovascular disease, platelet function tests

  20. Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandor, Barbara; Varga, Adam; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Andras; Papp, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Szakaly, Peter

    2014-05-01

    International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low ( i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 μM) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

  1. A review of antithrombotic therapy and the rationale and design of the randomized edoxaban in patients with peripheral artery disease (ePAD) trial adding edoxaban or clopidogrel to aspirin after femoropopliteal endovascular intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangelder, Marco J D; Nwachuku, Chuke E; Jaff, Michael; Baumgartner, Iris; Duggal, Anil; Adams, George; Ansel, Gary; Grosso, Michael; Mercuri, Michele; Shi, Minggao; Minar, Erich; Moll, Frans L

    2015-04-01

    Compared with the coronary setting, knowledge about antithrombotic therapies after endovascular treatment (EVT) is inadequate in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Based on a review of trials and guidelines, which is summarized in this article, there is scant evidence that antithrombotic drugs improve outcome after peripheral EVT. To address this knowledge gap, the randomized, open-label, multinational edoxaban in patients with Peripheral Artery Disease (ePAD) study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01802775) was designed to explore the safety and efficacy of a combined regimen of antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and anticoagulation with edoxaban, a selective and direct factor Xa inhibitor, both combined with aspirin. As of July 2014, 203 patients (144 men; mean age 67 years) from 7 countries have been enrolled. These patients have been allocated to once-daily edoxaban [60 mg for 3 months (or 30 mg in the presence of factors associated with increased exposure)] or clopidogrel (75 mg/d for 3 months). All patients received aspirin (100 mg/d) for the 6-month duration of the study. The primary safety endpoint is major or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding; the primary efficacy endpoint is restenosis or reocclusion at the treated segment(s) measured at 1, 3, and 6 months using duplex ultrasound scanning. All outcomes will be assessed and adjudicated centrally in a masked fashion. The ePAD study is the first of its kind to investigate a combined regimen of antiplatelet therapy and anticoagulation through factor Xa inhibition with edoxaban. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Prehospital identification of stroke - room for improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, C.E.; Barnung, S.; Nielsen, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rapid recognition of stroke is important because it allows early brain imaging and management such as thrombolytic therapy. We evaluated the identification of the diagnosis acute cerebrovascular incident in a physician-based prehospital emergency medical system. METHODS: From....... Of the remaining 558 patients, a hospital discharge diagnosis of cerebrovascular incident was made for 168 (30.1%) patients. Other cerebral disease was found in 171 (30.7%), systemic disease in 52 (9.3%), and other diagnoses in 167 (29.9%). DISCUSSION: We found a low accuracy of the clinical diagnosis acute...... the Copenhagen Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) register we identified patients classified as having an acute cerebrovascular incident through a 2-year period. We subsequently searched the hospital registration system and compared the consistency between the primary hospital discharge diagnosis and the MECU...

  3. Aspirin and omeprazole for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients at risk for aspirin-associated gastric ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rayado, Guillermo; Sostres, Carlos; Lanas, Angel

    2017-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in the world and low-dose aspirin is considered the cornerstone of the cardiovascular disease prevention. However, low-dose aspirin use is associated with gastrointestinal adverse effects in the whole gastrointestinal tract. In this setting, co-therapy with a proton pump inhibitor is the most accepted strategy to reduce aspirin related upper gastrointestinal damage. In addition, some adverse effects have been described with proton pump inhibitors long term use. Areas covered: Low-dose aspirin related beneficial and adverse effects in cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract are reviewed. In addition, this manuscript summarizes current data on upper gastrointestinal damage prevention and adverse events with proton pump inhibition. Finally, we discuss the benefit/risk ratio of proton pump inhibitor use in patients at risk of gastrointestinal damage taking low-dose aspirin. Expert commentary: Nowadays, with the current available evidence, the combination of low-dose aspirin with proton pump inhibitor is the most effective therapy for cardiovascular prevention in patients at high gastrointestinal risk. However, further studies are needed to discover new effective strategies with less related adverse events.

  4. Organization of prehospital medical care for patients with cerebral stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Anatolyevich Shamalov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main tasks of prehospital medical care are to make a correct diagnosis of stroke and to minimize patient transportation delays. Stroke is a medical emergency so all patients with suspected stroke must be admitted by a first arrived ambulance team to a specialized neurology unit for stroke patients. Most rapidly transporting the patient to hospital, as well as reducing the time of examination to verify the pattern of stroke are a guarantee of successful thrombolytic therapy that is the most effective treatment for ischemic stroke. Substantially reducing the time of in-hospital transfers (the so-called door-to-needle time allows stroke patients to be directly admitted to the around the clock computed tomography room, without being sent to the admission unit. Prehospital stroke treatment policy (basic therapy is to correct the body’s vital functions and to maintain respiration, hemodynamics, and water-electrolyte balance and it can be performed without neuroimaging verification of the pattern of stroke. The application of current organizational, methodical, and educational approaches is useful in improving the quality of medical care for stroke patients, in enhancing the continuity between prehospital and hospital cares, and in promoting new effective technologies in stroke therapy.

  5. Should This Patient Receive Aspirin?: Grand Rounds Discussion From Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Risa B; Graham, Kelly; Sawhney, Mandeep S; Reynolds, Eileen E

    2017-12-05

    Aspirin exerts antiplatelet effects through irreversible inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1, whereas its anticancer effects may be due to inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and other pathways. In 2009, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force endorsed aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, aspirin's role in cancer prevention is still emerging, and no groups currently recommend its use for this purpose. To help physicians balance the benefits and harms of aspirin in primary disease prevention, the Task Force issued a guideline titled, "Aspirin Use for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer" in 2016. In the evidence review conducted for the guideline, cardiovascular disease mortality and colorectal cancer mortality were significantly reduced among persons taking aspirin. However, there was no difference in nonfatal stroke, cardiovascular disease mortality, or all-cause mortality, nor in total cancer mortality, among those taking aspirin. Aspirin users were found to be at increased risk for major gastrointestinal bleeding. In this Beyond the Guidelines, the guideline is reviewed and 2 experts discuss how they would apply it to a 57-year-old man considering starting aspirin for primary prevention. Our experts review the data on which the guideline is based, discuss how they would balance the benefits and harms of aspirin therapy, and explain how they would incorporate shared decision making into clinical practice.

  6. 24-hour antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with previous definite stent thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Morten; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Lisette O

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Once-daily aspirin is standard treatment, but recent studies point towards increased platelet function at the end of the dosing interval. Stent thrombosis (ST) has been linked with reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin, so we investigated if platelet inhibition by aspirin declines...... with 100 patients with stable coronary artery disease and 50 healthy volunteers. All participants were on aspirin 75 mg/day mono antiplatelet therapy. Platelet aggregation was measured 1 and 24 h after aspirin intake using platelet aggregometry (Multiplate® Analyzer). Cyclooxygenase-1 activity, platelet...... activation, immature platelets, and thrombopoietin were measured. RESULTS: Platelet aggregation increased by 109±150 (arachidonic acid) and 47±155 (collagen) aggregation units per minute from 1 to 24 h after aspirin intake (p-values

  7. Clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone for preventing cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Bellesini, Marta; Takeda, Andrea; Middeldorp, Saskia; Donadini, Marco Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin is the prophylactic antiplatelet drug of choice for people with cardiovascular disease. Adding a second antiplatelet drug to aspirin may produce additional benefit for people at high risk and people with established cardiovascular disease. This is an update to a previously published review

  8. Clopidogrel plus aspirin versus aspirin alone for preventing cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Keller, Tymen; Romualdi, Erica; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin is the prophylactic antiplatelet drug of choice for people with cardiovascular disease. Adding a second antiplatelet drug to aspirin may produce additional benefit for those at high risk and those with established cardiovascular disease. To quantify the benefit and harm of adding clopidogrel

  9. Aspirin and the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases: An Approach Based on Individualized, Integrated Estimation of Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Massimo; Battistoni, Allegra; Gallo, Giovanna; Coluccia, Roberta; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2017-09-01

    While the use of aspirin in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular (CVD) is well established, aspirin in primary prevention is not systematically recommended because the absolute CV event reduction is similar to the absolute excess in major bleedings. Recently, emerging evidence suggests the possibility that the assumption of aspirin, may also be effective in the prevention of cancer. By adding to the CV prevention benefits the potential beneficial effect of aspirin in reducing the incidence of mortality and cancer could tip the balance between risks and benefits of aspirin therapy in the primary prevention in favour of the latter and broaden the indication for treatment with in populations at average risk. While prospective and randomized study are currently investigating the effect of aspirin in prevention of both cancer and CVD, clinical efforts at the individual level to promote the use of aspirin in global (or total) primary prevention could be already based on a balanced evaluation of the benefit/risk ratio.

  10. Phenomenology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of aspirin-sensitive rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapowal, A G; Simon, H U; Schmitz-Schumann, M

    1995-01-01

    Aspirin-sensitive rhinosinusitis is a non-allergic, non-infectious perennial eosinophilic rhinitis starting in middle age and rarely seen in children. It may also been seen in atopic patients who have developed a mixed type rhinitis with recurrent airway infections. There is an intolerance to aspirin and most other NSAID. An intolerance to tartrazine, food additives, alcohol, narcotics and local anaesthetics can follow. Most aspirin-sensitive patients develop nasal polyps. Untreated, it can lead to asthma. The frequency of aspirin intolerance is 6.18% in patients with perennial rhinitis and 14.68% in patients with nasal polyps. Immunologic studies of the blood and the nasal polyps show a hyperreactive immune system with an activation of the eosinophil granulocytes due to a TH1-lymphocyte-activation. In atopic subjects with a mixed type rhinitis, we found a TH2- and B-lymphocyte-activation as well. Inhibition of eosinophil apoptosis might be a second remarkable change in the immune system of aspirin-sensitive patients. A key pathogenic event for aspirin sensitivity is the change of the leukotriene pathway for arachidonic acid metabolism releasing high amounts of leukotrienes LTC4, LTD4 and LTE4, effective chemoattractants and activators of inflammatory cells. For the diagnosis of aspirin intolerance, nasal, bronchial and oral challenge are available. The sensitivity of nasal challenge with lysine-aspirin for the diagnosis of aspirin-sensitive rhinitis is 0.93, the specificity 0.97. It is the safest test in aspirin-sensitive asthmatics causing bronchial side effects only in 0.45%. Therapy of aspirin-sensitive rhinosinusitis includes avoidance of aspirin and NSAID. A general down regulation of the immune response with glucocorticosteroids is an effective means. We prefer a maintenance dose of budesonid 400 micrograms a day. Systemic steroids for a reversibility test or in exacerbation due to viral infection are given in a dose of 50 mg a day for one week. If steroids

  11. Comparative bioequivalence assessment of aspirin tablets marketed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: In the last few years, aspirin has become a life saver against cardiovascular accidents. This investigation was carried out to determine possible bioequivalence between regular aspirin and soluble aspirin tablets marketed in Nigeria. Methods: The in vivo bioavailability profiles of three commercial brands of aspirin ...

  12. Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolkit No. 23 Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart What can taking aspirin do for me? If you are at high risk for or if you have heart disease, taking a low dose aspirin every day may help. Aspirin can also help ...

  13. Understanding prehospital delay behavior in acute myocardial infarction in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Cynthia G

    2006-12-01

    Studies demonstrate that acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality can be reduced if reperfusion therapy is initiated within 1 hour of AMI symptom onset. However, a considerable number of men and women arrive at the emergency department outside of the time frame for thrombolytic and angioplasty effectiveness. This is especially true for women who have been shown to delay longer than men due to their prehospital decision-making process utilized. With a mean total delay time greater than 4 hours, the time interval from symptom onset to transport activation to the hospital consumes the majority of the prehospital phase of emergency cardiac care. The health belief model, self-regulation model, theory of reasoned action, and theory of planned behavior have all been used to describe the prehospital decision-making process of both men and women with an AMI and the variables that impact that process. These models have identified the importance of symptom attribution to cardiac-related causes as a target variable for research and interventions related to care-seeking behavior.

  14. Aspirin resistance may be identified by miR-92a in plasma combined with platelet distribution width

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Helle Glud; Houlind, Kim; Madsen, Jonna Skov

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Aspirin is a widely used drug for prevention of thrombotic events in cardiovascular patients, but approximately 25% of patients experience insufficient platelet inhibition due to aspirin, and remain in risk of cardiovascular events. This study aimed to investigate the value...... of circulating miR-92a and platelet size as biomarkers of the individual response to aspirin therapy. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 50 healthy blood donors without antithrombotic medication and 50 patients with intermittent claudication on daily aspirin therapy. Based on results from the arachidonic...... acid stimulated aggregation test on Multiplate®analyzer (ASPItest), patients were defined as aspirin resistant (n=10) or aspirin responders (n=40). Plasma levels of miR-92a were evaluated by RT-qPCR analysis and platelet distribution width (PDW) was used to assess platelet size variability. Receiver...

  15. Rivaroxaban or Aspirin for Extended Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Lensing, Anthonie W. A.; Prins, Martin H.; Bauersachs, Rupert; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A.; Cohen, Alexander T.; Davidson, Bruce L.; Decousus, Hervé; Freitas, Maria C. S.; Holberg, Gerlind; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Haskell, Lloyd; van Bellen, Bonno; Pap, Akos F.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S.; Prandoni, Paolo; Bianchi, Alessandra; Brighton, Tim; Carroll, Patrick; Chong, Beng; Chunilal, Sanjeev; Coughlin, Paul; Curnow, Jennifer; Jackson, David; Tran, Huyen; Ward, Chris; Brodmann, Marianne; Kyrle, Paul; Marschang, Peter; Petkov, Ventzislav; Hainaut, Philippe; Jordens, Paul; Vandekerkhof, Jos; Wautrecht, Jean-Claude; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce; Correa, Joao; Cukier, Alberto; Freire, Antonio; Pereira, Adamastor; Porto, Carmen; Sacilotto, Roberto; Vasconcelos Costa, Agenor; Della Siega, Anthony; Dolan, Sean; Le Gal, Gré goire; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although many patients with venous thromboembolism require extended treatment, it is uncertain whether it is better to use full- or lower-intensity anticoagulation therapy or aspirin. METHODS In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 study, we assigned 3396 patients with venous

  16. Effect of Aspirin in Postoperative Management of Adult Ischemic Moyamoya Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yahui; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Yuanli

    2017-09-01

    Aspirin has been implicated in the postoperative management of moyamoya disease (MMD) in order to avoid bypass failure and decrease the incidence of subsequent stroke. However, its effect has not been completely determined yet. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed data of 184 adult patients (197 hemispheres) presented with ischemic-onset MMD who had undergone direct or combined revascularization in our hospital, to clarify the effect of postoperative aspirin therapy in the management of moyamoya disease. Fifty-nine hemispheres that had been administered with aspirin (100 mg/day) after bypass surgery were defined as the "aspirin group," whereas 138 that hadn't been given aspirin postoperatively were defined as the "control group". Among 197 hemispheres, the mortality rate was 0. The incidence of postoperative newly developed infarction, transient ischemic attack, and hemorrhage were not significantly different between the aspirin and control groups. The patency rate of bypass graft was not significantly different between the groups, either. Notably, more patients experienced major stroke in the control group (9/138) than the aspirin group (1/59), but no statistical difference was found (P > 0.05). In the aspirin group, more patients had improved outcome than the control group (P = 0.04). Our findings showed that aspirin might not decrease the incidence of postoperative ischemic stroke or increase patency rate of bypass graft, but it does not increase the risk of hemorrhages, either. Also, postoperative aspirin therapy might improve outcome. More studies are needed to provide evidence for postoperative antiplatelet therapy in MMD management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of pre-hospital antibiotic use on community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, A F; Viasus, D; Garcia-Vidal, C; Grillo, S; Molero, L; Dorca, J; Carratalà, J

    2014-09-01

    Information on the influence of pre-hospital antibiotic treatment on the causative organisms, clinical features and outcomes of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains scarce. We performed an observational study of a prospective cohort of non-immunosuppressed adults hospitalized with CAP between 2003 and 2012. Patients were divided into two groups: those who had received pre-hospital antibiotic treatment for the same episode of CAP and those who had not. A propensity score was used to match patients. Of 2179 consecutive episodes of CAP, 376 (17.3%) occurred in patients who had received pre-hospital antibiotic treatment. After propensity score matching, Legionella pneumophila was more frequently identified in patients with pre-hospital antibiotic treatment, while Streptococcus pneumoniae was less common (p sensitivity and specificity of the pneumococcal urinary antigen test for diagnosing pneumococcal pneumonia were similar in the two groups. Patients with pre-hospital antibiotic treatment were less likely to present fever (p 0.02) or leucocytosis (p 0.001). Conversely, chest X-ray cavitation was more frequent in these patients (p 0.04). No significant differences were found in the frequency of patients classified into high-risk Pneumonia Severity Index classes, in intensive care unit admission, or in 30-day mortality between the groups. In conclusion, L. pneumophila occurrence was nearly three times higher in patients who received pre-hospital antibiotics. After a propensity-adjusted analysis, no significant differences were found in prognosis between study groups. Pre-hospital antibiotic use should be considered when choosing aetiological diagnostic tests and empirical antibiotic therapy in patients with CAP. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  18. Increased platelet expression of glycoprotein IIIa following aspirin treatment in aspirin-resistant but not aspirin-sensitive subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Christopher N; Goodman, Timothy; Becker, Silke; Chen, Nan; Mustafa, Agnesa; Schofield, Emma; Campbell, James; Ward, Malcolm; Sharma, Pankaj; Ferro, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Aims Aspirin is widely used as an anti-platelet agent for cardiovascular prophylaxis. Despite aspirin treatment, many patients experience recurrent thrombotic events, and aspirin resistance may contribute to this. We examined the prevalence of aspirin resistance in a healthy population, and investigated whether the platelet proteome differed in aspirin-resistant subjects. Methods Ninety-three healthy subjects received aspirin 300 mg daily for 28 days. Before and at the end of treatment, urine was taken to determine 11-dehydrothromboxane B2, and blood was taken to measure arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation of platelet-rich plasma and to interrogate the platelet proteome by mass spectrometric analysis with further confirmation of findings using Western blotting. Results In two of the 93 subjects, neither AA-induced aggregation nor urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 was effectively suppressed by aspirin, despite measurable plasma salicylate concentrations, suggesting the presence of true aspirin resistance. Despite no detectable differences in the platelet proteome at baseline, following aspirin a marked increase was seen in platelet glycoprotein IIIa expression in the aspirin-resistant but not aspirin-sensitive subjects. An increase in platelet glycoprotein IIIa expression with aspirin resistance was confirmed in a separate cohort of 17 patients with stable coronary artery disease on long term aspirin treatment, four of whom exhibited aspirin resistance. Conclusions In a healthy population, true aspirin resistance is uncommon but exists. Resistance is associated with an increase in platelet glycoprotein IIIa expression in response to aspirin. These data shed new light on the mechanism of aspirin resistance, and provide the potential to identify aspirin-resistant subjects using a novel biomarker. PMID:25099258

  19. Risk of bleeding in patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with different combinations of aspirin, clopidogrel, and vitamin K antagonists in Denmark: a retrospective analysis of nationwide registry data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Hansen, Morten L; Abildstrøm, Steen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Combinations of aspirin, clopidogrel, and vitamin K antagonists are widely used in patients after myocardial infarction. However, data for the safety of combinations are sparse. We examined the risk of hospital admission for bleeding associated with different antithrombotic regimens...... according to the following groups: monotherapy with aspirin, clopidogrel, or vitamin K antagonist; dual therapy with aspirin plus clopidogrel, aspirin plus vitamin K antagonist, or clopidogrel plus vitamin K antagonist; or triple therapy including all three drugs. Risk of hospital admission for bleeding...... was 2.6% for the aspirin group, 4.6% for clopidogrel, 4.3% for vitamin K antagonist, 3.7% for aspirin plus clopidogrel, 5.1% for aspirin plus vitamin K antagonist, 12.3% for clopidogrel plus vitamin K antagonist, and 12.0% for triple therapy. With aspirin as reference, adjusted hazard ratios...

  20. Effect of Ticagrelor Plus Aspirin, Ticagrelor Alone, or Aspirin Alone on Saphenous Vein Graft Patency 1 Year After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Zhu, Yunpeng; Xu, Zhiyun; Cheng, Zhaoyun; Mei, Ju; Chen, Xin; Wang, Xiaowei

    2018-04-24

    The effect of ticagrelor with or without aspirin on saphenous vein graft patency in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is unknown. To compare the effect of ticagrelor + aspirin or ticagrelor alone vs aspirin alone on saphenous vein graft patency 1 year after CABG. Randomized, multicenter, open-label, clinical trial among 6 tertiary hospitals in China. Eligible patients were aged 18 to 80 years with indications for elective CABG. Patients requiring urgent revascularization, concomitant cardiac surgery, dual antiplatelet or vitamin K antagonist therapy post-CABG, and who were at risk of serious bleeding were excluded. From July 2014 until November 2015, 1256 patients were identified and 500 were enrolled. Follow-up was completed in January 2017. Patients were randomized (1:1:1) to start ticagrelor (90 mg twice daily) + aspirin (100 mg once daily) (n = 168), ticagrelor (90 mg twice daily) (n = 166), or aspirin (100 mg once daily) (n = 166) within 24 hours post-CABG. Neither patients nor treating physicians were blinded to allocation. Primary outcome was saphenous vein graft patency 1 year after CABG (FitzGibbon grade A) adjudicated independently by a committee blinded to allocation. Saphenous vein graft patency was assessed by multislice computed tomographic angiography or coronary angiography. Among 500 randomized patients (mean age, 63.6 years; women, 91 [18.2%]), 461 (92.2%) completed the trial. Saphenous vein graft patency rates 1 year post-CABG were 88.7% (432 of 487 vein grafts) with ticagrelor + aspirin; 82.8% (404 of 488 vein grafts) with ticagrelor alone; and 76.5% (371 of 485 vein grafts) with aspirin alone. The difference between ticagrelor + aspirin vs aspirin alone was statistically significant (12.2% [95% CI, 5.2% to 19.2%]; P aspirin alone was not statistically significant (6.3% [95% CI, -1.1% to 13.7%]; P = .10). Five major bleeding episodes occurred during 1 year of follow-up (3 with

  1. Aspirin Increases the Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Richard; Barrett, Matthew; Zheng, Sonbo; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstadter, Maikel

    2014-03-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is often prescribed for patients with high levels of cholesterol for the secondary prevention of myocardial events, a regimen known as the Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy. We have recently shown that Aspirin partitions in lipid bilayers. However, a direct interplay between ASA and cholesterol has not been investigated. Cholesterol is known to insert itself into the membrane in a dispersed state at moderate concentrations (under ~37.5%) and decrease fluidity of membranes. We prepared model lipid membranes containing varying amounts of both ASA and cholesterol molecules. The structure of the bilayers as a function of ASA and cholesterol concentration was determined using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. At cholesterol levels of more than 40mol%, immiscible cholesterol plaques formed. Adding ASA to the membranes was found to dissolve the cholesterol plaques, leading to a fluid lipid bilayer structure. We present first direct evidence for an interaction between ASA and cholesterol on the level of the cell membrane.

  2. Preoperative Aspirin Does Not Increase Transfusion or Reoperation in Isolated Valve Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhammer, Jordan E; Herman, Corey R; Berguson, Mark W; Torjman, Marc C; Epstein, Richard H; Sun, Jian-Zhong

    2017-10-01

    Preoperative aspirin has been studied in patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery. However, there is a paucity of clinical data available evaluating perioperative aspirin in other cardiac surgical procedures. This study was designed to investigate the effects of aspirin on bleeding and transfusion in patients undergoing non-emergent, isolated, heart valve repair or replacement. Retrospective, cohort study. Academic medical center. A total of 694 consecutive patients having non-emergent, isolated, valve repair or replacement surgery at an academic medical center were identified. Of the 488 patients who met inclusion criteria, 2 groups were defined based on their preoperative use of aspirin: those taking (n = 282), and those not taking (n = 206) aspirin within 5 days of surgery. Binary logistic regression was used to examine relationships among demographic and clinical variables. No significant difference was found between the aspirin and non-aspirin groups with respect to the percentage receiving red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, mean RBC units transfused in those who required transfusion, massive transfusion of RBC, or amounts of fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, or platelets. Aspirin was not associated with an increase in the rate of re-exploration for bleeding (5.3% v 6.3%, p = 0.478). Major adverse cardiocerebral events (MACE), 30-day mortality, and 30-day readmission rates were not statistically different between the aspirin-and non-aspirin-treated groups. Preoperative aspirin therapy in elective, isolated, valve surgery did not result in an increase in transfusion or reoperation for bleeding and was not associated with reduced readmission rate, MACE, or 30-day mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera: a pilot study. Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia (GISP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    In this pilot study, aimed at exploring the feasibility of a large-scale trial of low-dose aspirin in polycythaemia vera (PV), 112 PV patients (42 females, 70 males. aged 17-80 years) were selected for not having a clear indication for, or contraindication to, aspirin treatment and randomized to receive oral aspirin (40 mg/d) or placebo. Follow-up duration was 16 +/- 6 months. Measurements of thromboxane A2 production during whole blood clotting demonstrated complete inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity in patients receiving aspirin. Aspirin administration was not associated with any bleeding complication. Within the limitations of the small sample size, this study indicates that a biochemically effective regimen of antiplatelet therapy is well tolerated in patients with polycythaemia vera and that a large-scale placebo-controlled trial is feasible.

  4. Pre-hospital management and risk factors in children with acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Diarrhoea remains a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in the developing world. Implementation of World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) guidelines and pre-hospital use of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) in the Western Cape Province of South Africa are ...

  5. [Prehospital emergency care in Mexico City: the opportunities of the healthcare system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinet, Luis M

    2005-01-01

    Unintentional vehicle traffic injuries cause 1.2 million preventable deaths per year worldwide, mostly affecting the population in their productive years of life. In Mexico, unintentional vehicle traffic injuries are one of the main causes of death; in Mexico City they account for 8% of deaths. Prehospital systems are set up to provide hospital medical care to the population, by means of a complex network that includes transportation, communications, resources (material, financial and human), and public participation. These systems may be designed in a variety of ways, depending on availability, capacity and quality of resources, according to specific community needs, always abiding by laws and regulations. In Mexico, several institutions and organizations offer prehospital services without being overseen in terms of coordination, regulation and performance evaluation, despite the high rates of morbidity and mortality due to injuries and preventable conditions amenable to effective therapy during the prehospital period. Prehospital care may contribute to decrease the morbidity and mortality rates of injuries requiring prompt medical care. Emphasis is made on the importance of assessing the performance of prehospital care, as well as on identification of needs for future development.

  6. Aspirin Versus Aspirin Plus Clopidogrel as Antithrombotic Treatment Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With a Balloon-Expandable Valve: The ARTE (Aspirin Versus Aspirin + Clopidogrel Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation) Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Masson, Jean-Bernard; Welsh, Robert C; Garcia Del Blanco, Bruno; Pelletier, Marc; Webb, John G; Al-Qoofi, Faisal; Généreux, Philippe; Maluenda, Gabriel; Thoenes, Martin; Paradis, Jean-Michel; Chamandi, Chekrallah; Serra, Vicenç; Dumont, Eric; Côté, Mélanie

    2017-07-10

    The aim of this study was to compare aspirin plus clopidogrel with aspirin alone as antithrombotic treatment following transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for the prevention of ischemic events, bleeding events, and death. Few data exist on the optimal antithrombotic therapy following TAVR. This was a randomized controlled trial comparing aspirin (80 to 100 mg/day) plus clopidogrel (75 mg/day) (dual antiplatelet therapy [DAPT]) versus aspirin alone (single-antiplatelet therapy [SAPT]) in patients undergoing TAVR with a balloon-expandable valve. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of death, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke or transient ischemic attack, or major or life-threatening bleeding (according to Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definitions) within the 3 months following the procedure. The trial was prematurely stopped after the inclusion of 74% of the planned study population. A total of 222 patients were included, 111 allocated to DAPT and 111 to SAPT. The composite of death, MI, stroke or transient ischemic attack, or major or life-threatening bleeding tended to occur more frequently in the DAPT group (15.3% vs. 7.2%, p = 0.065). There were no differences between groups in the occurrence of death (DAPT, 6.3%; SAPT, 3.6%; p = 0.37), MI (DAPT, 3.6%; SAT, 0.9%; p = 0.18), or stroke or transient ischemic attack (DAPT, 2.7%; SAPT, 0.9%; p = 0.31) at 3 months. DAPT was associated with a higher rate of major or life-threatening bleeding events (10.8% vs. 3.6% in the SAPT group, p = 0.038). There were no differences between groups in valve hemodynamic status post-TAVR. This small trial showed that SAPT (vs. DAPT) tended to reduce the occurrence of major adverse events following TAVR. SAPT reduced the risk for major or life-threatening events while not increasing the risk for MI or stroke. Larger studies are needed to confirm these results. (Aspirin Versus Aspirin + Clopidogrel Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: The ARTE

  7. Longterm Hydroxychloroquine Therapy and Low-dose Aspirin May Have an Additive Effectiveness in the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Serena; Pierro, Luciana; Pantano, Ilenia; Iudici, Michele; Valentini, Gabriele

    2017-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Thromboprophylaxis with low-dose aspirin (ASA) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) seems promising in SLE. We investigated the effects of HCQ cumulative dosages (c-HCQ) and the possible synergistic efficacy of ASA and HCQ in preventing a first CV event (CVE) in patients with SLE. Patients consecutively admitted to our center who, at admission, satisfied the 1997 American College of Rheumatology and/or 2012 Systemic Lupus Collaborating Clinics classification criteria for SLE, and had not experienced any CVE, were enrolled. The occurrence of a thrombotic event, use of ASA, and c-HCQ were recorded. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to determine the c-HCQ associated with a lower incidence of CVE. Cox regression analysis served to identify factors associated with a first CVE. For the study, 189 patients with SLE were enrolled and monitored for 13 years (median). Ten CVE occurred during followup. At Kaplan-Meier analysis, the CVE-free rate was higher in ASA-treated patients administered a c-HCQ > 600 g (standard HCQ dose for at least 5 yrs) than in patients receiving ASA alone, or with a c-HCQ dose < 600 g (log-rank test chi-square = 4.01, p = 0.04). Multivariate analysis showed that antimalarials plus ASA protected against thrombosis (HR 0.041 and HR 0.047, respectively), while antiphospholipid antibodies (HR 17.965) and hypertension (HR 18.054) increased the risk of a first CVE. Our results suggest that prolonged use of HCQ plus ASA is thromboprotective in SLE and provides additional evidence for its continued use in patients with SLE.

  8. Safety of low-dose aspirin in endovascular treatment for intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ma

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the safety of low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel versus high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel in prevention of vascular risk within 90 days of duration of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients treated with intracranial endovascular treatment. METHODS: From January 2012 to December 2013, this prospective and observational study enrolled 370 patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis of ≥70% with poor collateral undergoing intracranial endovascular treatment. Antiplatelet therapy consists of aspirin, at a low-dose of 100 mg or high-dose of 300 mg daily; clopidogrel, at a dose of 75 mg daily for 5 days before endovascular treatment. The dual antiplatelet therapy continued for 90 days after intervention. The study endpoints include acute thrombosis, subacute thrombosis, stroke or death within 90 days after intervention. RESULTS: Two hundred and seventy three patients received low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel and 97 patients received high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel before intracranial endovascular treatment. Within 90 days after intervention, there were 4 patients (1.5% with acute thrombosis, 5 patients (1.8% with subacute thrombosis, 17 patients (6.2% with stroke, and 2 death (0.7% in low-dose aspirin group, compared with no patient (0% with acute thrombosis, 2 patient (2.1% with subacute thrombosis, 6 patients (6.2% with stroke, and 2 death (2.1% in high-dose aspirin group, and there were no significant difference in all study endpoints between two groups. CONCLUSION: Low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel is comparative in safety with high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel within 90 days of duration of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients treated with intracranial endovascular treatment.

  9. [Drowning - An update on prehospital and intrahospital treatment strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunden, Mike Sebastian; Tank, Sascha; Kerner, Thoralf

    2015-07-01

    500000 people die from unintentional drowning each year worldwide. Drowning accidents occur to humans of every age, while fatal drowning is the leading cause of death among boys 5 to 14 years of age. In Germany, however, most drowning victims are elderly people. Considering the multitude of accident settings, ranging from bathing accidents in lakes to shipwrecks at sea, professional first responders need to adapt to various scenarios. This article summarizes the pathophysiology of drowning, particular features of prehospital life support and current knowledge on the further therapy of victims of near fatal drowning accidents. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Is aspirin still the drug of choice for management of patients with peripheral arterial disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poredos, Pavel; Jezovnik, Mateja K

    2013-03-01

    Antiplatelet drugs represent one of the basic options for management of patients with different atherosclerotic diseases. Aspirin is the oldest and most often prescribed antiplatelet drug. The efficacy of aspirin depends on the clinical characteristics of the treated population and probably also on the type or location of atherosclerotic disease. It seems that it is most effective in coronary patients with clinically unstable disease, less effective in prevention of cerebrovascular incidents, and its efficacy is uncertain in peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients. One of the first meta-analyses (Antithrombotic Trialists' Collaboration - ATC) indicated that antiplatelet drugs also significantly reduce cardiovascular events in patients with PAD. However, only one third of the PAD patients included were treated with aspirin, while the rest received other anti-platelet drugs. The latest ATC meta-analysis of randomized control trials of aspirin therapy involving patients with diabetes and PAD demonstrated no benefit of aspirin in reducing cardiovascular events. Also in patients with preclinical PAD (pathological ankle brachial index) aspirin did not result in a significant reduction of vascular events. The new anti-platelet drugs prasugrel, ticagrelor and picotamide seem to be more effective than aspirin in PAD patients, particularly in diabetic patients with PAD. In conclusion, antiplatelet drugs are effective in prevention of cardiovascular events in different atherosclerotic diseases, including PAD. However, recent studies indicated that in PAD patients aspirin is less effective than in coronary artery disease. New anti-platelet drugs showed marginal superiority over aspirin without definite advantages. Aspirin thus remains the first line of antiplatelet drug for secondary prevention of cardiovascular events in PAD patients and clopidogrel as its effective alternative. Further, new studies on PAD patients are necessary to better define the role of anti

  11. Prehospital management and fluid resuscitation in hypotensive trauma patients admitted to Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talving, Peep; Pålstedt, Joakim; Riddez, Louis

    2005-01-01

    Few previous studies have been conducted on the prehospital management of hypotensive trauma patients in Stockholm County. The aim of this study was to describe the prehospital management of hypotensive trauma patients admitted to the largest trauma center in Sweden, and to assess whether prehospital trauma life support (PHTLS) guidelines have been implemented regarding prehospital time intervals and fluid therapy. In addition, the effects of the age, type of injury, injury severity, prehospital time interval, blood pressure, and fluid therapy on outcome were investigated. This is a retrospective, descriptive study on consecutive, hypotensive trauma patients (systolic blood pressure Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, during 2001-2003. The reported values are medians with interquartile ranges. Basic demographics, prehospital time intervals and interventions, injury severity scores (ISS), type and volumes of prehospital fluid resuscitation, and 30-day mortality were abstracted. The effects of the patient's age, gender, prehospital time interval, type of injury, injury severity, on-scene and emergency department blood pressure, and resuscitation fluid volumes on mortality were analyzed using the exact logistic regression model. In 102 (71 male) adult patients (age > or = 15 years) recruited, the median age was 35.5 years (range: 27-55 years) and 77 patients (75%) had suffered blunt injury. The predominant trauma mechanisms were falls between levels (24%) and motor vehicle crashes (22%) with an ISS of 28.5 (range: 16-50). The on-scene time interval was 19 minutes (range: 12-24 minutes). Fluid therapy was initiated at the scene of injury in the majority of patients (73%) regardless of the type of injury (77 blunt [75%] / 25 penetrating [25%]) or injury severity (ISS: 0-20; 21-40; 41-75). Age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.04), male gender (OR = 3.2), ISS 21-40 (OR = 13.6), and ISS >40 (OR = 43.6) were the significant factors affecting outcome in the exact

  12. Low dose aspirin as adjuvant treatment for venous leg ulceration: pragmatic, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial (Aspirin4VLU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, Andrew; Wadham, Angela; Bullen, Chris; Parag, Varsha; Kerse, Ngaire; Waters, Jill

    2017-11-24

    Objective  To determine the effect of low dose aspirin on ulcer healing in patients with venous leg ulcers. Design  Pragmatic, community based, parallel group, double blind, randomised controlled trial. Setting  Five community nursing centres in New Zealand. Participants  251 adults with venous leg ulcers who could safely be treated with aspirin or placebo: 125 were randomised to aspirin and 126 to placebo. Interventions  150 mg oral aspirin daily or matching placebo for up to 24 weeks treatment, with compression therapy as standard background treatment. Main outcome measures  The primary outcome was time to complete healing of the reference ulcer (largest ulcer if more than one ulcer was present). Secondary outcomes included proportion of participants healed, change in ulcer area, change in health related quality of life, and adverse events. Analysis was by intention to treat. Results  The median number of days to healing of the reference ulcer was 77 in the aspirin group and 69 in the placebo group (hazard ratio 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.64 to 1.13, P=0.25). The number of participants healed at the endpoint was 88 (70%) in the aspirin group and 101 (80%) in the placebo group (risk difference -9.8%, 95% confidence interval -20.4% to 0.9%, P=0.07). Estimated change in ulcer area was 4.1 cm 2 in the aspirin group and 4.8 cm 2 in the placebo group (mean difference -0.7 cm 2 , 95% confidence interval -1.9 to 0.5 cm 2 , P=0.25). 40 adverse events occurred among 29 participants in the aspirin group and 37 adverse events among 27 participants in the placebo group (incidence rate ratio 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.7 to 1.7, P=0.71). Conclusion  Our findings do not support the use of low dose aspirin as adjuvant treatment for venous leg ulcers. Trial registration  ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02158806. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Pre-hospital critical care by anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, A J; Lossius, H M; Mikkelsen, S

    2013-01-01

    All Scandinavian countries provide anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services. Little is known of the incidence of critical illness or injury attended by these services. We aimed to investigate anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services in Scandinavia with special emphasis on incidence...

  14. Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Aspirin to Zoloft: Ways Medicines Work By Emily Carlson ... biology of how cancer cells grow. Antihistamines, Antidepressants, Aspirin Adrenergic receptor with carazolol, a beta-blocker. View ...

  15. Lansoprazole for secondary prevention of gastric or duodenal ulcers associated with long-term low-dose aspirin therapy: results of a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, double-dummy, active-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Kentaro; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Itabashi, Tsukasa; Abe, Sumihisa; Sakaki, Nobuhiro; Ashida, Kiyoshi; Mizokami, Yuji; Chiba, Tsutomu; Matsui, Shigeyuki; Kanto, Tatsuya; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Uemura, Naomi; Hiramatsu, Naoki

    2011-06-01

    The efficacy of low-dose lansoprazole has not been established for the prevention of recurrent gastric or duodenal ulcers in those receiving long-term low-dose aspirin (LDA) for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular protection. This study sought to examine the efficacy of low-dose lansoprazole (15 mg once daily) for the secondary prevention of LDA-associated gastric or duodenal ulcers. Patients were randomized to receive lansoprazole 15 mg daily (n = 226) or gefarnate 50 mg twice daily (n = 235) for 12 months or longer in a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, randomized active-controlled trial, followed by a 6-month follow-up study with open-label lansoprazole treatment. The study utilized 94 sites in Japan and 461 Japanese patients with a history of gastric or duodenal ulcers who required long-term LDA therapy for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. The primary endpoint was the development of gastric or duodenal ulcers. The cumulative incidence of gastric or duodenal ulcers on days 91, 181, and 361 from the start of the study was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method as 1.5, 2.1, and 3.7%, respectively, in the lansoprazole group versus 15.2, 24.0, and 31.7%, respectively, in the gefarnate group. The risk of ulcer development was significantly (log-rank test, P lansoprazole group than in the gefarnate group, with the hazard ratio being 0.099 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.042-0.230). Lansoprazole was superior to gefarnate in reducing the risk of gastric or duodenal ulcer recurrence in patients with a definite history of gastric or duodenal ulcers who required long-term LDA therapy.

  16. Aspirin counteracts cancer stem cell features, desmoplasia and gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiyao; Liu, Li; Fan, Pei; Bauer, Nathalie; Gladkich, Jury; Ryschich, Eduard; Bazhin, Alexandr V.; Giese, Nathalia A.; Strobel, Oliver; Hackert, Thilo; Hinz, Ulf; Gross, Wolfgang; Fortunato, Franco; Herr, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is characterized by an extremely poor prognosis. An inflammatory microenvironment triggers the pronounced desmoplasia, the selection of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and therapy resistance. The anti-inflammatory drug aspirin is suggested to lower the risk for PDA and to improve the treatment, although available results are conflicting and the effect of aspirin to CSC characteristics and desmoplasia in PDA has not yet been investigated. We characterized the influence of aspirin on CSC features, stromal reactions and gemcitabine resistance. Four established and 3 primary PDA cell lines, non-malignant cells, 3 patient tumor-derived CSC-enriched spheroidal cultures and tissues from patients who did or did not receive aspirin before surgery were analyzed using MTT assays, flow cytometry, colony and spheroid formation assays, Western blot analysis, antibody protein arrays, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), immunohistochemistry and in vivo xenotransplantation. Aspirin significantly induced apoptosis and reduced the viability, self-renewal potential, and expression of proteins involved in inflammation and stem cell signaling. Aspirin also reduced the growth and invasion of tumors in vivo, and it significantly prolonged the survival of mice with orthotopic pancreatic xenografts in combination with gemcitabine. This was associated with a decreased expression of markers for progression, inflammation and desmoplasia. These findings were confirmed in tissue samples obtained from patients who had or had not taken aspirin before surgery. Importantly, aspirin sensitized cells that were resistant to gemcitabine and thereby enhanced the therapeutic efficacy. Aspirin showed no obvious toxic effects on normal cells, chick embryos or mice. These results highlight aspirin as an effective, inexpensive and well-tolerated co-treatment to target inflammation, desmoplasia and CSC features PDA. PMID:25846752

  17. Continuous Aspirin Use Does Not Increase Bleeding Risk of Split-Thickness Skin Transplantation Repair to Chronic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanwei; Wang, Yibing; Li, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Ning; Wu, Dan

    Discontinuation of aspirin therapy before cutaneous surgery may cause serious complications. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the bleeding risk of split-thickness skin transplantation repair to chronic wounds in patients on aspirin therapy. A total of 97 patients who underwent split-thickness skin transplantation surgery of chronic wounds during a 2-year period were enrolled. They were categorized on the basis of aspirin therapies. The primary outcome was postoperative bleeding and bleeding complications. Univariate analysis was performed to examine the association between aspirin and bleeding complications. Among the 26 patients taking aspirin continuously in group A, there were 5 bleeding complications (19.23%). Among the 55 nonusers in group B, there were 10 bleeding complications (18.18%). Among the 16 discontinuous patients in group C, there were 3 bleeding complications (18.75%). No statistical differences were found among the groups ( P = .956). Univariate analysis showed that continuous aspirin use was not significantly associated with bleeding complications (odds ratio, 0.933; 95% confidence interval, 0.283-3.074; P = .910 in the aspirin and control groups) and that discontinuous aspirin use was not significantly associated with bleeding complications (odds ratio, 0.963; 95% confidence interval, 0.230-4.025; P = .959 in the aspirin and control groups; odds ratio, 0.969; 95% confidence interval, 0.198-4.752; P = .969 in the aspirin and discontinuous groups). Continuous aspirin use does not produce an additional bleeding risk in patients who undergo split-thickness skin transplantation repair of chronic wounds.

  18. Prehospital chest tube thoracostomy: effective treatment or additional trauma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg, W.R.; Bergs, B.; Krijen, P.; Schipper, I.; Ringburg, A.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Schipper, I.B.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of prehospital chest tube thoracostomy (TT) remains controversial because of presumed increased complication risks. This study analyzed infectious complication rates for physician-performed prehospital and emergency department (ED) TT. METHODS: Over a 40-month period, all

  19. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shahawy, A.S.; Mahfouz, R.M.; Aly, A.A.M.; El-Zohry, M.

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author)

  20. The Effect of Combined Aspirin and Clopidogrel Treatment on Cancer Incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, Avi; Zelikson-Saporta, Ravit; Pereg, David; Spectre, Galia; Rozovski, Uri; Raanani, Pia; Hermoni, Doron; Lishner, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Multiple studies have shown an association between aspirin treatment and a reduction in newly diagnosed cancer. Conversely, there are conflicting clinical and laboratory data on the effect of combined clopidogrel and aspirin therapy on cancer incidence, including analyses suggesting an increased cancer risk. No large-scale cohort study has been performed to address this issue in a heterogeneous real-world scenario. We investigated the effect of clopidogrel and aspirin on cancer incidence compared with aspirin alone and no antiplatelet therapy. A population-based historical cohort study of subjects aged ≥50 years covered by Clalit Health Services, an Israeli health maintenance organization, was performed. Patients treated with the newer antiplatelet drugs, prasugrel or ticagrelor, which, like clopidogrel, inhibit adenosine diphosphate receptors, and those with prior cancer were excluded. Prescription records of antiplatelet medication were retrieved. The cohort included 183,912 subjects diagnosed with 21,974 cancer cases based upon the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision. Dual aspirin and clopidogrel was prescribed in 9.6%, while 49% received aspirin alone and 41% used neither. Compared with nonusers, there was a lower risk of cancer in subjects exposed to aspirin with (hazard ratio [HR] 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.44-0.49) or without clopidogrel (HR 0.54; 95% CI, 0.52-0.56), on long-term follow-up. Combined treatment was associated with a lower cancer risk than the aspirin-only group (HR 0.92; 95% CI, 0.86-0.97). Dual clopidogrel and aspirin treatment is safe regarding the cancer risk. This study generates the hypothesis that clopidogrel may reduce cancer incidence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Compound list: aspirin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aspirin ASA 00014 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/aspirin....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/aspirin....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/aspirin....Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/aspirin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  2. Aspirin in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devereaux, P J; Mrkobrada, Marko; Sessler, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is substantial variability in the perioperative administration of aspirin in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, both among patients who are already on an aspirin regimen and among those who are not. METHODS: Using a 2-by-2 factorial trial design, we randomly assigned 10......,010 patients who were preparing to undergo noncardiac surgery and were at risk for vascular complications to receive aspirin or placebo and clonidine or placebo. The results of the aspirin trial are reported here. The patients were stratified according to whether they had not been taking aspirin before...... the study (initiation stratum, with 5628 patients) or they were already on an aspirin regimen (continuation stratum, with 4382 patients). Patients started taking aspirin (at a dose of 200 mg) or placebo just before surgery and continued it daily (at a dose of 100 mg) for 30 days in the initiation stratum...

  3. Prehospital care in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C B; Lai, K K; Mak, K P

    2000-09-01

    A quick and efficient prehospital emergency response depends on immediate ambulance dispatch, patient assessment, triage, and transport to hospital. During 1999, the Ambulance Command of the Hong Kong Fire Services Department responded to 484,923 calls, which corresponds to 1329 calls each day. Cooperation between the Fire Services Department and the Hospital Authority exists at the levels of professional training of emergency medical personnel, quality assurance, and a coordinated disaster response. In response to the incident at the Hong Kong International Airport in the summer of 1999, when an aircraft overturned during landing, the pre-set quota system was implemented to send patients to designated accident and emergency departments. Furthermore, the 'first crew at the scene' model has been adopted, whereby the command is established and triage process started by the first ambulance crew members to reach the scene. The development of emergency protocols should be accompanied by good field-to-hospital and interhospital communication, the upgrading of decision-making skills, a good monitoring and auditing structure, and commitment to training and skills maintenance.

  4. Effect of addition of clopidogrel to aspirin on subdural hematoma: meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheet, Majid F; Pearce, Lesly A; Hart, Robert G

    2015-06-01

    Clopidogrel combined with aspirin is routinely prescribed after coronary artery stenting, in patients with acute coronary syndromes, and recently to prevent stroke in patients with acute minor ischemic stroke and TIA. Subdural hematomas are an important complication of antithrombotic treatment, but the risk associated with clopidogrel plus aspirin has not been previously defined. To quantify the risk of subdural hematoma associated with dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel plus aspirin. Randomized clinical trials comparing clopidogrel plus aspirin with aspirin alone were identified by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from 1990 to 2014, and restricted to those with more than 7 days of treatment. Two reviewers independently extracted data about subdural hematomas. Of 24 randomized trials testing clopidogrel added to aspirin, results for subdural hematoma were available for 11 trials, of which eight did not identify any subdural hematomas. The three trials reporting subdural hematomas were double-blind and included patients with recent lacunar stroke, acute coronary syndromes or atrial fibrillation with a total of 23,136 patients (mean age 66 years) and reported 39 subdural hematomas during a mean follow-up 2.1 years per patient. Clopidogrel plus aspirin was associated with a significantly increased risk of subdural hematoma compared with aspirin alone (risk ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.0, 3.8; P = 0.04; fixed effects model; I2 for heterogeneity of 0%, P = 0.51). The average absolute incidence of subdural hematoma averaged 1.1 (95% CI 0.7,1.6) per 1000 patient - years among those assigned clopidogrel plus aspirin in 11 randomized trials. The absolute rate of subdural hematoma during dual antiplatelet therapy is low, averaging 1.1 per 1000 patient-years. Chronic treatment with clopidogrel plus aspirin significantly increases the risk of subdural hematoma compared with aspirin alone. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  5. The effect of aspirin on blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients with femoral neck fractures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manning, Brian J

    2012-02-03

    Although it is widely accepted that aspirin will increase the risk of intra- and post-operative bleeding, clinical studies have not consistently supported this assumption. We aimed to assess the effect of pre-operative aspirin on blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients undergoing emergency fixation of femoral neck fractures. A prospective case-control study was undertaken in patients presenting with femoral neck fractures. Parameters recorded included intra-operative blood loss, post-operative blood loss, transfusion requirements and peri-operative reduction in haemoglobin concentration. Of 89 patients presenting with femoral neck fractures 32 were on long-term aspirin therapy. Pre-operative aspirin ingestion did not significantly affect peri-operative blood loss, or change in haemoglobin concentration or haematocrit. However those patients taking aspirin pre-operatively had a significantly lower haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit and were more likely to be anaemic at presentation than those who were not receiving aspirin. Patients taking aspirin were also more likely to receive blood transfusion post-operatively.

  6. An assessment of aspirin use in a Nigerian diabetes outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolawole, B A; Adebayo, R A; Aloba, O O

    2004-01-01

    We have conducted this study to assess the use of aspirin among adult diabetic outpatients in our hospital. The records of all patients attending the weekly Diabetes clinic of the Wesley Guild Hospital (WGH), Ilesa, Osun state, Nigeria over one month were reviewed and aspirin use evaluated in light of the American Diabetes Association position statement (2003) on aspirin therapy in diabetes. Eighty-two patients in all were studied. Fourty three (52.4%) were males, 39 (47.6%) were females. Their mean age was 59.1 +/- 10.7 yrs (range 31-81). All were type 2 and had been diabetic for a mean of 5.2 +/- 5.7 yrs (1-26yrs). Concurrent hypertension, another major risk factor for cardiovascular disease was found in 71.9% and 12.2% were obese. Aspirin use was contraindicated in 1.2%. All other patients had at least one indication for the use of aspirin based on the ADA criteria but only 39% were taking aspirin regularly. The results of this present study suggest that aspirin is still grossly under utilised in clinic patients with diabetes despite proven benefits. There is need to stimulate awareness amongst health care providers.

  7. An Hourly Dose-Escalation Desensitization Protocol for Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Justin R; Buchmiller, Brett L; Khan, David A

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin desensitization followed by maintenance therapy effectively improves symptom control in patients with aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). The majority of current desensitization protocols use 3-hour dosing intervals and often require 2 to 3 days to complete. We evaluated hourly dose escalations in a subset of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and asthma who historically reacted to aspirin within 1 hour or were avoiding aspirin with the goal of developing a safe and efficient desensitization protocol. Fifty-seven aspirin desensitizations were performed under the hourly protocol. All patients had refractory nasal polyposis as an indication for aspirin desensitization. The clinical characteristics of each subject were analyzed in relation to aspects of his or her reactions during the procedure. Ninety-eight percent of study patients were successfully treated under the hourly protocol, including those with a history of severe reactions and intubation. None required further medication than is available in an outpatient allergy clinic. A total of 96% of reactors recorded a bronchial or naso-ocular reaction within 1 hour of the preceding dose. Of the total patients on this protocol, 40% were able to complete the procedure in a single day, and 60% within 2 days. Patients with AERD who have a history of symptoms less than 1 hour after aspirin exposure can be safely desensitized with a 1-hour dose-escalation protocol that can often be completed in a single day. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Aspirin Allergy Desensitization in Cerebrovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Seder, David B; Tsujiura, Crystiana; Cushing, Deborah; Gallup, Holly; Mocco, J; Hanel, Richard A; Ecker, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aspirin (ASA) is the mainstay of treatment in cerebrovascular and systemic vascular disease. ASA hypersensitivity can pose a challenge to achieving optimum medical management prior to and after neurointerventional treatment. Desensitization to ASA is well described in the allergy and cardiovascular literature, but there are no similar discussions specific to neurointervention. The purpose of our study was to describe our experience with ASA hypersensitivity management and review the relevant literature. Two cases of patients with symptomatic cerebrovascular disease requiring neurointervention who were successfully desensitized to their ASA hypersensitivity prior to treatment are described. The subsequent literature is reviewed. Several ASA desensitization protocols exist and have been proven to successfully treat ASA hypersensitivity and allow for ASA therapy to be safely initiated. We describe several previously published protocols. ASA desensitization is a safe and simple way to manage ASA hypersensitivity. We provide comprehensive management guidelines for the neurointerventionalist engaging in ASA desensitization. PMID:24556294

  9. Lower mortality rate in elderly patients with community-onset pneumonia on treatment with aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Marco; Russo, Alessandro; Cangemi, Roberto; Farcomeni, Alessio; Calvieri, Camilla; Barillà, Francesco; Scarpellini, Maria Gabriella; Bertazzoni, Giuliano; Palange, Paolo; Taliani, Gloria; Venditti, Mario; Violi, Francesco

    2015-01-06

    Pneumonia is complicated by high rate of mortality and cardiovascular events (CVEs). The potential benefit of aspirin, which lowers platelet aggregation by inhibition of thromboxane A2 production, is still unclear. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of aspirin on mortality in patients with pneumonia. Consecutive patients admitted to the University-Hospital Policlinico Umberto I (Rome, Italy) with community-onset pneumonia were recruited and prospectively followed up until discharge or death. The primary end point was the occurrence of death up to 30 days after admission; the secondary end point was the intrahospital incidence of nonfatal myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. One thousand and five patients (age, 74.7±15.1 years) were included in the study: 390 were receiving aspirin (100 mg/day) at the time of hospitalization, whereas 615 patients were aspirin free. During the follow-up, 16.2% of patients died; among these, 19 (4.9%) were aspirin users and 144 (23.4%; PFiO(2) ratio <300 negatively influenced survival, whereas aspirin therapy was associated with improved survival. Compared to patients receiving aspirin, the propensity score adjusted analysis confirmed that patients not taking aspirin had a hazard ratio of 2.07 (1.08 to 3.98; P=0.029) for total mortality. This study shows that chronic aspirin use is associated with lower mortality rate within 30 days after hospital admission in a large cohort of patients with pneumonia. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  10. Effect of Aspirin on Spinal Cord Injury: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Reihani Kermani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin is an anti-inflammatory drug, peroxyl radical scavenger, and antioxidant agent that inhibits phospholipases, nitric oxide synthetases, and cyclooxygenase enzymes. The existing literature contains no studies on the effects of various doses of aspirin on spinal cord injury (SCI. Therefore, we sought to investigate the putative effects of aspirin on experimental SCI. The weight-drop injury model was used to produce SCI in 100 albino Wistar rats. The animals were allocated to five groups: a control group, where the rats did not undergo any surgical or medical intervention except for anesthesia; a sham-treated group, where laminectomy was performed without SCI and no further therapy was administered; and three other groups, where the rats with SCI received low-dose aspirin [20 mg/kg], high-dose aspirin [80 mg/kg], and a vehicle, respectively. Half of the rats were sacrificed 24 hours later, and their spinal cords were excised for biochemical studies. The other rats were subjected to Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB locomotor rating scale scoring once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. Aspirin decreased lipid peroxidation following SCI as the mean (± standard error catalase level was significantly higher in the high-dose aspirin group (46.10±12.01 than in the sham-treated group (16.07±2.42 and the vehicle-treated group (15.31±3.20 (P<0.05; P<0.05, respectively. Both of the groups treated with high-dose and low-dose aspirin demonstrated a higher mean BBB score than did the control group (P<0.001 and the sham-treated group (P<0.001. Our data provide evidence in support of the potential effects of aspirin in biochemical and neurobehavioral recovery after SCI.

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Tranexamic Acid in Prehospital Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock: Outcomes of the Cal-PAT Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Neeki

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The California Prehospital Antifibrinolytic Therapy (Cal-PAT study seeks to assess the safety and impact on patient mortality of tranexamic acid (TXA administration in cases of trauma-induced hemorrhagic shock. The current study further aimed to assess the feasibility of prehospital TXA administration by paramedics within the framework of North American emergency medicine standards and protocols. Methods: This is an ongoing multi-centered, prospective, observational cohort study with a retrospective chart-review comparison. Trauma patients identified in the prehospital setting with signs of hemorrhagic shock by first responders were administered one gram of TXA followed by an optional second one-gram dose upon arrival to the hospital, if the patient still met inclusion criteria. Patients administered TXA make up the prehospital intervention group. Control group patients met the same inclusion criteria as TXA candidates and were matched with the prehospital intervention patients based on mechanism of injury, injury severity score, and age. The primary outcomes were mortality, measured at 24 hours, 48 hours, and 28 days. Secondary outcomes measured included the total blood products transfused and any known adverse events associated with TXA administration. Results: We included 128 patients in the prehospital intervention group and 125 in the control group. Although not statistically significant, the prehospital intervention group trended toward a lower 24-hour mortality rate (3.9% vs 7.2% for intervention and control, respectively, p=0.25, 48-hour mortality rate (6.3% vs 7.2% for intervention and control, respectively, p=0.76, and 28-day mortality rate (6.3% vs 10.4% for intervention and control, respectively, p=0.23. There was no significant difference observed in known adverse events associated with TXA administration in the prehospital intervention group and control group. A reduction in total blood product usage was observed

  12. Outcomes following prehospital airway management in severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Backgound. Prevention of hypoxia and thus secondary brain injury in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is critical. However there is controversy regarding the role of endotracheal intubation in the prehospital management of TBI. Objective. To describe the outcome of TBI with various airway management methods employed in the ...

  13. Talk with Your Doctor about Taking Aspirin Every Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t sure why this works. Can taking aspirin every day cause any side effects? Taking aspirin isn't ... read these benefits and risks of taking aspirin every day . Next section Talk with Your Doctor Previous section ...

  14. Aspirin increases mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uppala, Radha; Dudiak, Brianne; Beck, Megan E.; Bharathi, Sivakama S.; Zhang, Yuxun; Stolz, Donna B.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic effects of salicylates are poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of aspirin on fatty acid oxidation. Aspirin increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation, but inhibited peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation, in two different cell lines. Aspirin increased mitochondrial protein acetylation and was found to be a stronger acetylating agent in vitro than acetyl-CoA. However, aspirin-induced acetylation did not alter the activity of fatty acid oxidation proteins, and knocking out the mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 did not affect the induction of long-chain fatty acid oxidation by aspirin. Aspirin did not change oxidation of medium-chain fatty acids, which can freely traverse the mitochondrial membrane. Together, these data indicate that aspirin does not directly alter mitochondrial matrix fatty acid oxidation enzymes, but most likely exerts its effects at the level of long-chain fatty acid transport into mitochondria. The drive on mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation may be a compensatory response to altered mitochondrial morphology and inhibited electron transport chain function, both of which were observed after 24 h incubation of cells with aspirin. These studies provide insight into the pathophysiology of Reye Syndrome, which is known to be triggered by aspirin ingestion in patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders. - Highlights: • Aspirin increases mitochondrial—but inhibits peroxisomal—fatty acid oxidation. • Aspirin acetylates mitochondrial proteins including fatty acid oxidation enzymes. • SIRT3 does not influence the effect of aspirin on fatty acid oxidation. • Increased fatty acid oxidation is likely due to altered mitochondrial morphology and respiration.

  15. What is dignity in prehospital emergency care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelsson, Anna; Lindwall, Lillemor

    2017-05-01

    Ethics and dignity in prehospital emergency care are important due to vulnerability and suffering. Patients can lose control of their body and encounter unfamiliar faces in an emergency situation. To describe what specialist ambulance nurse students experienced as preserved and humiliated dignity in prehospital emergency care. The study had a qualitative approach. Data were collected by Flanagan's critical incident technique. The participants were 26 specialist ambulance nurse students who described two critical incidents of preserved and humiliated dignity, from prehospital emergency care. Data consist of 52 critical incidents and were analyzed with interpretive content analysis. Ethical considerations: The study followed the ethical principles in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. The result showed how human dignity in prehospital emergency care can be preserved by the ambulance nurse being there for the patient. The ambulance nurses meet the patient in the patient's world and make professional decisions. The ambulance nurse respects the patient's will and protects the patient's body from the gaze of others. Humiliated dignity was described through the ambulance nurse abandoning the patient and by healthcare professionals failing, disrespecting, and ignoring the patient. It is a unique situation when a nurse meets a patient face to face in a critical life or death moment. The discussion describes courage and the ethical vision to see another human. Dignity was preserved when the ambulance nurse showed respect and protected the patient in prehospital emergency care. The ambulance nurse students' ethical obligation results in the courage to see when a patient's dignity is in jeopardy of being humiliated. Humiliated dignity occurs when patients are ignored and left unprotected. This ethical dilemma affects the ambulance nurse students badly due to the fact that the morals and attitudes of ambulance nurses are reflected in their actions toward the patient.

  16. Impact of aspirin and statins on long-term survival in patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction complicated by heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewinter, Christian; Bland, John M; Crouch, Simon

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Aspirin and statins are established therapies for acute myocardial infarction (MI), but their benefits in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) remain elusive. We investigated the impact of aspirin and statins on long-term survival in patients hospitalized with acute MI complicated by HF...

  17. [Optimized logistics in the prehospital management of acute stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiz, T; Moosmann, A; Koch, C; Behrens, S; Daffertshofer, M; Ellinger, K

    2001-12-01

    Current management of acute stroke is characterised by an aggressive approach including specific therapy i. e. reperfusion therapy. However currently stroke patients often arrive too late in hospitals offering adequate treatment. Therefore optimized logistics play a predominant role in modern stroke management. 1. Does teaching of EMS staff and the public result in reduced prehospital latencies 2. Will EMS personnel be able to effectively screen patients potentially suitable for thrombolysis? During a six week-period all EMS patients presenting with possible signs of an acute stroke were prospectively registered (period 1). Data of interest were age, mode of primary contact, prehospital latencies, mode of transportation, destination and final diagnosis. Next an algorithm was established allowing EMS personnel to transfer patients with an assumed stroke to the best suitable hospital. Teaching comprised clinical signs, indication of CT scanning, pathophysiology, specific therapeutic options (thrombolysis), and criteria to identify patients suitable for thrombolysis. In a second step the public was continuously taught about stroke symptoms and the necessity to instantly seek EMS assistance. After 12 months data were compared to baseline (period 2). (period 2 vs. Period 1): Rate of patients transferred to a stroke center: 60 % vs. 54 %; rate of those transported to hospitals not offering CT scans: 17 % vs. 26 % (p < 0.05). Percentage of patients primarily contacting the EMS system: 33 % vs. 24 %. Median interval between onset of symptoms and emergency call: 54 vs. 263 minutes Median interval between the emergency call and arrival at the emergency department: 44 vs. 58 minutes (p < 0.01). Rate of patients admitted with a diagnosis other than stroke: 18 % vs. 25 % (n. s.). Median interval between onset of symptoms and hospital admission: 140 vs. 368 minutes (p < 0.001). Median age: 69 vs. 75 years (p < 0.01). This study demonstrates the efficacy of educational efforts in

  18. Role of p38 MAPK in enhanced human cancer cells killing by the combination of aspirin and ABT-737

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong; Shi, Jing; Mao, Shi-ying; Xu, Ya-si; Zhang, Dan; Feng, Lin-yi; Zhang, Bo; Yan, You-you; Wang, Si-cong; Pan, Jian-ping; Yang, You-ping; Lin, Neng-ming

    2015-01-01

    Regular use of aspirin after diagnosis is associated with longer survival among patients with mutated-PIK3CA colorectal cancer, but not among patients with wild-type PIK3CA cancer. In this study, we showed that clinically achievable concentrations of aspirin and ABT-737 in combination could induce a synergistic growth arrest in several human PIK3CA wild-type cancer cells. In addition, our results also demonstrated that long-term combination treatment with aspirin and ABT-737 could synergistically induce apoptosis both in A549 and H1299 cells. In the meanwhile, short-term aspirin plus ABT-737 combination treatment induced a greater autophagic response than did either drug alone and the combination-induced autophagy switched from a cytoprotective signal to a death-promoting signal. Furthermore, we showed that p38 acted as a switch between two different types of cell death (autophagy and apoptosis) induced by aspirin plus ABT-737. Moreover, the increased anti-cancer efficacy of aspirin combined with ABT-737 was further validated in a human lung cancer A549 xenograft model. We hope that this synergy may contribute to failure of aspirin cancer therapy and ultimately lead to efficacious regimens for cancer therapy. PMID:25388762

  19. Influence of aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use on ovarian and endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdoodt, F.; Kjaer, S. K.; Friis, S.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for aspirin use in reducing the incidence and mortality of several cancer types. This has spurred a new wave of interest in this widely used drug. In this review, we present and evaluate the epidemiologic evidence of the association between the use of aspirin....... Overall, observational studies indicate modest reductions in risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer with aspirin use, whereas the results for non-aspirin NSAID use are equivocal. The strongest inverse associations have been reported for long-term consistent aspirin use, notably among subgroups of users (e.......g., those with high body mass index). Few studies have evaluated the influence of NSAID use on the mortality of ovarian or endometrial cancer, and substantial heterogeneity of study characteristics and results preclude any conclusions. Additional studies of aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use and ovarian...

  20. Contemporary Reflections on the Safety of Long-Term Aspirin Treatment for the Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanaroff, Alexander C.; Roe, Matthew T.

    2018-01-01

    Aspirin has been the cornerstone of therapy for the secondary prevention treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease since landmark trials were completed in the late 1970s and early 1980s that demonstrated the efficacy of aspirin for reducing the risk of ischemic events. Notwithstanding the consistent benefits demonstrated with apirin for both acute and chronic cardiovascular disease, there are a number of toxicities associated with aspirin that have been showcased by recent long-term clinical trials that have included an aspirin monotherapy arm. As an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, aspirin impairs gastric mucosal protective mechanisms. Prior trials have shown that up to 15–20% of patients developed gastrointestinal symptoms with aspirin monotherapy and roughly 1% of patients per year had a clinically significant bleeding event, including 1 in 1000 patients who suffered an intracranial or fatal bleed. These risks have been shown to be compounded for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), who are also treated with other anti-thrombotic agents during the acute care/procedural period, as well as for an extended time period afterwards. Given observations of substantial increases in bleeding rates from many prior long-term clinical trials that have evaluated aspirin together with other oral platelet inhibitors or oral anti-coagulants, the focus of contemporary research has pivoted towards tailored anti-thrombotic regimens that attempt to either shorten the duration of exposure to aspirin or replace aspirin with an alternative anti-thrombotic agent. While these shifts are occurring, the safety profile of aspirin when used for the secondary prevention treatment of patients with established cardiovascular disease deserves further consideration. PMID:27028617

  1. Prehospital cardiac arrest survival and neurologic recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillis, M; Sinclair, D; Butler, G; Cain, E

    1993-01-01

    Many studies of prehospital defibrillation have been conducted but the effects of airway intervention are unknown and neurologic follow-up has been incomplete. A non-randomized cohort prospective study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of defibrillation in prehospital cardiac arrest. Two ambulance companies in the study area developed a defibrillation protocol and they formed the experimental group. A subgroup of these patients received airway management with an esophageal obturator airway (EOA) or endotracheal intubation (ETT). The control group was composed of patients who suffered a prehospital cardiac arrest and did not receive prehospital defibrillation. All survivors were assessed for residual deficits using the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and the Dementia Rating Scale (DRS). A total of 221 patients were studied over a 32-month period. Both the experimental group (N = 161) and the control group (N = 60) were comparable with respect to age, sex distribution, and ambulance response time. Survival to hospital discharge was 2/60 (3.3%) in the control group and 12/161 (6.3%) in the experimental group. This difference is not statistically significant. Survival in the experimental group by airway management technique was basic airway support (3/76 3.9%), EOA (3/67 4.5%), and ETT (6/48 12.5%). The improved effect on survival by ETT management was statistically significant. Survivors had minor differences in memory, work, and recreation as compared to ischemic heart disease patients as measured by the SIP and DRS. No effect of defibrillation was found on survival to hospital discharge. However, endotracheal intubation improved survival in defibrillated patients. Survivors had a good functional outcome.

  2. Aspirin in the Management of Patients with Prostate Cancer Undergoing Radiotherapy: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascan, Bianca; Marignol, Laure

    2018-04-01

    Aspirin has cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2)-mediated anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant properties that may confer a positive effect in preventing and limiting the progression of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer has been shown to have poor treatment outcomes due to therapeutic resistance; therefore, COX2 inhibition caused by aspirin could represent an opportunity to augment current therapies. This is particularly of interest to patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) where inflammation is a common side-effect. This review discusses the evidence for the potential role of aspirin in the management of patients with prostate cancer undergoing RT. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. CPAP Devices for Emergency Prehospital Use: A Bench Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusasco, Claudia; Corradi, Francesco; De Ferrari, Alessandra; Ball, Lorenzo; Kacmarek, Robert M; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    CPAP is frequently used in prehospital and emergency settings. An air-flow output minimum of 60 L/min and a constant positive pressure are 2 important features for a successful CPAP device. Unlike hospital CPAP devices, which require electricity, CPAP devices for ambulance use need only an oxygen source to function. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare on a bench model the performance of 3 orofacial mask devices (Ventumask, EasyVent, and Boussignac CPAP system) and 2 helmets (Ventukit and EVE Coulisse) used to apply CPAP in the prehospital setting. A static test evaluated air-flow output, positive pressure applied, and FIO2 delivered by each device. A dynamic test assessed airway pressure stability during simulated ventilation. Efficiency of devices was compared based on oxygen flow needed to generate a minimum air flow of 60 L/min at each CPAP setting. The EasyVent and EVE Coulisse devices delivered significantly higher mean air-flow outputs compared with the Ventumask and Ventukit under all CPAP conditions tested. The Boussignac CPAP system never reached an air-flow output of 60 L/min. The EasyVent had significantly lower pressure excursion than the Ventumask at all CPAP levels, and the EVE Coulisse had lower pressure excursion than the Ventukit at 5, 15, and 20 cm H2O, whereas at 10 cm H2O, no significant difference was observed between the 2 devices. Estimated oxygen consumption was lower for the EasyVent and EVE Coulisse compared with the Ventumask and Ventukit. Air-flow output, pressure applied, FIO2 delivered, device oxygen consumption, and ability to maintain air flow at 60 L/min differed significantly among the CPAP devices tested. Only the EasyVent and EVE Coulisse achieved the required minimum level of air-flow output needed to ensure an effective therapy under all CPAP conditions. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  4. Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reduce fever and to relieve mild to moderate pain from headaches, menstrual periods, arthritis, colds, toothaches, and muscle aches. Nonprescription ... weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and ...

  5. Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Association Science Volunteer Warning Signs Search for this keyword Search Advanced Search Donate Home About this Journal ... Sign In Join Sign out Search for this keyword Search Advanced search Header Publisher Menu American Heart ...

  6. Does prehospital time affect survival of major trauma patients where there is no prehospital care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S B Dharap

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Survival after major trauma is considered to be time dependent. Efficient prehospital care with rapid transport is the norm in developed countries, which is not available in many lower middle and low-income countries. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prehospital time and primary treatment given on survival of major trauma patients in a setting without prehospital care. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was carried out in a university hospital in Mumbai, from January to December 2014. The hospital has a trauma service but no organized prehospital care or defined interhospital transfer protocols. All patients with life- and/or limb-threatening injuries were included in the study. Injury time and arrival time were noted and the interval was defined as “prehospital time” for the directly arriving patients and as “time to tertiary care” for those transferred. Primary outcome measure was in-hospital death (or discharge. Results: Of 1181 patients, 352 were admitted directly from the trauma scene and 829 were transferred from other hospitals. In-hospital mortality was associated with age, mechanism and mode of injury, shock, Glasgow Coma Score <9, Injury Severity Score ≥16, need for intubation, and ventilatory support on arrival; but neither with prehospital time nor with time to tertiary care. Transferred patients had a significantly higher mortality (odds ratio = 1.869, 95% confidence interval = 1.233–2.561, P = 0.005 despite fewer patients with severe injury. Two hundred and ninety-four (35% of these needed airway intervention while 108 (13% needed chest tube insertion on arrival to the trauma unit suggesting inadequate care at primary facility. Conclusion: Mortality is not associated with prehospital time but with transfers from primary care; probably due to deficient care. To improve survival after major trauma, enhancement of resources for resuscitation and capacity building of on

  7. Aspirin induces IL-4 production: augmented IL-4 production in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Su-Kang; Soo Kim, Byung; Gi Uhm, Tae; Soo Chang, Hun; Sook Park, Jong; Woo Park, Sung; Park, Choon-Sik; Chung, Il Yup

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin hypersensitivity is a hallmark of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), a clinical syndrome characterized by the severe inflammation of the respiratory tract after ingestion of cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitors. We investigated the capacity of aspirin to induce interleukin-4 (IL-4) production in inflammatory cells relevant to AERD pathogenesis and examined the associated biochemical and molecular pathways. We also compared IL-4 production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with AERD vs aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA) upon exposure to aspirin. Aspirin induced IL-4 expression and activated the IL-4 promoter in a report assay. The capacity of aspirin to induce IL-4 expression correlated with its activity to activate mitogen-activated protein kinases, to form DNA–protein complexes on P elements in the IL-4 promoter and to synthesize nuclear factor of activated T cells, critical transcription factors for IL-4 transcription. Of clinical importance, aspirin upregulated IL-4 production twice as much in PBMCs from patients with AERD compared with PBMCs from patients with ATA. Our results suggest that IL-4 is an inflammatory component mediating intolerance reactions to aspirin, and thus is crucial for AERD pathogenesis. PMID:27534531

  8. Analysis of the Interaction between Clopidogrel, Aspirin, and Proton Pump Inhibitors Using the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yukiya; Suzuki, Honami; Umetsu, Ryogo; Uranishi, Hiroaki; Abe, Junko; Nishibata, Yuri; Sekiya, Yasuaki; Miyamura, Nobuteru; Hara, Hideaki; Tsuchiya, Teruo; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Clopidogrel is an antiplatelet agent widely used in combination with aspirin to limit the occurrence of cardiovascular (embolic/thrombotic) events. Consensus guidelines recommend proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) as a gastrointestinal (GI) prophylactic measure for all patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of the simultaneous use of clopidogrel, aspirin, and PPIs on hemorrhagic and embolic/thrombotic events using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database. Reports of hemorrhagic and embolic/thrombotic events between 2004 and 2013 were analyzed with a reporting odds ratio (ROR) algorithm and logistic regression methods. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Preferred Terms was used to identify such events. Regarding hemorrhagic events, the adjusted RORs of the concomitant use of aspirin and clopidogrel and those of PPIs prescribed with aspirin and clopidogrel were 4.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.02-4.81) and 3.40 (95% CI, 2.84-4.06), respectively. For embolic/thrombotic events, the adjusted RORs of the concomitant use of aspirin and clopidogrel and those of PPIs prescribed with aspirin and clopidogrel were 2.37 (95% CI, 2.16-2.59) and 2.38 (95% CI, 2.00-2.84), respectively. Among patients included in the FAERS database, the concurrent use of aspirin and clopidogrel with PPIs reduced the adjusted ROR of GI hemorrhagic events. PPIs had little influence on the adjusted ROR of embolic/thrombotic events. These results support the use of PPIs as a preventive measure against GI hemorrhagic events for patients receiving clopidogrel and aspirin.

  9. Accuracy of prehospital transport time estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, David J; Kahn, Jeremy M; Angus, Derek C; Martin-Gill, Christian; Callaway, Clifton W; Rea, Thomas D; Chhatwal, Jagpreet; Kurland, Kristen; Seymour, Christopher W

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of prehospital transport times are an important part of emergency care system research and planning; however, the accuracy of these estimates is unknown. The authors examined the accuracy of three estimation methods against observed transport times in a large cohort of prehospital patient transports. This was a validation study using prehospital records in King County, Washington, and southwestern Pennsylvania from 2002 to 2006 and 2005 to 2011, respectively. Transport time estimates were generated using three methods: linear arc distance, Google Maps, and ArcGIS Network Analyst. Estimation error, defined as the absolute difference between observed and estimated transport time, was assessed, as well as the proportion of estimated times that were within specified error thresholds. Based on the primary results, a regression estimate was used that incorporated population density, time of day, and season to assess improved accuracy. Finally, hospital catchment areas were compared using each method with a fixed drive time. The authors analyzed 29,935 prehospital transports to 44 hospitals. The mean (± standard deviation [±SD]) absolute error was 4.8 (±7.3) minutes using linear arc, 3.5 (±5.4) minutes using Google Maps, and 4.4 (±5.7) minutes using ArcGIS. All pairwise comparisons were statistically significant (p Google Maps, and 11.6 [±10.9] minutes for ArcGIS). Estimates were within 5 minutes of observed transport time for 79% of linear arc estimates, 86.6% of Google Maps estimates, and 81.3% of ArcGIS estimates. The regression-based approach did not substantially improve estimation. There were large differences in hospital catchment areas estimated by each method. Route-based transport time estimates demonstrate moderate accuracy. These methods can be valuable for informing a host of decisions related to the system organization and patient access to emergency medical care; however, they should be employed with sensitivity to their limitations.

  10. An Observational study of prehospital and hospital delay in reperfusion for acute myocardial infarction at a University Hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Choudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among Indian adults, and approximately 50% of deaths usually occur during the 1st hour after symptom onset before arriving at the hospital. A study was planned to evaluate the prehospital and hospital delay in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI. Methods: This was a prospective observational study of 390 patients with AMI admitted to the Department of Cardiology between March 2014 and August 2015. Detailed patient demographics, socioeconomic status, and prehospital and hospital delay were reviewed. Results: The mean age of presentation for male and female was 57 ± 12.91 and 61.5 ± 12.83 years, respectively. The mean prehospital delay, time to act after chest pain, and travel time were 9.08 ± 6.3, 7.16 ± 6.1, and 1.84 ± 0.8 h, respectively, and only three (9.7% patients reached the hospital within 2 h after symptom onset. Out of 300 patients who received reperfusion therapy, thrombolysis was done in 276 (92% patients while primary percutaneous coronary intervention was performed in only 24 (8% patients. Mean door-to-needle (D-N time and door-to-device time for those who received reperfusion therapy were 27.8 ± 4.3 and 78.95 ± 9.5 min, respectively. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the prehospital delay was significantly associated with older age, female sex, rural background, diabetes, having atypical pain, and lack of knowledge regarding the seriousness of chest pain. Conclusion: Approximately 79% of total prehospital delay was due to patient-related factors; old age, female sex, rural background, diabetes, atypical angina, and lack of knowledge being the significant attributes. D-N time and door-to-device time were within the limits of those recommended by current guidelines.

  11. Post Hoc Analyses of Randomized Clinical Trial for the Effect of Clopidogrel Added to Aspirin on Kidney Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeme, Jesse C; Pergola, Pablo E; Scherzer, Rebecca; Shlipak, Michael G; Benavente, Oscar R; Peralta, Carmen A

    2017-07-07

    Despite the high burden of CKD, few specific therapies are available that can halt disease progression. In animal models, clopidogrel has emerged as a potential therapy to preserve kidney function. The effect of clopidogrel on kidney function in humans has not been established. The Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes Study randomized participants with prior lacunar stroke to treatment with aspirin or aspirin plus clopidogrel. We compared annual eGFR decline and incidence of rapid eGFR decline (≥30% from baseline) using generalized estimating equations and interval-censored proportional hazards regression, respectively. We also stratified our analyses by baseline eGFR, systolic BP target, and time after randomization. At randomization, median age was 62 (interquartile range, 55-71) years old; 36% had a history of diabetes, 90% had hypertension, and the median eGFR was 81 (interquartile range, 65-94) ml/min per 1 m 2 . Persons receiving aspirin plus clopidogrel had an average annual change in kidney function of -1.39 (95% confidence interval, -1.15 to -1.62) ml/min per 1.73 m 2 per year compared with -1.52 (95% confidence interval, -1.30 to -1.74) ml/min per 1.73 m 2 per year among persons receiving aspirin only ( P =0.42). Rapid kidney function decline occurred in 21% of participants receiving clopidogrel plus aspirin compared with 22% of participants receiving aspirin plus placebo (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.79 to 1.10; P =0.42). Findings did not vary by baseline eGFR, time after randomization, or systolic BP target (all P values for interaction were >0.3). We found no effect of clopidogrel added to aspirin compared with aspirin alone on kidney function decline among persons with prior lacunar stroke. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Aspirin disrupts the mTOR-Raptor complex and potentiates the anti-cancer activities of sorafenib via mTORC1 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Danni; Liu, Hongchun; Dai, Xiaoyang; Zheng, Xingling; Yan, Juan; Wei, Rongrui; Fu, Xuhong; Huang, Min; Shen, Aijun; Huang, Xun; Ding, Jian; Geng, Meiyu

    2017-10-10

    Aspirin is associated with a reduced risk of cancer and delayed progression of malignant disease. Adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mTOR signaling is believed to partially contribute to these anticancer effects, although the mechanism is unclear. In this study, we revealed the mechanism underlying the effects of aspirin on AMPK-mTOR signaling, and described a mechanism-based rationale for the use of aspirin in cancer therapy. We found that aspirin inhibited mTORC1 signaling through AMPK-dependent and -independent manners. Aspirin inhibited the AMPK-TSC pathway, thus resulting in the suppression of mTORC1 activity. In parallel, it directly disrupted the mTOR-raptor interaction. Additionally, the combination of aspirin and sorafenib showed synergetic effects via inhibiting mTORC1 signaling and the PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK pathways. Aspirin and sorafenib showed synergetic anticancer efficacy in the SMMC-7721 model. Our study provides mechanistic insights and a mechanism-based rationale for the roles of aspirin in cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of peroxynitrite-mediated DNA strand cleavage and hydroxyl radical formation by aspirin at pharmacologically relevant concentrations: Implications for cancer intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei [Division of Biomedical Sciences, Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); College of Food Science and Biotechnology, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310035 (China); Department of Food Science and Technology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Zhu, Hong; Jia, Zhenquan [Division of Biomedical Sciences, Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); Li, Jianrong [College of Food Science and Biotechnology, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310035 (China); Misra, Hara P. [Division of Biomedical Sciences, Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); Zhou, Kequan, E-mail: kzhou@wayne.edu [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Li, Yunbo, E-mail: yli@vcom.vt.edu [Division of Biomedical Sciences, Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States)

    2009-12-04

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that the long-term use of aspirin is associated with a decreased incidence of human malignancies, especially colorectal cancer. Since accumulating evidence indicates that peroxynitrite is critically involved in multistage carcinogenesis, this study was undertaken to investigate the ability of aspirin to inhibit peroxynitrite-mediated DNA damage. Peroxynitrite and its generator 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) were used to cause DNA strand breaks in {phi}X-174 plasmid DNA. We demonstrated that the presence of aspirin at concentrations (0.25-2 mM) compatible with amounts in plasma during chronic anti-inflammatory therapy resulted in a significant inhibition of DNA cleavage induced by both peroxynitrite and SIN-1. Moreover, the consumption of oxygen caused by 250 {mu}M SIN-1 was found to be decreased in the presence of aspirin, indicating that aspirin might affect the auto-oxidation of SIN-1. Furthermore, EPR spectroscopy using 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap demonstrated the formation of DMPO-hydroxyl radical adduct (DMPO-OH) from authentic peroxynitrite, and that aspirin at 0.25-2 mM potently diminished the radical adduct formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that aspirin at pharmacologically relevant concentrations can inhibit peroxynitrite-mediated DNA strand breakage and hydroxyl radical formation. These results may have implications for cancer intervention by aspirin.

  14. Inhibition of peroxynitrite-mediated DNA strand cleavage and hydroxyl radical formation by aspirin at pharmacologically relevant concentrations: Implications for cancer intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wei; Zhu, Hong; Jia, Zhenquan; Li, Jianrong; Misra, Hara P.; Zhou, Kequan; Li, Yunbo

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that the long-term use of aspirin is associated with a decreased incidence of human malignancies, especially colorectal cancer. Since accumulating evidence indicates that peroxynitrite is critically involved in multistage carcinogenesis, this study was undertaken to investigate the ability of aspirin to inhibit peroxynitrite-mediated DNA damage. Peroxynitrite and its generator 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) were used to cause DNA strand breaks in φX-174 plasmid DNA. We demonstrated that the presence of aspirin at concentrations (0.25-2 mM) compatible with amounts in plasma during chronic anti-inflammatory therapy resulted in a significant inhibition of DNA cleavage induced by both peroxynitrite and SIN-1. Moreover, the consumption of oxygen caused by 250 μM SIN-1 was found to be decreased in the presence of aspirin, indicating that aspirin might affect the auto-oxidation of SIN-1. Furthermore, EPR spectroscopy using 5,5-dimethylpyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap demonstrated the formation of DMPO-hydroxyl radical adduct (DMPO-OH) from authentic peroxynitrite, and that aspirin at 0.25-2 mM potently diminished the radical adduct formation in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that aspirin at pharmacologically relevant concentrations can inhibit peroxynitrite-mediated DNA strand breakage and hydroxyl radical formation. These results may have implications for cancer intervention by aspirin.

  15. The pre-hospital administration of tranexamic acid to patients with multiple injuries and its effects on rotational thrombelastometry: a prospective observational study in pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze-Szikszay, Nils; Krack, Lennart A; Wildenauer, Pauline; Wand, Saskia; Heyne, Tim; Walliser, Karoline; Spering, Christopher; Bauer, Martin; Quintel, Michael; Roessler, Markus

    2016-10-10

    Hyperfibrinolysis (HF) is a major contributor to coagulopathy and mortality in trauma patients. This study investigated (i) the rate of HF during the pre-hospital management of patients with multiple injuries and (ii) the effects of pre-hospital tranexamic acid (TxA) administration on the coagulation system. From 27 trauma patients with pre-hospital an estimated injury severity score (ISS) ≥16 points blood was obtained at the scene and on admission to the emergency department (ED). All patients received 1 g of TxA after the first blood sample was taken. Rotational thrombelastometry (ROTEM) was performed for both blood samples, and the results were compared. HF was defined as a maximum lysis (ML) >15 % in EXTEM. The median (min-max) ISS was 17 points (4-50 points). Four patients (15 %) had HF diagnosed via ROTEM at the scene, and 2 patients (7.5 %) had HF diagnosed via ROTEM on admission to the ED. The median ML before TxA administration was 11 % (3-99 %) vs. 10 % after TxA administration (4-18 %; p > 0.05). TxA was administered 37 min (10-85 min) before ED arrival. The ROTEM results before and after TxA administration did not significantly differ. No adverse drug reactions were observed after TxA administration. HF can be present in severely injured patients during pre-hospital care. Antifibrinolytic therapy administered at the scene is a significant time saver. Even in milder trauma fibrinogen can be decreased to critically low levels. Early administration of TxA cannot reverse or entirely stop this decrease. The pre-hospital use of TxA should be considered for severely injured patients to prevent the worsening of trauma-induced coagulopathy and unnecessarily high fibrinogen consumption. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01938768 (Registered 5 September 2013).

  16. Reduced Antiplatelet Effect of Aspirin Does Not Predict Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sanne Bøjet; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Neergaard-Petersen, Søs; Würtz, Morten; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2017-08-05

    Increased platelet aggregation during antiplatelet therapy may predict cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease. The majority of these patients receive aspirin monotherapy. We aimed to investigate whether high platelet-aggregation levels predict cardiovascular events in stable coronary artery disease patients treated with aspirin. We included 900 stable coronary artery disease patients with either previous myocardial infarction, type 2 diabetes mellitus, or both. All patients received single antithrombotic therapy with 75 mg aspirin daily. Platelet aggregation was evaluated 1 hour after aspirin intake using the VerifyNow Aspirin Assay (Accriva Diagnostics) and Multiplate Analyzer (Roche; agonists: arachidonic acid and collagen). Adherence to aspirin was confirmed by serum thromboxane B 2 . The primary end point was the composite of nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and cardiovascular death. At 3-year follow-up, 78 primary end points were registered. The primary end point did not occur more frequently in patients with high platelet-aggregation levels (first versus fourth quartile) assessed by VerifyNow (hazard ratio: 0.5 [95% CI, 0.3-1.1], P =0.08) or Multiplate using arachidonic acid (hazard ratio: 1.0 [95% CI, 0.5-2.1], P =0.92) or collagen (hazard ratio: 1.4 [95% CI, 0.7-2.8], P =0.38). Similar results were found for the composite secondary end point (nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, stent thrombosis, and all-cause death) and the single end points. Thromboxane B 2 levels did not predict any end points. Renal insufficiency was the only clinical risk factor predicting the primary and secondary end points. This study is the largest to investigate platelet aggregation in stable coronary artery disease patients receiving aspirin as single antithrombotic therapy. We found that high platelet-aggregation levels did not predict cardiovascular events. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart

  17. Prehospital behaviour of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or witnessed cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Michael Mundt; Dixen, Ulrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study prehospital behaviour of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or witnessed cardiac arrest. DESIGN: Structured interview of 250 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome and relatives of 48 patients with witnessed cardiac arrest. The following courses of action...... hundred and thirteen patients (45%) knew of thrombolytic therapy. Twenty-seven of 75 patients with knowledge of the benefit of prompt treatment with thrombolysis, acted in accordance with this awareness. CONCLUSION: Patients misinterpret symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and are misguided when calling...

  18. Multicenter observational prehospital resuscitation on helicopter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, John B; Swartz, Michael D; DeSantis, Stacia M; Greene, Thomas J; Fox, Erin E; Stein, Deborah M; Bulger, Eileen M; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Goodman, Michael; Schreiber, Martin A; Zielinski, Martin D; O'Keeffe, Terence; Inaba, Kenji; Tomasek, Jeffrey S; Podbielski, Jeanette M; Appana, Savitri N; Yi, Misung; Wade, Charles E

    2017-07-01

    Earlier use of in-hospital plasma, platelets, and red blood cells (RBCs) has improved survival in trauma patients with severe hemorrhage. Retrospective studies have associated improved early survival with prehospital blood product transfusion (PHT). We hypothesized that PHT of plasma and/or RBCs would result in improved survival after injury in patients transported by helicopter. Adult trauma patients transported by helicopter from the scene to nine Level 1 trauma centers were prospectively observed from January to November 2015. Five helicopter systems had plasma and/or RBCs, whereas the other four helicopter systems used only crystalloid resuscitation. All patients meeting predetermined high-risk criteria were analyzed. Patients receiving PHT were compared with patients not receiving PHT. Our primary analysis compared mortality at 3 hours, 24 hours, and 30 days, using logistic regression to adjust for confounders and site heterogeneity to model patients who were matched on propensity scores. Twenty-five thousand one hundred eighteen trauma patients were admitted, 2,341 (9%) were transported by helicopter, of which 1,058 (45%) met the highest-risk criteria. Five hundred eighty-five of 1,058 patients were flown on helicopters carrying blood products. In the systems with blood available, prehospital median systolic blood pressure (125 vs 128) and Glasgow Coma Scale (7 vs 14) was significantly lower, whereas median Injury Severity Score was significantly higher (21 vs 14). Unadjusted mortality was significantly higher in the systems with blood products available, at 3 hours (8.4% vs 3.6%), 24 hours (12.6% vs 8.9%), and 30 days (19.3% vs 13.3%). Twenty-four percent of eligible patients received a PHT. A median of 1 unit of RBCs and plasma were transfused prehospital. Of patients receiving PHT, 24% received only plasma, 7% received only RBCs, and 69% received both. In the propensity score matching analysis (n = 109), PHT was not significantly associated with mortality

  19. Aspirin is first-line treatment for migraine and episodic tension-type headache regardless of headache intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampl, Christian; Voelker, Michael; Steiner, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    (1) To establish whether pre-treatment headache intensity in migraine or episodic tension-type headache (ETTH) predicts success or failure of treatment with aspirin; and (2) to reflect, accordingly, on the place of aspirin in the management of these disorders. Stepped care in migraine management uses symptomatic treatments as first-line, reserving triptans for those in whom this proves ineffective. Stratified care chooses between symptomatic therapy and triptans as first-line on an individual basis according to perceived illness severity. We questioned the 2 assumptions underpinning stratified care in migraine that greater illness severity: (1) reflects greater need; and (2) is a risk factor for failure of symptomatic treatment but not of triptans. With regard to the first assumption, we developed a rhetorical argument that need for treatment is underpinned by expectation of benefit, not by illness severity. To address the second, we reviewed individual patient data from 6 clinical trials of aspirin 1000 mg in migraine (N = 2079; 1165 moderate headache, 914 severe) and one of aspirin 500 and 1000 mg in ETTH (N = 325; 180 moderate, 145 severe), relating outcome to pre-treatment headache intensity. In migraine, for headache relief at 2 hours, a small (4.7%) and non-significant risk difference (RD) in therapeutic gain favored moderate pain; for pain freedom at 2 hours, therapeutic gains were almost identical (RD: -0.2%). In ETTH, for headache relief at 2 hours, RDs for both aspirin 500 mg (-4.2%) and aspirin 1000 mg (-9.7%) favored severe pain, although neither significantly; for pain freedom at 2 hours, RDs (-14.2 and -3.6) again favored severe pain. In neither migraine nor ETTH does pre-treatment headache intensity predict success or failure of aspirin. This is not an arguable basis for stratified care in migraine. In both disorders, aspirin is first-line treatment regardless of headache intensity. © 2011 American Headache Society.

  20. 21 CFR 520.1409 - Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets. 520.1409... Methylprednisolone, aspirin tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains 0.5 milligram of methylprednisolone and 300 milligrams of aspirin. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000009 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) NAS/NRC...

  1. A critical appraisal of the phenomenon of aspirin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup Poulsen, Tina; Risom Kristensen, Søren; Atar, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Aspirin is the mainstay antiplatelet treatment in patients with high risk of cardiovascular atherothrombotic events, and its beneficial effect is documented in several clinical trials. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of aspirin has been questioned by the emergence of the concept of 'aspirin...

  2. EMSC program manager survey on education of prehospital providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thuy L; Belli, Karen; Shah, Manish I

    2014-01-01

    Although pediatric-specific objectives for the initial education of prehospital providers have been established, uniform implementation of these objectives and guidelines for hours of required pediatric continuing education (CE) for prehospital providers have not been established. To examine the content and number of hours of pediatric-specific education that prehospital providers receive during initial certification and recertification. Second, to identify barriers to implementing specific requirements for pediatric education of prehospital providers. Electronic surveys were sent to 55 EMS for Children (EMSC) State Partnership grantee program managers inquiring about the certification and recertification processes of prehospital providers and barriers to receiving pediatric training in each jurisdiction. We had a 91% response rate for our survey. Specified pediatric education hours exist in more states and territories for recertification (63-67%) than initial certification (41%). Limitations in funding, time, instructors, and accessibility are barriers to enhancing pediatric education. Modifying statewide policies on prehospital education and increasing hands-on training may overcome identified barriers.

  3. A Multi Agent Based Approach for Prehospital Emergency Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Reza; Shoshtarian Malak, Jaleh; Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Danesh Shahraki, Azimeh

    2017-07-01

    To demonstrate an architecture to automate the prehospital emergency process to categorize the specialized care according to the situation at the right time for reducing the patient mortality and morbidity. Prehospital emergency process were analyzed using existing prehospital management systems, frameworks and the extracted process were modeled using sequence diagram in Rational Rose software. System main agents were identified and modeled via component diagram, considering the main system actors and by logically dividing business functionalities, finally the conceptual architecture for prehospital emergency management was proposed. The proposed architecture was simulated using Anylogic simulation software. Anylogic Agent Model, State Chart and Process Model were used to model the system. Multi agent systems (MAS) had a great success in distributed, complex and dynamic problem solving environments, and utilizing autonomous agents provides intelligent decision making capabilities.  The proposed architecture presents prehospital management operations. The main identified agents are: EMS Center, Ambulance, Traffic Station, Healthcare Provider, Patient, Consultation Center, National Medical Record System and quality of service monitoring agent. In a critical condition like prehospital emergency we are coping with sophisticated processes like ambulance navigation health care provider and service assignment, consultation, recalling patients past medical history through a centralized EHR system and monitoring healthcare quality in a real-time manner. The main advantage of our work has been the multi agent system utilization. Our Future work will include proposed architecture implementation and evaluation of its impact on patient quality care improvement.

  4. Failure rate of prehospital chest decompression after severe thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaserer, Alexander; Stein, Philipp; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Spahn, Donat R; Neuhaus, Valentin

    2017-03-01

    Chest decompression can be performed by different techniques, like needle thoracocentesis (NT), lateral thoracostomy (LT), or tube thoracostomy (TT). The aim of this study was to report the incidence of prehospital chest decompression and to analyse the effectiveness of these techniques. In this retrospective case series study, all medical records of adult trauma patients undergoing prehospital chest decompression and admitted to the resuscitation area of a level-1 trauma center between 2009 and 2015 were reviewed and analysed. Only descriptive statistics were applied. In a 6-year period 24 of 2261 (1.1%) trauma patients had prehospital chest decompression. Seventeen patients had NT, six patients TT, one patient NT as well as TT, and no patients had LT. Prehospital successful release of a tension pneumothorax was reported by the paramedics in 83% (5/6) with TT, whereas NT was effective in 18% only (3/17). In five CT scans all thoracocentesis needles were either removed or extrapleural, one patient had a tension pneumothorax, and two patients had no pneumothorax. No NT or TT related complications were reported during hospitalization. Prehospital NT or TT is infrequently attempted in trauma patients. Especially NT is associated with a high failure rate of more than 80%, potentially due to an inadequate ratio between chest wall thickness and catheter length as previously published as well as a possible different pathophysiological cause of respiratory distress. Therefore, TT may be considered already in the prehospital setting to retain sufficient pleural decompression upon admission. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Simultaneous silencing of ACSL4 and induction of GADD45B in hepatocellular carcinoma cells amplifies the synergistic therapeutic effect of aspirin and sorafenib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongping; Lee, Kee Wah; Chen, Jianxiang; Kong, Shik Nie; Sekar, Karthik; Deivasigamani, Amudha; Seshachalam, Veerabrahma Pratap; Goh, Brian Kim Poh; Ooi, London Lucien; Hui, Kam M

    2017-01-01

    Sorafenib is currently the only US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved molecular inhibitor for the systemic therapy of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Aspirin has been studied extensively as an anti-inflammation, cancer preventive and therapeutic agent. However, the potential synergistic therapeutic effects of sorafenib and aspirin on advanced HCC treatment have not been well studied. Drug combination studies and their synergy quantification were performed using the combination index method of Chou-Talalay. The synergistic therapeutic effects of sorafenib and aspirin were evaluated using an orthotopic mouse model of HCC and comprehensive gene profiling analyses were conducted to identify key factors mediating the synergistic therapeutic effects of sorafenib and aspirin. Sorafenib was determined to act synergistically on HCC cells with aspirin in vitro. Using Hep3B and HuH7 HCC cells, it was demonstrated that sorafenib and aspirin acted synergistically to induce apoptosis. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that combining sorafenib and aspirin yielded significant synergistically anti-tumor effects by simultaneously silencing ACSL4 and the induction of GADD45B expression in HCC cells both in vitro and in the orthotopic HCC xenograft mouse model. Importantly, clinical evidence has independently corroborated that survival of HCC patients expressing ACSL4highGADD45Blow was significantly poorer compared to patients with ACSL4lowGADD45Bhigh, thus demonstrating the potential clinical value of combining aspirin and sorafenib for HCC patients expressing ACSL4highGADD45Blow. In conclusion, sorafenib and aspirin provide synergistic therapeutic effects on HCC cells that are achieved through simultaneous silencing of ACSL4 and induction of GADD45B expression. Targeting HCC with ACSL4highGADD45Blow expression with aspirin and sorafenib could provide potential synergistic therapeutic benefits. PMID:28900541

  6. Mechanisms of aspirin-sensitive asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Ying

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now widely accepted that aspirin, along with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, may precipitate asthma attacks in a minority of susceptible individuals. The syndrome is part of a mucosal inflammatory disease that typically affects the nasal, as well as the bronchial, mucosa and sometimes the gut and skin also. Although the mucosal cellular infiltrate in aspirin-sensitive asthma and rhinitis resembles that of asthma and rhinitis in general, there is evidence of increased expression of asthma-relevant cytokines, such as interleukin-5 and granulocyte–macrophage colony stimulating factor, and a more intense infiltrate of mast cells and eosinophils. One key feature of aspirin-sensitive asthma is thought to be the overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes, principally by these local mast cells and eosinophils, but whether this represents a fundamental abnormality or is simply a consequence of greater numbers and activation of inflammatory cells is unclear. Genetic polymorphisms of the leukotriene C4 synthase gene, which result in elevated expression of this enzyme, may also play a role. In addition, overexpression of cysteinyl leukotriene receptors, particularly CysLT1, may contribute to an enhanced response of local inflammatory and structural cells to cysteinyl leukotrienes. Aspirin challenge in these patients is accompanied by acute further elevation of the already elevated baseline cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis, a phenomenon that is most closely related to the ability of aspirin and related NSAIDs to inhibit the cyclooxygenase enzyme COX-1. The reason for this is unknown, although it has been suggested that the COX-1 product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 serves as a ‘brake’ to leukotriene synthesis and that somehow this mechanism is deficient in aspirin-sensitive asthmatics. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of aspirin-sensitive asthma will undoubtedly lead to better approaches to treatment. Aside from the use of

  7. ESR investigation of gamma-irradiated Aspirin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozar, O.; Chis, V.; David, L.; Damian, G.; Barbur, I.

    1997-01-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate the radiation damage in a powder of 2-acetoxybenzoic acid (Aspirin). Three types of radicals occur by γ-irradiation of Aspirin at room temperature. Two of them are result of hydrogen abstraction while the third is produced by hydrogen addition at one of the carbon atoms of the ring. The relative yielding of the free radicals as a function of absorbed dose in the range of 2.4 kGy to 160 kGy is also discussed. (author)

  8. Long-term efficacy of aspirin desensitization in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease. Review of two clinical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Cambray-Gutiérrez

    2016-05-01

    Clinical cases: two patients diagnosed with respiratory disease exacerbated by aspirin, with poor asthma control and need for multiple polypectomies, despite optimal pharmacological management, carrying out protocol desensitization to aspirin (AAS successful, now after 4 years of having carried out, they have adequate asthma control without need for polypectomies with a maintenance dose of aspirin 150 mg/day.

  9. Low-Dose Aspirin Treatment Alleviates Gamma Irradiation Impaired Fertility in Female Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    elevated malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels compared to the related serum control values. The radiation effect was extended to Subgroup 2 that revealed apparent infertility. Moreover, Aspirin oral daily administration caused a remarkable reduction in both FSH and LH hormones alongside with elevated progesterone and PRL levels with no noted E2 level changes (Group 3). However the same treatment accelerated both the fertility and re productivity rates of Subgroup 3. However, the results of the present study revealed the potency of the anti-inflammatory drug Aspirin when administered post radiation exposure (Group 4) in ameliorating the abrupt irradiation induced hormonal imbalance and the significant elevation in serum MDA in addition to its ability in alleviating the radiation induced reproductive disorders (Subgroup 4). In conclusion, oxidative stress caused by radiation exposure of cycling female rats induced marked disturbance in their hormonal balance leading to negative fertility outcomes that has been ameliorated by Aspirin therapy.

  10. Are the current recommendations for the use of aspirin in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease applicable in low-income countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noubiap JJ

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jean Jacques N Noubiap,1,2 Jobert Richie N Nansseu3,41Department of Medicine, Groote Schuur Hospital, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; 2Medical Diagnostic Center, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 3Sickle Cell Disease Unit, Mother and Child Centre, Chantal BIYA Foundation, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 4Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, CameroonAbstract: Although evidence has accumulated that long-term aspirin therapy is beneficial in secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD, a lot of controversies persist regarding the benefit of aspirin use in primary prevention of CVD. In low-income countries (LIC specifically, the decision to prescribe aspirin for primary CVD prevention is more problematic, as there is a dearth of evidence in this regard. Aspirin has been shown to have relative beneficial effects in preventing a first myocardial infarction, but not stroke. However, as stroke is the prevailing CVD in many LIC, especially in Africa, the benefit of aspirin in these settings is therefore questionable. Indeed, there is no published trial that has evaluated the benefits and risks of continuous aspirin therapy in populations of LIC. Furthermore, though cardiovascular risk assessment is crucial in decision-making for the use of aspirin in primary prevention of CVD, there are no risk assessment tools that have been validated in African populations. Studies are urgently warranted, to determine the usefulness of aspirin in primary prevention of CVD in low-income settings where the drug is highly available and affordable, as CVD is becoming the leading cause of deaths in LIC.Keywords: aspirin, cardiovascular disease, primary prevention, low-income countries

  11. Implementing Prehospital Evidence-Based Guidelines: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishe, Jennifer N; Crowe, Remle P; Cash, Rebecca E; Nudell, Nikiah G; Martin-Gill, Christian; Richards, Christopher T

    2018-01-19

    As prehospital research advances, more evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) are implemented into emergency medical services (EMS) practice. However, incomplete or suboptimal prehospital EBG implementation may hinder improvement in patient outcomes. To inform future efforts, this study's objective was to review existing evidence pertaining to prehospital EBG implementation methods. This study was a systematic literature review and evaluation following the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, and Google Advanced Search were searched without language or publication date filters for articles addressing prehospital EBG implementation. Conference proceedings, textbooks, and non-English articles were excluded. GRADE was applied to the remaining articles independently by three of five study investigators. Study characteristics and salient findings from the included articles are reported. The systematic literature review identified 1,367 articles, with 41 meeting inclusion criteria. Most articles described prehospital EBG implementation (n = 24, 59%), or implementation barriers (n = 13, 32%). Common study designs were statement documents (n = 12, 29%), retrospective cohort studies (n = 12, 29%), and cross-sectional studies (n = 9, 22%). Using GRADE, evidence quality was rated low (n = 18, 44%), or very low (n = 23, 56%). Salient findings from the articles included: (i) EBG adherence and patient outcomes depend upon successful implementation, (ii) published studies generally lack detailed implementation methods, (iii) EBG implementation takes longer than planned (mostly for EMS education), (iv) EMS systems' heterogeneity affects EBG implementation, and (v) multiple barriers limit successful implementation (e.g., financial constraints, equipment purchasing, coordination with hospitals, and regulatory agencies). This review found no direct evidence for best prehospital EBG implementation practices. There

  12. Age-related macular degeneration in a randomized controlled trial of low-dose aspirin: Rationale and study design of the ASPREE-AMD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liubov Robman

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The study findings will be of significant clinical and public interest due to a potential to identify a possible low cost therapy for preventing AMD worldwide and to determine risk/benefit balance of the aspirin usage by the AMD-affected elderly. The ASPREE-AMD study provides a unique opportunity to determine the effect of aspirin on AMD incidence and progression, by adding retinal imaging to an ongoing, large-scale primary prevention randomized clinical trial.

  13. Risk for Major Bleeding in Patients Receiving Ticagrelor Compared With Aspirin After Transient Ischemic Attack or Acute Ischemic Stroke in the SOCRATES Study (Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated With Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, J Donald; Aunes, Maria; Albers, Gregory W; Amarenco, Pierre; Bokelund-Singh, Sara; Denison, Hans; Evans, Scott R; Held, Peter; Jahreskog, Marianne; Jonasson, Jenny; Minematsu, Kazuo; Molina, Carlos A; Wang, Yongjun; Wong, K S Lawrence; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2017-09-05

    Patients with minor acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack are at high risk for subsequent stroke, and more potent antiplatelet therapy in the acute setting is needed. However, the potential benefit of more intense antiplatelet therapy must be assessed in relation to the risk for major bleeding. The SOCRATES trial (Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated With Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes) was the first trial with ticagrelor in patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack in which the efficacy and safety of ticagrelor were compared with those of aspirin. The main safety objective was assessment of PLATO (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes)-defined major bleeds on treatment, with special focus on intracranial hemorrhage (ICrH). An independent adjudication committee blinded to study treatment classified bleeds according to the PLATO, TIMI (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction), and GUSTO (Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries) definitions. The definitions of ICrH and major bleeding excluded cerebral microbleeds and asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformations of cerebral infarctions so that the definitions better discriminated important events in the acute stroke population. A total of 13 130 of 13 199 randomized patients received at least 1 dose of study drug and were included in the safety analysis set. PLATO major bleeds occurred in 31 patients (0.5%) on ticagrelor and 38 patients (0.6%) on aspirin (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-1.34). The most common locations of major bleeds were intracranial and gastrointestinal. ICrH was reported in 12 patients (0.2%) on ticagrelor and 18 patients (0.3%) on aspirin. Thirteen of all 30 ICrHs (4 on ticagrelor and 9 on aspirin) were hemorrhagic strokes, and 4 (2 in each group) were symptomatic hemorrhagic transformations of brain infarctions. The ICrHs were spontaneous in 6 and 13, traumatic in 3 and 3, and procedural in 3 and 2

  14. Acetyl salicyclic acid (aspirin) improves synthesis of maspin and lowers incidence of metastasis in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, M.; Girish, G.V.; Ghosh, R.; Chakraborty, S.; Sinha, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Maspin, a 42 kDa protein produced in normal breast cells, has been shown to inhibit the invasion and metastasis of breast cancer in an animal model. Ingestion of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) by breast cancer patients has been reported to restore the systemic synthesis of maspin through the stimulation of systemic nitric oxide production. Studies were carried out to determine the effect of aspirin on the incidence of breast cancer metastasis, which is reported to occur in 50% of patients who have previously received chemotherapy, radiation, and/or surgery. Thirty-five female patients (aged 41-65 years) with breast cancer who had previously received these therapies took one 75 mg/70 kg body weight enteric-coated aspirin tablet every 24 h, after an adequate meal, for 3 years. Their plasma nitric oxide and maspin levels were measured. The occurrence of metastasis was ascertained monthly by a qualified oncologist, and confirmed, if necessary, by biopsy. Daily ingestion of aspirin by participants resulted in an increase in maspin levels from 0.95±0.04 to 4.63±0.05 nM after 24 h. These levels were maintained for 3 years. These studies suggest that daily ingestion of aspirin might significantly reduce the incidence of breast cancer metastasis in patients who have previously received anticancer therapies. (author)

  15. Rivaroxaban with or without aspirin in stable cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eikelboom, John W; Connolly, Stuart J; Bosch, Jackie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. METHODS: In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive...... rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin (100 mg once daily), rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily), or aspirin (100 mg once daily). The primary outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. The study was stopped for superiority of the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group after...... a mean follow-up of 23 months. RESULTS: The primary outcome occurred in fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group than in the aspirin-alone group (379 patients [4.1%] vs. 496 patients [5.4%]; hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 0.86; P

  16. Effect of aspirin treatment on chondromalacia patellae.

    OpenAIRE

    Bentley, G; Leslie, I J; Fischer, D

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients (21 females and 8 males) with chondromalacia patellae diagnosed by arthroscopy were randomly allocated to receive aspirin or placebo for 3 months. Clinical and arthroscopic examination after 3 months showed no significant change in symptoms, signs, or macroscopic appearances in either group. Surgical treatment was performed in 14 patients for deteriorating symptoms.

  17. Effect of aspirin treatment on chondromalacia patellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, G; Leslie, I J; Fischer, D

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients (21 females and 8 males) with chondromalacia patellae diagnosed by arthroscopy were randomly allocated to receive aspirin or placebo for 3 months. Clinical and arthroscopic examination after 3 months showed no significant change in symptoms, signs, or macroscopic appearances in either group. Surgical treatment was performed in 14 patients for deteriorating symptoms. Images PMID:7008711

  18. Aspirin in pregnancy : clinical and biochemical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A. Bremer (Henk)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAspirin, acetylsalicylic acid, is the most frequently consumed drug in pregnancy,47 mostly taken without a prescription because of headache or a minor ailment. 226,277 Numerous preparations containing acetylsalicylic acid are freely available over the counter under a variety of

  19. Aspirin augments hyaluronidase induced adhesion inhibition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative adhesions occur after virtually all abdomino-pelvic surgery and are the leading cause of intestinal obstruction and other gynaecologic problems. We used an animal model to test the efficacy of combined administration of aspirin and hyaluronidase on adhesion formation. Adhesions were induced using ...

  20. Van der Waals Interactions in Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Anthony; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    The ability of molecules to yield multiple solid forms, or polymorphs, has significance for diverse applications ranging from drug design and food chemistry to nonlinear optics and hydrogen storage. In particular, aspirin has been used and studied for over a century, but has only recently been shown to have an additional polymorphic form, known as form II. Since the two observed solid forms of aspirin are degenerate in terms of lattice energy, kinetic effects have been suggested to determine the metastability of the less abundant form II. Here, first-principles calculations provide an alternative explanation based on free-energy differences at room temperature. The explicit consideration of many-body van der Waals interactions in the free energy demonstrates that the stability of the most abundant form of aspirin is due to a subtle coupling between collective electronic fluctuations and quantized lattice vibrations. In addition, a systematic analysis of the elastic properties of the two forms of aspirin rules out mechanical instability of form II as making it metastable.

  1. Impact of Prehospital Care on Outcomes in Sepsis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Smyth

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sepsis is a common and potentially life-threatening response to an infection. International treatment guidelines for sepsis advocate that treatment be initiated at the earliest possible opportunity. It is not yet clear if very early intervention by ambulance clinicians prior to arrival at hospital leads to improved clinical outcomes among sepsis patients. Methoda: We systematically searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and PubMed up to June 2015. In addition, subject experts were contacted. We adopted the GRADE (grading recommendations assessment, development and evaluation methodology to conduct the review and follow PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses recommendations to report findings. Results: Nine studies met the eligibility criteria – one study was a randomized controlled trial while the remaining studies were observational in nature. There was considerable variation in the methodological approaches adopted and outcome measures reported across the studies. Because of these differences, the studies did not answer a unique research question and meta-analysis was not appropriate. A narrative approach to data synthesis was adopted. Conclusion: There is little robust evidence addressing the impact of prehospital interventions on outcomes in sepsis. That which is available is of low quality and indicates that prehospital interventions have limited impact on outcomes in sepsis beyond improving process outcomes and expediting the patient’s passage through the emergency care pathway. Evidence indicating that prehospital antibiotic therapy and fluid resuscitation improve patient outcomes is currently lacking. [West J Emerg Med. 2017;17(4427-437.

  2. Prehospital Acute Stroke Severity Scale to Predict Large Artery Occlusion: Design and Comparison With Other Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, Sidsel; Damgaard, Dorte; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Andersen, Grethe

    2016-07-01

    We designed and validated a simple prehospital stroke scale to identify emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) in patients with acute ischemic stroke and compared the scale to other published scales for prediction of ELVO. A national historical test cohort of 3127 patients with information on intracranial vessel status (angiography) before reperfusion therapy was identified. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) items with the highest predictive value of occlusion of a large intracranial artery were identified, and the most optimal combination meeting predefined criteria to ensure usefulness in the prehospital phase was determined. The predictive performance of Prehospital Acute Stroke Severity (PASS) scale was compared with other published scales for ELVO. The PASS scale was composed of 3 NIHSS scores: level of consciousness (month/age), gaze palsy/deviation, and arm weakness. In derivation of PASS 2/3 of the test cohort was used and showed accuracy (area under the curve) of 0.76 for detecting large arterial occlusion. Optimal cut point ≥2 abnormal scores showed: sensitivity=0.66 (95% CI, 0.62-0.69), specificity=0.83 (0.81-0.85), and area under the curve=0.74 (0.72-0.76). Validation on 1/3 of the test cohort showed similar performance. Patients with a large artery occlusion on angiography with PASS ≥2 had a median NIHSS score of 17 (interquartile range=6) as opposed to PASS <2 with a median NIHSS score of 6 (interquartile range=5). The PASS scale showed equal performance although more simple when compared with other scales predicting ELVO. The PASS scale is simple and has promising accuracy for prediction of ELVO in the field. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Prehospital use of plasma: the blood bankers' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervig, Tor; Doughty, Heidi; Ness, Paul; Badloe, John F; Berseus, Olle; Glassberg, Elon; Heier, Hans E

    2014-05-01

    At the 2013 Traumatic Hemostasis and Oxygenation Research Network's Remote Damage Control Resuscitation symposium, a panel of senior blood bankers with both civilian and military background was invited to discuss their willingness and ability to supply prehospital plasma for resuscitation of massively bleeding casualties and to comment on the optimal preparations for such situations. Available evidence indicates that prehospital use of plasma may improve remote damage control resuscitation, although level I evidence is lacking. This practice is well established in several military services and is also being introduced in civilian settings. There are few, if any, clinical contraindications to the prehospital use of plasma, except for blood group incompatibility and the danger of transfusion-induced acute lung injury, which can be circumvented in various ways. However, the choice of plasma source, plasma preparation, and logistics including stock management require consideration. Staff training should include hemovigilance and traceability as well as recognition and management of eventual adverse effects. Prehospital use of plasma should occur within the framework of clinical algorithms and prospective clinical studies. Clinicians have an ethical responsibility to both patients and donors; therefore, the introduction of new clinical capabilities of transfusion must be safe, efficacious, and sustainable. The panel agreed that although these problems need further attention and scientific studies, now is the time for both military and civilian transfusion systems to prepare for prehospital use of plasma in massively bleeding casualties.

  4. Burnout syndrome in nurses of prehospital rescue team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemeire Pereira Bezerra

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the presence and evaluate the levels of burnout syndrome in nurses of the prehospital rescue team. Methods: A cross-sectional study with a sample of 17 nurses from the prehospital rescue team, by application of the Maslach burnout Inventory and a questionnaire prepared by the authors. Rresults: In the group studied, 76% of the nurses of the prehospital rescue team were female. Ages varied from 30 to 49 years old. As to time already in the profession, 59% reported having worked from five to ten years in prehospital rescue. As to Maslach burnout Inventory subscale means, in the group analyzed of 17 prehospital rescue team nurses, low/moderate level (31.53 of reduced professional accomplishment, low/moderate level (18.41 of emotional exhaustion, and low/moderate level (8.88 of depersonalization were observed. As to dimensions of burnout levels, it was noted that 76.47% of the nurses displayed a low/moderate level of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced professional accomplishment. Cconclusions: It was demonstrated that this sample showed no evidence of burnout syndrome, since its presence is proven only when there are high scores of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced professional accomplishment.

  5. Aspirin is associated with an increased risk of subdural hematoma in normal-pressure hydrocephalus patients following shunt implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Peter; Lauritsen, Jens; Poulsen, Frantz Rom

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT: In this paper the authors investigate whether shunt-treated patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus receiving aspirin therapy are at increased risk of developing subdural hematoma (SDH). METHODS: Records from 80 consecutive patients who had undergone implantation of a cerebrospinal...

  6. Prehospital thrombolysis in acute myocardial infarction: the Belgian eminase prehospital study (BEPS). BEPS Collaborative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    Interest in early thrombolysis has prompted a study on the feasibility and time course of prehospital thrombolysis in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in six centres in Belgium. Patients with clinically suspected AMI and with typical ECG changes presenting within 4 h after onset of pain were treated with 30 units of Anisoylated Plasminogen Streptokinase Activator Complex (APSAC, eminase) intravenously by a mobile intensive care unit (MICU). Sixty-two patients were included in the study and an AMI was confirmed in 60. The mean time (+/- 1 SD) from onset of pain to injection of APSAC was 95 +/- 47 min and the mean estimated time gain, calculated as the time difference between the arrival of the MICU at home and the arrival of the MICU at the emergency department, was 50 +/- 17 min. In the prehospital period four patients developed ventricular fibrillation and one cardiogenic shock. During hospital stay severe complications were observed in four patients. Two events were fatal, one diffuse haemorrhage and one septal rupture; two events were non fatal, one feasible and that an estimated time gain of 50 min can be obtained. Potential risks and benefits remain to be demonstrated in a large controlled clinical trial.

  7. A Review on the Relationship between Aspirin and Bone Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Yong Chin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin is a cyclooxygenase inhibitor commonly used in primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Its users are elderly population susceptible to osteoporosis. It also inhibits the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 essential in bone remodeling. This prompts the question whether it can influence bone health among users. This review aimed to summarize the current literature on the use of aspirin on bone health. A literature search on experimental and clinical evidence on the effects of aspirin on bone health was performed using major scientific databases. In vitro studies showed that aspirin could enhance the survival of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, the progenitors of osteoblasts, and stimulate the differentiation of preosteoblasts. Aspirin also inhibited the nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB pathway and decreased the expression of receptor activator of NFκB ligand, thus suppressing the formation of osteoclast. Aspirin could prevent bone loss in animal models of osteoporosis. Despite a positive effect on bone mineral density, the limited human epidemiological studies revealed that aspirin could not reduce fracture risk. A study even suggested that the use of aspirin increased fracture risk. As a conclusion, aspirin may increase bone mineral density but its effect on fracture prevention is inconclusive. More data are needed to determine the effects of aspirin and bone health in human.

  8. New use of low-dose aspirin and risk of colorectal cancer by stage at diagnosis: a nested case-control study in UK general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Rodríguez, Luis A; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse; Bromley, Susan; Lanas, Angel; Cea Soriano, Lucía

    2017-09-07

    Evidence from clinical trial populations suggests low-dose aspirin reduces the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Part of this reduction in risk might be due to protection against metastatic disease. We investigated the risk of CRC among new-users of low-dose aspirin (75-300 mg), including risk by stage at diagnosis. Using The Health Improvement Network, we conducted a cohort study with nested case-control analysis. Two cohorts (N = 170,336 each) aged 40-89 years from 2000 to 2009 and free of cancer were identified: i) new-users of low-dose aspirin, ii) non-users of low-dose aspirin, at start of follow-up, matched by age, sex and previous primary care practitioner visits. Patients were followed for up to 12 years to identify incident CRC. 10,000 frequency-matched controls were selected by incidence density sampling where the odds ratio is an unbiased estimator of the incidence rate ratio (RR). RRs with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Low-dose aspirin use was classified 'as-treated' independent from baseline exposure status to account for changes in exposure during follow-up. Current users of low-dose aspirin (use on the index date or in the previous 90 days) had a significantly reduced risk of CRC, RR 0.66 (95% CI 0.60-0.74). The reduction in risk was apparent across all age groups, and was unrelated to dose, indication, gender, CRC location or case-fatality status. Reduced risks occurred throughout treatment duration and with all low-dose aspirin doses. RRs by aspirin indication were 0.71 (0·63-0·79) and 0.60 (0.53-0.68) for primary and secondary cardiovascular protection, respectively. Among cases with staging information (n = 1421), RRs for current use of low-dose aspirin were 0.94 (0.66-1.33) for Dukes Stage A CRC, 0.54 (0.42-0.68) for Dukes B, 0.71 (0.56-0.91) for Dukes C, and 0.60 (0.48-0.74) for Dukes D. After 5 years' therapy, the RR for Dukes Stage A CRC was 0.53 (0.24-1.19). Patients starting low-dose aspirin therapy have a reduced

  9. Do prehospital providers and emergency nurses agree on triage assignment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Pontoppidan, Louise L; Laursen, Jens O

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the agreement on triage level between prehospital providers and emergency department (ED) nurses in clinical practice when using the same triage system. The objectives were as follows: (a) What is the agreement of triage between prehospital...... providers and ED nurses, when using Danish Emergency Process Triage (DEPT) correctly? (b) Which part of the triage process yields the highest agreement regarding the final triage? METHODS: The study was a prospective and observational efficacy study. Patients transported to the ED by ambulances were...... included. They were triaged by prehospital providers while being transported by ambulance to the ED, and by ED nurses upon arrival. Triage was done using the DEPT - a five-level triage system based on vital signs and a presenting complaint algorithm. An agreement analysis was performed. RESULTS: DEPT...

  10. [Medical service to patients with stroke at the prehospital stage in different cities of the Russian Federation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakhovskaia, L V; Shekhovtsova, K V; Rozhkova, T I; Bodykhov, M K; Tsurikova, V E; Cher, I Sun; Surzha, T I; Bidenko, M A; Skvortsova, V I

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted a comparative analysis of medical service quality to stroke patients at the pre-hospital stage in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk and Irkutsk. Periods of hospitalization, including periods of referral of patients (or their relatives) for medical care, arrival of ambulance personnel (AP), time spent by AP on the primary medical care and transportation of patients have been analyzed. We have analyzed periods of referral of people for medical care and assessed the volume and quality of pre-hospital therapy. The high percentage of hospitalization during the period of "therapeutic window" has been found in both cities with the significant prevalence in Irkutsk. The delay in hospitalization was caused by late referral of patients, low level of population awareness on importance of referral for urgent medical care besides the referral to AP. The number of patients transported to a hospital during the time interval (30-40 min) recommended by the WHO did not exceed 30-40% in both cities. Although the volume of medical care at the pre-hospital stage was larger in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, the quality of pharmacotherapy used by AP in Irkutsk was more in line with modern standards.

  11. Prehospital emergency care and injury prevention in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Elbashir

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Due to an absence of published literature in Sudan, much of the data have been recorded from paper records and empirical observations. Prehospital care and injury prevention in the Sudan is a recent initiative, but it is developing into a promising model with many opportunities for improvement. This momentum should be nurtured and requires a purposive, collective collaboration to draw a blueprint for a locally relevant, effective and efficient prehospital system in Sudan. It is hoped that this article will highlight and encourage further progress.

  12. Do prehospital discharge pacemaker checks provide any additional clinical benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelan, Kevin R; Legge, Darlene M; Sakowski, Brent C; Bruce, Susan S; Roberts, David C; Johnston, L Murphy; Moore, B Jane; Beveridge, Thomas P; Wells, Peter J; Vallabahn, Ravi; Donsky, Michael S; Franklin, Jay O

    2005-08-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of 250 records of consecutive, newly implanted, pacemaker patients from a single center to determine the rate of postimplant complications and observations discovered before and during the prehospital discharge evaluation. No observations occurred in 246 of 250 patients (98.4%) (1-sided 95% confidence interval 96.4%). Of the 250 patients, 4 had observations that were discovered at the prehospital discharge check and required reprogramming to increase the sensitivity safety margin (3 atrial and 1 ventricular). We documented only 1 complication that was discovered before the predischarge evaluation through telemetry and resulted in an atrial lead revision.

  13. Prehospital Providers' Perceptions on Providing Patient and Family Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Emily M; Sampayo, Esther M; Shah, Manish I; Doughty, Cara B

    2017-01-01

    A gap exists in understanding a provider's approach to delivering care that is mutually beneficial to patients, families, and other providers in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes, beliefs, and perceived barriers to providing patient and family centered care (PFCC) in the prehospital setting and to describe potential solutions for improving PFCC during critical pediatric events. We conducted a qualitative, cross-sectional study of a purposive sample of Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and paramedics from an urban, municipal, fire-based EMS system, who participated in the Pediatric Simulation Training for Emergency Prehospital Providers (PediSTEPPS) course. Two coders reviewed transcriptions of audio recordings from participants' first simulation scenario debriefings and performed constant comparison analysis to identify unifying themes. Themes were verified through member checking with two focus groups of prehospital providers. A total of 122 EMTs and paramedics participated in 16 audiotaped debriefing sessions and two focus groups. Four overarching themes emerged regarding the experience of PFCC by prehospital providers: (1) Perceived barriers included the prehospital environment, limited manpower, multi-tasking medical care, and concern for interference with patient care; (2) Providing emotional support comprised of empathetically comforting caregivers, maintaining a calm demeanor, and empowering families to feel involved; (3) Effective communication strategies consisted of designating a family point person, narration of actions, preempting the next steps, speaking in lay terms, summarizing during downtime, and conveying a positive first impression; (4) Tactics to overcome PFCC barriers were maintaining a line of sight, removing and returning a caregiver to and from the scene, and providing situational awareness. Based on debriefings from simulated scenarios, some prehospital providers identified the provision of

  14. Comparison and analysis on the serum-binding characteristics of aspirin-zinc complex and aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-Xin; Zhang, Qun; Wang, Hong-Lin; Li, Li-Wei

    2017-09-01

    This study was designed to compare the protein-binding characteristics of aspirin-zinc complex (AZN) with those of aspirin itself. AZN was synthesized and interacted with a model transport protein, human serum albumin (HSA). Three-dimensional fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were used to characterize the interaction of AZN with HSA under physiological conditions. The interaction mechanism was explored using a fluorescence quenching method and thermodynamic calculation. The binding site and binding locality of AZN on HSA were demonstrated using a fluorescence probe technique and Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory. Synchronous fluorescence and CD spectra were employed to reveal the effect of AZN on the native conformation of the protein. The HSA-binding results for AZN were compared with those for aspirin under consistent experimental conditions, and indicated that aspirin acts as a guide in AZN when binding to Sudlow's site I, in subdomain IIA of the HSA molecule. Moreover, compared with aspirin, AZN showed greater observed binding constants with, but smaller changes in the α-helicity of, HSA, which proved that AZN might be easier to transport and have less toxicity in vivo. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Effectiveness of prehospital continuous positive airway pressure in the management of acute pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubble, Michael W; Richards, Michael E; Jarvis, Roger; Millikan, Tori; Young, Dwayne

    2006-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) with standard pharmacologic treatment in the management of prehospital acute pulmonary edema. Using a nonrandomized control group design, all consecutive patients presenting to two participating emergency medical services (EMS) systems with a field impression of acute pulmonary edema between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2005, were included in the study. The control EMS system patients received standard treatment with oxygen, nitrates, furosemide, morphine, and, if indicated, endotracheal intubation. The intervention EMS system patients received CPAP via face mask at 10 cm H2O in addition to standard therapy. Ninety-five patients received standard therapy, and 120 patients received CPAP and standard therapy. Intubation was required in 8.9% of CPAP-treated patients compared with 25.3% in the control group (p = 0.003), and mortality was lower in the CPAP group than in the control group (5.4% vs. 23.2%; p = 0.000). When compared with the control group, the CPAP group had more improvement in respiratory rate (-4.55 vs. -1.81; p = 0.001), pulse rate (-4.77 vs. 0.82; p = 0.013), and dyspnea score (-2.11 vs. -1.36; p = 0.008). Using logistic regression to control for potential confounders, patients receiving standard treatment were more likely to be intubated (odds ratio, 4.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.64 to 9.95) and more likely to die (odds ratio, 7.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.96 to 28.54) than those receiving standard therapy and CPAP. The prehospital use of CPAP is feasible, may avert the need for endotracheal intubation, and may reduce short-term mortality.

  16. Effect of Pre-Hospital Red Blood Cell Transfusion on Mortality and Time of Death in Civilian Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, Marius; Weaver, Anne; Brohi, Karim; Eshelby, Sarah; Green, Laura; Røislien, Jo; Lockey, David J

    2018-04-16

    Current management principles of haemorrhagic shock after trauma emphasize earlier transfusion therapy to prevent dilution of clotting factors and correct coagulopathy. London's air ambulance (LAA) was the first UK civilian pre-hospital service to routinely offer pre-hospital red blood cell (RBC) transfusion (phRTx). We investigated the effect of phRTx on mortality. Retrospective trauma database study comparing mortality before-implementation with after-implementation of phRTx in exsanguinating trauma patients. Univariate logistic regression was performed for the unadjusted association between phRTx and mortality was performed, and multiple logistic regression adjusting for potential confounders. We identified 623 subjects with suspected major haemorrhage. We excluded 84 (13.5%) patients due to missing data on survival status. Overall 187 (62.3%) patients died in the before phRTx period and 143 (59.8%) died in the after phRTx group. There was no significant improvement in overall survival after the introduction of phRTx (p = 0.554). Examination of pre-hospital mortality demonstrated 126 deaths in the pre-phRTx group (42.2%) and 66 deaths in the RBC administered group (27.6%) There was a significant reduction in pre-hospital mortality in the group who received RBC (p < 0.001). phRTx was associated with increased survival to hospital, but not overall survival. The "delay death" effect of phRTx carries an impetus to further develop in-hospital strategies to improve survival in severely bleeding patients.

  17. Microparticle Shedding by Erythrocytes, Monocytes and Vascular Smooth Muscular Cells Is Reduced by Aspirin in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiva-Blanch, Gemma; Suades, Rosa; Padró, Teresa; Vilahur, Gemma; Peña, Esther; Ybarra, Juan; Pou, Jose M; Badimon, Lina

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an enhanced risk for cardiovascular disease and its prevalence is increasing. Diabetes induces metabolic stress on blood and vascular cells, promoting platelet activation and vascular dysfunction. The level of vascular cell activation can be measured by the number and phenotype of microparticles found in the circulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a platelet-inhibitory dose of aspirin on the number and type of microparticles shed to the circulation. Forty-three diabetic patients were enrolled in the study and received a daily dose of 100mg of aspirin for 10 days to cover the average platelet life-span in the circulation. Before and after the intervention period, circulating microparticles were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry. Type 1 diabetic patients had about twice the number of tissue factor-positive circulating microparticles (derived both from platelets and monocytes) and endothelial-derived E-selectin positive microparticles than type 2 diabetic patients. Aspirin therapy significantly inhibited platelets since cyclooxygenase 1 derived thromboxane generation levels were reduced by 99%. Microparticles derived from erythrocytes, activated monocytes, and smooth muscle cells were significantly reduced after 10 days of aspirin administration. These results indicate that: a) vascular and blood cells in type 1 diabetic patients are exposed to more sustained stress shown by their specific microparticle origin and levels; b) aspirin therapy inhibits vascular wall cell activation and microparticle shedding, and c) the effects of aspirin are similar in type 1 and 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke: Know the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the-Counter Medicines Safe Daily Use of Aspirin Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and ... any pharmacy, grocery or convenience store and buy aspirin without a prescription. The Drug Facts label on ...

  19. Rivaroxaban with or without Aspirin in Stable Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikelboom, John W; Connolly, Stuart J; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles R; Hart, Robert G; Shestakovska, Olga; Diaz, Rafael; Alings, Marco; Lonn, Eva M; Anand, Sonia S; Widimsky, Petr; Hori, Masatsugu; Avezum, Alvaro; Piegas, Leopoldo S; Branch, Kelley R H; Probstfield, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Deepak L; Zhu, Jun; Liang, Yan; Maggioni, Aldo P; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; O'Donnell, Martin; Kakkar, Ajay K; Fox, Keith A A; Parkhomenko, Alexander N; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Keltai, Matyas; Ryden, Lars; Pogosova, Nana; Dans, Antonio L; Lanas, Fernando; Commerford, Patrick J; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Guzik, Tomek J; Verhamme, Peter B; Vinereanu, Dragos; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Tonkin, Andrew M; Lewis, Basil S; Felix, Camilo; Yusoff, Khalid; Steg, P Gabriel; Metsarinne, Kaj P; Cook Bruns, Nancy; Misselwitz, Frank; Chen, Edmond; Leong, Darryl; Yusuf, Salim

    2017-10-05

    We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin (100 mg once daily), rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily), or aspirin (100 mg once daily). The primary outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. The study was stopped for superiority of the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group after a mean follow-up of 23 months. The primary outcome occurred in fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group than in the aspirin-alone group (379 patients [4.1%] vs. 496 patients [5.4%]; hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 0.86; Paspirin group (288 patients [3.1%] vs. 170 patients [1.9%]; hazard ratio, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.40 to 2.05; Paspirin group as compared with 378 (4.1%) in the aspirin-alone group (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.96; P=0.01; threshold P value for significance, 0.0025). The primary outcome did not occur in significantly fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-alone group than in the aspirin-alone group, but major bleeding events occurred in more patients in the rivaroxaban-alone group. Among patients with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease, those assigned to rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin had better cardiovascular outcomes and more major bleeding events than those assigned to aspirin alone. Rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily) alone did not result in better cardiovascular outcomes than aspirin alone and resulted in more major bleeding events. (Funded by Bayer; COMPASS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01776424 .).

  20. Aspirin-induced asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botey, J; Navarro, C; Marín, A; Eseverri, J L

    1988-01-01

    Since Cooke first described bronchospasm induced by acetyl salicylic acid in asthmatic patients in 1919, numerous studies have been done with the objective of understanding the pathology, treatment and incidence of aspirin-induced asthma. The incidence is difficult to establish but according to two recent studies, the percentage in the infantile asthmatic population was estimated at 13% and 28%. This prevalence is greater than that suspected at first and reveals the necessity of reviewing this problem. In this study we present 4 pediatric patients, 2 atopics and 2 non-atopics affected with aspirin-induced asthma. A detailed clinical history, oral provocation test to acetyl salicylic acid, other non-steroid anti-inflammatory analgesics and additives was performed. The oral provocation test with acetyl salicylic acid was positive in all 4 cases. The oral provocation with non-steroid anti-inflammatory analgesics and other additives was negative in 2 patients. In the remaining 2 patients, one demonstrated sensitivity only to tartrazine and the other to tartrazine, red coccine, mefenamic acid and benorylate. In conclusion, aspirin-induced asthma is not infrequent in infancy. Therefore, it is important to bear it always in mind and to diagnose it through oral provocation besides looking for possible cross reactions.

  1. Anaesthesia in aspirin-induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiker, V; Basgül, E

    2003-01-01

    The triad of bronchial asthma, nasal polyposis, and intolerance to aspirin and aspirin-like chemicals are designated aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) or Samter's syndrome. The exact mechanism of the disease is unknown but it is thought to be a disorder of arachidonic acid metabolism. These patients are frequently referred to allergy clinics for preoperative evaluation for possible anesthetic agent sensitivity, requiring anesthesia for nasal polypectomy or several other reasons. Anesthetists must be aware of their pulmonary dysfunction, because the anesthetic management of asthma requires a specific approach. Marked cross-sensitivity with NSAIDs, which may also precipitate severe bronchospasm and adverse reactions, is the main problem faced by anesthetists in postoperative pain management. This article discusses the relationship between AIA and anesthesia. We also present our experience with 47 patients diagnosed with AIA between 1991 and 2003 in the department of chest diseases and adult allergy unit who underwent surgery requiring general anesthesia. In conclusion, preoperative evaluation of these patients and collaboration between the allergists and anesthesiologists is essential to prevent preoperative, perioperative and postoperative complications.

  2. Effect of misoprostol on patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease undergoing aspirin challenge and desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Kristen M; Simon, Ronald A; Woessner, Katharine M; Wineinger, Nathan E; White, Andrew A

    2017-07-01

    Prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) is an anti-inflammatory compound that inhibits 5-lipoxygenase activity. Diminished PGE 2 regulation in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) leads to respiratory reactions on cyclooxygenase 1 inhibition. In vitro studies have found that exogenous PGE 2 stabilizes inflammatory mediator release. To examine whether misoprostol (oral prostaglandin E 1 analogue) use during aspirin challenge and desensitization might decrease the severity of aspirin-induced symptoms and make desensitization safer for patients with AERD. Forty-five patients undergoing aspirin challenge and/or desensitization were randomized to misoprostol (n = 30) or placebo (n = 15) and compared with a group of historical controls (n = 31). Misoprostol (200 μg) was administered at 30 minutes, 90 minutes, and 4 hours after the first dose of nasal ketorolac. Measured end points included change in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ), peak nasal inspiratory flow rate (PNIF), number of treatments received for induced reactions, and adverse gastrointestinal effects. A difference in FEV 1 and PNIF reduction was detected between misoprostol and placebo (P = .03) and misoprostol and historical controls (P = .01), respectively, during nasal ketorolac challenge. No difference was detected among aspirin reactors. Among all reactors, no difference in magnitude was found for FEV 1 (P = .13) or PNIF (P = .07) reduction across all 3 groups. Total treatment requirement was similar (P = .14). Patients receiving misoprostol were more likely to report adverse gastrointestinal effects (P = .02). The addition of misoprostol to current aspirin challenge and/or desensitization protocols reveals no protective effect in reducing the intensity of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced symptoms and is not recommended based on the findings in this study. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pre-hospital Management of the Fractured Femur Using the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two aspects of the early management of the fractured femur are discussed: firstly the immediate treatment in the pre-hospital phase and secondly the transportation of this injury case over a long distance where necessary. In both instances there is considerable room for improvement, and this is discussed, particularly with ...

  4. An open, interoperable, and scalable prehospital information technology network architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Adam B; Rokos, Ivan C; Burns, Kevin; Van Gelder, Carin M; Fisher, Roger M; Dunford, James V; Cone, David C; Bogucki, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    Some of the most intractable challenges in prehospital medicine include response time optimization, inefficiencies at the emergency medical services (EMS)-emergency department (ED) interface, and the ability to correlate field interventions with patient outcomes. Information technology (IT) can address these and other concerns by ensuring that system and patient information is received when and where it is needed, is fully integrated with prior and subsequent patient information, and is securely archived. Some EMS agencies have begun adopting information technologies, such as wireless transmission of 12-lead electrocardiograms, but few agencies have developed a comprehensive plan for management of their prehospital information and integration with other electronic medical records. This perspective article highlights the challenges and limitations of integrating IT elements without a strategic plan, and proposes an open, interoperable, and scalable prehospital information technology (PHIT) architecture. The two core components of this PHIT architecture are 1) routers with broadband network connectivity to share data between ambulance devices and EMS system information services and 2) an electronic patient care report to organize and archive all electronic prehospital data. To successfully implement this comprehensive PHIT architecture, data and technology requirements must be based on best available evidence, and the system must adhere to health data standards as well as privacy and security regulations. Recent federal legislation prioritizing health information technology may position federal agencies to help design and fund PHIT architectures.

  5. The iTClamp in the management of prehospital haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.C.T.H.; Peters, J.H.; McKee, J.L.; Edwards, M.J.R.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Bleeding remains a leading cause of death in trauma patients. The iTClamp is a temporary wound closure device designed to control external bleeding within seconds of injury. We describe our experience using this device on 10 patients in the prehospital environment. METHODS: We have

  6. Prehospital cooling of severe burns: Experience of the Emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only cooling performed by the patient, their family, bystanders or prehospital staff was recorded. Cooling performed by the Edendale Hospital ED staff was not included. Duration of cooling with water was documented as per the report given by the patient. Variables assessed included age, gender, time of burn, day of week,.

  7. Value of prehospital assessment of spine fracture by paramedics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brinke, J. G.; Gebbink, W. K.; Pallada, L.; Saltzherr, T. P.; Hogervorst, M.; Goslings, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Current guidelines state that trauma patients at risk of spine injury should undergo prehospital spine immobilization to reduce the risk of neurological deterioration. Although this approach has been accepted and implemented as a standard for decades, there is little scientific evidence to support

  8. Road Traffic Injury in Lagos, Nigeria: Assessing Prehospital Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nasiru A; Ajani, Abdul Wahab O; Mustafa, Ibrahim A; Balogun, Rufai A; Oludara, Mobolaji A; Idowu, Olufemi E; Solagberu, Babatunde A

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Injuries are the third most important cause of overall deaths globally with one-quarter resulting from road traffic crashes. Majority of these deaths occur before arrival in the hospital and can be reduced with prompt and efficient prehospital care. The aim of this study was to highlight the burden of road traffic injury (RTI) in Lagos, Nigeria and assess the effectiveness of prehospital care, especially the role of Lagos State Ambulance Service (LASAMBUS) in providing initial care and transportation of the injured to the hospital. A three-year, retrospective review of road traffic injured patients seen at the Surgical Emergency Room (SER) of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Ikeja, Nigeria, from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2014 was conducted. Parameters extracted from the Institution Trauma Registry included bio-data, date and time of injury, date and time of arrival in SER, host status, type of vehicle involved, and region(s) injured. Information on how patients came to the hospital and outcome in SER also were recorded. Results were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS; IBM Corporation; Armonk, New York USA) version 16. A total of 23,537 patients were seen during the study period. Among them, 16,024 (68.1%) had trauma. Road traffic crashes were responsible in 5,629 (35.0%) of trauma cases. Passengers constituted 42.0% of the injured, followed by pedestrians (34.0%). Four wheelers were the most frequent vehicle type involved (54.0%), followed by motor cycles (30.0%). Regions mainly affected were head and neck (40.0%) and lower limb (29.0%). Less than one-quarter (24.0%) presented to the emergency room within an hour, while one-third arrived between one and six hours following injury. Relatives brought 55.4%, followed by bystanders (21.4%). Only 2.3% had formal prehospital care and were brought to the hospital by LASAMBUS. They also had significantly shorter arrival time. One hundred and nine patients

  9. Aspirin regulation of c-myc and cyclinD1 proteins to overcome tamoxifen resistance in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ran; Liu, Ya-Jing; Cui, Jun-Wei; Yang, Man; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhan; Zhu, Li-Zhang; Lu, Si-Yi; Zou, Li; Wu, Xiao-Qin; Li, Yu-Xia; Zhou, You; Fang, Zheng-Yu; Wei, Wei

    2017-05-02

    Tamoxifen is still the most commonly used endocrine therapy drug for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients and has an excellent outcome, but tamoxifen resistance remains a great impediment to successful treatment. Recent studies have prompted an anti-tumor effect of aspirin. Here, we demonstrated that aspirin not only inhibits the growth of ER-positive breast cancer cell line MCF-7, especially when combined with tamoxifen, but also has a potential function to overcome tamoxifen resistance in MCF-7/TAM. Aspirin combined with tamoxifen can down regulate cyclinD1 and block cell cycle in G0/G1 phase. Besides, tamoxifen alone represses c-myc, progesterone receptor (PR) and cyclinD1 in MCF-7 cell line but not in MCF-7/TAM, while aspirin combined with tamoxifen can inhibit the expression of these proteins in the resistant cell line. When knocking down c-myc in MCF-7/TAM, cells become more sensitive to tamoxifen, cell cycle is blocked as well, indicating that aspirin can regulate c-myc and cyclinD1 proteins to overcome tamoxifen resistance. Our study discovered a novel role of aspirin based on its anti-tumor effect, and put forward some kinds of possible mechanisms of tamoxifen resistance in ER-positive breast cancer cells, providing a new strategy for the treatment of ER-positive breast carcinoma.

  10. A review of antithrombotic therapy and the rationale and design of the randomized edoxaban in patients with peripheral artery disease (ePAD) trial adding edoxaban or clopidogrel to aspirin after femoropopliteal endovascular intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangelder, Marco J D; Nwachuku, Chuke E.; Jaff, Michael; Baumgartner, Iris; Duggal, Anil; Adams, George; Ansel, Gary; Grosso, Michael; Mercuri, Michele; Shi, Minggao; Minar, Erich; Moll, Frans L.

    2015-01-01

    Compared with the coronary setting, knowledge about antithrombotic therapies after endovascular treatment (EVT) is inadequate in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Based on a review of trials and guidelines, which is summarized in this article, there is scant evidence that antithrombotic

  11. Antiplatelet Regimen for Patients With Breakthrough Strokes While on Aspirin: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meng; Saver, Jeffrey L; Hong, Keun-Sik; Rao, Neal M; Wu, Yi-Ling; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2017-09-01

    Optimal antiplatelet therapy after an ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack while on aspirin is uncertain. We, therefore, conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched PubMed (1966 to August 2016) and bibliographies of relevant published original studies to identify randomized trials and cohort studies reporting patients who were on aspirin at the time of an index ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack and reported hazard ratio for major adverse cardiovascular events or recurrent stroke associated with a switch to or addition of another antiplatelet agent versus maintaining aspirin monotherapy. Estimates were combined using a random effects model. Five studies with 8723 patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack were identified. Clopidogrel was used in 4 cohorts, and ticagrelor was used in 1 cohort. Pooling results showed that addition of or a switch to another antiplatelet agent, versus aspirin monotherapy, was associated with reduced risks of major adverse cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.85) and recurrent stroke (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.92). Each of the strategies of addition of and switching another antiplatelet agent showed benefit versus continued aspirin monotherapy, and studies with regimen initiation in the first days after index event showed more homogenous evidence of benefit. Among patients who experience an ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack while on aspirin monotherapy, the addition of or a switch to another antiplatelet agent, especially in the first days after index event, is associated with fewer future vascular events, including stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Is it time to stop chilling? Induced therapeutic hypothermia doesn't appear to have the prehospital effect we thought it did.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, Bryan E

    2015-02-01

    The evidence is quite clear that ITH in the prehospital setting is of dubious benefit. But what is the harm in continuing the practice? Well, prehospital ITH most likely takes away from more beneficial therapies such as high-quality CPR, rapid defibrillation, recognition of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), and similar essential treatments. Several studies have shown prehospital ITH, in many cases, delays hospital transport. When the initial studies of ITH were released, I was immediately on the ITH bandwagon. Interestingly, the American Heart Association (AHA) has never recommended prehospital ITH. Even the position paper on ITH by the National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) was cautious, saying, "A lack of evidence on induced hypothermia in the prehospital setting currently precludes recommending this treatment modality as standard of care for all emergency medical services (EMS) patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest. A systematic review of ITH recently published states, "In cardiac arrest, the initiation of therapeutic hypothermia in the out-of-hospital environment has not been shown to improve neurologic outcomes, although studies to date have been limited. We now know that caution Fxercised by the AHA and preMSP was appropriate. One medmy mentors in residency and ays said, "Never be the first- Univtor to prescribe a new drug or of Mlast doctor to prescribe an old is th" Lik" many things in EMS, EMS tms something that was put in Practe with good intent but lim- scientific evidence. We now P ITH is probably not a good ice and it is time to abandon it. However, we should still carry chilled IV fluids for hyperthermia, excited delirium and to main- tainormothermia in patients in cardiac arrest where transport times are long.

  13. The role of aspirin desensitization in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Jonas Willian; Valera, Fabiana Cardoso Pereira; Cordeiro, Daniel Loiola; de Mendonça, Taís Nociti; Leite, Marcelo Gonçalves Junqueira; Tamashiro, Edwin; Arruda, Luiza Karla; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) consists of a classic tetrad: moderate/severe asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and intolerance to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Clinical control with drugs, surgery, and desensitization are treatment options. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of aspirin desensitization in patients with AERD. Periodic symptom assessment and endoscopy in patients with AERD undergoing surgery who were desensitized. Seventeen patients were desensitized. Eight patients completed the desensitization and were followed for a minimum of a one-year period (mean 3.1 years). These patients showed improvement in all symptoms. Moreover, surgical reassessment was not indicated in any of these patients and there was a decrease in costs with medication and procedures. Eight patients did not complete desensitization, mainly due to procedure intolerance and uncontrolled asthma, whereas another patient was lost to follow-up. Aspirin desensitization, when tolerated, was effective in patients with AERD and with poor clinical/surgical response. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of Aspirin postdiagnosis improves survival for colon cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Bastiaannet (Esther); K. Sampieri (K.); O.M. Dekkers (Olaf); A.J. de Craen (Anton); M.P.P. van Herk-Sukel (Myrthe); V.E.P.P. Lemmens (Valery); C.B.M. van den Broek (Colette); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); R.M.C. Herings (Ron); C.J.H. van de Velde (Cornelis); R. Fodde (Riccardo); G.-J. Liefers (Gerrit-Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The preventive role of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin, in particular, on colorectal cancer is well established. More recently, it has been suggested that aspirin may also have a therapeutic role. Aim of the present observational population-based

  15. Aspirin and lipid mediators in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H

    2015-09-01

    Aspirin is an unique compound because it bears two active moieties within one and the same molecule: a reactive acetyl group and the salicylate metabolite. Salicylate has some effects similar to aspirin, however only at higher concentrations, usually in the millimolar range, which are not obtained at conventional antiplatelet aspirin doses of 100-300 mg/day. Pharmacological actions of aspirin in the cardiovascular system at these doses are largely if not entirely due to target structure acetylation. Several classes of lipid mediators become affected: Best known is the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) in platelets with subsequent inhibition of thromboxane and, possibly, thrombin formation. By this action, aspirin also inhibits paracrine thromboxane functions on other lipid mediators, such as the platelet storage product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an inflammatory mediator. Acetylation of COX-2 allows for generation of 15-(R)HETE and subsequent formation of "aspirin-triggered lipoxin" (ATL) by interaction with white cell lipoxygenases. In the cardiovascular system, aspirin also acetylates eNOS with subsequent upregulation of NO formation and enhanced expression of the antioxidans heme-oxygenase-1. This action is possibly also COX-2/ATL mediated. Many more acetylation targets have been identified in live cells by quantitative acid-cleavable activity-based protein profiling and might result in discovery of even more aspirin targets in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Aspirin Metabolomics in Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substantial evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for cancer chemoprevention in addition to its well-established role in cardiovascular protection. In recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in humans, daily aspirin use reduced incidence, metastasis and mortality from several common types of cancer, especially colorectal cancer. The mechanism(s) by which

  17. Aspirin Risks in Perspective: A Comparison against Marathon Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin has public health potential to reduce the risk of ischaemic vascular events and sporadic cancer. One objection to the wider use of aspirin for primary prevention, however, is the undesirable effects of the medicine, which include increasing risk of bleeding and haemorrhagic stroke. Marathons also carry risks of serious events such as…

  18. Effect of aspirin on tumour cell colony formation and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodarz, Dominik; Goel, Ajay; Boland, C Richard; Komarova, Natalia L

    2017-09-01

    Aspirin is known to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In a previous study, we quantified the in vitro growth kinetics of different CRC tumour cell lines treated with varying doses of aspirin, measuring the rate of cell division and cell death. Here, we use these measured parameters to calculate the chances of successful clonal expansion and to determine the evolutionary potential of the tumour cell lines in the presence and absence of aspirin. The calculations indicate that aspirin increases the probability that a single tumour cell fails to clonally expand. Further, calculations suggest that aspirin increases the evolutionary potential of an expanding tumour cell colony. An aspirin-treated tumour cell population is predicted to result in the accumulation of more mutations (and is thus more virulent and more difficult to treat) than a cell population of the same size that grew without aspirin. This indicates a potential trade-off between delaying the onset of cancer and increasing its evolutionary potential through chemoprevention. Further work needs to investigate to what extent these findings apply to in vivo settings, and to what degree they contribute to the epidemiologically documented aspirin-mediated protection. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Rivaroxaban with or without Aspirin in Stable Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelboom, John W.; Connolly, Stuart J.; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles R.; Hart, Robert G.; Shestakovska, Olga; Diaz, Rafael; Alings, Marco; Lonn, Eva M.; Anand, Sonia S.; Widimsky, Petr; Hori, Masatsugu; Avezum, Alvaro; Piegas, Leopoldo S.; Branch, Kelley R. H.; Probstfield, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Zhu, Jun; Liang, Yan; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; O'Donnell, Martin; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Fox, Keith A. A.; Parkhomenko, Alexander N.; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Keltai, Matyas; Ryden, Lars; Pogosova, Nana; Dans, Antonio L.; Lanas, Fernando; Commerford, Patrick J.; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Guzik, Tomek J.; Verhamme, Peter B.; Vinereanu, Dragos; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Tonkin, Andrew M.; Lewis, Basil S.; Felix, Camilo; Yusoff, Khalid; Steg, P. Gabriel; Metsarinne, Kaj P.; Cook Bruns, Nancy; Misselwitz, Frank; Chen, Edmond; Leong, Darryl; Hashimoto, S.; Maas, M.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive rivaroxaban (2.5 mg

  20. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of aspirin and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr J. T. Ekanem

    Novel complexes of Co (11), Ni (11) and Fe (111) with aspirin and paracetamol have synthesized and characterized using infrared, electronic and Hnmr spectral, melting point and conductivity measurements. The two ligands have been found to act as bidentate chelating agents. Aspirin complexes coordinate through the ...

  1. Prehospital and hospital delays after stroke onset--United States, 2005-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-18

    Each year approximately 700,000 persons in the United States have a new or recurrent stroke; of these persons, 15%-30% become permanently disabled, and 20% require institutionalization during the first 3 months after the stroke. The severity of stroke-related disability can be reduced if timely and appropriate treatment is received. Patients with ischemic stroke may be eligible for treatment with intravenous thrombolytic (i.e., tissue plasminogen activator [t-PA]) therapy within 3 hours of symptom onset. Receipt of this treatment usually requires patients to recognize stroke symptoms and receive prompt transport to a hospital emergency department (ED), where timely evaluation and brain imaging (i.e., computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) can take place. For patients eligible for t-PA, evidence suggests that the earlier patients are treated after the onset of symptoms the greater the likelihood of a more favorable outcome. In 2001, Congress established the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry to measure and track the quality of care provided to acute stroke patients. To assess prehospital delays from onset of stroke symptoms to ED arrival and hospital delays from ED arrival to receipt of brain imaging, CDC analyzed data from the four states participating in the national stroke registry. The results of that analysis indicated that fewer than half (48.0%) of stroke patients for whom onset data were available arrived at the ED within 2 hours of symptom onset, and prehospital delays were shorter for persons transported to the ED by ambulance (i.e., emergency medical services) than for persons who did not receive ambulance transport. The interval between ED arrival and brain imaging also was significantly reduced for those arriving by ambulance. More extensive public education is needed regarding early recognition of stroke and the urgency of telephoning 9-1-1 to receive ambulance transport. Shortening prehospital and hospital delays will increase

  2. Aspirin decreases platelet uptake on Dacron vascular grafts in baboons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, W.C.; Connolly, R.J.; Callow, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of a single dose of aspirin (5.4-7.4 mg/kg) on platelet uptake on 4-mm Dacron interposition grafts was studied in a baboon model using gamma camera scanning for 111-Indium labeled platelets. In vitro assessment of platelet function after aspirin administration revealed that in the baboon, as in the human, aspirin abolished arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation, prolonged the lag time between exposure to collagen and aggregation, and decreased plasma thromboxane B2 levels. Aspirin also prolonged the template bleeding time. Scans for 111-Indium labeled platelets revealed that pretreatment with a single dose of aspirin decreased platelet uptake on 4-mm Dacron carotid interposition grafts. This decrease in platelet uptake was associated with a significant improvement in 2-hour graft patency and with a trend toward improved 2-week patency

  3. Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular events: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials and subgroup analysis by sex and diabetes status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manling Xie

    Full Text Available To evaluate the benefits and harms of aspirin for the primary prevention of CVD and determine whether the effects vary by sex and diabetes status.We searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases for randomized controlled trials comparing the effects of aspirin with placebo or control in people with no pre-existing CVD. Two investigators independently extracted data and assessed the study quality. Analyses were performed using Stata version 12.Fourteen trials (107,686 participants were eligible. Aspirin was associated with reductions in major cardiovascular events (risk ratio, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.85-0.95, myocardial infarction (0.86; 0.75-0.93, ischemic stroke (0.86; 0.75-0.98 and all-cause mortality (0.94; 0.89-0.99. There were also increases in hemorrhagic stroke (1.34; 1.01-1.79 and major bleeding (1.55; 1.35-1.78 with aspirin. The number needed to treat to prevent 1 major cardiovascular event over a mean follow-up of 6.8 years was 284. By comparison, the numbers needed to harm to cause 1 major bleeding is 299. In subgroup analyses, pooled results demonstrated a reduction in myocardial infarction among men (0.71; 0.59-0.85 and ischemic stroke among women (0.77; 0.63-0.93. Aspirin use was associated with a reduction (0.65; 0.51-0.82 in myocardial infarction among diabetic men. In meta-regression analyses, the results suggested that aspirin therapy might be associated with a decrease in stroke among diabetic women and a decrease in MI among diabetic men and risk reductions achieved with low doses (75 mg/day were as large as those obtained with higher doses (650 mg/day.The use of low-dose aspirin was beneficial for primary prevention of CVD and the decision regarding an aspirin regimen should be made on an individual patient basis. The effects of aspirin therapy varied by sex and diabetes status. A clear benefit of aspirin in the primary prevention of CVD in people with diabetes needs more trials.

  4. Aspirin in the Chemoprevention of Colorectal Neoplasia: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Andrew T.; Arber, Nadir; Burn, John; Chia, John Whay-Kuang; Elwood, Peter; Hull, Mark A.; Logan, Richard F.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Schrör, Karsten; Baron, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) in addition to its well-established benefits in the prevention of vascular disease. Epidemiologic studies have consistently observed an inverse association between aspirin use and risk of CRC. A recent pooled analysis of a long-term post-trial follow-up of nearly 14,000 patients from 4 randomized, cardiovascular disease prevention trials showed that daily aspirin treatment for about 5 years was associated with a 34% reduction in 20-year CRC mortality. A separate meta-analysis of nearly 3,000 patients with a history of colorectal adenoma or cancer in 4 randomized adenoma prevention trials demonstrated that aspirin reduced the occurrence of advanced adenomas by 28% and any adenoma by 17%. Aspirin has also been shown to be beneficial in a clinical trial of patients with Lynch syndrome, a hereditary CRC syndrome; in those treated with aspirin for at least 2 years, there was a ≥ 50% reduction in the risk of CRC commencing 5 years after randomization and after aspirin had been discontinued. A few observational studies have shown an increase in survival among patients with CRC who use aspirin. Taken together, these findings strengthen the case for consideration of long-term aspirin use in CRC prevention. Despite these compelling data, there is a lack of consensus about the balance of risks and benefits associated with long-term aspirin use, particularly in low-risk populations. The optimal dose to use for cancer prevention and the precise mechanism underlying aspirin’s anticancer effect require further investigation. PMID:22084361

  5. Pre-hospital treatment of acute poisonings in Oslo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Hovda, Knut E; Bjornaas, Mari A; Nore, Anne K; Figueiredo, Jose CP; Ekeberg, Oivind; Jacobsen, Dag

    2008-01-01

    Background Poisoned patients are often treated in and discharged from pre-hospital health care settings. Studies of poisonings should therefore not only include hospitalized patients. Aims: To describe the acutely poisoned patients treated by ambulance personnel and in an outpatient clinic; compare patients transferred to a higher treatment level with those discharged without transfer; and study the one-week mortality after pre-hospital discharge. Methods A one-year multi-centre study with prospective inclusion of all acutely poisoned patients ≥ 16 years of age treated in ambulances, an outpatient clinic, and hospitals in Oslo. Results A total of 3757 health service contacts from 2997 poisoning episodes were recorded: 1860 were treated in ambulances, of which 15 died and 750 (40%) were discharged without transfer; 956 were treated in outpatient clinic, of which 801 (84%) were discharged without transfer; and 941 episodes were treated in hospitals. Patients discharged alive after ambulance treatment were mainly poisoned by opiates (70%), were frequently comatose (35%), had respiratory depression (37%), and many received naloxone (49%). The majority of the patients discharged from the outpatient clinic were poisoned by ethanol (55%), fewer were comatose (10%), and they rarely had respiratory depression (4%). Among the hospitalized, pharmaceutical poisonings were most common (58%), 23% were comatose, and 7% had respiratory depression. Male patients comprised 69% of the pre-hospital discharges, but only 46% of the hospitalized patients. Except for one patient, who died of a new heroin overdose two days following discharge from an ambulance, there were no deaths during the first week after the poisonings in the 90% of the pre-hospital discharged patients with known identity. Conclusion More than half of the poisoned patients treated in pre-hospital treatment settings were discharged without transfer to higher levels. These poisonings were more often caused by drug and

  6. Development of key performance indicators for prehospital emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Adrian; Wakai, Abel; Walsh, Cathal; Cummins, Fergal; O'Sullivan, Ronan

    2016-04-01

    Key performance indicators (KPIs) are used to monitor and evaluate critical areas of clinical and support functions that influence patient outcome. Traditional prehospital emergency care performance monitoring has focused solely on response time metrics. The landscape of emergency care delivery in Ireland is in the process of significant national reconfiguration. The development of KPIs is therefore considered one of the key priorities in prehospital research. The aim of this study was to develop a suite of KPIs for prehospital emergency care in Ireland. A systematic literature review of prehospital care performance measurement was undertaken followed by a three-round Delphi consensus process facilitated by a broad-based multidisciplinary group of panellists. The consensus process was conducted between June 2012 and October 2013. Each candidate indicator on the Delphi survey questionnaire was rated using a 5-point Likert-type rating scale. Agreement was defined as at least 70% of responders rating an indicator as 'agree' or 'strongly agree' on the rating scale. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Sensitivity of the ratings was examined for robustness by bootstrapping the original sample. Of the 78 citations identified by the systematic review, 5 relevant publications were used to select candidate indicators for the Delphi round 1 questionnaire. Response rates in Delphi rounds 1 and 2 were 89% and 83%, respectively. Following the consensus development conference, 101 KPIs reached consensus. Based on the Donabedian framework for quality-of-care indicators, 7 of the KPIs which reached agreement were structure KPIs, 74 were process KPIs and 20 were outcome KPIs. The highest ranked indicator was a process KPI ('Direct transport of ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients to a primary percutaneous intervention (PCI)-capable facility for ECG to PCI time performance measurement using scientifically valid and reliable KPIs. Employing a Delphi panel of key

  7. Pre-hospital treatment of acute poisonings in Oslo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nore Anne K

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poisoned patients are often treated in and discharged from pre-hospital health care settings. Studies of poisonings should therefore not only include hospitalized patients. Aims: To describe the acutely poisoned patients treated by ambulance personnel and in an outpatient clinic; compare patients transferred to a higher treatment level with those discharged without transfer; and study the one-week mortality after pre-hospital discharge. Methods A one-year multi-centre study with prospective inclusion of all acutely poisoned patients ≥ 16 years of age treated in ambulances, an outpatient clinic, and hospitals in Oslo. Results A total of 3757 health service contacts from 2997 poisoning episodes were recorded: 1860 were treated in ambulances, of which 15 died and 750 (40% were discharged without transfer; 956 were treated in outpatient clinic, of which 801 (84% were discharged without transfer; and 941 episodes were treated in hospitals. Patients discharged alive after ambulance treatment were mainly poisoned by opiates (70%, were frequently comatose (35%, had respiratory depression (37%, and many received naloxone (49%. The majority of the patients discharged from the outpatient clinic were poisoned by ethanol (55%, fewer were comatose (10%, and they rarely had respiratory depression (4%. Among the hospitalized, pharmaceutical poisonings were most common (58%, 23% were comatose, and 7% had respiratory depression. Male patients comprised 69% of the pre-hospital discharges, but only 46% of the hospitalized patients. Except for one patient, who died of a new heroin overdose two days following discharge from an ambulance, there were no deaths during the first week after the poisonings in the 90% of the pre-hospital discharged patients with known identity. Conclusion More than half of the poisoned patients treated in pre-hospital treatment settings were discharged without transfer to higher levels. These poisonings were more often

  8. Glucose impairs aspirin inhibition in platelets through a NAD(P)H oxidase signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobzar, Gennadi; Mardla, Vilja; Samel, Nigulas

    2017-07-01

    Hyperglycemia has been suggested to play a role in the increased platelet resistance to antiplatelet therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Exposure to high glucose impairs platelet inhibition by aspirin. It has been found that antioxidant agents reduce the effect of glucose, confirming the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the effect of glucose. The aim of the study was to examine the mechanism of ROS increase by high glucose in aspirin-treated platelets. Platelet aggregation was measured by the optical method, and the production of ROS was detected using luminol-dependent horseradish peroxidase-enhanced chemiluminescence. We found that glucose did not affect ADP-induced platelet aggregation. However, it reduced the effect of aspirin on platelet aggregation, which was accompanied by an increase in ROS generation. The inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX) prevented the glucose effect and ROS generation. The same result was recorded after the inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK), phospholipase A 2 (PLA 2 ) or 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX). The inhibition of TxA 2 receptor did not decrease the effect of glucose indicating that the effect was not caused by activation of TxA 2 receptors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Aspirin resistance are associated with long-term recurrent stroke events after ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Wang, Zhenhua; Zhou, Lihong

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the prevalent of aspirin resistance (AR) in stroke and its association with recurrent stroke in 214 patients with ischemic stroke who were receiving aspirin before the stroke onset. Two hundreds and fourteen acute stroke patients who previously received aspirin therapy (100mg/day for ≥7days) were enrolled. Whole blood samples were collected for platelet aggregation testing. The result is expressed in aspirin reaction units (ARU). A cutoff of 550 ARU was used to determine the presence of AR. A follow-up period of 1year was performed to record stroke recurrence events. In this study, the median age was 68 years (IQR, 60-77 years), and 118 (55.1%) were men. A total of 43 of 214 enrolled patients (20.1%) were AR. ARU levels were significantly higher in patients with recurrence than those without (514[IQR: 466-592] vs. 454[IQR: 411-499]; P <0.001). The stroke recurrence distribution across the ARU quartiles ranged between 7.41% (first quartile) to 40.74% (fourth quartile). In multivariate analyses, the 3th and 4th quartile of ARU was significantly associated with stroke recurrence during the observation period compared to the 1st quartile group, and the adjusted risk increased by 215% (OR=3.15 [95% CI 1.96-4.33], P=0.007) and 322% (4.22[2.56-7.16], P<0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, AR was associated with a higher risk of stroke recurrence, and the adjusted risk increased by 365% (OR=4.65; 95% CI=2.99-8.16; P<0.001). In conclusion, AR is not uncommon in Chinese stroke patients who receive anti-platelet medications. Patients with AR may have a greater risk of suffering stroke recurrence events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduction of indium-111 platelet deposition on Dacron vascular grafts in humans by aspirin plus dipyridamole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, J.R.; Ritchie, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Aspirin plus dipyridamole reduces platelet accumulation on short-term Dacron vascular grafts in man. To determine whether drug inhibition of platelet deposition is sustained on older grafts, we studied 18 men aged 41 to 87 years who had Dacron aortic bifurcation grafts in place a mean of 43.4 months (range 9.8 to 121.0) before and during short-term therapy with aspirin (325 mg tid) plus dipyridamole (75 mg tid). During both the baseline and drug studies, indium-111 ( 111 In) platelet deposition was quantitated by two techniques, standard planar imaging performed at 24, 48, and 72 hr after injection of platelets and single photon emission computed tomographic imaging performed at 24 and 72 hr after injection. All analyses were performed in a blinded fashion. On both the planar and tomographic images, platelet accumulation on the graft was quantitated by a graft/blood ratio that compared activity in the graft to simultaneously collected whole blood 111 In platelet activity. Aspirin plus dipyridamole reduced the tomographic graft/blood ratio at 24 hr (20.6 +/- 3.5 vs 17.3 +/- 2.5) (+/-SEM) and at 72 hr (29.0 +/- 4.8 vs 25.0 +/- 4.1) after injection of platelets (p = .02). Dacron vascular grafts. Similarly, the planar graft/blood ratio was reduced at 24 hr (2.7 +/- 0.5 vs 2.4 +/- 0.5), 48 hr (3.7 +/- 0.9 vs 3.1 +/- 0.7), and 72 hr (4.0 +/- 0.9 vs 3.6 +/- 0.8) (p = .04). We conclude that aspirin (325 mg tid) plus dipyridamole (75 mg tid) reduces platelet accumulation on long-term Dacron vascular grafts

  11. Effect of aspirin desensitization on T-cell cytokines and plasma lipoxins in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Kurtuluş; Kurt, Emel; Alatas, Özkan; Gülbas, Zafer

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is thought to be based on, mainly, overproduction of eicosanoid lipid mediators and on defective anti-inflammatory regulators. Aspirin desensitization treatment, the mainstay of controlling asthma and rhinitis in AERD patients, however, is the least understood aspect of the disease. The study was designed to determine the effect of aspirin desensitization on T-lymphocyte cytokine expression and on plasma lipoxin levels in AERD. Spirometry, skin-prick test and asthma control test were documented and intracellular cytokine expression in T lymphocytes and plasma lipoxin levels were measured in 23 AERD patients, 17 aspirin-tolerant asthmatic (ATA) patients, and 16 healthy controls. In the AERD group nasal symptom and smell scores were assessed. Of the 23 AERD patients 15 accepted to undergo aspirin desensitization protocol and 14 of them were desensitized successfully. In the desensitized AERD group, cytokine and lipoxin measurements were repeated after 1-month aspirin treatment. CD4(+) IL-10 levels were higher in AERD patients than in healthy controls and CD4(+) interferon (IFN) gamma levels were higher in AERD and ATA patients than in controls. Plasma lipoxin-A4 and 15-epi-lipoxin-A4 levels were similar among the three study groups. In the AERD group, subjects underwent aspirin desensitization followed by a 1-month aspirin treatment. Clinical parameters improved and CD4(+) IFN-gamma levels decreased significantly. No significant change in lipoxin levels was recorded. CD4(+) IFN-gamma and CD4(+) IL-10 levels in AERD patients after 1-month aspirin desensitization treatment were similar to the healthy controls. The study confirms aspirin desensitization is effective clinically in AERD patients and suggests that IFN gamma and IL-10 expression in CD4(+) T lymphocytes may be related to the mechanism of action.

  12. Different impact of aspirin on renal progression in patients with predialysis advanced chronic kidney disease with or without previous stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Huang, Jing-Yang; Lee, Chun-Te; Hung, Tung-Wei; Liaw, Yung-Po; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2017-04-01

    The benefit of reducing the risk of stroke against increasing the risk of renal progression associated with antiplatelet therapy in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) is controversial. We enrolled 1301 adult patients with advanced CKD treated with erythropoiesis stimulating agents from January 1, 2002 to June 30, 2009 from the 2005 Longitudinal Health Insurance Database in Taiwan. All of the patients were followed until the development of the primary or secondary endpoints, or the end of the study (December 31, 2011). The primary endpoint was the development of ischemic stroke, and the secondary endpoints included hospitalization for bleeding events, cardiovascular mortality, all-cause mortality, and renal failure. The adjusted cumulative probability of events was calculated using multivariate Cox proportional regression analysis. Adjusted survival curves showed that the usage of aspirin was not associated with ischemic stroke, hospitalization for bleeding events, cardiovascular mortality or all-cause mortality, however, it was significantly associated with renal failure. In subgroup analysis, aspirin use was associated with renal failure in the patients with no history of stroke (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.14-1.73), and there was a borderline interaction between previous stroke and the use of aspirin on renal failure (interaction p=0.0565). There was no significant benefit in preventing ischemic stroke in the patients with advanced CKD who received aspirin therapy. Furthermore, the use of aspirin was associated with the risk of renal failure in the patients with advanced CKD without previous stroke. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Prehospital lung ultrasound for the diagnosis of cardiogenic pulmonary oedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Christian B; Hänselmann, Anja; Posth, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    diagnostic criteria for cardiogenic pulmonary oedema was used as gold standard. RESULTS: A total of 40 patients were included in the study. Feasibility of PLUS was 100 % and median time used was 3 min. The gold standard diagnosed 18 (45.0 %) patients with cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. The diagnostic accuracy......: The sensitivity of PLUS is high, making it a potential tool for ruling-out cardiogenic pulmonary. The observed specificity was lower than what has been described in previous studies. CONCLUSIONS: Performed, as part of a physician based prehospital emergency service, PLUS seems fast and highly feasible in patients...... with respiratory failure. Due to its diagnostic accuracy, PLUS may have potential as a prehospital tool, especially to rule out cardiogenic pulmonary oedema....

  14. Enhancement of aspirin capsulation by porous particles including iron hydrous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kenji; Koishi, Masumi; Hosoi, Fumio; Makuuchi, Keizo.

    1986-01-01

    Polymer-coated porous particles containing aspirin as a drug were prepared and the release of rate of aspirin was studied. The impregnation of aspirin was carried out by post-graft polymerization, where methyl methacrylate containing aspirin was treated with porous particles including iron oxide, pre-irradiated with γ-ray form Co-60. Release of aspirin from modified particles was examined with 50 % methanol solution. The amount of aspirin absorbed in porous particles increased by grafting of methyl methacrylate. The particles treated with iron hydrous oxide sols before irradiation led to the increment of aspirin absorption. Diffusion of aspirin through the polymer matrix and the gelled layer was the limiting process in the aspirin release from particles. The rate of aspirin released from modified particles including iron hydrous oxide wasn't affected by the grafting of methyl methacrylate. (author)

  15. Aspirin and clonidine in non-cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garg, Amit; Kurz, Andrea; Sessler, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Perioperative Ischaemic Evaluation-2 (POISE-2) is an international 2×2 factorial randomised controlled trial of low-dose aspirin versus placebo and low-dose clonidine versus placebo in patients who undergo non-cardiac surgery. Perioperative aspirin (and possibly clonidine) may reduce...... and preoperative chronic aspirin use. At the time of randomisation, a subpopulation agreed to a single measurement of serum creatinine between 3 and 12 months after surgery, and the authors will examine intervention effects on this outcome. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The authors were competitively awarded a grant...

  16. Comparative effects of aspirin and enteric-coated aspirin on loss of chromium 51-labeled erythrocytes from the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, D.C.; Schwartz, R.S.; Kutny, K.; Vallejo, G.; Horton, E.S.; Cotter, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium chromate Cr 51 was used to label red blood cells of 19 healthy male volunteers, whose stools were collected for four days before and four days during oral administration of either uncoated (N . 9) or enteric-coated (N . 10) aspirin. Each subject received 2.925 gm/day of aspirin, in three equal doses separated by eight-hour intervals, for a total of seven days. During drug use, stools were collected on days 4 through 7. Fecal blood content, estimated by measuring radioactivity in the stools, was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) during use of either type of aspirin than at baseline, but losses measured during use of the coated aspirin (mean, 1.54 ml/day) were significantly lower (P less than 0.001) than those measured during use of the uncoated aspirin (mean, 4.33 ml/day). The two types of aspirin produced equivalent serum concentrations of salicylates. We conclude that enteric-coated aspirin reduces gastrointestinal blood loss

  17. Prehospital high-dose sublingual nitroglycerin rarely causes hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemency, Brian M; Thompson, Jeffrey J; Tundo, Gina N; Lindstrom, Heather A

    2013-10-01

    High-dose intravenous nitroglycerin is a common in-hospital treatment for respiratory distress due to congestive heart failure (CHF) with hypertension. Intravenous (IV) nitroglycerin administration is impractical in the prehospital setting. In 2011, a new regional Emergency Medical Services (EMS) protocol was introduced allowing advanced providers to treat CHF with high-dose oral nitroglycerin. The protocol calls for patients to be treated with two sublingual tabs (0.8 mg) when systolic blood pressure (SBP) was >160 mm Hg, or three sublingual tabs (1.2 mg) when SBP was >200 mm Hg, every five minutes as needed. Hypothesis/Problem To assess the protocol's safety, the incidence of hypotension following prehospital administration of multiple simultaneous nitroglycerin (MSN) tabs by EMS providers was studied. This study was a retrospective cohort study of patients from a single commercial EMS agency over a 6-month period. Records from patients with at least one administration of MSN were reviewed. For each administration, the first documented vital signs pre- and post-administration were compared. Administrations were excluded if pre- or post-administration vital signs were missing. One hundred case-patients had at least one MSN administration by an advanced provider during the study period. Twenty-five case-patients were excluded due to incomplete vital signs. Seventy-five case-patients with 95 individual MSN administrations were included for analysis. There were 65 administrations of two tabs, 29 administrations of three tabs, and one administration of four tabs. The mean change in SBP following MSN was -14.7 mm Hg (SD = 30.7; range, +59 to -132). Three administrations had documented systolic hypotension in the post-administration vital signs (97/71, 78/50 and 66/47). All three patients were over 65 years old, were administered two tabs, had documented improved respiratory status, and had repeat SBP of at least 100. The incidence of hypotension following MSN

  18. The prehospital intravenous access assessment: a prospective study on intravenous access failure and access delay in prehospital emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prottengeier, Johannes; Albermann, Matthias; Heinrich, Sebastian; Birkholz, Torsten; Gall, Christine; Schmidt, Joachim

    2016-12-01

    Intravenous access in prehospital emergency care allows for early administration of medication and extended measures such as anaesthesia. Cannulation may, however, be difficult, and failure and resulting delay in treatment and transport may have negative effects on the patient. Therefore, our study aims to perform a concise assessment of the difficulties of prehospital venous cannulation. We analysed 23 candidate predictor variables on peripheral venous cannulations in terms of cannulation failure and exceedance of a 2 min time threshold. Multivariate logistic regression models were fitted for variables of predictive value (P0.6) of their respective receiver operating characteristic curve. A total of 762 intravenous cannulations were enroled. In all, 22% of punctures failed on the first attempt and 13% of punctures exceeded 2 min. Model selection yielded a three-factor model (vein visibility without tourniquet, vein palpability with tourniquet and insufficient ambient lighting) of fair accuracy for the prediction of puncture failure (AUC=0.76) and a structurally congruent model of four factors (failure model factors plus vein visibility with tourniquet) for the exceedance of the 2 min threshold (AUC=0.80). Our study offers a simple assessment to identify cases of difficult intravenous access in prehospital emergency care. Of the numerous factors subjectively perceived as possibly exerting influences on cannulation, only the universal - not exclusive to emergency care - factors of lighting, vein visibility and palpability proved to be valid predictors of cannulation failure and exceedance of a 2 min threshold.

  19. Pre-hospital physical activity status affects in-hospital course of elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Takamichi; Obayashi, Tohru; Hattori, Eijirou; Yamauchi, Yasuteru; Niwa, Akihiro; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2010-03-01

    The clinical course of elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) can sometimes unexpectedly result in an adverse outcome even when therapy appears to be successful. We suspect that specific factors may characterize this worsening of status during hospitalization. This study examines whether the pre-hospital physical activity status of the elderly treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for AMI affects their in-hospital course. We studied 110 consecutive patients, aged 80 or older, who had undergone emergent PCI for AMI. Patients were divided into two groups based on clinical presentation: Better Killip class (Killip classes I and II) and Worse Killip class (Killip classes III and IV). Patients were also divided into two groups based on pre-hospital physical activity status, determined retrospectively by review of medical records: Good physical activity (n=57) comprising those able to go out alone independently and Poor physical activity comprising those mainly confined to home (n=53). The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 9.1% for the study population. The Worse Killip class group had a higher in-hospital mortality rate than the Better Killip class group (27.8% vs 5.4%, respectively; p=0.0102). In addition, the Poor physical activity group had a higher in-hospital mortality rate than the Good physical activity group (15.1% vs. 3.5%, respectively; p=0.047). These data suggest that pre-hospital physical activity status in elderly patients with AMI may affect in-hospital mortality as well as Killip class.

  20. Team-focused Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Prehospital Principles Adapted for Emergency Department Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Blake; Runyon, Michael; Weekes, Anthony; Pearson, David

    2018-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has high rates of morbidity and mortality, and a growing body of evidence is redefining our approach to the resuscitation of these high-risk patients. Team-focused cardiopulmonary resuscitation (TFCPR), most commonly deployed and described by prehospital care providers, is a focused approach to cardiac arrest care that emphasizes early defibrillation and high-quality, minimally interrupted chest compressions while de-emphasizing endotracheal intubation and intravenous drug administration. TFCPR is associated with statistically significant increases in survival to hospital admission, survival to hospital discharge, and survival with good neurologic outcome; however, the adoption of similar streamlined resuscitation approaches by emergency physicians has not been widely reported. In the absence of a deliberately streamlined approach, such as TFCPR, other advanced therapies and procedures that have not shown similar survival benefit may be prioritized at the expense of simpler evidence-based interventions. This review examines the current literature on cardiac arrest resuscitation. The recent prehospital success of TFCPR is highlighted, including the associated improvements in multiple patient-centered outcomes. The adaptability of TFCPR to the emergency department (ED) setting is also discussed in detail. Finally, we discuss advanced interventions frequently performed during ED cardiac arrest resuscitation that may interfere with early defibrillation and effective high-quality chest compressions. TFCPR has been associated with improved patient outcomes in the prehospital setting. The data are less compelling for other commonly used advanced resuscitation tools and procedures. Emergency physicians should consider incorporating the TFCPR approach into ED cardiac arrest resuscitation to optimize delivery of those interventions most associated with improved outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Aspirin resistance: Prevalence and clinical outcome in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Salah

    2015-04-01

    Results: Prevalence of aspirin resistance was 48% in our study group. Aspirin resistance was significantly higher in patients with family history of CAD (p = 0.044, smoking (p = 0.011, history of MI (p = 0.024, history of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI (p = 0.001, and concomitant NSAIDs intake (p = 0.047. Moreover, aspirin resistance was more common among patients with multi-vessel CAD (p = 0.024. Aspirin-resistant patients had a significantly higher rate of UA (p = 0.001 and all major adverse cardiac events (MACE (p < 0.001.

  2. Aspirin Induces Apoptosis through Release of Cytochrome c from Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja C. Zimmermann

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID reduce the risk for cancer, due to their anti proliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects. A critical pathway for apoptosis involves the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, which then interacts with Apaf-1 to activate caspase proteases that orchestrate cell death. In this study we found that treatment of a human cancer cell line with aspirin induced caspase activation and the apoptotic cell morphology, which was blocked by the caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. Further analysis of the mechanism underlying this apoptotic event showed that aspirin induces translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and triggers release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. The release of cytochrome c from mitochondria was inhibited by overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cells that lack Apaf-1 were resistant to aspirin-induced apoptosis. These data provide evidence that the release of cytochrome c is an important part of the apoptotic mechanism of aspirin.

  3. Perioperative aspirin and clonidine and risk of acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garg, Amit X; Kurz, Andrea; Sessler, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Acute kidney injury, a common complication of surgery, is associated with poor outcomes and high health care costs. Some studies suggest aspirin or clonidine administered during the perioperative period reduces the risk of acute kidney injury; however, these effects are uncertain...... and each intervention has the potential for harm. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether aspirin compared with placebo, and clonidine compared with placebo, alters the risk of perioperative acute kidney injury. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A 2 × 2 factorial randomized, blinded, clinical trial of 6905...... patients undergoing noncardiac surgery from 88 centers in 22 countries with consecutive patients enrolled between January 2011 and December 2013. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were assigned to take aspirin (200 mg) or placebo 2 to 4 hours before surgery and then aspirin (100 mg) or placebo daily up to 30 days...

  4. Effect of Aspirin on Fractalkine in Rats with Pulmonary Embolism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Department of Surgical Oncology, Tumor Hospital of Taizhou, Wenling 317502, China ... PE-induced lung injury was alleviated by treatment with aspirin based on the results of ..... pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive ... pancreatitis.

  5. The Role of Platelet and its Interaction with Aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Fernanda Zúñiga Cerón

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion. It is recognized the role of platelet in different physiopathological processes and thus its interaction with aspirin, preventing its aggregation and thrombus formation in the spleen and other organs, this way contributing to the prevention of future cardiovascular events.

  6. Aspirin as a chemoprevention agent for colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Chun Seng

    2012-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of mortality in the western world. It is widely accepted that neoplasms such as colonic polyps are precursors to CRC formation; with the polyp-adenoma-carcinoma sequences well described in medical literature [1, 2]. It has been shown that Aspirin and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) have a negative effect on polyp and cancer formation. This review aims to describe some of the mechanism behind the chemoprotective properties of aspirin; COX 2 inhibition, regulation of proliferation and apoptosis and effects on the immune system and also the current evidence that supports its use as a chemoprevention agent against CRC. We will also aim to explore the side effects with the use of aspirin and the pitfalls of using aspirin routinely for primary prophylaxis against CRC.

  7. Trauma-informed care for children in the ambulance : international survey among pre-hospital providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alisic, Eva; Tyler, Mark P; Giummarra, Melita J; Kassam-Adams, Rahim; Gouweloos, Juul; Landolt, Markus A; Kassam-Adams, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pre-hospital providers, such as paramedics and emergency medical technicians, are in a position to provide key emotional support to injured children and their families. Objective: Our goal was to examine (a) pre-hospital providers' knowledge of traumatic stress in children, attitudes

  8. Data on association between QRS duration on prehospital ECG and mortality in patients with confirmed STEMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke; Frydland, Martin; Møller-Helgestad, Ole Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Data presented in this article relates to the research article entitled “Association between QRS duration on prehospital ECG and mortality in patients with suspected STEMI” (Hansen et al., in press) [1]. Data on the prognostic effect of automatically recoded QRS duration on prehospital ECG...

  9. Prehospital intraosseus access with the bone injection gun by a helicopter-transported emergency medical team.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritse, B.M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Draaisma, J.M.T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the use of the bone injection gun to obtain vascular access in the prehospital setting by an Helicopter-Transported Emergency Medical Team. METHODS: Prospective descriptive study to assess the frequency and success rate of the use of the bone injection gun in prehospital care

  10. Risk assessment of pre-hospital trauma airway management by anaesthesiologists using the predictive Bayesian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakstad Anders R

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Endotracheal intubation (ETI has been considered an essential part of pre-hospital advanced life support. Pre-hospital ETI, however, is a complex intervention also for airway specialist like anaesthesiologists working as pre-hospital emergency physicians. We therefore wanted to investigate the quality of pre-hospital airway management by anaesthesiologists in severely traumatised patients and identify possible areas for improvement. Method We performed a risk assessment according to the predictive Bayesian approach, in a typical anaesthesiologist-manned Norwegian helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS. The main focus of the risk assessment was the event where a patient arrives in the emergency department without ETI despite a pre-hospital indication for it. Results In the risk assessment, we assigned a high probability (29% for the event assessed, that a patient arrives without ETI despite a pre-hospital indication. However, several uncertainty factors in the risk assessment were identified related to data quality, indications for use of ETI, patient outcome and need for special training of ETI providers. Conclusion Our risk assessment indicated a high probability for trauma patients with an indication for pre-hospital ETI not receiving it in the studied HEMS. The uncertainty factors identified in the assessment should be further investigated to better understand the problem assessed and consequences for the patients. Better quality of pre-hospital airway management data could contribute to a reduction of these uncertainties.

  11. Antiplatelet therapy for recurrent stroke prevention: newer perspectives based on (MATCH), (CHARISMA), and (ESPRIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Philip B

    2008-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is an important component of our armamentarium for recurrent stroke prevention. Aspirin is a safe and effective antiplatelet drug for recurrent stroke prevention, however, it has been challenged recently by the thienopyridine derivative, clopidogrel, and the combination agent, aspirin plus extended release dipyridamole. In this review, we discuss recent studies of thienopyridine derivatives and aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole in stroke prevention and evidence-based guidelines for the administration of these agents in practice for recurrent stroke prevention.

  12. Trace element impurity determination in aspirin tablets by INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, E.K.; Saiki, M.

    2009-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was applied to assess trace element concentrations in six samples of aspirin tablets acquired in Sao Paulo city, Brazil. Concentrations of the elements Br, Ca, Co, Cr, Fe, K, La, Na, Sc and Zn were determined. Comparisons were made between the results obtained with published data for aspirins from foreign countries. Certified reference materials, INCT-MPH-2 Mixed Polish Herbs were analyzed for quality control of the analytical results. (author)

  13. Effect of prehospital ultrasound on clinical outcomes of non-trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Søren Steemann; Sørensen, Martin Kryspin; Svane, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Advances in technology have made prehospital ultrasound (US) examination available. Whether US in the prehospital setting can lead to improvement in clinical outcomes is yet unclear. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review was to assess whether prehospital US improves clinical...... studies for additional relevant studies. We then performed a risk of bias analysis and descriptive data analysis. RESULTS: We identified 1707 unique citations and included ten studies with a total of 1068 patients undergoing prehospital US examination. Included publications ranged from case series to non...... studies were of large heterogeneity and all showed a high risk of bias. We were thus unable to assess the effect of prehospital US on clinical outcomes. However, consistent reports suggested that US may improve patient management with respect to diagnosis, treatment, and hospital referral....

  14. Does prehospital ultrasound improve treatment of the trauma patient? A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik; Jensen, Carsten H; Dirks, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    an important role, as initial life support and early surgical care influences the outcome of the severely injured patient. Time is especially crucial in blunt abdominal trauma and penetrating truncal injuries. Several studies in this review showed that prehospital US is feasible and that the procedure...... created the possibility of bringing US to the prehospital setting, thus gaining a potential for early diagnosis and treatment. The objective of this study was to systematically search the literature for evidence that prehospital US of the abdomen or thorax increases survival of trauma patients. The data...... regarding the use of US in the prehospital setting is sparse, often of low quality and describing a broad variety of patients and clinical challenges. Therefore, from an evidence point of view it is not possible to answer the objectives in this review. In the prehospital setting, rapid assessment plays...

  15. Feasibility and safety of prehospital administration of bivalirudin in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersten, Maria; Nielsen, Søren Loumann; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    undergoing angiography with no difference between groups. Bivalirudin was easy to administer in the prehospital setting and did not affect the prehospital run times. In conclusion, the results suggest that prehospital bivalirudin administration is as safe and effective as heparin in the treatment of patients...... of this preliminary study was to describe the feasibility and safety of a switch from prehospital administration of unfractionated heparin to bivalirudin in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients referred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Patients with STEMI treated with a 1-mg...... patients (59%) receiving bivalirudin and 72 receiving heparin were followed during hospitalization. The baseline characteristics and prehospital treatment times were comparable between the 2 groups. The thrombolysis in myocardial infarction flow before and after primary percutaneous coronary intervention...

  16. Drug Resistance and Pseudoresistance: An Unintended Consequence of Enteric Coating Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosser, Tilo; Fries, Susanne; Lawson, John A.; Kapoor, Shiv C.; Grant, Gregory R.; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low dose aspirin reduces the secondary incidence of myocardial infarction and stroke. Drug resistance to aspirin might result in treatment failure. Despite this concern, no clear definition of “aspirin resistance” has emerged and estimates of its incidence have varied remarkably. We aimed to determine the commonality of a mechanistically consistent, stable and specific phenotype of true pharmacological resistance to aspirin – such as might be explained by genetic causes. Methods and Results Healthy volunteers (n=400) were screened for their response to a single oral dose of 325 mg immediate release or enteric coated aspirin. Response parameters reflected the activity of aspirin's molecular target, cyclooxygenase-1. Individuals who appeared “aspirin resistant” on one occasion underwent repeat testing and if still “resistant” were exposed to low dose enteric coated aspirin (81 mg) and clopidogrel (75 mg) for one week each. Variable absorption caused a high frequency of apparent resistance to a single dose of 325 mg enteric coated aspirin (up to 49%) but not to immediate release aspirin (0%). All individuals responded to aspirin upon repeated exposure, extension of the post dosing interval or addition of aspirin to their platelets ex vivo. Conclusions Pharmacological resistance to aspirin is rare; this study failed to identify a single case of true drug resistance. Pseudoresistance, reflecting delayed and reduced drug absorption, complicates enteric coated but not immediate release aspirin administration. Clinical Trial Registration Information clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier: NCT00948987. PMID:23212718

  17. Metabolome analysis of effect of aspirin on Drosophila lifespan extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chaochun; Zhu, Chenxing; Wu, Qi; Qi, Jiancheng; Gao, Yue; Zhang, Zhichao; Gaur, Uma; Yang, Deying; Fan, Xiaolan; Yang, Mingyao

    2017-09-01

    Effective approaches for drug development involve the repurposing of existing drugs which are already approved by the FDA. Aspirin has been shown to have many health benefits since its discovery as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) to treat pain and inflammation. Recent experiments demonstrated the longevity effects of aspirin in Drosophila, but its mechanism remains to be explored. In order to elucidate the effects of drug on metabolism, we carried out the metabolic analysis of aspirin-treated flies. The results identified 404 active metabolites in addition to the extended lifespan and improved healthspan in fly. There were 28 metabolites having significant changes between aspirin-treated group and the control group, out of which 22 compounds were found to have detailed information. These compounds are reported to have important functions in energy metabolism, amino sugar metabolism, and urea metabolism, indicating that aspirin might be playing positive roles in the fly's lifespan and healthspan improvement. Because of the conservation of major longevity pathways and mechanisms in different species, the health benefits of aspirin administration could be extended to other animals and humans as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Aspirin Supplementation on Hemodynamics in Older Firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane-Cordova, Abbi D; Ranadive, Sushant M; Yan, Huimin; Kappus, Rebecca M; Sun, Peng; Bunsawat, Kanokwan; Smith, Denise L; Horn, Gavin P; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Fernhall, B O

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular events are the leading cause of line-of-duty fatality for firefighters. Aspirin reduces the risk of cardiovascular events in men and may reduce fatalities in older (>40 yr) firefighters. We hypothesized that both chronic and acute aspirin supplementation would improve vascular function after live firefighting but that chronic supplementation would also improve resting hemodynamics. Twenty-four firefighters (40-60 yr) were randomly assigned to acute or chronic aspirin supplementation or placebo in a balanced, crossover design. Arterial stiffness, brachial and central blood pressures, as well as forearm vasodilatory capacity and blood flow were measured at rest and immediately after live firefighting. Total hyperemic blood flow (area under the curve (AUC)) was increased (P 0.05 for interaction). Arterial stiffness/central blood pressure increased (P < 0.04) with no effect of aspirin (from 0.0811 ± 0.001 to 0.0844 ± 0.003 m·s·mm⁻¹ Hg⁻¹ in aspirin condition versus 0.0802 ± 0.002 to 0.0858 ± 0.002 m·s⁻¹·mm Hg⁻¹ in placebo condition), whereas peripheral and central systolic and pulse pressures decreased after firefighting across conditions (P < 0.05). Live firefighting resulted in increased AUC and pressure-controlled arterial stiffness and decreased blood pressure in older firefighters, but aspirin supplementation did not affect macro- or microvascular responsiveness at rest or after firefighting.

  19. Selective and rapid monitoring of dual platelet inhibition by aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists by using multiple electrode aggregometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenz Reinhard

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor platelet inhibition by aspirin or clopidogrel has been associated with adverse outcomes in patients with cardiovascular diseases. A reliable and facile assay to measure platelet inhibition after treatment with aspirin and a P2Y12 antagonist is lacking. Multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA, which is being increasingly used in clinical studies, is sensitive to platelet inhibition by aspirin and clopidogrel, but a critical evaluation of MEA monitoring of dual anti-platelet therapy with aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists is missing. Design and Methods By performing in vitro and ex vivo experiments, we evaluated in healthy subjects the feasibility of using MEA to monitor platelet inhibition of P2Y12 antagonists (clopidogrel in vivo, cangrelor in vitro and aspirin (100 mg per day in vivo, and 1 mM or 5.4 mM in vitro alone, and in combination. Statistical analyses were performed by the Mann-Whitney rank sum test, student' t-test, analysis of variance followed by the Holm-Sidak test, where appropriate. Results ADP-induced platelet aggregation in hirudin-anticoagulated blood was inhibited by 99.3 ± 1.4% by in vitro addition of cangrelor (100 nM; p 95% and 100 ± 3.2%, respectively (p in vitro or ex vivo. Oral intake of clopidogrel did not significantly reduce AA-induced aggregation, but P2Y12 blockade by cangrelor (100 nM in vitro diminished AA-stimulated aggregation by 53 ± 26% (p Conclusions Selective platelet inhibition by aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists alone and in combination can be rapidly measured by MEA. We suggest that dual anti-platelet therapy with these two types of anti-platelet drugs can be optimized individually by measuring platelet responsiveness to ADP and AA with MEA before and after drug intake.

  20. Before Using Aspirin to Lower Your Risk of Heart Attack or Stroke, Here Is What You Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicines Safe Daily Use of Aspirin Before Using Aspirin to Lower Your Risk of Heart Attack or ... care provider can determine whether regular use of aspirin will help to prevent a heart attack or ...

  1. Effects of prehospital nitroglycerin on hemodynamics and chest pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberg, S; Singer, A J; Moldashel, J; Sciammarella, J; Thode, H C; Henry, M

    2000-01-01

    To assess the effects of prehospital nitroglycerin (NTG) on vital signs and chest pain intensity. A retrospective review of advanced life support (ALS) run sheets was performed in a suburban volunteer emergency medical services (EMS) system receiving 8,000 annual ALS calls. All consecutive patients who were administered NTG by EMS were included. Standardized forms were used to collect data on patient demographics, history, and physical exam. Patients assessed their chest pain (CP) before and after NTG on a verbal numeric scale of 0-10 from least to most severe. The presence of syncope, dysrhythmias, or profound hypotension [loss of peripheral pulses, a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 100 mm Hg in BP] was noted. Results. One thousand six hundred sixty-two patients received NTG over 18 months, their mean age was 66 years, and 48% were female. Indications for NTG included CP (83%), dyspnea (45%), and congestive heart failure (20%). After NTG administration, the CP score decreased from 6.9 to 4.4 (mean difference = 2.6; 95% CI = 2.4 to 2.8). The CP completely resolved in 10% of the patients. Mean decreases in SBPs and diastolic BPs were 11.8 mm Hg (95% CI = 10.7 to 13.0) and 4.0 mm Hg (95% CI = 2.9 to 5.1). The mean pulse rate increased by 2.7 beats/min (95% CI = 0.6 to 4.9). There were 12 patients with adverse events [0.7% (95% CI = 0.4% to 1.3%)], including profound bradycardia and hypotension (1), transient drop in SBP of 100 mm Hg responding to fluids (6), post-NTG SBP <90 mm Hg (4), and syncope (1). There were no deaths in the prehospital setting. Use of prehospital NTG appears safe. While NTG reduces CP, most patients have residual pain.

  2. Aspirin responsiveness changes in obese patients following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgard, Nicholas B; Monte, Scott V; Fernandez, Stanley F; Ma, Qing

    2017-08-01

    Bariatric surgery has emerged as a promising treatment option for weight loss and to counter the metabolic consequences of obesity. Obesity has been linked to a hyperaggregable state, as well as a blunted response to aspirin. This pilot study assessed the hypothesis that bariatric surgery would lead to an improvement in aspirin-induced platelet inhibition and a reduction in platelet aggregability. Fifteen patients scheduled to undergo bariatric surgery were administered two 7-day courses of aspirin 81 mg: the first course administered before surgery and the second was 3 months following surgery. Platelet aggregation was measured before and after each aspirin course using VerifyNow-Aspirin. The primary endpoint was the change in on-treatment aspirin reactive units (ARU) pre- and postsurgery. Data from bariatric surgery study patients were compared to data of normal weighted subjects gathered in a previous study. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was performed in 80%, and 20% underwent sleeve gastrectomy. The mean starting body mass index (BMI) was 46.9 kg/m 2 . Patients lost on average 24.5 kg, resulting in a postsurgical BMI of 38.5 kg/m 2 . Postbariatric surgery, off-treatment ARU was significantly reduced from presurgery levels (602±59 vs 531±78; P=.035). On-aspirin platelet reactivity was also significantly reduced following surgery (469±60 vs 432±143, P=.03). There was a significant correlation between the extent of weight loss and the degree of improvement in on-aspirin platelet reactivity (r 2 =.49, P=.024). Presurgery on-aspirin platelet reactivity was significantly higher in obese patients compared to normal weighted subjects (469±60 vs 419±52; P=.016) and reduced to the baseline after the surgery (432±63 vs 419±52; P=.54). Aspirin-induced platelet inhibition may be more potent following bariatric surgery. The mechanisms behind this improvement require further investigation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Emergency Physician Awareness of Prehospital Procedures and Medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Waldron

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Maintaining patient safety during transition from prehospital to emergency department (ED care depends on effective handoff communication between providers. We sought to determine emergency physicians’ (EP knowledge of the care provided by paramedics in terms of both procedures and medications, and whether the use of a verbal report improved physician accuracy. Methods: We conducted a 2-phase observational survey of a convenience sample of EPs in an urban, academic ED. In this large ED paramedics have no direct contact with physicians for non-critical patients, giving their report instead to the triage nurse. In Phase 1, paramedics gave verbal report to the triage nurse only. In Phase 2, a research assistant (RA stationed in triage listened to this report and then repeated it back verbatim to the EPs caring for the patient. The RA then queried the EPs 90 minutes later regarding their patients’ prehospital procedures and medications. We compared the accuracy of these 2 reporting methods. Results: There were 163 surveys completed in Phase 1 and 116 in Phase 2. The oral report had no effect on EP awareness that the patient had been brought in by ambulance (86% in Phase 1 and 85% in Phase 2. The oral report did improve EP awareness of prehospital procedures, from 16% in Phase 1 to 45% in Phase 2, OR=4.28 (2.5-7.5. EPs were able to correctly identify all oral medications in 18% of Phase 1 cases and 47% of Phase 2 cases, and all IV medications in 42% of Phase 1 cases and 50% of Phase 2 cases. The verbal report led to a mild improvement in physician awareness of oral medications given, OR=4.0 (1.09-14.5, and no improvement in physician awareness of IV medications given, OR=1.33 (0.15-11.35. Using a composite score of procedures plus oral plus IV medications, physicians had all three categories correct in 15% of Phase 1 and 39% of Phase 2 cases (p<0.0001. Conclusion: EPs in our ED were unaware of many prehospital procedures and

  4. [Scandinavian guidelines for prehospital management of severe traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollid, S.; Sundstrom, T.; Kock-Jensen, C.

    2008-01-01

    . Evidence-based guidelines already exist that focus on all steps in the process. In the present article members of the Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee present recommendations on prehospital management of traumatic brain injury adapted to the infrastructure of the Nordic region Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/26......Head trauma is the cause the death for many young persons. The number of fatalities can be reduced through systematic management. Prevention of secondary brain injury combined with the fastest possible transport to a neurosurgical unit, have been shown to effectively reduce mortality and morbidity...

  5. Patients in prehospital transport to the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Camilla Louise Nørgaard; Brabrand, Mikkel; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ambulance transfer is the first contact with the healthcare system for many patients in emergency conditions.We aimed to identify prognostic risk factors accessible in the prehospital phase that indicate an increased risk of 7-day mortality. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included patients ...... aged 18 years or older, transferred by ambulance to the emergency department at Odense University Hospital, from 1 April 2012 to 30 September 2014. We carried out multivariate logistic regressions, adjusted for age and sex, to describe the relationship between vital sign values recorded...

  6. Contemporary management of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis in aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease: an evidence-based review with recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Joshua M.; Rudmik, Luke; Peters, Anju T.; Wise, Sarah K.; Rotenberg, Brian W.; Smith, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) represents a recalcitrant form of sinonasal inflammation for which a multidisciplinary consensus on patient management has not been reached. Several medical interventions have been investigated, but a formal comprehensive evaluation of the evidence has never been performed. The purpose of this article is to provide an evidence-based approach for the multidisciplinary management of CRS in AERD. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed and the guidelines for development of an evidence-based review with recommendations were followed. Study inclusion criteria included: adult population>18 years old; CRS based on published diagnostic criteria and a presumptive diagnosis of AERD. We focused on reporting higher-quality studies (level 2 or higher) when available, but reported lower-quality studies if the topic contained insufficient evidence. Treatment recommendations were based on American Academy of Otolaryngology guidelines, with defined grades of evidence and evaluation of research quality and risk/benefits associated with each treatment. Results This review identified and evaluated the literature on 3 treatment strategies for CRS in AERD: dietary salicylate avoidance, leukotriene modification and desensitization with daily aspirin therapy. Conclusion Based on the available evidence, dietary salicylate avoidance and leukotriene modifying drugs are options following appropriate treatment with nasal corticosteroids and saline irrigation. Desensitization with daily aspirin therapy is recommended following revision ESS. PMID:27480830

  7. Electrocardiogram interpretation in general practice: relevance to prehospital thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, W A; Saltissi, S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess, in the context of their possible role in prehospital thrombolysis, the ability of general practitioners to recognise acute transmural myocardial ischaemia/infarction on an electrocardiogram. DESIGN--150 doctors (every fifth name) were selected from the alphabetical list of 750 on Merseyside general practitioner register and without prior warning were asked to interpret a series of six 12 lead electrocardiograms. Three of these showed acute transmural ischaemia/infarction, one was normal, and two showed non-acute abnormalities. Details of doctors' ages, postgraduate training, and clinical practice were sought. SETTING--General practitioners' surgeries and postgraduate centres within the Merseyside area. PARTICIPANTS--106 general practitioners (mean age 45 years) agreed to participate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Accuracy of general practitioners' interpretations of the six electrocardiograms. RESULTS--82% of general practitioners correctly recognised a normal electrocardiogram. Recognition of acute abnormalities was less reliable. Between 33% and 61% correctly identified acute transmural ischaemia/infarction depending on the specific trace presented. Accurate localisation of the site of the infarct was achieved only by between 8% and 30% of participants, while between 22% and 25% correctly interpreted non-acute abnormalities. Neither routine use of electrocardiography nor postgraduate hospital experience in general medicine was associated with significantly greater expertise. CONCLUSION--The current level of proficiency of a sample of general practitioners in the Merseyside area in recognising acute transmural ischaemia/infarction on an electrocardiogram suggests that refresher training is needed if general practitioners are to give prehospital thrombolysis. Images PMID:8398491

  8. Wireless local area network in a prehospital environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimes Gary J

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wireless local area networks (WLANs are considered the next generation of clinical data network. They open the possibility for capturing clinical data in a prehospital setting (e.g., a patient's home using various devices, such as personal digital assistants, laptops, digital electrocardiogram (EKG machines, and even cellular phones, and transmitting the captured data to a physician or hospital. The transmission rate is crucial to the applicability of the technology in the prehospital setting. Methods We created two separate WLANs to simulate a virtual local are network environment such as in a patient's home or an emergency room (ER. The effects of different methods of data transmission, number of clients, and roaming among different access points on the file transfer rate were determined. Results The present results suggest that it is feasible to transfer small files such as patient demographics and EKG data from the patient's home to the ER at a reasonable speed. Encryption, user control, and access control were implemented and results discussed. Conclusions Implementing a WLAN in a centrally managed and multiple-layer-controlled access control server is the key to ensuring its security and accessibility. Future studies should focus on product capacity, speed, compatibility, interoperability, and security management.

  9. Aspirin, but not clopidogrel, reduces collateral conductance in a rabbit model of femoral artery occlusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefer, Imo E.; Grundmann, Sebastian; Schirmer, Stephan; van Royen, Niels; Meder, Benjamin; Bode, Christoph; Piek, Jan J.; Buschmann, Ivo R.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to test the potential of aspirin and clopidogrel to influence collateral artery growth (arteriogenesis). BACKGROUND Aspirin and clopidogrel are antiplatelet agents commonly used in the treatment of ischemic cardiovascular disease. Both inhibit platelet

  10. Aspirin in Patients With Previous Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Michelle M; Sessler, Daniel I; Parlow, Joel L

    2018-01-01

    Background: Uncertainty remains about the effects of aspirin in patients with prior percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) having noncardiac surgery. Objective: To evaluate benefits and harms of perioperative aspirin in patients with prior PCI. Design: Nonprespecified subgroup analysis of a mul...

  11. Aspirin provocation increases 8-iso-PGE2 in exhaled breath condensate of aspirin-hypersensitive asthmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalerz, Lucyna; Januszek, Rafał; Kaszuba, Marek; Wójcik, Krzysztof; Celejewska-Wójcik, Natalia; Gielicz, Anna; Plutecka, Hanna; Oleś, Krzysztof; Stręk, Paweł; Sanak, Marek

    2015-09-01

    Isoprostanes are bioactive compounds formed by non-enzymatic oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, mostly arachidonic, and markers of free radical generation during inflammation. In aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), asthmatic symptoms are precipitated by ingestion of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs capable for pharmacologic inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 isoenzyme. We investigated whether aspirin-provoked bronchoconstriction is accompanied by changes of isoprostanes in exhaled breath condensate (EBC). EBC was collected from 28 AERD subjects and 25 aspirin-tolerant asthmatics before and after inhalatory aspirin challenge. Concentrations of 8-iso-PGF2α, 8-iso-PGE2, and prostaglandin E2 were measured using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Leukotriene E4 was measured by immunoassay in urine samples collected before and after the challenge. Before the challenge, exhaled 8-iso-PGF2α, 8-iso-PGE2, and PGE2 levels did not differ between the study groups. 8-iso-PGE2 level increased in AERD group only (p=0.014) as a result of the aspirin challenge. Urinary LTE4 was elevated in AERD, both in baseline and post-challenge samples. Post-challenge airways 8-iso-PGE2 correlated positively with urinary LTE4 level (p=0.046), whereas it correlated negatively with the provocative dose of aspirin (p=0.027). A significant increase of exhaled 8-iso-PGE2 after inhalatory challenge with aspirin was selective and not present for the other isoprostane measured. This is a novel finding in AERD, suggesting that inhibition of cyclooxygenase may elicit 8-iso-PGE2 production in a specific mechanism, contributing to bronchoconstriction and systemic overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Aspirin attenuates spontaneous recurrent seizures in the chronically epileptic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kun; Hu, Ming; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Jian-Xin; Liu, Yong

    2017-08-01

    Neuroinflammatory processes are pathologic hallmarks of both experimental and human epilepsy, and could be implicated in the neuronal hyperexcitability. Aspirin represents one of the non-selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with fewer side effects in long-term application. This study was carried out to assess the anti-epileptic effects of aspirin when administered during the chronic stage of temporal lobe epilepsy [TLE] in mice. The alteration of hippocampal neurogenesis was also examined for raising a possible mechanism underlying the protective effect of anti-inflammatory treatment in the TLE. Two months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, the chronically epileptic mice were treated with aspirin (20 mg, 60 mg or 80 mg/kg) once a day for 10 weeks. Spontaneous recurrent seizures were monitored by video camera for 2 weeks. To evaluate the profile of hippocampal neurogenesis, the newly generated cells in the dentate gyrus were labeled by the proliferation marker BrdU. The newborn neurons that extended axons to CA3 area were visualized by cholera toxin B subunit retrograde tracing. Administration of aspirin with a dosage of 60 mg or 80 mg/kg initiated at 2 months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus significantly reduced the frequency and duration of spontaneous recurrent seizures. Aspirin treatment also increased the number of newborn neurons with anatomic integration through improving the survival of the newly generated cells. Aspirin treatment during the chronic stage of TLE could attenuate the spontaneous recurrent seizures in mice. Promotion of hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibition of COX-PGE2 pathway might partly contribute to this anti-epileptic effect. Highlights • Aspirin attenuates spontaneous recurrent seizures of chronically epileptic mice • Aspirin increases neurogenesis of chronically epileptic hippocampus by improving the survival of newly generated cells • Promotion of hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibition

  13. Use and Misuse of Aspirin in Primary Cardiovascular Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Coccheri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of low-dose aspirin in primary prevention of cardiovascular (CV events in healthy or apparently healthy people is a widely debated topic. Many arguments indicate that “primary prevention” is only a conventional definition and that the transition from primary to secondary prevention represents a continuum of increasing levels of CV risk. Although there are no direct proofs of a different efficacy of aspirin at different CV risk levels, in low-risk populations aspirin will appear to be less efficient. In fact, the lower number of events occurring in patients at low risk yields lower absolute numbers of events prevented. As many as 6 meta-analyses of trials of primary CV prevention with aspirin versus placebo, performed between 2009 and 2016, confirmed the above concepts and showed a concordant, significant reduction in nonfatal myocardial infarction, with no significant effects on stroke, as well as on CV and all-cause mortality. The recent demonstration of a moderate protective effect of aspirin on cancer (especially colorectal confers, however, additional value to the use of aspirin, although unusually long durations of treatment and optimal daily compliance seem to be necessary. Because aspirin increases the bleeding risk, the evaluation of its net clinical benefit is an important point of debate. Thus, it is justified to search for a cutoff level of global CV risk above which the net clinical benefit of aspirin becomes evident. Such a threshold value has been calculated considering the data of 9 primary prevention trials, by the Thrombosis Group of the European Society of Cardiology, and has been indicated as a risk value of 2 or more major CV events per 100 persons per year. Also, in the recent 2016 US Guidelines, the main criterion adopted for the indication of aspirin is the level of global CV risk (suggested cutoff is 1 or more major CV events per 100 persons per year. Beyond the different values selected, it is seems very

  14. Influence of Differing Analgesic Formulations of Aspirin on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Kanani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin has been used therapeutically for over 100 years. As the originator and an important marketer of aspirin-containing products, Bayer’s clinical trial database contains numerous reports of the pharmacokinetics of various aspirin formulations. These include evaluations of plain tablets, effervescent tablets, granules, chewable tablets, and fast-release tablets. This publication seeks to expand upon the available pharmacokinetic information concerning aspirin formulations. In the pre-systemic circulation, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA is rapidly converted into its main active metabolite, salicylic acid (SA. Therefore, both substances are measured in plasma and reported in the results. The 500 mg strength of each formulation was chosen for analysis as this is the most commonly used for analgesia. A total of 22 studies were included in the analysis. All formulations of 500 mg aspirin result in comparable plasma exposure to ASA and SA as evidenced by AUC. Tablets and dry granules provide a consistently lower Cmax compared to effervescent, granules in suspension and fast release tablets. Effervescent tablets, fast release tablets, and granules in suspension provide a consistently lower median Tmax compared to dry granules and tablets for both ASA and SA. This report reinforces the importance of formulation differences and their impact on pharmacokinetic parameters.

  15. Functionalized bimodal mesoporous silicas as carriers for controlled aspirin delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Lin; Sun Jihong; Li Yuzhen

    2011-01-01

    The bimodal mesoporous silica modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was performed as the aspirin carrier. The samples' structure, drug loading and release profiles were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N 2 adsorption and desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, TG analysis, elemental analysis and UV-spectrophotometer. For further exploring the effects of the bimodal mesopores on the drug delivery behavior, the unimodal mesoporous material MCM-41 was also modified as the aspirin carrier. Meantime, Korsmeyer-Peppas equation f t =kt n was employed to analyze the dissolution data in details. It is indicated that the bimodal mesopores are beneficial for unrestricted drug molecules diffusing and therefore lead to a higher loading and faster releasing than that of MCM-41. The results show that the aspirin delivery properties are influenced considerably by the mesoporous matrix, whereas the large pore of bimodal mesoporous silica is the key point for the improved controlled-release properties. - Graphical abstract: Loading (A) and release profiles (B) of aspirin in N-BMMs and N-MCM-41 indicated that BMMs have more drug loading capacity and faster release rate than that MCM-41. Highlights: → Bimodal mesoporous silicas (BMMs) and MCM-41 modified with amino group via post-treatment procedure. → Loading and release profiles of aspirin in modified BMMs and MCM-41. → Modified BMMs have more drug loading capacity and faster release rate than that modified MCM-41.

  16. Acetaminophen and aspirin inhibit superoxide anion generation and lipid peroxidation, and protect against 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, D S; Saravanan, K S; Maharaj, H; Mohanakumar, K P; Daya, S

    2004-04-01

    We assessed the antioxidant activity of non-narcotic analgesics, acetaminophen and aspirin in rat brain homogenates and neuroprotective effects in vivo in rats intranigrally treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium (MPP+). Both drugs inhibited cyanide-induced superoxide anion generation, as well as lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenates, the combination of the agents resulting in a potentiation of this effect. Acetaminophen or aspirin when administered alone or in combination, did not alter dopamine (DA) levels in the forebrain or in the striatum. Intranigral infusion of MPP+ in rats caused severe depletion of striatal DA levels in the ipsilateral striatum in rats by the third day. Systemic post-treatment of acetaminophen afforded partial protection, whereas similar treatment of aspirin resulted in complete blockade of MPP+-induced striatal DA depletion. While these findings suggest usefulness of non-narcotic analgesics in neuroprotective therapy in neurodegenerative diseases, aspirin appears to be a potential candidate in prophylactic as well as in adjuvant therapy in Parkinson's disease.

  17. Two doses of rivaroxaban versus aspirin for prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism. Rationale for and design of the EINSTEIN CHOICE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Jeffrey I; Bauersachs, Rupert; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A; Cohen, Alexander T; Davidson, Bruce L; Holberg, Gerlind; Kakkar, Ajay; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Prins, Martin; Haskell, Lloyd; van Bellen, Bonno; Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S; Prandoni, Paolo

    2015-08-31

    Patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) are at high risk for recurrence. Although rivaroxaban is effective for extended VTE treatment at a dose of 20 mg once daily, use of the 10 mg dose may further improve its benefit-to-risk ratio. Low-dose aspirin also reduces rates of recurrent VTE, but has not been compared with anticoagulant therapy. The EINSTEIN CHOICE study is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, active-controlled, event-driven study comparing the efficacy and safety of two once daily doses of rivaroxaban (20 and 10 mg) with aspirin (100 mg daily) for the prevention of recurrent VTE in patients who completed 6-12 months of anticoagulant therapy for their index acute VTE event. All treatments will be given for 12 months. The primary efficacy objective is to determine whether both doses of rivaroxaban are superior to aspirin for the prevention of symptomatic recurrent VTE, while the principal safety outcome is the incidence of major bleeding. The trial is anticipated to enrol 2,850 patients from 230 sites in 31 countries over a period of 27 months. In conclusion, the EINSTEIN CHOICE study will provide new insights into the optimal antithrombotic strategy for extended VTE treatment by comparing two doses of rivaroxaban with aspirin (clinicaltrials.gov NCT02064439).

  18. Use and Safety of Non-Steroidal Inflammatory Drugs and Aspirin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.E. Valkhoff (Vera)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe use of acetylsalicylic acid, better known as aspirin, dates back to the Egyptians in 1534 BC. Aspirin-like compounds are naturally derived from willow tree bark and myr-tle. At the end of the 19th century aspirin was patented by Bayer as the world’s first syn-thetic drug. The

  19. Use of low-dose aspirin and non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; García-Rodríguez, L A; Sørensen, H T

    2013-01-01

    Background:Few studies have examined the association between use of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and risk of glioma and the results have been equivocal. We therefore investigated the influence of NSAID use on glioma risk in a nationwide setting.Methods:We used...... exposure to low-dose aspirin or non-aspirin (NA) NSAIDs into ever use or long-term use, defined as continuous use for 5 years. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (ORs), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), for glioma associated with NSAID use, adjusted for potential...... confounders.Results:A total of 2688 glioma cases and 18 848 population controls were included in the study. Ever use of low-dose aspirin (OR=0.90; 95% CI: 0.77-1.04) or NA-NSAIDs (OR=1.05; 95% CI: 0.96-1.14) was not associated with glioma risk. Compared with never use, long-term use of low-dose aspirin...

  20. Comparison of hyperuricemia in type 2 diabetics on low dose aspirin and not on low dose aspirin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the frequency of hyperuricemia in type 2 diabetes patients who are taking low dose aspirin with those patients who are not taking low dose aspirin. Study design: Quasi experimental study. Place and duration of study: This study was carried out at Military Hospital Rawalpindi for a period of two years (June 2006-May 2008). Patients and Methods: Sixty diabetic patients were selected who were taking low dose aspirin comparing group A and sixty diabetic patients who were not taking aspirin were placed in group B. These patients were selected from the OPD through non probability convenience sampling. All these patients were being followed up in medical outpatient quite regularly on fort-nightly basis. Data had been collected through a carefully designed questionnaire. Results: In group A, 90% of the patients had uric acid less than 445 micro mol/l and 10% of the patients had uric acid more than 445micro mol/l. Whereas in group B 100% of the patients had uric acid less than 445umol/l, there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Aspirin in low doses cause hyperuricemia and regular monitoring of uric acid is mandatory to prevent its adverse effects. (author)

  1. A computational prospect to aspirin side effects: aspirin and COX-1 interaction analysis based on non-synonymous SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjan, Mojtabavi Naeini; Hamzeh, Mesrian Tanha; Rahman, Emamzadeh; Sadeq, Vallian

    2014-08-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is a commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which exerts its therapeutic effects through inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) isoform 2 (COX-2), while the inhibition of COX-1 by ASA leads to apparent side effects. In the present study, the relationship between COX-1 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) and aspirin related side effects was investigated. The functional impacts of 37 nsSNPs on aspirin inhibition potency of COX-1 with COX-1/aspirin molecular docking were computationally analyzed, and each SNP was scored based on DOCK Amber score. The data predicted that 22 nsSNPs could reduce COX-1 inhibition, while 15 nsSNPs showed increasing inhibition level in comparison to the regular COX-1 protein. In order to perform a comparing state, the Amber scores for two Arg119 mutants (R119A and R119Q) were also calculated. Moreover, among nsSNP variants, rs117122585 represented the closest Amber score to R119A mutant. A separate docking computation validated the score and represented a new binding position for ASA that acetyl group was located within the distance of 3.86Å from Ser529 OH group. This could predict an associated loss of activity of ASA through this nsSNP variant. Our data represent a computational sub-population pattern for aspirin COX-1 related side effects, and provide basis for further research on COX-1/ASA interaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Functionalized bimodal mesoporous silicas as carriers for controlled aspirin delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin; Sun, Jihong; Li, Yuzhen

    2011-08-01

    The bimodal mesoporous silica modified with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane was performed as the aspirin carrier. The samples' structure, drug loading and release profiles were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, N 2 adsorption and desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, TG analysis, elemental analysis and UV-spectrophotometer. For further exploring the effects of the bimodal mesopores on the drug delivery behavior, the unimodal mesoporous material MCM-41 was also modified as the aspirin carrier. Meantime, Korsmeyer-Peppas equation ft= ktn was employed to analyze the dissolution data in details. It is indicated that the bimodal mesopores are beneficial for unrestricted drug molecules diffusing and therefore lead to a higher loading and faster releasing than that of MCM-41. The results show that the aspirin delivery properties are influenced considerably by the mesoporous matrix, whereas the large pore of bimodal mesoporous silica is the key point for the improved controlled-release properties.

  3. Regular use of aspirin and pancreatic cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoney Martin C

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs has been consistently associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer and adenoma, and there is some evidence for a protective effect for other types of cancer. As experimental studies reveal a possible role for NSAIDs is reducing the risk of pancreatic cancer, epidemiological studies examining similar associations in human populations become more important. Methods In this hospital-based case-control study, 194 patients with pancreatic cancer were compared to 582 age and sex-matched patients with non-neoplastic conditions to examine the association between aspirin use and risk of pancreatic cancer. All participants received medical services at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY and completed a comprehensive epidemiologic questionnaire that included information on demographics, lifestyle factors and medical history as well as frequency and duration of aspirin use. Patients using at least one tablet per week for at least six months were classified as regular aspirin users. Unconditional logistic regression was used to compute crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results Pancreatic cancer risk in aspirin users was not changed relative to non-users (adjusted OR = 1.00; 95% CI 0.72–1.39. No significant change in risk was found in relation to greater frequency or prolonged duration of use, in the total sample or in either gender. Conclusions These data suggest that regular aspirin use may not be associated with lower risk of pancreatic cancer.

  4. Pre-hospital haemostatic dressings: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granville-Chapman, J; Jacobs, N; Midwinter, M J

    2011-05-01

    Uncontrolled haemorrhage is a leading cause of prehospital death after military and civilian trauma. Exsanguination from extremity wounds causes over half of preven military combat deaths and wounds to the anatomical junctional zones provide a particular challenge for first responders. Commercial products have been developed, which claim to outperform standard gauze bandages in establishing and maintaining non-surgical haemostasis. Since 2004, two advanced haemostatic dressing products, HemCon and QuikClot have been widely deployed in military operations. Newer products have since become available which aim to provide more efficient haemostasis than and thus supersede HemCon and QuikClot. To conduct a systematic review of clinical and preclinical evidence to compare the relative efficacy and safety of available haemostatic products, which are of relevance to pre-hospital military and civilian emergency medical providers. An English language literature search was performed, using PubMed and Web of Knowledge Databases, with cross-referencing, focussed product searches and communication with product manufacturers. For studies employing animal models, the injury model was required to produce fatal haemorrhage. Products were categorised by primary mode of action as either factor concentrators,mucoadhesive agents or procoagulant supplementors. From 60 articles collated, 6 clinical papers and 37 preclinical animal trials were eligible for inclusion in this review. Products have been tested in three different types of haemorrhage model: low pressure, high volume venous bleeding, high pressure arterial bleeding and mixed arterial-venous bleeding. The efficacy of products varies with the model adopted. Criteria for the 'ideal battle field haemostatic dressing' have previously been defined by Pusateri, but no product has yet attained suchstatus. Since 2004, HemCon (a mucoadhesive agent) and QuikClot (a factor concentrator) have been widely deployed by United States and United

  5. Pre-hospital aspiration is associated with increased pulmonary complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Vanessa J; Warner, Keir J; Cuschieri, Joseph; Copass, Michael; Grabinsky, Andreas; Kwok, Heemun; Rea, Thomas; Evans, Heather L

    2015-04-01

    Rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) are highest among patients intubated on an emergency basis following trauma. We reported previously a retrospective analysis demonstrating an association between subjective aspiration and VAP after pre-hospital intubation. We hypothesize that by directing paramedics to note features of aspiration at intubation, we will confirm prospectively the association between pre-hospital aspiration and subsequent pneumonia in trauma patients. Paramedics collected data regarding aspiration at the time of intubation. All intubated patients admitted to a level 1 trauma center intensive care unit (ICU) were included. Data comprised a clinical impression of pre-hospital aspiration, as well as the presence and timing of blood and emesis in the airway. Injury severity, co-morbidities, and outcomes were collected from the trauma registry. Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HAP) was identified by medical record review of both bronchoalveolar lavage culture results and discharge diagnosis. Descriptive statistics and univariate analysis of outcomes by aspiration status, as well as covariable adjustment using propensity scores, were performed. Of the 228 patients, 89 (39%) were determined by paramedics to have aspirated. The majority of those who aspirated (84 [94%]) did so prior to intubation. Patients who aspirated had higher Injury Severity Scores than those who did not aspirate (25.0 ± 1.7 vs. 21.9 ± 1.5 points; p=0.04) and lower preintubation Glasgow Coma Scale scores (8.2 ± 0.50 vs. 9.6 ± 0.40; p=0.02). Of the 89 patients who aspirated around the time of intubation, 14 (16%) developed HAP vs. five (3.6%) of those who did not aspirate (paspiration (deaths: 21 [23.6%] vs. 23 [16.6%]; p=0.19; ICU LOS: 5.3 ± 0.9 vs. 4.1 ± 0.5 days; p=0.13; duration of mechanical ventilation: 5.3 ± 1.2 vs. 3.2 ± 0.5 days; p=0.10). Aspiration prior to intubation was reported commonly by paramedics and was associated with a higher risk of HAP.

  6. Aspirin for Prophylaxis Against Venous Thromboembolism After Orthopaedic Oncologic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Gregory M; Patel, Yash M; Ricketti, Daniel A; Gaughan, John P; Lackman, Richard D; Kim, Tae Won B

    2017-12-06

    Patients who undergo orthopaedic oncologic surgical procedures are at increased risk of developing a venous thromboembolism (VTE). Guidelines from surgical societies are shifting to include aspirin as a postoperative VTE prophylactic agent. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using aspirin as postoperative VTE prophylaxis for orthopaedic oncologic surgical procedures. This study was a retrospective review of patients diagnosed with a primary malignant soft-tissue or bone tumor or metastatic carcinoma. Demographic information, histopathologic diagnosis, VTE history, surgical procedure, and VTE prophylaxis were analyzed. VTE rates in the overall and prophylactic-specific cohorts were recorded and compared. A total of 142 distinct surgical procedures in 130 patients were included. VTE prophylaxis with aspirin was used after 103 procedures, and non-aspirin prophylaxis was used after 39. In 33 cases, imaging was used to investigate for VTE because of clinical signs and symptoms. VTE developed after 7 (4.9%) of the 142 procedures. There were 6 deep venous thromboses (DVTs) and 1 pulmonary embolism, and 2 of the VTEs presented in patients with a VTE history. VTE developed in 2.9% (3) of the 103 aspirin cases and 10.3% (4) of the 39 non-aspirin cases. No patient in the aspirin group who had been diagnosed with metastatic carcinoma, malignant soft-tissue sarcoma, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma developed a VTE. Risk factors for VTE development included diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 10.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.61 to 67.30), a history of VTE (OR = 7.26, 95% CI = 1.19 to 44.25), postoperative transfusion (OR = 34.50, 95% CI = 3.94 to 302.01), and estimated blood losses of 250 mL (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.03), 500 mL (OR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.23 to 4.13), and 1,000 mL (OR = 5.10, 95% CI = 1.52 to 17.04). Aspirin may be a suitable and effective option for VTE chemoprophylaxis in patients treated with orthopaedic oncologic surgery, especially

  7. Pre-hospital transfusion of plasma in hemorrhaging trauma patients independently improves hemostatic competence and acidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Hanne Herborg; Rahbar, Elaheh; Baer, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    hypothesized that pre-hospital plasma would improve hemostatic function as evaluated by rapid thrombelastography (rTEG). METHODS: We conducted a prospective observational study recruiting 257 trauma patients admitted to a Level I trauma center having received either blood products pre-hospital or in......BACKGROUND: The early use of blood products has been associated with improved patient outcomes following severe hemorrhage or traumatic injury. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-hospital blood products (i.e. plasma and/or RBCs) on admission hemostatic properties and patient outcomes. We......-hospital within 6 hours of admission. Clinical data on patient demographics, blood biochemistry, injury severity score and mortality were collected. Admission rTEG was conducted to characterize the coagulation profile and hemostatic function. RESULTS: 75 patients received pre-hospital plasma and/or RBCs (PH group...

  8. Prehospital interventions before and after implementation of a physician-staffed helicopter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Asger; Wulffeld, Sandra; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Implementation of a physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) in eastern Denmark was associated with increased survival for severely injured patients. This study aimed to assess the potential impact of advanced prehospital interventions by comparing the proportion...

  9. Excessive chest compression rate is associated with insufficient compression depth in prehospital cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monsieurs, Koenraad G.; De Regge, Melissa; Vansteelandt, Kristof; De Smet, Jeroen; Annaert, Emmanuel; Lemoyne, Sabine; Kalmar, Alain F.; Calle, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and goal of study: The relationship between chest compression rate and compression depth is unknown. In order to characterise this relationship, we performed an observational study in prehospital cardiac arrest patients. We hypothesised that faster compressions are associated with

  10. The value of the pre-hospital learning environment as part of the emergency nursing programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonett van Wyk

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: The research findings support the value and continuation of utilising the pre-hospital clinical learning environment for placing post-basic emergency nursing students when enrolled in the emergency nursing programme.

  11. Acute cyanide poisoning in prehospital care: new challenges, new tools for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, Tee

    2006-01-01

    Effective management of cyanide poisoning from chemical terrorism, inhalation of fire smoke, and other causes constitutes a critical challenge for the prehospital care provider. The ability to meet the challenge of managing cyanide poisoning in the prehospital setting may be enhanced by the availability of the cyanide antidote hydroxocobalamin, currently under development for potential introduction in the United States. This paper discusses the causes, recognition, and management of acute cyanide poisoning in the prehospital setting with emphasis on the emerging profile of hydroxocobalamin, an antidote that may have a risk:benefit ratio suitable for empiric, out-of-hospital treatment of the range of causes of cyanide poisoning. If introduced in the U.S., hydroxocobalamin may enhance the role of the U.S. prehospital responder in providing emergency care in a cyanide incident.

  12. The effect of aspirin nanoemulsion on TNFα and iNOS in gastric tissue in comparison with conventional aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud FA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fatma Abd Elhalim Mahmoud,1,2 Khalid S Hashem,3 Asmaa Mohammed M Hussein Elkelawy21Medical Pharmacology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, 2Clinical Pharmacology Department, Faculty of Medicine, 3Biochemistry Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef, EgyptBackground: No dose of aspirin is free of bleeding risk. Even at a dose as low as 75 mg/day, the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is twice as high as among nonusers. Nanoemulsions (NEs are emulsion systems with droplet size in nanometer scale in which oil or water droplets are finely dispersed in the opposite phase with the help of a suitable surfactant to stabilize the system.Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aspirin NE in comparison to conventional aspirin.Materials and methods: A total of 24 male rats were used in the study and arbitrarily assigned to four groups. Group 1 was the control group, and was given saline. Group 2 was given blank NE 1.5 mL/kg orally. Group 3 was given aspirin 30 mg/kg body weight orally. Group 4 was given aspirin NE 30 mg/kg body weight orally. Rats were killed, and gastric tissue was quickly excised after dissection of the animals. The tissues were divided into three pieces. The first one was kept in formalin 10% for pathological investigation. The second piece was kept in liquid nitrogen for molecular investigation. The third piece was homogenized in ten volumes of ice-cold phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7 using a Teflon homogenizer until a uniform suspension was obtained. The homogenate was centrifuged at 4,000 rpm for 30 minutes at 4°C to separate the supernatant from cellular debris. The supernatant was then used for the estimation of biochemical assays.Results: The present study shows that aspirin has a toxic effect on the stomach as a result of inducing marked oxidative damage and the release of reactive oxygen species. This was shown by the significant

  13. Prehospital score for acute disease: a community-based observational study in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara Hidekazu

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ambulance usage in Japan has increased consistently because it is free under the national health insurance system. The introduction of refusal for ambulance transfer is being debated nationally. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between prehospital data and hospitalization outcome for acute disease patients, and to develop a simple prehospital evaluation tool using prehospital data for Japan's emergency medical service system. Methods The subjects were 9,160 consecutive acute disease patients aged ≥ 15 years who were transferred to hospital by Kishiwada City Fire Department ambulance between July 2004 and March 2006. The relationship between prehospital data (age, systolic blood pressure, pulse rate, respiration rate, level of consciousness, SpO2 level and ability to walk and outcome (hospitalization or non-hospitalization was analyzed using logistic regression models. The prehospital score component of each item of prehospital data was determined by beta coefficients. Eligible patients were scored retrospectively and the distribution of outcome was examined. For patients transported to the two main hospitals, outcome after hospitalization was also confirmed. Results A total of 8,330 (91% patients were retrospectively evaluated using a prehospital score with a maximum value of 14. The percentage of patients requiring hospitalization rose from 9% with score = 0 to 100% with score = 14. With a cut-off point score ≥ 2, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 97%, 16%, 39% and 89%, respectively. Among the 6,498 patients transported to the two main hospitals, there were no deaths at scores ≤ 1 and the proportion of non-hospitalization was over 90%. The proportion of deaths increased rapidly at scores ≥ 11. Conclusion The prehospital score could be a useful tool for deciding the refusal of ambulance transfer in Japan's emergency medical

  14. Prehospital Ultrasound in Trauma: A Review of Current and Potential Future Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharwat El Zahran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is an essential tool for evaluating trauma patients in the hospital setting. Many previous in-hospital studies have been extrapolated to out of hospital setting to improve diagnostic accuracy in prehospital and austere environments. This review article presents the role of prehospital US in blunt and penetrating trauma management with emphasis on its current clinical applications, challenges, and future implications of such use.

  15. Systematic review: the barriers and facilitators for minority ethnic groups in accessing urgent and prehospital care

    OpenAIRE

    Phung, Viet-Hai; Windle, Karen; Asghar, Zahid; Ortega, Marishona; Essam, Nadya; Barot, Mukesh; Kai, Joe; Johnson, Mark; Siriwardena, A. Niroshan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Research addressing inequalities has focused predominantly on primary and community care; few initiatives relate to the prehospital environment. We aimed to identify in the literature barriers or facilitators experienced by patients from black and minority ethnic (BME) communities in accessing prehospital care and to explore the causes and consequences of any differences in delivery. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review and narrative synthesis. Electronic...

  16. Patients in prehospital transport to the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Camilla Louise Nørgaard; Brabrand, Mikkel; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2018-01-01

    in the prehospital setting and 7-day mortality. RESULTS: A total of 32 076 ambulance transfers were recorded. Of these, 20 328 were first-time transfers, including 2692 that received assistance from a physician-staffed mobile emergency care unit (MECU). The 7-day mortality was 5.3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 5...... the strongest association (OR: 17, 95% CI: 14.7-19.7). MECU assistance showed an adjusted OR of 5.3 (95% CI: 4.6-6.1). CONCLUSION: The overall 7-day mortality was 5.3%, but differed in the two subgroups, with 15.4% in the MECU-assisted ambulance transfers and 3.8% in non-MECU-assisted transfers. Older age...

  17. Prehospital Care of Canine Gastric Dilatation and Volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Lee E

    The intent of the Operational K9 (OpK9) ongoing series is to provide the Special Operations Medical Association community with clinical concepts and scientific information on preventive and prehospital emergency care relevant to the OpK9. Often the only medical support immediately available for an injured or ill OpK9 in the field is their handler or the human Special Operations Combat Medic or civilian tactical medic attached to the team (e.g., Pararescueman, 18D, SWAT medic). The information is applicable to personnel operating within the US Special Operations Command as well as civilian Tactical Emergency Medical Services communities that may have the responsibility of supporting an OpK9. 2018.

  18. Evaluation of the uses of aspirin, statins and ACEIs/ARBs in a diabetes outpatient population in southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongwecharak, J; Maila-ead, C; Sakulthap, J; Sripanitkulchai, N

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate the uses of aspirin, statins and angiotensin converting enzymes inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEIs/ARBs) in a diabetes population in southern Thailand. A review of outpatient medical records at the diabetic clinics of the regional hospital (n=304) and a community hospital (n=313), and a review of pharmacy computerized diabetes prescribing data (n=398) of the teaching hospital. All were in the province of Songkhla, southern Thailand. A total of 1015 diabetes patients, mean age (SD) 60.1 (12.1) years, were identified, with type 2 diabetes being most prevalent (93%). Females constituted 69%. Hypertension was a co-morbidity in almost half. Mean time (SD) since diagnosis was 5.8 (4.7) years. Where lipid profiles were available, less than one-third achieved the target LDL-C of <2.6 mmol L(-1). Almost all patients (96%) were candidates for treatment with a statin according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendation, whereas only 6.6 and 38.5% were actually taking one in the regional and the teaching hospital, respectively. Over 90% should have been taking primary prophylactic aspirin, whereas only 5.7-29% were actually prescribed one. A few had existing cardiovascular/cerebrovascular disease, and all were taking aspirin. There was no documented proteinuria status; however, 30-50% were on a ACEI/ARB, most likely as part of an antihypertensive regimen. Aspirin as a primary prophylaxis of cardiovascular disease in diabetes is remarkably underused. Screening for albuminuria was apparently lacking. Statin therapy also presented a major deficiency. ACEI/ARB was probably prescribed for hypertension rather than in relation to proteinuria.

  19. Time series modelling to forecast prehospital EMS demand for diabetic emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Melanie; Earnest, Arul; Nanayakkara, Natalie; Smith, Karen; de Courten, Barbora; Zoungas, Sophia

    2017-05-05

    Acute diabetic emergencies are often managed by prehospital Emergency Medical Services (EMS). The projected growth in prevalence of diabetes is likely to result in rising demand for prehospital EMS that are already under pressure. The aims of this study were to model the temporal trends and provide forecasts of prehospital attendances for diabetic emergencies. A time series analysis on monthly cases of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia was conducted using data from the Ambulance Victoria (AV) electronic database between 2009 and 2015. Using the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) modelling process, different models were evaluated. The most parsimonious model with the highest accuracy was selected. Forty-one thousand four hundred fifty-four prehospital diabetic emergencies were attended over a seven-year period with an increase in the annual median monthly caseload between 2009 (484.5) and 2015 (549.5). Hypoglycemia (70%) and people with type 1 diabetes (48%) accounted for most attendances. The SARIMA (0,1,0,12) model provided the best fit, with a MAPE of 4.2% and predicts a monthly caseload of approximately 740 by the end of 2017. Prehospital EMS demand for diabetic emergencies is increasing. SARIMA time series models are a valuable tool to allow forecasting of future caseload with high accuracy and predict increasing cases of prehospital diabetic emergencies into the future. The model generated by this study may be used by service providers to allow appropriate planning and resource allocation of EMS for diabetic emergencies.

  20. Mortality outcomes in trauma patients undergoing prehospital red blood cell transfusion: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gregory S; Dunham, C Michael

    2017-01-01

    The value of prehospital red blood cell (RBC) transfusion for trauma patients is controversial. The purposes of this literature review were to determine the mortality rate of trauma patients with hemodynamic instability and the benefit of prehospital RBC transfusion. A 30-year systematic literature review was performed in 2016. Eligible studies were combined for meta-analysis when tests for heterogeneity were insignificant. The synthesized mortality was 35.6% for systolic blood pressure ≤ 90 mmHg; 51.1% for ≤ 80 mmHg; and 63.9% for ≤ 70 mmHg. For patients with either hypotension or emergency trauma center transfused RBCs, the synthesized Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 27.0 and mortality was 36.2%; the ISS and mortality correlation was r = 0.766 ( P = 0.0096). For civilian patients receiving prehospital RBC transfusions, the synthesized ISS was 27.5 and mortality was 39.5%. One civilian study suggested a decrement in mortality with prehospital RBC transfusion; however, patient recruitment was only one per center per year and mortality was 16 showed similar mortality with and without prehospital RBC availability (27.6% versus 32.0%; P = 0.343). Trauma patient mortality increases with the magnitude of hemodynamic instability and anatomic injury. Some literature evidence indicates no survival advantage with prehospital RBC availability. However, other data suggesting a potential benefit is confounded or likely to be biased.

  1. Rural emergency medical technician pre-hospital electrocardiogram transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, A M; Halon, J M; Nelson, J

    2014-01-01

    Emergent care of the acute heart attack patient continues to be at the forefront of quality and cost reduction strategies throughout the healthcare industry. Although the average cardiac door-to-balloon (D2B) times have decreased substantially over the past few years, there are still vast disparities found in D2B times in populations that reside in rural areas. Such disparities are mostly related to prolonged travel time and subsequent delays in cardiac catherization lab team activation. Urban ambulance companies that are routinely staffed with paramedic level providers have been successful in the implementation of pre-hospital 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) protocols as a strategy to reduce D2B times. The authors sought to evaluate the evidence related to the risk and benefits associated with the replication of an ECG transmission protocol in a small rural emergency medical service. The latter is staffed with emergency medical technician-basics (EMT-B), emergency medical technician-advanced (EMT-A), and emergency medical technician-intermediate (EMT-I) level. The evidence reviewed was limited to studies with relevant data regarding the challenges and complexities of the ECG transmission process, the difficulties associated with ECG transmission in rural settings, and ECG transmission outcomes by provider level. The evidence supports additional research to further evaluate the feasibility of ECG transmission at the non-paramedic level. Multiple variables must be investigated including equipment cost, utilization, and rural transmission capabilities. Clearly, pre-hospital ECG transmission and early activation of the cardiac catheterization laboratory are critical components to successfully decreasing D2B times.

  2. Differential impairment of aspirin-dependent platelet cyclooxygenase acetylation by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuanwen; Fries, Susanne; Li, Ruizhi; Lawson, John A.; Propert, Kathleen J.; Diamond, Scott L.; Blair, Ian A.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Grosser, Tilo

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular safety of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be influenced by interactions with antiplatelet doses of aspirin. We sought to quantitate precisely the propensity of commonly consumed NSAIDs—ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib—to cause a drug–drug interaction with aspirin in vivo by measuring the target engagement of aspirin directly by MS. We developed a novel assay of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) acetylation in platelets isolated from volunteers who were administered aspirin and used conventional and microfluidic assays to evaluate platelet function. Although ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib all had the potential to compete with the access of aspirin to the substrate binding channel of COX-1 in vitro, exposure of volunteers to a single therapeutic dose of each NSAID followed by 325 mg aspirin revealed a potent drug–drug interaction between ibuprofen and aspirin and between naproxen and aspirin but not between celecoxib and aspirin. The imprecision of estimates of aspirin consumption and the differential impact on the ability of aspirin to inactivate platelet COX-1 will confound head-to-head comparisons of distinct NSAIDs in ongoing clinical studies designed to measure their cardiovascular risk. PMID:25385584

  3. Preparation and analysis of deuterium-labeled aspirin: application to pharmacokinetic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, A.K.; FitzGerald, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Inhibition of endogenous prostacyclin and thromboxane biosynthesis by aspirin is critically dose-dependent in humans. Gastrointestinal and hepatic hydrolysis may limit systemic availability of aspirin, especially in low doses, perhaps contributing to the biochemical selectivity of aspirin. Existing analytical methods do not permit determination of systemic bioavailability when low (less than 100 mg) doses of aspirin are administered. Deuterium-labeled aspirin (2-acetoxy[3,4,5,6- 2 H4]benzoic acid) was synthesized from salicylic acid by catalytic exchange and subsequent acetylation. Analysis of the compounds as benzyl esters by GC-MS followed extractive alkylation from plasma. Heptadeuterated compounds were used as internal standards. Simultaneous administration of tetradeuterated aspirin intravenously with native aspirin orally to anesthetized dogs permitted kinetic studies of both aspirin and salicylic acid. The sensitivity of the method is superior to published methods using HPLC and, thus, more applicable to studies of low dose aspirin. Pulse administration of stable isotope-labeled aspirin permits detailed and repeated studies of dose-related aspirin pharmacokinetics in humans

  4. Multidrug Resistance Protein-4 Influences Aspirin Toxicity in Human Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Massimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of efflux transporters, in human cells, is a mechanism of resistance to drug and also to chemotherapy. We found that multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4 overexpression has a role in reducing aspirin action in patients after bypass surgery and, very recently, we found that aspirin enhances platelet MRP4 levels through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα. In the present paper, we verified whether exposure of human embryonic kidney-293 cells (Hek-293 to aspirin modifies MRP4 gene expression and its correlation with drug elimination and cell toxicity. We first investigated the effect of high-dose aspirin in Hek-293 and we showed that aspirin is able to increase cell toxicity dose-dependently. Furthermore, aspirin effects, induced at low dose, already enhance MRP4 gene expression. Based on these findings, we compared cell viability in Hek-293, after high-dose aspirin treatment, in MRP4 overexpressing cells, either after aspirin pretreatment or in MRP4 transfected cells; in both cases, a decrease of selective aspirin cell growth inhibition was observed, in comparison with the control cultures. Altogether, these data suggest that exposing cells to low nontoxic aspirin dosages can induce gene expression alterations that may lead to the efflux transporter protein overexpression, thus increasing cellular detoxification of aspirin.

  5. Up-regulation of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor in Astrocytes by Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Khushbu K.; Sendtner, Michael; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a promyelinating trophic factor, and the mechanisms by which CNTF expression could be increased in the brain are poorly understood. Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is one of the most widely used analgesics. Interestingly, aspirin increased mRNA and protein expression of CNTF in primary mouse and human astrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Aspirin induced the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) but not protein kinase C (PKC). H-89, an inhibitor of PKA, abrogated aspirin-induced expression of CNTF. The activation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), but not NF-κB, by aspirin, the abrogation of aspirin-induced expression of CNTF by siRNA knockdown of CREB, the presence of a consensus cAMP-response element in the promoter of CNTF, and the recruitment of CREB and CREB-binding protein to the CNTF promoter by aspirin suggest that aspirin increases the expression of the Cntf gene via the activation of CREB. Furthermore, we demonstrate that aspirin-induced astroglial CNTF was also functionally active and that supernatants of aspirin-treated astrocytes of wild type, but not Cntf null, mice increased myelin-associated proteins in oligodendrocytes and protected oligodendrocytes from TNF-α insult. These results highlight a new and novel myelinogenic property of aspirin, which may be of benefit for multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating disorders. PMID:23653362

  6. Once- versus twice-daily aspirin treatment in patients with essential thrombocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mads Lamm; Pedersen, Oliver Heidmann; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2018-01-01

    Insufficient platelet inhibition has been reported in up to 40% of aspirin-treated patients, including patients with essential thrombocytosis. To maintain sufficient platelet inhibition, a shorter dosing interval with aspirin has been suggested. We aimed to investigate the antiplatelet effect...... of low-dose aspirin given twice-daily compared to standard once-daily dosing in patients with essential thrombocytosis. We included 22 patients, who were treated for 7 days with standard once-daily aspirin (75 mg once-daily) followed by 7 days treatment of twice-daily aspirin (37.5 mg twice......-daily). The two regimens were separated by 14 days aspirin washout. Blood samples were obtained 1h and 24h/12h after the last pill intake in each regimen. The effect of aspirin was evaluated by: (1) platelet aggregation measured by whole blood impedance aggregometry (Multiplate® Analyser) using arachidonic acid...

  7. Aspirin effects on lymphocyte cyclic AMP levels in normal human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, D E; Parker, C W

    1976-01-01

    In purified lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of healthy human subjects who had ingested therapeutic doses of aspirin, there was a significant decrease in resting cyclic AMP levels as well as a partial inhibition of the rise in cyclic AMP with isoproterenol or prostaglandin E1. These changes were seen as early as 30 min after aspirin ingestion and did not appear to result from aspirin effects on lymphocyte recovery, purity, viability, or relative number of thymus- or bone marrow-derived lymphocytes. In contrast, the direct addition of aspirin to suspensions of purified peripheral lymphocytes did not significantly alter their cyclic AMP levels. However, an effect of aspirin could be obtained in vitro if aspirin was added to unprocessed whole blood during the dextran sedimentation phase of the cell purification. Thus the effect of aspirin on lymphocyte cyclic AMP metabolism, may be indirect, through other cells present in the peripheral blood. PMID:182720

  8. The clinical dilemma of "silent desensitization" in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew A; Bosso, John V; Stevenson, Donald D

    2013-01-01

    Aspirin desensitization is a treatment option for patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). Some patients with an excellent history of aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) reactions have negative aspirin challenges/desensitization. This study discusses the clinical entity of silent desensitization in AERD and the dilemma that this presents to the practicing allergist/immunologist. We discuss a series of patients with a strong history of NSAID reactions who initially underwent a negative challenge/silent desensitization. These patients were subsequently proven to have AERD after a second positive aspirin challenge. Silent desensitization is an uncommon but important outcome to recognize in AERD. Clinicians performing aspirin desensitization should understand that this can occur and consider a second confirmatory aspirin challenge in some patients.

  9. The kinetics of hydrolysis of acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin) in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetics of hydrolysis of Acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin) to salicylic acid was followed by the direct spectrophotometric measurement of the amount of salicylic acid produced with time. Salicylic acid was complexed with ferric ion giving a characteristic purple colour (λlm 523nm). The kinetics of hydrolysis was found to follow ...

  10. Modelling of drug release from ensembles of aspirin microcapsules ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: In order to determine the drug release profile of an ensemble of aspirin crystals or microcapsules from its particle distribution a mathematical model that considered the individual release characteristics of the component single particles was developed. The model assumed that under sink conditions the release ...

  11. Low-dose aspirin and risk of intracranial bleeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Gaist, David; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse

    2017-01-01

    cohort of nonusers of low-dose aspirin at baseline were followed (maximum 14 years, median 5.4 years) to identify incident cases of ICB, with validation by manual review of patient records or linkage to hospitalization data. Using 10,000 frequency-matched controls, adjusted rate ratios (RRs) with 95...

  12. Determination of effect of aspirin and captopril on cat glomerular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four days later, renovascular hypertension was induced through renal-artery stenosis by clipping half of the left renalarteries. Renal scintigraphy was conducted after four days. After confirming the presence of hypertension, the cats were divided into two groups of 10 animals each (aspirin and captopril groups, respectively).

  13. A consensus-based template for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruger, Andreas J; Lockey, David; Kurola, Jouni

    2011-01-01

    -staffed pre-hospital services in Europe. METHODS: Using predefined criteria, we recruited sixteen European experts in the field of pre-hospital care. These experts were guided through a four-step modified nominal group technique. The process was carried out using both e-mail-based communication and a plenary...... have established a core data set for documenting and reporting in physician-staffed pre-hospital services. We believe that this template could facilitate future studies within the field and facilitate standardised reporting and future shared research efforts in advanced pre-hospital care....

  14. [Prehospital management of febrile convulsions by the Mobile Emergency Care Unit in the Capital Region of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekaer, A.L.; Nielsen, S.L.; Pedersen, Ulf Gøttrup

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We conducted a quality assurance project of The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in the Capital Region of Denmark when dispatched to febrile convulsions. The study focuses on prehospital treatment, comparison between prehospital and in-hospital diagnoses and parents' perceptions......% of cases, the prehospital and in-hospital diagnosis were identical. CONCLUSION: In general, parents appreciate the service provided by the MECU. Reasons of dissatisfaction are described. On several occasions, the prehospital physician administered intravenous anticonvulsants, but we discuss if the MECU...

  15. Intracellular Erythrocyte Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase I Inactivates Aspirin in Blood*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Marathe, Gopal K.; Willard, Belinda; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) prophylaxis suppresses major adverse cardiovascular events, but its rapid turnover limits inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity and thrombosis. Despite its importance, the identity of the enzyme(s) that hydrolyzes the acetyl residue of circulating aspirin, which must be an existing enzyme, remains unknown. We find that circulating aspirin was extensively hydrolyzed within erythrocytes, and chromatography indicated these cells contained a single hydrolytic activity. Purification by over 1400-fold and sequencing identified the PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of type I platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase, a phospholipase A2 with selectivity for acetyl residues of PAF, as a candidate for aspirin acetylhydrolase. Western blotting showed that catalytic PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of the type I enzyme co-migrated with purified erythrocyte aspirin hydrolytic activity. Recombinant PAFAH1B2, but not its family member plasma PAF acetylhydrolase, hydrolyzed aspirin, and PAF competitively inhibited aspirin hydrolysis by purified or recombinant erythrocyte enzymes. Aspirin was hydrolyzed by HEK cells transfected with PAFAH1B2 or PAFAH1B3, and the competitive type I PAF acetylhydrolase inhibitor NaF reduced erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin. Exposing aspirin to erythrocytes blocked its ability to inhibit thromboxane A2 synthesis and platelet aggregation. Not all individuals or populations are equally protected by aspirin prophylaxis, the phenomenon of aspirin resistance, and erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin varied 3-fold among individuals, which correlated with PAFAH1B2 and not PAFAH1B3. We conclude that intracellular type I PAF acetylhydrolase is the major aspirin hydrolase of human blood. PMID:21844189

  16. Intracellular erythrocyte platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase I inactivates aspirin in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Marathe, Gopal K; Willard, Belinda; McIntyre, Thomas M

    2011-10-07

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) prophylaxis suppresses major adverse cardiovascular events, but its rapid turnover limits inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity and thrombosis. Despite its importance, the identity of the enzyme(s) that hydrolyzes the acetyl residue of circulating aspirin, which must be an existing enzyme, remains unknown. We find that circulating aspirin was extensively hydrolyzed within erythrocytes, and chromatography indicated these cells contained a single hydrolytic activity. Purification by over 1400-fold and sequencing identified the PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of type I platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase, a phospholipase A(2) with selectivity for acetyl residues of PAF, as a candidate for aspirin acetylhydrolase. Western blotting showed that catalytic PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of the type I enzyme co-migrated with purified erythrocyte aspirin hydrolytic activity. Recombinant PAFAH1B2, but not its family member plasma PAF acetylhydrolase, hydrolyzed aspirin, and PAF competitively inhibited aspirin hydrolysis by purified or recombinant erythrocyte enzymes. Aspirin was hydrolyzed by HEK cells transfected with PAFAH1B2 or PAFAH1B3, and the competitive type I PAF acetylhydrolase inhibitor NaF reduced erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin. Exposing aspirin to erythrocytes blocked its ability to inhibit thromboxane A(2) synthesis and platelet aggregation. Not all individuals or populations are equally protected by aspirin prophylaxis, the phenomenon of aspirin resistance, and erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin varied 3-fold among individuals, which correlated with PAFAH1B2 and not PAFAH1B3. We conclude that intracellular type I PAF acetylhydrolase is the major aspirin hydrolase of human blood.

  17. Aspirin desensitization for patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Hossein; Nabavi, Mohammad; Aryan, Zahra; Arshi, Saba; Bemanian, Mohammad Hassan; Fallahpour, Morteza; Mortazavi, Negar

    2015-10-01

    The effect of aspirin desensitization (AD) on immunologic profile of patients with AERD has been poorly understood. This study is aimed at investigating the effect of AD on clinical and immunological markers of patients with AERD. This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial comprised 34 adult patients (67.6% female) with chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and aspirin-intolerant asthma. The active group underwent AD over a 2-day period with increasing doses of aspirin (60, 125, 325, and 625 mg), followed by receiving aspirin 625 mg twice daily for 6 months. Symptom scores and medication needs of patients with AERD who have undergone AD were significantly lower compared to the placebo group after 6 months (7.5 ± 3.5 vs. 10.6 ± 3.8 and 9.3 ± 2.0 vs. 11.0 ± 3.1, respectively, all p < 0.05). However, no significant difference was observed in serum concentration of IL-10, IFN-γ, and TGF-β between two groups neither at baseline nor at the end of study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Diabetes mellitus and insulin in an aspirin sensitive asthmatic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplin, I

    1976-03-01

    The infrequency of diabetes mellitus and asthma in the same individual is re-examined. The antagonism between epinephrine and insulin, as suggested by Konig in 1935, is indeed accurate. The assays done by the Eli Lilly Research Department revealed no in vitro effect of insulin on the CAMP and GMP level of mast cells as occurs in liver cells. It is felt that this effect is probably an in vivo effect produced via the vagus nerve and alpha-adrenergic receptor system stimulation. This would explain the mechanism of aggravation of asthma by excess insulin. Dr. Petersen's studies, the negative intradermal skin tests to insulin and the absence of change on either beef or pork insulin usage by our patient all point to a nonatopic factor in the aggravation of the asthma of this patient. In the uncommon occurrence of asthma and diabetes in the same patient, insulin dosage should be considered as a factor in all such asthmatics who do not respond well to conventional therapy. Two additional asthmatics who also have diabetes did improve with cessation of nocturnal asthma by a reduction of their evening dose of insulin. A high fat, low carbohydrate diet, as suggested by Abrahamson to avoid dietary hyperinsulinism, is certainly worth considering in patients with nocturnal asthma. If patients cannot be made to follow a diet requiring frequent feedings high in protein and fats and low in carbohydrates, another approach suggests itself. Abrahamson was able to relieve the patients who developed nocturnal asthma with hypoglycemia by having them drink a glass of milk. Assuming other causes have been eliminated and a patient awakens each day at 3:00 a.m., an alarm clock could be set at 2:00 a.m. Milk or a milk substitute in milk sensitive patients could be taken at 2:00 a.m. to raise the blood sugar and hopefully prevent the asthma associated with hypoglycemia. Also to be noted is the ubiquitous use of tartrazine in so many drugs, including those used to relieve asthmatic symptoms

  19. The impact of short prehospital times on trauma center performance benchmarking: An ecologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, James P; Mann, N Clay; Hoeft, Christopher J; Buick, Jason; Karanicolas, Paul; Rizoli, Sandro; Hunt, John P; Nathens, Avery B

    2016-04-01

    Emergency medical service (EMS) prehospital times vary between regions, yet the impact of local prehospital times on trauma center (TC) performance is unknown. To inform external benchmarking efforts, we explored the impact of EMS prehospital times on the risk-adjusted rate of emergency department (ED) death and overall hospital mortality at urban TCs across the United States. We used a novel ecologic study design, linking EMS data from the National EMS Information System to TCs participating in the American College of Surgeons' Trauma Quality Improvement Program (TQIP) by destination zip code. This approach provided EMS times for populations of injured patients transported to TQIP centers. We defined the exposure of interest as the 90th percentile total prehospital time (PHT) for each TC. TCs were then stratified by PHT quartile. Analyses were limited to adult patients with severe blunt or penetrating trauma, transported directly by land to urban TQIP centers. Random-intercept multilevel modeling was used to evaluate the risk-adjusted relationship between PHT quartile and the outcomes of ED death and overall hospital mortality. During the study period, 119,740 patients met inclusion criteria at 113 TCs. ED death occurred in 1% of patients, and overall mortality was 7.2%. Across all centers, the median PHT was 61 minutes (interquartile range, 53-71 minutes). After risk adjustment, TCs in regions with the shortest quartile of PHTs (<53 minutes) had significantly greater odds of ED death compared with those with the longest PHTs (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.43-2.78). However, there was no association between PHT and overall TC mortality. At urban TCs, local EMS prehospital times are a significant predictor of ED death. However, no relationship exists between prehospital time and overall TC risk-adjusted mortality. Therefore, there is no evidence for the inclusion of EMS prehospital time in external benchmarking analyses.

  20. Is advanced life support better than basic life support in prehospital care? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryynänen Olli-Pekka

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background - Prehospital care is classified into ALS- (advanced life support and BLS- (basic life support levels according to the methods used. ALS-level prehospital care uses invasive methods, such as intravenous fluids, medications and intubation. However, the effectiveness of ALS care compared to BLS has been questionable. Aim - The aim of this systematic review is to compare the effectiveness of ALS- and BLS-level prehospital care. Material and methods - In a systematic review, articles where ALS-level prehospital care was compared to BLS-level or any other treatment were included. The outcome variables were mortality or patient's health-related quality of life or patient's capacity to perform daily activities. Results - We identified 46 articles, mostly retrospective observational studies. The results on the effectiveness of ALS in unselected patient cohorts are contradictory. In cardiac arrest, early cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation are essential for survival, but prehospital ALS interventions have not improved survival. Prehospital thrombolytic treatment reduces mortality in patients having a myocardial infarction. The majority of research into trauma favours BLS in the case of penetrating trauma and also in cases of short distance to a hospital. In patients with severe head injuries, ALS provided by paramedics and intubation without anaesthesia can even be harmful. If the prehospital care is provided by an experienced physician and by a HEMS organisation (Helicopter Emergency Medical Service, ALS interventions may be beneficial for patients with multiple injuries and severe brain injuries. However, the results are contradictory. Conclusions - ALS seems to improve survival in patients with myocardial infarction and BLS seems to be the proper level of care for patients with penetrating injuries. Some studies indicate a beneficial effect of ALS among patients with blunt head injuries or multiple injuries. There is

  1. Prehospital Intubation and Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury—Assessing Intervention Efficacy in a Modern Trauma Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecka Rubenson Wahlin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPrehospital intubation in traumatic brain injury (TBI focuses on limiting the effects of secondary insults such as hypoxia, but no indisputable evidence has been presented that it is beneficial for outcome. The aim of this study was to explore the characteristics of patients who undergo prehospital intubation and, in turn, if these parameters affect outcome.Material and methodsPatients ≥15 years admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery, Stockholm, Sweden with TBI from 2008 through 2014 were included. Data were extracted from prehospital and hospital charts, including prospectively collected Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS after 12 months. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were employed to examine parameters independently correlated to prehospital intubation and outcome.ResultsA total of 458 patients were included (n = 178 unconscious, among them, n = 61 intubated. Multivariable analyses indicated that high energy trauma, prehospital hypotension, pupil unresponsiveness, mode of transportation, and distance to the hospital were independently correlated with intubation, and among them, only pupil responsiveness was independently associated with outcome. Prehospital intubation did not add independent information in a step-up model versus GOS (p = 0.154. Prehospital reports revealed that hypoxia was not the primary cause of prehospital intubation, and that the procedure did not improve oxygen saturation during transport, while an increasing distance from the hospital increased the intubation frequency.ConclusionIn this modern trauma cohort, prehospital intubation was not independently associated with outcome; however, hypoxia was not a common reason for prehospital intubation. Prospective trials to assess efficacy of prehospital airway intubation will be difficult due to logistical and ethical considerations.

  2. Employment of the porous particles for preparation of the capsules containing aspirin and drug release property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Fumio; Makuuchi, Keizo; Saito, Kenji; Koishi, Masumi.

    1985-01-01

    Polymer-coated porous particles containing aspirin as a drug were prepared and the rate of release of aspirin was studied. The impregnation of aspirin was carried out by post-graft polymerization, where methyl methacrylate or methacrylic acid was treated with porous particles, pre-irradiated with γ-ray from 60 Co, in the presence of aspirin. Release of aspirin from modified particles was tested with 50 % methanol solution and/or pH 5.2 buffer solution of acetic acid. The amount of aspirin released from capsules increased with time and reached a constant values after 140 h. The amount of aspirin absorbed in porous particles was increased with graft polymerization. In addition, absorption of aspirin in porous particles was significantly enhanced by treating the particle surface with TiO 2 before irradiation. The amount of aspirin released was linearly to the square root of time. It was concluded that the diffusion of aspirin through the polymer matrix was the rate limiting step. (author)

  3. Therapeutic utility of aspirin in the ApcMin/+ murine model of colon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, Brian K; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Miller, Mark JS

    2002-01-01

    In recent years it has become evident that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, in particular aspirin represent a potential class of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Despite the wealth of knowledge gained from epidemiological, clinical and animal studies, the effectiveness of aspirin to treat established gastrointestinal cancer has not been determined. The present study examines the ability of aspirin to treat established polyposis in Min/+ mice. Min/+ mice with established polyposis were treated orally once daily from 12–16 weeks of age with either drug vehicle or aspirin (25 mg/kg). Upon completion of treatment, the number, location and size of intestinal tumours was determined. Additional variables examined were the number of apoptotic cells within tumours and COX activity. Administration of aspirin for 4 weeks to Min/+ mice produce no effect on tumour number compared to vehicle-treated Min/+ mice (65 ± 8 vs. 63 ± 9, respectively). In addition, aspirin had no effect on tumour size or location. However, aspirin treatment produced a greater than 2-fold (p < 0.05) increase in the number of apoptotic positive cells within tumours and significantly decreased hepatic PGE 2 content. Aspirin was found to have no effect on tumour number and size when administered to Min/+ mice with established polyposis. The findings in the present study call in to question the utility of aspirin as a stand-alone treatment for established GI cancer. However, aspirin's ability to significantly promote apoptosis may render it suitable for use in combinatorial chemotherapy

  4. Association Between the P2RY12 Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Aspirin Resistance in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

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    Ludmila Karazhanova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Platelet activation and aggregation are key elements in the development of coronary atherosclerosis. Recent studies have shown that the two polymorphisms of platelet ADP receptor P2RY12 (haplotypes H2 and 34T are associated with increased platelet aggregation and atherothrombotic risk. It was shown that these polymorphisms promote reduced body response to antiplatelet therapy.Aim. We investigated the association of P2RY12 gene polymorphisms with aspirin resistance in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD.Methods. This case-control study included 100 cases with CAD (mean age 57.6 ± 2.8 years treated in the cardiology department of the city hospital Semey, Kazakhstan, 90 of whom suffered from myocardial infarction. The control group (n = 100 were healthy people without a history of CAD, matched on sex and age. Genotyping of polymorphisms H1/H2 in P2RY12 gene was performed by PCR. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS v.19.0.Results. The distribution of H1/H2 genotypes P2RY12 was 42%, 34%, and 24%, respectively, in cases and 42%, 58%, and 0%, respectively, in controls. All allele frequencies were consistent with the Hardy Weinberg equilibrium (p = 0.0036 and p = 0.0001 in cases and controls, respectively. Genotype H2 was associated with risk of CAD with aspirin resistance (co-dominant model: OR = 3.75, 95% CI 0.14 - 99.88, p = 0.05 and dominant model: OR = 2.78, 95% CI 0.11 - 70.93, p = 0.05. We found significant differences in the distribution of the mutant genotype H2 between CAD patients with aspirin resistance and healthy controls (χ2 = 30.3, p < 0.05.Conclusion. We found an association of H2 haplotype in P2RY12 gene with aspirin resistance in patients with CAD. However, in order to obtain definitive conclusions about the role of genetic variants with the development of aspirin resistance in patients with CAD, there is a need for further research with a larger sample size as well as the use of selective thromboxane

  5. Irradiation-Induced Cardiac Connexin-43 and miR-21 Responses Are Hampered by Treatment with Atorvastatin and Aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Viczenczova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Radiation of the chest during cancer therapy is deleterious to the heart, mostly due to oxidative stress and inflammation related injury. A single sub-lethal dose of irradiation has been shown to result in compensatory up-regulation of the myocardial connexin-43 (Cx43, activation of the protein kinase C (PKC signaling along with the decline of microRNA (miR-1 and an increase of miR-21 levels in the left ventricle (LV. We investigated whether drugs with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory or vasodilating properties, such as aspirin, atorvastatin, and sildenafil, may affect myocardial response in the LV and right ventricle (RV following chest irradiation. Adult, male Wistar rats were subjected to a single sub-lethal dose of chest radiation at 25 Gy and treated with aspirin (3 mg/day, atorvastatin (0.25 mg/day, and sildenafil (0.3 mg/day for six weeks. Cx43, PKCε and PKCδ proteins expression and levels of miR-1 as well as miR-21 were determined in the LV and RV. Results showed that the suppression of miR-1 was associated with an increase of total and phosphorylated forms of Cx43 as well as PKCε expression in the LV while having no effect in the RV post-irradiation as compared to the non-irradiated rats. Treatment with aspirin and atorvastatin prevented an increase in the expression of Cx43 and PKCε without change in the miR-1 levels. Furthermore, treatment with aspirin, atorvastatin, and sildenafil completely prevented an increase of miR-21 in the LV while having partial effect in the RV post irradiation. The increase in pro-apoptotic PKCδ was not affected by any of the used treatment. In conclusion, irradiation and drug-induced changes were less pronounced in the RV as compared to the LV. Treatment with aspirin and atorvastatin interfered with irradiation-induced compensatory changes in myocardial Cx43 protein and miR-21 by preventing their elevation, possibly via amelioration of oxidative stress and inflammation.

  6. Observational Study on Safety of Prehospital BLS CPAP in Dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Novneet; Matthews, Patrick; Groner, Kathryn; Papas, Mia A; Megargel, Ross

    2017-12-01

    Introduction Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves outcomes in patients with respiratory distress. Additional benefits are seen with CPAP application in the prehospital setting. Theoretical safety concerns regarding Basic Life Support (BLS) providers using CPAP exist. In Delaware's (USA) two-tiered Emergency Medical Service (EMS) system, BLS often arrives before Advanced Life Support (ALS). Hypothesis This study fills a gap in literature by evaluating the safety of CPAP applied by BLS prior to ALS arrival. This was a retrospective, observational study using Quality Assurance (QA) data collected from October 2009 through December 2012 throughout a state BLS CPAP pilot program; CPAP training was provided to BLS providers prior to participation. Collected data include pulse-oximetry (spO2), respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), skin color, and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) before and after CPAP application. Pre-CPAP and post-CPAP values were compared using McNemar's and t-tests. Advanced practitioners evaluated whether CPAP was correctly applied and monitored and whether the patient condition was "improved," "unchanged," or "worsened." Seventy-four patients received CPAP by BLS; CPAP was correctly indicated and applied for all 74 patients. Respiratory status and CPAP were appropriately monitored and documented in the majority of cases (98.6%). A total of 89.2% of patients improved and 4.1% worsened; CPAP significantly reduced the proportion of patients with SpO224, and cyanosis (PCPAP (mean difference [MD]=0.17; 95% CI, -0.49 to 0.83; P=.59). The HR decreased from 115.7 (SD=53) to 105.1 (SD=37) after CPAP (MD=-10.9; 95% CI, -3.2 to -18.6; PCPAP (MD=17.8; 95% CI, 14.2-21.5; PCPAP was indicated, to apply it correctly, and to appropriately monitor the status of these patients. The majority of patients who received CPAP by BLS providers had improvement in their clinical status and vital signs. The findings suggest that CPAP can be safely used by BLS providers

  7. Dual antiplatelet therapy with prasugrel or ticagrelor versus clopidogrel in interventional cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Peter; Dridi, Nadia Paarup; Holmvang, Lene

    2013-01-01

    For several years, clopidogrel plus aspirin has been the dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) of choice for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent implantation. More recently, prasugrel and ticagrelor have demonstrated greater effica...

  8. Aspirin for the prevention of cognitive decline in the elderly: rationale and design of a neuro-vascular imaging study (ENVIS-ion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Christopher M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the rationale and design of the ENVIS-ion Study, which aims to determine whether low-dose aspirin reduces the development of white matter hyper-intense (WMH lesions and silent brain infarction (SBI. Additional aims include determining whether a changes in retinal vascular imaging (RVI parameters parallel changes in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; b changes in RVI parameters are observed with aspirin therapy; c baseline cognitive function correlates with MRI and RVI parameters; d changes in cognitive function correlate with changes in brain MRI and RVI and e whether factors such as age, gender or blood pressure influence the above associations. Methods/Design Double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of three years duration set in two Australian academic medical centre outpatient clinics. This study will enrol 600 adults aged 70 years and over with normal cognitive function and without overt cardiovascular disease. Subjects will undergo cognitive testing, brain MRI and RVI at baseline and after 3 years of study treatment. All subjects will be recruited from a 19,000-patient clinical outcome trial conducted in Australia and the United States that will evaluate the effects of aspirin in maintaining disability-free longevity over 5 years. The intervention will be aspirin 100 mg daily versus matching placebo, randomized on a 1:1 basis. Discussion This study will improve understanding of the mechanisms at the level of brain and vascular structure that underlie the effects of aspirin on cognitive function. Given the limited access and high cost of MRI, RVI may prove useful as a tool for the identification of individuals at high risk for the development of cerebrovascular disease and cognitive decline. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01038583

  9. Monitoring the hydrolyzation of aspirin during the dissolution testing for aspirin delayed-release tablets with a fiber-optic dissolution system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the hydrolyzation of aspirin during the process of dissolution testing for aspirin delayed-release tablets. Hydrolysis product of salicylic acid can result in adverse effects and affect the determination of dissolution rate assaying. In this study, the technique of differential spectra was employed, which made it possible to monitor the dissolution testing in situ. The results showed that the hydrolyzation of aspirin made the percentage of salicylic acid exceed the limit of free salicylic acid (4.0, and the hydrolyzation may affect the quality detection of aspirin delayed-release tablets. Keywords: Aspirin delayed-release tablets, Drug dissolution test, Fiber-optic dissolution system, UV–vis spectrum

  10. Pre-hospital and hospital delay in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes in tertiary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Youssef

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Pre-hospital delay was mainly patient-related. Hospital delay was mainly related to healthcare resources. Governmental measures to promote ambulance emergency services may reduce the pre-hospital delay, while improving the utilization of healthcare resources may reduce hospital delay.

  11. Beyond COX-1: the effects of aspirin on platelet biology and potential mechanisms of chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas, Argentina; Zacharias-Millward, Niki; Menter, David G; Davis, Jennifer S; Lichtenberger, Lenard; Hawke, David; Hawk, Ernest; Vilar, Eduardo; Bhattacharya, Pratip; Millward, Steven

    2017-06-01

    After more than a century, aspirin remains one of the most commonly used drugs in western medicine. Although mainly used for its anti-thrombotic, anti-pyretic, and analgesic properties, a multitude of clinical studies have provided convincing evidence that regular, low-dose aspirin use dramatically lowers the risk of cancer. These observations coincide with recent studies showing a functional relationship between platelets and tumors, suggesting that aspirin's chemopreventive properties may result, in part, from direct modulation of platelet biology and biochemistry. Here, we present a review of the biochemistry and pharmacology of aspirin with particular emphasis on its cyclooxygenase-dependent and cyclooxygenase-independent effects in platelets. We also correlate the results of proteomic-based studies of aspirin acetylation in eukaryotic cells with recent developments in platelet proteomics to identify non-cyclooxygenase targets of aspirin-mediated acetylation in platelets that may play a role in its chemopreventive mechanism.

  12. Prevalence of aspirin resistance in patients with an evolving acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Jørgensen, Bo; Korsholm, Lars

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the prevalence and importance of aspirin resistance in patients with an evolving acute myocardial infarction (AMI) by use of the Platelet Function Analyzer-100. INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated the existence of aspirin resistance, but the clinical relevance...... of the phenomenon remains to be clarified. If aspirin resistant patients comprise a high-risk subgroup, it might be expected that the prevalence of aspirin resistance in patients with AMI would be higher than in patients without AMI. We hypothesized that the prevalence of aspirin resistance in patients with AMI...... was twice the prevalence in patients without AMI. METHODS: We included 298 consecutive patients with known cardiovascular disease who were admitted to hospital with symptoms suggestive of an AMI. All had been taking aspirin 150 mg/day for at least 7 days prior to hospital admission. Platelet function...

  13. Aspirin induces morphological transformation to the secretory state in isolated rabbit parietal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, U K; Levine, R A

    1991-08-01

    The morphological response of rabbit parietal cells to aspirin was evaluated by grading several ultra-structural features including the extent of the tubulovesicular system, intracellular secretory canaliculi, and microvilli. After exposure of isolated parietal cells and gastric glands to aspirin or histamine, there was an approximately twofold increase in the ratio of secretory to nonsecretory parietal cells, and depletion of extracellular Ca2+ abolished the aspirin-induced morphological changes. Morphometry in parietal cells showed that aspirin induced a sixfold increase in secretory canalicular membrane elaboration. Aspirin potentiated histamine-induced parietal cell respiration and aminopyrine uptake ratio but did not increase basal respiration or aminopyrine uptake, suggesting an apparent dissociation from aspirin-induced morphological changes.

  14. Systemic aspirin and systemic vitamin E in senile cataracts : cataract V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Y

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available We undertook a prospective study in senile cataract patients using systemic aspirin and systemic vitamin E. Vitamin E treated eyes did show less progression of PSC opacities extent and less new nuclear opacities during the follow-up, but overall vitamin E treated eyes did no better than the control group eyes. More eyes in systemic aspirin treated group maintained the initial vision and loss of vision in the aspirin group was also less marked. Aspirin also caused a significant less mean increase in cortical opacity extent, nuclear/opacity and density and PSC opacity extent and density as well as in ophthalmoscopically graded opacity extent and density. We suggest that aspirin is a potential drug which should be further evaluated in large double blind photodocumentated studies. The present data does not justify the recommendation that aspirin be prescribed for slowing down cataract progression. This must await large studies and confirmation.

  15. Prehospital Emergencies in Illegal Gold Mining Sites in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egmann, Gérald; Tattevin, Pierre; Palancade, Renaud; Nacher, Matthieu

    2018-03-01

    Illegal gold mining is flourishing in French Guiana, existing outside the law due to both the high cost of gold mining permits and the challenges of law enforcement within the Amazon forest. We report the characteristics of, and the medical responses to, medical emergencies in illegal gold mining sites. We performed a retrospective study of all medical emergencies reported from illegal gold mining sites to the centralized call office of SAMU 973 from 1998 through 2000 and from 2008 through 2010. According to the national health care system, any medical emergency within the territory is handled by the prehospital emergency medical service (SAMU 973), irrespective of the patients' legal status. Data were extracted from the SAMU 973 notebook registry (1998-2000) or the SAMU 973 computerized database (2008-2010) and werre collected using a standardized questionnaire. Of 71,932 calls for medical emergencies in French Guiana during the study periods, 340 (0.5%) originated from illegal gold mining sites. Of these, 196 (58%) led to medical evacuation by helicopter, whereas the overall rate of evacuation by helicopter after placing a call to SAMU 973 was only 4% (3020/71,932; PAmazon forest mostly include infectious diseases, followed by trauma, and often require medical evacuation by helicopter. Our study suggests that implementation of preventive medicine within gold mining sites, irrespective of their legal status, could be cost-effective and reduce morbidity. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prehospital tidal volume influences hospital tidal volume: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltze, Andrew J; Wong, Terrence S; Harland, Karisa K; Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Fuller, Brian M; Mohr, Nicholas M

    2015-06-01

    The purposes of the study are to describe current practice of ventilation in a modern air medical system and to measure the association of ventilation strategy with subsequent ventilator care and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Retrospective observational cohort study of intubated adult patients (n = 235) transported by a university-affiliated air medical transport service to a 711-bed tertiary academic center between July 2011 and May 2013. Low tidal volume ventilation was defined as tidal volumes less than or equal to 8 mL/kg predicted body weight. Multivariable regression was used to measure the association between prehospital tidal volume, hospital ventilation strategy, and ARDS. Most patients (57%) were ventilated solely with bag valve ventilation during transport. Mean tidal volume of mechanically ventilated patients was 8.6 mL/kg predicted body weight (SD, 0.2 mL/kg). Low tidal volume ventilation was used in 13% of patients. Patients receiving low tidal volume ventilation during air medical transport were more likely to receive low tidal volume ventilation in the emergency department (P tidal volume (P = .840). Low tidal volume ventilation was rare during air medical transport. Air transport ventilation strategy influenced subsequent ventilation but was not associated with ARDS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prehospital traumatic cardiac arrest: the cost of futility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemurgy, A S; Norris, P A; Olson, S M; Hurst, J M; Albrink, M H

    1993-09-01

    Of 12,462 trauma patients cared for by prehospital services from October 1, 1989 to March 31, 1991, 138 patients underwent CPR at the scene or during transport because of the absence of blood pressure, pulse, and respiration. Ninety-six (70%) suffered blunt trauma, 42 (30%) suffered penetrating trauma. Sixty (43%) were transported by air utilizing county-wide transport protocols. None of the patients survived. Aggregate care cost $871,186.00. In 11 cases (8%), tissue for transplantation was procured (only corneas). Trauma patients who require CPR at the scene or in transport die. Infrequent organ procurement does not seem to justify the cost (primarily borne by hospitals), consumption of resources, and exposure of health care providers to occupational health hazards. The wisdom of transporting trauma victims suffering cardiopulmonary arrest at the scene or during transport must be questioned. Allocation of resources to these patients is not an insular medical issue, but a broad concern for our society, and society should decide if the "cost of futility" is excessive.

  18. Emergency mobile care service: trauma epidemiology in prehospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Kist Ibiapino

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to characterize trauma victims assisted by the Mobile Emergency Care Service (SAMU 192 in the city of Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil. Method: this is a descriptive and retrospective study in which 1,588 records of traumatic events were analyzed from the following variables: sex, age, day of the week, period of the day, trauma mechanism, topography and type of injuries, revised trauma score, type of mobile unit used, professional responsible for care, time to hospital care, procedures performed and deaths. Results: there was a predominance of male victims (69.5% and age between 18 and 37 (46.5%. Occurrences were concentrated at weekends (37.8% and in the evening (52.0%. It revealed traffic accidents (41.3% as the main mechanism of trauma, among which prevailed the involvement of motorcycles (73.0%. Regarding the topographic distribution of lesions, the majority affected the limbs (58.2%. The most adopted conducts in prehospital care were immobilization (26.3% and compression dressing (25.9%. The deaths accounted for 2.7% of the total sample. Conclusion: The population most affected by traumatic events in Ilhéus shown to be composed of young men involved in traffic accidents, mainly motorcyclists, during the weekends.

  19. Low-Dose Aspirin for the Prevention of Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    2018-02-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder specific to pregnancy that remains a significant cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Identification of women who are most at risk for preeclampsia is imprecise. Because of the potential negative health consequences of preeclampsia for women and newborns and the lack of effective screening mechanisms preventing preeclampsia is an important component of prenatal care. Researchers have documented that low-dose aspirin, taken daily after the first trimester, can decrease the development of preeclampsia and reduce the incidence of preterm birth and birth of small-for-gestational-age infants. This column includes an overview of low-dose aspirin in pregnancy and a review of current recommendations from leading national organizations. © 2018 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  20. Determination of trace element impurities in aspirin tablets by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, F.Y.; Klein, D.E.; Bauer, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-five trace and minor elements in five different Egyptian aspirin brands (Aspo, Askin, Aspocid, Aspeol and Rivo) were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. It was concluded that the concentration of As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Fe (except in Aspocid), Mg, Mn, Rb, Se, Sr and Zn in the Egyptian brands is below or within the concentration range reported for these elements in 16 American aspirin and aspirin-like brands. (author)

  1. The use of preoperative aspirin in cardiac surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Hassan, Sleiman Sebastian; Stankowski, Tomasz; Marczak, Jakub; Peksa, Maciej; Nawotka, Marcin; Stanislawski, Ryszard; Kryszkowski, Bartosz; Cichon, Romuald

    2017-12-01

    Despite the fact that aspirin is of benefit to patients following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), continuation or administration of preoperative aspirin before CABG or any cardiac surgical procedure remains controversial. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the influence of preoperative aspirin administration on patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Medline database was searched using OVID SP interface. Similar searches were performed separately in EMBASE, PubMed, and Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Twelve randomized controlled trials and 28 observational studies met our inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The use of preoperative aspirin in patients undergoing CABG at any dose is associated with reduced early mortality as well as a reduced incidence of postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI). Low-dose aspirin (≤160 mg/d) is associated with a decreased incidence of perioperative myocardial infarction (MI). Administration of preoperative aspirin at any dose in patients undergoing cardiac surgery increases postoperative bleeding. Despite this effect of preoperative aspirin, it did not increase the rates of surgical re-exploration due to excessive postoperative bleeding nor did it increase the rates of packed red blood cell transfusions (PRBC) when preoperative low-dose aspirin (≤160 mg/d) was administered. Preoperative aspirin increases the risk for postoperative bleeding. However, this did not result in an increased need for chest re-exploration and did not increase the rates of PRBC transfusion when preoperative low-dose (≤160 mg/d) aspirin was administered. Aspirin at any dose is associated with decreased mortality and AKI and low-dose aspirin (≤160 mg/d) decreases the incidence of perioperative MI. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Failure of ethamsylate to reduce aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Daneshmend, T K; Stein, A G; Bhaskar, N K; Hawkey, C J

    1989-01-01

    1. We investigated the effect of the haemostatic agent ethamsylate on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding. 2. Eighteen healthy subjects were studied three times: at the end of 48 h periods of treatment with (a) placebo, (b) aspirin 600 mg four times daily, (9 doses) and (c) aspirin 600 mg four times daily with each dose preceded by ethamsylate 500 mg. 3. At the end of each treatment period gastric mucosal bleeding into timed gastric washings was quantified using the orthotolidine reactio...

  3. Aspirin versus warfarin in atrial fibrillation: decision analysis may help patients' choice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Romero-Ortuno, Roman

    2012-03-01

    the primary prevention of ischaemic stroke in chronic non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) typically involves consideration of aspirin or warfarin. CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc estimates annual stroke rates for untreated AF patients, which are reduced by 60% with warfarin and by 20% with aspirin. HAS-BLED estimates annual rates of major bleeding on warfarin. The latter risk with aspirin is 0.5-1.2% per year.

  4. Characteristics and prognoses of patients treated by an anaesthesiologist-manned prehospital emergency care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Lossius, Hans Morten; Toft, Palle

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: When planning and dimensioning an emergency medical system, knowledge of the population serviced is vital. The amount of literature concerning the prehospital population is sparse. In order to add to the current body of literature regarding prehospital treatment, thus aiding future...... public health planning, we describe the workload of a prehospital anaesthesiologist-manned mobile emergency care unit (MECU) and the total population it services in terms of factors associated with mortality. PARTICIPANTS: The study is a register-based study investigating all missions carried out...... the assistance of a MECU was high in the first 2 years following the incident. MECU response time assessed as a continuous parameter was not associated with patient outcome....

  5. Association between QRS duration on prehospital ECG and mortality in patients with suspected STEMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke; Frydland, Martin; Møller-Helgestad, Ole Kristian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: QRS duration has previously shown association with mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with thrombolytics, less is known in patients with suspected ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) when assessing QRS duration on prehospital ECG. Thus......, the objective was to investigate the prognostic effect of QRS duration on prehospital ECG and presence of classic left and right bundle branch block (LBBB/RBBB) for all-cause mortality in patients with suspected STEMI. METHOD: In total 2105 consecutive patients (mean age 64±13years, 72% men) with suspected...... STEMI were prospectively included. QRS duration was registered from automated QRS measurement on prehospital ECG and patients were divided according to quartiles of QRS duration (111ms). Primary endpoint was all-cause 30-day mortality. Predictors of all-cause mortality were...

  6. An overview of the construction of emergency and pre-hospital first aid platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To further improve the ability of pre-hospital and in-hospital collaborative treatment, strengthen emergency multidisciplinary cooperation and construct a scientific, rational and efficient emergency system, under the support of former chairman Yu Xue-zhong, Dr. Li Chun-sheng and numerous colleagues in the industry, the Emergency Medicine Society of the Chinese Medical Association appeal to us to draft Construction of Emergency and Pre-hospital Platform. Based on this background, the platform of emergency and pre-hospital first aid helps to build a “one horizontal and one Longitudinal” treatment model, using the horizontal and longitudinal patterns to integrate emergency medical resources to satisfy the automatic information integration and intelligent analysis sharing, realizing the emergency management visualization and medical information digitization, simplifying the medical process and establishing a perfect standard for the emergent diseases, thereby ultimately achieving efficient diagnosis and scientific treatment.

  7. The internationalisation of prehospital education: a merging of ideologies between Australia and the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B; Upchurch, J

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this project was to promote internationalisation of prehospital education collaboratively between students and teachers from EMS Education and Training, Montana, USA, and Monash University Centre for Ambulance and Paramedic Studies (MUCAPS), Victoria, Australia. The project required students and teachers to engage in a series of face to face lectures, which was reinforced through distance education strategies, such as online learning. The overall project aim was to establish an objective and descriptive view of the internationalisation of prehospital and community based emergency health education using e-learning as the educational approach. A cross sectional survey design using paper based evaluation was adopted in this project. Results revealed a positive student reaction, with flexible pedagogical processes broadening student learning and facilitating an international dimension otherwise not achievable. Given the current state of globalisation, internationalisation has the capacity to improve educational standards, quality, student interactions and specific learning outcomes in prehospital education.

  8. Longitudinal assessment of thrombin generation potential in response to alteration of antiplatelet therapy after TIA or ischaemic stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, W O

    2013-02-01

    The impact of changing antiplatelet therapy on thrombin generation potential in patients with ischaemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is unclear. We assessed patients within 4 weeks of TIA or ischaemic stroke (baseline), and then 14 days (14d) and >90 days (90d) after altering antiplatelet therapy. Thrombin generation was assessed in platelet poor plasma. Ninety-one patients were recruited. Twenty-four were initially assessed on no antiplatelet therapy, and then after 14d (N = 23) and 90d (N = 8) on aspirin monotherapy; 52 were assessed on aspirin monotherapy, and after 14 and 90 days on aspirin and dipyridamole combination therapy; 21 patients were assessed on aspirin and after 14 days (N = 21) and 90 days (N = 19) on clopidogrel. Peak thrombin generation and endogenous thrombin potential were reduced at 14 and 90 days (p ≤ 0.04) in the overall cohort. We assessed the impact of individual antiplatelet regimens on thrombin generation parameters to investigate the cause of this effect. Lag time and time-to-peak thrombin generation were unchanged at 14 days, but reduced 90 days after commencing aspirin (p ≤ 0.009). Lag time, peak thrombin generation and endogenous thrombin potential were reduced at both 14 and 90 days after adding dipyridamole to aspirin (p ≤ 0.01). Lag time was reduced 14 days after changing from aspirin to clopidogrel (p = 0.045), but this effect was not maintained at 90 days (p = 0.2). This pilot study did not show any consistent effects of commencing aspirin, or of changing from aspirin to clopidogrel on thrombin generation potential during follow-up. The addition of dipyridamole to aspirin led to a persistent reduction in peak and total thrombin generation ex vivo, and illustrates the diverse, potentially beneficial, newly recognised \\'anti-coagulant\\' effects of dipyridamole in ischaemic CVD.

  9. Safety of aspirin desensitization in patients with reported aspirin allergy and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, Kathryn L; Wedner, H James

    2013-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is the drug of choice in patients with coronary artery disease for primary and secondary prevention. This poses a problem for those patients reporting hypersensitivity to this drug or class of drugs. Desensitization to ASA may be carried out safely and effectively in patients with reported ASA or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) hypersensitivity needing ASA for cardiac indications. Our 7-step protocol is one choice for a rapid desensitization protocol. A retrospective chart review was conducted evaluating ASA desensitization in patients with reported ASA or NSAID hypersensitivity and a cardiac indication for ASA. In 160 evaluations over 15 years, 89 desensitizations were performed in both the inpatient and outpatient setting with only 16 reactions (18%). Eleven of these 16 patients (68.7%) were able to take daily ASA. Twenty-six desensitization procedures were performed with our 7-step rapid desensitization protocol in 10 inpatients and 16 outpatients with 3 reactions (18.75% of reactions). Initial reaction to ASA involving angioedema and reacting to ASA within the past year increased the risk of having a reaction to desensitization. Desensitization may be safely performed in patients with reported ASA or NSAID hypersensitivity and a cardiac indication for ASA. Our 7-step rapid protocol may be used in both the inpatient and outpatient setting to desensitize these patients. Patients who had angioedema with ASA ingestion or a reaction to ASA within the past year are at higher risk for reaction during the desensitization protocol. The authors have no funding, financial relationships, or conflicts of interest to disclose. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Aspirin and Risk of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Moore, Justin M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Thomas, Ajith J

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the use of low-dose aspirin may reduce the risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). We aimed to evaluate any association between aspirin use and risk of aSAH based on the literature, and whether this is influenced by duration or frequency of aspirin use. A search of electronic databases was done from inception to September 2016. For each study, data on risk of aSAH in aspirin versus nonaspirin users were used to generate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, and combined using inverse variance-weighted averages of logarithmic odds ratios in a random-effects models. From 7 included studies, no significant difference was noted between aspirin use of any duration or frequency and nonaspirin users (odds ratio, 1.00; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.24; P =0.99). We found a significant association between short-term use of aspirin (3 years of durations of use. No significant association was found between infrequent aspirin use (≤2× per week) or frequent use (≥3× per week) with risk of aSAH. Current evidence suggests that short-term (aspirin is associated with increased risk of aSAH. Limitations include substantial heterogenity of the included studies. The role of long-term aspirin in reducing risk of aSAH remains unclear and ideally should be addressed by an appropriately designed randomized controlled trial. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Aspirin inhibition of platelet deposition at angioplasty sites: demonstration by platelet scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuningham, D.A.; Kumar, B.; Siegel, B.A.; Gilula, L.A.; Totty, W.G.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    In-111 platelet scintigraphy was used to evaluate the effects of prior aspirin administration on the accumulation of In-111-labeled autologous platelets at sites of arterial injury resulting from iliac, femoral, or popliteal transluminal angioplasty in a nonrandomized study of 17 men. The degree of platelet localization at angioplasty sites was significantly less in nine men who had received aspirin in varying doses within the 4 days before angioplasty than in eight men who had not received aspirin for at least two weeks. The results suggest that aspirin treatment before angioplasty limits the early platelet deposition at the angioplasty site in men

  12. A Proteomic Approach to Analyze the Aspirin-mediated Lysine Acetylome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, Michael H; Cole, Christian; Scullion, Paul; Wilkie, Ross; Westwood, Nicholas J; Stark, Lesley A; Hay, Ronald T

    2017-02-01

    Aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid is widely used to control pain, inflammation and fever. Important to this function is its ability to irreversibly acetylate cyclooxygenases at active site serines. Aspirin has the potential to acetylate other amino acid side-chains, leading to the possibility that aspirin-mediated lysine acetylation could explain some of its as-yet unexplained drug actions or side-effects. Using isotopically labeled aspirin-d 3 , in combination with acetylated lysine purification and LC-MS/MS, we identified over 12000 sites of lysine acetylation from cultured human cells. Although aspirin amplifies endogenous acetylation signals at the majority of detectable endogenous sites, cells tolerate aspirin mediated acetylation very well unless cellular deacetylases are inhibited. Although most endogenous acetylations are amplified by orders of magnitude, lysine acetylation site occupancies remain very low even after high doses of aspirin. This work shows that while aspirin has enormous potential to alter protein function, in the majority of cases aspirin-mediated acetylations do not accumulate to levels likely to elicit biological effects. These findings are consistent with an emerging model for cellular acetylation whereby stoichiometry correlates with biological relevance, and deacetylases act to minimize the biological consequences of nonspecific chemical acetylations. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. A Proteomic Approach to Analyze the Aspirin-mediated Lysine Acetylome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, Michael H.; Cole, Christian; Scullion, Paul; Wilkie, Ross; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Stark, Lesley A.; Hay, Ronald T.

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid is widely used to control pain, inflammation and fever. Important to this function is its ability to irreversibly acetylate cyclooxygenases at active site serines. Aspirin has the potential to acetylate other amino acid side-chains, leading to the possibility that aspirin-mediated lysine acetylation could explain some of its as-yet unexplained drug actions or side-effects. Using isotopically labeled aspirin-d3, in combination with acetylated lysine purification and LC-MS/MS, we identified over 12000 sites of lysine acetylation from cultured human cells. Although aspirin amplifies endogenous acetylation signals at the majority of detectable endogenous sites, cells tolerate aspirin mediated acetylation very well unless cellular deacetylases are inhibited. Although most endogenous acetylations are amplified by orders of magnitude, lysine acetylation site occupancies remain very low even after high doses of aspirin. This work shows that while aspirin has enormous potential to alter protein function, in the majority of cases aspirin-mediated acetylations do not accumulate to levels likely to elicit biological effects. These findings are consistent with an emerging model for cellular acetylation whereby stoichiometry correlates with biological relevance, and deacetylases act to minimize the biological consequences of nonspecific chemical acetylations. PMID:27913581

  14. Accuracy of prehospital triage protocols in selecting severely injured patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rein, Eveline A J; Houwert, R Marijn; Gunning, Amy C; Lichtveld, Rob A; Leenen, Luke P H; van Heijl, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Prehospital trauma triage ensures proper transport of patients at risk of severe injury to hospitals with an appropriate corresponding level of trauma care. Incorrect triage results in undertriage and overtriage. The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma recommends an undertriage rate below 5% and an overtriage rate below 50% for prehospital trauma triage protocols. To find the most accurate prehospital trauma triage protocol, a clear overview of all currently available protocols and corresponding outcomes is necessary. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the current literature on all available prehospital trauma triage protocols and determine accuracy of protocol-based triage quality in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A search of Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases was performed to identify all studies describing prehospital trauma triage protocols before November 2016. The search terms included "trauma," "trauma center," or "trauma system" combined with "triage," "undertriage," or "overtriage." All studies describing protocol-based triage quality were reviewed. To assess the quality of these type of studies, a new critical appraisal tool was developed. In this review, 21 articles were included with numbers of patients ranging from 130 to over 1 million. Significant predictors for severe injury were: vital signs, suspicion of certain anatomic injuries, mechanism of injury, and age. Sensitivity ranged from 10% to 100%; specificity from 9% to 100%. Nearly all protocols had a low sensitivity, thereby failing to identify severely injured patients. Additionally, the critical appraisal showed poor quality of the majority of included studies. This systematic review shows that nearly all protocols are incapable of identifying severely injured patients. Future studies of high methodological quality should be performed to improve prehospital trauma triage protocols. Systematic review, level III.

  15. Pre-hospital antibiotic treatment and mortality caused by invasive meningococcal disease, adjusting for indication bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matute-Cruz Petra

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD has remained stable over the last thirty years and it is unclear whether pre-hospital antibiotherapy actually produces a decrease in this mortality. Our aim was to examine whether pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy reduces mortality from IMD, adjusting for indication bias. Methods A retrospective analysis was made of clinical reports of all patients (n = 848 diagnosed with IMD from 1995 to 2000 in Andalusia and the Canary Islands, Spain, and of the relationship between the use of pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy and mortality. Indication bias was controlled for by the propensity score technique, and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the probability of each patient receiving antibiotics, according to the symptoms identified before admission. Data on in-hospital death, use of antibiotics and demographic variables were collected. A logistic regression analysis was then carried out, using death as the dependent variable, and pre-hospital antibiotic use, age, time from onset of symptoms to parenteral antibiotics and the propensity score as independent variables. Results Data were recorded on 848 patients, 49 (5.72% of whom died. Of the total number of patients, 226 had received oral antibiotics before admission, mainly betalactams during the previous 48 hours. After adjusting the association between the use of antibiotics and death for age, time between onset of symptoms and in-hospital antibiotic treatment, pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy remained a significant protective factor (Odds Ratio for death 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.15–0.93. Conclusion Pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy appears to reduce IMD mortality.

  16. EMS Adherence to a Pre-hospital Cervical Spine Clearance Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson, David

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the degree of adherence to a cervical spine (c-spine clearance protocol by pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services (EMS personnel by both self-assessment and receiving hospital assessment, to describe deviations from the protocol, and to determine if the rate of compliance by paramedic self-assessment differed from receiving hospital assessment. Methods: A retrospective sample of pre-hospital (consecutive series and receiving hospital (convenience sample assessments of the compliance with and appropriateness of c-spine immobilization. The c-spine clearance protocol was implemented for Orange County EMS just prior to the April-November 1999 data collection period. Results: We collected 396 pre-hospital and 162 receiving hospital data forms. From the pre-hospital data sheet. the percentage deviation from the protocol was 4.096 (16/396. Only one out of 16 cases that did not comply with the protocol was due to over immobilization (0.2%. The remaining 15 cases were under immobilized, according to protocol. Nine of the under immobilized cases (66% that should have been placed in c-spine precautions met physical assessment criteria in the protocol, while the other five cases met mechanism of injury criteria. The rate of deviations from protocol did not differ over time. The receiving hospital identified 8.0% (13/162; 6/16 over immobilized, 7/16 under immobilized of patients with deviations from the protocol; none was determined to have actual c-spine injury. Conclusion: The implementation of a pre-hospital c-spine clearance protocol in Orange County was associated with a moderate overall adherence rate (96% from the pre-hospital perspective, and 92% from the hospital perspective, p=.08 for the two evaluation methods. Most patients who deviated from protocol were under immobilized, but no c-spine injuries were missed. The rate of over immobilization was better than previously reported, implying a saving of resources.

  17. Contemporary management of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease: an evidence-based review with recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Joshua M; Rudmik, Luke; Peters, Anju T; Wise, Sarah K; Rotenberg, Brian W; Smith, Timothy L

    2016-12-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) represents a recalcitrant form of sinonasal inflammation for which a multidisciplinary consensus on patient management has not been reached. Several medical interventions have been investigated, but a formal comprehensive evaluation of the evidence has never been performed. The purpose of this article is to provide an evidence-based approach for the multidisciplinary management of CRS in AERD. A systematic review of the literature was performed and the guidelines for development of an evidence-based review with recommendations were followed. Study inclusion criteria included: adult population >18 years old; CRS based on published diagnostic criteria, and a presumptive diagnosis of AERD. We focused on reporting higher-quality studies (level 2 or higher) when available, but reported lower-quality studies if the topic contained insufficient evidence. Treatment recommendations were based on American Academy of Otolaryngology (AAO) guidelines, with defined grades of evidence and evaluation of research quality and risk/benefits associated with each treatment. This review identified and evaluated the literature on 3 treatment strategies for CRS in AERD: dietary salicylate avoidance, leukotriene modification, and desensitization with daily aspirin therapy. Based on the available evidence, dietary salicylate avoidance and leukotriene-modifying drugs are options following appropriate treatment with nasal corticosteroids and saline irrigation. Desensitization with daily aspirin therapy is recommended following revision endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  18. Prehospital care practices for venomous snakebites in resource-limited settings: A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godpower Chinedu Michael

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Venomous snakebite is a medical emergency encountered worldwide, especially in resource-limited communities. It usually leaves victims at the mercy of traditional care, whose effectiveness have come under scrutiny over time. Several of these traditional/ first aid practices have also been reported over time. Controversies over their efficacy often result in confusion among snakebite victims, their caregivers, and sometimes, among health-care providers. This narrative review describes reported prehospital interventions for venomous snakebites highlighting their usefulness, dangers, and/or limitations associated with their use and the currently widely recommended prehospital activities for venomous snakebite.

  19. Prehospital delay in acute coronary syndrome--an analysis of the components of delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Michael Mundt; Dixen, Ulrik; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prompt hospital admission is essential when treating acute coronary syndrome. Delay prior to admission is unnecessarily long. Therefore, a thorough scrutiny of the influence of characteristics, circumstantial and subjective variables on elements of prehospital delay among patients...... admitted with acute coronary syndrome is warranted. METHODS: A structured interview was conducted on 250 consecutive patients admitted alive with acute coronary syndrome. RESULTS: Median prehospital, decision, physician and transportation delays were 107, 74, 25 and 22 min, respectively. Women (n=77) had...... of acute coronary syndrome among women, and thereby contributes to unnecessary long delay to treatment. The patient's prior experience and interpretation has a significant influence on behaviour....

  20. Damage Control for Vascular Trauma from the Prehospital to the Operating Room Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Pikoulis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Early management of vascular injury, starting at the field, is imperative for survival no less than any operative maneuver. Contemporary prehospital management of vascular trauma, including appropriate fluid and volume infusion, tourniquets, and hemostatic agents, has reversed the historically known limb hemorrhage as a leading cause of death. In this context, damage control (DC surgery has evolved to DC resuscitation (DCR as an overarching concept that draws together preoperative and operative interventions aiming at rapidly reducing bleeding from vascular disruption, optimizing oxygenation, and clinical outcomes. This review addresses contemporary DCR techniques from the prehospital to the surgical setting, focusing on civilian vascular injuries.

  1. Damage Control for Vascular Trauma from the Prehospital to the Operating Room Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikoulis, Emmanouil; Salem, Karim M; Avgerinos, Efthymios D; Pikouli, Anastasia; Angelou, Anastasios; Pikoulis, Antreas; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Karavokyros, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    Early management of vascular injury, starting at the field, is imperative for survival no less than any operative maneuver. Contemporary prehospital management of vascular trauma, including appropriate fluid and volume infusion, tourniquets, and hemostatic agents, has reversed the historically known limb hemorrhage as a leading cause of death. In this context, damage control (DC) surgery has evolved to DC resuscitation (DCR) as an overarching concept that draws together preoperative and operative interventions aiming at rapidly reducing bleeding from vascular disruption, optimizing oxygenation, and clinical outcomes. This review addresses contemporary DCR techniques from the prehospital to the surgical setting, focusing on civilian vascular injuries.

  2. Adult Status Epilepticus: A Review of the Prehospital and Emergency Department Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billington, Michael; Kandalaft, Osama R.; Aisiku, Imoigele P.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation in the prehospital and emergency department setting and status epilepticus represents an emergency neurologic condition. The classification and various types of seizures are numerous. The objectives of this narrative literature review focuses on adult patients with a presentation of status epilepticus in the prehospital and emergency department setting. In summary, benzodiazepines remain the primary first line therapeutic agent in the management of status epilepticus, however, there are new agents that may be appropriate for the management of status epilepticus as second- and third-line pharmacological agents. PMID:27563928

  3. Influence of aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use on ovarian and endometrial cancer: Summary of epidemiologic evidence of cancer risk and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoodt, F; Kjaer, S K; Friis, S

    2017-06-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for aspirin use in reducing the incidence and mortality of several cancer types. This has spurred a new wave of interest in this widely used drug. In this review, we present and evaluate the epidemiologic evidence of the association between the use of aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the incidence and prognosis of ovarian and endometrial cancer. The evidence of a preventive effect of NSAID use on risk of ovarian or endometrial cancer is based primarily on results from observational studies and, consequently, is only suggestive. Overall, observational studies indicate modest reductions in risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer with aspirin use, whereas the results for non-aspirin NSAID use are equivocal. The strongest inverse associations have been reported for long-term consistent aspirin use, notably among subgroups of users (e.g., those with high body mass index). Few studies have evaluated the influence of NSAID use on the mortality of ovarian or endometrial cancer, and substantial heterogeneity of study characteristics and results preclude any conclusions. Additional studies of aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use and ovarian or endometrial cancer risk and prognosis are warranted. In the present review, we discuss the importance of comprehensive exposure definitions (i.e., duration, timing, consistency and intensity/dose) and evaluation of potential effect modification according to user characteristics, with the aim of identifying women who may experience the largest benefit of aspirin or non-aspirin NSAID use on risk or prognosis of ovarian and endometrial cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Quality Indicators for Evaluating Prehospital Emergency Care: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ian; Cameron, Peter; Wallis, Lee; Castren, Maaret; Lindstrom, Veronica

    2018-02-01

    Introduction Historically, the quality and performance of prehospital emergency care (PEC) has been assessed largely based on surrogate, non-clinical endpoints such as response time intervals or other crude measures of care (eg, stakeholder satisfaction). However, advances in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems and services world-wide have seen their scope and reach continue to expand. This has dictated that novel measures of performance be implemented to compliment this growth. Significant progress has been made in this area, largely in the form of the development of evidence-informed quality indicators (QIs) of PEC. Problem Quality indicators represent an increasingly popular component of health care quality and performance measurement. However, little is known about the development of QIs in the PEC environment. The purpose of this study was to assess the development and characteristics of PEC-specific QIs in the literature. A scoping review was conducted through a search of PubMed (National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Institutes of Health; Bethesda, Maryland USA); EMBase (Elsevier; Amsterdam, Netherlands); CINAHL (EBSCO Information Services; Ipswich, Massachusetts USA); Web of Science (Thomson Reuters; New York, New York USA); and the Cochrane Library (The Cochrane Collaboration; Oxford, United Kingdom). To increase the sensitivity of the literature, a search of the grey literature and review of select websites was additionally conducted. Articles were selected that proposed at least one PEC QI and whose aim was to discuss, analyze, or promote quality measurement in the PEC environment. The majority of research (n=25 articles) was published within the last decade (68.0%) and largely originated within the USA (68.0%). Delphi and observational methodologies were the most commonly employed for QI development (28.0%). A total of 331 QIs were identified via the article review, with an additional 15 QIs identified via the website review. Of

  5. Effect of aspirin and ticlopidine on platelet deposition in carotid atherosclerosis: assessment by indium-111 platelet scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaka, Y.; Kimura, K.; Etani, H.; Uehara, A.; Uyama, O.; Yoneda, S.; Kamada, T.; Kusunoki, M.

    1986-01-01

    The antiplatelet effects of aspirin and ticlopidine were studied by a dual-tracer method, using indium-111 labeled platelets and technetium-99m human serum albumin, in a group of 12 patients with suspected ischemic cerebrovascular disease. The magnitude of platelet accumulation at the carotid bifurcation was expressed as the ratio of radioactivity of indium-111 platelets deposited on the vascular wall to those circulating in the blood-pool (PAI, platelet accumulation index), 48 hr after injection of labeled platelets. PAI values were measured before (baseline studies) and after the antithrombotic therapies (aspirin studies: 325 mg bid for 22.3 +/- 1.3 days, ticlopidine studies: 100 mg tid for 21.8 +/- 2.1 days). At the baseline, the mean PAI value at 24 carotid bifurcations in the patient group was 15.7 +/- 15.3% (mean +/- S.D.) compared to -4.3 +/- 9.1 at 24 carotid bifurcations in 12 normal subjects (p less than 0.01). We defined the upper limit for a normal PAI (%) value to be +13.9, namely the mean PAI plus 2 SD for the carotid bifurcation in normal subjects and used this value for semiquantitative analysis. At the baseline, significant elevation of PAI (more than 13.9%; positive scintigram) was observed at 12 of 24 vessels, while 12 other regions were negative (less than 13.9%). In the lesions with positive scintigraphic results at the baseline, the mean PAI (%) value from the baseline, aspirin and ticlopidine studies was 29.5 +/- 7.0, 11.2 +/- 8.5 (p less than 0.01 versus baseline) and 21.4 +/- 21.3 (not significant from baseline), respectively

  6. Prehospital characteristics in the North East Department of Haiti: a cross-sectional study from a low-income setting without prehospital systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluisio, Adam R; Gore, Robert; Decome, Isnelle; De Wulf, Annelies; Bloem, Christina

    2014-06-01

    Although prehospital care is recognized as key in health systems development, it has been largely neglected in Haiti. The North East Department is one of the poorest areas of Haiti, and is a region where no data on out-of-hospital health care exists. This research assessed prehospital characteristics in the North East Department with the aim of providing baseline data to inform prehospital systems development. In this observational study, data were collected from patients presenting at the Fort Liberté Hospital, the public regional referral health center in the North East Department. Data were accrued from April 2, 2012 through June 5, 2012. All patients accessing acute care at the hospital were eligible for enrollment. After obtaining consent, data on demographics, health needs, and prehospital information were gathered via a standardized questionnaire administered by hospital staff trained in study protocols. Data were collected from 441 patient visits. The median age was 24 years, with 62% of the population being female. Medical complaints comprised 75% of visits, with fever and gastrointestinal complaints being the most common reasons for presentation. Traumatic injuries accounted for 25% of encounters, with an equal distribution of blunt and penetrating events. Extremity injuries were the most common traumatic subclassification. The majority of patients (67.2%) were transported by motorcycle taxi and paid transport fees. Trauma patients were more likely to be transported without charge (OR = 9.10; 95% CI, 2.19-37.76; P Haiti. Out-of-hospital care is nearly nonexistent in the region and its development has the potential to yield public health benefits.

  7. Aspirin and its related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspirin and its related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Aspirin or acetylsalicylic acid has been utilised by physicians for hundreds of years as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic (1). Derived from plant sources, such as the willow tree, it has the ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells and stimulate.

  8. Use and misuse of aspirin in rural Ethiopia | Duncan | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To investigate ability to distinguish simple analgesics, to document misconceptions about aspirin use, and to identify strategies to diminish potentially harmful aspirin use in Ethiopia. Design: Qualitative study (eight focus group discussions) used to inform cross-sectional survey. Setting: Butajira, a small town in ...

  9. Aspirin for Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer. A Benefit and Harm Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegeman, Inge; Bossuyt, Patrick M.; Yu, Tsung; Boyd, Cynthia; Puhan, Milo A.

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin is widely used for prevention of cardiovascular disease. In recent years randomized trials also suggested a preventive effect for various types of cancer. We aimed to assess, in a quantitative way, benefits and harms of aspirin for primary prevention of both cardiovascular disease and cancer

  10. Effect of chronic aspirin ingestion on epithelial proliferation in rat fundus, antrum, and duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastwood, G.L.; Quimby, G.F.

    1972-01-01

    We studied the effect of chronic aspirin ingestion on gastroduodenal epithelial proliferation by feeding rats aspirin in the drinking water. A control group of rats received plain water. At the end of 4 wk, [3H]-thymidine was given intravenously to label proliferating cells, and the rats were killed 1 h later. Sections of fundus, antrum, and proximal duodenum were processed for light autoradiography. We found that chronic aspirin ingestion stimulated epithelial proliferation in fundic mucosa but had no effect in the antrum. In the duodenum, aspirin increased proliferation in the lowest four crypt-cell positions, which most likely indicates an increase in stem-cell production. None of the tissues contained evidence of inflammation or ulceration. The proliferative effects of aspirin may help explain the previously observed phenomenon of mucosal adaptation in the rat after repeated exposure to aspirin. Further, if human gastroduodenal epithelium responds in a similar manner to chronic aspirin exposure, the effects on proliferation may explain in part the distribution of aspirin-associated ulcers

  11. UP-REGULATION OF ANTITHROMBOTIC ECTONUCLEOTIDASES BY ASPIRIN IN HUMAN ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS IN-VITRO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHEUNG, PK; VISSER, J; BAKKER, WW

    1994-01-01

    Ecto ATP-diphosphohydrolase (apyrase) activity of human endothelial cells following aspirin treatment has been studied in-vitro. It was shown by HPLC analysis of supernatant samples that pre-incubation of the cultures with aspirin resulted in a significantly increased turnover of supplemented ATP

  12. Effect of Prior Aspirin Treatment on Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes: Insights From the PROSPECT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Sorin J; Maehara, Akiko; Mintz, Gary S; Weisz, Giora; de Bruyne, Bernard; Serruys, Patrick W; Stone, Gregg W

    2015-12-01

    Prior aspirin treatment is considered a risk factor for adverse outcomes in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. The relationships between aspirin pretreatment and findings on quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), as well as clinical outcomes, are not well understood. In the PROSPECT trial, QCA and triple-vessel IVUS imaging were performed after successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of the culprit lesion(s) in ACS patients. We compared patients receiving aspirin within 7 days of enrollment to those naive to aspirin. Propensity score matching was performed to adjust for differences in baseline characteristics. Aspirin-pretreated patients (n = 236; 35%) were older and more likely to have known coronary disease than those without pretreatment (P≤.01 for all). Pretreated patients had more untreated non-culprit lesions with angiographic and IVUS characteristics predictive of future events (53.1% vs 38.6%; PPROSPECT trial, aspirin pretreatment identifies an older population with more advanced coronary disease. Aspirin pretreatment was not an independent predictor of MACE in ACS patients treated with an early invasive strategy. The extent to which aspirin pretreatment is a risk factor for adverse events after PCI in ACS should be revisited.

  13. Aspirin and Zileuton and Biomarker Expression in Nasal Tissue of Current Smokers | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This randomized phase II trial studies the effects of aspirin and zileuton on genes related to tobacco use in current smokers. Aspirin and zileuton may interfere with genes related to tobacco use and may be useful in preventing lung cancer in current smokers. |

  14. Apixaban vs. warfarin with concomitant aspirin in patients with atrial fibrillation: insights from the ARISTOTLE trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander, J.H.; Lopes, R.D.; Thomas, L.; Alings, M.; Atar, D.; Aylward, P.; Goto, S.; Hanna, M.; Huber, K.; Husted, S.; Lewis, B.S.; McMurray, J.J.; Pais, P.; Pouleur, H.; Steg, P.G.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Wojdyla, D.M.; Granger, C.B.; Wallentin, L.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: We assessed the effect of concomitant aspirin use on the efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). METHODS AND RESULTS: In ARISTOTLE, 18 201 patients were randomized to apixaban 5 mg twice daily or warfarin. Concomitant aspirin use was

  15. Psychological consequences of aggression in pre-hospital emergency care: cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaldo-De-Quirós, Mónica; Piccini, Ana T; Gómez, M Mar; Cerdeira, Jose C

    2015-01-01

    Pre-hospital emergency care is a particularly vulnerable setting for workplace violence. However, there is no literature available to date on the psychological consequences of violence in pre-hospital emergency care. To evaluate the psychological consequences of exposure to workplace violence from patients and those accompanying them in pre-hospital emergency care. A retrospective cross-sectional study. 70 pre-hospital emergency care services located in Madrid region. A randomized sample of 441 health care workers (135 physicians, 127 nurses and 179 emergency care assistants). Data were collected from February to May 2012. The survey was divided into four sections: demographic/professional information, level of burnout determined by Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), mental health status using General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) and frequency and type of violent behaviour experienced by staff members. The health care professionals who had been exposed to physical and verbal violence presented a significantly higher percentage of anxiety, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and burnout syndrome compared with those who had not been subjected to any aggression. Frequency of verbal violence (more than five times) was related to emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Type of violence (i.e. physical aggression) is especially related to high anxiety levels and frequency of verbal aggression is associated with burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization). Psychological counselling should be made available to professional staff who have been subjected to physical aggression or frequent verbal violence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prehospital administration of P2Y12 inhibitors and early coronary reperfusion in primary PCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Ratcovich, Hanna; Biasco, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The newer oral P2Y12 inhibitors prasugrel and ticagrelor have been reported to be more potent and faster-acting antiplatelet agents than clopidogrel. This study aimed to investigate whether prehospital loading with prasugrel or ticagrelor improves early coronary reperfusion as compared to prehosp......The newer oral P2Y12 inhibitors prasugrel and ticagrelor have been reported to be more potent and faster-acting antiplatelet agents than clopidogrel. This study aimed to investigate whether prehospital loading with prasugrel or ticagrelor improves early coronary reperfusion as compared...... to prehospital loading with clopidogrel in a real-world ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) setting. Over a 70-month period, 3497 patients with on-going STEMI of less than 6 hours and without cardiac arrest or cardiogenic shock underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) at our centre....... The primary endpoint of this study was the proportion of patients who did not meet the criteria for TIMI (Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction) flow grade 3 in the infarct-related artery at initial angiography before PPCI. Prehospital loading with prasugrel (n = 883) or ticagrelor (n = 491) did...

  17. Witnessed arrest, but not delayed bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves prehospital cardiac arrest survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukmir, R B

    2004-05-01

    This study correlated the effect of witnessing a cardiac arrest and instituting bystander CPR (ByCPR), as a secondary end point in a study evaluating the effect of bicarbonate on survival. This prospective, randomised, double blinded clinical intervention trial enrolled 874 prehospital cardiopulmonary arrest patients encountered in a prehospital urban, suburban, and rural regional emergency medical service (EMS) area. This group underwent conventional advanced cardiac life support intervention followed by empiric early administration of sodium bicarbonate (1 mEq/l), monitoring conventional resuscitation parameters. Survival was measured as presence of vital signs on emergency department (ED) arrival. Data were analysed using chi(2) with Pearson correlation and odds ratio where appropriate. The overall survival rate was 13.9% (110 of 792) of prehospital cardiac arrest patients. The mean (SD) time until provision of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ByCPR) by laymen was 2.08 (2.77) minutes, and basic life support (BLS) by emergency medical technicians was 6.62 (5.73) minutes. There was improved survival noted with witnessed cardiac arrest-a 2.2-fold increase in survival, 18.9% (76 of 402) versus 8.6% (27 of 315) compared with unwitnessed arrests (ptwo minutes (p = 0.3752). Survival after prehospital cardiac arrest is more likely when witnessed, but not necessarily when ByCPR was performed by laymen.

  18. Design of a game-based pre-hospital resuscitation training for first responders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Schmitz, Birgit; Biermann, Henning; Klemke, Roland; Ternier, Stefaan; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Kalz, M., Schmitz, B., Biermann, H., Klemke, R., Ternier, S., & Specht, M. (2013). Design of a game-based pre-hospital resuscitation training for first responders. In A. Holzinger, M. Ziefle, & V. Glavinić (Eds.), SouthCHI 2013, LNCS 7946 (pp. 363-372). Germany: Springer, Heidelberg.

  19. Prehospital prognosis is difficult in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvig, Katrine P.; Brøchner, Anne C.; Lassen, Annmarie T.

    2017-01-01

    in the form of intubation. The emergency physician faces difficult treatment decisions, however, and prognostic tools that could assist in determining which patients would benefit from intubation and ventilator support would be helpful. The aim of the current study was to identify prehospital clinical...

  20. Large discrepancy between prehospital visitation to mobile emergency care unit and discharge diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Christine Puck; Wichmann, Sine; Nielsen, Søren Loumann

    2012-01-01

    In Copenhagen, Denmark, patients in need of prehospital emergency assistance dial 112 and may then receive evaluation and treatment by physicians (from the Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU)). ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a severe condition leaving only a limited time frame...

  1. Association between prehospital physician involvement and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, Annika; Steinmetz, Jacob; Wissenberg, Mads

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Sudden out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is an important public health problem. While several interventions are known to improve survival, the impact of physician-delivered advanced cardiac life support for OHCA is unclear. We aimed to assess the association between prehospital physician...

  2. Prehospital Interventions During Mass-Casualty Events in Afghanistan: A Case Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Steven G; April, Michael D; Simon, Erica; Maddry, Joseph K; Carter, Robert; Delorenzo, Robert A

    2017-08-01

    Mass-casualty (MASCAL) events are known to occur in the combat setting. There are very limited data at this time from the Joint Theater (Iraq and Afghanistan) wars specific to MASCAL events. The purpose of this report was to provide preliminary data for the development of prehospital planning and guidelines. Cases were identified using the Department of Defense (DoD; Virginia USA) Trauma Registry (DoDTR) and the Prehospital Trauma Registry (PHTR). These cases were identified as part of a research study evaluating Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) guidelines. Cases that were designated as or associated with denoted MASCAL events were included. Data Fifty subjects were identified during the course of this project. Explosives were the most common cause of injuries. There was a wide range of vital signs. Tourniquet placement and pressure dressings were the most common interventions, followed by analgesia administration. Oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC) was the most common parenteral analgesic drug administered. Most were evacuated as "routine." Follow-up data were available for 36 of the subjects and 97% were discharged alive. The most common prehospital interventions were tourniquet and pressure dressing hemorrhage control, along with pain medication administration. Larger data sets are needed to guide development of MASCAL in-theater clinical practice guidelines. Schauer SG , April MD , Simon E , Maddry JK , Carter R III , Delorenzo RA . Prehospital interventions during mass-casualty events in Afghanistan: a case analysis. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(4):465-468.

  3. Effects of Crew Resource Management Training on Medical Errors in a Simulated Prehospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart, Elliot D.

    2012-01-01

    This applied dissertation investigated the effect of crew resource management (CRM) training on medical errors in a simulated prehospital setting. Specific areas addressed by this program included situational awareness, decision making, task management, teamwork, and communication. This study is believed to be the first investigation of CRM…

  4. Standardised pre-hospital care of acute myocardial infarction patients: MISSION! guidelines applied in practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atary, J. Z.; de Visser, M.; van den Dijk, R.; Bosch, J.; Liem, S. S.; Antoni, M. L.; Bootsma, M.; Viergever, E. P.; Kirchhof, C. J.; Padmos, I.; Sedney, M. I.; van Exel, H. J.; Verwey, H. F.; Atsma, D. E.; van der Wal, E. E.; Jukema, J. W.; Schalij, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background. To improve acute myocardial infarction (AMI) care in the region 'Hollands-Midden' (the Netherlands), a standardised guideline-based care program was developed (MISSION!). This study aimed to evaluate the outcome of the pre-hospital part of the MISSION! program and to study potential

  5. The value of the pre-hospital learning environment as part of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Four major themes were identified: an unpredictable environment, role players in emergency medical services, team work, and competencies. Conclusion: The research findings support the value and continuation of utilising the prehospital clinical learning environment for placing post-basic emergency nursing ...

  6. Exonic variants associated with development of aspirin exacerbated respiratory diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Woo Shin

    Full Text Available Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD is one phenotype of asthma, often occurring in the form of a severe and sudden attack. Due to the time-consuming nature and difficulty of oral aspirin challenge (OAC for AERD diagnosis, non-invasive biomarkers have been sought. The aim of this study was to identify AERD-associated exonic SNPs and examine the diagnostic potential of a combination of these candidate SNPs to predict AERD. DNA from 165 AERD patients, 397 subjects with aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA, and 398 normal controls were subjected to an Exome BeadChip assay containing 240K SNPs. 1,023 models (210-1 were generated from combinations of the top 10 SNPs, selected by the p-values in association with AERD. The area under the curve (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves was calculated for each model. SNP Function Portal and PolyPhen-2 were used to validate the functional significance of candidate SNPs. An exonic SNP, exm537513 in HLA-DPB1, showed the lowest p-value (p = 3.40×10-8 in its association with AERD risk. From the top 10 SNPs, a combination model of 7 SNPs (exm537513, exm83523, exm1884673, exm538564, exm2264237, exm396794, and exm791954 showed the best AUC of 0.75 (asymptotic p-value of 7.94×10-21, with 34% sensitivity and 93% specificity to discriminate AERD from ATA. Amino acid changes due to exm83523 in CHIA were predicted to be "probably damaging" to the structure and function of the protein, with a high score of '1'. A combination model of seven SNPs may provide a useful, non-invasive genetic marker combination for predicting AERD.

  7. Regular Use of Aspirin or Non-Aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Is Not Associated With Risk of Incident Pancreatic Cancer in Two Large Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Natalia; Yuan, Chen; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Cao, Yin; Babic, Ana; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Kraft, Peter; Ng, Kimmie; Giovannucci, Edward; Ogino, Shuji; Stampfer, Meir; Cochrane, Barbara B; Manson, JoAnn E; Clish, Clary B; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Wolpin, Brian M

    2018-04-01

    Use of aspirin and/or non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk of several cancers, but it is not clear if use of these drugs is associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. We evaluated aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use and risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in 141,940 participants from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression. We considered several exposure classifications to model differing lag times between NSAID exposure and cancer development. We also conducted a nested case-control study of participants from 3 prospective cohorts using conditional logistic regression to evaluate pre-diagnosis levels of plasma salicylurate, a major metabolite of aspirin, in 396 pancreatic cancer cases and 784 matched individuals without pancreatic cancer (controls). In the prospective cohort study, 1122 participants developed pancreatic adenocarcinoma over 4.2 million person-years. Use of aspirin or non-aspirin NSAIDs was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk, even after considering several latency exposure classifications. In a pre-planned subgroup analysis, regular aspirin use was associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk among participants with diabetes (relative risk, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54-0.94). In the nested case-control study, pre-diagnosis levels of salicylurate were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.72-1.61; P trend 0.81; comparing participants in the highest quintile with those in the lowest quintile of plasma salicylurate). Regular aspirin or non-aspirin NSAID use was not associated with future risk of pancreatic cancer in participants from several large prospective cohort studies. A possible reduction in risk for pancreatic cancer among people with diabetes who regularly use aspirin should be further examined in preclinical and human studies. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier

  8. Low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and prostate cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Charlotte; Dehlendorff, Christian; Borre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Increasing evidence suggests that aspirin use may protect against prostate cancer. In a nationwide case-control study, using Danish high-quality registry data, we evaluated the association between the use of low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs......) and the risk of prostate cancer. METHODS: We identified 35,600 patients (cases) with histologically verified prostate cancer during 2000-2012. Cases were matched to 177,992 population controls on age and residence by risk-set sampling. Aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID exposure was defined by type, estimated dose......, duration, and consistency of use. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs), with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs), for prostate cancer associated with low-dose aspirin (75-150 mg) or nonaspirin NSAID use, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Use of low-dose aspirin...

  9. By inhibiting PFKFB3, aspirin overcomes sorafenib resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sainan; Dai, Weiqi; Mo, Wenhui; Li, Jingjing; Feng, Jiao; Wu, Liwei; Liu, Tong; Yu, Qiang; Xu, Shizan; Wang, Wenwen; Lu, Xiya; Zhang, Qinghui; Chen, Kan; Xia, Yujing; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Fan, Xiaoming; Xu, Ling; Guo, Chuanyong

    2017-12-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the few cancers with a continuous increase in incidence and mortality. Drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of HCC. In this study, two sorafenib-resistant HCC cell lines and a nude mouse subcutaneously tumor model were used to explore the possible mechanisms leading to sorafenib resistance, and to investigate whether aspirin could increase the sensitivity of hepatoma cells to sorafenib. The combination of aspirin and sorafenib resulted in a synergistic antitumor effect against liver tumors both in vitro and in vivo. High glycolysis and PFKFB3 overexpression occupied a dominant position in sorafenib resistance, and can be targeted and overcome by aspirin. Aspirin plus sorafenib induced apoptosis in tumors without inducing weight loss, hepatotoxicity or inflammation. Our results suggest that aspirin overcomes sorafenib resistance and their combination may be an effective treatment approach for HCC. © 2017 UICC.

  10. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  11. Pre-hospital intubation factors and pneumonia in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Heather L; Warner, Keir; Bulger, Eileen M; Sharar, Sam R; Maier, Ronald V; Cuschieri, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    We reported similar rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) previously in trauma patients intubated either in a pre-hospital (PH) venue or the emergency department. A subset of PH intubations with continuous quality assessment was re-examined to identify the intubation factors associated with VAP. The subgroup was derived from an existing data set of consecutive adult trauma patients intubated prior to Level I trauma center admission July 2007-July 2008. Intubation details recorded included bag-valve mask ventilation (BVM) and the presence of material in the airway. The diagnosis of VAP was made preferentially by quantitative bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cultures (≥ 10⁴ colony-forming units indicating infection). Baseline data, injury characteristics, and circumstances of intubation of patients with and without VAP were compared by univariable analysis. Detailed data were available for 197 patients; 32 (16.2%) developed VAP, on average 6.0±0.7 days after admission. Baseline characteristics were similar in the groups, but diabetes mellitus was more common in the VAP group (4 [12.5%] vs. 5 [3.0%]; p=0.02). There was a higher rate of blunt injury in the VAP patients (28 [87.5%] vs. 106 [64.2%]; p=0.01) and higher injury severity scores (33.1±2.8 vs. 23.0±1.0; p=0.0002) and chest Abbreviated Injury Scores (2.6±0.3 vs. 1.5±0.1; p=0.002). Lower Glasgow Coma Scale scores (7.9±0.9 vs. 9.9±0.4; p=0.04) and greater use of BVM (18 [56.3%] vs. 56 [34.0%]; p=0.02) were observed in patients who developed VAP. Among aspirations, 10 (31.3%) of patients with emesis developed VAP compared with only 4 (12.5%) with blood in the airway (p=0.003). Aspiration, along with depressed consciousness and greater injury severity, may predispose trauma patients to VAP. Prospective studies should focus on the quality and timing of aspiration relative to intubation to determine if novel interventions can prevent aspiration or decrease the risk of VAP after aspiration.

  12. Comparison of Three Prehospital Cervical Spine Protocols for Missed Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Hong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We wanted to compare 3 existing emergency medical services (EMS immobilization protocols: the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS, mechanism-based; the Domeier protocol (parallels the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study [NEXUS] criteria; and the Hankins’ criteria (immobilization for patients 65 years, those with altered consciousness, focal neurologic deficit, distracting injury, or midline or paraspinal tenderness.To determine the proportion of patients who would require cervical immobilization per protocol and the number of missed cervical spine injuries, had each protocol been followed with 100% compliance. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of patients ≥18 years transported by EMS post-traumatic mechanism to an inner city emergency department. Demographic and clinical/historical data obtained by physicians were recorded prior to radiologic imaging. Medical record review ascertained cervical spine injuries. Both physicians and EMS were blinded to the objective of the study. Results: Of 498 participants, 58% were male and mean age was 48 years. The following participants would have required cervical spine immobilization based on the respective protocol: PHTLS, 95.4% (95% CI: 93.1-96.9%; Domeier, 68.7% (95% CI: 64.5-72.6%; Hankins, 81.5% (95% CI: 77.9-84.7%. There were 18 cervical spine injuries: 12 vertebral fractures, 2 subluxations/dislocations and 4 spinal cord injuries. Compliance with each of the 3 protocols would have led to appropriate cervical spine immobilization of all injured patients. In practice, 2 injuries were missed when the PHTLS criteria were mis-applied. Conclusion: Although physician-determined presence of cervical spine immobilization criteria cannot be generalized to the findings obtained by EMS personnel, our findings suggest that the mechanism-based PHTLS criteria may result in unnecessary cervical spine immobilization without apparent benefit to injured patients. PHTLS

  13. Positive Coping: A Unique Characteristic to Pre-Hospital Emergency Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Abbas; Froutan, Razieh

    2017-01-01

    It is important to gain a thorough understanding of positive coping methods adopted by medical emergency personnel to manage stressful situations associated with accidents and emergencies. Thus, the purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of positive coping strategies used by emergency medical service providers. This study was conducted using a qualitative content analysis method. The study participants included 28 pre-hospital emergency personnel selected from emergency medical service providers in bases located in different regions of the city of Mashhad, Iran, from April to November 2016. The purposive sampling method also was used in this study, which was continued until data saturation was reached. To collect the data, semistructured open interviews, observations, and field notes were used. Four categories and 10 subcategories were extracted from the data on the experiences of pre-hospital emergency personnel related to positive coping strategies. The four categories included work engagement, smart capability, positive feedback, and crisis pioneering. All the obtained categories had their own subcategories, which were determined based on their distinctly integrated properties. The results of this study show that positive coping consists of several concepts used by medical emergency personnel, management of stressful situations, and ultimately quality of pre-hospital clinical services. Given the fact that efficient methods such as positive coping can prevent debilitating stress in an individual, pre-hospital emergency authorities should seek to build and strengthen "positive coping" characteristics in pre-hospital medical emergency personnel to deal with accidents, emergencies, and injuries through adopting regular and dynamic policies.

  14. A qualitative study of the barriers to prehospital management of acute pain in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Adrian; Barrett, Michael; Cronin, John; McCoy, Siobhan; Larkin, Philip; Brenner, Maria; Wakai, Abel; O'Sullivan, Ronan

    2014-06-01

    Effective pain management in the prehospital setting is gaining momentum as a potential key performance indicator by many emergency medical service systems, but historically has been shown to be inadequate, particularly in the paediatric population. This study aimed to identify the barriers, as perceived by a national cohort of advanced paramedics (APs), to achieving optimal prehospital management of acute pain in children. A qualitative approach was employed to capture data through two focus group interviews. Sixteen APs were invited to participate in this study. Both focus groups were audio recorded, transcribed and analysed using Attride-Stirling's framework for thematic network analysis. The global theme 'Understanding Barriers to the Prehospital Management of Acute Pain in Children' emerged from three organising themes as follows: AP education and training; current clinical practice guidelines for paediatric pain management; realities of prehospital practice. Limited exposure to children in the prehospital setting, difficulty assessing pain intensity in small children, and challenges in administering oral or inhaled analgesic agents to distressed and uncooperative children were highlighted by participants. Short transfer times to the emergency department, and a 'medical' cause of pain were also implicated as examples of when children are less likely to receive analgesia from practitioners. The pathway to improving care must include an emphasis on improvements in practitioner education and training, offering alternatives to assessing pain in preverbal children, exploring the intranasal route of drug delivery in managing acute severe pain, and robustly developed evidence-based guidelines that are practitioner friendly and patient-focused. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Attitudes of prehospital emergency care professionals toward refusal of treatment: A regional survey in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbay, Hasan; Alan, Sultan; Kadioglu, Selim

    2014-08-01

    Prehospital emergency medicine is a specific field of emergency medicine. The basic approach of prehospital emergency medicine is to provide patients with medical intervention at the scene of the incident. This special environment causes health professionals to encounter various problems. One of the most important problems in this field is ethics, in particular questions involving refusal of treatment and the processes associated with it. The objective of this study is to identify emergency health professionals' views regarding refusal of treatment. This study was conducted with 356 health professionals who were on active duty in prehospital emergency health services. The data were collected through a form which included 10 statements. The participants were asked to indicate their level of agreement with the statements given by rating them between 0 and 10. Before conducting the research, permission was received from the local ethics committee. Participants were given written information about the purpose of the study. Participants were assured that their participation was voluntary. The healthcare professionals with fewer years of experience in the profession and female participants adopted an attitude of giving priority to providing care. Young participants, in general, respected patient autonomy. However, paradoxically, when it comes to emergency medical cases, they expressed an opinion closer to paternalism. This study has found that prehospital emergency health professionals generally respect the patient's right to refuse treatment; however, they do not prioritize this right when there is a life-threatening situation or when the person does not have decision-making capacity. In these cases, prehospital emergency health professionals tended to adopt a more paternalistic approach. © The Author(s) 2013.

  16. Telestroke ambulances in prehospital stroke management: concept and pilot feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liman, Thomas G; Winter, Benjamin; Waldschmidt, Carolin; Zerbe, Norman; Hufnagl, Peter; Audebert, Heinrich J; Endres, Matthias

    2012-08-01

    Pre- and intrahospital time delays are major concerns in acute stroke care. Telemedicine-equipped ambulances may improve time management and identify patients with stroke eligible for thrombolysis by an early prehospital stroke diagnosis. The aims of this study were (1) to develop a telestroke ambulance prototype; (2) to test the reliability of stroke severity assessment; and (3) to evaluate its feasibility in the prehospital emergency setting. Mobil, real-time audio-video streaming telemedicine devices were implemented into advanced life support ambulances. Feasibility of telestroke ambulances and reliability of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale assessment were tested using current wireless cellular communication technology (third generation) in a prehospital stroke scenario. Two stroke actors were trained in simulation of differing right and left middle cerebral artery stroke syndromes. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale assessment was performed by a hospital-based stroke physician by telemedicine, by an emergency physician guided by telemedicine, and "a posteriori" on the basis of video documentation. In 18 of 30 scenarios, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale assessment could not be performed due to absence or loss of audio-video signal. In the remaining 12 completed scenarios, interrater agreement of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale examination between ambulance and hospital and ambulance and "a posteriori" video evaluation was moderate to good with weighted κ values of 0.69 (95% CI, 0.51-0.87) and 0.79 (95% CI, 0.59-0.98), respectively. Prehospital telestroke examination was not at an acceptable level for clinical use, at least on the basis of the used technology. Further technical development is needed before telestroke is applicable for prehospital stroke management during patient transport.

  17. Improving prehospital trauma care in Rwanda through continuous quality improvement: an interrupted time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John W; Nyinawankusi, Jeanne D'Arc; Enumah, Samuel; Maine, Rebecca; Uwitonze, Eric; Hu, Yihan; Kabagema, Ignace; Byiringiro, Jean Claude; Riviello, Robert; Jayaraman, Sudha

    2017-07-01

    Injury is a major cause of premature death and disability in East Africa, and high-quality pre-hospital care is essential for optimal trauma outcomes. The Rwandan pre-hospital emergency care service (SAMU) uses an electronic database to evaluate and optimize pre-hospital care through a continuous quality improvement programme (CQIP), beginning March 2014. The SAMU database was used to assess pre-hospital quality metrics including supplementary oxygen for hypoxia (O2), intravenous fluids for hypotension (IVF), cervical collar placement for head injuries (c-collar), and either splinting (splint) or administration of pain medications (pain) for long bone fractures. Targets of >90% were set for each metric and daily team meetings and monthly feedback sessions were implemented to address opportunities for improvement. These five pre-hospital quality metrics were assessed monthly before and after implementation of the CQIP. Met and unmet needs for O2, IVF, and c-collar were combined into a summative monthly SAMU Trauma Quality Scores (STQ score). An interrupted time series linear regression model compared the STQ score during 14 months before the CQIP implementation to the first 14 months after. During the 29-month study period 3,822 patients met study criteria. 1,028 patients needed one or more of the five studied interventions during the study period. All five endpoints had a significant increase between the pre-CQI and post-CQI periods (pRwanda. This programme may be used as an example for additional efforts engaging frontline staff with real-time data feedback in order to rapidly translate data collection efforts into improved care for the injured in a resource-limited setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardioprotective aspirin users and their excess risk of upper gastrointestinal complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; García Rodríguez, Luis A

    2006-09-20

    To balance the cardiovascular benefits from low-dose aspirin against the gastrointestinal harm caused, studies have considered the coronary heart disease risk for each individual but not their gastrointestinal risk profile. We characterized the gastrointestinal risk profile of low-dose aspirin users in real clinical practice, and estimated the excess risk of upper gastrointestinal complications attributable to aspirin among patients with different gastrointestinal risk profiles. To characterize aspirin users in terms of major gastrointestinal risk factors (i.e., advanced age, male sex, prior ulcer history and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), we used The General Practice Research Database in the United Kingdom and the Base de Datos para la Investigación Farmacoepidemiológica en Atención Primaria in Spain. To estimate the baseline risk of upper gastrointestinal complications according to major gastrointestinal risk factors and the excess risk attributable to aspirin within levels of these factors, we used previously published meta-analyses on both absolute and relative risks of upper gastrointestinal complications. Over 60% of aspirin users are above 60 years of age, 4 to 6% have a recent history of peptic ulcers and over 13% use other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The estimated average excess risk of upper gastrointestinal complications attributable to aspirin is around 5 extra cases per 1,000 aspirin users per year. However, the excess risk varies in parallel to the underlying gastrointestinal risk and might be above 10 extra cases per 1,000 person-years in over 10% of aspirin users. In addition to the cardiovascular risk, the underlying gastrointestinal risk factors have to be considered when balancing harms and benefits of aspirin use for an individual patient. The gastrointestinal harms may offset the cardiovascular benefits in certain groups of patients where the gastrointestinal risk is high and the cardiovascular risk is low.

  19. The risk of venous thromboembolism with aspirin compared to anticoagulants after hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Janet N; Maselli, Judith; Auerbach, Andrew D; Fang, Margaret C

    2017-07-01

    Recent guidelines include aspirin as an option to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in selected patients undergoing hip or knee replacement surgery. However, the efficacy of aspirin after arthroplasty has not been well-defined, particularly in more contemporary patient populations. We compared rates of post-operative VTE between patients who received aspirin-only versus anticoagulants after hip or knee arthroplasty, using data from a large US-based administrative database. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 231,780 adults who underwent total knee arthroplasty and 110,621 who underwent total hip arthroplasty in 2009-2012 and who received pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis (aspirin or anticoagulant) within the first 7days after surgery. We compared the risk of post-operative VTE between patients receiving aspirin-only vs. anticoagulants, controlling for clinical and hospital characteristics using multivariable logistic regression with propensity score adjustment. Aspirin-only prophylaxis was administered to 7.5% of patients after knee arthroplasty and 8.0% after hip arthroplasty. Post-operative VTE was diagnosed in 2217 (0.96%) patients after knee arthroplasty and 454 (0.41%) after hip arthroplasty. Compared to anticoagulants, aspirin was not associated with a higher risk for post-operative VTE either after knee arthroplasty (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval [OR] 0.34 [0.24-0.48]) or hip arthroplasty (OR 0.82 [0.45-1.51]). Aspirin was uncommonly administered as the sole prophylactic agent after hip or knee arthroplasty in this study. However, patients who received aspirin-only had similar rates of post-operative VTE compared to patients who received anticoagulants. Further research should focus on distinguishing which patients benefit more from anticoagulants versus aspirin after arthroplasty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Combining aspirin with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in heart failure: how safe is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, H; Mahajan, A; Bansal, N; Vaidya, S; Pathak, L

    1998-11-01

    The above discussion on the interaction of aspirin and ACE inhibitors seems to suggest that aspirin in high doses may have adverse interaction with ACE inhibitors in patients with heart failure but the data obtained is not sufficient or conclusive to recommended omission of aspirin in patients with heart failure. This raises a query in the mind of the physician whether to use a combination or not? The role of aspirin in the early period after myocardial infarction is well established so is the role of ACE inhibitors. Hence in patients with myocardial infarction and preserved left ventricular function it would not be wrong to administer combination of ACE inhibitors and aspirin. Albeit at a lower dose. In patients with large myocardial infarction or heart failure, warfarin may be an option but still needs to be documented in large trials. As suggested long term use of aspirin after infarction is still ambiguous and may be harmful in patients with heart failure with its anticedent side effects. But long term benefits of ACE inhibitors in heart failure are well documented. Hence if a choice has to be made whether to discontinue either of the two drugs it would be preferable to stop the aspirin. To answer the issue of use of aspirin in patients with heart failure it would be essential to conduct a double blind randomized trial comparing known anti-thrombotic treatment, aspirin and anti-coagulants on mortality in patients with heart failure, especially caused by coronary artery disease. Such a trial is underway at the present and till the results are available it should be left to clinical judgement of the physician whether to administer aspirin in patients with heart failure after weighing the benefits versus risk.

  1. The top five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care: a consensus report from a European research collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockey David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physician-manned emergency medical teams supplement other emergency medical services in some countries. These teams are often selectively deployed to patients who are considered likely to require critical care treatment in the pre-hospital phase. The evidence base for guidelines for pre-hospital triage and immediate medical care is often poor. We used a recognised consensus methodology to define key priority areas for research within the subfield of physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. Methods A European expert panel participated in a consensus process based upon a four-stage modified nominal group technique that included a consensus meeting. Results The expert panel concluded that the five most important areas for further research in the field of physician-based pre-hospital critical care were the following: Appropriate staffing and training in pre-hospital critical care and the effect on outcomes, advanced airway management in pre-hospital care, definition of time windows for key critical interventions which are indicated in the pre-hospital phase of care, the role of pre-hospital ultrasound and dispatch criteria for pre-hospital critical care services. Conclusion A modified nominal group technique was successfully used by a European expert group to reach consensus on the most important research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care.

  2. The difference in association between aspirin use and other thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors and survival in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouws, M A; Rademaker, E; Bastiaannet, E; van Herk-Sukel, M P P; Lemmens, V E; Van de Velde, C J H; Portielje, J E A; Liefers, G J

    2017-05-01

    Several studies have suggested that the association between aspirin and improved cancer survival is mediated through the mechanism of aspirin as thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors (TAI). The aim of this study was to provide epidemiological evidence for this mechanism assessing the association between overall survival and the use of aspirin and non-aspirin TAI in patients with colorectal cancer. In this observational study, data from the Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation were linked to PHARMO Database Network. Patients using aspirin or aspirin in combination with non-aspirin TAI (dual users) were selected and compared with non-users. The association between overall survival and the use of (non-)aspirin TAI was analysed using Cox regression models with the use of (non-)aspirin TAI as a time-varying covariate. In total, 9196 patients were identified with colorectal cancer and 1766 patients used TAI after diagnosis. Non-aspirin TAI were mostly clopidogrel and dipyridamole. Aspirin use was associated with a significant increased overall survival and hazard ratio (HR) 0.41 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37-0.47), and the use of non-aspirin TAI was not associated with survival of HR 0.92 (95% CI 0.70-1.22). Dual users did not have an improved overall survival when compared with patients using solely aspirin. Aspirin use after diagnosis of colorectal cancer was associated with significantly lower mortality rates and this effect remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders. No additional survival benefit was observed in patients using both aspirin and another TAI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bleeding Risk with Long-Term Low-Dose Aspirin: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Rodríguez, Luis A.; Martín-Pérez, Mar; Hennekens, Charles H.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-dose aspirin has proven effectiveness in secondary and primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but is also associated with an increased risk of major bleeding events. For primary prevention, this absolute risk must be carefully weighed against the benefits of aspirin; such assessments are currently limited by a lack of data from general populations. Methods Systematic searches of Medline and Embase were conducted to identify observational studies published between 1946 and 4 March 2015 that reported the risks of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding or intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with long-term, low-dose aspirin (75–325 mg/day). Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) for bleeding events with aspirin versus non-use were calculated using random-effects models, based on reported estimates of RR (including odds ratios, hazard ratios, incidence rate ratios and standardized incidence ratios) in 39 articles. Findings The incidence of GI bleeding with low-dose aspirin was 0.48–3.64 cases per 1000 person-years, and the overall pooled estimate of the RR with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–1.7). For upper and lower GI bleeding, the RRs with low-dose aspirin were 2.3 (2.0–2.6) and 1.8 (1.1–3.0), respectively. Neither aspirin dose nor duration of use had consistent effects on RRs for upper GI bleeding. The estimated RR for ICH with low-dose aspirin was 1.4 (1.2–1.7) overall. Aspirin was associated with increased bleeding risks when combined with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, clopidogrel and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors compared with monotherapy. By contrast, concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors decreased upper GI bleeding risks relative to aspirin monotherapy. Conclusions The risks of major bleeding with low-dose aspirin in real-world settings are of a similar magnitude to those reported in randomized trials. These data will help inform clinical judgements regarding the use of low-dose aspirin

  4. Aspirin locally disrupts the liquid-ordered phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Richard J.; Himbert, Sebastian; Dhaliwal, Alexander; Schmalzl, Karin; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2018-02-01

    Local structure and dynamics of lipid membranes play an important role in membrane function. The diffusion of small molecules, the curvature of lipids around a protein and the existence of cholesterol-rich lipid domains (rafts) are examples for the membrane to serve as a functional interface. The collective fluctuations of lipid tails, in particular, are relevant for diffusion of membrane constituents and small molecules in and across membranes, and for structure and formation of membrane domains. We studied the effect of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) on local structure and dynamics of membranes composed of dimyristoylphosphocholine (DMPC) and cholesterol. Aspirin is a common analgesic, but is also used in the treatment of cholesterol. Using coherent inelastic neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we present evidence that ASA binds to liquid-ordered, raft-like domains and disturbs domain organization and dampens collective fluctuations. By hydrogen-bonding to lipid molecules, ASA forms `superfluid' complexes with lipid molecules that can organize laterally in superlattices and suppress cholesterol's ordering effect.

  5. Pre-hospital identification and post-recovery challenges of intoxication with synthetic cannabinoid containing legal high products such as 'Exodus Damnation'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, David; O'Meara, Patrick; Cunningham, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    This short report describes the case of a young adult male who had smoked a synthetic cannabinoid legal high product called 'Exodus Damnation'. The patient's presentation was atypical from that described in the literature, with hypotension and hypoxaemia. Of note was the rapid recovery after pre-hospital intervention with high-flow oxygen therapy and intravenous fluids. The patient refused on-going care, despite repeated advice to attend the Emergency Department. The distinct lack of specialist support and referral to drug treatment for this patient population, with whom ambulance services are coming into contact with increasing frequency, is reported. For those patients with the capacity to refuse on-going care, ambulance services may be in an opportune position to actively promote referral to support services for these vulnerable individuals. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Interaction between polymorphisms in aspirin metabolic pathways, regular aspirin use and colorectal cancer risk: A case-control study in unselected white European populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Sheth

    Full Text Available Regular aspirin use is associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer (CRC. Variation in aspirin's chemoprevention efficacy has been attributed to the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. We conducted a meta-analysis using two large population-based case-control datasets, the UK-Leeds Colorectal Cancer Study Group and the NIH-Colon Cancer Family Registry, having a combined total of 3325 cases and 2262 controls. The aim was to assess 42 candidate SNPs in 15 genes whose association with colorectal cancer risk was putatively modified by aspirin use, in the literature. Log odds ratios (ORs and standard errors were estimated for each dataset separately using logistic regression adjusting for age, sex and study site, and dataset-specific results were combined using random effects meta-analysis. Meta-analysis showed association between SNPs rs6983267, rs11694911 and rs2302615 with CRC risk reduction (All P<0.05. Association for SNP rs6983267 in the CCAT2 gene only was noteworthy after multiple test correction (P = 0.001. Site-specific analysis showed association between SNPs rs1799853 and rs2302615 with reduced colon cancer risk only (P = 0.01 and P = 0.004, respectively, however neither reached significance threshold following multiple test correction. Meta-analysis of SNPs rs2070959 and rs1105879 in UGT1A6 gene showed interaction between aspirin use and CRC risk (Pinteraction = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively; stratification by aspirin use showed an association for decreased CRC risk for aspirin users having a wild-type genotype (rs2070959 OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.68-0.86; rs1105879 OR = 0.77 95% CI = 0.69-0.86 compared to variant allele cariers. The direction of the interaction however is in contrast to that published in studies on colorectal adenomas. Both SNPs showed potential site-specific interaction with aspirin use and colon cancer risk only (Pinteraction = 0.006 and 0.008, respectively, with the direction of association similar to

  7. Pre-Hospital 12-Lead Electrocardiogram within 60 Minutes Differentiates Proximal versus Nonproximal Left Anterior Descending Artery Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J McCarthy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute anterior myocardial infarctions caused by proximal left anterior descending (LAD artery occlusions are associated with a higher morbidity and mortality. Early identification of high-risk patients via the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG could assist physicians and emergency response teams in providing early and aggressive care for patients with anterior ST-elevation myocardial infarctions (STEMI. Approximately 25% of US hospitals have primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI capability for the treatment of acute myocardial infarctions. Given the paucity of hospitals capable of PCI, early identification of more severe myocardial infarction may prompt emergency medical service routing of these patients to PCI-capable hospitals. We sought to determine if the 12 lead ECG is capable of predicting proximal LAD artery occlusions. Methods: In a retrospective, post-hoc analysis of the Pre-Hospital Administration of Thrombolytic Therapy with Urgent Culprit Artery Revascularization pilot trial, we compared the ECG findings of proximal and nonproximal LAD occlusions for patients who had undergone an ECG within 180 minutes of symptom onset. Results: In this study, 72 patients had anterior STEMIs, with ECGs performed within 180 minutes of symptom onset. In patients who had undergone ECGs within 60 minutes (n¼35, the mean sum of ST elevation (STE in leads V1 through V6 plus ST depression (STD in leads II, III, and aVF was 19.2 mm for proximal LAD occlusions and 11.7 mm for nonproximal LAD occlusions (P¼0.007. A sum STE in V1 through V6 plus STD in II, III, and aVF of at least 17.5 mm had a sensitivity of 52.3%, specificity of 92.9%, positive predictive value of 91.7%, and negative predictive value of 56.5% for proximal LAD occlusions. When the ECG was performed more than 60 minutes after symptom onset (n¼37, there was no significant difference in ST-segment deviation between the 2 groups. Conclusion: The sum STE (V1-V6 and STD (II

  8. CAN THE DETERMINATION OF PROCALCITONIN IN PREHOSPITAL (EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT BE A USEFUL AND PRECOCIOUS MARKER IN SEPSIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anda Maria Neagoe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES AND BACKGROUND The management of sepsis requires a hasty identification of infection, through the application of different dynamic strategies in prehospital and hospital conditions, through the implementation of a number of changes and by measuring the outcome of these changes thus ensuring a decrease in the mortality rate and allowing a rapid identification of the infection MATERIALS AND METHODS Procalcitonin (PCT was used as a marker of sepsis in emergency departments. Due to its sensitivity and molecular peculiarities, procalcitonin allows a rapid diagnosis of severe bacterial infections, and is able to differentiate viral infections from bacterial ones. It is also able to differentiate an infectious process from an inflammation, thus sketching a clinically applicable protocol that can be implemented and continuously improved. RESULTS The identification of the infectious process in the emergency department within 24 hours leads to a decreased in the mortality rate. Speedy diagnostic methods of infection based on the determination of specific, rapidly measurable, markers – procalcitonin in our case - can confirm the presence of sepsis and its’ outcome. CONCLUSIONS Prehospital determination of procalcitonin (PCT is recommended in the early diagnosis of sepsis and is also an indicator of its severity, starting from a solid theoretical database that is justified by the efficiency and effectiveness of its usage. Graphical abstract: Laboratory changes of inflammatory response REFERENCES 1. Uchil S, Ravi KV, Thimmaiah AK, Medha YR, Punith K. Significance of serum procalcitonin in sepsis. Indian J Crit Care Med. 2011;15:1–5. 2. Todi S, Chatterjee S, Bhattacharyya M. Epidemiology of severe sepsis in India. Crit Care Med. 2007;11:65. 3. Chan YL, Tseng CP, Tsay PK, Chang SS, Chiu TF, Chen JC. Procalcitonin as a marker of bacterial infection in the emergency department: an observational study. Crit Care Med. 2004;8:12-20. 4. Schuetz P

  9. Limited evidence for intranasal fentanyl in the emergency department and the prehospital setting--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Sejer; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2013-01-01

    The intranasal (IN) mode of application may be a valuable asset in non-invasive pain management. Fentanyl demonstrates pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties that are desirable in the management of acute pain, and IN fentanyl may be of value in the prehospital setting. The aim...... of this systematic review was to evaluate the current evidence for the use of IN fentanyl in the emergency department (ED) and prehospital setting....

  10. Prehospital interventions for penetrating trauma victims: a prospective comparison between Advanced Life Support and Basic Life Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamon, Mark J; Doane, Stephen M; Gaughan, John P; Kulp, Heather; D'Andrea, Anthony P; Pathak, Abhijit S; Santora, Thomas A; Goldberg, Amy J; Wydro, Gerald C

    2013-05-01

    Advanced Life Support (ALS) providers may perform more invasive prehospital procedures, while Basic Life Support (BLS) providers offer stabilisation care and often "scoop and run". We hypothesised that prehospital interventions by urban ALS providers prolong prehospital time and decrease survival in penetrating trauma victims. We prospectively analysed 236 consecutive ambulance-transported, penetrating trauma patients an our urban Level-1 trauma centre (6/2008-12/2009). Inclusion criteria included ICU admission, length of stay >/=2 days, or in-hospital death. Demographics, clinical characteristics, and outcomes were compared between ALS and BLS patients. Single and multiple variable logistic regression analysis determined predictors of hospital survival. Of 236 patients, 71% were transported by ALS and 29% by BLS. When ALS and BLS patients were compared, no differences in age, penetrating mechanism, scene GCS score, Injury Severity Score, or need for emergency surgery were detected (p>0.05). Patients transported by ALS units more often underwent prehospital interventions (97% vs. 17%; p<0.01), including endotracheal intubation, needle thoracostomy, cervical collar, IV placement, and crystalloid resuscitation. While ALS ambulance on-scene time was significantly longer than that of BLS (p<0.01), total prehospital time was not (p=0.98) despite these prehospital interventions (1.8 ± 1.0 per ALS patient vs. 0.2 ± 0.5 per BLS patient; p<0.01). Overall, 69.5% ALS patients and 88.4% of BLS patients (p<0.01) survived to hospital discharge. Prehospital resuscitative interventions by ALS units performed on penetrating trauma patients may lengthen on-scene time but do not significantly increase total prehospital time. Regardless, these interventions did not appear to benefit our rapidly transported, urban penetrating trauma patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In vivo quantitation of platelet deposition on human peripheral arterial bypass grafts using indium-111-labeled platelets. Effect of dipyridamole and aspirin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pumphrey, C.W.; Chesebro, J.H.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Wahner, H.W.; Hollier, L.H.; Pairolero, P.C.; Fuster, V.

    1983-01-01

    Indium-111-labeled autologous platelets, injected 48 hours after operation, were used to evaluate the thrombogenicity of prosthetic material and the effect of platelet inhibitor therapy in vivo. Dacron double-velour (Microvel) aortofemoral artery bifurcation grafts were placed in 16 patients and unilateral polytetrafluoroethylene femoropopliteal grafts were placed in 10 patients. Half the patients in each group received platelet inhibitors before operation (dipyridamole, 100 mg 4 times a day) and after operation (dipyridamole, 75 mg, and acetylsalicylic acid, 325 mg 3 times a day); the rest of the patients served as control subjects. Five-minute scintigrams of the graft region were taken with a gamma camera interfaced with a computer 48, 72, and 96 hours after injection of the labeled platelets. Platelet deposition was estimated from the radioactivities of the grafts and expressed as counts per 100 pixels per microcurie injected. Dipyridamole and aspirin therapy significantly reduced the number of platelets deposited on Dacron grafts and prevented platelet accumulation over 3 days. With the small amount of platelet deposition on polytetrafluoroethylene femoropopliteal artery grafts even in control patients, platelet inhibitor therapy had no demonstrable effect on platelet deposition on these grafts. It is concluded that (1) platelet deposition on vascular grafts in vivo can be quantitated by noninvasive methods, and (2) dipyridamole and aspirin therapy reduced platelet deposition on Dacron aortofemoral artery grafts

  12. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: aspirin increases the incidence of minor bleeding complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliwell, O.T.; Yadegafar, G.; Lane, C.; Dewbury, K.C.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess whether patients taking aspirin were more likely to experience bleeding complications after transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and methods: Three hundred and eighty-seven patients taking aspirin who underwent prostate biopsy over a 3.5 year period and 731 patients not taking aspirin over a 2 year period returned a questionnaire assessing the incidence and severity of bleeding complications. Results: Patients taking aspirin had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of haematuria and rectal bleeding, but not of haemospermia. They also had a longer mean duration of bleeding, but no increase in bleeding severity. Severe bleeding was very uncommon in both groups and no patients required intervention for bleeding complications. Conclusion: Aspirin exacerbates minor bleeding complications in patients undergoing TRUS guided biopsy of the prostate, but in this large group of aspirin-taking patients no dangerous bleeding complications were encountered. It may be that the risks associated with aspirin cessation outweigh the risks of haemorrhagic complications

  13. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: aspirin increases the incidence of minor bleeding complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliwell, O.T. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)], E-mail: hallo99@doctors.org.uk; Yadegafar, G. [Public Health Sciences and Medical Statistics Division, School of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton University, Southampton (United Kingdom); Lane, C.; Dewbury, K.C. [Department of Radiology, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Aim: To assess whether patients taking aspirin were more likely to experience bleeding complications after transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and methods: Three hundred and eighty-seven patients taking aspirin who underwent prostate biopsy over a 3.5 year period and 731 patients not taking aspirin over a 2 year period returned a questionnaire assessing the incidence and severity of bleeding complications. Results: Patients taking aspirin had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of haematuria and rectal bleeding, but not of haemospermia. They also had a longer mean duration of bleeding, but no increase in bleeding severity. Severe bleeding was very uncommon in both groups and no patients required intervention for bleeding complications. Conclusion: Aspirin exacerbates minor bleeding complications in patients undergoing TRUS guided biopsy of the prostate, but in this large group of aspirin-taking patients no dangerous bleeding complications were encountered. It may be that the risks associated with aspirin cessation outweigh the risks of haemorrhagic complications.

  14. Low-Dose Aspirin in Heart Failure Not Complicated by Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madelaire, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar; Kristensen, Søren L

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to assess safety and effectiveness of low-dose aspirin in heart failure (HF) not complicated by atrial fibrillation. BACKGROUND: Despite lack of evidence, low-dose aspirin is widely used in patients with HF and sinus rhythm with and without prior ischemic heart disease....... METHODS: The study included 12,277 patients with new-onset HF during 2007 to 2012 who had no history of atrial fibrillation. Of 5,450 patients using low-dose aspirin at baseline, 3,840 were propensity matched to non-aspirin users in a 1:1 ratio. Propensity-matched Cox models were calculated with respect...... to the primary composite outcome of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke and the secondary outcomes of bleeding and HF readmission. RESULTS: The composite outcome occurred in 1,554 (40.5%) patients in the aspirin group and 1,604 (41.8%) patients in the non-aspirin group. Aspirin use...

  15. Effects of aspirin and enoxaparin in a rat model of liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen-Jie; Yang, Zhi-Hui; Shi, Xiao-Liu; Liu, De-Liang

    2017-09-21

    To examine the effects of aspirin and enoxaparin on liver function, coagulation index and histopathology in a rat model of liver fibrosis. METHODS Forty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the control group (n = 5) and model group (n = 40). Thioacetamide (TAA) was used to induce liver fibrosis in the model group. TAA-induced fibrotic rats received TAA continuously (n = 9), TAA + low-dose aspirin (n = 9), TAA + high-dose aspirin (n = 9) or TAA + enoxaparin (n = 9) for 4 wk. All rats were euthanized after 4 wk, and both hematoxylin-eosin and Masson staining were performed to observe pathological changes in liver tissue. Liver fibrosis was assessed according to the METAVIR score. Compared with untreated cirrhotic controls, a significant improvement in fibrosis grade was observed in the low-dose aspirin, high-dose aspirin and enoxaparin treated groups, especially in the high-dose aspirin treated group. Alanine aminotransferase and total bilirubin were higher, albumin was lower and both prothrombin time and international normalized ratio were prolonged in the four treatment groups compared to controls. No significant differences among the four groups were observed. Aspirin and enoxaparin can alleviate liver fibrosis in this rat model.

  16. Failure of ethamsylate to reduce aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmend, T K; Stein, A G; Bhaskar, N K; Hawkey, C J

    1989-07-01

    1. We investigated the effect of the haemostatic agent ethamsylate on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding. 2. Eighteen healthy subjects were studied three times: at the end of 48 h periods of treatment with (a) placebo, (b) aspirin 600 mg four times daily, (9 doses) and (c) aspirin 600 mg four times daily with each dose preceded by ethamsylate 500 mg. 3. At the end of each treatment period gastric mucosal bleeding into timed gastric washings was quantified using the orthotolidine reaction. 4. Aspirin increased bleeding from a rate on placebo of 1.2 microliters 10 min-1 geometric mean (95% confidence limits) (0.7-1.8) microliters 10 min-1 to 20.0 (11.6-34.2) microliters 10 min-1, (P less than 0.01). The rate of bleeding after aspirin preceded by ethamsylate [14.1 (8.5-23.4) microliters 10 min-1] was not significantly different from that after aspirin alone. 5. We conclude that ethamsylate does not reduce acute aspirin-induced gastric mucosal bleeding in healthy humans.

  17. Prehospital trauma care reduces mortality. Ten-year results from a time-cohort and trauma audit study in Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murad Mudhafar K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blunt implementation of Western trauma system models is not feasible in low-resource communities with long prehospital transit times. The aims of the study were to evaluate to which extent a low-cost prehospital trauma system reduces trauma deaths where prehospital transit times are long, and to identify specific life support interventions that contributed to survival. Methods In the study period from 1997 to 2006, 2,788 patients injured by land mines, war, and traffic accidents were managed by a chain-of-survival trauma system where non-graduate paramedics were the key care providers. The study was conducted with a time-period cohort design. Results 37% of the study patients had serious injuries with Injury Severity Score ≥ 9. The mean prehospital transport time was 2.5 hours (95% CI 1.9 - 3.2. During the ten-year study period trauma mortality was reduced from 17% (95% CI 15 -19 to 4% (95% CI 3.5 - 5, survival especially improving in major trauma victims. In most patients with airway problems, in chest injured, and in patients with external hemorrhage, simple life support measures were sufficient to improve physiological severity indicators. Conclusion In case of long prehospital transit times simple life support measures by paramedics and lay first responders reduce trauma mortality in major injuries. Delegating life-saving skills to paramedics and lay people is a key factor for efficient prehospital trauma systems in low-resource communities.

  18. A validation of ground ambulance pre-hospital times modeled using geographic information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alka B; Waters, Nigel M; Blanchard, Ian E; Doig, Christopher J; Ghali, William A

    2012-10-03

    Evaluating geographic access to health services often requires determining the patient travel time to a specified service. For urgent care, many research studies have modeled patient pre-hospital time by ground emergency medical services (EMS) using geographic information systems (GIS). The purpose of this study was to determine if the modeling assumptions proposed through prior United States (US) studies are valid in a non-US context, and to use the resulting information to provide revised recommendations for modeling travel time using GIS in the absence of actual EMS trip data. The study sample contained all emergency adult patient trips within the Calgary area for 2006. Each record included four components of pre-hospital time (activation, response, on-scene and transport interval). The actual activation and on-scene intervals were compared with those used in published models. The transport interval was calculated within GIS using the Network Analyst extension of Esri ArcGIS 10.0 and the response interval was derived using previously established methods. These GIS derived transport and response intervals were compared with the actual times using descriptive methods. We used the information acquired through the analysis of the EMS trip data to create an updated model that could be used to estimate travel time in the absence of actual EMS trip records. There were 29,765 complete EMS records for scene locations inside the city and 529 outside. The actual median on-scene intervals were longer than the average previously reported by 7-8 minutes. Actual EMS pre-hospital times across our study area were significantly higher than the estimated times modeled using GIS and the original travel time assumptions. Our updated model, although still underestimating the total pre-hospital time, more accurately represents the true pre-hospital time in our study area. The widespread use of generalized EMS pre-hospital time assumptions based on US data may not be appropriate in a

  19. Where there are no emergency medical services-prehospital care for the injured in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nobhojit; Murlidhar, V; Chowdhury, Ritam; Patil, Sandeep B; Supe, Priyanka A; Vaishnav, Poonam D; Vatkar, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    In a populous city like Mumbai, which lacks an organized prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) system, there exists an informal network through which victims arrive at the trauma center. This baseline study describes the prehospital care and transportation that currently is available in Mumbai. A prospective trauma database was created by interviewing 170 randomly selected patients from a total of 454 admitted over a two-month period (July-August 2005) at a Level-I, urban, trauma center. The injured victim in Mumbai usually is rescued by a good Samaritan passer-by (43.5%) and contrary to popular belief, helped by the police (89.7%). Almost immediately after rescue, the victim begins transport to the hospital. No one waits for the EMS ambulance to arrive, as there is none. A taxi cab is the most popular substitute for the ambulance (39.3%). The trauma patient in India usually is a young man in his late-twenties, from a lower socioeconomic class. He mostly finds himself in a government hospital, as private hospitals are reluctant to provide trauma care to the seriously injured. The injured who do receive prehospital care receive inadequate and inappropriate care due to the high cost of consumables in resuscitation, and in part due to the providers' lack of training in emergency care. Those who were more likely to receive prehospital care suffered from road traffic injuries (odds ratio (OR) = 2.3) and those transported by government ambulances (OR = 10.83), as compared to railway accident victims (OR = 0 .41) and those who came by taxi (OR = 0.54). Currently, as a result of not having an EMS system, prehospital care is a citizen responsibility using societal networks. It is easy to eliminate this system and shift the responsibility to the state. The moot point is whether the state-funded EMS system will be robust enough in a resource-poor setting in which public hospitals are poorly funded. Considering the high funding cost of EMS systems in developed countries

  20. COAST (Cisplatin ototoxicity attenuated by aspirin trial): A phase II double-blind, randomised controlled trial to establish if aspirin reduces cisplatin induced hearing-loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, Simon J; Martin, Karen; Abab, Julia; Ratcliffe, Ian; Thornton, Roger; Lineton, Ben; Ellis, Mary; Moody, Ronald; Stanton, Louise; Galanopoulou, Angeliki; Maishman, Tom; Geldart, Thomas; Bayne, Mike; Davies, Joe; Lamb, Carolynn; Popat, Sanjay; Joffe, Johnathan K; Nutting, Chris; Chester, John; Hartley, Andrew; Thomas, Gareth; Ottensmeier, Christian; Huddart, Robert; King, Emma

    2017-12-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most ototoxic chemotherapy drugs, resulting in a permanent and irreversible hearing loss in up to 50% of patients. Cisplatin and gentamicin are thought to damage hearing through a common mechanism, involving reactive oxygen species in the inner ear. Aspirin has been shown to minimise gentamicin-induced ototoxicity. We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that aspirin could also reduce ototoxicity from cisplatin-based chemotherapy. A total of 94 patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy for multiple cancer types were recruited into a phase II, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial and randomised in a ratio of 1:1 to receive aspirin 975 mg tid and omeprazole 20 mg od, or matched placebos from the day before, to 2 days after, their cisplatin dose(s), for each treatment cycle. Patients underwent pure tone audiometry before and at 7 and 90 days after their final cisplatin dose. The primary end-point was combined hearing loss (cHL), the summed hearing loss at 6 kHz and 8 kHz, in both ears. Although aspirin was well tolerated, it did not protect hearing in patients receiving cisplatin (p-value = 0.233, 20% one-sided level of significance). In the aspirin arm, patients demonstrated mean cHL of 49 dB (standard deviation [SD] 61.41) following cisplatin compared with placebo patients who demonstrated mean cHL of 36 dB (SD 50.85). Women had greater average hearing loss than men, and patients treated for head and neck malignancy experienced the greatest cHL. Aspirin did not protect from cisplatin-related ototoxicity. Cisplatin and gentamicin may therefore have distinct ototoxic mechanisms, or cisplatin-induced ototoxicity may be refractory to the aspirin regimen used here. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention trial: influence of compliance on beneficial effect of aspirin in prevention of preterm preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David; Poon, Liona C; Rolnik, Daniel L; Syngelaki, Argyro; Delgado, Juan Luis; Vojtassakova, Denisa; de Alvarado, Mercedes; Kapeti, Evgenia; Rehal, Anoop; Pazos, Andrea; Carbone, Ilma Floriana; Dutemeyer, Vivien; Plasencia, Walter; Papantoniou, Nikos; Nicolaides, Kypros H

    2017-12-01

    The Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention trial was a multicenter study in women with singleton pregnancies. Screening was carried out at 11-13 weeks' gestation with an algorithm that combines maternal factors and biomarkers (mean arterial pressure, uterine artery pulsatility index, and maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein A and placental growth factor). Those with an estimated risk for preterm preeclampsia of >1 in 100 were invited to participate in a double-blind trial of aspirin (150 mg/d) vs placebo from 11-14 until 36 weeks' gestation. Preterm preeclampsia with delivery at preeclampsia in the Aspirin for Evidence-Based Preeclampsia Prevention trial. This was a secondary analysis of data from the trial. The proportion of prescribed tablets taken was used as an overall measure of compliance. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of aspirin on the incidence of preterm preeclampsia according to compliance of preeclampsia at screening and the participating center. The choice of cut-off of 90% was based on an exploratory analysis of the treatment effect. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate predictors of compliance ≥90% among maternal characteristics and medical history. Preterm preeclampsia occurred in 5/555 (0.9%) participants in the aspirin group with compliance ≥90%, in 8/243 (3.3%) of participants in the aspirin group with compliance preeclampsia was 0.24 (95% confidence interval, 0.09-0.65) for compliance ≥90% and 0.59 (95% confidence interval, 0.23-1.53) for compliance preeclampsia and negatively associated with smoking, maternal age preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy. The beneficial effect of aspirin in the prevention of preterm preeclampsia appears to depend on compliance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. European Collaboration on Low-dose Aspirin in Polycythemia Vera (ECLAP): a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolfi, R; Marchioli, R

    1997-01-01

    Thrombotic complications characterize the clinical course of polycythemia vera (PV) and represent the main cause of morbidity and mortality. However, uncertainty still exists as to the benefit/risk ratio of aspirin prophylaxis in this setting. In vivo platelet biosynthesis of thromboxane A2 is enhanced and can be suppressed by low-dose aspirin in PV, thus providing a rationale for assessing the efficacy and safety of a low-dose aspirin regimen in these patients. The Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia Vera has recently performed a pilot study on 112 patients randomized to receive aspirin, 40 mg daily, or placebo and followed for 16 +/- 6 months (mean +/- SD). This study showed that low-dose aspirin is well tolerated in PV patients, and that a large-scale efficacy trial is feasible in this setting. In this article we report the protocol of the European Collaboration on Low-dose Aspirin in Polycythemia Vera (ECLAP) study, which is a randomized trial designed to assess the risk/benefit ratio of low-dose aspirin in PV. To estimate the size and the follow-up duration required for the ECLAP trial, a retrospective analysis of the clinical epidemiology of a large PV population has recently been completed by the Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia Vera. On this basis, approximately 3500 patients will be enrolled in the ECLAP study with a follow-up of 3 to 4 years. The uncertainty principle will be used as the main eligibility criterion: Polycythemic patients of any age, having no clear indication for or contraindication to aspirin treatment, will be randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive oral aspirin (100 mg daily) or placebo. According to current therapeutic recommendations, the basic treatment of randomized patients should be aimed at maintaining the hematocrit value 50. Randomization will be stratified by participating center. The study is funded by the European Union BIOMED 2 program.

  3. Aspirin in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia: current facts and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolfi, R; Patrono, C

    1996-09-01

    The role of aspirin in the antithrombotic strategy of patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) is highly controversial. Long considered unsafe on the basis of a single clinical trial testing very high doses in PV patients, aspirin is being increasingly used at lower dosage. The rationale for the use of aspirin in patients with PV and ET is provided by the efficacy of this agent in the treatment of microcirculatory disturbances of thrombocythemic states associated with myeloproliferative disorders and by recent evidence that asymptomatic PV and ET patients have persistently increased thromboxane (TX) A2-biosynthesis. This increase, which most likely reflects enhanced platelet activation in vivo, is independent of the platelet mass and blood viscosity and largely supressed by a short term low-dose aspirin regimen (50 mg/day for 7 days). Since enhanced TXA2 biosynthesis may play a role in transducing the increased thrombotic risk associated with PV and ET, long-term low-dose aspirin administration has been proposed as a possible antithombotic strategy in these subjects. The safety of this treatment in PV patients has been recently reassessed by the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Policitemia Vera (GISP) which has followed for over one year 112 patients randomized to receive 40 mg/day aspirin or placebo. In the same study, serum TXB2 measurements provided evidence that the low-dose aspirin regimen tested was fully effective in inhibiting platelet cyclooxygenase activity. On this basis, a large scale trial aimed at assessing the antithrombotic efficacy of this approach is currently being organized. In patients with ET both the minimal aspirin dose required for complete inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase and the safety of long-term aspirin administration need to be established prior to extensive clinical evaluation of this strategy.

  4. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-01-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million

  5. Elastic properties of aspirin in its crystalline and glassy phases studied by micro-Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Sei; Ike, Yuji; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-11-01

    The acoustic waves propagating along the direction perpendicular to the (1 0 0) cleavage plane of aspirin crystal were investigated using micro-Brillouin spectroscopy from which C11, C55 and C66 were obtained. The temperature dependence of the longitudinal acoustic waves could be explained by normal anharmonic lattice models, while the transverse acoustic waves showed an abnormal increase in the hypersonic attenuation at low temperatures indicating their coupling to local remnant dynamics. The sound velocity as well as the attenuation of the longitudinal acoustic waves of glassy aspirin showed a substantial change at ˜235 K confirming a transition from glassy to supercooled liquid state in vitreous aspirin.

  6. A Proteomic Approach to Analyze the Aspirin-mediated Lysine Acetylome*

    OpenAIRE

    Tatham, Michael H.; Cole, Christian; Scullion, Paul; Wilkie, Ross; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Stark, Lesley A.; Hay, Ronald T.

    2016-01-01

    This work is supported by Cancer Research UK Grant C434/A13067 (M.H.T & R.T.H) and Wellcome Trust Grant 098391/Z/12/7 (R.T.H.). Aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid is widely used to control pain, inflammation and fever. Important to this function is its ability to irreversibly acetylate cyclooxygenases at active site serines. Aspirin has the potential to acetylate other amino-acid side-chains, leading to the possibility that aspirin-mediated lysine acetylation could explain some of its as-yet...

  7. Effect of transcervical resection of adhesion combined with low-dose aspirin on uterine artery blood flow and Smad2/3 in endometrial tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Wen Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of transcervical resection of adhesion combined with lowdose aspirin on uterine artery blood flow and Smad2/3 in endometrial tissue. Methods: A total of 78 patients with severe intrauterine adhesions who received transcervical resection of adhesion in our hospital between June 2012 and October 2014 were prospectively studied and randomly divided into two groups, observation group received postoperative estrogenprogestogen combined with low-dose aspirin therapy, and control group received postoperative estrogen-progestogen therapy. Ultrasound examination was conducted before and after treatment to determine uterine artery and endometrial blood flow parameters, intrauterine adhesion tissue was collected to detect the expression levels of Smad2 and Smad3 as well as downstream molecules, and serum was collected to determine the levels of cytokines. Results: On the ovulation day after 3 cycles of treatment, uterine artery RI and PI of observation group were significantly lower than those of control group, and endometrial VI, FI and VFI were significantly higher than those of control group; uPA expression level in intrauterine adhesion tissue of observation group was significantly higher than that of control group, Smad2, Smad3, PAI-1, ADAM15 and ADAM17 expression levels were significantly lower than those of control group, and serum TGF-β, VEGF, CTGF, IGF-I and TNF-α levels were significantly lower than those of control group. Conclusions: Transcervical resection of adhesion combined with low-dose aspirin therapy can improve the postoperative uterine artery and endometrial blood flow state, inhibit extracellular matrix deposition mediated by Smad2/3 signaling pathway and prevent intrauterine re-adhesion in patients with intrauterine adhesions.

  8. Association between use of pre-hospital ECG and 30-day mortality: A large cohort study of patients experiencing chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawshani, Nina; Rawshani, Araz; Gelang, Carita; Herlitz, Johan; Bång, Angela; Andersson, Jan-Otto; Gellerstedt, Martin

    2017-12-01

    In the assessment of patients with chest pain, there is support for the use of pre-hospital ECG in the literature and in the care guidelines. Using propensity score methods, we aim to examine whether the mere acquisition of a pre-hospital ECG among patients with chest pain affects the outcome (30-day mortality). The association between pre-hospital ECG and 30-day mortality was studied in the overall cohort (n=13151), as well as in the one-to-one matched cohort with 2524 patients not examined with pre-hospital ECG and 2524 patients examined with pre-hospital ECG. In the overall cohort, 21% (n=2809) did not undergo an ECG tracing in the pre-hospital setting. Among those who had pain during transport, 14% (n=1159) did not undergo a pre-hospital ECG while 32% (n=1135) of those who did not have pain underwent an ECG tracing. In the overall cohort, the OR for 30-day mortality in patients who had a pre-hospital ECG, as compared with those who did not, was 0.63 (95% CI 0.05-0.79; pECG was used. The PH-ECG is underused among patients with chest discomfort and the mere acquisition of a pre-hospital ECG may reduce mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Interaction between polymorphisms in aspirin metabolic pathways, regular aspirin use and colorectal cancer risk: A case-control study in unselected white European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Harsh; Northwood, Emma; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Scherer, Dominique; Elliott, Faye; Barrett, Jennifer H; Forman, David; Wolf, C Roland; Smith, Gillian; Jackson, Michael S; Santibanez-Koref, Mauro; Haile, Robert; Casey, Graham; Jenkins, Mark; Win, Aung Ko; Hopper, John L; Marchand, Loic Le; Lindor, Noralane M; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Potter, John D; Burn, John; Bishop, D Timothy

    2018-01-01

    Regular aspirin use is associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Variation in aspirin's chemoprevention efficacy has been attributed to the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We conducted a meta-analysis using two large population-based case-control datasets, the UK-Leeds Colorectal Cancer Study Group and the NIH-Colon Cancer Family Registry, having a combined total of 3325 cases and 2262 controls. The aim was to assess 42 candidate SNPs in 15 genes whose association with colorectal cancer risk was putatively modified by aspirin use, in the literature. Log odds ratios (ORs) and standard errors were estimated for each dataset separately using logistic regression adjusting for age, sex and study site, and dataset-specific results were combined using random effects meta-analysis. Meta-analysis showed association between SNPs rs6983267, rs11694911 and rs2302615 with CRC risk reduction (All Paspirin use and CRC risk (Pinteraction = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively); stratification by aspirin use showed an association for decreased CRC risk for aspirin users having a wild-type genotype (rs2070959 OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.68-0.86; rs1105879 OR = 0.77 95% CI = 0.69-0.86) compared to variant allele cariers. The direction of the interaction however is in contrast to that published in studies on colorectal adenomas. Both SNPs showed potential site-specific interaction with aspirin use and colon cancer risk only (Pinteraction = 0.006 and 0.008, respectively), with the direction of association similar to that observed for CRC. Additionally, they showed interaction between any non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (including aspirin) use and CRC risk (Pinteraction = 0.01 for both). All gene x environment (GxE) interactions however were not significant after multiple test correction. Candidate gene investigation indicated no evidence of GxE interaction between genetic variants in genes involved in aspirin pathways, regular aspirin use and colorectal cancer

  10. Essential Thrombocythemia in a Two-year-old Child, Responsive to Hydroxyurea but Not Aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq N. Aladily

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Essential thrombocythemia (ET is a myeloproliferative neoplasm that occurs mostly in patients above the age of 50 years. Its incidence in children is very rare, with around 100 cases reported in the literature. High-risk patients are defined by previous life threatening major thrombotic or severe hemorrhagic complication or age > 60. Those patients probably benefit from cytoreductive therapy. On the other hand, antiplatelet drugs are recommended for patients with low risk group. Although rare, ET should be considered in the differential diagnosis of persistent thrombocytosis in children, even at a very young age. A constellation of clinical, pathologic ,and molecular testing are essential for diagnosis. Given the rarity of these cases, there is currently no consensus for treatment guidelines in children, especially in asymptomatic patients. We describe a case of a two-year old girl who presented with unexplained, isolated thrombocytosis which persisted for eight years. Bone marrow biopsy demonstrated typical features of ET. Over the course of the disease, hydroxyurea, but not aspirin, showed better control of symptoms and lowered the platelets level.

  11. Pulmonary antifibrotic mechanisms aspirin-triggered lipoxin A(4) synthetic analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Rafael F; Xisto, Debora G; Kunkel, Steven L; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G; Rocco, Patricia R M; Neves, Josiane S; Fierro, Iolanda M; Canetti, Claudio; Benjamim, Claudia F

    2013-12-01

    No successful therapies are available for pulmonary fibrosis, indicating the need for new treatments. Lipoxins and their 15-epimers, aspirin-triggered lipoxins (ATL), present potent antiinflammatory and proresolution effects (Martins et al., J Immunol 2009;182:5374-5381). We show that ATLa, an ATL synthetic analog, therapeutically reversed a well-established pulmonary fibrotic process induced by bleomycin (BLM) in mice. We investigated the mechanisms involved in its effect and found that systemic treatment with ATLa 1 week after BLM instillation considerably reversed the inflammatory response, total collagen and collagen type 1 deposition, vascular endothelial growth factor, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β expression in the lung and restored surfactant protein C expression levels. ATLa also inhibited BLM-induced apoptosis and cellular accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in the lung parenchyma as evaluated by light microscopy and flow cytometry (Ly6G(+), F4/80(+), CD11c(+), CD4(+), and B220(+) cells) assays. Moreover, ATLa inhibited the lung production of IL-1β, IL-17, TNF-α, and TGF-β induced by BLM-challenged mice. ATLa restored the balance of inducible nitric oxide synthase-positive and arginase-positive cells in the lungs, suggesting a prevalence of M2 versus M1 macrophages. Together, these effects improved pulmonary mechanics because ATLa treatment brought to normal levels lung resistance and elastance, which were clearly altered at 7 days after BLM challenge. Our findings support ATLa as a promising therapeutic agent to treat lung fibrosis.

  12. Aspirin allergy desensitization in cerebrovascular disease. A report of two cases, literature review and management guide for the neurointerventionalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Seder, David B; Tsujiura, Crystiana; Cushing, Deborah; Gallup, Holly; Mocco, J; Hanel, Richard A; Ecker, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin (ASA) is the mainstay of treatment in cerebrovascular and systemic vascular disease. ASA hypersensitivity can pose a challenge to achieving optimum medical management prior to and after neurointerventional treatment. Desensitization to ASA is well described in the allergy and cardiovascular literature, but there are no similar discussions specific to neurointervention. The purpose of our study was to describe our experience with ASA hypersensitivity management and review the relevant literature. Two cases of patients with symptomatic cerebrovascular disease requiring neurointervention who were successfully desensitized to their ASA hypersensitivity prior to treatment are described. The subsequent literature is reviewed. Several ASA desensitization protocols exist and have been proven to successfully treat ASA hypersensitivity and allow for ASA therapy to be safely initiated. We describe several previously published protocols. ASA desensitization is a safe and simple way to manage ASA hypersensitivity. We provide comprehensive management guidelines for the neurointerventionalist engaging in ASA desensitization.

  13. Efficacy of a sedo-analgesia protocol in pre-hospital trauma treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savino Occhionorelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pre-hospital trauma treatment is an important situation in which pain should be appropriately assessed and treated, but there is a great lack of studies about it. Literature has widely pointed out that the underanalgesia problem is spread to all groups of patients. The objective of the study is to verify the efficacy of a sedation-analgesia protocol based on the use of NSAIDs, Fentanyl and Midazolam, for prehospital treatment of trauma patients. The protocol was tested in three Emergency Medical Services for a four month period, in which 30 patients were included in the study. Results evidenced a good management of both pain and anxiety in the majority of patients treated, with the achievement of analgesia target in 80% of the patients and sedation target in 100% of the patients.

  14. High-velocity facial gunshot wounds: multidisciplinary care from prehospital to discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, J D; Morris, G; Medland, P J; Porter, K

    2016-01-28

    A case is presented in which a high velocity rifle (shotgun) was fired into the inferior part of a patient's face in an attempted suicide causing widespread trauma to the inferior and left side of the patient's face. He presented to his general practitioner where an ambulance was called. The patient is followed from prehospital care (air ambulance) to resuscitation in accident and emergency and through the first stages of reconstructive surgery. The article focuses on the multidisciplinary approach to the patient's prehospital care and initial resuscitation at a major trauma centre. CT reconstruction images of the patient's skull allow visualisation of the extent of bone damage at presentation. Medical photography allows visualisation of the extent of the initial damage and shows how reconstructive surgery was undertaken early and in progressive stages. A literature review was performed allowing discussion of the current evidence and best practice in the management of facial gunshot wounds. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. The value of the pre-hospital learning environment as part of the emergency nursing programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonett van Wyk

    2015-10-01

    Objective: The study explored the views of the emergency nurse students regarding the value of rotating through the pre-hospital learning environment during an emergency nursing programme. Methods: A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual research design using an Appreciative Inquiry approach was used to collect the data. Through purposive sampling a total of 45 emergency nursing students participated. Data was collected by means of selfreported Appreciative Inquiry interview guides and individual Appreciative Inquiry interviews.The data was analysed using content analysis. Results: Four major themes were identified: an unpredictable environment, role players in emergency medical services, team work, and competencies. Conclusion: The research findings support the value and continuation of utilising the prehospital clinical learning environment for placing post-basic emergency nursing students when enrolled in the emergency nursing programme.

  16. Prehospital chemical restraint of a noncommunicative autistic minor by law enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jeffrey D; Nystrom, Paul C; Calvo, Darryl V; Berris, Marc S; Norlin, Jeffrey F; Clinton, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    When responders are dealing with an agitated patient in the field, safety for all involved may sometimes only be accomplished with physical or chemical restraints. While experiences using chemical restraint in the prehospital setting are found in the medical literature, the use of this by law enforcement as a first-response restraint has not previously been described. We report a case of successful law enforcement-administered sedation of a noncommunicative, autistic, and violent minor using intramuscular droperidol and diphenhydramine. Although this case has some unique characteristics that allowed chemical restraint to be given by the law enforcement agency, it calls attention to some specific prehospital issues that need to be addressed when dealing with autistic patients with extreme agitation.

  17. The role of nitric oxide in aspirin induced thrombolysis in vitro and the purification of aspirin activated nitric oxide synthase from human blood platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmohapatra, Soumendra K; Chakraborty, Kushal; Kahn, Nighat N; Sinha, Asru K

    2007-11-01

    Aspirin, a well-known inhibitor of platelet aggregation, is extensively used for the prevention/treatment of coronary artery disease. The beneficial and antithrombotic effects of the compound are related to the inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase. It is currently believed that aspirin has no effect on the formed thrombus, which results in coronary artery disease. It was found that the exposure of platelets to 4.0 microM aspirin either in vitro or in vivo resulted in fibrinolysis of the formed "clot" produced by the recalcification of platelet-rich plasma due to the production of NO in these cells by the compound. The lysis of clot in the presence of aspirin was found to be related to the fibrinolysis with simultaneous appearance of fibrin degradation products due to the generation of serine proteinase activity by NO in the assay mixture. The aspirin activated nitric oxide synthase that catalyzed the synthesis of NO in platelets was solubilized by Triton X-100 treatment and purified to homogeneity by chromatography on DEAE cellulose and Sephadex G-50 columns. The enzyme was found to be a single chain polypeptide with M.W. 19 kDa. The treatment of human plasminogen with NO was found to directly activate the zymogen to plasmin with the production of preactivation peptide in the absence of cofactors, or cells without the formation of cyclic GMP in the assay mixture. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan Xianwen; Geng Zhirong; Zhao Yao; Wang Zhilin; Zhu Junjie [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, MOE Key Lab of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)], E-mail: wangzl@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: jjzhu@nju.edu.cn

    2009-04-22

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  19. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for aspirin recognition and controlled release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan Xianwen; Geng Zhirong; Zhao Yao; Wang Zhilin; Zhu Junjie

    2009-01-01

    Core-shell structural magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic MIPs) with combined properties of molecular recognition and controlled release were prepared and characterized. Magnetic MIPs were synthesized by the co-polymerization of methacrylic acid (MAA) and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) around aspirin (ASP) at the surface of double-bond-functionalized Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles in chloroform. The obtained spherical magnetic MIPs with diameters of about 500 nm had obvious superparamagnetism and could be separated quickly by an external magnetic field. Binding experiments were carried out to evaluate the properties of magnetic MIPs and magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers (magnetic NIPs). The results demonstrated that the magnetic MIPs had high adsorption capacity and selectivity to ASP. Moreover, release profiles and release rate of ASP from the ASP-loaded magnetic MIPs indicated that the magnetic MIPs also had potential applications in drug controlled release.

  20. Analysis of the incidence of postintubation injuries in patients intubated in the prehospital or early hospital conditions of the hospital emergency department and the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cierniak M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Marcin Cierniak,1 Dariusz Timler,1 Renata Sobczak,1 Andrzej Wieczorek,2 Przemyslaw Sekalski,3 Natalia Borkowska,2 Tomasz Gaszynski1 1Department of Emergency Medicine and Disaster Medicine, Barlicki University Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Medical University of Lodz, 3Department of Microelectronics and Computer Science, IT Centre, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz, Poland Background: Intubation is still one of the best methods to secure the airway. In the case of prehospital or early hospital conditions when factors such as urgency, stress, or inaccuracy of the undertaken activities are involved, the risk of causing complications, for instance, edema or postintubation injuries, increases, especially while dealing with a difficult intubation. The risk of improper inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff also increases, which is considered in this study.Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of postintubation complications, such as postintubation injuries or edema, in a research sample, and to examine whether such complications occur more often, for example, while using a guidewire. In this study, we also evaluated the injuries associated with the inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff.Materials and methods: This study was performed on a group of 153 patients intubated in prehospital conditions. The tests were carried out in three clinical sites that received patients from prehospital care. Postintubation injuries were revealed and photographed using videolaryngoscope, such as the C-MAC and the McGrath series 5. The endotracheal tube cuff pressure was measured using a pressure gage manual (VBM Medizintechnik GmbH. The quantitative analyses of differences between incidence of variables were assessed using χ2 test for P<0.05. Analyses have been carried out using the Statistica software.Results: In the group of 153 patients, postintubation injuries occurred in 17% of cases. The dependency

  1. Systematic review: barriers and facilitators for minority ethnic groups accessing urgent and prehospital care

    OpenAIRE

    Phung, Viet-Hai; Windle, Karen; Asghar, Zahid; Ortega, Marishona; Essam, Nadya; Barot, Mukesh; Kai, Joe; Johnson, Mark; Siriwardena, A. Niroshan

    2014-01-01

    Background Research addressing inequalities has focussed predominantly on primary and acute care. We aimed to identify barriers or facilitators to people from minority ethnic groups accessing prehospital care and to explore the causes and consequences of any differences in delivery. Methodology We conducted a systematic literature review and narrative synthesis. Electronic searches from 2003 through to 2013 identified studies; systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials, quasi-...

  2. Facilitators and obstacles in pre-hospital medical response to earthquakes: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Earthquakes are renowned as being amongst the most dangerous and destructive types of natural disasters. Iran, a developing country in Asia, is prone to earthquakes and is ranked as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world in this respect. The medical response in disasters is accompanied by managerial, logistic, technical, and medical challenges being also the case in the Bam earthquake in Iran. Our objective was to explore the medical response to the Bam earthquake with specific emphasis on pre-hospital medical management during the first days. Methods The study was performed in 2008; an interview based qualitative study using content analysis. We conducted nineteen interviews with experts and managers responsible for responding to the Bam earthquake, including pre-hospital emergency medical services, the Red Crescent, and Universities of Medical Sciences. The selection of participants was determined by using a purposeful sampling method. Sample size was given by data saturation. Results The pre-hospital medical service was divided into three categories; triage, emergency medical care and transportation, each category in turn was identified into facilitators and obstacles. The obstacles identified were absence of a structured disaster plan, absence of standardized medical teams, and shortage of resources. The army and skilled medical volunteers were identified as facilitators. Conclusions The most compelling, and at the same time amenable obstacle, was the lack of a disaster management plan. It was evident that implementing a comprehensive plan would not only save lives but decrease suffering and enable an effective praxis of the available resources at pre-hospital and hospital levels. PMID:21575233

  3. Pre-hospital transport times and survival for Hypotensive patients with penetrating thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Swaroop

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achieving definitive care within the "Golden Hour" by minimizing response times is a consistent goal of regional trauma systems . This study hypothesizes that in urban Level I Trauma Centers, shorter pre-hospital times would predict outcomes in penetrating thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed using a statewide trauma registry for the years 1999-2003 . Total pre-hospital times were measured for urban victims of penetrating thoracic trauma. Crude and adjusted mortality rates were compared by pre-hospital time using STATA statistical software. Results: During the study period, 908 patients presented to the hospital after penetrating thoracic trauma, with 79% surviving . Patients with higher injury severity scores (ISS were transported more quickly. Injury severity scores (ISS ≥16 and emergency department (ED hypotension (systolic blood pressure, SBP <90 strongly predicted mortality (P < 0.05 for each . In a logistic regression model including age, race, and ISS, longer transport times for hypotensive patients were associated with higher mortality rates (all P values <0.05. This was seen most significantly when comparing patient transport times 0-15 min and 46-60 min (P < 0.001. Conclusion: In victims of penetrating thoracic trauma, more severely injured patients arrive at urban trauma centers sooner . Mortality is strongly predicted by injury severity, although shorter pre-hospital times are associated with improved survival . These results suggest that careful planning to optimize transport time-encompassing hospital capacity and existing resources, traffic patterns, and trauma incident densities may be beneficial in areas with a high burden of penetrating trauma.

  4. Effectiveness of prehospital trauma triage systems in selecting severely injured patients: Is comparative analysis possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rein, Eveline A J; van der Sluijs, Rogier; Houwert, R Marijn; Gunning, Amy C; Lichtveld, Rob A; Leenen, Luke P H; van Heijl, Mark

    2018-01-27

    In an optimal trauma system, prehospital trauma triage ensures transport of the right patient to the right hospital. Incorrect triage results in undertriage and overtriage. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate and compare prehospital trauma triage system quality worldwide and determine effectiveness in terms of undertriage and overtriage for trauma patients. A systematic search of Pubmed/MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases was performed, using "trauma", "trauma center," or "trauma system", combined with "triage", "undertriage," or "overtriage", as search terms. All studies describing ground transport and actual destination hospital of patients with and without severe injuries, using prehospital triage, published before November 2017, were eligible for inclusion. To assess the quality of these studies, a critical appraisal tool was developed. A total of 33 articles were included. The percentage of undertriage ranged from 1% to 68%; overtriage from 5% to 99%. Older age and increased geographical distance were associated with undertriage. Mortality was lower for severely injured patients transferred to a higher-level trauma center. The majority of the included studies were of poor methodological quality. The studies of good quality showed poor performance of the triage protocol, but additional value of EMS provider judgment in the identification of severely injured patients. In most of the evaluated trauma systems, a substantial part of the severely injured patients is not transported to the appropriate level trauma center. Future research should come up with new innovative ways to improve the quality of prehospital triage in trauma patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Analysis of occupational accidents with biological material among professionals in pre-hospital services

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Adriana Cristina de; Paiva,Maria Henriqueta Rocha Siqueira

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of accidents due to biological material exposure, the characteristics and post-accident conduct among professionals of pre-hospital services of the four municipalities of Minas Gerais, Brazil. METHOD: A cross-sectional study, using a structured questionnaire that was developed to enable the calculation of prevalence, descriptive analysis and analytical analysis using logistic regression. The study included 228 professionals; the prevalence of accidents du...

  6. Improving Posthospital Discharge Telephone Reach Rates Through Prehospital Discharge Face-to-Face Meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Franz H; Sheridan, Daniel J; Sullivan, Nancy J; Budhathoki, Chakra

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a face-to-face meeting with patients by a telephonic case manager prehospital discharge would result in increased telephone follow-up (TFU) reach rates posthospital discharge. Acute care adult medicine inpatient units. A quasiexperimental design was utilized. Two adult inpatient medicine units were selected as the intervention and comparison groups. The framework of the study is the transitions theory. A convenience sampling technique was used, whereby 88 eligible patients on the intervention unit received face-to-face meetings prehospital discharge whereas 123 patients on the comparison unit received standard care (no face-to-face meetings). Cross-tabulation and chi-square tests were employed to examine the association of face-to-face meeting intervention and TFU reach rates. Implementing brief (face-to-face meetings by a telephonic case manager prehospital discharge resulted in a TFU reach rate of 87% on the intervention unit, whereas the comparison unit only had a 58% TFU reach rate (p communication with more patients posthospital discharge. A brief prehospital discharge face-to-face meeting with patients assisted them to understand the reasons for a posthospital discharge telephone call, identified the best times to call using accurate telephone numbers, and taught patients how best to prepare for the call. In addition, by meeting patients face-to-face, the telephonic case manager was no longer an unknown person on the telephone asking them questions about their medical condition. These factors combined may have significantly helped to increase TFU reach rates.

  7. Prehospital plasma resuscitation associated with improved neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Matthew C; Thiels, Cornelius A; Aho, Johnathon M; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Zielinski, Martin D; Stubbs, James A; Jenkins, Donald H; Zietlow, Scott P

    2017-09-01

    Trauma-related hypotension and coagulopathy worsen secondary brain injury in patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Early damage control resuscitation with blood products may mitigate hypotension and coagulopathy. Preliminary data suggest resuscitation with plasma in large animals improves neurologic function after TBI; however, data in humans are lacking. We retrospectively identified all patients with multiple injuries age >15 years with head injuries undergoing prehospital resuscitation with blood products at a single Level I trauma center from January 2002 to December 2013. Inclusion criteria were prehospital resuscitation with either packed red blood cells (pRBCs) or thawed plasma as sole colloid resuscitation. Patients who died in hospital and those using anticoagulants were excluded. Primary outcomes were Glasgow Outcomes Score Extended (GOSE) and Disability Rating Score (DRS) at dismissal and during follow-up. Of 76 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 53% (n = 40) received prehospital pRBCs and 47% (n = 36) received thawed plasma. Age, gender, injury severity or TBI severity, arrival laboratory values, and number of prehospital units were similar (all p > 0.05). Patients who received thawed plasma had an improved neurologic outcome compared to those receiving pRBCs (median GOSE 7 [7-8] vs. 5.5 [3-7], p plasma had improved functionality compared to pRBCs (median DRS 2 [1-3.5] vs. 9 [3-13], p plasma compared to pRBCs by both median GOSE (8 [7-8] vs. 6 [6-7], p plasma is associated with improved neurologic and functional outcomes at discharge and during follow-up compared to pRBCs alone. These preliminary data support the further investigation and use of plasma in the resuscitation of critically injured TBI patients. Therapeutic, level V.

  8. Prehospital Use of the Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway in Patients with Severe Polytrauma: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Mason

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A case series of five patients is described demonstrating the utility of the intubating laryngeal mask airway in the prehospital setting, both as a primary airway rescue device and as a bridge to tracheal intubation. All patients were hypoxaemic, had sustained severe polytrauma and were trapped in their vehicles following road traffic collisions. A probability of survival study showed better-than-predicted outcomes for the group as a whole.

  9. Pre-hospital management of mass casualty civilian shootings: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Conor D. A.; Lockey, David J.; Rehn, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Background Mass casualty civilian shootings present an uncommon but recurring challenge to emergency services around the world and produce unique management demands. On the background of a rising threat of transnational terrorism worldwide, emergency response strategies are of critical importance. This study aims to systematically identify, describe and appraise the quality of indexed and non-indexed literature on the pre-hospital management of modern civilian mass shootings to guide future p...

  10. First Responders and Prehospital Care for Road Traffic Injuries in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokotho, Linda; Mulwafu, Wakisa; Singini, Isaac; Njalale, Yasin; Maliwichi-Senganimalunje, Limbika; Jacobsen, Kathryn H

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Road traffic collisions are a common cause of injuries and injury-related deaths in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Basic prehospital care can be the difference between life and death for injured drivers, passengers, and pedestrians. Problem This study examined the challenges associated with current first response practices in Malawi. In April 2014, focus groups were conducted in two areas of Malawi: Karonga (in the Northern Region) and Blantyre (in the Southern Region; both are along the M1 highway), and a qualitative synthesis approach was used to identify themes. All governmental and nongovernmental first response organizations identified by key informants were contacted, and a checklist was used to identify the services they offer. Access to professional prehospital care in Malawi is almost nonexistent, aside from a few city fire departments and private ambulance services. Rapid transportation to a hospital is usually the primary goal of roadside care because of limited first aid knowledge and a lack of access to basic safety equipment. The key informants recommended: expanding community-based first aid training; emphasizing umunthu (shared humanity) to inspire bystander involvement in roadside care; empowering local leaders to coordinate on-site responses; improving emergency communication systems; equipping traffic police with road safety gear; and expanding access to ambulance services. Prehospital care in Malawi would be improved by the creation of a formal network of community leaders, police, commercial drivers, and other lay volunteers who are trained in basic first aid and are equipped to respond to crash sites to provide roadside care to trauma patients and prepare them for safe transport to hospitals. Chokotho L , Mulwafu W , Singini I , Njalale Y , Maliwichi-Senganimalunje L , Jacobsen KH . First responders and prehospital care for road traffic injuries in Malawi. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(1):14-19.

  11. Evaluation of intensified prehospital treatment in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, F; Nielsen, J R; Gram, L

    1991-01-01

    During a period of 3 years three different types of emergency medical service (EMS) systems were evaluated in a city with about 238,000 inhabitants/population density of 570/km2. Included were 393 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in whom prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation was provid...... survive and the more patients survive with good cerebral function. However, the ambulances with specially trained paramedics were only effective in the area with 340 inhabitants/km2....

  12. The accuracy of prehospital diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular accidents: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliński, Michał; Gluszkiewicz, Marcin; Członkowska, Anna

    2015-06-19

    Time to treatment is the key factor in stroke care. Although the initial medical assessment is usually made by a non-neurologist or a paramedic, it should ensure correct identification of all acute cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs). Our aim was to evaluate the accuracy of the physician-made prehospital diagnosis of acute CVA in patients referred directly to the neurological emergency department (ED), and to identify conditions mimicking CVAs. This observational study included consecutive patients referred to our neurological ED by emergency physicians with a suspicion of CVA (acute stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA) or a syndrome-based diagnosis) during 12 months. Referrals were considered correct if the prehospital diagnosis of CVA proved to be stroke or TIA. The prehospital diagnosis of CVA was correct in 360 of 570 cases. Its positive predictive value ranged from 100% for the syndrome-based diagnosis, through 70% for stroke, to 34% for TIA. Misdiagnoses were less frequent among ambulance physicians compared to primary care and outpatient physicians (33% vs. 52%, p < 0.001). The most frequent mimics were vertigo (19%), electrolyte and metabolic disturbances (12%), seizures (11%), cardiovascular disorders (10%), blood hypertension (8%) and brain tumors (5%). Additionally, 6% of all admitted CVA cases were referred with prehospital diagnoses other than CVA. Emergency physicians appear to be sensitive in diagnosing CVAs but their overall accuracy does not seem high. They tend to overuse the diagnosis of TIA. Constant education and adoption of stroke screening scales may be beneficial for emergency care systems based both on physicians and on paramedics.

  13. Medical Decision Algorithm for Pre-Hospital Trauma Care. Phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Algorithm for Pre-Hospital Trauma Care PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Donald K. Wedding, P.E., Ph.D CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION : Photonics Systems, Incorporated... ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Photonics Systems, Incorporated Northwood, Ohio 43619 9. SPONSORING...three areas: 1) data acquisition, 2) neural network design, and 3) system architechture design. In the first area of this research, a triage database

  14. The accuracy of prehospital diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular accidents: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Karli?ski, Micha?; Gluszkiewicz, Marcin; Cz?onkowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Time to treatment is the key factor in stroke care. Although the initial medical assessment is usually made by a non-neurologist or a paramedic, it should ensure correct identification of all acute cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs). Our aim was to evaluate the accuracy of the physician-made prehospital diagnosis of acute CVA in patients referred directly to the neurological emergency department (ED), and to identify conditions mimicking CVAs. Material and methods This observationa...

  15. Facilitators and obstacles in pre-hospital medical response to earthquakes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djalali, Ahmadreza; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Öhlén, Gunnar; Castrén, Maaret; Kurland, Lisa

    2011-05-16

    Earthquakes are renowned as being amongst the most dangerous and destructive types of natural disasters. Iran, a developing country in Asia, is prone to earthquakes and is ranked as one of the most vulnerable countries in the world in this respect. The medical response in disasters is accompanied by managerial, logistic, technical, and medical challenges being also the case in the Bam earthquake in Iran. Our objective was to explore the medical response to the Bam earthquake with specific emphasis on pre-hospital medical management during the first days. The study was performed in 2008; an interview based qualitative study using content analysis. We conducted nineteen interviews with experts and managers responsible for responding to the Bam earthquake, including pre-hospital emergency medical services, the Red Crescent, and Universities of Medical Sciences. The selection of participants was determined by using a purposeful sampling method. Sample size was given by data saturation. The pre-hospital medical service was divided into three categories; triage, emergency medical care and transportation, each category in turn was identified into facilitators and obstacles. The obstacles identified were absence of a structured disaster plan, absence of standardized medical teams, and shortage of resources. The army and skilled medical volunteers were identified as facilitators. The most compelling, and at the same time amenable obstacle, was the lack of a disaster management plan. It was evident that implementing a comprehensive plan would not only save lives but decrease suffering and enable an effective praxis of the available resources at pre-hospital and hospital levels.

  16. Spinal immobilisaton in pre-hospital and emergency care: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Natalie; Considine, Julie

    2015-08-01

    Spinal immobilisation has been a mainstay of trauma care for decades and is based on the premise that immobilisation will prevent further neurological compromise in patients with a spinal column injury. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the evidence related to spinal immobilisation in pre-hospital and emergency care settings. In February 2015, we performed a systematic literature review of English language publications from 1966 to January 2015 indexed in MEDLINE and Cochrane library using the following search terms: 'spinal injuries' OR 'spinal cord injuries' AND 'emergency treatment' OR 'emergency care' OR 'first aid' AND immobilisation. EMBASE was searched for keywords 'spinal injury OR 'spinal cord injury' OR 'spine fracture AND 'emergency care' OR 'prehospital care'. There were 47 studies meeting inclusion criteria for further review. Ten studies were case series (level of evidence IV) and there were 37 studies from which data were extrapolated from healthy volunteers, cadavers or multiple trauma patients. There were 15 studies that were supportive, 13 studies that were neutral, and 19 studies opposing spinal immobilisation. There are no published high-level studies that assess the efficacy of spinal immobilisation in pre-hospital and emergency care settings. Almost all of the current evidence is related to spinal immobilisation is extrapolated data, mostly from healthy volunteers. Copyright © 2015 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Methodological Challenges in Studies Comparing Prehospital Advanced Life Support with Basic Life Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Timmy; Jones, Courtney M C; Shah, Manish N; Cushman, Jeremy T; Jusko, Todd A

    2017-08-01

    Determining the most appropriate level of care for patients in the prehospital setting during medical emergencies is essential. A large body of literature suggests that, compared with Basic Life Support (BLS) care, Advanced Life Support (ALS) care is not associated with increased patient survival or decreased mortality. The purpose of this special report is to synthesize the literature to identify common study design and analytic challenges in research studies that examine the effect of ALS, compared to BLS, on patient outcomes. The challenges discussed in this report include: (1) choice of outcome measure; (2) logistic regression modeling of common outcomes; (3) baseline differences between study groups (confounding); (4) inappropriate statistical adjustment; and (5) inclusion of patients who are no longer at risk for the outcome. These challenges may affect the results of studies, and thus, conclusions of studies regarding the effect of level of prehospital care on patient outcomes should require cautious interpretation. Specific alternatives for avoiding these challenges are presented. Li T , Jones CMC , Shah MN , Cushman JT , Jusko TA . Methodological challenges in studies comparing prehospital Advanced Life Support with Basic Life Support. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(4):444-450.

  18. Pre-hospital advanced airway management by anaesthesiologists: is there still room for improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollid, Stephen J M; Heltne, Jon Kenneth; Søreide, Eldar; Lossius, Hans Morten

    2008-07-21

    Endotracheal intubation is an important part of pre-hospital advanced life support that requires training and experience, and should only be performed by specially trained personnel. In Norway, anaesthesiologists serve as Helicopter Emergency Medical Service HEMS physicians. However, little is known about how they themselves evaluate the quality and safety of pre-hospital advanced airway management. Using a semi-structured questionnaire, we interviewed anaesthesiologists working in the three HEMS programs covering Western Norway. We compared answers from specialists and non-specialists as well as full- and part-time HEMS physicians. Of the 17 available respondents, most (88%) felt that their continuous exposure to intubations was not sufficient. Additional training was mainly acquired through other clinical practice and mannequin- or cadaver-based skills training. Of the respondents, 77% and 35% reported having experienced difficult and failed intubations, respectively. Further, 59% reported knowledge of airway management-related deaths in their HEMS program. Significantly more full- than part-time HEMS physicians had experienced these problems. All respondents had airway back-up equipment in their service, but 29% were not familiar with all the equipment. The majority of anaesthesiologists working as HEMS physicians view pre-hospital advanced airway management as a high-risk procedure. Relevant airway management competencies for HEMS physicians in Norway seem to be insufficiently trained and maintained. A better-defined level of competence with better training methods and systems seems warranted.

  19. Pre-hospital advanced airway management by anaesthesiologists: Is there still room for improvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søreide Eldar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endotracheal intubation is an important part of pre-hospital advanced life support that requires training and experience, and should only be performed by specially trained personnel. In Norway, anaesthesiologists serve as Helicopter Emergency Medical Service HEMS physicians. However, little is known about how they themselves evaluate the quality and safety of pre-hospital advanced airway management. Method Using a semi-structured questionnaire, we interviewed anaesthesiologists working in the three HEMS programs covering Western Norway. We compared answers from specialists and non-specialists as well as full- and part-time HEMS physicians. Results Of the 17 available respondents, most (88% felt that their continuous exposure to intubations was not sufficient. Additional training was mainly acquired through other clinical practice and mannequin- or cadaver-based skills training. Of the respondents, 77% and 35% reported having experienced difficult and failed intubations, respectively. Further, 59% reported knowledge of airway management-related deaths in their HEMS program. Significantly more full- than part-time HEMS physicians had experienced these problems. All respondents had airway back-up equipment in their service, but 29% were not familiar with all the equipment. Conclusion The majority of anaesthesiologists working as HEMS physicians view pre-hospital advanced airway management as a high-risk procedure. Relevant airway management competencies for HEMS physicians in Norway seem to be insufficiently trained and maintained. A better-defined level of competence with better training methods and systems seems warranted.

  20. Aspirin Augments IgE-Mediated Histamine Release from Human Peripheral Basophils via Syk Kinase Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Matsuo

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Aspirin enhanced histamine release from basophils via increased Syk kinase activation, and that the augmentation of histamine release by NSAIDs or FAs may be one possible cause of worsening symptoms in patients with chronic urticaria and FDEIA.

  1. Reprint of: Aspirin use and early age-related macular degeneration: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahawita, Shyalle K; Casson, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for an association between Aspirin use and early age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). A literature search was performed in 5 databases with no restrictions on language or date of publication. Four studies involving 10292 individuals examining the association between aspirin and ARMD met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis was carried out by Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager 5.2 software (Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, Denmark). The pooled odd ratios showed that Aspirin use was associated with early ARMD (pooled odds ratio 1.43, 95% CI 1.09-1.88). There is a small but statistically significant association between Aspirin use and early ARMD, which may warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Aspirin use and early age-related macular degeneration: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahawita, Shyalle K; Casson, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for an association between Aspirin use and early age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). A literature search was performed in 5 databases with no restrictions on language or date of publication. Four studies involving 10292 individuals examining the association between aspirin and ARMD met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis was carried out by Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager 5.2 software (Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, Denmark). The pooled odd ratios showed that Aspirin use was associated with early ARMD (pooled odds ratio 1.43, 95% CI 1.09-1.88). There is a small but statistically significant association between Aspirin use and early ARMD, which may warrant further investigation. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Optimization of calcium alginate floating microspheres loading aspirin by artificial neural networks and response surface methodology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, An-yang; Fan, Tian-yuan

    2010-04-18

    To investigate the preparation and optimization of calcium alginate floating microspheres loading aspirin. A model was used to predict the in vitro release of aspirin and optimize the formulation by artificial neural networks (ANNs) and response surface methodology (RSM). The amounts of the material in the formulation were used as inputs, while the release and floating rate of the microspheres were used as outputs. The performances of ANNs and RSM were compared. ANNs were more accurate in prediction. There was no significant difference between ANNs and RSM in optimization. Approximately 90% of the optimized microspheres could float on the artificial gastric juice over 4 hours. 42.12% of aspirin was released in 60 min, 60.97% in 120 min and 78.56% in 240 min. The release of the drug from the microspheres complied with Higuchi equation. The aspirin floating microspheres with satisfying in vitro release were prepared successfully by the methods of ANNs and RSM.

  4. Promising psyllium-based composite containing TiO2 nanoparticles as aspirin-carrier matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela-Corina Rosu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Composite nanomaterials represent a new trend in the biomedical field. Coupling inorganic/organic constituents with non-toxicity/biocompatibility properties leads to develop the new systems having special characteristics that can be used in various bio-applications. This paper describes the preparation and characterization of psyllium-based composites containing TiO2 nanoparticles in order to develop new therapeutic strategies for aspirin drug delivery. The structural characteristics of obtained materials were investigated by FTIR spectroscopy. The UV–vis spectrophotometric analysis was performed to evaluate the aspirin release behavior under different pH conditions at 37 °C. Combining psyllium (as an excellent source of fiber with TiO2 inorganic unit (as vehicle of aspirin it was found that polymeric-TiO2 networks have promising potential for controlled aspirin release as therapeutic agent.

  5. of aspirin The use of renal enzymes indication of renal toxicity dose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-30

    Apr 30, 1983 ... analysis revealed that aspirin significantly increased the output of both ... Acetylsalicylic acid (Disprin) I500 mg wa administered 3 times a day .... completely removing salicylic acid and metabolites from the urine, as could be ...

  6. Role of Dispersion Interactions in the Polymorphism and Entropic Stabilization of the Aspirin Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Anthony M.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2014-08-01

    Aspirin has been used and studied for over a century but has only recently been shown to have an additional polymorphic form, known as form II. Since the two observed solid forms of aspirin are degenerate in terms of lattice energy, kinetic effects have been suggested to determine the metastability of the less abundant form II. Here, first-principles calculations provide an alternative explanation based on free-energy differences at room temperature. The explicit consideration of many-body van der Waals interactions in the free energy demonstrates that the stability of the most abundant form of aspirin is due to a subtle coupling between collective electronic fluctuations and quantized lattice vibrations. In addition, a systematic analysis of the elastic properties of the two forms of aspirin rules out mechanical instability of form II as making it metastable.

  7. Comparison of aspirin renogram and captopril renogram in the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabiri Oskoie, S.; Argani, H.

    2002-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis is the most common cause of secondary hypertension. Preliminary data indicate that aspirin renography with hippurate may be more sensitive for detection renal artery stenosis. In this study 20 patients with known or suspected renal artery stenosis underwent aspirin renography (20 mg/kg orally 1 hour before injection of radiotracer) and captopril renography (50 mg orally) with 99 Tc-DTPA. Renal angiography was performed in all patients. Of the 20 patients enrolled, 11 had unilateral renal artery stenosis on angiography. Captopril renography was positive in 10 patients (915 sensitivity and 90% specificity). Aspirin renogram showed 9 patients with renal artery stenosis correctly (81.85 sensitivity and 100% specificity). Our data suggest that aspirin renography with 99 Tc-DTPA has comparable sensitivity with captopril in detection of unilateral renal artery stenosis

  8. Use of paracetamol, ibuprofen or aspirin in pregnancy and risk of cerebral palsy in the child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tanja Gram; Liew, Zeyan; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie

    2018-01-01

    Background: It has been debated whether mild analgesics, mainly paracetamol, adversely affect aspects of neurodevelopment. We examined whether mother's use of paracetamol, aspirin or ibuprofen in pregnancy is associated with increased risk of cerebral palsy (CP) in the child. Method: We included...... registers. We estimated the average causal effect of analgesics on risk of CP using marginal structural models with stabilized inverse probability weights. Results: Paracetamol use was reported in 49% of all pregnancies, aspirin in 3% and ibuprofen in 4%. Prenatal exposure to paracetamol ever in pregnancy......% CI: 1.0-2.5). Children ever prenatally exposed to aspirin in pregnancy had an elevated risk of bilateral spastic CP (aOR 2.4, 95% CI: 1.1-5.3) compared with unexposed. Conclusion: We observed an increased risk of spastic CP in children prenatally exposed to paracetamol and aspirin. Although we...

  9. Study Shows Aspirin Reduces Colorectal Cancer in Those at High Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findings from the first large clinical trial of its kind indicate that taking high doses of aspirin daily for at least 2 years substantially reduces the risk of colorectal cancer among people at increased risk of the disease.

  10. Impact of aspirin on fetal growth in diabetic pregnancies according to White classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Katlynn; Allshouse, Amanda A; Metz, Torri D; Heyborne, Kent D

    2017-10-01

    Current US Preventive Services Task Force and other guidelines recommend low-dose aspirin for all pregnant women with pregestational diabetes mellitus to prevent preeclampsia and small-for-gestational-age birth. The Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units High-Risk Aspirin trial did not show a reduction in either preeclampsia or small-for-gestational-age birth in diabetic women. Our objective was to reassess the impact of aspirin on fetal growth in diabetic pregnancies overall and according to White classification. We hypothesized that aspirin improves fetal growth in pregnancies with vascular complications of diabetes at highest risk for poor fetal growth. We conducted secondary analysis of the cohort of diabetic women enrolled in the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units High-Risk Aspirin trial. The impact of aspirin prophylaxis on birthweight was assessed in the overall cohort and in 2 groups categorized according to White classification as nonvascular (White class B, C, D) or vascular (White class R, F, RF). Birthweight was converted to Z-score normalized for gestational age at delivery and neonatal sex. Difference in birthweight Z-score between aspirin and placebo was tested with a 2-sample t test. The effect of vascular group, aspirin vs placebo randomization, and the interaction of the 2 on normalized birthweight percentile was estimated with linear regression with a multivariable model including covariates body mass index, tobacco use, race, and parity. The percentage of small and large-for-gestational-age newborns born to aspirin- vs placebo-treated women was compared between groups using Pearson exact χ 2 analysis, and an adjusted model was estimated by logistic regression. All 444 women with pregestational diabetes and complete outcome data were included (53 vascular, 391 nonvascular). Aspirin was significantly associated with a higher birthweight Z-score (0.283; 95% confidence interval, 0.023-0.544) in the overall cohort (P = .03). In the adjusted model, the

  11. Spinal cholinergic involvement after treatment with aspirin and paracetamol in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Kommalage, Mahinda; Höglund, A Urban

    2004-01-01

    Aspirin and paracetamol have been shown to suppress non-inflammatory pain conditions like thermal, visceral and mechanical pain in mice and rats. The non-inflammatory antinociception appears to be mediated by central receptor mechanisms, such as the cholinergic system. In this study, we tested...... the hypothesis that the non-inflammatory antinociception of aspirin and paracetamol could be mediated by an increase of intraspinal acetylcholine release. Microdialysis probes were placed intraspinally in anesthetized rats for acetylcholine sampling. Subcutaneously administered aspirin 100 and 300 mg....../kg increased, while paracetamol 300 mg/kg decreased intraspinal acetylcholine release. Intraspinal drug administration did not affect acetylcholine release. Our results suggest that an increased intraspinal acetylcholine release could be involved in part of the non-inflammatory pain suppression by aspirin...

  12. Mobile compression devices and aspirin for VTE prophylaxis following simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Denis; Nunley, Ryan M; Johnson, Staci R; Keeney, James A; Barrack, Robert L

    2015-03-01

    Recently, Levy et al questioned the effectiveness of mobile compression devices (MCDs) as the sole method of thromboprophylaxis following simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This study's purpose was to assess if the addition of aspirin to MCDs improves venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention following simultaneous bilateral TKA. Ninety-six patients (192 TKAs) were retrospectively reviewed: 47 patients received MCDs for 10 days and aspirin for 6 weeks postoperatively based on a risk stratification protocol, while 49 patients received warfarin for 4 weeks postoperatively. One symptomatic VTE was noted in the warfarin cohort, while one patient in the MCD/aspirin cohort and three patients in the warfarin cohort were readmitted within 3 months of surgery. In appropriately selected patients, MCDs with aspirin shows promise in VTE prevention following simultaneous bilateral TKA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Underutilization of aspirin in people living with human immunodeficiency virus at increased risk for acute myocardial infarction: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Pak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: With the increased availability of potent combination antiretroviral therapies, the life expectancy of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV has greatly increased. This rapid improvement in lifespan has served as a catalyst for a paradigm shift in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV care. The focus of HIV care models has transitioned from the sole treatment of acute opportunistic infections to comprehensive management of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD. Multiple studies have demonstrated that PLHIV are 50% more likely to develop acute myocardial infarction (AMI, compared to the general population. Cardiovascular risk prevention is becoming an essential component of the overarching HIV treatment plan. Aims: This meta-analysis aims to compare the rate of aspirin use for AMI prevention in indicated patients between PLHIV and general population. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and MEDLINE databases were used to identify observational cohort trials. Studies were assessed by two reviewers for inclusion criteria. Two separate random-effects meta-analyses' models were performed using the DerSimonian and Laird method. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 value. Meta-regression with study level variables was used to explore potential sources of heterogeneity. The funnel-plot-based trim-and-fill method was applied to detect and adjust for potential publication bias. Statistical tests were two-sided and P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 13 studies were included for analysis. In these trials, 30.4% of PLHIV with increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD used aspirin for AMI prevention, compared to 36.9% of patients at risk of CHD in the general population. Conclusions: The results of this meta-analysis provide evidence that aspirin is underutilized in both PLHIV and the general population across broad geographical zones. Aspirin use

  14. Aspirin augments the expression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli protein by suppression of IKKβ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashida, Noboru; Kishihata, Masako; Tien, Dat Nguyen; Kamei, Kaeko; Kimura, Takeshi; Yokode, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Clinical studies revealed aspirin inhibits cancer, but the mechanism is not known. • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a well-known tumor-suppressing gene. • We found aspirin up-regulates the protein of APC. • Aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, an essential kinase in NFκB activation. • The deletion of IKKβ significantly increases the expression of APC protein. - Abstract: Aspirin has been widely used as analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory medicine for long. In addition to these traditional effects, clinical studies suggest that aspirin can protect against cancer, but its mechanism has not been explored. To unveil it, we identified the proteins up- or down-regulated after incubation with aspirin by using proteomics analysis with Nano-flow LC/MALDI-TOF system. Interestingly, the analysis identified the protein of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) as one of the most up-regulated protein. APC regulates cell proliferation or angiogenesis, and is widely known as a tumor-suppressing gene which can cause colorectal cancer when it is mutated. Western blots confirmed this result, and real-time PCR indicated it is transcriptionally regulated. We further tried to elucidate the molecular mechanism with focusing on IKKβ. IKKβ is the essential kinase in activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), major transcriptional factors that regulate genes responsible for inflammation or immune response. Previous reports indicated that aspirin specifically inhibits IKKβ activity, and constitutively active form of IKKβ accelerates APC loss. We found that aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, and the deletion of IKKβ by siRNA increases the expression of APC in HEK294 cells. Finally, we observed similar effects of aspirin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results reveal that aspirin up-regulates the expression of APC via the suppression of IKKβ. This can be a mechanism how aspirin prevents cancer at

  15. Aspirin reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary inflammation in human models of ARDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, U; Krasnodembskaya, A; Fitzgerald, M; Shyamsundar, M; Kissenpfennig, A; Scott, C; Lefrancais, E; Looney, M R; Verghis, R; Scott, J; Simpson, A J; McNamee, J; McAuley, D F; O'Kane, C M

    2017-11-01

    Platelets play an active role in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Animal and observational studies have shown aspirin's antiplatelet and immunomodulatory effects may be beneficial in ARDS. To test the hypothesis that aspirin reduces inflammation in clinically relevant human models that recapitulate pathophysiological mechanisms implicated in the development of ARDS. Healthy volunteers were randomised to receive placebo or aspirin 75  or 1200 mg (1:1:1) for seven days prior to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhalation, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, allocation-concealed study. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 6 hours after inhaling 50 µg of LPS. The primary outcome measure was BAL IL-8. Secondary outcome measures included markers of alveolar inflammation (BAL neutrophils, cytokines, neutrophil proteases), alveolar epithelial cell injury, systemic inflammation (neutrophils and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP)) and platelet activation (thromboxane B2, TXB2). Human lungs, perfused and ventilated ex vivo (EVLP) were randomised to placebo or 24 mg aspirin and injured with LPS. BAL was carried out 4 hours later. Inflammation was assessed by BAL differential cell counts and histological changes. In the healthy volunteer (n=33) model, data for the aspirin groups were combined. Aspirin did not reduce BAL IL-8. However, aspirin reduced pulmonary neutrophilia and tissue damaging neutrophil proteases (Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-8/-9), reduced BAL concentrations of tumour necrosis factor α and reduced systemic and pulmonary TXB2. There was no difference between high-dose and low-dose aspirin. In the EVLP model, aspirin reduced BAL neutrophilia and alveolar injury as measured by histological damage. These are the first prospective human data indicating that aspirin inhibits pulmonary neutrophilic inflammation, at both low and high doses. Further clinical studies are indicated to assess the role of aspirin in the

  16. Aspirin augments the expression of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli protein by suppression of IKKβ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashida, Noboru, E-mail: nashida@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Innovative Medicine, Institute for Advancement of Clinical and Translational Science, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kishihata, Masako [Department of Clinical Innovative Medicine, Institute for Advancement of Clinical and Translational Science, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Tien, Dat Nguyen [Department of Clinical Innovative Medicine, Institute for Advancement of Clinical and Translational Science, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Kamei, Kaeko [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Kimura, Takeshi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Yokode, Masayuki [Department of Clinical Innovative Medicine, Institute for Advancement of Clinical and Translational Science, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Clinical studies revealed aspirin inhibits cancer, but the mechanism is not known. • Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a well-known tumor-suppressing gene. • We found aspirin up-regulates the protein of APC. • Aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, an essential kinase in NFκB activation. • The deletion of IKKβ significantly increases the expression of APC protein. - Abstract: Aspirin has been widely used as analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory medicine for long. In addition to these traditional effects, clinical studies suggest that aspirin can protect against cancer, but its mechanism has not been explored. To unveil it, we identified the proteins up- or down-regulated after incubation with aspirin by using proteomics analysis with Nano-flow LC/MALDI-TOF system. Interestingly, the analysis identified the protein of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) as one of the most up-regulated protein. APC regulates cell proliferation or angiogenesis, and is widely known as a tumor-suppressing gene which can cause colorectal cancer when it is mutated. Western blots confirmed this result, and real-time PCR indicated it is transcriptionally regulated. We further tried to elucidate the molecular mechanism with focusing on IKKβ. IKKβ is the essential kinase in activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), major transcriptional factors that regulate genes responsible for inflammation or immune response. Previous reports indicated that aspirin specifically inhibits IKKβ activity, and constitutively active form of IKKβ accelerates APC loss. We found that aspirin suppressed the expression of IKKβ, and the deletion of IKKβ by siRNA increases the expression of APC in HEK294 cells. Finally, we observed similar effects of aspirin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results reveal that aspirin up-regulates the expression of APC via the suppression of IKKβ. This can be a mechanism how aspirin prevents cancer at

  17. Aspirin exerts high anti-cancer activity in PIK3CA-mutant colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mancang; Nishihara, Reiko; Chen, Yang; Li, Wanwan; Shi, Yan; Masugi, Yohei; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Kosumi, Keisuke; Liu, Li; da Silva, Annacarolina; Nowak, Jonathan A; Twombly, Tyler; Du, Chunxia; Koh, Hideo; Li, Wenbin; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Wolpin, Brian M; Giannakis, Marios; Aguirre, Andrew J; Bass, Adam J; Drew, David A; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Qian, Zhi Rong; Ogino, Shuji

    2017-10-20

    Evidence suggests that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) may improve patient survival in PIK3CA -mutant colorectal carcinoma, but not in PIK3CA -wild-type carcinoma. However, whether aspirin directly influences the viability of PIK3CA -mutant colon cancer cells is poorly understood. We conducted in vitro experiments to test our hypothesis that the anti-proliferative activity of aspirin might be stronger for PIK3CA -mutant colon cancer cells than for PIK3CA -wild-type colon cancer cells. We measured the anti-proliferative effect of aspirin at physiologic concentrations in seven PIK3CA -mutant and six PIK3CA -wild-type human colon cancer cell lines. After exposure to aspirin, the apoptotic index and cell cycle phase of colon cancer cells were assessed. In addition, the effect of aspirin was examined in parental SW48 cells and SW48 cell clones with individual knock-in PIK3CA mutations of either c.3140A>G (p.H1047R) or c.1633G>A (p.E545K). Aspirin induced greater dose-dependent loss of cell viability in PIK3CA -mutant cells than in PIK3CA -wild-type cells after treatment for 48 and 72 hours. Aspirin treatment also led to higher proportions of apoptotic cells and G0/G1 phase arrest in PIK3CA -mutant cells than in PIK3CA -wild-type cells. Aspirin treatment of isogenic SW48 cells carrying a PIK3CA mutation, either c.3140A>G (p.H1047R) or c.1633G>A (p. E545K), resulted in a more significant loss of cell viability compared to wild-type controls. Our findings indicate that aspirin causes cell cycle arrest, induces apoptosis, and leads to loss of cell viability more profoundly in PIK3CA -mutated colon cancer cells than in PIK3CA -wild-type colon cancer cells. These findings support the use of aspirin to treat patients with PIK3CA -mutant colon cancer.

  18. Factors associated with prehospital death among traffic accident patients in Osaka City, Japan: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Yusuke; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Iwami, Taku; Kawamura, Takashi; Hayashida, Sumito; Ogura, Hiroshi; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2018-01-02

    Although it is important to assess the factors associated with traffic accident fatalities to decrease them as a matter of public health, such factors have not been fully identified. Using a large-scale data set of ambulance records in Osaka City, Japan, we retrospectively analyzed all traffic accident patients transported to hospitals by emergency medical service personnel from 2013 to 2014. In this study, prehospital death was defined as that occurring at the scene or in the emergency department immediately after hospital arrival. We assessed prehospital factors associated with prehospital death due to traffic accidents by logistic regression models. This study enrolled 28,903 emergency patients involved in traffic accidents, of whom 68 died prehospital. In a multivariate model, elderly patients aged ≥75 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.29-8.23), nighttime (AOR = 2.75; 95% CI, 1.65-4.70), and type of injured person compared to bicyclists such as pedestrians (AOR = 9.58; 95% CI, 5.07-17.99), motorcyclists (AOR = 2.75; 95% CI, 1.21-6.24), and car occupants (AOR = 2.98; 95% CI, 1.39-6.40) were significantly associated with prehospital death due to traffic accidents. In addition, the AOR for automobile versus nonautomobile as the collision opponent was 4.76 (95% CI, 2.30-9.88). In this population, the factors associated with prehospital death due to traffic accidents were elderly people, nighttime, and pedestrian as the type of patient. The proportion of prehospital deaths due to traffic accidents was also high when the collision component was an automobile.

  19. The analgesic effect of different antidepressants combined with aspirin on thermally induced pain in Albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla S. Elhwuegi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Combination analgesics provide more effective pain relief for a broader spectrum of pain. This research examines the possible potentiation of the analgesic effect of different classes of antidepressants when combined with aspirin in thermal model of pain using Albino mice.Methods:Different groups of six animals each were injected intraperitoneally by different doses of aspirin (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg, imipramine (2.5, 7.5, 15 or 30 mg/kg, fluoxetine (1.25, 2.5, 5 or 7.5 mg/kg, mirtazapine (1.25, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg and a combination of a fixed dose of aspirin (100 mg/kg with the different doses of the three antidepressants. One hour later the analgesic effect of these treatments were evaluated against thermally induced pain. All data were subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired Student's t-test.Results:Aspirin had no analgesic effect in thermally induced pain. The three selected antidepressants produced dose dependent analgesia. The addition of a fixed dose of aspirin to imipramine significantly increased the reaction time (RT of the lowest dose (by 23% and the highest dose (by 20%. The addition of the fixed dose of aspirin to fluoxetine significantly increased RT by 13% of the dose 2.5 mg/Kg. Finally, the addition of the fixed dose of aspirin significantly potentiated the antinociceptive effect of the different doses of mirtazapine (RT was increased by 24, 54 and 38% respectively.Conclusion:Combination of aspirin with an antidepressant might produce better analgesia, increasing the efficacy of pain management and reduces side effects by using smaller doses of each drug.

  20. Gender differences in the activities of aspirin-esterases in rat tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito M.A.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The activities of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid-esterases were measured in several tissues (liver, kidney, adrenal glands, brain and serum from adult male and female Wistar rats. In males, both aspirin-esterase I (assayed at pH 5.5 and II (assayed at pH 7.4 activities were higher in liver homogenates when compared to females (aspirin-esterase I: males 48.9 ± 4.8 (N = 8 and females 29.3 ± 4.2 (N = 8 nmol of salicylic acid formed min-1 mg protein-1; aspirin-esterase II: males 41.4 ± 4.1 (N = 8 and females 26.1 ± 4.5 (N = 8 nmol of salicylic acid formed min-1 mg protein-1, P<0.001. In serum, enzyme activity was higher in females than in males (aspirin-esterase I: males 0.85 ± 0.06 (N = 6 and females 1.18 ± 0.11 (N = 6 nmol of salicylic acid formed min-1 mg protein-1; aspirin-esterase II: males 1.03 ± 0.13 (N = 6 and females 1.34 ± 0.11 (N = 6 nmol of salicylic acid formed min-1 mg protein-1, P<0.001. In the other tissues assayed, no statistically significant difference between males and females was found. There were no statistically significant differences when the enzymes were assayed in different phases of the estrous cycle in liver and serum. These results show that the differences in aspirin-esterase activity observed between males and females are not due to the estrous cycle. The gender difference obtained in our study may indicate an involvement of gonadal hormones in the control of the hydrolysis of aspirin. This possibility is currently under investigation.

  1. Use of aspirin to facilitate vomiting in a young woman with bulimia nervosa: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J; Ramsay, R; Treasure, J

    1997-03-01

    A 25-year-old female patient with a 9-year history of bulimia nervosa gave a 2-year history of regularly ingesting up to 24 x 300 mg aspirin tablets to facilitate vomiting after a binge. Awareness of this dangerous practice is important when asking for an eating disorder history. Assessing for the possible physical sequelae of aspirin misuse and educating the patient about the risks would be an important part of the overall treatment.